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Sample records for clostridium perfringens polynucleotide

  1. [Clostridium perfringens].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Haruki; Inui, Ayano; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Fujisawa, Tomoo

    2012-08-01

    In Japan, Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is the top 5th or 6th pathogen of foodborne illnesses. Annually between 2006 and 2010, there were between 20 and 40 reported outbreaks of foodborne illnesses caused by C. perfringens. C. perfringens is found in soil and dust, in the intestinal tract humans and animals, on the surface of vegetable products. C. perfringens produces an enterotoxin that causes diarrhea and abdominal pain. Inappropriate food handing practice (inadequate heating, cooling and reheating) can lead to an outbreak. In general, clinical symptoms are mild and short duration. The diagnosis of C. perfringens food poisoning is based on either quantitative cultures of implicated foods or enterotoxin-positive stool specimens. Antibiotics are not indicated.

  2. Bacteriophages of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The specific aims of the book chapter are to: (1) Briefly review the nomenclature of bacteriophages and how these agents are classified. (2) Discuss the problems associated with addition/removal of antibiotics in commercial animal feeds. (3) Provide a brief overview of Clostridium perfringens biolog...

  3. Toxin plasmids of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P; Uzal, Francisco A; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2013-06-01

    In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  5. Regulation of Toxin Production in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens is widely distributed in nature, especially in soil and the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. C. perfringens causes gas gangrene and food poisoning, and it produces extracellular enzymes and toxins that are thought to act synergistically and contribute to its pathogenesis. A complicated regulatory network of toxin genes has been reported that includes a two-component system for regulatory RNA and cell-cell communication. It is necessary to clarify the global regulatory system of these genes in order to understand and treat the virulence of C. perfringens. We summarize the existing knowledge about the regulatory mechanisms here. PMID:27399773

  6. Perfringolysin O: The Underrated Clostridium perfringens Toxin?

    PubMed Central

    Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Goossens, Evy; Valgaeren, Bonnie; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet; Wade, Kristin R.; Tweten, Rodney; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as θ toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250–300 Å in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis. PMID:26008232

  7. Diagnostic multiplex PCR for toxin genotyping of Clostridium perfringens isolates.

    PubMed

    Baums, Christoph G; Schotte, Ulrich; Amtsberg, Gunter; Goethe, Ralph

    2004-05-20

    In this study we provide a protocol for genotyping Clostridium perfringens with a new multiplex PCR. This PCR enables reliable and specific detection of the toxin genes cpa, cpb, etx, iap, cpe and cpb2 from heat lysed bacterial suspensions. The efficiency of the protocol was demonstrated by typing C. perfringens reference strains and isolates from veterinary bacteriological routine diagnostic specimens.

  8. Clostridium perfringens in Animal Disease: A Review of Current Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Niilo, L.

    1980-01-01

    The diseases caused by various types of Clostridium perfringens are critically reviewed in the light of current knowledge. Particular emphasis is placed on information concerning these diseases in Canadian livestock. There are two etiologically clearly-defined acute C. perfringens diseases recognized in Canada: hemorrhagic enteritis of the new born calf, caused by C. perfringens type C, and enterotoxemia of sheep, caused by type D. Clostridium perfringens type A may play a role as a secondary pathological agent in various disease conditions, such as necrotic enteritis of chickens. It may also cause wound infections and may provide a source for human food poisoning outbreaks. There appears to be a considerable lack of knowledge regarding the distribution of C. perfringens types, their pathogenesis, diagnosis and the incidence of diseases caused by this organism. PMID:6253040

  9. Predisposing factors and prevention of Clostridium perfringens-associated enteritis.

    PubMed

    Allaart, Janneke G; van Asten, Alphons J A M; Gröne, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is one of the major causes of intestinal disease in humans and animals. Its pathogenicity is contributed to by the production of a variety of toxins. In addition, predisposing environmental factors are important for the induction of C. perfringens-associated enteritis as shown by infection models. Environmental contamination, gastric and intestinal pH, intestinal microflora, nutrition, concurrent infections, and medical interventions may influence the intestinal colonization, growth, and toxin production by C. perfringens. Prevention of C. perfringens-associated enteritis may be mediated by the use of feed additives like probiotics, prebiotics, organic acids, essential oils, bacteriophages, lysozymes, bacteriocins, and antimicrobial peptides. Here we summarize and discuss published data on the influence of different environmental predisposing factors and preventive measures. Further research should focus on feed composition and feed additives in order to prevent C. perfringens-associated enteritis.

  10. [Toxins of Clostridium perfringens as a natural and bioterroristic threats].

    PubMed

    Omernik, Andrzej; Płusa, Tadeusz

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is absolutely anaerobic rod-shaped, sporeforming bacterium. The morbidity is connected with producing toxins. Depending on the type of toxin produced Clostridium perfringens can be divided into five serotypes:A-E. Under natural conditions, this bacterium is responsible for local outbreaks of food poisoning associated with eating contaminated food which which was improperly heat treated. Some countries with lower economic level are endemic foci of necrotizing enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens. The bacterium is also a major cause of gas gangrene. It is a disease, associated with wound infection, with potentially fatal prognosis in the case of treatment's delays. In the absence of early radical surgery, antibiotic therapy and (if available) hyperbaric treatment leads to the spread of toxins in the body causing shock, coma and death. Due to the force of produced toxins is a pathogen that poses a substrate for the production of biological weapons. It could potentially be used to induce outbreaks of food poisoning and by missiles contamination by spore lead to increased morbidity of gas gangrene in injured soldiers. C. perfringens types B and D produce epsilon toxin considered to be the third most powerful bacterial toxin. Because of the ability to disperse the toxin as an aerosol and a lack of methods of treatment and prevention of poisoning possible factors it is a potential tool for bioterrorism It is advisable to continue research into vaccines and treatments for poisoning toxins of C. perfringens. PMID:26449576

  11. [Toxins of Clostridium perfringens as a natural and bioterroristic threats].

    PubMed

    Omernik, Andrzej; Płusa, Tadeusz

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is absolutely anaerobic rod-shaped, sporeforming bacterium. The morbidity is connected with producing toxins. Depending on the type of toxin produced Clostridium perfringens can be divided into five serotypes:A-E. Under natural conditions, this bacterium is responsible for local outbreaks of food poisoning associated with eating contaminated food which which was improperly heat treated. Some countries with lower economic level are endemic foci of necrotizing enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens. The bacterium is also a major cause of gas gangrene. It is a disease, associated with wound infection, with potentially fatal prognosis in the case of treatment's delays. In the absence of early radical surgery, antibiotic therapy and (if available) hyperbaric treatment leads to the spread of toxins in the body causing shock, coma and death. Due to the force of produced toxins is a pathogen that poses a substrate for the production of biological weapons. It could potentially be used to induce outbreaks of food poisoning and by missiles contamination by spore lead to increased morbidity of gas gangrene in injured soldiers. C. perfringens types B and D produce epsilon toxin considered to be the third most powerful bacterial toxin. Because of the ability to disperse the toxin as an aerosol and a lack of methods of treatment and prevention of poisoning possible factors it is a potential tool for bioterrorism It is advisable to continue research into vaccines and treatments for poisoning toxins of C. perfringens.

  12. Role of Clostridium perfringens in causing abomasal ulcers in buffalo.

    PubMed

    Mashhadi, Ali R Ghadrdan; Ghorbanpour, Masoud; Kamali, Sojdeh; Kohli, Raghu N

    2010-11-15

    In this study, the correlation between abomasal ulcers and presence of Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) was evaluated in 80 (50 affected and 30 non affected) randomly slaughtered buffaloes in Ahvaz slaughterhouse. Immediately after the slaughter, the abomasums was isolated and an incision was made on the wall of it. Then the abomasums were emptied and its interior was washed with water. The inner surface was examined for presence of abnormal lesion. Ulcers from affected and piece of abomasa from non affected buffaloes were cultured. Cultures were also made from contents of all samples and smears were also prepared from affected and non affected tissues. Cultures from content samples (12%) of 50 ulcerated abomasa were positive for C. perfringens while the agents were isolated from 1 content (3.3%) of non ulcerated abomasa. There was no statistical difference between presence of C. perfringens in contents and abomasal ulcers. Totally C. perfringens were isolated from ulcers of 6 (12%) ulcerated and tissues of 3 (10%) non ulcerated cases. Statistical analysis showed no correlation between presences of C. perfringens and abomasal ulcers. There was no statistical difference between sex and age of the affected animals. In conclusion C. perfringens seems not to be solely, a cause ofabomasal ulcers in buffaloes.

  13. Tips to Prevent Illness from Clostridium Perfringens

    MedlinePlus

    ... that is often found on raw meat and poultry, and is one of the most common causes ... are common food sources of C. perfringens ? Beef, poultry, gravies, and dried or precooked foods are common ...

  14. Clostridium perfringens type A-E toxin plasmids.

    PubMed

    Freedman, John C; Theoret, James R; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Uzal, Francisco A; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell.

  15. Enteritis necroticans with midgut necrosis caused by Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Clarke, L E; Diekmann-Guiroy, B; McNamee, W; Java, D J; Weiss, S M

    1994-05-01

    Enteritis necroticans is a necrotizing process manifesting as segmental gangrene of the bowel, triggered by Clostridium perfringens toxins under specific dietary conditions. It is a rare disease in developed countries and is probably underdiagnosed. A case of enteritis necroticans presenting with midgut necrosis with sepsis and hemolysis is reported herein. Bacteriologic culture of blood and peritoneal content revealed C perfringens. Dietary history, including the ingestion of meat together with sweet potatoes, should increase clinical suspicion of enteritis necroticans. Early recognition and timely surgical intervention are required for successful treatment. Clinicians are encouraged to be aware of this clinically fulminant yet rarely recognized surgical entity.

  16. Clostridium perfringens Sporulation and Sporulation-Associated Toxin Production.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Sarker, Mahfuzur R; McClane, Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    The ability of Clostridium perfringens to form spores plays a key role during the transmission of this Gram-positive bacterium to cause disease. Of particular note, the spores produced by food poisoning strains are often exceptionally resistant to food environment stresses such as heat, cold, and preservatives, which likely facilitates their survival in temperature-abused foods. The exceptional resistance properties of spores made by most type A food poisoning strains and some type C foodborne disease strains involve their production of a variant small acid-soluble protein-4 that binds more tightly to spore DNA than to the small acid-soluble protein-4 made by most other C. perfringens strains. Sporulation and germination by C. perfringens and Bacillus spp. share both similarities and differences. Finally, sporulation is essential for production of C. perfringens enterotoxin, which is responsible for the symptoms of C. perfringens type A food poisoning, the second most common bacterial foodborne disease in the United States. During this foodborne disease, C. perfringens is ingested with food and then, by using sporulation-specific alternate sigma factors, this bacterium sporulates and produces the enterotoxin in the intestines. PMID:27337447

  17. Growth potential of Clostridium perfringens during cooling of cooked meats.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Peter J; Dorsa, Warren J

    2004-07-01

    Many meat-based food products are cooked to temperatures sufficient to inactivate vegetative cells of Clostridium perfringens, but spores of this bacterium can survive, germinate, and grow in these products if sufficient time, temperature, and other variables exist. Because ingestion of large numbers of vegetative cells can lead to concomitant sporulation, enterotoxin release in the gastrointestinal tract, and diarrhea-like illness, a necessary food safety objective is to ensure that not more than acceptable levels of C. perfringens are in finished products. As cooked meat items cool they will pass through the growth temperature range of C. perfringens (50 to 15 degrees C). Therefore, an important step in determining the likely level of C. perfringens in the final product is the estimation of growth of the pathogen during cooling of the cooked product. Numerous studies exist dealing with just such estimations, yet consensual methodologies, results, and conclusions are lacking. There is a need to consider the bulk of C. perfringens work relating to cooling of cooked meat-based products and attempt to move toward a better understanding of the true growth potential of the organism. This review attempts to summarize observations made by researchers and highlight variations in experimental approach as possible explanations for different outcomes. An attempt is also made here to identify and justify optimal procedures for conducting C. perfringens growth estimation in meat-based cooked food products during cooling. PMID:15270517

  18. Bacteriocin typing of Clostridium perfringens in human feces.

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, D E; Swantee, C A

    1978-01-01

    Three hundred and ninety-nine isolates of Clostridium perfringens from enriched stool specimens of 51 individuals (about eight colonies per person) were typed by bacteriocins. Forty-nine percent of these persons carried more than one bacteriocin type in their stool, and some had three or four different stains as determined by bacteriocin typing. Weekly stool specimens obtained from seven positive volunteers over a period of 5 weeks were screened for C. perfringens, and several colonies from each person were typed. This survey demonstrated that the number of types fluctuated with time, several types could be carried simultaneously, and the isolation of the organism was variable. Nine new bacteriocin types of C. perfringens were isolated in this study. PMID:206573

  19. Hazard analysis of Clostridium perfringens in the Skylab Food System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourland, C. T.; Huber, C. S.; Kiser, P. R.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rowley, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Food System presented unique microbiological problems because food was warmed in null-gravity and because the heat source was limited to 69.4 C (to prevent boiling in null-gravity). For these reasons, the foods were manufactured using critical control point techniques of quality control coupled with appropriate hazard analyses. One of these hazard analyses evaluated the threat from Clostridium perfringens. Samples of food were inoculated with C. perfringens and incubated for 2 h at temperatures ranging from 25 to 55 C. Generation times were determined for the foods at various temperatures. Results of these tests were evaluated taking into consideration: food-borne disease epidemiology, the Skylab food manufacturing procedures, and the performance requirements of the Skylab Food System. Based on this hazard analysis, a limit for C. perfringens of 100/g was established for Skylab foods.

  20. An observation of Clostridium perfringens in Greater Sage-Grouse.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Christian A; Bildfell, Robert J

    2007-07-01

    Mortality due to infectious diseases is seldom reported in the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). A case of necrotic enteritis associated with Clostridium perfringens type A is described in a free-ranging adult male sage-grouse in eastern Oregon. Clostridial enteritis is known to cause outbreaks of mortality in various domestic and wild birds, and should be considered as a potential cause of mortality in sage-grouse populations.

  1. Expression and delivery of an endolysin to combat Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Teresa; Horn, Nikki; Wegmann, Udo; Dugo, Giacomo; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J

    2014-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a cause for increasing concern due to its responsibility for severe infections both in humans and animals, especially poultry. To find new control strategies to treat C. perfringens infection, we investigated the activity and delivery of a bacteriophage endolysin. We identified a new endolysin, designated CP25L, which shows similarity to an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase domain and is distinct from other C. perfringens endolysins whose activity has been demonstrated in vitro. The cp25l gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product demonstrated lytic activity against all 25 C. perfringens strains tested. The probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785 was engineered to deliver the endolysin to the gastrointestinal tract. The integration of the nisRK two-component regulatory system from the Lactococcus lactis nisin A biosynthesis operon into the chromosome of L. johnsonii allowed constitutive expression of the endolysin under the control of the nisA promoter (P nisA ), while the use of a signal peptide (SLPmod) led to successful secretion of the active endolysin to the surrounding media. The high specificity and activity of the endolysin suggest that it may be developed as an effective tool to enhance the control of C. perfringens by L. johnsonii in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23942878

  2. Growth of Clostridium perfringens during cooling of refried beans.

    PubMed

    Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan M; Akins, E Deann; Friedrich, Loretta M; Danyluk, Michelle D; Simonne, Amarat H

    2012-10-01

    Outbreaks of Clostridium perfringens have been associated with dishes containing refried beans from food service establishments. However, growth of C. perfringens in refried beans has not been investigated, and predictive models have not been validated in this food matrix. We investigated the growth of C. perfringens during the cooling of refried beans. Refried beans (pinto and black, with and without salt added) were inoculated with 3 log CFU/g C. perfringens spores and incubated isothermally at 12, 23, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50°C. The levels of C. perfringens were monitored 3, 5, 8, and 10 h after inoculation, and then fitted to the Baranyi primary model and the Rosso secondary model prior to solving the Baranyi differential equation. The final model was validated by dynamic cooling experiments carried out in stockpots, thus mimicking the worst possible food service conditions. All refried beans samples supported the growth of C. perfringens, and all models fit the data with pseudo-R(2) values of 0.95 or greater and mean square errors of 0.3 or lower. The estimated maximum specific growth rates were generally higher in pinto beans, with or without salt added (2.64 and 1.95 h(-1), respectively), when compared with black beans, with or without salt added (1.78 and 1.61 h(-1), respectively). After 10 h of incubation, maximum populations of C. perfringens were significantly higher in samples with no salt added (7.9 log CFU/g for both pinto and black beans) than in samples with salt added (7.3 and 7.2 log CFU/g for pinto and black beans, respectively). The dynamic model predicted the growth of C. perfringens during cooling, with an average root mean squared error of 0.44. The use of large stockpots to cool refried beans led to an observed 1.2-log increase (1.5-log increase predicted by model) in levels of C. perfringens during cooling. The use of shallower pans for cooling is recommended, because they cool faster, therefore limiting the growth of C. perfringens. PMID

  3. Growth of Clostridium perfringens during cooling of refried beans.

    PubMed

    Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan M; Akins, E Deann; Friedrich, Loretta M; Danyluk, Michelle D; Simonne, Amarat H

    2012-10-01

    Outbreaks of Clostridium perfringens have been associated with dishes containing refried beans from food service establishments. However, growth of C. perfringens in refried beans has not been investigated, and predictive models have not been validated in this food matrix. We investigated the growth of C. perfringens during the cooling of refried beans. Refried beans (pinto and black, with and without salt added) were inoculated with 3 log CFU/g C. perfringens spores and incubated isothermally at 12, 23, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50°C. The levels of C. perfringens were monitored 3, 5, 8, and 10 h after inoculation, and then fitted to the Baranyi primary model and the Rosso secondary model prior to solving the Baranyi differential equation. The final model was validated by dynamic cooling experiments carried out in stockpots, thus mimicking the worst possible food service conditions. All refried beans samples supported the growth of C. perfringens, and all models fit the data with pseudo-R(2) values of 0.95 or greater and mean square errors of 0.3 or lower. The estimated maximum specific growth rates were generally higher in pinto beans, with or without salt added (2.64 and 1.95 h(-1), respectively), when compared with black beans, with or without salt added (1.78 and 1.61 h(-1), respectively). After 10 h of incubation, maximum populations of C. perfringens were significantly higher in samples with no salt added (7.9 log CFU/g for both pinto and black beans) than in samples with salt added (7.3 and 7.2 log CFU/g for pinto and black beans, respectively). The dynamic model predicted the growth of C. perfringens during cooling, with an average root mean squared error of 0.44. The use of large stockpots to cool refried beans led to an observed 1.2-log increase (1.5-log increase predicted by model) in levels of C. perfringens during cooling. The use of shallower pans for cooling is recommended, because they cool faster, therefore limiting the growth of C. perfringens.

  4. Clostridium Perfringens Toxins Involved in Mammalian Veterinary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Uzal, F. A.; Vidal, J. E.; McClane, B. A.; Gurjar, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a gram-positive anaerobic rod that is classified into 5 toxinotypes (A, B, C, D, and E) according to the production of 4 major toxins, namely alpha (CPA), beta (CPB), epsilon (ETX) and iota (ITX). However, this microorganism can produce up to 16 toxins in various combinations, including lethal toxins such as perfringolysin O (PFO), enterotoxin (CPE), and beta2 toxin (CPB2). Most diseases caused by this microorganism are mediated by one or more of these toxins. The role of CPA in intestinal disease of mammals is controversial and poorly documented, but there is no doubt that this toxin is essential in the production of gas gangrene of humans and several animal species. CPB produced by C. perfringens types B and C is responsible for necrotizing enteritis and enterotoxemia mainly in neonatal individuals of several animal species. ETX produced by C. perfringens type D is responsible for clinical signs and lesions of enterotoxemia, a predominantly neurological disease of sheep and goats. The role of ITX in disease of animals is poorly understood, although it is usually assumed that the pathogenesis of intestinal diseases produced by C. perfringens type E is mediated by this toxin. CPB2, a necrotizing and lethal toxin that can be produced by all types of C. perfringens, has been blamed for disease in many animal species, but little information is currently available to sustain or rule out this claim. CPE is an important virulence factor for C. perfringens type A gastrointestinal disease in humans and dogs; however, the data implicating CPE in other animal diseases remains ambiguous. PFO does not seem to play a direct role as the main virulence factor for animal diseases, but it may have a synergistic role with CPA-mediated gangrene and ETX-mediated enterotoxemia. The recent improvement of animal models for C. perfringens infection and the use of toxin gene knock-out mutants have demonstrated the specific pathogenic role of several toxins of C

  5. Hydrolyzable and condensed tannins resistance in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Redondo, L M; Dominguez, J E; Rabinovitz, B C; Redondo, E A; Fernández Miyakawa, M E

    2015-08-01

    Tannins added in the diet are being used to improve nutrition and health in farm animals as an alternative to antibiotic growth promoters and to control enteric clostridial diseases. However, the capacity of Clostridium perfringens to develop resistance under the selective pressure of tannins is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if C. perfringens possess the ability to develop resistance against tannins in comparison with antimicrobial agents. Susceptibility for 7 AGPs (antimicrobial growth promoters), 9 therapeutic antimicrobials and 2 tannin based extracts was determined for 30 C. perfringens strains isolated from poultry and cattle. Two susceptible strains were selected and cultured in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of tannins and AGPs for resistant sub-populations selection. Tannin resistance of C. perfringens isolates from both animal species revealed no statistically significant differences in MICs (minimum inhibitory concentration). Poultry isolates showed higher MICs to several AGPs compared with cattle isolates. All isolates were susceptible to the therapeutic antimicrobials tested, but avian isolates showed a significantly lower susceptibility to these antimicrobials which was highly correlated with an increased resistance to bacitracin and others AGPs. In-vitro selection of resistant clones suggests that C. perfringens was unable to develop resistance against tannins at least compared to AGPs like bacitracin and avilamycin. Avian origin strains, which were previously exposed to antibiotics showed higher resistance, compared to cattle origin strains. These results suggest that the evolution of resistance against tannins in C. perfringens would be more difficult and slower than to the determined AGPs.

  6. Occurrence of Clostridium perfringens from different cultivated soils.

    PubMed

    Voidarou, C; Bezirtzoglou, E; Alexopoulos, A; Plessas, S; Stefanis, C; Papadopoulos, I; Vavias, S; Stavropoulou, E; Fotou, K; Tzora, A; Skoufos, I

    2011-12-01

    The occurrence of Clostridium perfringens was estimated in 750 samples originated from a variety of soils bearing various bulb crops: Brawnica oderacea (vegetable), Olea europaea, Daucus carota (carote), Solanum tuberosum (potato), Phaseolus vulgaris (green haricot), Beta vulgaris var. rapaceum (beetroot), Cucurbita pepo (squash), Allium cepa (onion), Cucumis sativus (cucumber) and Capsicum annum (pepper). All isolated strains were tested for their antimicrobial activities to amoxicillin, penicillin G, kanamycin, tetracycline, streptomycin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol and metronidazole. When considering the type of the bulb production, it was observed increased number of C. perfringens spore densities in the most undersurface bulb soils. Moreover, C. perfringens spore are likely to occur in particularly large numbers in soil contaminated by fecal matter. Additionally, there is a close relationship between the spore amount and nature of organic content. Presence of C. perfringens was associated with acidic soil. Most of our strains showed resistance to the studied antibiotics applied usually for human and veterinary care. A systematic monitoring of the cultivated soil ecosystems must include bacteriological parameters together with chemical indices of organic pollution in order to obtain information adequate for assessing their overall quality. PMID:21621626

  7. Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin: Action, Genetics, and Translational Applications

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John C.; Shrestha, Archana; McClane, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) is responsible for causing the gastrointestinal symptoms of several C. perfringens food- and nonfood-borne human gastrointestinal diseases. The enterotoxin gene (cpe) is located on either the chromosome (for most C. perfringens type A food poisoning strains) or large conjugative plasmids (for the remaining type A food poisoning and most, if not all, other CPE-producing strains). In all CPE-positive strains, the cpe gene is strongly associated with insertion sequences that may help to assist its mobilization and spread. During disease, CPE is produced when C. perfringens sporulates in the intestines, a process involving several sporulation-specific alternative sigma factors. The action of CPE starts with its binding to claudin receptors to form a small complex; those small complexes then oligomerize to create a hexameric prepore on the membrane surface. Beta hairpin loops from the CPE molecules in the prepore assemble into a beta barrel that inserts into the membrane to form an active pore that enhances calcium influx, causing cell death. This cell death results in intestinal damage that causes fluid and electrolyte loss. CPE is now being explored for translational applications including cancer therapy/diagnosis, drug delivery, and vaccination. PMID:26999202

  8. Beneficial effect of catalase treatment on growth of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Harmon, S M; Kautter, D A

    1976-09-01

    Several common plating media were tested for their ability to support growth of Clostridium perfringens after storage of the plates for 1 to 10 days at 4 and 25 degrees C with and without subsequent addition of catalase. Liver-veal (LV) agar and brain heart infusion (BHI) agar quickly become incapable of supporting growth after storage without added catalase, whereas Shahidi Ferguson perfringens (SFP) agar and Brewer anaerobic (BA) agar were less affected. Plate counts of C. perfringens on untreated LV and BHI agars stored 3 days at 25 degrees C showed a reduction of 98.2%, whereas counts on SFP and BA agars were reduced by 13.6% and 46.2%, respectively. Addition of 1,500 U of beef liver catalase to the surface of the 3-day-old agars before incubation resulted in substantial restoration of their growth-promoting ability. Counts of colonies on LV, GHI, SFP, and BA agars with added catalase were usually 20 to 90% higher than untreated controls. Similar results were obtained using purified catalase, fungal catalase, and horseradish peroxidase. These results suggest that inhibition may be due to peroxide formed during storage and incubation and that additon of catalase provides near optimum conditions for growth of C. perfringens on these media. PMID:185958

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of canine Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens isolates to commonly utilized antimicrobial drugs.

    PubMed

    Marks, Stanley L; Kather, Elizabeth J

    2003-06-24

    Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens are anaerobic, Gram-positive bacilli that are common causes of enteritis and enterotoxemias in both domestic animals and humans. Both organisms have been associated with acute and chronic large and small bowel diarrhea, and acute hemorrhagic diarrheal syndrome in the dog. The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibilities of canine C. difficile and C. perfringens isolates in an effort to optimize antimicrobial therapy for dogs with clostridial-associated diarrhea. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of antibiotics recommended for treating C. difficile (metronidazole, vancomycin) and C. perfringens-associated diarrhea in the dog (ampicillin, erythromycin, metronidazole, tetracycline, tylosin) were determined for 70 canine fecal C. difficile isolates and 131 C. perfringens isolates. All C. difficile isolates tested had an MIC of perfringens isolates tested had an MIC for ampicillin of perfringens isolates had an MIC of >or=256 microg/ml for both erythromycin and tylosin. A third C. perfringens isolate had an MIC of 32 microg/ml for metronidazole. Based on the results of this study, ampicillin, erythromycin, metronidazole, and tylosin appear to be effective antibiotics for the treatment of C. perfringens-associated diarrhea, although resistant strains do exist. However, because there is limited information regarding breakpoints for veterinary anaerobes, and because intestinal concentrations are not known, in vitro results should be interpreted with caution. PMID:12742714

  10. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase of C. perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium-related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by react...

  11. Prevalence and characterization of Clostridium perfringens from spices in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Milton Osmar; Stagnitta, Patricia Virginia; Micalizzi, Blas; de Guzmán, Ana María Stefanini

    2005-12-01

    Spices can present high microbial counts and Clostridium perfringens, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella and Shigella, among others have been isolated from spices. C. perfringens is an important pathogen agent causing, among other diseases, enteritis in humans caused by C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) which causes human food poisoning and enterotoxemia in domestic animals. The aims of the present work were (i) to establish the hygienic sanitary quality of some spices in San Luis, Argentina; (ii) to determine the presence of C. perfringens in these spices by means of the most probable number (MPN) and count on plate methods; (iii) to characterize the enterotoxigenic strains of C. perfringens by PCR and immunological methods such as reverse passive latex agglutination (RPLA) and (iv) to type by PCR C. perfringens strains isolated. A total of 115 samples of spices, 67 of which were purchased in local retail stores and 48 domestically collected were analysed. Total aerobe counts on tryptone glucose yeast extract agar medium of the 115 samples were between <10 and 10(6) CFU/g. The colifecal counts using Mac Conkey broth of the 115 samples were <4-10(3)CFU/g, with 28 samples (24.34%) exceeding the limit established by the Spanish Alimentary Code (10 CFU/g) while 2 samples (1.73%) had a sulfite reducing anaerobe load above standard limits. A total of 14 C. perfringens strains (12.17%) were isolated and characterized from 115 samples by the standard biochemical tests. Four of which (28.60%) turned out to be enterotoxigenic by PCR and RPLA. In order to type C. perfringens strains based on their main toxins, the 14 strains were analysed by PCR. All strains belonged to type A. All RPLA positive strains were cpe(+) by PCR. The percentage of enterotoxigenic strains was more elevated that those reported in other studies for this type of sample. These results indicate that sanitary conditions in different production stages of species must be improved to reduce health hazards. The high

  12. Clostridium perfringens Type E Virulence Traits Involved in Gut Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Leandro M.; Carrasco, Juan M. Díaz; Redondo, Enzo A.; Delgado, Fernando; Miyakawa, Mariano E. Fernández

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type E disease in ruminants has been characterized by hemorrhagic enteritis or sudden death. Although type E isolates are defined by the production of alpha and iota toxin, little is known about the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type E infections. Thus far, the role of iota toxin as a virulence factor is unknown. In this report, iota toxin showed positive effects on adherence and colonization of C. perfringens type E while having negative effect on the adherence of type A cells. In-vitro and in-vivo models suggest that toxinotype E would be particularly adapted to exploit the changes induced by iota toxin in the surface of epithelial cells. In addition, type E strains produce metabolites that affected the growth of potential intra-specific competitors. These results suggest that the alteration of the enterocyte morphology induced by iota toxin concomitantly with the specific increase of type E cell adhesion and the strong intra-specific growth inhibition of other strains could be competitive traits inherent to type E isolates that improve its fitness within the bovine gut environment. PMID:25799452

  13. Plasmid partitioning systems of conjugative plasmids from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Adams, Vicki; Watts, Thomas D; Bulach, Dieter M; Lyras, Dena; Rood, Julian I

    2015-07-01

    Many pathogenic strains of Clostridium perfringens carry several highly similar toxin or antibiotic resistance plasmids that have 35 to 40 kb of very closely related syntenous sequences, including regions that carry the genes encoding conjugative transfer, plasmid replication and plasmid maintenance functions. Key questions are how are these closely related plasmids stably maintained in the same cell and what is the basis for plasmid incompatibility in C. perfringens. Comparative analysis of the Rep proteins encoded by these plasmids suggested that this protein was not the basis for plasmid incompatibility since plasmids carried in a single strain often encoded an almost identical Rep protein. These plasmids all carried a similar, but not identical, parMRC plasmid partitioning locus. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced ParM proteins revealed that these proteins could be divided into ten separate groups. Importantly, in every strain that carried more than one of these plasmids, the respective ParM proteins were from different phylogenetic groups. Similar observations were made from the analysis of phylogenetic trees of the ParR proteins and the parC loci. These findings provide evidence that the basis for plasmid incompatibility in the conjugative toxin and resistance plasmid family from C. perfringens resides in subtle differences in the parMRC plasmid partitioning loci carried by these plasmids.

  14. Case of Clostridium perfringens bacteremia after routine colonoscopy and polypectomy.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Anjali N; Riera, Diana; Hickey, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    Bacteremia is an uncommon complication after polypectomy and colonoscopy. We report one of the first cases of Clostridium perfringens bacteremia after polypectomy. Our patient was a four years old boy with congenital polyposis, who underwent colonoscopy and polypectomy without complication. Approximately 12h later he developed a fever and tachycardia with no other clinical symptoms. His blood cultures grew out penicillin susceptible C. perfringens and Enterococcus faecalis. He responded to antibiotic therapy and remained clinically asymptomatic for the duration of his course. There are a few reports of bacteremia after routine polypectomy, but no reported cases of C. perfringens bacteremia in the pediatric population. Clostridial sp. bacteremia can be fatal with devastating consequences if appropriate antibiotics and/or surgical debridement are delayed. Polymicrobial infection, as illustrated in our patient, is also common and can be a poor prognostic risk factor. Therefore, for patients with a history of polypectomy and new onset fever, anaerobic infections should be considered and empiric antibiotic therapy should include coverage for these organisms. PMID:19324098

  15. Prevalence and diversity of toxigenic Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile among swine herds in the midwest.

    PubMed

    Baker, Ashley A; Davis, Ellen; Rehberger, Thomas; Rosener, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile are associated with scours in the neonatal piglet and are an economic concern in swine production. The objective of this study was to characterize the prevalence and diversity of C. perfringens and C. difficile isolates obtained from scouring neonatal piglets in a large integrated production system, as well as in smaller independently owned regional farms. Rectal swabs were collected from 333 pigs at 11 sites in an integrated swine production system and from an additional 180 pigs at 16 regional farms located throughout the Midwest. C. perfringens was isolated from 89.8% of the pigs swabbed at the integrated sites, and C. difficile was isolated from 57.7% of these pigs. Of the pigs from the regional farms sampled, 95.6% were positive for isolation of C. perfringens and 27.2% were positive for C. difficile. Toxigenic isolates were typed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR, and were placed in four dendrograms for C. perfringens and C. difficile populations isolated from the integrated sites and regional farms. Diversity indices showed that there was greater diversity in C. difficile populations and in populations isolated from the regional farms. A subset of isolates from the C. difficile dendrograms were further toxinotyped by amplification of the pathogenicity locus and subsequent digestion by HincII, AccI, and EcoRI. Of the 45 isolates typed, 44 were determined to be toxinotype V. The results of this study illustrate the diversity of C. perfringens and C. difficile isolates and the prevalence of these pathogens in swine production sites.

  16. The Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage CPV1 Virulent for Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of bacteriophages and their lytic enzymes to control Clostridium perfringens is one potential approach to reduce the pathogen on poultry farms and in poultry-processing facilities. Bacteriophages lytic for C. perfringens were isolated from sewage, feces and broiler intestinal contents. P...

  17. Clostridium perfringens in Long Island Sound sediments: An urban sedimentary record

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchholtz ten Brink, M. R.; Mecray, E.L.; Galvin, E.L.

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a conservative tracer and an indicator of sewage-derived pollution in the marine environment. The distribution of Clostridium perfringens spores was measured in sediments from Long Island Sound, USA, as part of a regional study designed to: (1) map the distribution of contaminated sediments; (2) determine transport and dispersal paths; (3) identify the locations of sediment and contaminant focusing; and (4) constrain predictive models. In 1996, sediment cores were collected at 58 stations, and surface sediments were collected at 219 locations throughout the Sound. Elevated concentrations of Clostridium perfringens in the sediments indicate that sewage pollution is present throughout Long Island Sound and has persisted for more than a century. Concentrations range from undetectable amounts to 15,000 spores/g dry sediment and are above background levels in the upper 30 cm at nearly all core locations. Sediment focusing strongly impacts the accumulation of Clostridium perfringens spores. Inventories in the cores range from 28 to 70,000 spores/cm2, and elevated concentrations can extend to depths of 50 cm. The steep gradients in Clostridium perfringens profiles in muddier cores contrast with concentrations that are generally constant with depth in sandier cores. Clostridium perfringens concentrations rarely decrease in the uppermost sediment, unlike those reported for metal contaminants. Concentrations in surface sediments are highest in the western end of the Sound, very low in the eastern region, and intermediate in the central part. This pattern reflects winnowing and focusing of Clostridium perfringens spores and fine-grained sediment by the hydrodynamic regime; however, the proximity of sewage sources to the westernmost Sound locally enhances the Clostridium perfringens signals.

  18. Comparison of the azoreductase and nitroreductase from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, F; Cerniglia, C E

    1993-01-01

    The purified azoreductase and nitroreductase of Clostridium perfringens, which have similar electrophoretic properties, both reacted in a Western blot (immunoblot) with a polyclonal antibody raised against the azoreductase. The activity of both enzymes was enhanced by flavin adenine dinucleotide and was inhibited by menadione, o-iodosobenzoic acid, and the antibody against azoreductase. Reduction of the azo dye Direct Blue 15 by the azoreductase was inhibited by nitroaromatic compounds. The apparent Km of the enzyme for reduction of Direct Blue 15 in the presence of 1-nitropyrene was higher than the Km with the azo dye alone, demonstrating competitive inhibition. The data show that the same protein is involved in the reduction of both azo dyes and nitroaromatic compounds. Images PMID:8328797

  19. Heat treatment adaptations in Clostridium perfringens vegetative cells.

    PubMed

    Novak, J S; Tunick, M H; Juneja, V K

    2001-10-01

    Vegetative cells of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxigenic strains NCTC 8679, NCTC 8238. and H6 were grown at 37 degrees C followed by a 60-min exposure to 28 degrees C or 46 degrees C. D10-values, as a measure of thermal resistance at 60 degrees C, were significantly lower for 28 degrees C exposures as compared with cultures given 37 and 46 degrees C exposures. Following refrigeration at 4 degrees C for 24 h, D10-values for the 37 and 46 degrees C samples could not be differentiated from 28 degrees C samples. Western immunoblot analyses of lysates from heat-adapted cells also detected the increased expression of proteins reacting with antiserum directed against the molecular chaperonins from Escherichia coli; GroEL, DnaJ, and the small acid soluble protein from Bacillus subtilis, SspC. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) identified thermal transitions corresponding to ribosomal protein denaturations at 72.1 +/- 0.5 degrees C. Any cellular heat adaptations in the DSC profiles were lost following refrigeration for several days to simulate minimally processed food storage conditions. Further analyses of high-speed pellets from crude cell extract fractions using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis detected the differential gene expression of at least four major proteins in heat-adapted vegetative cells of C. perfringens. N-terminal amino acid analyses identified two of the proteins as glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and rubrerythrin. Both appear to have roles in this anaerobe under stressful conditions. PMID:11601701

  20. Clostridium perfringens Delta-Toxin Induces Rapid Cell Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Seike, Soshi; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Takehara, Masaya; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens delta-toxin is a β-pore-forming toxin and a putative pathogenic agent of C. perfringens types B and C. However, the mechanism of cytotoxicity of delta-toxin remains unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of cell death induced by delta-toxin in five cell lines (A549, A431, MDCK, Vero, and Caco-2). All cell lines were susceptible to delta-toxin. The toxin caused rapid ATP depletion and swelling of the cells. Delta-toxin bound and formed oligomers predominantly in plasma membrane lipid rafts. Destruction of the lipid rafts with methyl β-cyclodextrin inhibited delta-toxin-induced cytotoxicity and ATP depletion. Delta-toxin caused the release of carboxyfluorescein from sphingomyelin-cholesterol liposomes and formed oligomers; toxin binding to the liposomes declined with decreasing cholesterol content in the liposomes. Flow cytometric assays with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that delta-toxin treatment induced an elevation in the population of annexin V-negative and propidium iodide-positive cells. Delta-toxin did not cause the fragmentation of DNA or caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, delta-toxin caused damage to mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytochrome c release. In the present study, we demonstrate that delta-toxin produces cytotoxic activity through necrosis.

  1. Clostridium perfringens Delta-Toxin Induces Rapid Cell Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Seike, Soshi; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Takehara, Masaya; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens delta-toxin is a β-pore-forming toxin and a putative pathogenic agent of C. perfringens types B and C. However, the mechanism of cytotoxicity of delta-toxin remains unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of cell death induced by delta-toxin in five cell lines (A549, A431, MDCK, Vero, and Caco-2). All cell lines were susceptible to delta-toxin. The toxin caused rapid ATP depletion and swelling of the cells. Delta-toxin bound and formed oligomers predominantly in plasma membrane lipid rafts. Destruction of the lipid rafts with methyl β-cyclodextrin inhibited delta-toxin-induced cytotoxicity and ATP depletion. Delta-toxin caused the release of carboxyfluorescein from sphingomyelin-cholesterol liposomes and formed oligomers; toxin binding to the liposomes declined with decreasing cholesterol content in the liposomes. Flow cytometric assays with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that delta-toxin treatment induced an elevation in the population of annexin V-negative and propidium iodide-positive cells. Delta-toxin did not cause the fragmentation of DNA or caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, delta-toxin caused damage to mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytochrome c release. In the present study, we demonstrate that delta-toxin produces cytotoxic activity through necrosis. PMID:26807591

  2. Structural Basis of Clostridium perfringens Toxin Complex Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Adams,J.; Gregg, K.; Bayer, E.; Boraston, A.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    The virulent properties of the common human and livestock pathogen Clostridium perfringens are attributable to a formidable battery of toxins. Among these are a number of large and highly modular carbohydrate-active enzymes, including the {mu}-toxin and sialidases, whose catalytic properties are consistent with degradation of the mucosal layer of the human gut, glycosaminoglycans, and other cellular glycans found throughout the body. The conservation of noncatalytic ancillary modules among these enzymes suggests they make significant contributions to the overall functionality of the toxins. Here, we describe the structural basis of an ultra-tight interaction (Ka = 1.44 x 1011 M-1) between the X82 and dockerin modules, which are found throughout numerous C. perfringens carbohydrate-active enzymes. Extensive hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals contacts between the X82 and dockerin modules give rise to the observed high affinity. The {mu}-toxin dockerin module in this complex is positioned {approx}180 relative to the orientation of the dockerin modules on the cohesin module surface within cellulolytic complexes. These observations represent a unique property of these clostridial toxins whereby they can associate into large, noncovalent multitoxin complexes that allow potentiation of the activities of the individual toxins by combining complementary toxin specificities.

  3. Clostridium perfringens Delta-Toxin Induces Rapid Cell Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Seike, Soshi; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Takehara, Masaya; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens delta-toxin is a β-pore-forming toxin and a putative pathogenic agent of C. perfringens types B and C. However, the mechanism of cytotoxicity of delta-toxin remains unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of cell death induced by delta-toxin in five cell lines (A549, A431, MDCK, Vero, and Caco-2). All cell lines were susceptible to delta-toxin. The toxin caused rapid ATP depletion and swelling of the cells. Delta-toxin bound and formed oligomers predominantly in plasma membrane lipid rafts. Destruction of the lipid rafts with methyl β-cyclodextrin inhibited delta-toxin-induced cytotoxicity and ATP depletion. Delta-toxin caused the release of carboxyfluorescein from sphingomyelin-cholesterol liposomes and formed oligomers; toxin binding to the liposomes declined with decreasing cholesterol content in the liposomes. Flow cytometric assays with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that delta-toxin treatment induced an elevation in the population of annexin V-negative and propidium iodide-positive cells. Delta-toxin did not cause the fragmentation of DNA or caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, delta-toxin caused damage to mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytochrome c release. In the present study, we demonstrate that delta-toxin produces cytotoxic activity through necrosis. PMID:26807591

  4. Enumeration and isolation of cpe-positive Clostridium perfringens spores from feces.

    PubMed

    Heikinheimo, Annamari; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2004-09-01

    A hydrophobic grid membrane filter-colony hybridization (HGMF-CH) method for the enumeration and isolation of cpe gene-carrying (cpe-positive) Clostridium perfringens spores from feces was developed. A 425-bp DNA probe specific for the cpe gene was sensitive and specific when tested with bacterial DNA and pure cultures. The enumeration of cpe-positive C. perfringens by the HGMF-CH method proved to be as sensitive as nested PCR combined with the most-probable number technique when tested with fecal samples from healthy individuals. With the aid of the HGMF-CH method, positive hybridization signals were detected from two out of seven fecal samples obtained from healthy individuals. Furthermore, cpe-positive C. perfringens was successfully isolated from both of these samples. The detection of cpe-positive C. perfringens by the HGMF-CH method is dependent on the ratio of cpe-positive C. perfringens colonies to total C. perfringens colonies growing on the HGMF-tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine plate. cpe-positive C. perfringens could be isolated if the ratio of cpe-positive C. perfringens spores to total C. perfringens spores was 6 x 10(-5) or higher. The HGMF-CH method provides an aid in the investigation of fecal samples of patients suffering from food poisoning or other diseases caused by cpe-positive C. perfringens. The method also offers a new approach in the investigation of the epidemiology of cpe-positive C. perfringens strains.

  5. Structural Insights into Clostridium perfringens Delta Toxin Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Huyet, Jessica; Naylor, Claire E.; Savva, Christos G.; Gibert, Maryse; Popoff, Michel R.; Basak, Ajit K.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysin-like proteins produced by C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. One of the others, NetB, has been shown to be the major cause of Avian Nectrotic Enteritis, which following the reduction in use of antibiotics as growth promoters, has become an emerging disease of industrial poultry. Delta toxin itself is cytotoxic to the wide range of human and animal macrophages and platelets that present GM2 ganglioside on their membranes. It has sequence similarity with Staphylococcus aureus β-pore forming toxins and is expected to heptamerize and form pores in the lipid bilayer of host cell membranes. Nevertheless, its exact mode of action remains undetermined. Here we report the 2.4 Å crystal structure of monomeric Delta toxin. The superposition of this structure with the structure of the phospholipid-bound F component of S. aureus leucocidin (LukF) revealed that the glycerol molecules bound to Delta toxin and the phospholipids in LukF are accommodated in the same hydrophobic clefts, corresponding to where the toxin is expected to latch onto the membrane, though the binding sites show significant differences. From structure-based sequence alignment with the known structure of staphylococcal α-hemolysin, a model of the Delta toxin pore form has been built. Using electron microscopy, we have validated our model and characterized the Delta toxin pore on liposomes. These results highlight both similarities and differences in the mechanism of Delta toxin (and by extension NetB) cytotoxicity from that of the staphylococcal pore-forming toxins. PMID:23805259

  6. Genotyping of Clostridium perfringens isolated from broiler meat in northeastern of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Afshari, Asma; Jamshidi, Abdollah; Razmyar, Jamshid; Rad, Mehrnaz

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is an important cause of bacterial food poisoning worldwide. The disease is caused by C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) encoded by cpe gene. The aim of this research was to identify the different types of C. perfringens and the presence of cpe gene in isolated bacteria from broilers’ meat marketed in retail meat shops of Mashhad city in Northeastern of Iran. After isolation of C. perfringens using conventional culture method and confirmation by specific 16S rDNA gene, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay with specific primers, were performed for toxin typing of isolates. Clostridium perfringens was isolated from 31 broilers’ meat samples (15.50%) out of 200 samples and for toxin typing the results showed 9 isolates as type A (29.03%) and 22 isolates as type C (70.96%). In this study, cpe-positive C. perfringens were detected in eight isolates of type C (25.00%). Our results indicated that C. perfringens type C is the most common type in broiler chicken carcasses. PMID:26973762

  7. Evaluation of two media for the membrane filtration enumeration of Clostridium perfringens from water.

    PubMed

    Sartory, D P; Field, M; Curbishley, S M; Pritchard, A M

    1998-12-01

    Two media (mCP medium and Tryptose Sulphite Cycloserine (TSC) agar) were evaluated for recovery of Clostridium perfringens in environmental and part-treated drinking water. For laboratory strains of Clostridium, mCP was more selective and specific for Cl. perfringens than TSC, but was markedly less efficient for the enumeration of both vegetative cells and spores. For samples of river water and part-treated drinking water, TSC recovered significantly greater numbers of Cl. perfringens than mCP. In contrast to previous reports, there was a significant number of false presumptive positive and negative isolates on mCP. TSC is a more suitable medium for the routine monitoring of water supplies for the presence of Cl. perfringens.

  8. Mechanistic Investigations of Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens*

    PubMed Central

    Jongkees, Seino A. K.; Yoo, Hayoung; Withers, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to probe the details of the hydration-initiated hydrolysis catalyzed by the Clostridium perfringens unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase of glycoside hydrolase family 88 in the CAZy classification system. Direct 1H NMR monitoring of the enzymatic reaction detected no accumulated reaction intermediates in solution, suggesting that rearrangement of the initial hydration product occurs on-enzyme. An attempt at mechanism-based trapping of on-enzyme intermediates using a 1,1-difluoro-substrate was unsuccessful because the probe was too deactivated to be turned over by the enzyme. Kinetic isotope effects arising from deuterium-for-hydrogen substitution at carbons 1 and 4 provide evidence for separate first-irreversible and overall rate-determining steps in the hydration reaction, with two potential mechanisms proposed to explain these results. Based on the positioning of catalytic residues in the enzyme active site, the lack of efficient turnover of a 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-substrate, and several unsuccessful attempts at confirmation of a simpler mechanism involving a covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, the most plausible mechanism is one involving an intermediate bearing an epoxide on carbons 1 and 2. PMID:24573682

  9. Comparison of methods for the enumeration of Clostridium perfringens spores in water.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Valéria Christina Amstalden; Neto, Romeu Cantúsio; da Silva, Neusely; Terra, Juliana Hirata

    2012-01-01

    Four methods for enumerating Clostridium perfringens spores in water were evaluated: (1) the IMM (Iron Milk Medium) method (MPN); (2) the LS (Lactose Sulfite Broth) method (MPN); (3) the m-CP (membrane filtration Clostridium perfringens Agar) method (membrane filtration); and (4) the TSC (Tryptose Sulfite Cycloserine Agar) method (membrane filtration). The performance of these methods was compared with that of the DRCM (Differential Reinforced Clostridium Medium) method (MPN) as adopted by CETESB (Brazil's Environmental Sanitation Technology Company) for the analysis of C. perfringens spores in water. Statistical analysis was performed according to ISO 17994:2004 (Water Quality - Criteria for Establishing Equivalence between Microbiological Methods). The LS, m-CP, and TSC methods were considered not equivalent to the DRCM method, as they gave significantly lower results. The IMM showed inconclusive results and, according to ISO 17994:2004, analysis of a greater number of samples is needed to draw definitive conclusions comparing IMM and DRCM.

  10. Clostridium perfringens type A enteritis in blue and yellow macaw (Ara ararauna).

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Marta Brito; Torres, Luciana Neves; Mesquita, Ramon Gomes; Ampuero, Fernanda; Cunha, Marcos Paulo Vieira; Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana Porfida; Ferreira, Antonio José Piantino; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Moreno, Andrea Micke; Knöbl, Terezinha

    2014-12-01

    This study describes an outbreak of necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens type A in captive macaws (Ara ararauna). Two psittacine birds presented a history of prostration and died 18 hr after manifestation of clinical signs. The necropsy findings and histopathologic lesions were indicative of necrotic enteritis. Microbiologic assays resulted in the growth of large gram-positive bacilli that were identified as C. perfringens. PCR was used to identify clostridium toxinotypes and confirmed the identification of isolated strains as C pefringens type A, positive to gene codifying beta 2 toxin. The infection source and predisposing factors could not be ascertained.

  11. Animal models to study the pathogenesis of human and animal Clostridium perfringens infections.

    PubMed

    Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A; Cheung, Jackie K; Theoret, James; Garcia, Jorge P; Moore, Robert J; Rood, Julian I

    2015-08-31

    The most common animal models used to study Clostridium perfringens infections in humans and animals are reviewed here. The classical C. perfringens-mediated histotoxic disease of humans is clostridial myonecrosis or gas gangrene and the use of a mouse myonecrosis model coupled with genetic studies has contributed greatly to our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Similarly, the use of a chicken model has enhanced our understanding of type A-mediated necrotic enteritis in poultry and has led to the identification of NetB as the primary toxin involved in disease. C. perfringens type A food poisoning is a highly prevalent bacterial illness in the USA and elsewhere. Rabbits and mice are the species most commonly used to study the action of enterotoxin, the causative toxin. Other animal models used to study the effect of this toxin are rats, non-human primates, sheep and cattle. In rabbits and mice, CPE produces severe necrosis of the small intestinal epithelium along with fluid accumulation. C. perfringens type D infection has been studied by inoculating epsilon toxin (ETX) intravenously into mice, rats, sheep, goats and cattle, and by intraduodenal inoculation of whole cultures of this microorganism in mice, sheep, goats and cattle. Molecular Koch's postulates have been fulfilled for enterotoxigenic C. perfringens type A in rabbits and mice, for C. perfringens type A necrotic enteritis and gas gangrene in chickens and mice, respectively, for C. perfringens type C in mice, rabbits and goats, and for C. perfringens type D in mice, sheep and goats. PMID:25770894

  12. Adhesive properties of Clostridium perfringens to extracellular matrix proteins collagens and fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Hitsumoto, Yasuo; Morita, Naomi; Yamazoe, Ryosuke; Tagomori, Mika; Yamasaki, Tsutomu; Katayama, Seiichi

    2014-02-01

    The adhesive properties of Clostridium perfringens to collagens, gelatin, fibronectin (Fn), Fn-prebound collagens, and Fn-prebound gelatin were investigated. C. perfringens could bind to Fn-prebound collagen type II, type III, and gelatin, but not to gelatin or collagens except for collagen type I directly. Recombinant Fn-binding proteins of C. perfringens, rFbpA and rFbpB, were used to examine Fn-mediated bacterial adherence to collagen type I. In the presence of rFbps, C. perfringens adherence to Fn-prebound collagen type I was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Fn was not released from the coated collagen type I by the presence of rFbps, and rFbps did not bind to collagen type I. Thus, the inhibition of C. perfringens binding to Fn-prebound collagen type I by rFbps could not be explained by the removal of Fn from collagen or by the competitive binding of rFbps to collagen. Instead, both rFbps were found to bind to C. perfringens. These results suggest the possibility that rFbps may bind to the putative Fn receptor expressed on C. perfringens and competitively inhibit Fn binding to C. perfringens.

  13. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins.

  14. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R.; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  15. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  16. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) of C. perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium-related diseases such as gangrenous dermatitis (GD) and necrotic enteritis (NE) are increasingly emerging as major diseases in recent years with high economic loss around the world. In this report, we characterized two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens (CP) proteins (e.g., elongation f...

  17. Clostridium perfringens Epsilon Toxin: A Malevolent Molecule for Animals and Man?

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Bradley G.; Barth, Gillian; Barth, Holger; Popoff, Michel R.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a prolific, toxin-producing anaerobe causing multiple diseases in humans and animals. One of these toxins is epsilon, a 33 kDa protein produced by Clostridium perfringens (types B and D) that induces fatal enteric disease of goats, sheep and cattle. Epsilon toxin (Etx) belongs to the aerolysin-like toxin family. It contains three distinct domains, is proteolytically-activated and forms oligomeric pores on cell surfaces via a lipid raft-associated protein(s). Vaccination controls Etx-induced disease in the field. However, therapeutic measures are currently lacking. This review initially introduces C. perfringens toxins, subsequently focusing upon the Etx and its biochemistry, disease characteristics in various animals that include laboratory models (in vitro and in vivo), and finally control mechanisms (vaccines and therapeutics). PMID:24284826

  18. Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin: a malevolent molecule for animals and man?

    PubMed

    Stiles, Bradley G; Barth, Gillian; Barth, Holger; Popoff, Michel R

    2013-11-12

    Clostridium perfringens is a prolific, toxin-producing anaerobe causing multiple diseases in humans and animals. One of these toxins is epsilon, a 33 kDa protein produced by Clostridium perfringens (types B and D) that induces fatal enteric disease of goats, sheep and cattle. Epsilon toxin (Etx) belongs to the aerolysin-like toxin family. It contains three distinct domains, is proteolytically-activated and forms oligomeric pores on cell surfaces via a lipid raft-associated protein(s). Vaccination controls Etx-induced disease in the field. However, therapeutic measures are currently lacking. This review initially introduces C. perfringens toxins, subsequently focusing upon the Etx and its biochemistry, disease characteristics in various animals that include laboratory models (in vitro and in vivo), and finally control mechanisms (vaccines and therapeutics).

  19. Bacteriophages of the family siphoviridae contain amidase enzymes that lyse Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    *Agtech-Danisco, current address In chickens Clostridium perfringens (Cp) is the etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis and causes gas gangrene along with being the third leading cause of bacterial food-borne gastroenteritis in humans. While the disease in poultry can be controlled by antibiotics, th...

  20. BACTERIOPHAGES OF THE FAMILY SIPHOVIRIDAE CONTAIN AMIDASE ENZYMES THAT LYSE CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In chickens Clostridium perfringens (Cp) is the etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis and causes gas gangrene along with being the third leading cause of bacterial food-borne gastroenteritis in humans. While the disease in poultry can be controlled by antibiotics, there is increasing pressure to ban...

  1. Determination of toxinotypes of environmental Clostridium perfringens by Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Florence L, C H; Hakim, S L; Kamaluddin, M A; Thong, K L

    2011-04-01

    Toxinotype of Clostridium perfringens (CP) isolates collected from the Bernam River, Selangor River and Tengi Canal between April 2007 and January 2008 were determined by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) using published primers. All the 147 isolates were toxinotype Type A, harbouring the alpha toxin gene. In addition, 5 of the isolates also had the enterotoxin (CPE) gene.

  2. Complete genome sequence of the podoviral bacteriophage CP24R virulent for Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriophage 'CP24R was isolated from raw sewage of a waste treatment plant and lytic activity was observed against a type C Clostridium perfringens isolate. Electron microscopy revealed a small virion (44nm diameter icosahedral capsid) with a short, non-contractile tail, indicative of the family ...

  3. Molecular Characterization of Podoviridae Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Comparison of Their Predicted Lytic Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control ba...

  4. Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile in cooked beef sold in Côte d'Ivoire and their antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Kouassi, Kra Athanase; Dadie, Adjéhi Thomas; N'Guessan, Kouadio Florent; Dje, Koffi Marcellin; Loukou, Yao Guillaume

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens in cooked beef sold in the streets in Côte d'Ivoire and their antimicrobial susceptibility. A total of 395 kidney and flesh samples of cooked beef were collected from vendors at Abidjan and subjected to C. difficile and C. perfringens isolation and identification by using biochemical tests, API 20A system and PCR detection. Subsequently, the antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed for confirmed isolates. Our results showed the prevalence of 12.4% for C. difficile (11.04% in kidney and 13.45% in flesh) and 5.06% for C. perfringens (2.32% in kidney and 7.17% in flesh). Metronidazole and vancomycin remained the most potent antimicrobial agents against C. difficile while metronidazole and penicillin G were the most potent agents against C. perfringens. The resistance rates to tetracycline, doxycycline, chloramphenicol and erythromycin against C. difficile and C. perfringens isolates ranged from 2.05% to 8.16% and from 20% to 50%, respectively. Among all antimicrobial agents tested against C. difficile, percentages of resistance to quinolones ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and nalidixic acid as well as to gentamicin and cefotaxime were the highest. Eight resistant phenotypes were defined for C. difficile isolates and eleven resistant phenotypes for C. perfringens isolates. Clindamycin/gentamicin/cefotaxime/ciprofloxacin/norfloxacin/nalidixic acid resistance was the most common phenotype for C. difficile (55.10% of isolates) while norfloxacin/nalidixic acid resistance was the most common phenotype for C. perfringens (20% of isolates).

  5. Importance of histamine-producing Clostridium perfringens in scombrotoxin-forming fish.

    PubMed

    Bjornsdottir-Butler, Kristin; McCarthy, Susan; Burkhardt, William; Benner, Ronald A

    2013-07-01

    It has been suggested that anaerobic histamine-producing bacteria (HPB) are important contributors to scombrotoxin fish poisoning (SFP). In order to assess the role of Clostridium perfringens in SFP, we developed a real-time PCR method for rapid detection of histamine-producing (HP) C. perfringens. The real-time PCR assay was 100% inclusive for detecting 23 HP C. perfringens and did not detect any of the other 116 HP or non-HP isolates examined. The efficiency of the assay with or without internal amplification control DNA was 102%; in the presence of background flora and inhibitory matrices, it was 90 to 99%. To investigate the importance of HP C. perfringens in SFP, we examined histamine production by C. perfringens in inoculated fish samples incubated under anaerobic conditions. C. perfringens produced low histamine levels in tuna (19 ppm) and Spanish mackerel (3 ppm), whereas gram-negative HPB produced high histamine levels (6,345 ppm in tuna; 1,223 ppm in Spanish mackerel) under the same conditions. When one bonito, two bigeye tuna, nine mahi-mahi, and five yellowfin tuna were examined for the presence of HPB, none (0 of 17) of the samples contained HP C. perfringens or other gram-positive HPB, whereas 86% of the samples contained gram-negative HPB. Our study indicates that histamine production by C. perfringens in scombrotoxin-forming fish was minimal compared with that by gram-negative HPB and that C. perfringens may not be an important bacterial species associated with SFP. PMID:23834808

  6. A thermophilic phage endolysin fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-specific cell wall binding domain creates an anti-clostridium antimicrobial with improved thermostability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of Necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Man...

  7. Fusion of a thermophilic phage endolysin to a Clostridium perfringens-specific cell wall binding domain creates an anti-clostridium antimicrobial with improved thermostability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of Necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Man...

  8. Growth promoting effects of prebiotic yeast cell wall products in starter broilers under an immune stress and Clostridium perfringens challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to investigate the growth promoting effects of supplementing different sources and concentrations of prebiotic yeast cell wall (YCW) products containing mannanoligosaccharides in starter broilers under an immune stress and Clostridium perfringens challenge. Through a series ...

  9. Comparative genomics of four closely related Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages reveals variable rates of evolution within a core genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Biotechnological uses of bacteriophage gene products as alternatives to conventional antibiotics will require a thorough understanding of their genomic context. We sequenced and analyzed the genomes of four closely related phages isolated from Clostridium perfringens, an important agricu...

  10. BACTERIOCIN E1073 PRODUCED BY ENTEROCOCCUS FAECIUM LWP1073 IS EFFECTIVE FOR TREATING COMMENSAL CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS INFECTION IN BROILERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterotoxin-producing Clostridium perfringens type A bacteria occupy a significant place in the etiological structure of food-borne infections in humans. One potential approach to minimize infections associated with food-borne pathogens is to control the carriage of C. perfringens in broilers. For ...

  11. Selection for pro-inflammatory mediators produces chickens more resistant to Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is the fourth leading cause of bacterial-induced foodborne illnesses with an estimated economic burden of $342M USD per year. In addition to being a foodborne pathogen, C. perfringens is also an economically important poultry pathogen and is one of the known etiologic agents...

  12. The molecular-genetic analysis of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from broilers on farms in Central Russia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the research was to perform phenotypic and molecular-genetic typing of Clostridium perfringens strains commonly spread on poultry farms in Central Russia. Samples of homogenized iliac and cecal contents from 760 broilers were assayed and 325 C. perfringens strains (42.8 %) were isol...

  13. Clostridium perfringens: A review of enteric diseases in dogs, cats and wild animals.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus that is commonly part of the microbiota of humans and animals. It is considered a common enteric pathogen, but the pathogenesis and the predisposing factors of the disease commonly differ between host species. Thus, specific research is necessary to understand the role of this pathogen, how to diagnose it, and which control measures are applicable. The aim of this paper is to review the current knowledge of C. perfringens infections in dogs, cats and wild animals.

  14. Mechanism of action of a novel recombinant peptide, MP1102, against Clostridium perfringens type C.

    PubMed

    Zong, Lifen; Teng, Da; Wang, Xiumin; Mao, Ruoyu; Yang, Na; Hao, Ya; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-06-01

    This work is the first to report the antibacterial characteristics and antibacterial mechanisms of MP1102, which is a variant of NZ2114, against pathogenic Clostridium perfringens. MP1102 exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against C. perfringens strains CVCC 61, CVCC 1163, and CVCC 2032 at a low minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.91 μM. MP1102 showed anti-C. perfringens activity over a wide pH range of 2.0 and 10.0, high thermal stability from 20 to 80 °C, and remarkable resistance to pepsin. The fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) indicated an additive or synergic effect between MP1102 and bacitracin zinc, nisin, vancomycin, virginiamycin, aureomycin, and ampicillin against C. perfringens (FICI = 0.3125-1.0). To further elucidate the antibacterial mechanism of MP1102, its effect on the C. perfringens CVCC 61 cell membrane and intracellular DNA was studied. Flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that MP1102 treatment resulted in the release of cellular contents by damaging the membrane. A DNA gel retardation and circular dichroism analysis demonstrated that MP1102 interacted with DNA and intercalated into the DNA base pairs. A cell cycle assay demonstrated that MP1102 affected cellular functions, such as DNA synthesis. These results suggested that MP1102 exhibited potential as a new antimicrobial agent against C. perfringens infections. PMID:26921181

  15. Mechanism of action of a novel recombinant peptide, MP1102, against Clostridium perfringens type C.

    PubMed

    Zong, Lifen; Teng, Da; Wang, Xiumin; Mao, Ruoyu; Yang, Na; Hao, Ya; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-06-01

    This work is the first to report the antibacterial characteristics and antibacterial mechanisms of MP1102, which is a variant of NZ2114, against pathogenic Clostridium perfringens. MP1102 exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against C. perfringens strains CVCC 61, CVCC 1163, and CVCC 2032 at a low minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.91 μM. MP1102 showed anti-C. perfringens activity over a wide pH range of 2.0 and 10.0, high thermal stability from 20 to 80 °C, and remarkable resistance to pepsin. The fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) indicated an additive or synergic effect between MP1102 and bacitracin zinc, nisin, vancomycin, virginiamycin, aureomycin, and ampicillin against C. perfringens (FICI = 0.3125-1.0). To further elucidate the antibacterial mechanism of MP1102, its effect on the C. perfringens CVCC 61 cell membrane and intracellular DNA was studied. Flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that MP1102 treatment resulted in the release of cellular contents by damaging the membrane. A DNA gel retardation and circular dichroism analysis demonstrated that MP1102 interacted with DNA and intercalated into the DNA base pairs. A cell cycle assay demonstrated that MP1102 affected cellular functions, such as DNA synthesis. These results suggested that MP1102 exhibited potential as a new antimicrobial agent against C. perfringens infections.

  16. Growth of Clostridium perfringens in food proteins previously exposed to proteolytic bacilli.

    PubMed

    Schroder, D J; Busta, F F

    1973-11-01

    Proteolytic sporeforming bacteria capable of surviving processing heat treatments in synthetic or fabricated protein foods exhibited no antagonistic effects on growth of Clostridium perfringens, but instead shortened the lag of subsequent growth of C. perfringens in sodium caseinate and isolated soy protein. Bacillus subtilis A cells were cultured in 3% sodium caseinate or isolated soy protein solutions. The subsequent effect on the lag time and growth of C. perfringens type A (strain S40) at 45 C was measured by colony count or absorbance at 650 nm, or both. B. subtilis incubation for 12 h or more in sodium caseinate reduced the C. perfringens lag by 3 h. Incubation of 8 h or more in isolated soy protein reduced the lag time by 1.5 h. Molecular sieving of the B. subtilis-treated sodium caseinate revealed that all molecular sizes yielded a similar reduced lag time. Diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex ion exchange fractionation and subsequent amino acid analysis indicated that the lag time reduction caused by B. subtilis incubation was not related to charge of the peptides nor to their amino acid composition. Apparently the shortened C. perfringens lag in these B. subtilis-hydrolyzed food proteins was a result of the protein being more readily available for utilization by C. perfringens.

  17. Gut microbiome analysis in neuromyelitis optica reveals overabundance of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Cree, Bruce A. C.; Spencer, Collin M.; Varrin‐Doyer, Michel; Baranzini, Sergio E.

    2016-01-01

    T cells from neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients, which recognize the immunodominant epitope of aquaporin‐4, exhibit Th17 polarization and cross‐react with a homologous sequence of a Clostridium perfringens adenosine triphosphate‐binding cassette transporter. Therefore, this commensal microbe might participate in NMO pathogenesis. We examined the gut microbiome by PhyloChip G3 from 16 NMO patients, 16 healthy controls (HC), and 16 multiple sclerosis patients. A significant difference in the abundance of several microbial communities was observed between NMO and HC (Adonis test, p = 0.001). Strikingly, C. perfringens was overrepresented in NMO (p = 5.24 × 10−8). These observations support a potential role for C. perfringens in NMO pathogenesis. Ann Neurol 2016;80:443–447 PMID:27398819

  18. Clostridium perfringens type A toxin production in 3 commonly used culture media.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E; Marcellino, Romanella; Uzal, Francisco A

    2007-03-01

    In vitro toxin production is an important tool not only for diagnostic purposes but also for the study of pathogenesis of Clostridium perfringens infections. The present study was carried out to compare the level of toxin production by several strains of C. perfringens type A, isolated from the intestine of animals, when cultured in 3 different conventional culture media. Six strains of C. perfringens type A isolated from the small intestine of healthy sheep were cultured in commercial cooked meat medium (CMM), brain heart infusion (BHI), and tryptone glucose yeast (TGY). Intravenous lethality in mice and phospholipase C (PLC) activity were measured in filtered culture supernatants. Lethality of culture supernatants was highest for all isolates when grown in BHI, followed by CMM. No supernatants from any isolates grown in TGY produced lethality in mice. Phospholipase C activity was highest when the isolates were grown in BHI and CMM and significantly lower when grown in TGY. PMID:17402614

  19. Clostridium perfringens type A toxin production in 3 commonly used culture media.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E; Marcellino, Romanella; Uzal, Francisco A

    2007-03-01

    In vitro toxin production is an important tool not only for diagnostic purposes but also for the study of pathogenesis of Clostridium perfringens infections. The present study was carried out to compare the level of toxin production by several strains of C. perfringens type A, isolated from the intestine of animals, when cultured in 3 different conventional culture media. Six strains of C. perfringens type A isolated from the small intestine of healthy sheep were cultured in commercial cooked meat medium (CMM), brain heart infusion (BHI), and tryptone glucose yeast (TGY). Intravenous lethality in mice and phospholipase C (PLC) activity were measured in filtered culture supernatants. Lethality of culture supernatants was highest for all isolates when grown in BHI, followed by CMM. No supernatants from any isolates grown in TGY produced lethality in mice. Phospholipase C activity was highest when the isolates were grown in BHI and CMM and significantly lower when grown in TGY.

  20. Use of allicin as feed additive to enhance vaccination capacity of Clostridium perfringens toxoid in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Abu El Hammed, Waleed; Soufy, Hamdy; El-Shemy, Ahmed; Nasr, Soad M; Dessouky, Mohamed I

    2016-04-12

    The present study assessed the efficacy of Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) toxoid and/or allicin - as feed additive - in rabbits for preventing or minimizing the severity of infection with locally isolated strain of C. perfringens type A. Serum biochemical, immunological and pathological investigations were also done. One hundred rabbits of 6 weeks of age were divided into five equal groups (G1-G5). G1 were kept as normal control. G2 was allocated for C. perfringens type A infection. G3 was vaccinated with C. perfringens toxoid at zero time and then with a booster dose at the 3rd week of the experimental period. G4 was treated with allicin 20% added to the ration (200mg/kg ration) all over the experimental period. G5 was vaccinated with C. perfringens toxoid at the zero time then with a booster dose at the 3rd week of the experiment period, and treated with allicin 20% from the zero time till the end of the experiment. At the 4th week, G2, G3, G4 and G5 were challenged orally (5 ml) and subcutaneously (2 ml) with 24h cooked meat broth containing 1 × 10(7) colony-forming units/ml of C. perfringens type A strain. Blood and tissue samples were collected from all groups po st-vaccination then post-challenge for biochemical analysis, serum neutralization test and histopathological examinations. Results revealed that rabbits treated with both allicin and toxoid vaccine demonstrated high level of antitoxin titre post-challenge, improved liver and kidney functions, and reduced morbidity and mortality rates and the severity of histopathological changes associated with challenge of rabbits with C. perfringens type A strain. In conclusion, vaccination of rabbits with C. perfringens toxoid combined with allicin 20% gave better protection, enhanced immune response and had no adverse effects on the general health conditions against C. perfringens type A infection compared to rabbits vaccinated with C. perfringens toxoid only. PMID:26973070

  1. Use of allicin as feed additive to enhance vaccination capacity of Clostridium perfringens toxoid in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Abu El Hammed, Waleed; Soufy, Hamdy; El-Shemy, Ahmed; Nasr, Soad M; Dessouky, Mohamed I

    2016-04-12

    The present study assessed the efficacy of Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) toxoid and/or allicin - as feed additive - in rabbits for preventing or minimizing the severity of infection with locally isolated strain of C. perfringens type A. Serum biochemical, immunological and pathological investigations were also done. One hundred rabbits of 6 weeks of age were divided into five equal groups (G1-G5). G1 were kept as normal control. G2 was allocated for C. perfringens type A infection. G3 was vaccinated with C. perfringens toxoid at zero time and then with a booster dose at the 3rd week of the experimental period. G4 was treated with allicin 20% added to the ration (200mg/kg ration) all over the experimental period. G5 was vaccinated with C. perfringens toxoid at the zero time then with a booster dose at the 3rd week of the experiment period, and treated with allicin 20% from the zero time till the end of the experiment. At the 4th week, G2, G3, G4 and G5 were challenged orally (5 ml) and subcutaneously (2 ml) with 24h cooked meat broth containing 1 × 10(7) colony-forming units/ml of C. perfringens type A strain. Blood and tissue samples were collected from all groups po st-vaccination then post-challenge for biochemical analysis, serum neutralization test and histopathological examinations. Results revealed that rabbits treated with both allicin and toxoid vaccine demonstrated high level of antitoxin titre post-challenge, improved liver and kidney functions, and reduced morbidity and mortality rates and the severity of histopathological changes associated with challenge of rabbits with C. perfringens type A strain. In conclusion, vaccination of rabbits with C. perfringens toxoid combined with allicin 20% gave better protection, enhanced immune response and had no adverse effects on the general health conditions against C. perfringens type A infection compared to rabbits vaccinated with C. perfringens toxoid only.

  2. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment for Clostridium perfringens in Natural and Processed Cheeses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heeyoung; Lee, Soomin; Kim, Sejeong; Lee, Jeeyeon; Ha, Jimyeong; Yoon, Yohan

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the risk of Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) foodborne illness from natural and processed cheeses. Microbial risk assessment in this study was conducted according to four steps: hazard identification, hazard characterization, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. The hazard identification of C. perfringens on cheese was identified through literature, and dose response models were utilized for hazard characterization of the pathogen. For exposure assessment, the prevalence of C. perfringens, storage temperatures, storage time, and annual amounts of cheese consumption were surveyed. Eventually, a simulation model was developed using the collected data and the simulation result was used to estimate the probability of C. perfringens foodborne illness by cheese consumption with @RISK. C. perfringens was determined to be low risk on cheese based on hazard identification, and the exponential model (r = 1.82×10−11) was deemed appropriate for hazard characterization. Annual amounts of natural and processed cheese consumption were 12.40±19.43 g and 19.46±14.39 g, respectively. Since the contamination levels of C. perfringens on natural (0.30 Log CFU/g) and processed cheeses (0.45 Log CFU/g) were below the detection limit, the initial contamination levels of natural and processed cheeses were estimated by beta distribution (α1 = 1, α2 = 91; α1 = 1, α2 = 309)×uniform distribution (a = 0, b = 2; a = 0, b = 2.8) to be −2.35 and −2.73 Log CFU/g, respectively. Moreover, no growth of C. perfringens was observed for exposure assessment to simulated conditions of distribution and storage. These data were used for risk characterization by a simulation model, and the mean values of the probability of C. perfringens foodborne illness by cheese consumption per person per day for natural and processed cheeses were 9.57×10−14 and 3.58×10−14, respectively. These results indicate that probability of C. perfringens foodborne illness

  3. The pathology of enterotoxemia by Clostridium perfringens type C in calves.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Jorge P; Anderson, Mark; Blanchard, Patricia; Mete, Asli; Uzal, Francisco A

    2013-05-01

    The pathology of Clostridium perfringens type C infection has been described with detail only in foals and piglets. The current report describes the diagnostic workup and detailed pathology of 3 cases of C. perfringens type C infection in calves. A 2-day-old Jersey calf and fresh and fixed tissues from a 4-week-old Angus calf and from a 1-week-old Jersey calf were received at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System with a history of digestive disease and death. The gross changes in the gastrointestinal tract of 1 calf consisted of multifocal subserosal hemorrhages of the rumen, diffuse congestion and multifocal hemorrhages of the small intestinal mucosa, and dilated cecum with bloody liquid contents. In a second calf, a large segment of small intestine was hemorrhagic. The small intestine of the third calf was dilated and filled with abundant yellow fluid content. Microscopically, all 3 calves had diffuse coagulation necrosis of the intestinal mucosa. Clostridium perfringens type A was isolated from the intestinal content of 2 calves. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Bovine rotavirus was positive on colonic content of 1 calf. Small numbers of cryptosporidia were seen in smears of colonic content of 2 calves, and Salmonella sp. group E was detected in the small intestinal content of another calf. Clostridium perfringens beta toxin was detected in the intestinal content of the 3 animals. A diagnosis of C. perfringens type C infection was confirmed based on pathological findings and detection of beta toxin in the intestinal content of the 3 animals. PMID:23592750

  4. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of recombinant Clostridium perfringens β2-toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Gurjar, Abhijit A.; Yennawar, Neela H.; Yennawar, Hemant P.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Hegde, Narasimha V.; Jayarao, Bhushan M.

    2007-06-01

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant Clostridium perfringens β2-toxin is described. The crystals diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution. Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive sporulating anaerobic bacterium that is responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases in animals, birds and humans. The virulence of C. perfringens is associated with the production of several enterotoxins and exotoxins. β2-toxin is a 28 kDa exotoxin produced by C. perfringens. It is implicated in necrotic enteritis in animals and humans, a disease characterized by a sudden acute onset with lethal hemorrhagic mucosal ulceration. The recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of β2-toxin using the batch-under-oil technique are reported here. Native X-ray diffraction data were obtained to 2.9 Å resolution on a synchrotron beamline at the F2 station at Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) using an ADSC Quantum-210 CCD detector. The crystals belong to space group R3, with a dimer in the asymmetric unit; the unit-cell parameters are a = b = 103.71, c = 193.48 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120° using the hexagonal axis setting. A self-rotation function shows that the two molecules are related by a noncrystallographic twofold axis with polar angles ω = 90.0, ϕ = 210.3°.

  5. Detection by in vitro amplification of the alpha-toxin (phospholipase C) gene from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Fach, P; Guillou, J P

    1993-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with thermostable DNA polymerase from Thermus aquaticus is described for the specific amplification of the phospholipase C (alpha-toxin) gene of Clostridium perfringens. A set of primers selected for their high specificity could detect Cl. perfringens in stools with a detection limit of approximately 5 x 10(2) bacteria, after bi-amplification. A modified PCR without thermal steps was performed to rapidly amplify, with a yield of 60%, the DNA template. With this PCR method Cl. perfringens alpha-toxin gene could be detected within 2 h. The PCR method detected alpha-toxin positive Cl. perfringens but did not react with phospholipase C-producing Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Cl. sordellii and Cl. bifermentans. The amplified PCR products were screened through ethidium bromide agarose gel electrophoresis or, in only 1 h, with the PhastSystem (Pharmacia). This PCR satisfies the criteria of specificity, sensitivity and rapidity required for a useful tool in epidemiology and for the diagnosis of the pathogen Cl. perfringens as it may be used directly on stool samples.

  6. Severe Sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia of Urinary Origin: A Case Report and Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Millard, Michael A; McManus, Kathleen A; Wispelwey, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is an uncommon yet serious clinical syndrome that typically arises from a gastrointestinal source. However, clinicians should consider nongastrointestinal sources as well. We present a rare case of C. perfringens bacteremia of urinary origin that required surgical intervention for definitive treatment. A 61-year-old male presented with acute nausea and vomiting, altered mental status, and chronic diarrhea. His physical exam revealed right costovertebral tenderness and his laboratory work-up revealed acute renal failure. Percutaneous blood cultures grew C. perfringens. Cross-sectional imaging revealed a right-sided ureteral stone with hydronephrosis, which required nephrostomy placement. On placement of the nephrostomy tube, purulent drainage was identified and Gram stain of the drainage revealed Gram-variable rods. A urinary source of C. perfringens was clinically supported. Although it is not a common presentation, nongastrointestinal sources such as a urinary source should be considered in C. perfringens bacteremia because failure to recognize a nongastrointestinal source can delay appropriate treatment, which may include surgical intervention. PMID:26998370

  7. Perfringolysin O expression in Clostridium perfringens is independent of the upstream pfoR gene.

    PubMed

    Awad, Milena M; Rood, Julian I

    2002-04-01

    The pathogenesis of Clostridium perfringens-mediated gas gangrene or clostridial myonecrosis involves the extracellular toxins alpha-toxin and perfringolysin O. Previous studies (T. Shimizu, A. Okabe, J. Minami, and H. Hayashi, Infect. Immun. 59:137-142, 1991) carried out with Escherichia coli suggested that the perfringolysin O structural gene, pfoA, was positively regulated by the product of the upstream pfoR gene. In an attempt to confirm this hypothesis in C. perfringens, a pfoR-pfoA deletion mutant was complemented with isogenic pfoA(+) shuttle plasmids that varied only in their ability to encode an intact pfoR gene. No difference in the ability to produce perfringolysin O was observed for C. perfringens strains carrying these plasmids. In addition, chromosomal pfoR mutants were constructed by homologous recombination in C. perfringens. Again no difference in perfringolysin O activity was observed. Since it was not possible to alter perfringolysin O expression by mutation of pfoR, it was concluded that the pfoR gene product is unlikely to have a role in the regulation of pfoA expression in C. perfringens. PMID:11889112

  8. Severe Sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia of Urinary Origin: A Case Report and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Michael A.; McManus, Kathleen A.; Wispelwey, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is an uncommon yet serious clinical syndrome that typically arises from a gastrointestinal source. However, clinicians should consider nongastrointestinal sources as well. We present a rare case of C. perfringens bacteremia of urinary origin that required surgical intervention for definitive treatment. A 61-year-old male presented with acute nausea and vomiting, altered mental status, and chronic diarrhea. His physical exam revealed right costovertebral tenderness and his laboratory work-up revealed acute renal failure. Percutaneous blood cultures grew C. perfringens. Cross-sectional imaging revealed a right-sided ureteral stone with hydronephrosis, which required nephrostomy placement. On placement of the nephrostomy tube, purulent drainage was identified and Gram stain of the drainage revealed Gram-variable rods. A urinary source of C. perfringens was clinically supported. Although it is not a common presentation, nongastrointestinal sources such as a urinary source should be considered in C. perfringens bacteremia because failure to recognize a nongastrointestinal source can delay appropriate treatment, which may include surgical intervention. PMID:26998370

  9. Membrane vesicles of Clostridium perfringens Type A strains induce innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L.; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle shedding from bacteria is a universal process in most Gram-negative bacteria and a few Gram-positive bacteria. In this report, we isolate extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs) from the supernatants of Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens). We demonstrated vesicle production in a variety of virulent and nonvirulent type A strains. MVs did not contain alpha-toxin and NetB toxin demonstrated by negative reaction to specific antibody and absence of specific proteins identified by LC-MS/MS. C. perfringens MVs contained DNA components such as 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA), alpha-toxin gene (plc) and the perfringolysin O gene (pfoA) demonstrated by PCR. We also identified a total of 431 proteins in vesicles by 1-D gel separation and LC-MS/MS analysis. In vitro studies demonstrated that vesicles could be internalized into murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells without direct cytotoxicity effects, causing release of inflammation cytokines including granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1), which could also be detected in mice injected with MVs through intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. Mice immunized with C. perfringens MVs produced high titer IgG, especially IgG1, antibodies against C. perfringens membrane proteins. However, this kind of antibody could not provide protection in mice following challenge, though it could slightly postpone the time of death. Our results indicate that release of MVs from C. perfringens could provide a previously unknown mechanism to induce release of inflammatory cytokines, especially TNF-α, these findings may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infection. PMID:24631214

  10. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by reaction with...

  11. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jacques, Mario; Archambault, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277). Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin, and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta-1,4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials. PMID:24795711

  12. New amino acid germinants for spores of the enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens type A isolates.

    PubMed

    Udompijitkul, Pathima; Alnoman, Maryam; Banawas, Saeed; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium perfringens spore germination plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of C. perfringens-associated food poisoning (FP) and non-food-borne (NFB) gastrointestinal diseases. Germination is initiated when bacterial spores sense specific nutrient germinants (such as amino acids) through germinant receptors (GRs). In this study, we aimed to identify and characterize amino acid germinants for spores of enterotoxigenic C. perfringens type A. The polar, uncharged amino acids at pH 6.0 efficiently induced germination of C. perfringens spores; L-asparagine, L-cysteine, L-serine, and L-threonine triggered germination of spores of most FP and NFB isolates; whereas, L-glutamine was a unique germinant for FP spores. For cysteine- or glutamine-induced germination, gerKC spores (spores of a gerKC mutant derivative of FP strain SM101) germinated to a significantly lower extent and released less DPA than wild type spores; however, a less defective germination phenotype was observed in gerAA or gerKB spores. The germination defects in gerKC spores were partially restored by complementing the gerKC mutant with a recombinant plasmid carrying wild-type gerKA-KC, indicating that GerKC is an essential GR protein. The gerKA, gerKC, and gerKB spores germinated significantly slower with L-serine and L-threonine than their parental strain, suggesting the requirement for these GR proteins for normal germination of C. perfringens spores. In summary, these results indicate that the polar, uncharged amino acids at pH 6.0 are effective germinants for spores of C. perfringens type A and that GerKC is the main GR protein for germination of spores of FP strain SM101 with L-cysteine, L-glutamine, and L-asparagine.

  13. Multilocus sequence typing subtypes of poultry Clostridium perfringens isolates demonstrate disease niche partitioning.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, M C; Neumann, A P; Rehberger, T G; Siragusa, G R

    2011-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a ubiquitous and versatile pathogenic bacterium and is implicated in the etiology of the poultry diseases necrotic enteritis (NE) and poultry gangrene (PG). In this study, multilocus sequence typing was used to investigate genotypic relationships among 139 C. perfringens isolates from 74 flocks. These isolates had multiple disease, host, and environmental origins. The results indicated a polymorphic yet highly clonal population, with 79.6% of all isolates partitioning into one of six clonal complexes or two dominant sequence types, ST-9 and ST-31. The most prolific clonal complex, CC-1, contained 27.3% of all isolates and was not clearly associated with one particular disease. The subtypes CC-4 and ST-31 were highly associated with NE and represented 9.4% and 7.2% of the total isolates, respectively. No PG-associated and NE-associated C. perfringens isolates shared the same sequence type or clonal complex. NE-associated subtypes were more clonal and appeared more evolutionarily divergent than PG-associated subtypes, which tended to cluster in the more ancestral lineages alongside isolates from asymptomatic chickens and turkeys. Toxin gene screening identified cpb2 throughout these isolates and correlated the presence of netB with NE pathology. Previous investigations into the genetic basis of C. perfringens pathogenicity have focused on toxins and other variable genetic elements. This study presents the first sequence-based comparison of C. perfringens isolates recovered in clinical cases of PG and NE and demonstrates that niche specialization is observable in the core genomes of poultry-associated C. perfringens isolates, a concept with both epidemiological and evolutionary significance.

  14. Levels and enterotoxigenicity of Clostridium perfringens in pozole, tamales, and birria.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Hidalgo, V; Cabrera-Díaz, E; Zepeda, H; Mota de la Garza, L; Castillo, A; Torres-Vitela, R

    2005-02-01

    A quantitative survey of Clostridium perfringens in typical foods served at local restaurants was conducted for 18 months in Guadalajara, Mexico. A total of 151 samples, including goat's birria (50), pozole (50), and beef tamales (51), were collected from small restaurants in Guadalajara. Samples were tested for C. perfringens by the most probable number (MPN) method and for mesophilic aerobic plate counts (MAPCs) and coliform, yeast, and mold counts by plate count methods. Isolates confirmed as C. perfringens were further sporulated and tested for cytotoxic or cytotonic effect against Vero cells as an indication of enterotoxin production. C. perfringens was detected in 78 (52%) of all samples at concentrations that ranged from 2.3 to 5.4 log MPN/g. Average MAPCs were 1.3 to 2.7 log CFU/g, depending on the type of dish. Coliform counts ranged from less than 1.0 to 1.5 CFU/g, and yeast and mold counts were less than 1.0 log CFU/g in all cases. A total of 118 isolates of C. perfringens were tested for enterotoxic effect on Vero cells; 82 (70%) showed activity against Vero cells. Of them, 31 isolates induced cell lysis, indicating cytotoxic effect; 41 induced cell elongation, indicating cytotonic effect; and 10 produced both cytotoxic and cytotonic effect. Dilution of the bacterial filtrates that were still producing an effect on Vero cells ranged from 1:80 to 1:5,120. These results underscore the importance of determining enterotoxigenicity when testing for C. perfringens in foods. PMID:15726977

  15. Diversity of Clostridium perfringens isolates from various sources and prevalence of conjugative plasmids.

    PubMed

    Park, Miseon; Deck, Joanna; Foley, Steven L; Nayak, Rajesh; Songer, J Glenn; Seibel, Janice R; Khan, Saeed A; Rooney, Alejandro P; Hecht, David W; Rafii, Fatemeh

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an important pathogen, causing food poisoning and other mild to severe infections in humans and animals. Some strains of C. perfringens contain conjugative plasmids, which may carry antimicrobial resistance and toxin genes. We studied genomic and plasmid diversity of 145 C. perfringens type A strains isolated from soils, foods, chickens, clinical samples, and domestic animals (porcine, bovine and canine), from different geographic areas in the United States between 1994 and 2006, using multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and/or pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). MLVA detected the genetic diversity in a majority of the isolates. PFGE, using SmaI and KspI, confirmed the MLVA results but also detected differences among the strains that could not be differentiated by MLVA. All of the PFGE profiles of the strains were different, except for a few of the epidemiologically related strains, which were identical. The PFGE profiles of strains isolated from the same domestic animal species were clustered more closely with each other than with other strains. However, a variety of C. perfringens strains with distinct genetic backgrounds were found among the clinical isolates. Variation was also observed in the size and number of plasmids in the strains. Primers for the internal fragment of a conjugative tcpH gene of C. perfringens plasmid pCPF4969 amplified identical size fragments from a majority of strains tested; and this gene hybridized to the various-sized plasmids of these strains. The sequences of the PCR-amplified tcpH genes from 12 strains showed diversity among the tcpH genes. Regardless of the sources of the isolates, the genetic diversity of C. perfringens extended to the plasmids carrying conjugative genes. PMID:26608548

  16. [Molecular characterization and antimicrobial resistance of Clostridium perfringens isolates of different origins from Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Coronado, María del Mar; Mau-Inchaustegui, Silvia; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn

    2011-12-01

    Clostridium perfringens, a Gram positive, spore-forming anaerobe, is widely distributed in nature. Based upon their production of four major toxins alpha, beta, epsilon and iota, C. perfringens is classified into five toxinotypes (A-E). Some strains produce an enterotoxin (CPE), encoded by the cpe gene, which causes diarrhea in humans and some animals. C. perfringens strains that had been previously isolated and been kept at -80 degrees C were analyzed for the presence of toxin genes and for antimicrobial resistance: 20 from soils, 20 from animal, 20 from human origin and 21 from food non related to outbreaks. According to PCR results, all strains were classified as C. perfringens type A, since only alpha toxin gene was detected, while cpe was detected in two strains (2.5%) isolated from food, as it has been described in other world regions. Antibiotic resistance to at least one antibiotic was detected in 44% of the strains, 41% was resistant to clindamycin, 25% to chloramphenicol, 22% to penicillin and 20% to metronidazole. Soils strains showed the highest resistance percentages to almost all antibiotics. Multiresistance (to three or more antibiotic groups) was detected in the strains from soil (40%), human origin (30%), food (14%) and animal origin (5%). The high resistance rates found may be explained by the widespread use of antimicrobials as growth promoters in plants and animals; also these resistant strains may act as reservoir of resistance genes that may be transferred between bacteria in different environments. PMID:22208067

  17. Growth of Clostridium perfringens from spore inocula in sous-vide turkey products.

    PubMed

    Juneja, V K; Marmer, B S

    1996-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens growth from a spore inoculum was investigated in vacuum-packaged, cook-in-bag ground turkey (pH 6) that included 0.3% (w/w) sodium pyrophosphate, and sodium chloride at 0, 1, 2, or 3% (w/w). The packages were processed to an internal temperature of 71.1 degrees C, ice chilled and stored at various temperatures. The total C. perfringens population was determined by plating diluted samples on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar followed by anaerobic incubation at 37 degrees C for 48 h. At 28 degrees C, the addition of 3% salt in turkey was effective in delaying growth for 12 h. At 15 degrees C, growth occurred at a relatively slow rate in the presence of 1-2% salt. Vegetative cells were not observed even after 28 days of storage in the presence of 3% salt. C. perfringens growth was not observed at 4 degrees C regardless of salt levels. The D-values ranged from 23.2 min (no salt) to 17.7 min (3% salt). Cyclic and static temperature abuse of refrigerated products for 8 h did not lead to growth by C. perfringens from a spore inoculum. PMID:8880332

  18. Immunization of broiler chickens against Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, R R; Parreira, V R; Sharif, S; Prescott, J F

    2007-09-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) in broiler chickens is caused by Clostridium perfringens. Currently, no vaccine against NE is available and immunity to NE is not well characterized. Our previous studies showed that immunity to NE followed oral infection by virulent rather than avirulent C. perfringens strains and identified immunogenic secreted proteins apparently uniquely produced by virulent C. perfringens isolates. These proteins were alpha-toxin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), fructose 1,6-biphosphate aldolase, and a hypothetical protein (HP). The current study investigated the role of each of these proteins in conferring protection to broiler chickens against oral infection challenges of different severities with virulent C. perfringens. The genes encoding these proteins were cloned and purified as histidine-tagged recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli and were used to immunize broiler chickens intramuscularly. Serum and intestinal antibody responses were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All proteins significantly protected broiler chickens against a relatively mild challenge. In addition, immunization with alpha-toxin, HP, and PFOR also offered significant protection against a more severe challenge. When the birds were primed with alpha-toxoid and boosted with active toxin, birds immunized with alpha-toxin were provided with the greatest protection against a severe challenge. The serum and intestinal washings from protected birds had high antigen-specific antibody titers. Thus, we conclude that there are certain secreted proteins, in addition to alpha-toxin, that are involved in immunity to NE in broiler chickens. PMID:17634510

  19. How do swine practitioners and veterinary pathologists arrive at a diagnosis of Clostridium perfringens type A enteritis in neonatal piglets?

    PubMed

    Chan, Gloria; Farzan, Abdolvahab; Prescott, John F; Friendship, Robert

    2013-05-01

    A questionnaire was administered to 22 veterinary practitioners and 17 veterinary pathologists to investigate the methods used for diagnosis of Clostridium perfringens type A enteritis in neonatal pigs. Practitioners generally diagnosed C. perfringens type A associated enteritis by age of onset of diarrhea (between 1 to 7 days of age). Most practitioners (95%) were moderately to very confident in their diagnosis. Pathologists generally diagnosed C. perfringens type A associated enteritis by combinations of isolation of the organism, genotyping or detecting the toxins of the organism, and ruling out other pathogens through histopathology. Almost half (41%) of the pathologists were not confident of their diagnosis. This study reports that the current diagnostic method for C. perfringens type A enteritis is not specific, and although many pathologists expressed reservations about making a diagnosis of C. perfringens type A enteritis, most practitioners were confident in their diagnosis, even though reported clinical signs of clostridial diarrhea are similar to those of a number of other enteric diseases.

  20. Clostridium perfringens: Comparative effects of heat and osmotic stress on non-enterotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic strains.

    PubMed

    Abbona, Cinthia Carolina; Stagnitta, Patricia Virginia

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens isolates associated with food poisoning carries a chromosomal cpe gene, while non-foodborne human gastrointestinal disease isolates carry a plasmid cpe gene. The enterotoxigenic strains tested produced vegetative cells and spores with significantly higher resistance than non-enterotoxigenic strains. These results suggest that the vegetative cells and spores have a competitive advantage over non-enterotoxigenic strains. However, no explanation has been provided for the significant associations between chromosomal cpe genotypes with the high resistance, which could explain the strong relationship between chromosomal cpe isolates and C. perfringens type A food poisoning. Here, we analyse the action of physical and chemical agent on non-enterotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic regional strains. And this study tested the relationship between the sensitivities of spores and their levels SASPs (small acid soluble proteins) production in the same strains examined. PMID:27012900

  1. Binding of Clostridium perfringens to collagen correlates with the ability to cause necrotic enteritis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Wade, B; Keyburn, A L; Seemann, T; Rood, J I; Moore, R J

    2015-11-18

    This study investigated the ability of Clostridium perfringens isolates derived from chickens to bind to collagen types I-V and gelatin. In total 21 strains from three distinct backgrounds were studied: (i) virulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis, (ii) avirulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis and (iii) strains isolated from healthy birds. All strains isolated from diseased birds had been assessed for virulence in a disease induction model. The virulent isolates all displayed collagen binding ability. However, most strains in the other two classes showed negligible binding to collagen. The prevalence of a previously described C. perfringens putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene was investigated by PCR screening. It was found that five of the strains carried the putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene and that all of these strains were virulent isolates. Based on these studies it is postulated that collagen adhesion may play a role in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis.

  2. Determination of the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes in canine Clostridium perfringens isolates.

    PubMed

    Kather, Elizabeth J; Marks, Stanley L; Foley, Janet E

    2006-03-10

    Clostridium perfringens is a well documented cause of a mild self-limiting diarrhea and a potentially fatal acute hemorrhagic diarrheal syndrome in the dog. A recent study documented that 21% of canine C. perfringens isolates had MIC's indicative of resistance to tetracycline, an antimicrobial commonly recommended for treatment of C. perfringens-associated diarrhea. The objective of the present study was to further evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of these isolates by determining the prevalence of specific resistance genes, their expression, and ability for transference between bacteria. One hundred and twenty-four canine C. perfringens isolates from 124 dogs were evaluated. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of tetracycline, erythromycin, tylosin, and metronidazole were determined using the CLSI Reference Agar Dilution Method. All isolates were screened for three tetracycline resistance genes: tetA(P), tetB(P) and tetM, and two macrolide resistance genes: ermB and ermQ, via PCR using primer sequences previously described. Ninety-six percent (119/124) of the isolates were positive for the tetA(P) gene, and 41% (51/124) were positive for both the tetA(P) and tetB(P) genes. No isolates were positive for the tetB(P) gene alone. Highly susceptible isolates (MIC< or = 4 microg/ml) were significantly more likely to lack the tetB(P) gene. One isolate (0.8%) was positive for the ermB gene, and one isolate was positive for the ermQ gene. The tetM gene was not found in any of the isolates tested. Two out of 15 tested isolates (13%) demonstrated transfer of tetracycline resistance via bacterial conjugation. Tetracycline should be avoided for the treatment of C. perfringens-associated diarrhea in dogs because of the relatively high prevalence of in vitro resistance, and the potential for conjugative transfer of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:16330169

  3. Identification and Characterization of a New Enterotoxin Produced by Clostridium perfringens Isolated from Food Poisoning Outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Irikura, Daisuke; Monma, Chie; Suzuki, Yasunori; Nakama, Akiko; Kai, Akemi; Fukui-Miyazaki, Aya; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kamata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    There is a strain of Clostridium perfringens, W5052, which does not produce a known enterotoxin. We herein report that the strain W5052 expressed a homologue of the iota-like toxin components sa and sb of C. spiroforme, named Clostridium perfringens iota-like enterotoxin, CPILE-a and CPILE-b, respectively, based on the results of a genome sequencing analysis and a systematic protein screening. In the nicotinamide glyco-hydrolase (NADase) assay the hydrolysis activity was dose-dependently increased by the concentration of rCPILE-a, as judged by the mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the actin monomer of the lysates of Vero and L929 cells were radiolabeled in the presence of [32P]NAD and rCPILE-a. These findings indicated that CPILE-a possesses ADP-ribosylation activity. The culture supernatant of W5052 facilitated the rounding and killing of Vero and L929 cells, but the rCPILE-a or a non-proteolyzed rCPILE-b did not. However, a trypsin-treated rCPILE-b did. Moreover, a mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b enhanced the cell rounding and killing activities, compared with that induced by the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b alone. The injection of the mixture of rCPILE-a and the trypsin-treated rCPILE-b into an ileum loop of rabbits evoked the swelling of the loop and accumulation of the fluid dose-dependently, suggesting that CPILE possesses enterotoxic activity. The evidence presented in this communication will facilitate the epidemiological, etiological, and toxicological studies of C. perfringens food poisoning, and also stimulate studies on the transfer of the toxins' gene(s) among the Genus Clostridium. PMID:26584048

  4. Clostridium perfringens: a flesh-eating bacterium living in your garden.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Ann

    2010-10-01

    Gas gangrene is a painful, rapidly developing and potentially fatal infection despite antibiotic treatment. During the First World War thousands of soldiers died from this disease. Dr Alexis Carrel pioneered a controversial method of irrigating wounds with Dakin's solution to destroy Clostridium perfringens, a bacterium found in heavily fertilised soils that causes gas gangrene. Although this method is no longer used due to the discovery of antibiotics, many of his other ideas, such as scientifically determining the type and number of bacteria and delaying the closure of a wound until the bacteria had been eradicated, are still used today. PMID:21049805

  5. Evaluation of the efficacy of yeast extract in reducing intestinal Clostridium perfringens levels in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Thanissery, R; McReynolds, J L; Conner, D E; Macklin, K S; Curtis, P A; Fasina, Y O

    2010-11-01

    The etiological agent of necrotic enteritis is Clostridium perfringens. Traditionally, necrotic enteritis is controlled with in-feed antibiotics. However, increasing consumer demand for drug-free poultry has fostered the search for nonantibiotic alternatives. Yeast extract contain nucleotides that are immunomodulatory and also essential for cellular functions. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of NuPro yeast extract (Alltech Inc., Nicholasville, KY) in reducing intestinal C. perfringens levels in broiler chickens. One hundred ninety-two 1-d-old male broiler chicks were obtained and randomly assigned to 6 treatments in a battery cage trial. Treatment 1 consisted of chicks fed a corn-soybean meal basal diet (BD) without added bacitracin methylene disalicylate or NuPro. Treatment 2 consisted of chicks fed BD into which bacitracin methylene disalicylate was added at 0.055 g/kg. Treatment 3 consisted of chicks fed BD supplemented with NuPro at a 2% level for the first 10 d of the experiment. Treatments 4 (PX), 5, and 6 (PN) consisted of chicks that were challenged with 3 mL of the C. perfringens inoculum (~10(7) cfu/mL) on d 14, 15, and 16 of the experiment and fed diets similar to treatments 1, 2, and 3, respectively. On d 1 and 7 postchallenge, intestinal C. perfringens levels, lesion scores, and alkaline phosphatase activity were assessed. On d 1 postchallenge, C. perfringens level in treatment 5 (2.09 log(10) cfu/g) was lower (P < 0.05) compared with the PX treatment (4.71 log(10) cfu/g) but similar to the PN treatment (2.98 log(10) cfu/g). A similar trend was observed on d 7 postchallenge. NuPro supplementation enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity (P < 0.05) in C. perfringens-challenged chicks and appeared to reduce intestinal lesion scores. Although dietary supplementation of NuPro in the PN treatment reduced C. perfringens levels by 1.73 and 0.68 log(10) cfu/g compared with the PX treatment on d 1 and 7 postchallenge, respectively, these

  6. Genetic diversity of Clostridium perfringens type A isolates from animals, food poisoning outbreaks and sludge

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Anders; Aspan, Anna; Bagge, Elisabeth; Båverud, Viveca; Engström, Björn E; Johansson, Karl-Erik

    2006-01-01

    Background Clostridium perfringens, a serious pathogen, causes enteric diseases in domestic animals and food poisoning in humans. The epidemiological relationship between C. perfringens isolates from the same source has previously been investigated chiefly by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In this study the genetic diversity of C. perfringens isolated from various animals, from food poisoning outbreaks and from sludge was investigated. Results We used PFGE to examine the genetic diversity of 95 C. perfringens type A isolates from eight different sources. The isolates were also examined for the presence of the beta2 toxin gene (cpb2) and the enterotoxin gene (cpe). The cpb2 gene from the 28 cpb2-positive isolates was also partially sequenced (519 bp, corresponding to positions 188 to 706 in the consensus cpb2 sequence). The results of PFGE revealed a wide genetic diversity among the C. perfringens type A isolates. The genetic relatedness of the isolates ranged from 58 to 100% and 56 distinct PFGE types were identified. Almost all clusters with similar patterns comprised isolates with a known epidemiological correlation. Most of the isolates from pig, horse and sheep carried the cpb2 gene. All isolates originating from food poisoning outbreaks carried the cpe gene and three of these also carried cpb2. Two evolutionary different populations were identified by sequence analysis of the partially sequenced cpb2 genes from our study and cpb2 sequences previously deposited in GenBank. Conclusion As revealed by PFGE, there was a wide genetic diversity among C. perfringens isolates from different sources. Epidemiologically related isolates showed a high genetic similarity, as expected, while isolates with no obvious epidemiological relationship expressed a lesser degree of genetic similarity. The wide diversity revealed by PFGE was not reflected in the 16S rRNA sequences, which had a considerable degree of sequence similarity. Sequence comparison of the partially

  7. Toxinotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens isolates from mutton, beef and chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha; Nazir, Jawad; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Ahmad, Mansur-Ud-Din; Nawaz, Muhammad; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair

    2015-08-01

    A total of 300 meat samples comprising mutton, beef, and chicken meat (n = 100) collected from either local butcher shops or large meat outlets situated at various areas of Lahore City located in Punjab province of Pakistan were tested for the isolation of Clostridium perfringens. Prevalence of the organism was highest in the chicken (6 %) followed by mutton (5 %) and beef (1 %). Contamination level was high (10/150) in the samples collected from local butcher shops in comparison to the samples collected from large meat outlets (2/150). All of the raw meat samples were negative for the presence of alpha, beta and epsilon toxins of C. perfringens as detected through ELISA. Out of a total number of 12 isolates only half were capable of producing enterotoxins when cultured in trypticase glucose yeast (TGY) broth. Toxinotyping of the isolates showed that 3 were of type A while one each of the remaining three belonged to type B, C, and D. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of the toxin producing isolates revealed that C. perfringens were susceptible to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and ceftriaxone. All of the other drugs were relatively less effective with a least activity of amoxicillin against the isolates.

  8. The Generation and Characterization of Recombinant Protein and Antibodies of Clostridium perfringens Beta2 Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jin; Song, Fuyang; Yang, Yi; Ma, Chenjie; Deng, Guangcun; Li, Yong; Wang, Yujiong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) beta2 toxin (CPB2) is an important virulent factor of necrotic enteritis in both animals and humans. However, studies of its pathogenic roles and functional mechanisms have been hampered due to the difficulty of purification and lack of specific antibodies against this toxin. Methods. A recombinant His-tagged C. perfringens beta2 (rCPB2) toxin and monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) against CPB2 were generated and characterized by assays of cytotoxicity, immunoblotting, ELISA, neutralization, and immunofluorescence. Results. A His-tagged rCPB2 with integrity and cytotoxicity of native CPB2 was purified from E. coli expressing system, which exhibited a moderate cytotoxicity on NCM460 human intestinal epithelial cells. The rCPB2 could induce apoptotic cell death rather than necrotic death in part through a pathway involved in caspase-3 signaling. Mechanistically, rCPB2 was able to first bind to cell membrane and dynamically translocate into cytoplasm for its cytotoxic activity. Three McAbs 1E23, 2G7 and 2H7 were characterized to be able to immunologically react with CPB2 and neutralize rCPB2 cytotoxicity on NCM460 cells. Conclusion. These results indicated the rCPB2 and antibodies generated in this study are useful tools for studies of biological functions and pathogenic mechanisms of CPB2 in future, which warrants for further investigations.

  9. The Generation and Characterization of Recombinant Protein and Antibodies of Clostridium perfringens Beta2 Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jin; Song, Fuyang; Yang, Yi; Ma, Chenjie; Deng, Guangcun; Li, Yong; Wang, Yujiong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) beta2 toxin (CPB2) is an important virulent factor of necrotic enteritis in both animals and humans. However, studies of its pathogenic roles and functional mechanisms have been hampered due to the difficulty of purification and lack of specific antibodies against this toxin. Methods. A recombinant His-tagged C. perfringens beta2 (rCPB2) toxin and monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) against CPB2 were generated and characterized by assays of cytotoxicity, immunoblotting, ELISA, neutralization, and immunofluorescence. Results. A His-tagged rCPB2 with integrity and cytotoxicity of native CPB2 was purified from E. coli expressing system, which exhibited a moderate cytotoxicity on NCM460 human intestinal epithelial cells. The rCPB2 could induce apoptotic cell death rather than necrotic death in part through a pathway involved in caspase-3 signaling. Mechanistically, rCPB2 was able to first bind to cell membrane and dynamically translocate into cytoplasm for its cytotoxic activity. Three McAbs 1E23, 2G7 and 2H7 were characterized to be able to immunologically react with CPB2 and neutralize rCPB2 cytotoxicity on NCM460 cells. Conclusion. These results indicated the rCPB2 and antibodies generated in this study are useful tools for studies of biological functions and pathogenic mechanisms of CPB2 in future, which warrants for further investigations. PMID:27672668

  10. Beta Lactamase Producing Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia in an Elderly Man with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rashmi; Duncalf, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is associated with adverse outcomes. Known risk factors include chronic kidney disease, malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal disease. We present a 74-year-old man admitted with confusion, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Exam revealed tachycardia, hypotension, lethargy, distended abdomen, and cold extremities. He required intubation and aggressive resuscitation for septic shock. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis, metabolic acidosis, acute kidney injury, and elevated lipase. CT scan of abdomen revealed acute pancreatitis and small bowel ileus. He was started on vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam. Initial blood cultures were positive for C. perfringens on day five. Metronidazole and clindamycin were added to the regimen. Repeat CT (day 7) revealed pancreatic necrosis. The patient developed profound circulatory shock requiring multiple vasopressors, renal failure requiring dialysis, and bacteremia with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Hemodynamic instability precluded surgical intervention and he succumbed to multiorgan failure. Interestingly, our isolate was beta lactamase producing. We review the epidemiology, risk factors, presentation, and management of C. perfringens bacteremia. This case indicates a need for high clinical suspicion for clostridial sepsis and that extended spectrum beta lactam antibiotic coverage may be inadequate and should be supplemented with use of clindamycin or metronidazole if culture is positive, until sensitivities are known. PMID:26904307

  11. Identification of a two-component signal transduction system that regulates maltose genes in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Thomas J; Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru; Cheung, Jackie K; Rood, Julian I

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive rod that is widely distributed in nature and is the etiological agent of several human and animal diseases. The complete genome sequence of C. perfringens strain 13 has been determined and multiple two-component signal transduction systems identified. One of these systems, designated here as the MalNO system, was analyzed in this study. Microarray analysis was used to carry out functional analysis of a malO mutant. The results, which were confirmed by quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, indicated that genes putatively involved in the uptake and metabolism of maltose were up-regulated in the malO mutant. These effects were reversed by complementation with the wild-type malO gene. Growth of these isogenic strains in medium with and without maltose showed that the malO mutant recovered more quickly from maltose deprivation when compared to the wild-type and complemented strains, leading to the conclusion that the MalNO system regulates maltose utilization in C. perfringens. It is postulated that this regulatory network may allow this soil bacterium and opportunistic pathogen to respond to environmental conditions where there are higher concentrations of maltose or maltodextrins, such as in the presence of decaying plant material in rich soil. PMID:25152227

  12. Identification, Isolation and characterization of a novel azoreductase from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; Wright, Cristee M; John, Gilbert H

    2012-04-01

    Azo dyes are used widely in the textile, pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industries as colorants and are often sources of environmental pollution. There are many microorganisms that are able to reduce azo dyes by use of an azoreductase enzyme. It is through the reduction of the azo bonds of the dyes that carcinogenic metabolites are produced thereby a concern for human health. The field of research on azoreductases is growing, but there is very little information available on azoreductases from strict anaerobic bacteria. In this study, the azoreductase gene was identified in Clostridium perfringens, a pathogen that is commonly found in the human intestinal tract. C. perfringens shows high azoreductase activity, especially in the presence of the common dye Direct Blue 15. A gene that encodes for a flavoprotein was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli, and further purified and tested for azoreductase activity. The azoreductase (known as AzoC) was characterized by enzymatic reaction assays using different dyes. AzoC activity was highest in the presence of two cofactors, NADH and FAD. A strong cofactor effect was shown with some dyes, as dye reduction occurred without the presence of the AzoC (cofactors alone). AzoC was shown to perform best at a pH of 9, at room temperature, and in an anaerobic environment. Enzyme kinetics studies suggested that the association between enzyme and substrate is strong. Our results show that AzoC from C. perfringens has azoreductase activity.

  13. Detection of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens in food and fecal samples with a duplex PCR and the slide latex agglutination test.

    PubMed Central

    Fach, P; Popoff, M R

    1997-01-01

    A duplex PCR procedure was evaluated for the detection of Clostridium perfringens in food and biological samples and for the identification of enterotoxigenic strains. This method uses two sets of primers which amplify in the same reaction two different DNA fragments simultaneously: the 283-bp C. perfringens phospholipase C gene fragment and the 426-bp enterotoxin gene fragment. Internal primers within the two primer sets confirmed the specificity of the method by DNA-DNA hybridization with the PCR products. No cross-reaction was observed with other Clostridium species or with other bacteria routinely found in food. The detection level was approximately 10(5) C. perfringens cells per g of stool or food sample. When overnight enrichment culture was used, 10 C. perfringens cells per g was detected in 57 artificially contaminated food samples. The duplex PCR is a rapid, sensitive, and reliable method for the detection and identification of enterotoxigenic C. perfringens strains in food samples. A slide latex agglutination test was also evaluated as a rapid, simple technique for the detection of C. perfringens enterotoxin in stool samples. PMID:9361409

  14. Impedance Analysis of Ovarian Cancer Cells upon Challenge with C-terminal Clostridium Perfringens Enterotoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Geoffrey; Lo, Chun-Min

    2007-03-01

    Both in vitro and animal studies in breast, prostate, and ovarian cancers have shown that clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), which binds to CLDN4, may have an important therapeutic benefit, as it is rapidly cytotoxic in tissues overexpressing CLDN4. This study sought to evaluate the ability of C-terminal clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE), a CLDN4-targetting molecule, to disrupt tight junction barrier function. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) was used to measure both junctional resistance and average cell-substrate separation of ovarian cancer cell lines after exposure to C-CPE. A total of 14 ovarian cancer cell lines were used, and included cell lines derived from serous, mucinous, and clear cells. Our results showed that junctional resistance increases as CLDN4 expression increases. In addition, C-CPE is non-cytotoxic in ovarian cancer cells expressing CLDN4. However, exposure to C-CPE results in a significant (p<0.05) dose- and CLDN4-dependent decrease in junctional resistance and an increase in cell-substrate separation. Treatment of ovarian cancer cell lines with C-CPE disrupts tight junction barrier function.

  15. Epidemiological and pathobiological profiles of Clostridium perfringens infections: review of consecutive series of 33 cases over a 13-year period

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Yuji; Dobashi, Yoh; Sakai, Toshiyasu; Monma, Chie; Miyatani, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is well known as the causative agent of several forms of enteric disease, precise epidemiological and pathobiological aspects are still unknown. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the culture results of samples collected in our hospital from 2001 through 2013. In addition, for the detection and toxinogenic typing of C. perfringens, polymerase-chain-reaction amplification (PCR)-based rapid analysis was performed in 6 cases using DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded tissues. Results: A total of 35 samples from 33 cases were positive for C. perfringens, representing an incidence of 0.017% (35/205, 114). Among 33 patients, 21 patients manifested sepsis and 7 patients had bacteremia. One of the septic cases was complicated by fatal intravascular hemolysis and thus, the prevalence was estimated at 3.0% among C. perfringens infections (1/33). The direct causative disease or state for C. perfringens infection was identified in 18 patients: surgery or intervention for cancers, 8 patients; chemotherapy for cancer, 2 patients; surgery or intervention for non-neoplastic disease, 6 patients; liver cirrhosis, 3 patients, etc. PCR-based toxinogenic typing of C. perfringens detected the alpha-toxin gene only in tissue from a patient who died of massive hemolysis; none of the toxin genes could be amplified in the other 5 cases examined. Conclusions: The prevalence of overt C. perfringens infection is low, but upon detection, infected patients should be carefully monitored for fatal acute hemolysis caused by type A C. perfringens. Furthermore, PCR-based rapid detection of C. perfringens and toxinogenic typing by archival pathological material is applicable as a diagnostic tool. PMID:25755747

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium perfringens Strain JJC, a Highly Efficient Hydrogen Producer Isolated from Landfill Leachate Sludge.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y M; Juan, J C; Gan, H M; Austin, C M

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens strain JJC is an effective biohydrogen and biochemical producer that was isolated from landfill leachate sludge. Here, we present the assembly and annotation of its genome, which may provide further insights into the gene interactions involved in efficient biohydrogen production. PMID:24604637

  17. INHIBITION OF GERMINATION AND OUTGROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS SPORES BY LACTIC ACID SALTS DURING COOLING OF COOKED GROUND TURKEY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by lactic acid salts during exponential cooling of cooked ground turkey products was evaluated. Injected turkey containing either calcium lactate, potassium lactate, or sodium lactate (1.0, 2.0, 3.0 or 4.8% w/w) along with a cont...

  18. Effect of phosphate and meat (pork) types on the germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores during abusive chilling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of blends of phosphates and the pork meat type (pale, soft and exudative, PSE; normal; and dark, firm and dry, DFD) on the germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens during abusive exponential chilling times was evaluated. Two different phosphates, tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSP...

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium perfringens Strain JJC, a Highly Efficient Hydrogen Producer Isolated from Landfill Leachate Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Y. M.; Gan, H. M.; Austin, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens strain JJC is an effective biohydrogen and biochemical producer that was isolated from landfill leachate sludge. Here, we present the assembly and annotation of its genome, which may provide further insights into the gene interactions involved in efficient biohydrogen production. PMID:24604637

  20. Molecular Characterization of Podoviral Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Their Comparison with Members of the Picovirinae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal, and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control b...

  1. Levels and toxigenicity of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium perfringens from retail seafood.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, T; Labbe, R

    2008-06-01

    For the period 1990 through 2003, seafood was the most commonly identified food linked to foodborne outbreaks in the United States. Fish as a commodity has rarely been examined for the presence of Bacillus cereus in particular. For the present study, 347 fresh and processed retail seafood samples were examined for the presence of Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium perfringens, and B. cereus. The presence of C. botulinum was not confirmed in any of the isolates, but C. perfringens was confirmed in 17 samples. One of the C. perfringens isolates possessed the enterotoxin gene, as determined by PCR. In contrast, 62 confirmed B. cereus isolates were obtained from separate samples at levels ranging from 3.6 to > 1,100 CFU/g. Thirty (48%) of 62 isolates produced both the hemolysin BL (HBL) and nonhemolytic (NHE) enterotoxins, and 58 (94%) and 31 (50%) produced NHE or HBL toxins, respectively. The presence of at least one of the three genes of the NHE complex was detected in 99% of the isolates; 69% of the isolates possessed all three genes. In contrast, 71% of the isolates possessed at least one of the three genes of the HBL complex, and 37% possessed all three HBL gene components. Fifty of the 62 B. cereus isolates were from imported seafood, and 19 (38%) of these samples were at levels > 100 CFU/g. Twelve of the 14 highest enterotoxin assay results were from isolates from imported food. Only one B. cereus isolate possessed the cereulide synthetase gene, ces; this isolate also possessed the genes for the three-component HBL and NHE complexes. A majority of enterotoxin-producing isolates were resistant to 2 of 10 antibiotics tested, ceftriaxone and clindamycin. Our results demonstrate the potential of seafood as a vehicle for foodborne illness caused by B. cereus, in particular the enterotoxin-producing genotype. PMID:18592743

  2. Detection of Clostridium perfringens in yearling lamb meat (barbacoa), head, and gut tacos from public markets in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Natividad-Bonifacio, Iván; Vázquez-Quiñones, Carlos R; Rodas-Suárez, Oscar R; Fernández, Francisco J; Rodríguez-Solis, Esteban; Quiñones-Ramírez, Elsa Irma; Vázquez-Salinas, Carlos

    2010-06-01

    No reports on the incidence of Clostridium perfringens in popularly-consumed food from Mexico City have been published; neither are there any reports that have analyzed food consumed in popular markets and less established restaurants. Therefore, this study is aimed at providing data to evaluate the relevance of C. perfringens as an etiologic agent of food-borne diseases. Of the 650 analyzed samples, 106 (16.3%) were positive for C. perfringens; 6.4% (16/250) isolates were from barbacoa, 19% (38/200) from head, and 13% (52/200) from gut tacos. The presence of C. perfringens in these popular-consumed foods demonstrates its relevance as an etiologic agent of food-borne diseases, and confirms the great sanitary risk involved in their consumption. These results may serve as a basis for the Mexican sanitary authorities to control the microbiological quality of street-made foods. PMID:20198526

  3. Oral immunization of broiler chickens against necrotic enteritis with an attenuated Salmonella vaccine vector expressing Clostridium perfringens antigens.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, R R; Parreira, V R; Sharif, S; Prescott, J F

    2008-08-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) in broiler chickens is caused by Clostridium perfringens but currently no effective vaccine is available. Our previous study showed that certain C. perfringens secreted proteins when administered intramuscularly protected chickens against experimental infection. In the current study, genes encoding three C. perfringens proteins: fructose-biphosphate-aldolase (FBA), pyruvate:ferredoxin-oxidoreductase (PFOR) and hypothetical protein (HP), were cloned into an avirulent Salmonella enterica sv. typhimurium vaccine vector. Broiler chickens immunized orally with recombinant Salmonella expressing FBA or HP proteins were significantly protected against NE challenge. Immunized birds developed serum and mucosal antibodies to both clostridial and Salmonella antigens. This study showed the oral immunizing ability of two C. perfringens antigens against NE in broiler chickens through an attenuated Salmonella vaccine vector. PMID:18597901

  4. Detection of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens in spices used in Mexico by dot blotting using a DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romo, L A; Heredia, N L; Labbé, R G; García-Alvarado, J S

    1998-02-01

    Several reports on the microbiology of spices and herbs indicate the presence of Clostridium perfringens, a spore-forming foodborne pathogen responsible for gastrointestinal disease. In the present study, a total of 380 samples of spices and herbs (cumin seed, black pepper, oregano, garlic powder, and bay leaves) widely used in Mexico were analyzed for the presence of C. perfringens, and the enterotoxigenicity of the isolates was determined by a dot-blot technique using an enterotoxin degoxigenin-labeled DNA probe. C. perfringens counts varied from <100 to 433 CFU/g in garlic powder, from <100 to 200 CFU/g in black pepper, from <100 to 433 CFU/g in cumin seed, from <100 to 340 CFU/g in oregano, and from < 100 to 450 CFU/g in bay leaves. The dot-blot technique detected the enterotoxin gene in 8 (4.25%) of 188 confirmed isolates of C. perfringens. dot-blot.

  5. Detection of Clostridium perfringens in yearling lamb meat (barbacoa), head, and gut tacos from public markets in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Natividad-Bonifacio, Iván; Vázquez-Quiñones, Carlos R; Rodas-Suárez, Oscar R; Fernández, Francisco J; Rodríguez-Solis, Esteban; Quiñones-Ramírez, Elsa Irma; Vázquez-Salinas, Carlos

    2010-06-01

    No reports on the incidence of Clostridium perfringens in popularly-consumed food from Mexico City have been published; neither are there any reports that have analyzed food consumed in popular markets and less established restaurants. Therefore, this study is aimed at providing data to evaluate the relevance of C. perfringens as an etiologic agent of food-borne diseases. Of the 650 analyzed samples, 106 (16.3%) were positive for C. perfringens; 6.4% (16/250) isolates were from barbacoa, 19% (38/200) from head, and 13% (52/200) from gut tacos. The presence of C. perfringens in these popular-consumed foods demonstrates its relevance as an etiologic agent of food-borne diseases, and confirms the great sanitary risk involved in their consumption. These results may serve as a basis for the Mexican sanitary authorities to control the microbiological quality of street-made foods.

  6. Validation of bacon processing conditions to verify control of Clostridium perfringens and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Peter J; Bartholomew, Gene W

    2005-09-01

    It is unclear how rapidly meat products, such as bacon, that have been heat treated but not fully cooked should be cooled to prevent the outgrowth of spore-forming bacterial pathogens and limit the growth of vegetative cells. Clostridium perfringens spores and vegetative cells and Staphylococcus aureus cells were inoculated into ground cured pork bellies with and without 1.25% liquid smoke. Bellies were subjected to the thermal profiles of industrial smoking to 48.9 degrees C (120 degrees F) and normal cooling of bacon (3 h) as well as a cooling phase of 15 h until the meat reached 7.2 degrees C (45 degrees F). A laboratory-scale bacon smoking and cooling operation was also performed. Under normal smoking and cooling thermal conditions, growth of C. perfringens in ground pork bellies was <1 log regardless of smoke. Increase of S. aureus was 2.38 log CFU/g but only 0.68 log CFU/g with smoke. When cooling spanned 15 h, both C. perfringens and S. aureus grew by a total of about 4 log. The addition of liquid smoke inhibited C. perfringens, but S. aureus still achieved a 3.97-log increase. Staphylococcal enterotoxins were detected in five of six samples cooled for 15 h without smoke but in none of the six samples of smoked bellies. In laboratory-scale smoking of whole belly pieces, initial C. perfringens populations of 2.23 +/- 0.25 log CFU/g were reduced during smoking to 0.99 +/- 0.50 log CFU/g and were 0.65 +/- 0.21 log CFU/g after 15 h of cooling. Populations of S. aureus were reduced from 2.00 +/- 0.74 to a final concentration of 0.74 +/- 0.53 log CFU/g after cooling. Contrary to findings in the ground pork belly system, the 15-h cooling of whole belly pieces did not permit growth of either pathogen. This study demonstrates that if smoked bacon is cooled from 48.9 to 7.2 degrees C (120 to 45 degrees F) within 15 h, a food safety hazard from either C. perfringens or S. aureus is not likely to occur. PMID:16161681

  7. Structural and biochemical analyses of a Clostridium perfringens sortase D transpeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Suryadinata, Randy Seabrook, Shane A.; Adams, Timothy E.; Nuttall, Stewart D.; Peat, Thomas S.

    2015-06-30

    The structure of C. perfringens sortase D was determined at 1.99 Å resolution. Comparative biochemical and structural analyses revealed that this transpeptidase may represent a new subclass of the sortase D family. The assembly and anchorage of various pathogenic proteins on the surface of Gram-positive bacteria is mediated by the sortase family of enzymes. These cysteine transpeptidases catalyze a unique sorting signal motif located at the C-terminus of their target substrate and promote the covalent attachment of these proteins onto an amino nucleophile located on another protein or on the bacterial cell wall. Each of the six distinct classes of sortases displays a unique biological role, with sequential activation of multiple sortases often observed in many Gram-positive bacteria to decorate their peptidoglycans. Less is known about the members of the class D family of sortases (SrtD), but they have a suggested role in spore formation in an oxygen-limiting environment. Here, the crystal structure of the SrtD enzyme from Clostridium perfringens was determined at 1.99 Å resolution. Comparative analysis of the C. perfringens SrtD structure reveals the typical eight-stranded β-barrel fold observed in all other known sortases, along with the conserved catalytic triad consisting of cysteine, histidine and arginine residues. Biochemical approaches further reveal the specifics of the SrtD catalytic activity in vitro, with a significant preference for the LPQTGS sorting motif. Additionally, the catalytic activity of SrtD is most efficient at 316 K and can be further improved in the presence of magnesium cations. Since C. perfringens spores are heat-resistant and lead to foodborne illnesses, characterization of the spore-promoting sortase SrtD may lead to the development of new antimicrobial agents.

  8. Production of a bacteriocin by a poultry derived Campylobacter jejuni isolate with antimicrobial activity against Clostridium perfringens and other Gram positive bacteria.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have purified a bacteriocin peptide (termed CUV-3), produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni (strain CUV-3) with inhibitory activity against Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Listeria mon...

  9. Evaluating the performance of a new model for predicting the growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked, uncured meat and poultry products under isothermal, heating, and dynamically cooling conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens Type A is a significant public health threat and may germinate, outgrow, and multiply during cooling of cooked meats. This study evaluates a new C. perfringens growth model in IPMP Dynamic Prediction using the same criteria and cooling data in Mohr and others (2015), but inc...

  10. Expression of a Clostridium perfringens genome-encoded putative N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase as a potential antimicrobial to control the bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a substantial role in non-foodborne human, animal and avian diseases as well as human foodborne disease. Previously discovered C. perfringens bacteriophage lytic enzyme amino acid sequences were utilized to iden...

  11. Abilities of the mCP Agar method and CRENAME alpha toxin-specific real-time PCR assay to detect Clostridium perfringens spores in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Maheux, Andrée F; Bérubé, Eve; Boudreau, Dominique K; Villéger, Romain; Cantin, Philippe; Boissinot, Maurice; Bissonnette, Luc; Bergeron, Michel G

    2013-12-01

    We first determined the analytical specificity and ubiquity (i.e., the ability to detect all or most strains) of a Clostridium perfringens-specific real-time PCR (rtPCR) assay based on the cpa gene (cpa rtPCR) by using a bacterial strain panel composed of C. perfringens and non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains. All non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains tested negative, whereas all C. perfringens strains tested positive with the cpa rtPCR, for an analytical specificity and ubiquity of 100%. The cpa rtPCR assay was then used to confirm the identity of 116 putative C. perfringens isolates recovered after filtration of water samples and culture on mCP agar. Colonies presenting discordant results between the phenotype on mCP agar and cpa rtPCR were identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA and cpa genes. Four mCP(-)/rtPCR(+) colonies were identified as C. perfringens, whereas 3 mCP(+)/rtPCR(-) colonies were identified as non-C. perfringens. The cpa rtPCR was negative with all 51 non-C. perfringens strains and positive with 64 of 65 C. perfringens strains. Finally, we compared mCP agar and a CRENAME (concentration and recovery of microbial particles, extraction of nucleic acids, and molecular enrichment) procedure plus cpa rtPCR (CRENAME + cpa rtPCR) for their abilities to detect C. perfringens spores in drinking water. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR detected as few as one C. perfringens CFU per 100 ml of drinking water sample in less than 5 h, whereas mCP agar took at least 25 h to deliver results. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR also allows the simultaneous and sensitive detection of Escherichia coli and C. perfringens from the same potable water sample. In itself, it could be used to assess the public health risk posed by drinking water potentially contaminated with pathogens more resistant to disinfection.

  12. Risk assessment for Clostridium perfringens in ready-to-eat and partially cooked meat and poultry products.

    PubMed

    Golden, Neal J; Crouch, Edmund A; Latimer, Heejeong; Kadry, Abdel-Razak; Kause, Janell

    2009-07-01

    An assessment of the risk of illness associated with Clostridium perfringens in ready-to-eat and partially cooked meat and poultry products was completed to estimate the effect on the annual frequency of illnesses of changing the allowed maximal 1-log growth of C. perfringens during stabilization (cooling after the manufacturing heat step). The exposure assessment modeled stabilization, storage, and consumer preparation such as reheating and hot-holding. The model predicted that assuming a 10- or 100-fold increase from the assumed 1-log (maximal allowable) growth of C. perfringens results in a 1.2- or 1.6-fold increase of C. perfringens-caused illnesses, respectively, at the median of the uncertainty distribution. Improper retail and consumer refrigeration accounted for approximately 90% of the 79,000 C. perfringens illnesses predicted by the model at 1-log growth during stabilization. Improper hot-holding accounted for 8% of predicted illnesses, although model limitations imply that this is an underestimate. Stabilization accounted for less than 1% of illnesses. Efforts to reduce illnesses from C. perfringens in ready-to-eat and partially cooked meat and poultry products should focus on retail and consumer storage and preparation methods.

  13. Growth and physiology of Clostridium perfringens wild-type and ΔazoC knockout: an azo dye exposure study.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens, a strictly anaerobic micro-organism and inhabitant of the human intestine, has been shown to produce the azoreductase enzyme AzoC, an NAD(P)H-dependent flavin oxidoreductase. This enzyme reduces azo dyes to aromatic amines, which are carcinogenic in nature. A significant amount of work has been completed that focuses on the activity of this enzyme; however, few studies have been completed that focus on the physiology of azo dye reduction. Dye reduction studies coupled with C. perfringens growth studies in the presence of ten different azo dyes and in media of varying complexities were completed to compare the growth rates and dye-reducing activity of C. perfringens WT cells, a C. perfringens ΔazoC knockout, and Bifidobacterium infantis, a non-azoreductase-producing control bacterium. The presence of azo dyes significantly increased the generation time of C. perfringens in rich medium, an effect that was not seen in minimal medium. In addition, azo dye reduction studies with the ΔazoC knockout suggested the presence of additional functional azoreductases in this medically important bacterium. Overall, this study addresses a major gap in the literature by providing the first look, to our knowledge, at the complex physiology of C. perfringens upon azo dye exposure and the effect that both azo dyes and the azoreductase enzyme have on growth. PMID:26566621

  14. Toxinotyping of Clostridium perfringens fecal isolates of reintroduced Père David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus) in China.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Huiling; Chen, Fu; Leng, Xinyan; Fei, Rongmei; Wang, Libo

    2014-10-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an important pathogen causing sudden death syndrome, necrotic enteritis, and gas gangrene in ruminants, especially some deer species. Père David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus) is one of the world's rare species and is an endangered and protected species in China. Some Père David's deer in the Chinese Shishou Père David's Deer Preserve died due to C. perfringens infection. We investigated the toxin types and C. perfringens enterotoxin-positive (cpe(+)) strains of isolated C. perfringens in Père David's deer in China. We collected 155 fecal samples from the Beijing Nanhaizi Père David's Deer Park and the Jiangsu Dafeng Père David's Deer National Nature Reserve between July 2010 and July 2011. Bacteria isolated using blood agar and mannitol agar plates were identified by Gram staining and nested PCR for 16S rRNA. We isolated C. perfringens from 41 fecal samples and used PCR amplification of five toxin genes to identify the toxinotypes and the cpe(+) strains of C. perfringens. Twenty-one isolates were type A, 15 were type E, and five were type D. Fifteen isolates were cpe(+) strains, including eight that were type A and seven that were type E.

  15. Assessment of Clostridium perfringens spore response to high hydrostatic pressure and heat with nisin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yulong; Qiu, Weifen; Wu, Ding; Fu, Qiang

    2011-08-01

    The elimination of spores from low-acid foods presents food-processing and food-safety challenges to high-pressure processing (HPP) developers as bacterial spores are extremely resistant to pressure. Therefore, the effects of pressure (400-800 MPa), temperature (35-95 °C), and nisin (0-496 IU/mL) on the inactivation of Clostridium perfringens AS 64701 spores at various pressure-holding times (7.5-17.5 min) were explored. A second-order polynomal equation for HPP- and nisin-induced inactivation of C. perfringens spores was constructed with response surface methodology. Experiment results showed that the experimental values were shown to be significantly in agreement with the predicted values because the adjusted determination coefficient (R (Adj)²) was 0.9708 and the level of significance was P < 0.0001. The optimum process parameters (obtained by solving the quadratic polynomal equation) for a six-log cycle reduction of C. perfringens AS 64701 spores were pressure of 654 Mpa, temperature of 74 °C, pressure-holding time of 13.6 min, and nisin concentration of 328 IU/mL. The validation of the model equation for predicting the optimum response values was verified effectively by ten test points that were not used in the establishment of the model. Compared with conventional HPP techniques, the main process advantages of HPP-nisin combination sterilization in the UHT milk are, lower pressure, temperature, natural preservative (nisin), and in a shorter treatment time. The synergistic inactivation of bacteria by HPP-nisin combination is a promising and natural method to increase the efficiency and safety of high-pressure pasteurization.

  16. The NEAT Domain-Containing Proteins of Clostridium perfringens Bind Heme.

    PubMed

    Choo, Jocelyn M; Cheung, Jackie K; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Steer, David L; Bulach, Dieter M; Hiscox, Thomas J; Chakravorty, Anjana; Smith, A Ian; Gell, David A; Rood, Julian I; Awad, Milena M

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a pathogenic bacterium to scavenge iron from its host is important for its growth and survival during an infection. Our studies on C. perfringens gas gangrene strain JIR325, a derivative of strain 13, showed that it is capable of utilizing both human hemoglobin and ferric chloride, but not human holo-transferrin, as an iron source for in vitro growth. Analysis of the C. perfringens strain 13 genome sequence identified a putative heme acquisition system encoded by an iron-regulated surface gene region that we have named the Cht (Clostridium perfringens heme transport) locus. This locus comprises eight genes that are co-transcribed and includes genes that encode NEAT domain-containing proteins (ChtD and ChtE) and a putative sortase (Srt). The ChtD, ChtE and Srt proteins were shown to be expressed in JIR325 cells grown under iron-limited conditions and were localized to the cell envelope. Moreover, the NEAT proteins, ChtD and ChtE, were found to bind heme. Both chtDE and srt mutants were constructed, but these mutants were not defective in hemoglobin or ferric chloride utilization. They were, however, attenuated for virulence when tested in a mouse myonecrosis model, although the virulence phenotype could not be restored via complementation and, as is common with such systems, secondary mutations were identified in these strains. In summary, this study provides evidence for the functional redundancies that occur in the heme transport pathways of this life threatening pathogen. PMID:27637108

  17. The NEAT Domain-Containing Proteins of Clostridium perfringens Bind Heme

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Jocelyn M.; Cheung, Jackie K.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Steer, David L.; Bulach, Dieter M.; Hiscox, Thomas J.; Chakravorty, Anjana; Smith, A. Ian; Gell, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a pathogenic bacterium to scavenge iron from its host is important for its growth and survival during an infection. Our studies on C. perfringens gas gangrene strain JIR325, a derivative of strain 13, showed that it is capable of utilizing both human hemoglobin and ferric chloride, but not human holo-transferrin, as an iron source for in vitro growth. Analysis of the C. perfringens strain 13 genome sequence identified a putative heme acquisition system encoded by an iron-regulated surface gene region that we have named the Cht (Clostridium perfringens heme transport) locus. This locus comprises eight genes that are co-transcribed and includes genes that encode NEAT domain-containing proteins (ChtD and ChtE) and a putative sortase (Srt). The ChtD, ChtE and Srt proteins were shown to be expressed in JIR325 cells grown under iron-limited conditions and were localized to the cell envelope. Moreover, the NEAT proteins, ChtD and ChtE, were found to bind heme. Both chtDE and srt mutants were constructed, but these mutants were not defective in hemoglobin or ferric chloride utilization. They were, however, attenuated for virulence when tested in a mouse myonecrosis model, although the virulence phenotype could not be restored via complementation and, as is common with such systems, secondary mutations were identified in these strains. In summary, this study provides evidence for the functional redundancies that occur in the heme transport pathways of this life threatening pathogen. PMID:27637108

  18. Structural and biochemical analyses of a Clostridium perfringens sortase D transpeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Suryadinata, Randy; Seabrook, Shane A.; Adams, Timothy E.; Nuttall, Stewart D.; Peat, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The assembly and anchorage of various pathogenic proteins on the surface of Gram-positive bacteria is mediated by the sortase family of enzymes. These cysteine transpeptidases catalyze a unique sorting signal motif located at the C-terminus of their target substrate and promote the covalent attachment of these proteins onto an amino nucleophile located on another protein or on the bacterial cell wall. Each of the six distinct classes of sortases displays a unique biological role, with sequential activation of multiple sortases often observed in many Gram-positive bacteria to decorate their peptidoglycans. Less is known about the members of the class D family of sortases (SrtD), but they have a suggested role in spore formation in an oxygen-limiting environment. Here, the crystal structure of the SrtD enzyme from Clostridium perfringens was determined at 1.99 Å resolution. Comparative analysis of the C. perfringens SrtD structure reveals the typical eight-stranded β-barrel fold observed in all other known sortases, along with the conserved catalytic triad consisting of cysteine, histidine and arginine residues. Biochemical approaches further reveal the specifics of the SrtD catalytic activity in vitro, with a significant preference for the LPQTGS sorting motif. Additionally, the catalytic activity of SrtD is most efficient at 316 K and can be further improved in the presence of magnesium cations. Since C. perfringens spores are heat-resistant and lead to foodborne illnesses, characterization of the spore-promoting sortase SrtD may lead to the development of new antimicrobial agents. PMID:26143922

  19. Effect of tannins on the in vitro growth of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Elizondo, Ana M; Mercado, Elsa C; Rabinovitz, Bettina C; Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2010-10-26

    Vegetable tannins are water-soluble polyphenolic compounds of varying molecular weights that occur abundantly in nature. The diet of many free-ranging wild animals contains significant amounts of tannins. Also, commercial tannins are used in animal industry as food additives to improve animal performance. In order to further determine the capacity of tannins to inhibit the development of intestinal diseases produced by Clostridium pefringens, we evaluated here the effect of tannins from quebracho, chestnut or combinations of both on C. perfringens and their toxins. The C. perfringens (types A, B, C, D and E) growth obtained from the intestine of healthy and diseased animals was reduced in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of quebracho tannins, chestnut tannins, combinations of both or a commercial formula based in these tannins. Although the minimal inhibitory concentration of both tannins varied between isolates, no statistically significant differences were observed between isolates from healthy or sick animals. Comparative analysis showed that the concentrations of quebracho tannin inhibiting the growth of C. perfringens were higher than chestnut tannin. In fact, antibacterial effect of quebracho tannin was increased up to 20 times with the addition of 25% of chestnut tannin and 85 times with 75% of chestnut tannin. Antibacterial activity of the commercial product was up to ~50 times higher than quebracho tannin alone. Quebracho tannin showed partial bactericidal activity, whereas chestnut tannin activity was stronger. Both tannins were able to reduce the alpha toxin lecithinase activity and epsilon toxin cytotoxicity in MDCK cells. These results suggest that tannin-supplemented diet could be useful to prevent some clostridial diseases.

  20. The NEAT Domain-Containing Proteins of Clostridium perfringens Bind Heme.

    PubMed

    Choo, Jocelyn M; Cheung, Jackie K; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Steer, David L; Bulach, Dieter M; Hiscox, Thomas J; Chakravorty, Anjana; Smith, A Ian; Gell, David A; Rood, Julian I; Awad, Milena M

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a pathogenic bacterium to scavenge iron from its host is important for its growth and survival during an infection. Our studies on C. perfringens gas gangrene strain JIR325, a derivative of strain 13, showed that it is capable of utilizing both human hemoglobin and ferric chloride, but not human holo-transferrin, as an iron source for in vitro growth. Analysis of the C. perfringens strain 13 genome sequence identified a putative heme acquisition system encoded by an iron-regulated surface gene region that we have named the Cht (Clostridium perfringens heme transport) locus. This locus comprises eight genes that are co-transcribed and includes genes that encode NEAT domain-containing proteins (ChtD and ChtE) and a putative sortase (Srt). The ChtD, ChtE and Srt proteins were shown to be expressed in JIR325 cells grown under iron-limited conditions and were localized to the cell envelope. Moreover, the NEAT proteins, ChtD and ChtE, were found to bind heme. Both chtDE and srt mutants were constructed, but these mutants were not defective in hemoglobin or ferric chloride utilization. They were, however, attenuated for virulence when tested in a mouse myonecrosis model, although the virulence phenotype could not be restored via complementation and, as is common with such systems, secondary mutations were identified in these strains. In summary, this study provides evidence for the functional redundancies that occur in the heme transport pathways of this life threatening pathogen.

  1. Brain lesions associated with clostridium perfringens type D epsilon toxin in a Holstein heifer calf.

    PubMed

    Mete, A; Garcia, J; Ortega, J; Lane, M; Scholes, S; Uzal, F A

    2013-09-01

    A 6-month-old dairy heifer calf with no premonitory signs was acutely down after the morning feeding and could not rise. On presentation, the heifer was in right lateral recumbency and moribund with opisthotonus and left hind limb paddling. Following euthanasia, gross examination of the brain revealed multifocal loss of gray-white matter distinction and extensive petechiae throughout the brainstem. On histopathological examination, there was striking white matter edema and marked perivascular proteinaceous edema surrounding many arterioles and venules (microangiopathy), mainly in the white matter of the internal capsule, thalamus, midbrain, cerebellum, and cerebellar peduncles. The perivascular neuropil was strongly positive for Alzheimer precursor protein A4. Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin was detected in the intestinal contents. This is the first report of microangiopathy in postneonatal cattle associated with the detection of epsilon toxin in the intestinal contents.

  2. Molecular typing and antimicrobial susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens from broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Gharaibeh, Saad; Al Rifai, Rami; Al-Majali, Ahmad

    2010-12-01

    Clostridium perfringens (Cp) causes necrotic enteritis disease in commercial poultry. Antimicrobials are used to control and treat this disease and sometimes clinical outbreaks do not respond well to certain treatments. This study was designed to isolate Cp from clinical cases, type these isolates by multiplex PCR, and determine their antimicrobial susceptibility by micro-dilution method. A total of 67 Cp isolates were obtained from 155 broiler chicken flocks. All isolates were classified as type A and non-enterotoxin producers. Lincomycin, erythromycins, and tilmicosin showed very high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) 50 of ≥256 μg/ml. However, tylosin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, penicillin, florfenicol, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, chlortetracycline, doxycycline, and oxytetracycline had variable MIC₅₀ of 64, 0.5, 1, 1, 8, 4, 8, 4, 8, 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. It is recommended that Cp infections in Jordan be treated with either penicillins or tetracyclines especially amoxicillin and oxytetracycline. PMID:20969969

  3. Carriage of Clostridium perfringens by benthic crabs in a sewage-polluted estuary.

    PubMed

    La Sala, Luciano F; Redondo, Leandro M; Díaz Carrasco, Juan M; Pereyra, Ana María; Farber, Marisa; Jost, Helen; Fernández-Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2015-08-15

    The Estuary of Bahía Blanca (EBB), Argentina, is an important wetland under intense sewage pollution. We investigated the occurrence of Clostridium perfringens (CP) in populations of two benthic crabs (Neohelice granulata and Cyrtograpsus angulatus) and in sediment from the EBB. CP was found in 49.1% of the crabs and all of the isolates were identified as type A. The alpha (cpa) and enterotoxin (cpe) encoding genes were identified. Genetic analyses identified 13 novel sequence types, and found no clustering among isolates, suggesting that CP is not part of the crabs' commensal flora. CP carriage was 51 times more likely in crabs from the area nearest sewage outfalls compared with crabs from a reference site. Our in vitro experiments suggest that the carriage of CP in crabs is transient. The use of these benthic crabs as monitoring organisms of sewage pollution in coastal habitats is proposed.

  4. Effect of Intramuscular or Intrahepatic Injections of Clostridium perfringens on Rabbit Serum Lactate Dehydrogenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Dwayne

    1970-01-01

    Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, LDH isoenzyme pattern, phospholipase C activity, phosphorous level, hemoglobin, and erythrocyte osmotic fragility were followed in rabbits after intramuscular (IM) or intrahepatic (IH) injections of Clostridium perfringens. On the first day after IM injection, there was a drop in LDH activity; this was followed by an increase of LDH activity on the third and sixth day. On the seventh day, LDH activity began to decline, and by the ninth day it had almost returned to normal. On the sixth day after IM injection, there was an increase in serum LDH isoenzyme 5, hemoglobin, and erythrocyte osmotic fragility, but the increase of erythrocyte osmotic fragility and serum hemoglobin could not be attributed to phospholipase C activity since that enzyme was not detected nor was there an increase in serum phosphorus. C. perfringens was recovered by culturing the wound of IM-injected rabbits but not recovered from IH-injected rabbits. Rabbits injected IH showed no change from normal values in any of the tests performed. PMID:16557808

  5. Antimicrobial activities of six essential oils commonly used as condiments in Brazil against Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, Marcela; da Silva, Bárbara Parraga; Weidlich, Luciana; Hoehne, Lucélia; Flach, Adriana; da Costa, Luiz Antonio Mendonça Alves; Ethur, Eduardo Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in food production technology, food-borne diseases (FBD) remain a challenging public health concern. In several countries, including Brazil, Clostridium perfringens is among the five main causative agents of food-borne diseases. The present study determines antimicrobial activities of essential oils of six condiments commonly used in Brazil, viz., Ocimum basilicum L. (basil), Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary), Origanum majorana L. (marjoram), Mentha × piperita L. var. Piperita (peppermint), Thymus vulgaris L. (thyme) and Pimpinella anisum L. (anise) against C. perfringens strain A. Chemical compositions of the oils were determined by GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). The identities of the isolated compounds were established from the respective Kováts indices, and a comparison of mass spectral data was made with those reported earlier. The antibacterial activity was assessed from minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) using the microdilution method. Minimum inhibitory concentration values were 1.25mgmL(-1) for thyme, 5.0mgmL(-1) for basil and marjoram, and 10mgmL(-1) for rosemary, peppermint and anise. All oils showed bactericidal activity at their minimum inhibitory concentration, except anise oil, which was only bacteriostatic. The use of essential oils from these common spices might serve as an alternative to the use of chemical preservatives in the control and inactivation of pathogens in commercially produced food systems. PMID:26991289

  6. Antimicrobial activities of six essential oils commonly used as condiments in Brazil against Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, Marcela; da Silva, Bárbara Parraga; Weidlich, Luciana; Hoehne, Lucélia; Flach, Adriana; da Costa, Luiz Antonio Mendonça Alves; Ethur, Eduardo Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in food production technology, food-borne diseases (FBD) remain a challenging public health concern. In several countries, including Brazil, Clostridium perfringens is among the five main causative agents of food-borne diseases. The present study determines antimicrobial activities of essential oils of six condiments commonly used in Brazil, viz., Ocimum basilicum L. (basil), Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary), Origanum majorana L. (marjoram), Mentha × piperita L. var. Piperita (peppermint), Thymus vulgaris L. (thyme) and Pimpinella anisum L. (anise) against C. perfringens strain A. Chemical compositions of the oils were determined by GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). The identities of the isolated compounds were established from the respective Kováts indices, and a comparison of mass spectral data was made with those reported earlier. The antibacterial activity was assessed from minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) using the microdilution method. Minimum inhibitory concentration values were 1.25mgmL(-1) for thyme, 5.0mgmL(-1) for basil and marjoram, and 10mgmL(-1) for rosemary, peppermint and anise. All oils showed bactericidal activity at their minimum inhibitory concentration, except anise oil, which was only bacteriostatic. The use of essential oils from these common spices might serve as an alternative to the use of chemical preservatives in the control and inactivation of pathogens in commercially produced food systems.

  7. Development of a minimal medium for Clostridium perfringens by using an anaerobic chemostat.

    PubMed Central

    Goldner, S B; Solberg, M; Post, L S

    1985-01-01

    A minimal medium was developed for the cultivation of Clostridium perfringens in an anaerobic chemostat. Cultures of C. perfringens ATCC 3624 and NCTC 10240 were grown at 46 and 43 degrees C, respectively, in a glucose-limited, chemically defined medium at pH 7.2. The concentrations of amino acids, minerals, nucleotides, and vitamins, initially present in excess, were varied independently. The minimum concentration of each nutrient which would support 3 X 10(8) CFU/ml with a generation time of less than 40 min was determined and used to develop a reformulated defined medium. Atomic absorption spectroscopy and amino acid analyses of the reformulated medium indicated additional adjustments in nutrient content which led to the development of a minimal medium for each strain. The nutritional profile for each strain was similar. A decrease in the concentration of arginine, histidine, and tyrosine for strain 3624 and of arginine, histidine, and isoleucine for strain 10240 resulted in an increase in the optical density of each culture. PMID:2864896

  8. Alpha toxin from Clostridium perfringens induces proinflammatory changes in endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bunting, M; Lorant, D E; Bryant, A E; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Stevens, D L; Prescott, S M

    1997-01-01

    Alpha toxin from Clostridium perfringens type A, a phospholipase C, has been implicated in many of the localized and systemic features of gas gangrene. We demonstrated that human endothelial cells synthesize two vasoactive lipids, platelet-activating factor (PAF) and prostacyclin, in response to alpha toxin treatment. The stimulated synthesis of PAF required the enzymatic activity of the toxin and subsequent protein kinase C activation. Alpha toxin-treated endothelial cells accumulated the products of the phospholipase C reaction, diacylglycerol and ceramide, and exhibited a decrease in the enzymatic precursors phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. Furthermore, the temporal accumulation of PAF depended on the concentration of the toxin in the overlying medium and was blocked in the presence of a neutralizing antibody. The cultured endothelial cells also exhibited enhanced neutrophil adhesion in response to alpha toxin which was mediated through the PAF receptor and P-selectin. P-selectin expression by endothelial cells and extravascular neutrophil accumulation were also observed in tissue sections from alpha toxin-injected Sprague-Dawley rats. These endothelial cell-mediated processes are important in maintaining vascular homeostasis and, when activated in a dysregulated manner by C. perfringens alpha toxin, may contribute to localized and systemic manifestations of gas gangrene including enhanced vascular permeability, localized neutrophil accumulation, and myocardial dysfunction. PMID:9239403

  9. Potency against enterotoxemia of a recombinant Clostridium perfringens type D epsilon toxoid in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Lobato, Francisco C F; Lima, Catarina G R D; Assis, Ronnie A; Pires, Prhiscylla S; Silva, Rodrigo O S; Salvarani, Felipe M; Carmo, Anderson O; Contigli, Christiane; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes

    2010-08-31

    Enterotoxemia, a disease that affects domestic ruminants, is caused mainly by the epsilon toxin from Clostridium perfringens type D. Its eradication is virtually impossible, control and prophylaxis are based on systematic vaccination of herds with epsilon toxoids that are efficient in inducing protective antibody production. The use of recombinant toxins is one of the most promising of these strategies. This work evaluates the potency of a Cl. perfringens type D epsilon toxoid expressed by Escherichia coli administered to goats, sheep, and cattle. The etx gene was cloned into the pET-11a plasmid of E. coli strain BL21 to produce the recombinant toxin. Rabbits (n=8), goats, sheep, and cattle (n=5 for each species) were immunized with 0.2mg of the insoluble recombinant protein fraction to evaluate vaccine potency of the epsilon toxoid studied. Antibody titers were 40, 14.3, 26, and 13.1 IU/mL in the rabbit, goat, sheep, and cattle serum pools, respectively. The epsilon toxoid produced and tested in this work is adequate for immunization of ruminants against enterotoxemia. PMID:20670910

  10. Assessing the Performance of Clostridium perfringens Cooling Models for Cooked, Uncured Meat and Poultry Products.

    PubMed

    Mohr, T B; Juneja, V K; Thippareddi, H H; Schaffner, D W; Bronstein, P A; Silverman, M; Cook, L V

    2015-08-01

    Heat-resistant spores of Clostridium perfringens may germinate and multiply in cooked meat and poultry products when the rate and extent of cooling does not occur in a timely manner. Therefore, six cooling models (PMP 7.0 broth model; PMIP uncured beef, chicken, and pork models; Smith-Schaffner version 3; and UK IFR ComBase Perfringens Predictor) were evaluated for relative performance in predicting growth of C. perfringens under dynamic temperature conditions encountered during cooling of cooked, uncured meat and poultry products. The predicted growth responses from the models were extensively compared with those observed in food. Data from 188 time-temperature cooling profiles (176 for single-rate exponential cooling and 12 for dual-rate exponential cooling) were collected from 17 independent sources (16 peer-reviewed publications and one report) for model evaluation. Data were obtained for a variety of cooked products, including meat and poultry slurries, ground meat and poultry products with and without added ingredients (e.g., potato starch, sodium triphosphate, and potassium tetrapyrophosphate), and processed products such as ham and roast beef. Performance of the models was evaluated using three sets of criteria, and accuracy was defined within a 1- to 2-log range. The percentages of accurate, fail-safe, or fail-dangerous predictions for each cooling model differed depending on which criterion was used to evaluate the data set. Nevertheless, the combined percentages of accurate and fail-safe predictions based on the three performance criteria were 34.66 to 42.61% for the PMP 7.0 beef broth model, 100% for the PMIP cooling models for uncured beef, uncured pork and uncured chicken, 80.11 to 93.18% for the Smith-Schaffner cooling model, and 74.43 to 85.23% for the UK IFR ComBase Perfringens Predictor model during single-rate exponential chilling. Except for the PMP 7.0 broth model, the other five cooling models (PMIP, Smith-Schaffner, and UK IFR ComBase) are

  11. Clinico-pathological findings of Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxaemia in goats and its hemolytic activity in different erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ali Nasir, A.; Younus, M.; Rashid, A.; Abdul Khaliq, S.; Khan, E.; Shah, S. H.; Aslam, A.; Ghumman, M. A.; Joiya, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted to study the effects of experimental Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxaemia in teddy goats. Clinical signs started to appear after 30 min of experimental infection like anorexia, diarrhea, dehydration, frothing and dyspnea. Gross lesions consisted of severe congestion in tissues of varying intensity with enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes while histological examination revealed edema of lungs, kidney, and lymph nodes and to some extent in brain along with hemorrhages in lungs and intestines. Clostridium perfringens type D carrying alpha and epsilon toxin genes were amplified with amplicon size about 247 bp and 665 bp, respectively. Human erythrocytes showed the highest hemolysis, 68%, followed by mice, 57%, against culture supernatants. The percentage of hemolysis was significantly higher at 37°C as compared to 25°C except for rabbit and dog. PMID:27175159

  12. The Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Predisposes for the Development of Clostridium perfringens-Induced Necrotic Enteritis in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Antonissen, Gunther; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Timbermont, Leen; Verlinden, Marc; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (P<0.001). DON significantly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance in duodenal segments (P<0.001) and decreased duodenal villus height (P = 0.014) indicating intestinal barrier disruption and intestinal epithelial damage, respectively. This may lead to an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and decreased absorption of dietary proteins. Protein analysis of duodenal content indeed showed that DON contamination resulted in a significant increase in total protein concentration (P = 0.023). Furthermore, DON had no effect on in vitro growth, alpha toxin production and netB toxin transcription of Clostridium perfringens. In conclusion, feed contamination with DON at concentrations below the European maximum guidance level of 5,000 µg/kg feed, is a predisposing factor for the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens. PMID:25268498

  13. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol predisposes for the development of Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Antonissen, Gunther; Van Immerseel, Filip; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Timbermont, Leen; Verlinden, Marc; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (P<0.001). DON significantly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance in duodenal segments (P<0.001) and decreased duodenal villus height (P = 0.014) indicating intestinal barrier disruption and intestinal epithelial damage, respectively. This may lead to an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and decreased absorption of dietary proteins. Protein analysis of duodenal content indeed showed that DON contamination resulted in a significant increase in total protein concentration (P = 0.023). Furthermore, DON had no effect on in vitro growth, alpha toxin production and netB toxin transcription of Clostridium perfringens. In conclusion, feed contamination with DON at concentrations below the European maximum guidance level of 5,000 µg/kg feed, is a predisposing factor for the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens.

  14. Putative function of hypothetical proteins expressed by Clostridium perfringens type A strains and their protective efficacy in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Dwivedi, Pratistha

    2016-10-01

    The whole genome sequencing and annotation of Clostridium perfringens strains revealed several genes coding for proteins of unknown function with no significant similarities to genes in other organisms. Our previous studies clearly demonstrated that hypothetical proteins CPF_2500, CPF_1441, CPF_0876, CPF_0093, CPF_2002, CPF_2314, CPF_1179, CPF_1132, CPF_2853, CPF_0552, CPF_2032, CPF_0438, CPF_1440, CPF_2918, CPF_0656, and CPF_2364 are genuine proteins of C. perfringens expressed in high abundance. This study explored the putative role of these hypothetical proteins using bioinformatic tools and evaluated their potential as putative candidates for prophylaxis. Apart from a group of eight hypothetical proteins (HPs), a putative function was predicted for the rest of the hypothetical proteins using one or more of the algorithms used. The phylogenetic analysis did not suggest an evidence of a horizontal gene transfer event except for HP CPF_0876. HP CPF_2918 is an abundant extracellular protein, unique to C. perfringens species with maximum strain coverage and did not show any significant match in the database. CPF_2918 was cloned, recombinant protein was purified to near homogeneity, and probing with mouse anti-CPF_2918 serum revealed surface localization of the protein in C. perfringens ATCC13124 cultures. The purified recombinant CPF_2918 protein induced antibody production, a mixed Th1 and Th2 kind of response, and provided partial protection to immunized mice in direct C. perfringens challenge.

  15. A medium for the isolation, enumeration and rapid presumptive identification of injured Clostridium perfringens and Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Hood, A M; Tuck, A; Dane, C R

    1990-09-01

    A blood-free egg yolk medium (BCP) containing pyruvate, inositol, mannitol and a bromocresol purple indicator in a nutrient agar base has been developed to initiate the growth of Clostridium perfringens. It is comparable to blood agar for the growth of normal, chilled stored vegetative cells and heat-injured spores of Cl. perfringens and Bacillus cereus. It has the advantage over blood agar in exhibiting presumptive evidence of Cl. perfringens (production of lecithinase and inositol fermentation) after an overnight incubation at 43 degrees - 45 degrees C. Pyruvate, catalase and other hydrogen peroxide degraders were found to remove toxins rapidly formed in media exposed to air and light. Free radical scavengers of superoxide, hydroxyl ions and singlet oxygen were ineffective. Without scavengers the formation of 10-20 micrograms/ml hydrogen peroxide in the exposed medium was indicated and found lethal to injured Cl. perfringens. The BCP medium has been used successfully for the rapid identification and enumeration of Cl. perfringens in foods and faeces from food poisoning outbreaks and cases of suspected infectious diarrhoea. Greater recovery of severely injured vegetative Cl. perfrigens could be obtained by pre-incubation at 37 degrees C of inoculated media for 2-4 h followed by overnight incubation at 43 degrees - 45 degrees C. Tryptose-sulphite-cycloserine and Shahidi-Ferguson-perfringens agar base were found to inhibit the growth of several strains of injured vegetative Cl. perfringens. This was not completely overcome by the addition of pyruvate. The inclusion of mannitol also allows the medium to be used for the presumptive identification of B. cereus. Growth and lecithinase activity are profuse on BCP. Heat-injured spores are recovered equally well on BCP and blood agar. A scheme for the identification of some other clostridia on BCP is presented.

  16. Implications of Decreased Nitrite Concentrations on Clostridium perfringens Outgrowth during Cooling of Ready-to-Eat Meats.

    PubMed

    Myers, Megan I; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S; Shaw, Angela M; Tarté, Rodrigo; Adams, Kristin R; Neibuhr, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Increased popularity of natural and organic processed meats can be attributed to the growing consumer demand for preservative-free foods, including processed meats. To meet this consumer demand, meat processors have begun using celery juice concentrate in place of sodium nitrite to create products labeled as no-nitrate or no-nitrite-added meat products while maintaining the characteristics unique to conventionally cured processed meats. Because of flavor limitations, natural cures with celery concentrate typically provide lower ingoing nitrite concentrations for ready-to-eat processed meats than do conventional cures, which could allow for increased growth of pathogens, such as Clostridium perfringens, during cooked product cooling such as that required by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The objective of this study was to investigate the implications associated with reduced nitrite concentrations for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth during a typical cooling cycle used for cooked products. Nitrite treatments of 0, 50, and 100 ppm were tested in a broth system inoculated with a three-strain C. perfringens cocktail and heated with a simulated product thermal process followed by a typical cooling-stabilization process. The nitrite concentration of 50 ppm was more effective for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth than was 0 ppm but was not as effective as 100 ppm. The interaction between nitrite and temperature significantly affected (P < 0.05) C. perfringens outgrowth in both total population and number of vegetative cells. Both temperature and nitrite concentration significantly affected (P < 0.05) C. perfringens spore survival, but the interaction between nitrite and temperature did not have a significant effect (P > 0.05) on spore outgrowth. Results indicate that decreased nitrite concentrations (50 ppm) have increased potential for total C. perfringens population outgrowth during cooling and may require additional protective measures, such as faster chilling

  17. Delayed Clostridium perfringens growth from a spore inocula by sodium lactate in sous-vide chicken products.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Vijay K

    2006-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens growth from a spore inoculum was investigated in vacuum-packaged, cook-in-bag marinated chicken breast that included 0%, 1.5%, 3%, or 4.8% sodium lactate (NaL; w/w). The packages were processed to an internal temperature of 71.1 degrees C, ice chilled and stored at 4, 19, and 25 degrees C. The total C. perfringens population was determined by plating diluted samples on Tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar followed by anaerobic incubation for 48 h at 37 degrees C. At 25 degrees C, addition of 1.5% NaL was effective in delaying growth for 29 h. Increasing the NaL level to 4.8%, C. perfringens growth from a spore inoculum during storage at 25 degrees C for 480 h was not observed. At 19 degrees C, the growth was > 6 log 10 cfu/g by 288 h in control samples. In samples with 3.0% or 4.8% NaL, the growth of C. perfringens from spores was dramatically restricted with little or no growth in 648 h at 19 degrees C. C. perfringens growth was not observed at 4 degrees C regardless of NaL concentration. The D-values at 55 degrees C ranged from 47.40 (no NaL) to 57.58 min (1.5% NaL). Cyclic and static temperature abuse of refrigerated products for 20 h did not permit C. perfringens growth. However, temperature abuse of products for periods 24 h or longer in the absence of NaL led to growth of C. perfringens from a spore inoculum. An extra degree of safety may be assured in such products by supplementation with NaL at 1.5-4.8% NaL level. PMID:16942993

  18. Differential Responses of Cecal Microbiota to Fishmeal, Eimeria and Clostridium perfringens in a Necrotic Enteritis Challenge Model in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Nicholas; Swick, Robert A.; Moore, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes enteric diseases in animals and humans. In poultry, avian-specific C. perfringens strains cause necrotic enteritis, an economically significant poultry disease that costs the global industry over $2 billion annually in losses and control measures. With removal of antibiotic growth promoters in some countries this disease appears to be on the rise. In experimental conditions used to study disease pathogenesis and potential control measures, reproduction of the disease relies on the use of predisposing factors such as Eimeria infection and the use of high protein diets, indicating complex mechanisms involved in the onset of necrotic enteritis. The mechanisms by which the predisposing factors contribute to disease progression are not well understood but it has been suggested that they may cause perturbations in the microbiota within the gastrointestinal tract. We inspected changes in cecal microbiota and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) induced by Eimeria and fishmeal, in birds challenged or not challenged with C. perfringens. C. perfringens challenge in the absence of predisposing factors did not cause significant changes in either the alpha or beta diversity of the microbiota nor in concentrations of SCFA. Moreover, there was no C. perfringens detected in the cecal microbiota 2 days post-challenge without the presence of predisposing factors. In contrast, both fishmeal and Eimeria caused significant changes in microbiota, seen in both alpha and beta diversity and also enabled C. perfringens to establish itself post challenge. Eimeria had its strongest influence on intestinal microbiota and SCFA when combined with fishmeal. Out of 6 SCFAs measured, including butyric acid, none were significantly influenced by C. perfringens, but their levels were strongly modified following the use of both predisposing factors. There was little overlap in the changes caused following Eimeria and fishmeal treatments, possibly indicating multiple routes for

  19. Differential responses of cecal microbiota to fishmeal, Eimeria and Clostridium perfringens in a necrotic enteritis challenge model in chickens.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Dragana; Wu, Shu-Biao; Rodgers, Nicholas; Swick, Robert A; Moore, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens causes enteric diseases in animals and humans. In poultry, avian-specific C. perfringens strains cause necrotic enteritis, an economically significant poultry disease that costs the global industry over $2 billion annually in losses and control measures. With removal of antibiotic growth promoters in some countries this disease appears to be on the rise. In experimental conditions used to study disease pathogenesis and potential control measures, reproduction of the disease relies on the use of predisposing factors such as Eimeria infection and the use of high protein diets, indicating complex mechanisms involved in the onset of necrotic enteritis. The mechanisms by which the predisposing factors contribute to disease progression are not well understood but it has been suggested that they may cause perturbations in the microbiota within the gastrointestinal tract. We inspected changes in cecal microbiota and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) induced by Eimeria and fishmeal, in birds challenged or not challenged with C. perfringens. C. perfringens challenge in the absence of predisposing factors did not cause significant changes in either the alpha or beta diversity of the microbiota nor in concentrations of SCFA. Moreover, there was no C. perfringens detected in the cecal microbiota 2 days post-challenge without the presence of predisposing factors. In contrast, both fishmeal and Eimeria caused significant changes in microbiota, seen in both alpha and beta diversity and also enabled C. perfringens to establish itself post challenge. Eimeria had its strongest influence on intestinal microbiota and SCFA when combined with fishmeal. Out of 6 SCFAs measured, including butyric acid, none were significantly influenced by C. perfringens, but their levels were strongly modified following the use of both predisposing factors. There was little overlap in the changes caused following Eimeria and fishmeal treatments, possibly indicating multiple routes for

  20. Implications of Decreased Nitrite Concentrations on Clostridium perfringens Outgrowth during Cooling of Ready-to-Eat Meats.

    PubMed

    Myers, Megan I; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S; Shaw, Angela M; Tarté, Rodrigo; Adams, Kristin R; Neibuhr, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Increased popularity of natural and organic processed meats can be attributed to the growing consumer demand for preservative-free foods, including processed meats. To meet this consumer demand, meat processors have begun using celery juice concentrate in place of sodium nitrite to create products labeled as no-nitrate or no-nitrite-added meat products while maintaining the characteristics unique to conventionally cured processed meats. Because of flavor limitations, natural cures with celery concentrate typically provide lower ingoing nitrite concentrations for ready-to-eat processed meats than do conventional cures, which could allow for increased growth of pathogens, such as Clostridium perfringens, during cooked product cooling such as that required by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The objective of this study was to investigate the implications associated with reduced nitrite concentrations for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth during a typical cooling cycle used for cooked products. Nitrite treatments of 0, 50, and 100 ppm were tested in a broth system inoculated with a three-strain C. perfringens cocktail and heated with a simulated product thermal process followed by a typical cooling-stabilization process. The nitrite concentration of 50 ppm was more effective for preventing C. perfringens outgrowth than was 0 ppm but was not as effective as 100 ppm. The interaction between nitrite and temperature significantly affected (P < 0.05) C. perfringens outgrowth in both total population and number of vegetative cells. Both temperature and nitrite concentration significantly affected (P < 0.05) C. perfringens spore survival, but the interaction between nitrite and temperature did not have a significant effect (P > 0.05) on spore outgrowth. Results indicate that decreased nitrite concentrations (50 ppm) have increased potential for total C. perfringens population outgrowth during cooling and may require additional protective measures, such as faster chilling

  1. Clostridium Perfringens Epsilon Toxin Binds to Membrane Lipids and Its Cytotoxic Action Depends on Sulfatide.

    PubMed

    Gil, Carles; Dorca-Arévalo, Jonatan; Blasi, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon toxin (Etx) is one of the major lethal toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, being the causal agent of fatal enterotoxemia in animals, mainly sheep and goats. Etx is synthesized as a non-active prototoxin form (proEtx) that becomes active upon proteolytic activation. Etx exhibits a cytotoxic effect through the formation of a pore in the plasma membrane of selected cell targets where Etx specifically binds due to the presence of specific receptors. However, the identity and nature of host receptors of Etx remain a matter of controversy. In the present study, the interactions between Etx and membrane lipids from the synaptosome-enriched fraction from rat brain (P2 fraction) and MDCK cell plasma membrane preparations were analyzed. Our findings show that both Etx and proEtx bind to lipids extracted from lipid rafts from the two different models as assessed by protein-lipid overlay assay. Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Binding of proEtx to sulfatide, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol (3)-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol (5)-phosphate was detected. Removal of the sulphate groups via sulfatase treatment led to a dramatic decrease in Etx-induced cytotoxicity, but not in proEtx-GFP binding to MDCK cells or a significant shift in oligomer formation, pointing to a role of sulfatide in pore formation in rafts but not in toxin binding to the target cell membrane. These results show for the first time the interaction between Etx and membrane lipids from host tissue and point to a major role for sulfatides in C. perfringens epsilon toxin pathophysiology.

  2. The successful experimental induction of necrotic enteritis in chickens by Clostridium perfringens: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is one of the most important enteric diseases in poultry and is a high cost to the industry worldwide. It is caused by avian-specific, Necrotic Enteritis Beta toxin (NetB)-producing, strains of Clostridium perfringens that also possess in common other virulence-associated genes. In Europe the disease incidence has increased since the ban on in-feed “growth promoting” antibiotics. Because of this, many recent studies of NE have focused on finding different ways to control the disease, and on understanding its pathogenesis. Frustratingly, reproduction of the disease has proven impossible for some researchers. This review describes and discusses factors known to be important in reproducing the disease experimentally, as well as other considerations in reproducing the disease. The critical bacterial factor is the use of virulent, netB-positive, strains; virulence can be enhanced by using tpeL- positive strains and by the use of young rather than old broth cultures to increase toxin expression. Intestinal damaging factors, notably the use of concurrent or preceding coccidial infection, or administration of coccidial vaccines, combined with netB-positive C. perfringens administration, can also be used to induce NE. Nutritional factors, particularly feeding high percentage of cereals containing non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) (wheat, rye, and barley) enhance disease by increasing digesta viscosity, mucus production and bacterial growth. Animal proteins, especially fish meal, enhance C. perfringens proliferation and toxin production. Other factors are discussed that may affect outcome but for which evidence of their importance is lacking. The review compares the different challenge approaches; depending on the aim of particular studies, the different critical factors can be adjusted to affect the severity of the lesions induced. A standardized scoring system is proposed for international adoption based on gross rather than histopathological

  3. Clostridium perfringens growth from spore inocula in sous-vide processed pork-based Mexican entrée.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Garcia, Denise Y; Juneja, Vijay K; Valenzuela-Melendrez, Martin; Díaz-Cinco, Martha E; Thippareddi, H; Aida Peña-Ramos, E

    2009-01-01

    The combined effect of Citricidal wih irradiation on Clostridium perfringens growth from spores in a sous-vide processed marinated pork meat Mexican entrée was investigated. Citricidal was added at 200 or 800 ppm after mixing pork meat with tomatillo sauce and inoculated with 3 log(10) CFU/g of C. perfringens spores. Samples were irradiated at either 0 or 2 kGy, heated to an internal temperature of 71 degrees C, and stored at 4 degrees C for 28 d, 15 degrees C for 45 d, and 25 degrees C for 26 h. To simulate the conditions that may occur during transportation, distribution, storage, or handling in supermarkets or by consumers, the effect of static temperature abuse on C. perfringens growth was assessed by transferring samples stored at 4 to 25 degrees C for 13 and 15 h. Total C. perfringens populations were determined by plating diluted samples on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar. Growth was not observed up to 45 d of storage at 15 degrees C in samples supplemented with 800 ppm of Citricidal. At 25 degrees C, no significant differences (P > 0.05) on the lag phase duration due to antimicrobial treatments was observed. The temperature abuse of refrigerated products for up to 15 h did not lead to C. perfringens growth to high infective dose levels of 1 million cells required to cause food poisoning. The results suggest that 800 ppm Citricidal can have significant bacteriostatic activity against C. perfringens and may provide a degree of protection against this pathogen in sous-vide processed marinated pork meat Mexican entrée, under mild temperature abuse (

  4. Effect of phosphate and meat (pork) types on the germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores during abusive chilling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aikansh; Korasapati, Nageswara Rao; Juneja, Vijay K; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan

    2010-05-01

    The effect of phosphate blends and pork meat type (pale, soft, and exudative [PSE]; normal; and dark, firm, and dry [DFD]) on the germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens during abusive exponential chilling times was evaluated. Two phosphates were used: tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSPP) and sodium acid pyrophosphate (SAPP; from two different sources, SAPP(1) and SAPP(2)). The pork loins representing each meat type were ground (1/8-in. [0.3-cm] plate), and one of the three phosphate blends (SAPP(1)+SAPP(2), TSPP+SAPP(1), or TSPP+SAPP(2)) was added (0.3% total, equal proportions of 0.15% each type) with salt (1.0%). The pork was then mixed with a three-strain C. perfringens spore cocktail to obtain a final concentration of ca. 2.0 to 2.5 log spores per g. The inoculated product was heat shocked for 20 min at 75 degrees C and chilled exponentially from 54.4 to 4 degrees C in a period of 6.5, 9, 12, 15, 18, or 21 h. In control samples (PSE, normal, and DFD), the increase in C. perfringens population was <1 log CFU/g within the 6.5-h chilling period, and longer chilling times resulted in greater increases. C. perfringens population increases of 5.95, 4.73, and 5.95 log CFU/g of meat were observed in normal, PSE, and DFD pork, respectively, during the 21-h abusive chilling period. The combination of SAPP(1)+SAPP(2) was more effective than the other treatments for inhibiting C. perfringens. The types of phosphate and their blends and the meat type affected the germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens spores in cooked pork during abusive chilling periods.

  5. Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin: Binding Studies and Characterization of Cell Surface Receptor by Fluorescence-Activated Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Bradley G.; Hale, Martha L.; Marvaud, Jean-Christophe; Popoff, Michel R.

    2000-01-01

    The binding characteristics of iota toxin, a binary enterotoxin produced by Clostridium perfringens type E, were studied by fluorescence-activated cytometry. The proteolytically activated binding component of iota toxin, iota b (Ib), bound to various cell types when incubated at 4, 25, or 37°C for 10 min. The binding of Ib was inhibited by antisera against C. perfringens type E or Clostridium spiroforme culture supernatants, but not C. perfringens types C or D. Pretreatment of Vero cells with glycosidases or lectins did not affect Ib interactions, while pronase effectively prevented Ib binding to the cell surface. The Ib protomer (Ibp) bound to the cell surface, but trypsinization of Ibp was necessary for docking of the ADP-ribosylating component, iota a (Ia). Ia attached to cell-bound Ib within 10 min at 37°C, but surface levels of Ia decreased 90% after 30 min and were undetectable by 60 min. Detectable surface levels of Ib also diminished over time, and Western blot analysis suggested internalization or embedment of Ib into the membrane. PMID:10816501

  6. A Thermophilic Phage Endolysin Fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-Specific Cell Wall Binding Domain Creates an Anti-Clostridium Antimicrobial with Improved Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Steven M.; Seal, Bruce S.; Garrish, Johnna K.; Oakley, Brian B.; Hiett, Kelli; Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Woolsey, Rebekah; Schegg, Kathleen M.; Line, John Eric; Donovan, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Many enzymes are added to animal feed during production and are subjected to high-heat stress during feed processing. To produce a thermostabile endolysin for treating poultry, an E. coli codon-optimized gene was synthesized that fused the N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase domain from the endolysin of the thermophilic bacteriophage ΦGVE2 to the cell-wall binding domain (CWB) from the endolysin of the C. perfringens-specific bacteriophage ΦCP26F. The resulting protein, PlyGVE2CpCWB, lysed C. perfringens in liquid and solid cultures. PlyGVE2CpCWB was most active at pH 8, had peak activity at 10 mM NaCl, 40% activity at 150 mM NaCl and was still 16% active at 600 mM NaCl. The protein was able to withstand temperatures up to 50 °C and still lyse C. perfringens. Herein, we report the construction and characterization of a thermostable chimeric endolysin that could potentially be utilized as a feed additive to control the bacterium during poultry production. PMID:26075507

  7. Oligomerization of Clostridium perfringens Epsilon Toxin Is Dependent upon Caveolins 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Fennessey, Christine M.; Sheng, Jinsong; Rubin, Donald H.; McClain, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from multiple studies suggests that Clostridium perfringens ε-toxin is a pore-forming toxin, assembling into oligomeric complexes in the plasma membrane of sensitive cells. In a previous study, we used gene-trap mutagenesis to identify mammalian factors contributing to toxin activity, including caveolin-2 (CAV2). In this study, we demonstrate the importance of caveolin-2 and its interaction partner, caveolin-1 (CAV1), in ε-toxin-induced cytotoxicity. Using CAV2-specific shRNA in a toxin-sensitive human kidney cell line, ACHN, we confirmed that cells deficient in CAV2 exhibit increased resistance to ε-toxin. Similarly, using CAV1-specific shRNA, we demonstrate that cells deficient in CAV1 also exhibit increased resistance to the toxin. Immunoprecipitation of CAV1 and CAV2 from ε-toxin-treated ACHN cells demonstrated interaction of both CAV1 and -2 with the toxin. Furthermore, blue-native PAGE indicated that the toxin and caveolins were components of a 670 kDa protein complex. Although ε-toxin binding was only slightly perturbed in caveolin-deficient cells, oligomerization of the toxin was dramatically reduced in both CAV1- and CAV2-deficient cells. These results indicate that CAV1 and -2 potentiate ε-toxin induced cytotoxicity by promoting toxin oligomerization – an event which is requisite for pore formation and, by extension, cell death. PMID:23056496

  8. Clostridium perfringens and sulphite reducing clostridia densities in selected tropical Malaysian rivers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Florence C H; Hakim, S L; Kamaluddin, M A; Thong, Kwai Lin

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens (CP) and sulphite reducing clostridia (SRC) densities in the Selangor River, Bernam River and Tengi River Canal were examined between April 2007 and January 2008. Water samples were taken from two or three locations along each river, using either depth-integration or grab sampling methods. The downstream sampling site of the Selangor River, Rantau Panjang, reported the highest arithmetic mean of CP and SRC densities (583.45 and 8,120.08 cfu/100 ml, respectively). Both CP and SRC densities in the Selangor River increased further downstream, but the reverse was true in the Bernam River. The SRC densities in these rivers were significantly different from each other (p < 0.05) when comparing upstream and downstream results, but CP densities were not significantly different (p > 0.05). SRC densities were significantly correlated (p < 0.05) in different locations along the Selangor River and the Bernam River. The CP densities did not show such pattern (p > 0.05). River discharge had no significant correlation with SRC or CP densities by study site (p > 0.05). Since the Selangor River has a denser human population along its banks, this study confirms CP as a suitable indicator of human fecal contamination. However, tracing CP distribution along the river is more difficult than SRC. To our knowledge, this is the first study of CP and SRC densities from Malaysian rivers. CP densities found in this study were within the range of general water bodies reported from other countries.

  9. Multiple effects of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 on growth, biofilm formation, and inflammation cytokines profile of Clostridium perfringens type A strain CP4.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L; Wolf, Amanda; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an important Gram-positive pathogen responsible for food poisoning, necrotic enteritis, gas gangrene, and even death. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is a well-characterized probiotic strain with demonstrated benefits. In this study, we evaluated the effects of EcN on growth, toxin production, biofilm formation, and inflammatory cytokine responses of C. perfringens. In vitro co-culture experiments demonstrated that EcN inhibited growth, gas production, and toxin production (α-toxin and NetB) of C. perfringens in a dose-dependent manner. The growth inhibition effect was not observed when C. perfringens was incubated with EcN cell-free supernatants (CFSE), suggesting that growth inhibition was caused by nutrition competition during co-incubation. In vitro studies demonstrated that pre-incubation with EcN did not inhibit C. perfringens attachment to Caco-2 cells, but did reduce C. perfringens total number, toxin production, and cytotoxicity after 24 h. The similar growth inhibition results were also observed during the formation of C. perfringens biofilm. Finally, pre-incubation of EcN with RAW264.7 cells significantly decreased the production of inflammatory cytokines caused by the introduction of C. perfringens. Our results indicate that EcN can inhibit many of the pathological effects of C. perfringens in vitro conditions. PMID:24532573

  10. Occurrence of Clostridium perfringens Types A, E, and C in Fresh Fish and Its Public Health Significance.

    PubMed

    Sabry, Maha; Abd El-Moein, Khaled; Hamza, Eman; Abdel Kader, Fatma

    2016-06-01

    Fish remains among the most traded of food commodities, and Egypt is one of the emerging countries being recognized as an important world fish exporter. Clostridium perfringens is an important foodborne pathogen to consider in fish trade, as it has been implicated as the causative organism of two fish outbreaks. The aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence and toxin diversity of C. perfringens associated with fresh and canned fish and to examine the public health significance of C. perfringens infection in fish. Isolation and identification of C. perfringens showed a significantly higher prevalence of the bacterium in fresh fish collected from aquaculture (54.5%) and from markets (71%) as well as in humans in contact with fish (63%) compared with water used for keeping fresh fish (27.3%) and water used in canned fish (17.8%). The isolation level was significantly higher in samples from the external surface of fresh fish (31.8% in aquaculture, 45.6% in markets) than from the intestinal contents of the same fish (9.1% in aquaculture, 6.7% in markets). Thus, markets represent a risk factor for contamination of the external surface of fish from the surrounding environment. Genotyping of the C. perfringens-positive isolates by using multiplex PCR revealed that type A enterotoxin-negative (CPE(-)) is the predominant strain among fish (fresh and canned), humans, and water in contact with fresh fish. Interestingly, C. perfringens types A enterotoxin-positive (CPE(+)) and C were found only in fresh fish, and these two strains have great health importance in humans. Strikingly, C. perfringens type E strain was detected for the first time in fish, humans, and water in contact with fresh fish. Our results demonstrate for the first time that fish act as a reservoir for C. perfringens, particularly for types A CPE(+), C, and E. The external surface of fish represents a vehicle for contamination of fish from the surrounding environment as well as a source of

  11. Occurrence of Clostridium perfringens Types A, E, and C in Fresh Fish and Its Public Health Significance.

    PubMed

    Sabry, Maha; Abd El-Moein, Khaled; Hamza, Eman; Abdel Kader, Fatma

    2016-06-01

    Fish remains among the most traded of food commodities, and Egypt is one of the emerging countries being recognized as an important world fish exporter. Clostridium perfringens is an important foodborne pathogen to consider in fish trade, as it has been implicated as the causative organism of two fish outbreaks. The aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence and toxin diversity of C. perfringens associated with fresh and canned fish and to examine the public health significance of C. perfringens infection in fish. Isolation and identification of C. perfringens showed a significantly higher prevalence of the bacterium in fresh fish collected from aquaculture (54.5%) and from markets (71%) as well as in humans in contact with fish (63%) compared with water used for keeping fresh fish (27.3%) and water used in canned fish (17.8%). The isolation level was significantly higher in samples from the external surface of fresh fish (31.8% in aquaculture, 45.6% in markets) than from the intestinal contents of the same fish (9.1% in aquaculture, 6.7% in markets). Thus, markets represent a risk factor for contamination of the external surface of fish from the surrounding environment. Genotyping of the C. perfringens-positive isolates by using multiplex PCR revealed that type A enterotoxin-negative (CPE(-)) is the predominant strain among fish (fresh and canned), humans, and water in contact with fresh fish. Interestingly, C. perfringens types A enterotoxin-positive (CPE(+)) and C were found only in fresh fish, and these two strains have great health importance in humans. Strikingly, C. perfringens type E strain was detected for the first time in fish, humans, and water in contact with fresh fish. Our results demonstrate for the first time that fish act as a reservoir for C. perfringens, particularly for types A CPE(+), C, and E. The external surface of fish represents a vehicle for contamination of fish from the surrounding environment as well as a source of

  12. Abilities of the mCP Agar Method and CRENAME Alpha Toxin-Specific Real-Time PCR Assay To Detect Clostridium perfringens Spores in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, Andrée F.; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K.; Villéger, Romain; Cantin, Philippe; Boissinot, Maurice; Bissonnette, Luc

    2013-01-01

    We first determined the analytical specificity and ubiquity (i.e., the ability to detect all or most strains) of a Clostridium perfringens-specific real-time PCR (rtPCR) assay based on the cpa gene (cpa rtPCR) by using a bacterial strain panel composed of C. perfringens and non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains. All non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains tested negative, whereas all C. perfringens strains tested positive with the cpa rtPCR, for an analytical specificity and ubiquity of 100%. The cpa rtPCR assay was then used to confirm the identity of 116 putative C. perfringens isolates recovered after filtration of water samples and culture on mCP agar. Colonies presenting discordant results between the phenotype on mCP agar and cpa rtPCR were identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA and cpa genes. Four mCP−/rtPCR+ colonies were identified as C. perfringens, whereas 3 mCP+/rtPCR− colonies were identified as non-C. perfringens. The cpa rtPCR was negative with all 51 non-C. perfringens strains and positive with 64 of 65 C. perfringens strains. Finally, we compared mCP agar and a CRENAME (concentration and recovery of microbial particles, extraction of nucleic acids, and molecular enrichment) procedure plus cpa rtPCR (CRENAME + cpa rtPCR) for their abilities to detect C. perfringens spores in drinking water. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR detected as few as one C. perfringens CFU per 100 ml of drinking water sample in less than 5 h, whereas mCP agar took at least 25 h to deliver results. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR also allows the simultaneous and sensitive detection of Escherichia coli and C. perfringens from the same potable water sample. In itself, it could be used to assess the public health risk posed by drinking water potentially contaminated with pathogens more resistant to disinfection. PMID:24077714

  13. Bacillus subtilis PB6 improves intestinal health of broiler chickens challenged with Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Sathishkumar; Thangavel, Gokila; Kurian, Hannah; Mani, Ravichandran; Mukkalil, Rajalekshmi; Chirakkal, Haridasan

    2013-02-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is an enterotoxemic disease caused by Clostridium perfringens that results in significant economic losses, averaging damage of $0.05 per bird. The present study investigated the influence of a dietary supplement, Bacillus subtilis PB6, on performance, intestinal health, and gut integrity against C. perfringens-induced NE in broiler birds. Bacillus subtilis PB6 (ATCC-PTA 6737) is a natural strain isolated from healthy chicken gut that has been shown in in vitro to produce antimicrobial substances with broad activity against various strains of Campylobacter and Clostridium species. The animal study was conducted on broiler chickens (Cobb 400) for the period of 35 d using a completely randomized design. The experimental design included 3 treatments groups. Each treatment group contained 6 replicates, 3 male and 3 female, with 12 birds in each replicate. The 3 treatment groups were an uninfected control, an infected control, and an infected group supplemented with B. subtilis PB6 at 500 g/t of feed, containing 5 × 10(11) cfu/kg. Necrotic enteritis was induced in the broiler birds via oral inoculation of 30,000 oocysts of mixed strains of Eimeria species on d 14 followed by C. perfringens (10(8) cfu/mL) on d 19 through 21 of trial. The birds were analyzed for BW gain, mortality, feed conversion ratio (FCR), intestinal lesion score, intestinal C. perfringens counts, and villus histomorphometry. The infected control group showed markedly thickened mucosa, hemorrhages, intestinal lesions, and ballooning of intestine. The supplementation of B. subtilis PB6 reduced the FCR (P < 0.05) and intestinal C. perfringens counts significantly (P < 0.05) compared with the infected control group. It was also observed that B. subtilis PB6 improved villi length by 10.88 and 30.46% (P < 0.05) compared with uninfected and infected control groups, respectively. The group supplemented with B. subtilis PB6 significantly (P < 0.05) increased the villi length to crypt

  14. Clostridium perfringens and somatic coliphages as indicators of the efficiency of drinking water treatment for viruses and protozoan cysts.

    PubMed Central

    Payment, P; Franco, E

    1993-01-01

    To find the most suitable indicator of viral and parasitic contamination of drinking water, large-volume samples were collected and analyzed for the presence of pathogens (cultivable human enteric viruses, Giardia lamblia cysts, and Cryptosporidium oocysts) and potential indicators (somatic and male-specific coliphages, Clostridium perfringens). The samples were obtained from three water treatment plants by using conventional or better treatments (ozonation, biological filtration). All samples of river water contained the microorganisms sought, and only C. perfringens counts were correlated with human enteric viruses, cysts, or oocysts. For settled and filtered water samples, all indicators were statistically correlated with human enteric viruses but not with cysts or oocysts. By using multiple regression, the somatic coliphage counts were the only explanatory variable for the human enteric virus counts in settled water, while in filtered water samples it was C. perfringens counts. Finished water samples of 1,000 liters each were free of all microorganisms, except for a single sample that contained low levels of cysts and oocysts of undetermined viability. Three of nine finished water samples of 20,000 liters each revealed residual levels of somatic coliphages at 0.03, 0.10, and 0.26 per 100 liters. Measured virus removal was more than 4 to 5 log10, and cyst removal was more than 4 log10. Coliphage and C. perfringens counts suggested that the total removal and inactivation was more than 7 log10 viable microorganisms. C. perfringens counts appear to be the most suitable indicator for the inactivation and removal of viruses in drinking water treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8368831

  15. Bioassay-Guided Chromatographic Isolation and Identification of Antibacterial Compounds from Artemisia annua L. That Inhibit Clostridium perfringens Growth.

    PubMed

    Ivarsen, Elise; Fretté, Xavier C; Christensen, Kathrine B; Christensen, Lars P; Engberg, Ricarda M; Grevsen, Kai; Kjaer, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the causative agent of necrotic enteritis leading to significant losses in the poultry industry. Dichloromethane and n-hexane extracts of aerial parts of Artemisia annua (Asteraceae) exhibited activity against C. perfringens with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 185 and 270 μg/mL, respectively. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the extracts gave several active fractions (MIC between 75 and 600 μg/mL). Investigations of the most active fractions resulted in the isolation and characterization of the polyacetylene ponticaepoxide (MIC between 100 and 200 μg/mL) and (+)-threo-(5E)-trideca-1,5-dien-7,9,11-triyne-3,4-diol (MIC between 400 and 800 μg/mL), the flavonols chrysosplenol D (MIC between 200 and 400 μg/mL) and casticin (slight inhibition at 800 μg/mL), and 2,4-dihydroxy-6-methoxyacetophenone (slight inhibition at 800 μg/mL). Also, the coumarin scopoletin and the sesquiterpene lactone artemisinin were isolated from active fractions but showed no inhibition of C. perfringens growth at 800 and 2000 μg/mL, respectively. Fractions containing essential oil components with camphor constituting >60% did not show inhibition of C. perfringens up to 1600 μg/mL. Extracts and some active fractions showed higher antibacterial effect than individual bioactive compounds, suggesting that synergistic effects may underlie the observed antibacterial effect. The present study adds new valuable information on the antibacterial effect of A. annua against C. perfringens. PMID:25902977

  16. Characterization of polymorphisms and isoforms of the Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C gene (plc) reveals high genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Flávia F; Almeida, Marcelle O; Barroca, Tatiana M; Horta, Carolina C R; Carmo, Anderson O; Silva, Rodrigo O S; Pires, Prhiscylla S; Lobato, Francisco C F; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes

    2012-10-12

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (Cp-PLC), also called alpha-toxin, is encoded by the plc gene and has been implicated in several diseases; however, only a few studies have described polymorphisms in this gene. The aim of this study was to analyze polymorphisms in the Cp-PLC nucleotide and amino acid sequences obtained from isolates from different regions and to compare them to Clostridium phospholipase C sequences deposited in the NCBI database. Environmental samples (sediment, poultry feed, sawdust) and stool samples (from poultry, bovine, swine, horse, caprine, bird, dog, rabbit, toucan) were collected from healthy and sick animals. A total of 73 isolates were analyzed with the majority of samples belonging to the toxin type A subtype and possessing the gene encoding for the beta-2 toxin. Comparison of plc gene sequences from respective isolates revealed a high genetic diversity in the nucleotide sequences of mature Cp-PLC. Sequence comparisons identified 30 amino acid substitutions and 34 isoforms including some isoforms with substitutions in amino acids critical to toxin function. Comparison of sequences obtained in this study to Cp-PLC sequences obtained from the NCBI database resulted in the identification of 11 common haplotypes and 22 new isoforms. Phylogenetic analysis of phospholipase C sequences obtained from other Clostridium species identified relationships previously described. This report describes a broad characterization of the genetic diversity in the C. perfringens plc gene resulting in the identification of various isoforms. A better understanding of sequences encoding phospholipase C isoforms may reveal changes associated with protein function and C. perfringens virulence.

  17. A tripartite cocktail of chimeric monoclonal antibodies passively protects mice against ricin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B and Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin.

    PubMed

    Sully, Erin K; Whaley, Kevin; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Pauly, Michael; Velasco, Jesus; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Stavale, Eric; Aman, M Javad; Tangudu, Chandra; Uzal, Francisco A; Mantis, Nicholas J; Zeitlin, Larry

    2014-12-15

    Due to the fast-acting nature of ricin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), and Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), it is necessary that therapeutic interventions following a bioterrorism incident by one of these toxins occur as soon as possible after intoxication. Moreover, because the clinical manifestations of intoxication by these agents are likely to be indistinguishable from each other, especially following aerosol exposure, we have developed a cocktail of chimeric monoclonal antibodies that is capable of neutralizing all three toxins. The efficacy of this cocktail was demonstrated in mouse models of lethal dose toxin challenge. PMID:25260254

  18. A Tripartite Cocktail of Chimeric Monoclonal Antibodies Passively Protects Mice against Ricin, Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B and Clostridium perfringens Epsilon Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Sully, Erin K.; Whaley, Kevin; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Pauly, Michael; Velasco, Jesus; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Stavale, Eric; Aman, M. Javad; Tangudu, Chandra; Uzal, Francisco A.; Mantis, Nicholas J.; Zeitlin, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Due to the fast-acting nature of ricin, staphylococcal enterotoxin (SEB), and Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), it is necessary that therapeutic interventions following a bioterrorism incident by one of these toxins occur as soon as possible after intoxication. Moreover, because the clinical manifestations of intoxication by these toxins are likely to be indistinguishable from each other, especially following aerosol exposure, we have developed a cocktail of chimeric monoclonal antibodies that is capable of neutralizing all three toxins. The efficacy of this cocktail was demonstrated in mouse models of lethal dose toxin challenge. PMID:25260254

  19. A tripartite cocktail of chimeric monoclonal antibodies passively protects mice against ricin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B and Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin.

    PubMed

    Sully, Erin K; Whaley, Kevin; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Pauly, Michael; Velasco, Jesus; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Stavale, Eric; Aman, M Javad; Tangudu, Chandra; Uzal, Francisco A; Mantis, Nicholas J; Zeitlin, Larry

    2014-12-15

    Due to the fast-acting nature of ricin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), and Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), it is necessary that therapeutic interventions following a bioterrorism incident by one of these toxins occur as soon as possible after intoxication. Moreover, because the clinical manifestations of intoxication by these agents are likely to be indistinguishable from each other, especially following aerosol exposure, we have developed a cocktail of chimeric monoclonal antibodies that is capable of neutralizing all three toxins. The efficacy of this cocktail was demonstrated in mouse models of lethal dose toxin challenge.

  20. Characterization of the high affinity binding of epsilon toxin from Clostridium perfringens to the renal system.

    PubMed

    Dorca-Arévalo, Jonatan; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Blasi, Juan

    2012-05-25

    Epsilon toxin (ε-toxin), produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, causes fatal enterotoxaemia in livestock. In the renal system, the toxin binds to target cells before oligomerization, pore formation and cell death. Still, there is little information about the cellular and molecular mechanism involved in the initial steps of the cytotoxic action of ε-toxin, including the specific binding to the target sensitive cells. In the present report, the binding step of ε-toxin to the MDCK cell line is characterized by means of an ELISA-based binding assay with recombinant ε-toxin-green fluorescence protein (ε-toxin-GFP) and ε-prototoxin-GFP. In addition, different treatments with Pronase E, detergents, N-glycosidase F and beta-elimination on MDCK cells and renal cryosections have been performed to further characterize the ε-toxin binding. The ELISA assays revealed a single binding site with a similar dissociation constant (K(d)) for ε-toxin-GFP and ε-prototoxin-GFP, but a three-fold increase in B(max) levels in the case of ε-toxin-GFP. Double staining on kidney cryoslices with lectins and ε-prototoxin-GFP revealed specific binding to distal and collecting tubule cells. In addition, experiments on kidney and bladder cryoslices demonstrated the specific binding to distal tubule of a range of mammalian renal systems. Pronase E and beta-elimination treatments on kidney cryoslices and MDCK cells revealed that the binding of ε-toxin in renal system is mediated by a O-glycoprotein. Detergent treatments revealed that the integrity of the plasma membrane is required for the binding of ε-toxin to its receptor.

  1. Gene-Trap Mutagenesis Identifies Mammalian Genes Contributing to Intoxication by Clostridium perfringens ε-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Ivie, Susan E.; Fennessey, Christine M.; Sheng, Jinsong; Rubin, Donald H.; McClain, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    The Clostridium perfringens ε-toxin is an extremely potent toxin associated with lethal toxemias in domesticated ruminants and may be toxic to humans. Intoxication results in fluid accumulation in various tissues, most notably in the brain and kidneys. Previous studies suggest that the toxin is a pore-forming toxin, leading to dysregulated ion homeostasis and ultimately cell death. However, mammalian host factors that likely contribute to ε-toxin-induced cytotoxicity are poorly understood. A library of insertional mutant Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, which are highly susceptible to the lethal affects of ε-toxin, was used to select clones of cells resistant to ε-toxin-induced cytotoxicity. The genes mutated in 9 surviving resistant cell clones were identified. We focused additional experiments on one of the identified genes as a means of validating the experimental approach. Gene expression microarray analysis revealed that one of the identified genes, hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1, KIM-1, TIM1), is more abundantly expressed in human kidney cell lines than it is expressed in human cells known to be resistant to ε-toxin. One human kidney cell line, ACHN, was found to be sensitive to the toxin and expresses a larger isoform of the HAVCR1 protein than the HAVCR1 protein expressed by other, toxin-resistant human kidney cell lines. RNA interference studies in MDCK and in ACHN cells confirmed that HAVCR1 contributes to ε-toxin-induced cytotoxicity. Additionally, ε-toxin was shown to bind to HAVCR1 in vitro. The results of this study indicate that HAVCR1 and the other genes identified through the use of gene-trap mutagenesis and RNA interference strategies represent important targets for investigation of the process by which ε-toxin induces cell death and new targets for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:21412435

  2. Characterization of the enzymatic component of Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, M; Sakaguchi, Y; Kobayashi, K; Ochi, S; Sakurai, J

    2000-04-01

    The iota(a) component (i(a)) of Clostridium perfringens ADP ribosylates nonmuscle beta/gamma actin and skeletal muscle alpha-actin. Replacement of Arg-295 in i(a) with alanine led to a complete loss of NAD(+)-glycohydrolase (NADase) and ADP-ribosyltransferase (ARTase); that of the residue with lysine caused a drastic reduction in NADase and ARTase activities (<0.1% of the wild-type activities) but did not completely diminish them. Substitution of alanine for Glu-378 and Glu-380 caused a complete loss of NADase and ARTase. However, exchange of Glu-378 to aspartic acid or glutamine resulted in little effect on NADase activity but a drastic reduction in ARTase activity (<0.1% of the wild-type activity). Exchange of Glu-380 to aspartic acid caused a drastic reduction in NADase and ARTase activities (<0.1% of the wild-type activities) but did not completely diminish them; that of the residue to glutamine caused a complete loss of ARTase activity. Replacement of Ser-338 with alanine resulted in 0.7 to 2.3% wild-type activities, and that of Ser-340 and Thr-339 caused a reduction in these activities of 5 to 30% wild-type activities. The kinetic analysis showed that Arg-295 and Ser-338 also play an important role in the binding of NAD(+) to i(a), that Arg-295, Glu-380, and Ser-338 play a crucial role in the catalytic rate of NADase activity, and that these three amino acid residues and Glu-378 are essential for ARTase activity. The effect of amino acid replacement in i(a) on ARTase activity was similar to that on lethal and cytotoxic activities, suggesting that lethal and cytotoxic activities in i(a) are dependent on ARTase activity. PMID:10735850

  3. Enhanced expression of recombinant beta toxin of Clostridium perfringens type B using a commercially available Escherichia coli strain.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Fatemah; Pilehchian Langroudi, Reza; Eimani, Bahram Golestani

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens beta toxin is only produced by types B and C and plays an important role in many human and animal diseases, causing fatal conditions that originate in the intestines. We compared the expression of C. perfringens type B vaccine strain recombinant beta toxin gene in the Escherichia coli strains Rosetta(DE3) and BL21(DE3). The beta toxin gene was extracted from pJETβ and ligated with pET22b(+). pET22β was transformed into E. coli strains BL21(DE3) and Rosetta(DE3). Recombinant protein was expressed as a soluble protein after isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction in strain Rosetta(DE3) but not in BL21(DE3). Expression was optimised by growing recombinant cells at 37 °C and at an induction of 0.5 mM, 1 mM, 1.5 mM IPTG. Expression was evaluated using sodium dodecyl sulfate Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The recombinant protein was purified via Ni-NTA and was analysed using western blot. We concluded that E. coli strain RosettaTM(DE3) can enhance the expression of C. perfringens recombinant beta toxin. PMID:27380656

  4. Clostridium perfringens septicemia in a long-beaked common dolphin Delphinus capensis: an etiology of gas bubble accumulation in cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Danil, Kerri; St Leger, Judy A; Dennison, Sophie; Bernaldo de Quirós, Yara; Scadeng, Miriam; Nilson, Erika; Beaulieu, Nicole

    2014-10-16

    An adult female long-beaked common dolphin Delphinus capensis live-stranded in La Jolla, California, USA, on July 30, 2012 and subsequently died on the beach. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed gas bubble accumulation in the vasculature, organ parenchyma, mandibular fat pads, and subdermal sheath as well as a gas-filled cavity within the liver, mild caudal abdominal effusion, and fluid in the uterus. Gross examination confirmed these findings and also identified mild ulcerations on the palate, ventral skin, and flukes, uterine necrosis, and multifocal parenchymal cavitations in the brain. Histological review demonstrated necrosis and round clear spaces interpreted as gas bubbles with associated bacterial rods within the brain, liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Anaerobic cultures of the lung, spleen, liver, bone marrow, and abdominal fluid yielded Clostridium perfringens, which was further identified as type A via a multiplex PCR assay. The gas composition of sampled bubbles was typical of putrefaction gases, which is consistent with the by-products of C. perfringens, a gas-producing bacterium. Gas bubble formation in marine mammals due to barotrauma, and peri- or postmortem off-gassing of supersaturated tissues and blood has been previously described. This case study concluded that a systemic infection of C. perfringens likely resulted in production of gas and toxins, causing tissue necrosis. PMID:25320031

  5. Portrait of an Enzyme, a Complete Structural Analysis of a Multimodular beta-N-Acetylglucosaminidase from Clostridium perfringens

    SciTech Connect

    Ficko-Blean, E.; Gregg, K; Adams, J; Hehemann, J; Czjzek, M; Smith, S; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    Common features of the extracellular carbohydrate-active virulence factors involved in host-pathogen interactions are their large sizes and modular complexities. This has made them recalcitrant to structural analysis, and therefore our understanding of the significance of modularity in these important proteins is lagging. Clostridium perfringens is a prevalent human pathogen that harbors a wide array of large, extracellular carbohydrate-active enzymes and is an excellent and relevant model system to approach this problem. Here we describe the complete structure of C. perfringens GH84C (NagJ), a 1001-amino acid multimodular homolog of the C. perfringens ?-toxin, which was determined using a combination of small angle x-ray scattering and x-ray crystallography. The resulting structure reveals unprecedented insight into how catalysis, carbohydrate-specific adherence, and the formation of molecular complexes with other enzymes via an ultra-tight protein-protein interaction are spatially coordinated in an enzyme involved in a host-pathogen interaction.

  6. Cloning, recombinant production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a family 84 glycoside hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens

    SciTech Connect

    Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2005-09-01

    Crystallization of a family 84 glycoside hydrolase, a putative virulence factor, secreted by C. perfringens is reported. Clostridium perfringens is a ubiquitous environmental organism that is capable of causing a variety of diseases in mammals, including gas gangrene and necrotic enteritis in humans. The activity of a secreted hyaluronidase, attributed to the NagH protein, contributes to the pathogenicity of this organism. The family 84 catalytic module of one of the three homologues of NagH found in C. perfringens (ATCC 13124) has been cloned. The 69 kDa catalytic module of NagJ, here called GH84C, was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). Crystals belonging to space group I222 or I2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} with unit-cell parameters a = 130.39, b = 150.05, c = 155.43 Å were obtained that diffracted to 2.1 Å. Selenomethionyl crystals have also been produced, leading to the possibility of solving the phase problem by MAD using synchrotron radiation.

  7. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens isolates obtained from 2010 to 2012 from chickens with necrotic enteritis in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Young; Kim, Sara; Oh, Jae Young; Kim, Hye Ryoung; Jang, Il; Lee, Hee Soo; Kwon, Yong Kuk

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens produces diverse virulent toxins that cause necrotic enteritis in poultry, resulting in a great negative impact on the poultry industry. To study the characteristics of C. perfringens in chickens, we isolated 88 strains from chickens (1 strain per flock) with necrotic enteritis. The isolated bacterial strains were screened for toxin type and antimicrobial susceptibility. Necropsy of 17 chickens that died from necrotic enteritis revealed that their intestines were dilated with inflammatory exudates and characterized by mucosal necrosis. All the isolated strains were identified as toxin type A using multiplex PCR for toxin typing. We found that the rate of netB-positive strains isolated from dead chickens was significantly higher (8 of 17) than the rate among healthy chickens (2 of 50). We performed antimicrobial susceptibility test with 20 selected antimicrobial agents using the disk diffusion test and found that 30 tested strains were completely resistant to 5 antibiotics and partially resistant to 6 antibiotics whereas all the strains were susceptible to 9 antimicrobial agents. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis, the 17 strains were divided into 13 genetic clusters showing high genetic diversity. In conclusion, C. perfringens strains isolated from Korean poultry showed a high resistance to antimicrobial drugs and high genetic diversity, suggesting that continuous monitoring is essential to prevent outbreaks of necrotic enteritis in chickens.

  8. Evaluation of a Clostridium perfringens predictive model, developed under isothermal conditions in broth, to predict growth in ground beef during cooling.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah; Schaffner, Donald W

    2004-05-01

    Proper temperature control is essential in minimizing Clostridium perfringens germination, growth, and toxin production. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) offers two options for the cooling of meat products: follow a standard time-temperature schedule or validate that alternative cooling regimens result in no more than a 1-log(10) CFU/g increase of C. perfringens and no growth of Clostridium botulinum. A mathematical model developed by Juneja et al. (Food Microbiol. 16:335-349, 1999) may be helpful in determining if the C. perfringens performance standard has been achieved, but this model has not been extensively validated. The objective of this study was to validate the Juneja 1999 model in ground beef under a variety of changing temperature and temperature abuse situations. The Juneja 1999 model consistently underpredicted growth of C. perfringens during exponential cooling of ground beef. The model also underpredicted growth of C. perfringens in ground beef cooled at two different rates. The results presented here show generally good agreement with published data on the growth of C. perfringens in similar products. The model error may be due to faster-than-expected exponential growth rates in ground beef during cooling or an error in the mathematical formulation of the model.

  9. Clostridium Perfringens a-Toxin and NetB Toxin Antibodies and their possible role in protection against Necrotic Enteritis and Gangrenous Dermatitis in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) are important infectious diseases of poultry. Although NE and GD share a common pathogen, Clostridium perfringens, they differ in other important aspects, such as clinical signs, pathologic symptoms, and age of onset. The primary virulence facto...

  10. A poultry-intestinal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni produces a bacteriocin (CUV-3) active against a range of Gram positive bacterial pathogens including Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly isolated bacteriocin, CUV-3, produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni strain CUV-3 had inhibitory activity against several Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staph.epidermidis and Listeria monocytogenes. The pept...

  11. Inhibition of clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by buffered vinegar and lemon juice concentrate during chilling.....of ground turkey road containing minimal ingredients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ground turkey roast containing minimal ingredients (salt and sugar), by buffered vinegar (MoStatin V) and a blend (buffered) of lemon juice concentrate and vinegar (MoStatin LV) was evaluated. Ground turkey roast was formulat...

  12. Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by lemon juice and vinegar product in reduced NaCl roast beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in reduced sodium roast beef by a blend of buffered lemon juice concentrate and vinegar (MoStatin LV) during abusive exponential cooling was evaluated. Roast beef containing salt (NaCl; 1, 1.5, or 2%, wt/wt), blend of sodium pyro-...

  13. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently utilized antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne d...

  14. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently utilized antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne di...

  15. Characterization of Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Identification of Phage Lytic Enzymes as Alternatives to Antibiotics for Potential Control of the Bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal, and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control b...

  16. Characterization of Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Identification of Phage Lytic Enzymes as Alternatives to Antibiotics for Potential Control of the Bacterium.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal, and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control b...

  17. Effect of meat ingredients (sodium nitrite and erythorbate) and processing (vacuum storage and packaging atmosphere) on germination and outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens spores in ham during abusive cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of nitrite and erythorbate on Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ham during abusive cooling (15 h) was evaluated. Ham was formulated with ground pork, NaNO2 (0, 50, 100, 150 or 200 ppm) and sodium erythorbate (0 or 547 ppm). Ten grams of meat (stored at 5C for 3 or...

  18. Endothelial binding of beta toxin to small intestinal mucosal endothelial cells in early stages of experimentally induced Clostridium perfringens type C enteritis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, V L; Martel, A; Pasmans, F; Van Immerseel, F; Posthaus, H

    2013-07-01

    Beta toxin (CPB) is known to be an essential virulence factor in the development of lesions of Clostridium perfringens type C enteritis in different animal species. Its target cells and exact mechanism of toxicity have not yet been clearly defined. Here, we evaluate the suitability of a neonatal piglet jejunal loop model to investigate early lesions of C. perfringens type C enteritis. Immunohistochemically, CPB was detected at microvascular endothelial cells in intestinal villi during early and advanced stages of lesions induced by C. perfringens type C. This was first associated with capillary dilatation and subsequently with widespread hemorrhage in affected intestinal segments. CPB was, however, not demonstrated on intestinal epithelial cells. This indicates a tropism of CPB toward endothelial cells and suggests that CPB-induced endothelial damage plays an important role in the early stages of C. perfringens type C enteritis in pigs.

  19. Clostridium perfringens challenge and dietary fat type affect broiler chicken performance and fermentation in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Józefiak, D; Kierończyk, B; Rawski, M; Hejdysz, M; Rutkowski, A; Engberg, R M; Højberg, O

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to examine how different fats commonly used in the feed industry affect broiler performance, nutrient digestibility and microbial fermentation in the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens challenged with virulent Clostridium perfringens strains. Two experiments were carried out, each including 480-day-old male broilers (Ross 308), which were randomly distributed to eight experimental groups using six replicate pens per treatment and 10 birds per pen. In Experiment 1, birds were fed diets containing soybean oil, palm kernel fatty acid distillers, rendered pork fat and lard. In Experiment 2, birds were fed diets containing rapeseed oil, coconut oil, beef tallow and palm oil. In both experiments, the birds were either not challenged or challenged with a mixture of three C. perfringens type A strains. Irrespective of the fat type present in the diet, C. perfringens did not affect broiler chicken body weight gain (BWG) and mortality in either of the two experiments. The BWG was affected by dietary fat type in both experiments, indicating that the fatty acid composition of the fat source affects broiler growth performance. In particular, the inclusion of animal fats tended to improve final BW to a greater extent compared with the inclusion of unsaturated vegetable oils. In Experiment 2, irrespective of the dietary fat type present in the diet, C. perfringens challenge significantly impaired feed conversion ratio in the period from 14 to 28 days (1.63 v. 1.69) and at 42 days (1.65 v. 1.68). In both experiments apparent metabolizable energy values were affected by dietary fat type. Irrespective of the fat type present in the diet, C. perfringens challenge decreased the digesta pH in the crop and ileum, but had no effect in cecal contents. Moreover, in Experiment 1, total organic acid concentration in the ileum was two to three times lower on soybean oil diets as compared with other treatments, indicating that C. perfringens as well as

  20. Effect of oxygen stress on growth and survival of Clostridium perfringens, Campylobacter jejuni, and Listeria monocytogenes under different storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Qadiri, Hamzah; Sablani, Shyam S; Ovissipour, Mahmoudreza; Al-Alami, Nivin; Govindan, Byju; Rasco, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the growth and survival of three foodborne pathogens (Clostridium perfringens, Campylobacter jejuni, and Listeria monocytogenes) in beef (7% fat) and nutrient broth under different oxygen levels. Samples were tested under anoxic (<0.5%), microoxic (6 to 8%), and oxic (20%) conditions during storage at 7 °C for 14 days and at 22 °C for 5 days. Two initial inoculum concentrations were used (1 and 2 log CFU per g of beef or per ml of broth). The results show that C. perfringens could grow in beef at 22 °C, with an increase of approximately 5 log under anoxic conditions and a 1-log increase under microoxic conditions. However, C. perfringens could not survive in beef held at 7 °C under microoxic and oxic storage conditions after 14 days. In an anoxic environment, C. perfringens survived in beef samples held at 7 °C, with a 1-log reduction. A cell decline was observed at 2 log under these conditions, with no surviving cells at the 1-log level. However, the results show that C. jejuni under microoxic conditions survived with declining cell numbers. Significant increases in L. monocytogenes (5 to 7 log) were observed in beef held at 22 °C for 5 days, with the lowest levels recovered under anoxic conditions. L. monocytogenes in refrigerated storage increased by a factor of 2 to 4 log. It showed the greatest growth under oxic conditions, with significant growth under anoxic conditions. These findings can be used to enhance food safety in vacuum-packed and modified atmosphere-packaged food products.

  1. Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin as a potential drug for intravesical treatment of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Gabig, Theodore G; Waltzer, Wayne C; Whyard, Terry; Romanov, Victor

    2016-09-16

    The current intravesical treatment of bladder cancer (BC) is limited to a few chemotherapeutics that show imperfect effectiveness and are associated with some serious complications. Thus, there is an urgent need for alternative therapies, especially for patients with high-risk non-muscle invasive (NMIBC). Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), cytolytic protein binds to its receptors: claudin 3 and 4 that are expressed in epithelial cells. This binding is followed by rapid cell death. Claudin 4 is present in several epithelial tissue including bladder urothelium and its expression is elevated in some forms of BC. In addition to directly targeting BC cells, binding of CPE to claudins increases urothelium permeability that creates conditions for better accession of the tumor. Therefore, we evaluated CPE as a candidate for intravesical treatment of BC using a cellular model. We examined cytotoxicity of CPE against BC cells lines and 3D cultures of cells derived from surgical samples. To better elucidate cellular mechanisms, activated by CPE and to consider the use of CPE non-toxic fragment (C-CPE) for combination treatment with other drugs we synthesized C-CPE, compared its cytotoxic activity with CPE and examined claudin 4 expression and intracellular localization after C-CPE treatment. CPE induced cell death after 1 h in low aggressive RT4 cells, in moderately aggressive 5637 cells and in the primary 3D cultures of BC cells derived from NMIBC. Conversely, non-transformed urothelial cells and cells derived from highly aggressive tumor (T24) survived this treatment. The reason for this resistance to CPE might be the lower expression of CLDNs or their inaccessibility for CPE in these cells. C-CPE treatment for 48 h did not affect cell viability in tested cells, but declined expression of CLDN4 in RT4 cells. C-CPE increased sensitivity of RT4 cells to Mitommycin C and Dasatinib. To better understand mechanisms of this effect we examined expression and

  2. Clostridium perfringens α-Toxin Impairs Innate Immunity via Inhibition of Neutrophil Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Masaya; Takagishi, Teruhisa; Seike, Soshi; Ohtani, Kaori; Kobayashi, Keiko; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Shimizu, Tohru; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Although granulopoiesis is accelerated to suppress bacteria during infection, some bacteria can still cause life-threatening infections, but the mechanism behind this remains unclear. In this study, we found that mature neutrophils in bone marrow cells (BMCs) were decreased in C. perfringens-infected mice and also after injection of virulence factor α-toxin. C. perfringens infection interfered with the replenishment of mature neutrophils in the peripheral circulation and the accumulation of neutrophils at C. perfringens-infected sites in an α-toxin-dependent manner. Measurements of bacterial colony-forming units in C. perfringens-infected muscle revealed that α-toxin inhibited a reduction in the load of C. perfringens. In vitro treatment of isolated BMCs with α-toxin (phospholipase C) revealed that α-toxin directly decreased mature neutrophils. α-Toxin did not influence the viability of isolated mature neutrophils, while simultaneous treatment of BMCs with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor attenuated the reduction of mature neutrophils by α-toxin. Together, our results illustrate that impairment of the innate immune system by the inhibition of neutrophil differentiation is crucial for the pathogenesis of C. perfringens to promote disease to a life-threatening infection, which provides new insight to understand how pathogenic bacteria evade the host immune system. PMID:27306065

  3. Selection for pro-inflammatory mediators produces chickens more resistant to Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Swaggerty, C L; McReynolds, J L; Byrd, J A; Pevzner, I Y; Duke, S E; Genovese, K J; He, H; Kogut, M H

    2016-02-01

    We developed a novel selection method based on an inherently high and low phenotype of pro-inflammatory mediators and produced "high" and "low" line chickens. We have shown high line birds are more resistant to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and Eimeria tenella compared to the low line. Clostridium perfringens is the fourth leading cause of bacterial-induced foodborne illness, and is also an economically important poultry pathogen and known etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis (NE). The objective of this study was to determine if high line birds were also more resistant to NE than low line birds using an established model. Birds were reared in floor pens and challenges were conducted twice (high line = 25/trial, 50 birds total; low line = 26/trial, 52 birds total). Day-old chicks were provided a 55% wheat-corn-based un-medicated starter diet. A bursal disease vaccine was administered at 10× the recommended dose via the ocular route at 14-d-of-age. Birds were challenged daily for 3 d beginning at 16-d-of-age by oral gavage (3 mL) with 10(7) colony forming units (cfu) of C. perfringens/mL then necropsied at 21-d-of-age. All birds had sections of the intestine examined and scored for lesions while the first 10 necropsied also had gut content collected for C. perfringens enumeration. Chickens from the high line were more resistant to C. perfringens-induced NE pathology compared to the low line, as indicated by reduced lesion scores. Ninety percent of the high line birds had lesions of zero or one compared to 67% of the low line birds. Wilcoxon rank sum test showed significantly higher lesion scores in the low line birds compared to the high line (P < 0.0001). There were no differences in the C. perfringens recovered (P = 0.83). These data provide additional validation and support selection based on elevated levels of pro-inflammatory mediators produces chickens with increased resistance against foodborne and poultry pathogens.

  4. NetB-producing and beta2-producing Clostridium perfringens associated with subclinical necrotic enteritis in laying hens in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Allaart, Janneke G; de Bruijn, Naomi D; van Asten, Alphons J A M; Fabri, Teun H F; Gröne, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Since 2006 increasing numbers of laying hen flocks with decreased production have been reported in the Netherlands. At necropsy, birds from affected flocks showed multifocal areas of necrosis in the duodenum. Histologically the duodenum had moderate to marked villus atrophy and fusion with crypt hyperplasia and a mixed inflammatory infiltrate within the lamina propria underlying focal areas of degenerative epithelium. Multifocally, free within the intestinal lumen and associated with epithelial necrosis, were marked numbers of large rod-shaped bacteria. Anaerobic culturing and subsequent toxin typing revealed, in 19 out of 73 affected birds, the presence of Clostridium perfringens strains, either type A or type C harbouring the atypical allele of cpb2 and netB. Eighteen out of these 19 birds carried C. perfringens strains capable of producing beta2 toxin in vitro and all of these birds harboured C. perfringens strains capable of producing NetB toxin in vitro. In contrast, specific pathogen free (SPF) birds lacked gross or histological lesions in their duodenum, and C. perfringens type C was isolated from four out of 15 SPF birds tested. One of these isolates harboured the consensus three allele of cpb2 that produced beta2 toxin in vitro. None of the C. perfringens isolates originating from SPF birds harboured netB. These findings might indicate that the NetB toxin produced by C. perfringens is associated with subclinical necrotic enteritis in layers, whereas the involvement of beta2 toxin in subclinical necrotic enteritis, if any, might be variant dependent.

  5. Immunogenicity of a Trivalent Recombinant Vaccine Against Clostridium perfringens Alpha, Beta, and Epsilon Toxins in Farm Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Gustavo Marçal Schmidt Garcia; Salvarani, Felipe Masiero; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo Pouey; Mendonça, Marcelo; Moreira, Ângela Nunes; Gonçalves, Luciana Aramuni; Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria; Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic bacterium that produces several toxins. Of these, the alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins are responsible for causing the most severe C. perfringens-related diseases in farm animals. The best way to control these diseases is through vaccination. However, commercially available vaccines are based on inactivated toxins and have many production drawbacks, which can be overcome through the use of recombinant antigens. In this study, we produced recombinant alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins in Escherichia coli to formulate a trivalent vaccine. Its effectiveness was evaluated through a potency test in rabbits, in which the vaccine generated 9.6, 24.4, and 25.0 IU/mL of neutralizing antibodies against the respective toxins. Following this, cattle, sheep, and goats received the same formulation, generating, respectively, 5.19 ± 0.48, 4.34 ± 0.43, and 4.70 ± 0.58 IU/mL against alpha toxin, 13.71 ± 1.17 IU/mL (for all three species) against beta toxin, and 12.74 ± 1.70, 7.66 ± 1.69, and 8.91 ± 2.14 IU/mL against epsilon toxin. These levels were above the minimum recommended by international protocols. As such, our vaccine was effective in generating protective antibodies and, thus, may represent an interesting alternative for the prevention of C. perfringens-related intoxications in farm animals. PMID:27004612

  6. Molecular characterization of podoviral bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and their comparison with members of the Picovirinae.

    PubMed

    Volozhantsev, Nikolay V; Oakley, Brian B; Morales, Cesar A; Verevkin, Vladimir V; Bannov, Vasily A; Krasilnikova, Valentina M; Popova, Anastasia V; Zhilenkov, Eugeni L; Garrish, Johnna K; Schegg, Kathleen M; Woolsey, Rebekah; Quilici, David R; Line, J Eric; Hiett, Kelli L; Siragusa, Gregory R; Svetoch, Edward A; Seal, Bruce S

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium responsible for human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal and poultry diseases. Because bacteriophages or their gene products could be applied to control bacterial diseases in a species-specific manner, they are potential important alternatives to antibiotics. Consequently, poultry intestinal material, soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water were screened for virulent bacteriophages that lysed C. perfringens. Two bacteriophages, designated ΦCPV4 and ΦZP2, were isolated in the Moscow Region of the Russian Federation while another closely related virus, named ΦCP7R, was isolated in the southeastern USA. The viruses were identified as members of the order Caudovirales in the family Podoviridae with short, non-contractile tails of the C1 morphotype. The genomes of the three bacteriophages were 17.972, 18.078 and 18.397 kbp respectively; encoding twenty-six to twenty-eight ORF's with inverted terminal repeats and an average GC content of 34.6%. Structural proteins identified by mass spectrometry in the purified ΦCP7R virion included a pre-neck/appendage with putative lyase activity, major head, tail, connector/upper collar, lower collar and a structural protein with putative lysozyme-peptidase activity. All three podoviral bacteriophage genomes encoded a predicted N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and a putative stage V sporulation protein. Each putative amidase contained a predicted bacterial SH3 domain at the C-terminal end of the protein, presumably involved with binding the C. perfringens cell wall. The predicted DNA polymerase type B protein sequences were closely related to other members of the Podoviridae including Bacillus phage Φ29. Whole-genome comparisons supported this relationship, but also indicated that the Russian and USA viruses may be unique members of the sub-family Picovirinae. PMID:22666499

  7. An unusual necrotic myositis by Clostridium perfringens in a German Shepherd dog: A clinical report, bacteriological and molecular identification.

    PubMed

    Salari Sedigh, Hamideh; Rajabioun, Masoud; Razmyar, Jamshid; Kazemi Mehrjerdi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Clostridial myositis, considered to be rare in pet animals, is an acutely fatal toxaemic condition. Some species of clostridia are responsible for necrotic myositis. A 2-year-old male German shepherd dog was admitted with non-weight bearing lameness and massive swelling of the left hind limb. Clostridium perfringens type A with alpha toxin was diagnosed as a pathogenic agent. Based on the history, the bacteria were introduced inside the tissue via contaminated needle following intramuscular injection. Urgent medical therapy followed by surgical intervention was performed. The dog was discharged completely healthy after hospitalization for four weeks. The objective of this report was to describe necrotic myositis in a dog with an emphasis on clinical signs and treatment as well as bacteriological and molecular identification of the micro-organism. Because of the fatal entity of the disease, prompt diagnosis as well as proper and urgent treatment is very important for successful therapy. PMID:26973773

  8. An unusual necrotic myositis by Clostridium perfringens in a German Shepherd dog: A clinical report, bacteriological and molecular identification

    PubMed Central

    Salari Sedigh, Hamideh; Rajabioun, Masoud; Razmyar, Jamshid; Kazemi Mehrjerdi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Clostridial myositis, considered to be rare in pet animals, is an acutely fatal toxaemic condition. Some species of clostridia are responsible for necrotic myositis. A 2-year-old male German shepherd dog was admitted with non-weight bearing lameness and massive swelling of the left hind limb. Clostridium perfringens type A with alpha toxin was diagnosed as a pathogenic agent. Based on the history, the bacteria were introduced inside the tissue via contaminated needle following intramuscular injection. Urgent medical therapy followed by surgical intervention was performed. The dog was discharged completely healthy after hospitalization for four weeks. The objective of this report was to describe necrotic myositis in a dog with an emphasis on clinical signs and treatment as well as bacteriological and molecular identification of the micro-organism. Because of the fatal entity of the disease, prompt diagnosis as well as proper and urgent treatment is very important for successful therapy. PMID:26973773

  9. Oral immunization of mice against Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin with a Lactobacillus casei vector vaccine expressing epsilon toxoid.

    PubMed

    Alimolaei, Mojtaba; Golchin, Mehdi; Daneshvar, Hamid

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D infects ruminants and causes the enterotoxemia disease by ε-toxin. A mutated ε-toxin gene lacking toxicity was designed, synthesized, and cloned into the pT1NX vector and electroporated into Lactobacillus casei competent cells to yield LC-pT1NX-ε recombinant strain. BALB/c mice, immunized orally with this strain, highly induced mucosal, humoral, and cell-mediated immune responses and developed a protection against 200 MLD/ml of the activated ε-toxin. This study showed that the LC-pT1NX-ε could be a promising vaccine candidate against the enterotoxemia disease. PMID:27012151

  10. Changes in lipid metabolism and cell morphology following attack by phospholipase C (Clostridium perfringens) on red cells or lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Allan, D; Low, M G; Finean, J B; Michell, R H

    1975-12-01

    When intact human erythrocytes were treated with phospholipase C (Clostridium perfringens), up to 30% of the membrane phospholipids were broken down without significant cell lysis. Only phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin were attacked. Ceramide (derived from sphingomyelin) accumulated, but 1,2-diacylglycerol (derived from phosphatidylcholine) was largely converted into phosphatidate. Up to 12% of the cell phospholipid could be converted into phosphatidate in this way. Pig erythrocytes and lymphocytes showed a similar but smaller synthesis of phosphatidate after phospholipase C attack. Phospholipase C also caused a marked morphological change in erythrocytes, giving rise to spherical cells containing internal membrane vesicles. This change appeared to be due to ceramide and de and diacylglycerol accumulation rather than to increased phosphatidate content of the cells.

  11. Use of Aviguard and other intestinal bioproducts in experimental Clostridium perfringens-associated necrotizing enteritis in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Hofacre, C L; Froyman, R; Gautrias, B; George, B; Goodwin, M A; Brown, J

    1998-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens-associated necrotic enteritis (CPANE) is a common problem among rapidly growing broiler strains of chickens that are raised intensively in modern microenvironments. The purpose of this study was to compare the use of Aviguard and three other intestinal bioproducts (two normal gut flora [NGF] products and one probiotic product) in experimental CPANE in broiler chickens. Male broiler chicks were housed in the same environmentally controlled facility and given one of six treatments. The necrotic enteritis infection model (NEIM) used in the present study was effective in inducing CPANE intestinal gross lesions in broiler chickens. Equally important, Aviguard was found to be significantly more effective than either the other two NGF products or the probiotic for reducing gross lesions induced by the NEIM. In addition, Aviguard/NEIM-treated chicks ate more feed and had better feed efficiency than their NGF- or probiotic/NEIM-treated counterparts. Other significant differences among these four reconstituted microbial preparations were not found. Results from this study have additional importance because they further support the use of reconstituted microbial preparations as novel and effective alternatives to antibiotics that can reduce the severity of C. perfringens-associated necrotic enteritis challenge in broilers. PMID:9777159

  12. Molecular cloning and expression of epsilon toxin from Clostridium perfringens type D and tests of animal immunization.

    PubMed

    Souza, A M; Reis, J K P; Assis, R A; Horta, C C; Siqueira, F F; Facchin, S; Alvarenga, E R; Castro, C S; Salvarani, F M; Silva, R O S; Pires, P S; Contigli, C; Lobato, F C F; Kalapothakis, E

    2010-02-18

    Epsilon toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D causes enterotoxemia in sheep, goats and calves. Enterotoxemia can cause acute or superacute disease, with sudden death of the affected animal. It provokes huge economic losses when large numbers of livestock are affected. Therapeutic intervention is challenging, because the disease progresses very rapidly. However, it can be prevented by immunization with specific immunogenic vaccines. We cloned the etx gene, encoding epsilon toxin, into vector pET-11a; recombinant epsilon toxin (rec-epsilon) was expressed in inclusion bodies and was used for animal immunization. Serum protection was evaluated and cross-serum neutralization tests were used to characterize the recombinant toxin. To analyze the potency of the toxin (as an antigen), rabbits were immunized with 50, 100 or 200 microg recombinant toxin, using aluminum hydroxide gel as an adjuvant. Titers of 10, 30 and 40 IU/mL were obtained, respectively. These titers were higher than the minimum level required by the European Pharmacopoeia (5 IU/mL) and by the USA Code of Federal Regulation (2 IU/mL). This rec-epsilon is a good candidate for vaccine production against enterotoxemia caused by epsilon toxin of C. perfringens type D.

  13. Global Phenotypic Characterization of Effects of Fluoroquinolone Resistance Selection on the Metabolic Activities and Drug Susceptibilities of Clostridium perfringens Strains.

    PubMed

    Park, Miseon; Rafii, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone resistance affects toxin production of Clostridium perfringens strains differently. To investigate the effect of fluoroquinolone resistance selection on global changes in metabolic activities and drug susceptibilities, four C. perfringens strains and their norfloxacin-, ciprofloxacin-, and gatifloxacin-resistant mutants were compared in nearly 2000 assays, using phenotype microarray plates. Variations among mutant strains resulting from resistance selection were observed in all aspects of metabolism. Carbon utilization, pH range, osmotic tolerance, and chemical sensitivity of resistant strains were affected differently in the resistant mutants depending on both the bacterial genotype and the fluoroquinolone to which the bacterium was resistant. The susceptibilities to gentamicin and erythromycin of all resistant mutants except one increased, but some resistant strains were less susceptible to amoxicillin, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, and metronidazole than their wild types. Sensitivity to ethidium bromide decreased in some resistant mutants and increased in others. Microarray analysis of two gatifloxacin-resistant mutants showed changes in metabolic activities that were correlated with altered expression of various genes. Both the chemical structures of fluoroquinolones and the genomic makeup of the wild types influenced the changes found in resistant mutants, which may explain some inconsistent reports of the effects of therapeutic use of fluoroquinolones on clinical isolates of bacteria. PMID:25587280

  14. Evaluation of the microbial quality of Tajik sambusa and control of Clostridium perfringens germination and outgrowth by buffered sodium citrate and potassium lactate.

    PubMed

    Yarbaeva, Shakhlo N; Velugoti, Padmanabha R; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan; Albrecht, Julie A

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens spore destruction, aerobic plate counts (APCs), and counts of Enterobacteriaceae, coliforms, and Escherichia coli during baking of sambusa (a traditional Tajik food) were evaluated. Control of germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens spores in sambusa during cooling at room or refrigerated temperatures was evaluated using organic acid salts (buffered sodium citrate [Ional] and 1 and 2% potassium lactate, wt/wt). Sambusa were prepared with 40 g of either inoculated or noninoculated meat and baked for 45 min at 180 degrees C. For evaluation of destruction of C. perfringens spores during heating and germination and outgrowth of spores during cooling, ground beef was inoculated and mixed with a three-strain cocktail of C. perfringens spores. Aerobic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, coliforms, and E. coli were enumerated in noninoculated sambusa before and after baking and after cooling at room or refrigeration temperatures. After baking, APCs and Enterobacteriaceae and coliform counts were reduced by 4.32, 2.55, and 1.96 log CFU/g, respectively. E. coli counts were below detectable levels in ground beef and sambusa samples. Enterobacteriaceae, coliform, and E. coli counts were below detectable levels (< 0.04 log CFU/g) in sambusa after cooling by both methods. Total C. perfringens populations increased (4.67 log CFU/g) during cooling at room temperature, but minimal increases (0.31 log CFU/g) were observed during cooling under refrigeration. Incorporation of 2% (wt/wt) buffered sodium citrate controlled C. perfringens spore germination and outgrowth (0.25 log CFU/g), whereas incorporation of up to 2% (wt/wt) potassium lactate did not prevent C. perfringens spore germination and outgrowth. Incorporation of organic acid salts at appropriate concentrations can prevent germination and outgrowth of C. perfringens in improperly cooled sambusa.

  15. Plasmid Characterization and Chromosome Analysis of Two netF+ Clostridium perfringens Isolates Associated with Foal and Canine Necrotizing Enteritis.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh Gohari, Iman; Kropinski, Andrew M; Weese, Scott J; Parreira, Valeria R; Whitehead, Ashley E; Boerlin, Patrick; Prescott, John F

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of a novel beta-pore-forming toxin, NetF, which is strongly associated with canine and foal necrotizing enteritis should improve our understanding of the role of type A Clostridium perfringens associated disease in these animals. The current study presents the complete genome sequence of two netF-positive strains, JFP55 and JFP838, which were recovered from cases of foal necrotizing enteritis and canine hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, respectively. Genome sequencing was done using Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) technology-PacBio and Illumina Hiseq2000. The JFP55 and JFP838 genomes include a single 3.34 Mb and 3.53 Mb chromosome, respectively, and both genomes include five circular plasmids. Plasmid annotation revealed that three plasmids were shared by the two newly sequenced genomes, including a NetF/NetE toxins-encoding tcp-conjugative plasmid, a CPE/CPB2 toxins-encoding tcp-conjugative plasmid and a putative bacteriocin-encoding plasmid. The putative beta-pore-forming toxin genes, netF, netE and netG, were located in unique pathogenicity loci on tcp-conjugative plasmids. The C. perfringens JFP55 chromosome carries 2,825 protein-coding genes whereas the chromosome of JFP838 contains 3,014 protein-encoding genes. Comparison of these two chromosomes with three available reference C. perfringens chromosome sequences identified 48 (~247 kb) and 81 (~430 kb) regions unique to JFP55 and JFP838, respectively. Some of these divergent genomic regions in both chromosomes are phage- and plasmid-related segments. Sixteen of these unique chromosomal regions (~69 kb) were shared between the two isolates. Five of these shared regions formed a mosaic of plasmid-integrated segments, suggesting that these elements were acquired early in a clonal lineage of netF-positive C. perfringens strains. These results provide significant insight into the basis of canine and foal necrotizing enteritis and are the first to demonstrate that netF resides on a large and

  16. Plasmid Characterization and Chromosome Analysis of Two netF+ Clostridium perfringens Isolates Associated with Foal and Canine Necrotizing Enteritis.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh Gohari, Iman; Kropinski, Andrew M; Weese, Scott J; Parreira, Valeria R; Whitehead, Ashley E; Boerlin, Patrick; Prescott, John F

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of a novel beta-pore-forming toxin, NetF, which is strongly associated with canine and foal necrotizing enteritis should improve our understanding of the role of type A Clostridium perfringens associated disease in these animals. The current study presents the complete genome sequence of two netF-positive strains, JFP55 and JFP838, which were recovered from cases of foal necrotizing enteritis and canine hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, respectively. Genome sequencing was done using Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) technology-PacBio and Illumina Hiseq2000. The JFP55 and JFP838 genomes include a single 3.34 Mb and 3.53 Mb chromosome, respectively, and both genomes include five circular plasmids. Plasmid annotation revealed that three plasmids were shared by the two newly sequenced genomes, including a NetF/NetE toxins-encoding tcp-conjugative plasmid, a CPE/CPB2 toxins-encoding tcp-conjugative plasmid and a putative bacteriocin-encoding plasmid. The putative beta-pore-forming toxin genes, netF, netE and netG, were located in unique pathogenicity loci on tcp-conjugative plasmids. The C. perfringens JFP55 chromosome carries 2,825 protein-coding genes whereas the chromosome of JFP838 contains 3,014 protein-encoding genes. Comparison of these two chromosomes with three available reference C. perfringens chromosome sequences identified 48 (~247 kb) and 81 (~430 kb) regions unique to JFP55 and JFP838, respectively. Some of these divergent genomic regions in both chromosomes are phage- and plasmid-related segments. Sixteen of these unique chromosomal regions (~69 kb) were shared between the two isolates. Five of these shared regions formed a mosaic of plasmid-integrated segments, suggesting that these elements were acquired early in a clonal lineage of netF-positive C. perfringens strains. These results provide significant insight into the basis of canine and foal necrotizing enteritis and are the first to demonstrate that netF resides on a large and

  17. Plasmid Characterization and Chromosome Analysis of Two netF+ Clostridium perfringens Isolates Associated with Foal and Canine Necrotizing Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Mehdizadeh Gohari, Iman; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Weese, Scott J.; Parreira, Valeria R.; Whitehead, Ashley E.; Boerlin, Patrick; Prescott, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of a novel beta-pore-forming toxin, NetF, which is strongly associated with canine and foal necrotizing enteritis should improve our understanding of the role of type A Clostridium perfringens associated disease in these animals. The current study presents the complete genome sequence of two netF-positive strains, JFP55 and JFP838, which were recovered from cases of foal necrotizing enteritis and canine hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, respectively. Genome sequencing was done using Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) technology-PacBio and Illumina Hiseq2000. The JFP55 and JFP838 genomes include a single 3.34 Mb and 3.53 Mb chromosome, respectively, and both genomes include five circular plasmids. Plasmid annotation revealed that three plasmids were shared by the two newly sequenced genomes, including a NetF/NetE toxins-encoding tcp-conjugative plasmid, a CPE/CPB2 toxins-encoding tcp-conjugative plasmid and a putative bacteriocin-encoding plasmid. The putative beta-pore-forming toxin genes, netF, netE and netG, were located in unique pathogenicity loci on tcp-conjugative plasmids. The C. perfringens JFP55 chromosome carries 2,825 protein-coding genes whereas the chromosome of JFP838 contains 3,014 protein-encoding genes. Comparison of these two chromosomes with three available reference C. perfringens chromosome sequences identified 48 (~247 kb) and 81 (~430 kb) regions unique to JFP55 and JFP838, respectively. Some of these divergent genomic regions in both chromosomes are phage- and plasmid-related segments. Sixteen of these unique chromosomal regions (~69 kb) were shared between the two isolates. Five of these shared regions formed a mosaic of plasmid-integrated segments, suggesting that these elements were acquired early in a clonal lineage of netF-positive C. perfringens strains. These results provide significant insight into the basis of canine and foal necrotizing enteritis and are the first to demonstrate that netF resides on a large and

  18. Growth potential of Clostridium perfringens from spores in acidified beef, pork and poultry products during chilling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of C. perfringens to germinate and grow in acidified ground beef as well as in ten commercially prepared acidified beef, pork and poultry products was assessed. The pH of ground beef was adjusted using organic vinegar to achieve various pH values between 5.0 and 5.6; the pH of the commer...

  19. Assessing the performance of Clostridium perfringens cooling models for cooked, uncured meat and poultry products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat-resistant spores of C. perfringens may germinate and multiply in cooked meat and poultry products if the rate and extent of cooling does not occur in a timely manner. Therefore, six cooling models (PMP 7.0 broth model; PMIP Uncured Beef, Chicken, and Pork Models; Smith-Schaffner (version 3); a...

  20. [The occurrence of Escherichia coli, Aeromonas hydrophila, Plesiomonas shigelloides and Clostridium perfringens in the intestinal flora of gray herons (Ardea cinerea)].

    PubMed

    Glünder, G

    1989-05-01

    The flora of the large intestine of 92 grey herons was examined for the frequency of aerobic and microaerobic growing bacteria. Clostridium perfringens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Plesiomonas shigelloides and E. coli were isolated from 55%, 48%, 14% and 35% of the birds, respectively. It could be demonstrated that the findings of these bacteria in the intestinal flora are depending on the age of the birds. The percentage of carriers of Clostridium perfringens, Aeromonas hydrophila and Plesiomonas shigelloides was highest in nestlings younger than 18 days, less high in older nestlings and lowest in adult grey herons. Contrary to those bacteria, E. coli was found more often in the intestinal flora at increasing age of the birds. Salmonella spp. were isolated from 6 birds. Two birds yielded positive for Yersinia enterocolitica and Campylobacter spp., respectively. Other aerobic and microaerobic bacteria play a less significant role as part of the intestinal flora.

  1. Impact of a drug-free program on broiler chicken growth performances, gut health, Clostridium perfringens and Campylobacter jejuni occurrences at the farm level.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, M-L; Quessy, S; Letellier, A; Arsenault, J; Boulianne, M

    2015-08-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents as feed additives in poultry production is a public health concern due to the overall increase in antimicrobial resistance. Although some alternative products are commercially available, little is known on their potential impact on flock health and productivity. A prospective study involving 1.55 million birds was conducted on eight commercial broiler farms in Québec, Canada, to evaluate the impact of replacing antibiotic growth promoters and anticoccidial drugs by a drug-free program including improved brooding conditions, anticoccidial vaccination, essential oil-based feed additives, and water acidification. Various productivity and health parameters were compared between barns allocated to the conventional and the drug-free program. Zootechnical performances were monitored as productivity criteria. Clinical necrotic enteritis and subclinical enteritis occurrences, litter and fecal moistures content were measured, and microscopic gut health was evaluated. Clostridium perfringens and Campylobacter spp. strains were recovered from fecal samples collected during farm visits. Clostridium perfringens counts were used as poultry health indicators and Campylobacter prevalence was noted as well. The drug-free program was associated with a significant increase in feed conversion ratio and a decrease in mean live weight at slaughter and in daily weight gain. An increased incidence of necrotic enteritis outbreaks and subclinical enteritis cases, as well as an increase in litter moisture content at the end of the rearing period were also observed for this program. Mean microscopic intestinal lesion scores and prevalence of Campylobacter colonization were not statistically different between the two groups but the drug-free program was associated with higher Clostridium perfringens isolation rates. According to the current study design, the results suggest that substitution of antibiotic growth promoters and anticoccidial drugs by a drug

  2. Effect of rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) on growth control of Clostridium perfringens and lipid oxidation of ready-to-eat Jokbal (pig's trotters).

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Jin; Park, Keun-Cheol; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the antimicrobial effects of rooibos (tea extract), potassium lactate (PL) and sodium diacetate (SDA) mixture alone or in combinations on the growth of Clostridium perfringens vegetative cell and spore in ready-to-eat (RTE) Jokbal (pig's trotters). Addition of a combination of 10% rooibos and 4% PL + SDA inhibit growth of C. perfringens vegetative cell in Jokbal at 24 °C and 36 °C. The significant inhibition on germination and growth of C. perfringens spores was also observed in Jokbal with a combination of 10% rooibos and 4% PL + SDA (PL: 2.24%, SDA: 0.16%) at 24 °C. The Jokbal treated with 10% rooibos and 4% PL + SDA mixture had significantly (P < 0.05) lower TBARS values than the control at 10 and 24 °C. The lipid oxidation inhibition effect was the highest (P < 0.05) in anaerobic packed Jokbal with 10% rooibos. The addition of a combination of 10% rooibos and 4% PL + SDA during the processing of Jokbal prevented the growth of C. perfringens and the germination and growth of C. perfringens spores at room temperature. This study shows rooibos tea as a valuable natural food preservative in meat products.

  3. Effect of yeast-derived products and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on growth performance and local innate immune response of broiler chickens challenged with Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, M; Rogiewicz, A; McMillan, E; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Patterson, R; Slominski, B A

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of yeast-derived products on growth performance, gut lesion score, intestinal population of Clostridium perfringens, and local innate immunity of broiler chickens challenged with C. perfringens. One-day-old broiler chickens were randomly assigned to eight dietary treatments providing six replicate pens of 55 birds each per treatment. Dietary treatments consisted of Control diets without and with C. perfringens challenge, and diets containing bacitracin methylene disalicylate (BMD, 55 g/tonne), nucleotides (150 g/tonne), yeast cell wall (YCW, 300 g/tonne), and a commercial product Maxi-Gen Plus (1 kg/tonne) fed to chickens challenged with C. perfringens. Diets containing 10% distillers dried grains with solubles without and with C. perfringens challenge were also used. Birds were orally challenged with C. perfringens (10(8) colony-forming units (cfu)/bird) on day 14. On day 21, intestinal samples were collected for gene expression analysis. Pathogen challenge significantly (P < 0.05) impaired feed intake, body weight gain, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) shortly after the challenge (14-21 days). Increased C. perfringens counts and intestinal lesion scores were observed for challenged birds except the BMD-containing diet. Over the entire trial (1-35 days), no difference in growth performance was observed except the BMD diet which improved FCR over the Control, challenged group. Birds receiving nucleotides showed increased expression of toll-like receptors and cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-18 compared to the Control, challenged group. Expression of macrophage mannose receptor and IL-18 was upregulated in birds receiving YCW. Increased expression of cytokines and receptors involved in innate immunity in broilers receiving nucleotides and YCW suggests the immunomodulatory properties of these products under pathogen challenge conditions. PMID:26956683

  4. Gas gangrene caused by clostridium perfringens involving the liver, spleen, and heart in a man 20 years after an orthotopic liver transplant: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kitterer, Daniel; Braun, Niko; Jehs, Margit C; Schulte, Bernhard; Alscher, M Dominik; Latus, Joerg

    2014-04-01

    Despite advances in immunosuppression and liver transplant in the past, mortality and morbidity caused by infections remain major problems. We present a 71-year-old man who was admitted to our internal intensive care unit with septicemia. Upon admission, he had poorly localized epigastric pain and fever of 2 days ' duration. Twenty years earlier, he had undergone an orthotopic liver transplant. Testing revealed a high C-reactive protein level, elevated liver enzymes, and an acute kidney injury. A computer tomography scan showed 2 circular, non--rim-enhancing, totally emphysematous intrahepatic lesions. Additionally, gas could be seen in the portal veins mainly, as well as in the biliary system, in the right auricle, and the splenic veins. To the best of our knowledge, he showed no malignant lesion or predisposing trauma. Empirically, treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was begun, and the patient was transferred to the operating suite. When surgery began, blood cultures revealed the presence of gram-positive bacilli, which were identified as Clostridium perfringens. Seven hours after the surgery, the patient developed asystole and died. In septic patients presenting with severe hemolysis, Clostridium perfringens infection must be considered in the absence of a malignant lesion or a predisposing trauma; a previous episode of gastroenteritis might be a predisposing trauma by impairing the barrier of the intestinal flora, leading to Clostridium perfringens infection.

  5. Analysis of the virulence-associated RevSR two-component signal transduction system of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jackie K; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Adams, Vicki M; Quinsey, Noelene S; Rood, Julian I

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that causes human gas gangrene (clostridial myonecrosis) and food poisoning. Early studies showed that virulence was regulated by the VirSR two-component signal transduction system. However, our identification of the RevR orphan response regulator indicated that more than one system was involved in controlling virulence. To further characterize this virulence-associated regulator, gel mobility shift experiments, coupled with DNase I footprinting, were used to identify the RevR DNA binding sequence. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that an orphan sensor histidine kinase, CPE1757 (renamed RevS), was the cognate sensor of RevR. Interaction between RevS and RevR was demonstrated by use of a bacterial two-hybrid system and validated by protein-protein interaction studies using biolayer interferometry. To assess the involvement of RevS in virulence regulation, the revS gene was inactivated by Targetron insertion. When isogenic wild-type, revS and complemented revS strains were tested in a mouse myonecrosis model, the revS mutant was found to be attenuated in virulence, which was similar to the attenuation observed previously with the revR mutant. However, transcriptional analysis of selected RevR-regulated genes in the revS mutant revealed a different pattern of expression to a revR mutant, suggesting that the RevSR system is more complex than originally thought. Taken together, the results have led to the identification and characterization of the two essential parts of a new regulatory network that is involved in the regulation of virulence in C. perfringens. PMID:27267179

  6. Generation and characterization of recombinant bivalent fusion protein r-Cpib for immunotherapy against Clostridium perfringens beta and iota toxemia.

    PubMed

    Das, Shreya; Majumder, Saugata; Kingston, Joseph J; Batra, Harsh V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens beta (CPB) and iota (CPI) toxaemias result in some of the most lethal forms of haemorrhagic and necrotic enteritis and sudden death syndrome affecting especially neonates. While CPB enterotoxemia is one of the most common forms of clostridial enterotoxemia, CPI enterotoxemia though putatively considered to be rare is an emerging cause of concern. The similarities in clinical manifestation, gross and histopathology findings of both types of toxaemias coupled to the infrequency of CPI toxaemia might lead to symptomatic misidentification with Type C resulting in therapeutic failure due to habitual administration of CPB anti-toxin which is ineffective against CPI. Therefore in the present study, to generate a composite anti-toxin capable of neutralizing both toxaemias, a novel bivalent chimera r-Cpib was constructed by splicing the non-toxic C terminal binding regions of CPB and CPI, via a flexible glycine linker (G4S) by overlap-extension PCR. The fusion protein was characterized for its therapeutic abilities toward CPI and CPB toxin neutralizations. The r-Cpib was found to be non-toxic and could competitively inhibit binding of CPB to host cell receptors thereby reducing its cytotoxicity. Immunization of mice with r-Cpib generated specific antibodies capable of neutralizing the above toxaemias both in vitro and in vivo. Caco-2 cells exposed to a mixture of anti-r-Cpib sera and native CPI or CPB, displayed significantly superior protection against the respective toxins while passive challenge of mice with a similar mixture resulted in 83 and 91% protection against CPI and CPB respectively. Alternatively, mice exposed to a mixture of sham sera and native toxins died within 2-3 days. This work thus demonstrates r-Cpib as a novel bivalent fusion protein capable of efficient immunotherapy against C. perfringens CPI and CPB toxaemia. PMID:26774054

  7. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characterization of Clostridium perfringens Isolates from Darmbrand Cases in Post-World War II Germany

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Menglin; Li, Jihong

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C strains are the only non-type-A isolates that cause human disease. They are responsible for enteritis necroticans, which was termed Darmbrand when occurring in post-World War II Germany. Darmbrand strains were initially classified as type F because of their exceptional heat resistance but later identified as type C strains. Since only limited information exists regarding Darmbrand strains, this study genetically and phenotypically characterized seven 1940s era Darmbrand-associated strains. Results obtained indicated the following. (i) Five of these Darmbrand isolates belong to type C, carry beta-toxin (cpb) and enterotoxin (cpe) genes on large plasmids, and express both beta-toxin and enterotoxin. The other two isolates are cpe-negative type A. (ii) All seven isolates produce highly heat-resistant spores with D100 values (the time that a culture must be kept at 100°C to reduce its viability by 90%) of 7 to 40 min. (iii) All of the isolates surveyed produce the same variant small acid-soluble protein 4 (Ssp4) made by type A food poisoning isolates with a chromosomal cpe gene that also produce extremely heat-resistant spores. (iv) The Darmbrand isolates share a genetic background with type A chromosomal-cpe-bearing isolates. Finally, it was shown that both the cpe and cpb genes can be mobilized in Darmbrand isolates. These results suggest that C. perfringens type A and C strains that cause human food-borne illness share a spore heat resistance mechanism that likely favors their survival in temperature-abused food. They also suggest possible evolutionary relationships between Darmbrand strains and type A strains carrying a chromosomal cpe gene. PMID:23027533

  8. The NanI and NanJ Sialidases of Clostridium perfringens Are Not Essential for Virulence▿

    PubMed Central

    Chiarezza, Martina; Lyras, Dena; Pidot, Sacha J.; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Awad, Milena M.; Kennedy, Catherine L.; Cordner, Leanne M.; Phumoonna, Tongted; Poon, Rachael; Hughes, Meredith L.; Emmins, John J.; Alape-Girón, Alberto; Rood, Julian I.

    2009-01-01

    The essential toxin in Clostridium perfringens-mediated gas gangrene or clostridial myonecrosis is alpha-toxin, although other toxins and extracellular enzymes may also be involved. In many bacterial pathogens extracellular sialidases are important virulence factors, and it has been suggested that sialidases may play a role in gas gangrene. C. perfringens strains have combinations of three different sialidase genes, two of which, nanI and nanJ, encode secreted sialidases. The nanI and nanJ genes were insertionally inactivated by homologous recombination in derivatives of sequenced strain 13 and were shown to encode two functional secreted sialidases, NanI and NanJ. Analysis of these derivatives showed that NanI was the major sialidase in this organism. Mutation of nanI resulted in loss of most of the secreted sialidase activity, and the residual activity was eliminated by subsequent mutation of the nanJ gene. Only a slight reduction in the total sialidase activity was observed in a nanJ mutant. Cytotoxicity assays using the B16 melanoma cell line showed that supernatants containing NanI or overexpressing NanJ enhanced alpha-toxin-mediated cytotoxicity. Finally, the ability of nanI, nanJ, and nanIJ mutants to cause disease was assessed in a mouse myonecrosis model. No attenuation of virulence was observed for any of these strains, providing evidence that neither the NanI sialidase nor the NanJ sialidase is essential for virulence. PMID:19651873

  9. Analysis of the virulence-associated RevSR two-component signal transduction system of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jackie K; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Adams, Vicki M; Quinsey, Noelene S; Rood, Julian I

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that causes human gas gangrene (clostridial myonecrosis) and food poisoning. Early studies showed that virulence was regulated by the VirSR two-component signal transduction system. However, our identification of the RevR orphan response regulator indicated that more than one system was involved in controlling virulence. To further characterize this virulence-associated regulator, gel mobility shift experiments, coupled with DNase I footprinting, were used to identify the RevR DNA binding sequence. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that an orphan sensor histidine kinase, CPE1757 (renamed RevS), was the cognate sensor of RevR. Interaction between RevS and RevR was demonstrated by use of a bacterial two-hybrid system and validated by protein-protein interaction studies using biolayer interferometry. To assess the involvement of RevS in virulence regulation, the revS gene was inactivated by Targetron insertion. When isogenic wild-type, revS and complemented revS strains were tested in a mouse myonecrosis model, the revS mutant was found to be attenuated in virulence, which was similar to the attenuation observed previously with the revR mutant. However, transcriptional analysis of selected RevR-regulated genes in the revS mutant revealed a different pattern of expression to a revR mutant, suggesting that the RevSR system is more complex than originally thought. Taken together, the results have led to the identification and characterization of the two essential parts of a new regulatory network that is involved in the regulation of virulence in C. perfringens.

  10. The Details of Glycolipid Glycan Hydrolysis by the Structural Analysis of a Family 123 Glycoside Hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Noach, Ilit; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Laurie, Cassandra; Abe, Kento T; Alteen, Matthew G; Vocadlo, David J; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2016-08-14

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen of humans and animals whose genome encodes a wide variety of putative carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes that are increasingly being shown to be directed toward the cleavage of host glycans. Among these putative enzymes is a member of glycoside hydrolase family 123. Here we show that the recombinant enzyme (referred to as CpNga123) encoded by the gene cloned from C. perfringens strain ATCC 13124 (locus tag CPF_1473) is a β-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, similar to NgaP from Paenibacillus sp. TS12. Like NgaP, CpNga123 was able to cleave the terminal β-D-GalNAc-(1→4)-D-Gal and β-D-GalNAc-(1→3)-D-Gal motifs that would be found in glycosphigolipids. The X-ray crystal structure of CpNga123 revealed it to have an N-terminal β-sandwich domain and a (β/α)8-barrel catalytic domain with a C-terminal α-helical elaboration. The structures determined in complex with reaction products provide details of the -1 subsite architecture, catalytic residues, and a structural change in the active site that is likely required to enable hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond by promoting engagement of the substrate by the catalytic residues. The features of the active site support the likelihood of a substrate-assisted catalytic mechanism for this enzyme. The structures of an inactive mutant of CpNga123 in complex with intact GA2 and Gb4 glycosphingolipid motifs reveal insight into aglycon recognition and suggest that the kinked or pleated conformation of GA2 caused by the β-1,4-linkage between N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose, and the accommodation of this conformation by the enzyme active site, may be responsible for greater activity on GA2. PMID:27038508

  11. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of Clostridium perfringens isolates from Darmbrand cases in post-World War II Germany.

    PubMed

    Ma, Menglin; Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A

    2012-12-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C strains are the only non-type-A isolates that cause human disease. They are responsible for enteritis necroticans, which was termed Darmbrand when occurring in post-World War II Germany. Darmbrand strains were initially classified as type F because of their exceptional heat resistance but later identified as type C strains. Since only limited information exists regarding Darmbrand strains, this study genetically and phenotypically characterized seven 1940s era Darmbrand-associated strains. Results obtained indicated the following. (i) Five of these Darmbrand isolates belong to type C, carry beta-toxin (cpb) and enterotoxin (cpe) genes on large plasmids, and express both beta-toxin and enterotoxin. The other two isolates are cpe-negative type A. (ii) All seven isolates produce highly heat-resistant spores with D(100) values (the time that a culture must be kept at 100°C to reduce its viability by 90%) of 7 to 40 min. (iii) All of the isolates surveyed produce the same variant small acid-soluble protein 4 (Ssp4) made by type A food poisoning isolates with a chromosomal cpe gene that also produce extremely heat-resistant spores. (iv) The Darmbrand isolates share a genetic background with type A chromosomal-cpe-bearing isolates. Finally, it was shown that both the cpe and cpb genes can be mobilized in Darmbrand isolates. These results suggest that C. perfringens type A and C strains that cause human food-borne illness share a spore heat resistance mechanism that likely favors their survival in temperature-abused food. They also suggest possible evolutionary relationships between Darmbrand strains and type A strains carrying a chromosomal cpe gene.

  12. Influence of starch source on sporulation and enterotoxin production by Clostridium perfringens type A.

    PubMed

    Labbe, R; Somers, E; Duncan, C

    1976-03-01

    Of 16 different starch preparations tested, Clostridium perfringes NCTC 8798 yielded maximum sporulation and enterotoxin formation when ICN-soluble starch was included in Duncan and Strong sporulation medium. In general soluble starches were better than potato, corn, or arrowroot starch with regard to these two parameters. PMID:180885

  13. Influence of starch source on sporulation and enterotoxin production by Clostridium perfringens type A.

    PubMed

    Labbe, R; Somers, E; Duncan, C

    1976-03-01

    Of 16 different starch preparations tested, Clostridium perfringes NCTC 8798 yielded maximum sporulation and enterotoxin formation when ICN-soluble starch was included in Duncan and Strong sporulation medium. In general soluble starches were better than potato, corn, or arrowroot starch with regard to these two parameters.

  14. Crystal structure of the phosphate-binding protein (PBP-1) of an ABC-type phosphate transporter from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Richez, Magali; Bergonzi, Celine; Chabriere, Eric; Elias, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate limitation is an important environmental stress that affects the metabolism of various organisms and, in particular, can trigger the virulence of numerous bacterial pathogens. Clostridium perfringens, a human pathogen, is one of the most common causes of enteritis necroticans, gas gangrene and food poisoning. Here, we focused on the high affinity phosphate-binding protein (PBP-1) of an ABC-type transporter, responsible for cellular phosphate uptake. We report the crystal structure (1.65 Å resolution) of the protein in complex with phosphate. Interestingly, PBP-1 does not form the short, low-barrier hydrogen bond with phosphate that is typical of previously characterized phosphate-binding proteins, but rather a canonical hydrogen bond. In its unique binding configuration, PBP-1 forms an unusually high number of hydrogen bonds (14) with the phosphate anion. Discrimination experiments reveal that PBP-1 is the least selective PBP characterised so far and is able to discriminate phosphate from its close competing anion, arsenate, by ~150-fold.

  15. Detergent-resistant membrane microdomains facilitate Ib oligomer formation and biological activity of Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin.

    PubMed

    Hale, Martha L; Marvaud, Jean-Christophe; Popoff, Michel R; Stiles, Bradley G

    2004-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin consists of two separate proteins identified as a cell binding protein, iota b (Ib), which forms high-molecular-weight complexes on cells generating Na(+)/K(+)-permeable pores through which iota a (Ia), an ADP-ribosyltransferase, presumably enters the cytosol. Identity of the cell receptor and membrane domains involved in Ib binding, oligomer formation, and internalization is currently unknown. In this study, Vero (toxin-sensitive) and MRC-5 (toxin-resistant) cells were incubated with Ib, after which detergent-resistant membrane microdomains (DRMs) were extracted with cold Triton X-100. Western blotting revealed that Ib oligomers localized in DRMs extracted from Vero, but not MRC-5, cells while monomeric Ib was detected in the detergent-soluble fractions of both cell types. The Ib protoxin, previously shown to bind Vero cells but not form oligomers or induce cytotoxicity, was detected only in the soluble fractions. Vero cells pretreated with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C before addition of Ib indicated that glycosylphosphatidyl inositol-anchored proteins were minimally involved in Ib binding or oligomer formation. While pretreatment of Vero cells with filipin (which sequesters cholesterol) had no effect, methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (which extracts cholesterol) reduced Ib binding and oligomer formation and delayed iota-toxin cytotoxicity. These studies showed that iota-toxin exploits DRMs for oligomer formation to intoxicate cells.

  16. Crystal structure of the phosphate-binding protein (PBP-1) of an ABC-type phosphate transporter from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Richez, Magali; Bergonzi, Celine; Chabriere, Eric; Elias, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate limitation is an important environmental stress that affects the metabolism of various organisms and, in particular, can trigger the virulence of numerous bacterial pathogens. Clostridium perfringens, a human pathogen, is one of the most common causes of enteritis necroticans, gas gangrene and food poisoning. Here, we focused on the high affinity phosphate-binding protein (PBP-1) of an ABC-type transporter, responsible for cellular phosphate uptake. We report the crystal structure (1.65 Å resolution) of the protein in complex with phosphate. Interestingly, PBP-1 does not form the short, low-barrier hydrogen bond with phosphate that is typical of previously characterized phosphate-binding proteins, but rather a canonical hydrogen bond. In its unique binding configuration, PBP-1 forms an unusually high number of hydrogen bonds (14) with the phosphate anion. Discrimination experiments reveal that PBP-1 is the least selective PBP characterised so far and is able to discriminate phosphate from its close competing anion, arsenate, by ~150-fold. PMID:25338617

  17. Attack of the nervous system by Clostridium perfringens Epsilon toxin: from disease to mode of action on neural cells.

    PubMed

    Wioland, Laetitia; Dupont, Jean-Luc; Bossu, Jean-Louis; Popoff, Michel R; Poulain, Bernard

    2013-12-01

    Epsilon toxin (ET), produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, ranks among the four most potent poisonous substances known so far. ET-intoxication is responsible for enterotoxaemia in animals, mainly sheep and goats. This disease comprises several manifestations indicating the attack of the nervous system. This review aims to summarize the effects of ET on central nervous system. ET binds to endothelial cells of brain capillary vessels before passing through the blood-brain barrier. Therefore, it induces perivascular oedema and accumulates into brain. ET binding to different brain structures and to different component in the brain indicates regional susceptibility to the toxin. Histological examination has revealed nerve tissue and cellular lesions, which may be directly or indirectly caused by ET. The naturally occurring disease caused by ET-intoxication can be reproduced experimentally in rodents. In mice and rats, ET recognizes receptor at the surface of different neural cell types, including certain neurons (e.g. the granule cells in cerebellum) as well as oligodendrocytes, which are the glial cells responsible for the axons myelination. Moreover, ET induces release of glutamate and other transmitters, leading to firing of neural network. The precise mode of action of ET on neural cells remains to be determined.

  18. Clostridium perfringens Phospholipase C Induced ROS Production and Cytotoxicity Require PKC, MEK1 and NFκB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Pineda-Padilla, Maria Jose; Castro-Castro, Ana Cristina; Alape-Giron, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (CpPLC), also called α-toxin, is the most toxic extracellular enzyme produced by this bacteria and is essential for virulence in gas gangrene. At lytic concentrations, CpPLC causes membrane disruption, whereas at sublytic concentrations this toxin causes oxidative stress and activates the MEK/ERK pathway, which contributes to its cytotoxic and myotoxic effects. In the present work, the role of PKC, ERK 1/2 and NFκB signalling pathways in ROS generation induced by CpPLC and their contribution to CpPLC-induced cytotoxicity was evaluated. The results demonstrate that CpPLC induces ROS production through PKC, MEK/ERK and NFκB pathways, the latter being activated by the MEK/ERK signalling cascade. Inhibition of either of these signalling pathways prevents CpPLC's cytotoxic effect. In addition, it was demonstrated that NFκB inhibition leads to a significant reduction in the myotoxicity induced by intramuscular injection of CpPLC in mice. Understanding the role of these signalling pathways could lead towards developing rational therapeutic strategies aimed to reduce cell death during a clostridialmyonecrosis. PMID:24466113

  19. Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C induced ROS production and cytotoxicity require PKC, MEK1 and NFκB activation.

    PubMed

    Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Pineda-Padilla, Maria Jose; Castro-Castro, Ana Cristina; Alape-Giron, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (CpPLC), also called α-toxin, is the most toxic extracellular enzyme produced by this bacteria and is essential for virulence in gas gangrene. At lytic concentrations, CpPLC causes membrane disruption, whereas at sublytic concentrations this toxin causes oxidative stress and activates the MEK/ERK pathway, which contributes to its cytotoxic and myotoxic effects. In the present work, the role of PKC, ERK 1/2 and NFκB signalling pathways in ROS generation induced by CpPLC and their contribution to CpPLC-induced cytotoxicity was evaluated. The results demonstrate that CpPLC induces ROS production through PKC, MEK/ERK and NFκB pathways, the latter being activated by the MEK/ERK signalling cascade. Inhibition of either of these signalling pathways prevents CpPLC's cytotoxic effect. In addition, it was demonstrated that NFκB inhibition leads to a significant reduction in the myotoxicity induced by intramuscular injection of CpPLC in mice. Understanding the role of these signalling pathways could lead towards developing rational therapeutic strategies aimed to reduce cell death during a clostridialmyonecrosis. PMID:24466113

  20. Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin mutant Y30A-Y196A as a recombinant vaccine candidate against enterotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Hall, Charlotte A; Vance, Charlotte; Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P; Savva, Christos G; Naylor, Claire E; Cole, Ambrose R; Basak, Ajit K; Moss, David S; Titball, Richard W

    2014-05-13

    Epsilon toxin (Etx) is a β-pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens toxinotypes B and D and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of enterotoxemia, a severe, often fatal disease of ruminants that causes significant economic losses to the farming industry worldwide. This study aimed to determine the potential of a site-directed mutant of Etx (Y30A-Y196A) to be exploited as a recombinant vaccine against enterotoxemia. Replacement of Y30 and Y196 with alanine generated a stable variant of Etx with significantly reduced cell binding and cytotoxic activities in MDCK.2 cells relative to wild type toxin (>430-fold increase in CT50) and Y30A-Y196A was inactive in mice after intraperitoneal administration of trypsin activated toxin at 1000× the expected LD50 dose of trypsin activated wild type toxin. Moreover, polyclonal antibody raised in rabbits against Y30A-Y196A provided protection against wild type toxin in an in vitro neutralisation assay. These data suggest that Y30A-Y196A mutant could form the basis of an improved recombinant vaccine against enterotoxemia. PMID:24709588

  1. Roles of Asp179 and Glu270 in ADP-Ribosylation of Actin by Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Tabakova, Irina; Lang, Alexander E.; Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota toxin is a binary toxin composed of the enzymatically active component Ia and receptor binding component Ib. Ia is an ADP-ribosyltransferase, which modifies Arg177 of actin. The previously determined crystal structure of the actin-Ia complex suggested involvement of Asp179 of actin in the ADP-ribosylation reaction. To gain more insights into the structural requirements of actin to serve as a substrate for toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, we engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, in which wild type actin was replaced by actin variants with substitutions in residues located on the Ia-actin interface. Expression of the actin mutant Arg177Lys resulted in complete resistance towards Ia. Actin mutation of Asp179 did not change Ia-induced ADP-ribosylation and growth inhibition of S. cerevisiae. By contrast, substitution of Glu270 of actin inhibited the toxic action of Ia and the ADP-ribosylation of actin. In vitro transcribed/translated human β-actin confirmed the crucial role of Glu270 in ADP-ribosylation of actin by Ia. PMID:26713879

  2. Use of Plant Extracts as an Effective Manner to Control Clostridium perfringens Induced Necrotic Enteritis in Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, J. E.; Chacana, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is an important concern in poultry industry since it causes economic losses, increased mortality, reduction of bird welfare, and contamination of chicken products for human consumption. For decades, the use of in-feed antimicrobial growth promoters (AGPs) has been the main strategy to control intestinal pathogens including Clostridium perfringens (CP), the causative agent of NE. However, the use of AGPs in animal diet has been linked to the emergence and transmission of antimicrobial resistance through food-borne microorganisms, which has led to the ban of AGPs in many countries. This scenario has challenged the poultry industry to search for safer alternative products in order to prevent NE. In this context, the utilization of natural plant extracts with antimicrobial properties appears as a promising and feasible tool to control NE in chicken. In this paper, we review the scientific studies analyzing the potential of plant extracts as alternative feed additives to reduce NE in poultry, with focus on two types of plant products that arise as promising candidates: tannins and essential oils. Some of these products showed antimicrobial activity against CP and coccidia in vitro and in vivo and are able to increase productive performance, emulating the bioactive properties of AGPs. PMID:27747227

  3. Interaction of Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin with biological and model membranes: A putative protein receptor in cells.

    PubMed

    Manni, Marco M; Sot, Jesús; Goñi, Félix M

    2015-03-01

    Epsilon-toxin (ETX) is a powerful toxin produced by some strains of Clostridium perfringens (classified as types B and D) that is responsible for enterotoxemia in animals. ETX forms pores through the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, consisting of a β-barrel of 14 amphipathic β-strands. ETX shows a high specificity for certain cell lines, of which Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) is the first sensitive cell line identified and the most studied one. The aim of this study was to establish the role of lipids in the toxicity caused by ETX and the correlation of its activity in model and biological membranes. In MDCK cells, using cell counting and confocal microscopy, we have observed that the toxin causes cell death mediated by toxin binding to plasma membrane. Moreover, ETX binds and permeabilizes the membranes of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMV). However, little effect is observed on protein-free vesicles. The data suggest the essential role of a protein receptor for the toxin in cell membranes.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of Satureja montana L. essential oil against Clostridium perfringens type A inoculated in mortadella-type sausages formulated with different levels of sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; de Araújo Soares, Rodrigo; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes; das Graças Cardoso, Maria; Alves, Eduardo; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf

    2011-01-01

    This research evaluated the antimicrobial effect of the winter savory (Satureja montana L.) essential oil (EO) against Clostridium perfringens type A (ATCC 3624) inoculated in mortadella-type sausages formulated with different levels of sodium nitrite (NaNO₂: 0 ppm, 100 ppm and 200 ppm) in addition to EO at concentrations of 0.0%, 0.78%, 1.56% and 3.125% stored at 25°C for 30 days. The EO extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (CG-MS) was tested in vitro using an agar well diffusion method for determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) on C. perfringens. According to compositional analysis of the winter savory EO, 26 chemical compounds were identified, and the major constituents were thymol (28.99%), p-cymene (12.00%), linalool (11.00%) and carvacrol (10.71%). The results obtained showed that EO applied at a concentration of 1.56%, which was defined as the MIC, exhibited antimicrobial activity against C. perfringens in the in vitro assays, and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed structural damage and cell lysis of C. perfringens caused by EO treatment. A synergistic effect between NaNO₂ and EO was observed. In mortadella-type sausages formulated with 100 ppm of NaNO₂ and EO at all concentrations tested, the population of target microorganisms was reduced (p≤0.05) compared to control samples during all storage period. This data suggests the potential combined use of savory EO and minimal amounts of the synthetic additive, NaNO₂ to control C. perfringens in mortadella, which goes according to current market trends, where consumers are requesting natural products. PMID:21131083

  5. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium.

    PubMed

    Seal, Bruce S

    2013-02-01

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently used antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human foodborne disease as well as non-foodborne human, animal, and avian diseases. Countries that have complied with the ban on antimicrobial growth promoters in feeds have reported increased incidences of C. perfringens-associated diseases in poultry. To address these issues, new antimicrobial agents, putative lysins encoded by the genomes of bacteriophages, are being identified in our laboratory. Poultry intestinal material, soil, sewage, and poultry processing drainage water were screened for virulent bacteriophages that could lyse C. perfringens and produce clear plaques in spot assays. Bacteriophages were isolated that had long noncontractile tails, members of the family Siphoviridae, and with short noncontractile tails, members of the family Podoviridae. Several bacteriophage genes were identified that encoded N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases, lysozyme-endopeptidases, and a zinc carboxypeptidase domain that has not been previously reported in viral genomes. Putative phage lysin genes (ply) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant lysins were amidases capable of lysing both parental phage host strains of C. perfringens as well as other strains of the bacterium in spot and turbidity reduction assays, but did not lyse any clostridia beyond the species. Consequently, bacteriophage gene products could eventually be used to target bacterial pathogens, such as C. perfringens via a species-specific strategy, to control animal and human diseases without having deleterious effects on beneficial probiotic bacteria. PMID:23300321

  6. Impact of cooking, cooling, and subsequent refrigeration on the growth or survival of Clostridium perfringens in cooked meat and poultry products.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Robin M; Tompkin, R Bruce; Bodnaruk, Peter W; Pruett, W Payton

    2003-07-01

    In January 1999, the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) finalized performance standards for the cooking and chilling of meat and poultry products in federally inspected establishments. More restrictive chilling (stabilization) requirements were adopted despite the lack of strong evidence of a public health risk posed by industry practices employing the original May 1988 guidelines (U.S. Department of Agriculture FSIS Directive 7110.3). Baseline data led the FSIS to estimate a "worst case" of 10(4) Clostridium perfringens cells per g in raw meat products. The rationale for the FSIS performance standards was based on this estimate and the assumption that the numbers detected in the baseline study were spores that could survive cooking. The assumptions underlying the regulation stimulated work in our laboratory to help address why there have been so few documented outbreaks of C. perfringens illness associated with the consumption of commercially processed cooked meat and poultry products. Our research took into account the numbers of C. perfringens spores in both raw and cooked products. One hundred ninety-seven raw comminuted meat samples were cooked to 73.9 degrees C and analyzed for C. perfringens levels. All but two samples had undetectable levels (<3 spores per g). Two ground pork samples contained 3.3 and 66 spores per g. Research was also conducted to determine the effect of chilling on the outgrowth of C. perfringens spores in cured and uncured turkey. Raw meat blends inoculated with C. perfringens spores, cooked to 73.9 degrees C, and chilled according to current guidelines or under abuse conditions yielded increases of 2.25 and 2.44 log10 CFU/g for uncured turkey chilled for 6 h and an increase of 3.07 log10 CFU/g for cured turkey chilled for 24 h. No growth occurred in cured turkey during a 6-h cooling period. Furthermore, the fate of C. perfringens in cooked cured and uncured turkey held at refrigeration temperatures was investigated. C

  7. Comparison of the Effect of Curing Ingredients Derived from Purified and Natural Sources on Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens Outgrowth during Cooling of Deli-Style Turkey Breast.

    PubMed

    King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2015-08-01

    The antimicrobial impact of purified and natural sources of both nitrite and ascorbate were evaluated against Clostridium perfringens during the postthermal processing cooling period of deli-style turkey breast. The objective of phase I was to assess comparable concentrations of nitrite (0 or 100 ppm) and ascorbate (0 or 547 ppm) from both purified and natural sources. Phase II was conducted to investigate concentrations of nitrite (50, 75, or 100 ppm) from cultured celery juice powder and ascorbate (0, 250, or 500 ppm) from cherry powder to simulate alternative curing formulations. Ground turkey breast (75% moisture, 1.2% salt, pH 6.2) treatments were inoculated with C. perfringens spores (three-strain mixture) to yield 2.5 log CFU/g. Individual 50-g portions were vacuum packaged, cooked to 71.1°C, and chilled from 54.4 to 26.7°C in 5 h and from 26.7 to 7.2°C in 10 additional hours. Triplicate samples were assayed for growth of C. perfringens at predetermined intervals by plating on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar; experiments were replicated three times. In phase I, uncured, purified nitrite, and natural nitrite treatments without ascorbate had 5.3-, 4.2-, and 4.4-log increases in C. perfringens, respectively, at 15 h, but <1-log increase was observed at the end of chilling in treatments containing 100 ppm of nitrite and 547 ppm of ascorbate from either source. In phase II, 0, 50, 75, and 100 ppm of nitrite and 50 ppm of nitrite plus 250 ppm of ascorbate supported 4.5-, 3.9-, 3.5-, 2.2-, and 1.5-log increases in C. perfringens, respectively. In contrast, <1-log increase was observed after 15 h in the remaining phase II treatments supplemented with 50 ppm of nitrite and 500 ppm of ascorbate or ≥75 ppm of nitrite and ≥250 ppm of ascorbate. These results confirm that equivalent concentrations of nitrite, regardless of the source, provide similar inhibition of C. perfringens during chilling and that ascorbate enhances the antimicrobial effect of nitrite on C

  8. Comparison of the Effect of Curing Ingredients Derived from Purified and Natural Sources on Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens Outgrowth during Cooling of Deli-Style Turkey Breast.

    PubMed

    King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2015-08-01

    The antimicrobial impact of purified and natural sources of both nitrite and ascorbate were evaluated against Clostridium perfringens during the postthermal processing cooling period of deli-style turkey breast. The objective of phase I was to assess comparable concentrations of nitrite (0 or 100 ppm) and ascorbate (0 or 547 ppm) from both purified and natural sources. Phase II was conducted to investigate concentrations of nitrite (50, 75, or 100 ppm) from cultured celery juice powder and ascorbate (0, 250, or 500 ppm) from cherry powder to simulate alternative curing formulations. Ground turkey breast (75% moisture, 1.2% salt, pH 6.2) treatments were inoculated with C. perfringens spores (three-strain mixture) to yield 2.5 log CFU/g. Individual 50-g portions were vacuum packaged, cooked to 71.1°C, and chilled from 54.4 to 26.7°C in 5 h and from 26.7 to 7.2°C in 10 additional hours. Triplicate samples were assayed for growth of C. perfringens at predetermined intervals by plating on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar; experiments were replicated three times. In phase I, uncured, purified nitrite, and natural nitrite treatments without ascorbate had 5.3-, 4.2-, and 4.4-log increases in C. perfringens, respectively, at 15 h, but <1-log increase was observed at the end of chilling in treatments containing 100 ppm of nitrite and 547 ppm of ascorbate from either source. In phase II, 0, 50, 75, and 100 ppm of nitrite and 50 ppm of nitrite plus 250 ppm of ascorbate supported 4.5-, 3.9-, 3.5-, 2.2-, and 1.5-log increases in C. perfringens, respectively. In contrast, <1-log increase was observed after 15 h in the remaining phase II treatments supplemented with 50 ppm of nitrite and 500 ppm of ascorbate or ≥75 ppm of nitrite and ≥250 ppm of ascorbate. These results confirm that equivalent concentrations of nitrite, regardless of the source, provide similar inhibition of C. perfringens during chilling and that ascorbate enhances the antimicrobial effect of nitrite on C

  9. ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO EPSILON TOXIN OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN CAPTIVE RED DEER (CERVUS ELAPHUS) OVER A 13-MONTH PERIOD.

    PubMed

    Scala, Christopher; Duffard, Nicolas; Beauchamp, Guy; Boullier, Séverine; Locatelli, Yann

    2016-03-01

    Deer are sensitive to clostridial diseases, and vaccination with clostridial toxoids is the method of choice to prevent these infections in ruminants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the serologic responses in red deer (Cervus elaphus) over a 13-mo period after vaccination with a multivalent clostridial vaccine, containing an aluminium hydroxide adjuvant. Antibody production to the Clostridium perfringens type D epsilon toxin component of the vaccine was measured using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Animals from group 1 (9 mo old; n = 6) were naïve and received an initial vaccination with a booster vaccine 4 wk apart and one annual booster. Animals from group 2 (21 mo old; n = 10) had been previously vaccinated 12 mo prior and received a first annual booster at the beginning of this study and a second annual booster 12 mo later. The multivalent clostridial vaccine induced a high antibody response that peaked after each injection and then slowly decreased with time. In group 1, a booster vaccine was required to obtain an initial high humoral response. The annual booster injection induced a strong, rapid, and consistent anamnestic response in both groups. The serologic responses persisted significantly over the baseline value for 9-12 mo in group 1, but more than 12 mo in group 2. It is unknown whether the measured humoral immune responses would have been protective as no challenge studies were performed. Further investigation is needed to determine the protective antibody titers to challenge and how long this immunity might persist after vaccination. PMID:27010263

  10. Enhanced expression of recombinant beta toxin of Clostridium perfringens type B using a commercially available Escherichia coli strain.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Fatemah; Pilehchian Langroudi, Reza; Imani, Bahram Golestani

    2016-06-30

    Clostridium perfringens beta toxin is only produced by types B and C and plays an important role in many human and animal diseases, causing fatal conditions that originate in the intestines. We compared the expression of C. perfringens type B vaccine strain recombinant beta toxin gene in the Escherichia coli strains RosettaTM(DE3) and BL21(DE3). The beta toxin gene was extracted from pJETβ and ligated with pET22b(+). pET22β was transformed into E. coli strains BL21(DE3) and RosettaTM(DE3). Recombinant protein was expressed as a soluble protein after isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction in strain RosettaTM(DE3) but not in BL21(DE3). Expression was optimised by growing recombinant cells at 37 °C and at an induction of 0.5 mM, 1 mM, 1.5 mM IPTG. Expression was evaluated using sodium dodecyl sulfate Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The recombinant protein was purified via Ni-NTA and was analysed using western blot. We concluded that E. coli strain RosettaTM(DE3) can enhance the expression of C. perfringens recombinant beta toxin.

  11. A chimeric protein composed of the binding domains of Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C and Trueperella pyogenes pyolysin induces partial immunoprotection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunhao; Zhang, Wenlong; Bao, Jun; Wu, Yuhong; Yan, Minghui; Xiao, Ya; Yang, Lingxiao; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Junwei

    2016-08-01

    Trueperella pyogenes and Clostridium perfringens are two kinds of conditional pathogens frequently associated with wound infections and succeeding lethal complications in various economic livestock. Pyolysin (PLO) and phospholipase C (PLC) are the key virulence factors of these two pathogens, respectively. In our study, a chimeric protein called rPC-PD4, which is composed of the binding regions of PLO and PLC, was synthesized. The toxicity of rPC-PD4 was evaluated. Results revealed that rPC-PD4 is a safe chimeric molecule that can be used to develop vaccines. Immunizing BALB/c mice with rPC-PD4 induced high titers of serum antibodies that could efficiently neutralize the hemolytic activity of recombinant PLO and PLC. After the challenge with T. pyogenes or C. perfringens was performed through the intraperitoneal route, we observed that rPC-PD4 immunization could provide partial immunoprotection and reduce lung, intestine, and liver tissue damage to mice. This work demonstrated the efficacy of the rationally designed rPC-PD4 chimeric protein as a potential vaccine candidate against C. perfringens and T. pyogenes. PMID:27473983

  12. The effect of calcium and sodium lactates on growth from spores of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium perfringens in a 'sous-vide' beef goulash under temperature abuse.

    PubMed

    Aran, N

    2001-01-22

    The effect of calcium and sodium lactates on growth from spores of Bacillus cereus and Clostridium perfringens at three different concentrations (0, 1.5 and 3% w/w) and at different temperatures (10, 15 and 20 degrees C for B. cereus and 15, 20 and 25 degrees C for C. perfringens) was investigated, using beef goulash as a model system for pasteurised vacuum-packaged convenience foods. Calcium lactate at a level of 3% reduced the pH values of the samples from 6.0 to 5.5. No B. cereus growth was observed at 10 degrees C, but after 7 days at an incubation temperature of 15 degrees C, cell number increased by 1 log cfu/g in the control samples. At this temperature, lactates were seen to be effective at inhibiting growth. Calcium lactate was more inhibitory than sodium lactate as the growth of B. cereus was inhibited at 1.5 and 3% concentrations at 20 degrees C, respectively. Growth of C. perfringens was arrested in the presence of 1.5% calcium lactate at all storage temperatures, whereas growth was inhibited by 3% sodium lactate only at 15 degrees C. PMID:11205943

  13. Enhanced expression of recombinant beta toxin of Clostridium perfringens type B using a commercially available Escherichia coli strain.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Fatemah; Pilehchian Langroudi, Reza; Imani, Bahram Golestani

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens beta toxin is only produced by types B and C and plays an important role in many human and animal diseases, causing fatal conditions that originate in the intestines. We compared the expression of C. perfringens type B vaccine strain recombinant beta toxin gene in the Escherichia coli strains RosettaTM(DE3) and BL21(DE3). The beta toxin gene was extracted from pJETβ and ligated with pET22b(+). pET22β was transformed into E. coli strains BL21(DE3) and RosettaTM(DE3). Recombinant protein was expressed as a soluble protein after isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction in strain RosettaTM(DE3) but not in BL21(DE3). Expression was optimised by growing recombinant cells at 37 °C and at an induction of 0.5 mM, 1 mM, 1.5 mM IPTG. Expression was evaluated using sodium dodecyl sulfate Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The recombinant protein was purified via Ni-NTA and was analysed using western blot. We concluded that E. coli strain RosettaTM(DE3) can enhance the expression of C. perfringens recombinant beta toxin. PMID:27543150

  14. Ex vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship of valnemulin against Clostridium perfringens in plasma, the small intestinal and caecal contents of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Feng; Yu, Yang; Sun, Jian; Tao, Meng-Ting; Zhou, Wen-Jie; Li, Xiao; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) and ex vivo pharmacodynamic (PD) of valnemulin against Clostridium perfringens were investigated in plasma, the small intestinal and caecal contents of rabbits following intravenous (IV) or oral administration at 3 mg/kg bodyweight (BW). The postantibiotic effect (PAE) and postantibiotic sub-MIC effect (PA-SME) of valnemulin against C. perfringens ATCC13124 were also determined. The time-kill curves were established in vitro and ex vivo to evaluate the antibacterial activity of valnemulin against C. perfringens. The elimination half-lives (T1/2λz) of valnemulin in the jejunal fluids (7.82 h) or caecal contents (14.8 h) of rabbits was significantly longer than that in plasma (2.94 h). The MIC values of valnemulin against C. perfringens ATCC13124 were both 0.063 μg/mL in the artificial medium and jejunal fluids. The PAEs of valnemulin against C. perfringens were 2.9 h (1 × MIC) and 5.03 h (4 × MIC), and the PA-SMEs ranged from 7.9 h to 11.1 h. Valnemulin exhibited rapid, time-dependent killing feature, and the ex vivo dose-response profile was closely fitted to sigmoid Emax model (r(2) = 0.9985). The surrogate index of AUC24 h/MIC ratios required to achieve the bactericidal and virtual bacterial elimination effects were 57.5 and 90.1 h, respectively. Accordingly, the calculated daily dosage regimens of valnemulin for the bactericidal activity (1.96 mg/kg) and bacterial elimination (3.08 mg/kg) would be therapeutically effective in rabbits against C. perfringens with MIC ≤0.5 μg/mL.

  15. Ex vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship of valnemulin against Clostridium perfringens in plasma, the small intestinal and caecal contents of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Feng; Yu, Yang; Sun, Jian; Tao, Meng-Ting; Zhou, Wen-Jie; Li, Xiao; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) and ex vivo pharmacodynamic (PD) of valnemulin against Clostridium perfringens were investigated in plasma, the small intestinal and caecal contents of rabbits following intravenous (IV) or oral administration at 3 mg/kg bodyweight (BW). The postantibiotic effect (PAE) and postantibiotic sub-MIC effect (PA-SME) of valnemulin against C. perfringens ATCC13124 were also determined. The time-kill curves were established in vitro and ex vivo to evaluate the antibacterial activity of valnemulin against C. perfringens. The elimination half-lives (T1/2λz) of valnemulin in the jejunal fluids (7.82 h) or caecal contents (14.8 h) of rabbits was significantly longer than that in plasma (2.94 h). The MIC values of valnemulin against C. perfringens ATCC13124 were both 0.063 μg/mL in the artificial medium and jejunal fluids. The PAEs of valnemulin against C. perfringens were 2.9 h (1 × MIC) and 5.03 h (4 × MIC), and the PA-SMEs ranged from 7.9 h to 11.1 h. Valnemulin exhibited rapid, time-dependent killing feature, and the ex vivo dose-response profile was closely fitted to sigmoid Emax model (r(2) = 0.9985). The surrogate index of AUC24 h/MIC ratios required to achieve the bactericidal and virtual bacterial elimination effects were 57.5 and 90.1 h, respectively. Accordingly, the calculated daily dosage regimens of valnemulin for the bactericidal activity (1.96 mg/kg) and bacterial elimination (3.08 mg/kg) would be therapeutically effective in rabbits against C. perfringens with MIC ≤0.5 μg/mL. PMID:27060276

  16. Functional Analysis of a Bacitracin Resistance Determinant Located on ICECp1, a Novel Tn916-Like Element from a Conjugative Plasmid in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaoyan; Du, Xiang-Dang; Southey, Luke; Bulach, Dieter M.; Seemann, Torsten; Yan, Xu-Xia; Bannam, Trudi L.

    2015-01-01

    Bacitracins are mixtures of structurally related cyclic polypeptides with antibiotic properties. They act by interfering with the biosynthesis of the bacterial cell wall. In this study, we analyzed an avian necrotic enteritis strain of Clostridium perfringens that was resistant to bacitracin and produced NetB toxin. We identified a bacitracin resistance locus that resembled a bacitracin resistance determinant from Enterococcus faecalis. It contained the structural genes bcrABD and a putative regulatory gene, bcrR. Mutagenesis studies provided evidence that both bcrA and bcrB are essential for bacitracin resistance, and that evidence was supported by the results of experiments in which the introduction of both the bcrA and bcrB genes into a bacitracin-susceptible C. perfringens strain was required to confer bacitracin resistance. The wild-type strain was shown to contain at least three large, putatively conjugative plasmids, and the bcrRABD locus was localized to an 89.7-kb plasmid, pJIR4150. This plasmid was experimentally shown to be conjugative and was sequenced. The sequence revealed that it also carries a tpeL toxin gene and is related to the pCW3 family of conjugative antibiotic resistance and toxin plasmids from C. perfringens. The bcr genes were located on a genetic element, ICECp1, which is related to the Tn916 family of integrative conjugative elements (ICEs). ICECp1 appears to be the first Tn916-like element shown to confer bacitracin resistance. In summary, we identified in a toxin-producing C. perfringens strain a novel mobile bacitracin resistance element which was experimentally shown to be essential for bacitracin resistance and is carried by a putative ICE located on a conjugative plasmid. PMID:26282424

  17. Type IV pili and the CcpA protein are needed for maximal biofilm formation by the gram-positive anaerobic pathogen Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Varga, John J; Therit, Blair; Melville, Stephen B

    2008-11-01

    The predominant organizational state of bacteria in nature is biofilms. Biofilms have been shown to increase bacterial resistance to a variety of stresses. We demonstrate for the first time that the anaerobic gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens forms biofilms. At the same concentration of glucose in the medium, optimal biofilm formation depended on a functional CcpA protein. While the ratio of biofilm to planktonic growth was higher in the wild type than in a ccpA mutant strain in middle to late stages of biofilm development, the bacteria shifted from a predominantly biofilm state to planktonic growth as the concentration of glucose in the medium increased in a CcpA-independent manner. As is the case in some gram-negative bacteria, type IV pilus (TFP)-dependent gliding motility was necessary for efficient biofilm formation, as demonstrated by laser confocal and electron microscopy. However, TFP were not associated with the bacteria in the biofilm but with the extracellular matrix. Biofilms afforded C. perfringens protection from environmental stress, including exposure to atmospheric oxygen for 6 h and 24 h and to 10 mM H(2)O(2) for 5 min. Biofilm cells also showed 5- to 15-fold-increased survival over planktonic cells after exposure to 20 microg/ml (27 times the MIC) of penicillin G for 6 h and 24 h, respectively. These results indicate C. perfringens biofilms play an important role in the persistence of the bacteria in response to environmental stress and that they may be a factor in diseases, such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea and gas gangrene, that are caused by C. perfringens.

  18. Differential outgrowth potential of Clostridium perfringens food-borne isolates with various cpe-genotypes in vacuum-packed ground beef during storage at 12°C.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yinghua; Wagendorp, Arjen; Abee, Tjakko; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J

    2015-02-01

    In the current study, the outgrowth of spores of 15 different food isolates of Clostridium perfringens was evaluated in vacuum-packed ground beef during storage at 12°C and 25°C. This included enterotoxic strains carrying the gene encoding the CPE enterotoxin on the chromosome (C-cpe), on a plasmid (P-cpe) and cpe-negative strains. The 15 strains were selected from a larger group of strains that were first evaluated for their ability to sporulate in modified Duncan-Strong sporulating medium. Sporulation ability varied greatly between strains but was not associated with a particular cpe genotype. In line with previous studies, the tested C-cpe strains produced spores with significantly higher heat resistance than the cpe-negative and P-cpe strains (both IS1151 and IS1470-like) with the exception of strain VWA009. Following inoculation of vacuum-packed cooked ground beef with spores, the heat-resistant C-cpe strains showed lower outgrowth potential in this model food stored at 12°C than the P-cpe and cpe-negative strains, while no significant differences were observed at 25°C. These results suggest that the latter strains may have a competitive advantage over C-cpe strains at reduced temperatures during storage of foods that support the growth of C. perfringens. While spores of P-cpe strains are readily inactivated by heat processing, post-processing contamination by food handlers who may carry P-cpe strains that have a better growth potential at lower temperatures must be avoided. The varying responses of C. perfringens spores to heat and the differences in outgrowth capacity at different temperatures are factors to be considered in strain selection for challenge tests, and for predictive modelling of C. perfringens.

  19. Effects of Temperature and Packaging on the Growth Kinetics of Clostridium perfringens in Ready-to-eat Jokbal (Pig's Trotters).

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Jin; Na, Yu-Jin; Cho, Joon-Il; Lee, Soon-Ho; Yoon, Ki-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Ready-to-eat (RTE) Jokbal (Pig's trotter), which consists of pig's feet cooked in soy sauce and various spices, is a very popular and widely sold in Korean retail markets. Commercially, the anaerobically packed Jokbal have also become a popular RTE food in several convenience stores. This study evaluates the effects of storage temperature and packaging methods for the growth of C. perfringens in Jokbal. Growth kinetic parameters of C. perfringens in aerobically and anaerobically packed Jokbals are determined at each temperature by the modified Gompertz equation. The lag time, specific growth rate, and maximum population density of C. perfringens are being analyzed as a function of temperature and packaging method. The minimum growth temperature of C. perfringens in aerobically and anaerobically packed Jokbal is 24℃ and 18℃, respectively. The C. perfringens in Jokbal did not grow under conditions of over 50℃ regardless of the packaging methods, indicating that the holding temperature of Jokbal in markets must be maintained at above 50℃ or below 18℃. Growth of C. perfringens in anaerobically packed Jokbal is faster than in aerobically packed Jokbal when stored under the same conditions. This indicates that there are a higher risks associated with C. perfringens for anaerobically packed meat products. PMID:26760749

  20. Effects of Temperature and Packaging on the Growth Kinetics of Clostridium perfringens in Ready-to-eat Jokbal (Pig's Trotters).

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Jin; Na, Yu-Jin; Cho, Joon-Il; Lee, Soon-Ho; Yoon, Ki-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Ready-to-eat (RTE) Jokbal (Pig's trotter), which consists of pig's feet cooked in soy sauce and various spices, is a very popular and widely sold in Korean retail markets. Commercially, the anaerobically packed Jokbal have also become a popular RTE food in several convenience stores. This study evaluates the effects of storage temperature and packaging methods for the growth of C. perfringens in Jokbal. Growth kinetic parameters of C. perfringens in aerobically and anaerobically packed Jokbals are determined at each temperature by the modified Gompertz equation. The lag time, specific growth rate, and maximum population density of C. perfringens are being analyzed as a function of temperature and packaging method. The minimum growth temperature of C. perfringens in aerobically and anaerobically packed Jokbal is 24℃ and 18℃, respectively. The C. perfringens in Jokbal did not grow under conditions of over 50℃ regardless of the packaging methods, indicating that the holding temperature of Jokbal in markets must be maintained at above 50℃ or below 18℃. Growth of C. perfringens in anaerobically packed Jokbal is faster than in aerobically packed Jokbal when stored under the same conditions. This indicates that there are a higher risks associated with C. perfringens for anaerobically packed meat products.

  1. Inhibition of neuromuscular transmission in isolated mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm by the enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens type A.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, N; Miyamoto, A; Horiguchi, Y; Okabe, T; Matsuda, M

    1992-08-01

    The enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens type A, a channel forming protein toxin, inhibited neuromuscular transmission under conditions of low calcium. Twitch tension of isolated phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations elicited by electrical stimulations to the phrenic nerve was recorded isometrically, and the preparations were exposed to the purified enterotoxin. In Krebs solution containing 0.5 mM calcium, the enterotoxin (20 micrograms/ml) reduced within 10 min the amplitude of the twitch tension to 34 +/- 7% (mean +/- S.D., n = 11) of that recorded before the treatment. The effects of the enterotoxin on the twitch tension were irreversible and proceeded independently of stimulation. The reduction of the twitch tension by the enterotoxin was apparent in Krebs solution containing less than 0.6 mM calcium and the degree of reduction was inversely related to the concentration of calcium. The reduction of the twitch tension by the enterotoxin was also dependent on temperature and concentration of the toxin. At temperatures below 20 degrees C, no obvious reduction of twitch tension was observed with 20 micrograms/ml of the enterotoxin. Enterotoxin at a concentration of 0.4 micrograms/ml caused 16 +/- 2% (mean +/- S.D., n = 4) reduction of twitch tension, and the degree of the reduction in twitch tension increased with toxin concentration, reaching a plateau of 65 +/- 4% (mean +/- S.D., n = 7) at 6.5 micrograms/ml of the enterotoxin. The effects of the enterotoxin were antagonized by 2 microM physostigmine. Unlike curare, pretreatment of the preparation with enterotoxin did not antagonize the neuromuscular block by decamethonium. Neither the tension of muscular twitch elicited by direct electrical stimulation to the muscle nor the resting membrane potentials of muscle fibers recorded intracellularly were affected by the enterotoxin. The enterotoxin (2.2 micrograms/ml) reduced the frequency, but not mean amplitude or amplitude distribution, of miniature end

  2. Effect of Clostridium perfringens infection and antibiotic administration on microbiota in the small intestine of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Fasina, Yewande O; Newman, Molli M; Stough, Joshua M; Liles, Mark R

    2016-02-01

    The etiological agent of necrotic enteritis (NE) is Clostridium perfringens (CP), which is an economically significant problem for broiler chicken producers worldwide. Traditional use of in-feed antibiotic growth promoters to control NE disease have resulted in the emergence of antibiotic resistance in CP strains. Identification of probiotic bacteria strains as an alternative to antibiotics for the control of intestinal CP colonization is crucial. Two experiments were conducted to determine changes in intestinal bacterial assemblages in response to CP infection and in-feed bacitracin methylene disalicylate (BMD) in broiler chickens. In each experiment conducted in battery-cage or floor-pen housing, chicks were randomly assigned to the following treatment groups: 1) BMD-supplemented diet with no CP challenge (CM), 2) BMD-free control diet with no CP challenge (CX), 3) BMD-supplemented diet with CP challenge (PCM), or 4) BMD-free control diet with CP challenge (PCX). The establishment of CP infection was confirmed, with the treatment groups exposed to CP having a 1.5- to 2-fold higher CP levels (P < 0.05) compared to the non-exposed groups. Next-generation sequencing of PCR amplified 16S rRNA genes, was used to perform intestinal bacterial diversity analyses pre-challenge, and at 1, 7, and 21 d post-challenge. The results indicated that the intestinal bacterial assemblage was dominated by members of the phylum Firmicutes in all treatments before and after CP challenge, especially the Lactobacillaceae and Clostridiales families. In addition, we observed post-challenge emergence of members of the Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcaceae in the non-medicated PCX treatment, and emergence of the Enterococcaceae in the medicated PCM treatment. This study highlights the bacterial interactions that could be important in suppressing or eliminating CP infection within the chicken intestine. Future studies should explore the potential to use commensal strains of unknown

  3. Behavior and Inactivation of Enterotoxin-Positive Clostridium perfringens in Pork Picadillo and Tamales Filled with Pork Picadillo under Different Cooking, Storage, and Reheating Conditions.

    PubMed

    Villarruel-López, A; Ruíz-Quezada, S L; Castro-Rosas, J; Gomez-Aldapa, C A; Olea-Rodríguez, M A; Nuño, K; Navarro-Hidalgo, V; Torres-Vitela, M R

    2016-05-01

    This study analyzed the behavior of Clostridium perfringens in individual ingredients and tamales containing different pathogen concentrations upon exposure to different temperatures and methods of cooking, storage, and reheating. In ground pork, C. perfringens cells were inactivated when exposed to 95°C for 30 min. Three lots of picadillo inoculated with 0, 3, and 5 log CFU/g C. perfringens cells, respectively, were exposed to different storage temperatures. At 20°C, cell counts increased 1 log in all lots, whereas at 8°C, counts decreased by 2 log. Four lots of tamales prepared with picadillo inoculated with 0, 2, 3, and 7 log CFU/g prior to the final cooking step exhibited no surviving cells (91°C for 90, 45, or 35 min). Four lots of tamales were inoculated after cooking with concentrations of 0, 0.6, 4, and 6 log CFU/g of the pathogen and then stored at different temperatures. In these preparations, after 24 h at 20°C, the count increased by 1.4, 1.7, and 1.8 log in the tamales inoculated with 0.6, 4, and 6 log inoculum, respectively. When they were stored at 8°C for 24 h, enumerations decreased to <1, 2.5, and 1.9 log in the tamales inoculated with 0.6, 4, and 6 log of C. perfringens cells, respectively. However, when the lots were exposed to 20°C and then 8°C, 0.8, 1.8, and 2.4 log changes were observed for the tamales inoculated with 0.6, 4, and 6 log, respectively. Microwaving, steaming, and frying to reheat tamales inoculated with 6 log CFU/g C. perfringens cells showed that the pathogen was inactivated after 2 min of exposure in the microwave and after 5 min of exposure to steam. In contrast, no inactivation was observed after 5 min of frying. The tamales inoculated with spores (7 log most probable number [MPN]/g) showed a decrease of 2 log after steaming or frying, and no survival was observed after microwaving. Tamales inoculated with spores (7 log MPN/g) after cooking were susceptible to microwaves, but 2.4 and 255 MPN/g remained after frying

  4. Occurrence of microbial indicators and Clostridium perfringens in wastewater, water column samples, sediments, drinking water, and Weddell seal feces collected at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisle, J.T.; Smith, J.J.; Edwards, D.D.; McFeters, G.A.

    2004-01-01

    McMurdo Station, Antarctica, has discharged untreated sewage into McMurdo Sound for decades. Previous studies delineated the impacted area, which included the drinking water intake, by using total coliform and Clostridium perfringens concentrations. The estimation of risk to humans in contact with the impacted and potable waters may be greater than presumed, as these microbial indicators may not be the most appropriate for this environment. To address these concerns, concentrations of these and additional indicators (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, coliphage, and enteroviruses) in the untreated wastewater, water column, and sediments of the impacted area and drinking water treatment facility and distribution system at McMurdo Station were determined. Fecal samples from Weddell seals in this area were also collected and analyzed for indicators. All drinking water samples were negative for indicators except for a single total coliform-positive sample. Total coliforms were present in water column samples at higher concentrations than other indicators. Fecal coliform and enterococcus concentrations were similar to each other and greater than those of other indicators in sediment samples closer to the discharge site. C. perfringens concentrations were higher in sediments at greater distances from the discharge site. Seal fecal samples contained concentrations of fecal coliforms, E. coli, enterococci, and C. perfringens similar to those found in untreated sewage. All samples were negative for enteroviruses. A wastewater treatment facility at McMurdo Station has started operation, and these data provide a baseline data set for monitoring the recovery of the impacted area. The contribution of seal feces to indicator concentrations in this area should be considered.

  5. Occurrence of microbial indicators and Clostridium perfringens in wastewater, water column samples, sediments, drinking water, and Weddell seal feces collected at McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lisle, John T; Smith, James J; Edwards, Diane D; McFeters, Gordon A

    2004-12-01

    McMurdo Station, Antarctica, has discharged untreated sewage into McMurdo Sound for decades. Previous studies delineated the impacted area, which included the drinking water intake, by using total coliform and Clostridium perfringens concentrations. The estimation of risk to humans in contact with the impacted and potable waters may be greater than presumed, as these microbial indicators may not be the most appropriate for this environment. To address these concerns, concentrations of these and additional indicators (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, coliphage, and enteroviruses) in the untreated wastewater, water column, and sediments of the impacted area and drinking water treatment facility and distribution system at McMurdo Station were determined. Fecal samples from Weddell seals in this area were also collected and analyzed for indicators. All drinking water samples were negative for indicators except for a single total coliform-positive sample. Total coliforms were present in water column samples at higher concentrations than other indicators. Fecal coliform and enterococcus concentrations were similar to each other and greater than those of other indicators in sediment samples closer to the discharge site. C. perfringens concentrations were higher in sediments at greater distances from the discharge site. Seal fecal samples contained concentrations of fecal coliforms, E. coli, enterococci, and C. perfringens similar to those found in untreated sewage. All samples were negative for enteroviruses. A wastewater treatment facility at McMurdo Station has started operation, and these data provide a baseline data set for monitoring the recovery of the impacted area. The contribution of seal feces to indicator concentrations in this area should be considered. PMID:15574926

  6. Occurrence of microbial indicators and Clostridium perfringens in wastewater, water column samples, sediments, drinking water, and Weddell seal feces collected at McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Lisle, John T; Smith, James J; Edwards, Diane D; McFeters, Gordon A

    2004-12-01

    McMurdo Station, Antarctica, has discharged untreated sewage into McMurdo Sound for decades. Previous studies delineated the impacted area, which included the drinking water intake, by using total coliform and Clostridium perfringens concentrations. The estimation of risk to humans in contact with the impacted and potable waters may be greater than presumed, as these microbial indicators may not be the most appropriate for this environment. To address these concerns, concentrations of these and additional indicators (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, coliphage, and enteroviruses) in the untreated wastewater, water column, and sediments of the impacted area and drinking water treatment facility and distribution system at McMurdo Station were determined. Fecal samples from Weddell seals in this area were also collected and analyzed for indicators. All drinking water samples were negative for indicators except for a single total coliform-positive sample. Total coliforms were present in water column samples at higher concentrations than other indicators. Fecal coliform and enterococcus concentrations were similar to each other and greater than those of other indicators in sediment samples closer to the discharge site. C. perfringens concentrations were higher in sediments at greater distances from the discharge site. Seal fecal samples contained concentrations of fecal coliforms, E. coli, enterococci, and C. perfringens similar to those found in untreated sewage. All samples were negative for enteroviruses. A wastewater treatment facility at McMurdo Station has started operation, and these data provide a baseline data set for monitoring the recovery of the impacted area. The contribution of seal feces to indicator concentrations in this area should be considered.

  7. Comparative neuropathology of ovine enterotoxemia produced by Clostridium perfringens type D wild-type strain CN1020 and its genetically modified derivatives.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J P; Giannitti, F; Finnie, J W; Manavis, J; Beingesser, J; Adams, V; Rood, J I; Uzal, F A

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D causes enterotoxemia in sheep and goats. The disease is mediated by epsilon toxin (ETX), which affects the cerebrovascular endothelium, increasing vascular permeability and leading to cerebral edema. In the present study, we compared the distribution and severity of the cerebrovascular changes induced in lambs by C. perfringens type D strain CN1020, its isogenic etx null mutant, and the ETX-producing complemented mutant. We also applied histochemical and immunohistochemical markers to further characterize the brain lesions induced by ETX. Both ETX-producing strains induced extensive cerebrovascular damage that did not differ significantly between each other in nature, neuroanatomic distribution, or severity. By contrast, lambs inoculated with the etx mutant or sterile, nontoxic culture medium did not develop detectable brain lesions, confirming that the neuropathologic effects observed in these infections are dependent on ETX production. Lambs treated with the wild-type and complemented strains showed perivascular and mural vascular edema, as well as serum albumin extravasation, particularly severe in the cerebral white matter, midbrain, medulla oblongata, and cerebellum. Brains of animals inoculated with the ETX-producing strains showed decreased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and increased expression of aquaporin-4 in the end-feet processes of the astrocytes around blood vessels. Early axonal injury was demonstrated with anti-amyloid precursor protein immunohistochemistry. Perivascular accumulation of macrophages/microglia with intracytoplasmic albumin globules was also observed in these animals. This study demonstrates that ETX is responsible for the major cerebrovascular changes in C. perfringens type D-induced disease.

  8. Relation of in vitro inhibition by chelates of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin to their ability to protect against experimental toxemia.

    PubMed

    Senff, L M; Moskowitz, M

    1969-04-01

    The inhibition of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin by ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and diethylenetriaminepentacetate (DTPA) was studied utilizing three different in vitro assay procedures: diffusion on egg yolk-agar, disintegration of muscle sections, and manometric assay with partially purified lecithin as substrate. DTPA was 10 to 20 times more efficient as an inhibitor than EDTA in systems containing relatively large amounts of calcium; these observations were similar to those observed in previous in vivo protection studies. A number of other chelating agents were tested for their ability to inhibit alpha-toxin in vitro and protect mice against it; the chelating agents which were the most efficient in vitro inhibitors had the greatest in vivo protective ability.

  9. Relation of In Vitro Inhibition by Chelates of Clostridium perfringens α-Toxin to Their Ability to Protect Against Experimental Toxemia

    PubMed Central

    Senff, Leah M. M.; Moskowitz, Merwin

    1969-01-01

    The inhibition of Clostridium perfringens α-toxin by ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and diethylenetriaminepentacetate (DTPA) was studied utilizing three different in vitro assay procedures: diffusion on egg yolk-agar, disintegration of muscle sections, and manometric assay with partially purified lecithin as substrate. DTPA was 10 to 20 times more efficient as an inhibitor than EDTA in systems containing relatively large amounts of calcium; these observations were similar to those observed in previous in vivo protection studies. A number of other chelating agents were tested for their ability to inhibit α-toxin in vitro and protect mice against it; the chelating agents which were the most efficient in vitro inhibitors had the greatest in vivo protective ability. Images PMID:4976467

  10. Evaluation in broilers of the probiotic properties of Pichia pastoris and a recombinant P. pastoris containing the Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin gene.

    PubMed

    Gil de los Santos, João Rodrigo; Storch, Otávio Brod; Fernandes, Cristina Gevehr; Gil-Turnes, Carlos

    2012-05-01

    The probiotic properties of Pichia pastoris and of a recombinant P. pastoris containing the Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin gene were evaluated in broilers. One-day-old chicks randomly divided in four groups were fed with commercial feed devoid of antibacterials. The control group (1) received plain food, while the other groups were supplemented with either P. pastoris (2), the recombinant P. pastoris (3) or Bacillus cereus var. Toyoi (4). At day 49, live weights, feed efficiency and seroconversions were higher (P<0.05) in the supplemented groups than in the control groups. Group 3 showed the best results, while group 2 had lower weight gain than groups 3 and 4 although food conversion was better than in group 4. Seroconversions were not different (P>0.05) among the supplemented groups. Adverse reactions were not observed in histopathologic evaluation. We concluded that P. pastoris and the recombinant P. pastoris could be used as probiotics in broilers. PMID:22176763

  11. Hydrogen production at high Faradaic efficiency by a bio-electrode based on TiO2 adsorption of a new [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Morra, Simone; Valetti, Francesca; Sarasso, Veronica; Castrignanò, Silvia; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2015-12-01

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenase CpHydA from Clostridium perfringens was immobilized by adsorption on anatase TiO2 electrodes for clean hydrogen production. The immobilized enzyme proved to perform direct electron transfer to and from the electrode surface and catalyses both H2 oxidation (H2 uptake) and H2 production (H2 evolution) with a current density for H2 evolution of about 2 mA cm(-1). The TiO2/CpHydA bioelectrode remained active for several days upon storage and when a reducing potential was set, H2 evolution occurred with a mean Faradaic efficiency of 98%. The high turnover frequency of H2 production and the tight coupling of electron transfer, resulting in a Faradaic efficiency close to 100%, support the exploitation of the novel TiO2/CpHydA stationary electrode as a powerful device for H2 production.

  12. Relative disease susceptibility and clostridial toxin antibody responses in three commercial broiler lines coinfected with Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seung I; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Lee, Sung-Hyen; Lee, Kyung Woo; Lillehoj, Erik P; Hong, Yeong Ho; An, Dong-Jun; Jeoung, D Hye-Young; Chun, Ji-Eun

    2013-09-01

    Necrotic enteritis is an enteric disease of poultry resulting from infection by Clostridium perfringens with coinfection by Eimeria spp. constituting a major risk factor for disease pathogenesis. This study compared three commercial broiler chicken lines using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis. Day-old male Cobb, Ross, and Hubbard broilers were orally infected with viable C. perfringens and E. maxima and fed a high-protein diet to promote the development of experimental disease. Body weight loss, intestinal lesions, and serum antibody levels against alpha-toxin and necrotic enteritis B-like (NetB) toxin were measured as parameters of disease susceptibility and host immune response. Cobb chickens exhibited increased body weight loss compared with Ross and Hubbard breeds and greater gut lesion severity compared with Ross chickens. NetB antibody levels were greater in Cobb chickens compared with the Ross or Hubbard groups. These results suggest that Cobb chickens may be more susceptible to necrotic enteritis in the field compared with the Ross and Hubbard lines.

  13. Evaluating the Performance of a New Model for Predicting the Growth of Clostridium perfringens in Cooked, Uncured Meat and Poultry Products under Isothermal, Heating, and Dynamically Cooling Conditions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihan

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A is a significant public health threat and its spores may germinate, outgrow, and multiply during cooling of cooked meats. This study applies a new C. perfringens growth model in the USDA Integrated Pathogen Modeling Program-Dynamic Prediction (IPMP Dynamic Prediction) Dynamic Prediction to predict the growth from spores of C. perfringens in cooked uncured meat and poultry products using isothermal, dynamic heating, and cooling data reported in the literature. The residual errors of predictions (observation-prediction) are analyzed, and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) calculated. For isothermal and heating profiles, each data point in growth curves is compared. The mean residual errors (MRE) of predictions range from -0.40 to 0.02 Log colony forming units (CFU)/g, with a RMSE of approximately 0.6 Log CFU/g. For cooling, the end point predictions are conservative in nature, with an MRE of -1.16 Log CFU/g for single-rate cooling and -0.66 Log CFU/g for dual-rate cooling. The RMSE is between 0.6 and 0.7 Log CFU/g. Compared with other models reported in the literature, this model makes more accurate and fail-safe predictions. For cooling, the percentage for accurate and fail-safe predictions is between 97.6% and 100%. Under criterion 1, the percentage of accurate predictions is 47.5% for single-rate cooling and 66.7% for dual-rate cooling, while the fail-dangerous predictions are between 0% and 2.4%. This study demonstrates that IPMP Dynamic Prediction can be used by food processors and regulatory agencies as a tool to predict the growth of C. perfringens in uncured cooked meats and evaluate the safety of cooked or heat-treated uncured meat and poultry products exposed to cooling deviations or to develop customized cooling schedules. This study also demonstrates the need for more accurate data collection during cooling.

  14. Impact of Clean-Label Antimicrobials and Nitrite Derived from Natural Sources on the Outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens during Cooling of Deli-Style Turkey Breast.

    PubMed

    King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2015-05-01

    Organic acids and sodium nitrite have long been shown to provide antimicrobial activity during chilling of cured meat products. However, neither purified organic acids nor NaNO2 is permitted in products labeled natural and both are generally avoided in clean-label formulations; efficacy of their replacement is not well understood. Natural and clean-label antimicrobial alternatives were evaluated in both uncured and in alternative cured (a process that uses natural sources of nitrite) deli-style turkey breast to determine inhibition of Clostridium perfringens outgrowth during 15 h of chilling. Ten treatments of ground turkey breast (76% moisture, 1.2% salt) included a control and four antimicrobials: 1.0% tropical fruit extract, 0.7% dried vinegar, 1.0% cultured sugar-vinegar blend, and 2.0% lemon-vinegar blend. Each treatment was formulated without (uncured) and with nitrite (PCN; 50 ppm of NaNO2 from cultured celery juice powder). Treatments were inoculated with C. perfringens spores (three-strain mixture) to yield 2.5 log CFU/g. Individual 50-g portions were vacuum packaged, cooked to 71.1°C, and chilled from 54.4 to 26.7°C in 5 h and from 26.7 to 7.2°C in an additional 10 h. Triplicate samples were assayed for growth of C. perfringens at predetermined intervals by plating on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar. Uncured control and PCN-only treatments allowed for 4.6- and 4.2-log increases at 15 h, respectively, and although all antimicrobial treatments allowed less outgrowth than uncured and PCN, the degree of inhibition varied. The 1.0% fruit extract and 1.0% cultured sugar-vinegar blend were effective at controlling populations at or below initial levels, whether or not PCN was included. Without PCN, 0.7% dried vinegar and 2.0% lemon-vinegar blend allowed for 2.0- and 2.5-log increases, respectively, and ∼1.5-log increases with PCN. Results suggest using clean-label antimicrobials can provide for safe cooling following the study parameters, and greater

  15. Impact of Clean-Label Antimicrobials and Nitrite Derived from Natural Sources on the Outgrowth of Clostridium perfringens during Cooling of Deli-Style Turkey Breast.

    PubMed

    King, Amanda M; Glass, Kathleen A; Milkowski, Andrew L; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2015-05-01

    Organic acids and sodium nitrite have long been shown to provide antimicrobial activity during chilling of cured meat products. However, neither purified organic acids nor NaNO2 is permitted in products labeled natural and both are generally avoided in clean-label formulations; efficacy of their replacement is not well understood. Natural and clean-label antimicrobial alternatives were evaluated in both uncured and in alternative cured (a process that uses natural sources of nitrite) deli-style turkey breast to determine inhibition of Clostridium perfringens outgrowth during 15 h of chilling. Ten treatments of ground turkey breast (76% moisture, 1.2% salt) included a control and four antimicrobials: 1.0% tropical fruit extract, 0.7% dried vinegar, 1.0% cultured sugar-vinegar blend, and 2.0% lemon-vinegar blend. Each treatment was formulated without (uncured) and with nitrite (PCN; 50 ppm of NaNO2 from cultured celery juice powder). Treatments were inoculated with C. perfringens spores (three-strain mixture) to yield 2.5 log CFU/g. Individual 50-g portions were vacuum packaged, cooked to 71.1°C, and chilled from 54.4 to 26.7°C in 5 h and from 26.7 to 7.2°C in an additional 10 h. Triplicate samples were assayed for growth of C. perfringens at predetermined intervals by plating on tryptose-sulfite-cycloserine agar. Uncured control and PCN-only treatments allowed for 4.6- and 4.2-log increases at 15 h, respectively, and although all antimicrobial treatments allowed less outgrowth than uncured and PCN, the degree of inhibition varied. The 1.0% fruit extract and 1.0% cultured sugar-vinegar blend were effective at controlling populations at or below initial levels, whether or not PCN was included. Without PCN, 0.7% dried vinegar and 2.0% lemon-vinegar blend allowed for 2.0- and 2.5-log increases, respectively, and ∼1.5-log increases with PCN. Results suggest using clean-label antimicrobials can provide for safe cooling following the study parameters, and greater

  16. Direct dynamic kinetic analysis and computer simulation of growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked turkey during cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research applied a new one-step methodology to directly construct a tertiary model for describing the growth of C. perfringens in cooked turkey meat under dynamically cooling conditions. The kinetic parameters of the growth models were determined by numerical analysis and optimization using mu...

  17. A proposed sero-grouping scheme for epidemiological investigation of food poisoning due to Clostridium perfringens type A.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, A K; Narayan, K G

    1979-10-01

    Serological studies with soluble and particulate antigens of Cl. perfringens type A revealed that enterotoxin and spore antigens could be used as a suitable marker for epidemiological studies. 94% of the food poisoning strains of Cl. perfringens type A could be grouped into 3 groups with the help of 2 enterotoxin-specific sera and 90% in 4 groups with antispore sera. Heat-sensitive strains were found to be antigenically more homogenous than the heat-resistant ones. Sera raised against spores of heat-resistant strains could not agglutinate spore of any of the heat-sensitive strains. Similarly no spores of heat-resistant strains were agglutinable by serum raised against spores of heat-sensitive strains. On the basis of typing efficiency the two antigen, viz enterotoxin and spore antigens were used in the serogrouping scheme proposed for the epidemiological investigation of food poisoning with Cl. perfringens type A. Used together, enterotoxin and spore agglutinogen form an antigenic formula for each strain showing the serogroup to which it belongs. PMID:44603

  18. A Novel Pore-Forming Toxin in Type A Clostridium perfringens Is Associated with Both Fatal Canine Hemorrhagic Gastroenteritis and Fatal Foal Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Nowell, Victoria J.; Nicholson, Vivian M.; Oliphant, Kaitlyn; Prescott, John F.

    2015-01-01

    A role for type A Clostridium perfringens in acute hemorrhagic and necrotizing gastroenteritis in dogs and in necrotizing enterocolitis of neonatal foals has long been suspected but incompletely characterized. The supernatants of an isolate made from a dog and from a foal that died from these diseases were both found to be highly cytotoxic for an equine ovarian (EO) cell line. Partial genome sequencing of the canine isolate revealed three novel putative toxin genes encoding proteins related to the pore-forming Leukocidin/Hemolysin Superfamily; these were designated netE, netF, and netG. netE and netF were located on one large conjugative plasmid, and netG was located with a cpe enterotoxin gene on a second large conjugative plasmid. Mutation and complementation showed that only netF was associated with the cytotoxicity. Although netE and netG were not associated with cytotoxicity, immunoblotting with specific antisera showed these proteins to be expressed in vitro. There was a highly significant association between the presence of netF with type A strains isolated from cases of canine acute hemorrhagic gastroenteritis and foal necrotizing enterocolitis. netE and netF were found in all cytotoxic isolates, as was cpe, but netG was less consistently present. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that netF-positive isolates belonged to a clonal population; some canine and equine netF-positive isolates were genetically indistinguishable. Equine antisera to recombinant Net proteins showed that only antiserum to rNetF had high supernatant cytotoxin neutralizing activity. The identifica-tion of this novel necrotizing toxin is an important advance in understanding the virulence of type A C. perfringens in specific enteric disease of animals. PMID:25853427

  19. NanR, a Transcriptional Regulator That Binds to the Promoters of Genes Involved in Sialic Acid Metabolism in the Anaerobic Pathogen Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Therit, Blair; Cheung, Jackie K.; Rood, Julian I.; Melville, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Among many other virulence factors, Clostridium perfringens produces three sialidases NanH, NanI and NanJ. NanH lacks a secretion signal peptide and is predicted to be an intracellular enzyme, while NanI and NanJ are secreted. Previously, we had identified part of an operon encoding NanE (epimerase) and NanA (sialic acid lyase) enzymes. Further analysis of the entire operon suggests that it encodes a complete pathway for the transport and metabolism of sialic acid along with a putative transcriptional regulator, NanR. The addition of 30 mM N-acetyl neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) to a semi-defined medium significantly enhanced the growth yield of strain 13, suggesting that Neu5Ac can be used as a nutrient. C. perfringens strain 13 lacks a nanH gene, but has NanI- and NanJ-encoding genes. Analysis of nanI, nanJ, and nanInanJ mutants constructed by homologous recombination revealed that the expression of the major sialidase, NanI, was induced by the addition of Neu5Ac to the medium, and that in separate experiments, the same was true of a nanI-gusA transcriptional fusion. For the nanI and nanJ genes, primer extension identified three and two putative transcription start sites, respectively. Gel mobility shift assays using purified NanR and DNA from the promoter regions of the nanI and nanE genes showed high affinity, specific binding by NanR. We propose that NanR is a global regulator of sialic acid-associated genes and that it responds, in a positive feedback loop, to the concentration of sialic acid in the cell. PMID:26197388

  20. Influence of four retail food service cooling methods on the behavior of Clostridium perfringens ATCC 10388 in turkey roasts following heating to an internal temperature of 74 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Olds, D A; Mendonca, A F; Sneed, J; Bisha, B

    2006-01-01

    The influence of four food service cooling methods (CM) on growth of Clostridium perfringens ATCC 10388 in cooked turkey roasts was evaluated. Raw whole turkey roasts were inoculated with C. perfringens spores (approximately 4.23 log CFU per roast), vacuum packaged, and heated to an internal temperature of 74 degrees C. The cooked roasts were cooled as follows: whole roast cut into four quarters and held at 4 degrees C (CM1); whole roast held in a blast chiller (CM2); whole roast loosely wrapped and held at 4 degrees C (CM3); and whole roasts (three per bag) held at 4 degrees C (CM4). The roasts were analyzed for C. perfringens using Shahidi-Ferguson perfringens agar and anaerobic incubation (37 degrees C, 24 h). None of the cooling methods met the amended 2001 U.S. Food and Drug Administration Food Code guidelines for safe cooling of potentially hazardous foods. Times taken for roasts to cool from 57 to 21 degrees C using CM1, CM2, CM3, and CM4 were 2.27, 3.11, 6.22, and 8.71 h, respectively. Times taken for roasts (21 degrees C) to reach 5 degrees C ranged from 6.33 (CM1) to 19.45 h (CM4). Based on initial numbers of C. perfringens, no growth occurred in roasts cooled by CM1 or CM2, whereas numbers increased by 1.5 and 4.0 log in whole roasts cooled via CM3 and CM4, respectively. These findings indicate that certain food service cooling methods for whole cooked turkey roasts may result in proliferation of C. perfringens and increase the risk of foodborne illness by this pathogen.

  1. LRP1 is a receptor for Clostridium perfringens TpeL toxin indicating a two-receptor model of clostridial glycosylating toxins.

    PubMed

    Schorch, Björn; Song, Shuo; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Bock, Hans H; May, Petra; Herz, Joachim; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Aktories, Klaus

    2014-04-29

    Large glycosylating toxins are major virulence factors of various species of pathogenic Clostridia. Prototypes are Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, which cause antibiotics-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. The current model of the toxins' action suggests that receptor binding is mediated by a C-terminal domain of combined repetitive oligopeptides (CROP). This model is challenged by the glycosylating Clostridium perfringens large cytotoxin (TpeL toxin) that is devoid of the CROP domain but still intoxicates cells. Using a haploid genetic screen, we identified LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) as a host cell receptor for the TpeL toxin. LRP1-deficient cells are not able to take up TpeL and are not intoxicated. Expression of cluster IV of LRP1 is sufficient to rescue toxin uptake in these cells. By plasmon resonance spectroscopy, a KD value of 23 nM was determined for binding of TpeL to LRP1 cluster IV. The C terminus of TpeL (residues 1335-1779) represents the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the toxin. RBD-like regions are conserved in all other clostridial glycosylating toxins preceding their CROP domain. CROP-deficient C. difficile toxin B is toxic to cells, depending on the RBD-like region (residues 1349-1811) but does not interact with LRP1. Our data indicate the presence of a second, CROP-independent receptor-binding domain in clostridial glycosylating toxins and suggest a two-receptor model for the cellular uptake of clostridial glycosylating toxins.

  2. Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin forms a heptameric pore within the detergent-insoluble microdomains of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and rat synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shigeru; Minami, Junzaburo; Tamai, Eiji; Matsushita, Osamu; Shimamoto, Seiko; Okabe, Akinobu

    2002-10-18

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin, which is responsible for enterotoxaemia in ungulates, forms a heptamer in rat synaptosomal and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell membranes, leading to membrane permealization. Thus, the toxin may target the detergent-resistant membrane domains (DRMs) of these membranes, in analogy to aerolysin, a heptameric pore-forming toxin that associates with DRMs. To test this idea, we examined the distribution of radiolabeled epsilon-toxin in DRM and detergent-soluble membrane fractions of MDCK cells and rat synaptosomal membranes. When MDCK cells and synaptosomal membranes were incubated with the toxin and then fractionated by cold Triton X-100 extraction and flotation on sucrose gradients, the heptameric toxin was detected almost exclusively in DRMs. The results of a toxin overlay assay revealed that the toxin preferentially bound to and heptamerized in the isolated DRMs. Furthermore, cholesterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin abrogated their association and lowered the cytotoxicity of the toxin toward MDCK cells. When epsilon-protoxin, an inactive precursor able to bind to but unable to heptamerize in the membrane, was incubated with MDCK cell membranes, it was detected mainly in their DRMs. These results suggest that the toxin is concentrated and induced to heptamerize on binding to a putative receptor located preferentially in DRMs, with all steps from initial binding through pore formation completed within the same DRMs.

  3. Changes in ganglioside content affect the binding of Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin to detergent-resistant membranes of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Seiko; Tamai, Eiji; Matsushita, Osamu; Minami, Junzaburo; Okabe, Akinobu; Miyata, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    Epsilon-toxin (ET) of Clostridium perfringens, which causes fatal enterotoxemia in ungulates, was previously shown to bind to and form a heptameric pore within the detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) of MDCK cells. Depletion of cholesterol has also been shown to decrease the cytotoxicity of ET and its heptamerization. In this study, we investigated the effects of changes in sphingolipids, other DRM components of MDCK cells, on the cells' susceptibility to ET. Treatment with fumonisin B1 and PDMP, inhibitors of sphingolipid and glycosphingolipid syntheses, respectively, increased the susceptibility, while D609, a sphingomyelin synthesis inhibitor, had the opposite effect. The exogenous addition of ganglioside G(M1) dramatically decreased the ET binding, heptamerization and cytotoxicity. These effects were shown not to be due to ET binding to G(M1) or to denaturation of ET. We also found that the ET cytotoxicity towards MDCK cells decreased with an increase in culture time. In accordance with the resistance observed for prolonged cultured cells, G(M3), a major ganglioside component, increased and sialidase treatment increased their susceptibility. These results suggest that membrane-anchored sialic acid of G(M3) within DRMs inhibits ET binding, leading to prevention of the heptamerization of ET and cell death. It is also suggested that sialidase produced by this organism aids the targeting of ET to MDCK cells.

  4. The enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens type A binds to the presynaptic nerve endings in neuromuscular junctions of mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Senda, T; Sugimoto, N; Horiguchi, Y; Matsuda, M

    1995-04-01

    The enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens type A, a channel-pore forming protein toxin, inhibited neuromuscular transmission in isolated mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation at low concentrations of calcium. We investigated immunohistochemically the localization of the binding sites of the enterotoxin in the preparation under the conditions in which the enterotoxin reduced maximally the amplitudes of the twitch tension elicited by electrical stimulations to the phrenic nerve. Under the conditions, double immunohistochemical staining of the preparation with (1) rabbit anti-enterotoxin IgG-rhodamine-labeled goat anti-rabbit IgG and (2) mouse anti-synaptophysin (one of the synaptic vesicle-specific membrane proteins)-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled goat anti-mouse IgG showed that the enterotoxin binds specifically to most of the sites which were stained with anti-synaptophysin exactly in the same configurations having the shapes of the nerve endings in the endplates. The thin section electron micrographs of the enterotoxin-intoxicated preparation showed no alterations in the ultrastructure of the neuromuscular junction and the nerve endings filled with numerous synaptic vesicles. The present results, together with our previous electrophysiological findings, indicate that the enterotoxin binds specifically to the presynaptic nerve endings and inhibits neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction.

  5. A low-toxic site-directed mutant of Clostridium perfringens ε-toxin as a potential candidate vaccine against enterotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Xin, Wenwen; Gao, Shan; Kang, Lin; Wang, Jinglin

    2013-11-01

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX), one of the most potent toxins known, is a potential biological weapon; therefore, the development of an effective vaccine is important for preventing intoxication or disease by ETX. In this study, genetically detoxified epsilon toxin mutants were developed as candidate vaccines. We used site-directed mutagenesis to mutate the essential amino acid residues (His106, Ser111 and Phe199). Six site-directed mutants of ETX (mETX (H106P) , mETX (S111H) , mETX (S111Y) , mETX (F199H) , mETX (F199E) , mETX (S111YF199E) ) were generated and then expressed in Escherichia coli. Both mETX (F199E) and mETX (H106P) with low or non-cytotoxicity that retained their immunogenicity were selected to immunize mice 3 times, and the mouse survival data were recorded after challenging with recombinant wild-type ETX. mETX (F199E) induces the same protection as mETX (H106P) , which was reported previously as a promising toxin mutant for vaccine, and both of them could protect immunized mice against a 100× LD₅₀ dose of active wild-type recombinant ETX. This work showed that mETX (F199E) is another promising candidate vaccine against enterotoxemia and other diseases caused by ETX. PMID:23835363

  6. Structural and Functional Characterization of the Clostridium perfringens N-Acetylmannosamine-6-phosphate 2-Epimerase Essential for the Sialic Acid Salvage Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Pélissier, Marie-Cécile; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Guerlesquin, Françoise; Brannigan, James A.; Bourne, Yves; Vincent, Florence

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria are endowed with an arsenal of specialized enzymes to convert nutrient compounds from their cell hosts. The essential N-acetylmannosamine-6-phosphate 2-epimerase (NanE) belongs to a convergent glycolytic pathway for utilization of the three amino sugars, GlcNAc, ManNAc, and sialic acid. The crystal structure of ligand-free NanE from Clostridium perfringens reveals a modified triose-phosphate isomerase (β/α)8 barrel in which a stable dimer is formed by exchanging the C-terminal helix. By retaining catalytic activity in the crystalline state, the structure of the enzyme bound to the GlcNAc-6P product identifies the topology of the active site pocket and points to invariant residues Lys66 as a putative single catalyst, supported by the structure of the catalytically inactive K66A mutant in complex with substrate ManNAc-6P. 1H NMR-based time course assays of native NanE and mutated variants demonstrate the essential role of Lys66 for the epimerization reaction with participation of neighboring Arg43, Asp126, and Glu180 residues. These findings unveil a one-base catalytic mechanism of C2 deprotonation/reprotonation via an enolate intermediate and provide the structural basis for the development of new antimicrobial agents against this family of bacterial 2-epimerases. PMID:25320079

  7. Variable protection against experimental broiler necrotic enteritis after immunization with the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin and a non-toxic NetB variant

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P.; Mot, Dorien; Geeraerts, Sofie; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Van Immerseel, Filip; Titball, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Necrotic enteritis toxin B (NetB) is a pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens and has been shown to play a key role in avian necrotic enteritis, a disease causing significant costs to the poultry production industry worldwide. The aim of this work was to determine whether immunization with a non-toxic variant of NetB (NetB W262A) and the C-terminal fragment of C. perfringens alpha-toxin (CPA247–370) would provide protection against experimental necrotic enteritis. Immunized birds with either antigen or a combination of antigens developed serum antibody levels against NetB and CPA. When CPA247–370 and NetB W262A were used in combination as immunogens, an increased protection was observed after oral challenge by individual dosing, but not after in-feed-challenge. PMID:26743457

  8. Selection of Bacillus spp. for Cellulase and Xylanase Production as Direct-Fed Microbials to Reduce Digesta Viscosity and Clostridium perfringens Proliferation Using an in vitro Digestive Model in Different Poultry Diets

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Juan D.; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Kuttappan, Vivek A.; Wolfenden, Ross E.; Vicente, Jose L.; Wolfenden, Amanda D.; Bielke, Lisa R.; Prado-Rebolledo, Omar F.; Morales, Eduardo; Hargis, Billy M.; Tellez, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Previously, our laboratory has screened and identified Bacillus spp. isolates as direct-fed microbials (DFM). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the cellulase and xylanase production of these isolates and select the most appropriate Bacillus spp. candidates for DFM. Furthermore, an in vitro digestive model, simulating different compartments of the gastrointestinal tract, was used to determine the effect of these selected candidates on digesta viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation in different poultry diets. Production of cellulase and xylanase were based on their relative enzyme activity. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequence classified two strains as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and one of the strains as Bacillus subtilis. The DFM was included at a concentration of 108 spores/g of feed in five different sterile soybean-based diets containing corn, wheat, rye, barley, or oat. After digestion time, supernatants from different diets were collected to measure viscosity, and C. perfringens proliferation. Additionally, from each in vitro simulated compartment, samples were taken to enumerate viable Bacillus spores using a plate count method after heat-treatment. Significant (P < 0.05) DFM-associated reductions in supernatant viscosity and C. perfringens proliferation were observed for all non-corn diets. These results suggest that antinutritional factors, such as non-starch polysaccharides from different cereals, can enhance viscosity and C. perfringens growth. Remarkably, dietary inclusion of the DFM that produce cellulase and xylanase reduced both viscosity and C. perfringens proliferation compared with control diets. Regardless of diet composition, 90% of the DFM spores germinated during the first 30 min in the crop compartment of the digestion model, followed by a noteworthy increased in the intestine compartment by ~2log10, suggesting a full-life cycle development. Further studies to evaluate in vivo necrotic enteritis effects are in

  9. Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages ΦCP39O and ΦCP26F: genomic organization and proteomic analysis of the virions.

    PubMed

    Seal, Bruce S; Fouts, Derrick E; Simmons, Mustafa; Garrish, Johnna K; Kuntz, Robin L; Woolsey, Rebekah; Schegg, Kathleen M; Kropinski, Andrew M; Ackermann, Hans-W; Siragusa, Gregory R

    2011-01-01

    Poultry intestinal material, sewage and poultry processing drainage water were screened for virulent Clostridium perfringens bacteriophages. Viruses isolated from broiler chicken offal washes (O) and poultry feces (F), designated ΦCP39O and ΦCP26F, respectively, produced clear plaques on host strains. Both bacteriophages had isometric heads of 57 nm in diameter with 100-nm non-contractile tails characteristic of members of the family Siphoviridae in the order Caudovirales. The double-strand DNA genome of bacteriophage ΦCP39O was 38,753 base pairs (bp), while the ΦCP26F genome was 39,188 bp, with an average GC content of 30.3%. Both viral genomes contained 62 potential open reading frames (ORFs) predicted to be encoded on one strand. Among the ORFs, 29 predicted proteins had no known similarity while others encoded putative bacteriophage capsid components such as a pre-neck/appendage, tail, tape measure and portal proteins. Other genes encoded a predicted DNA primase, single-strand DNA-binding protein, terminase, thymidylate synthase and a transcription factor. Potential lytic enzymes such as a fibronectin-binding autolysin, an amidase/hydrolase and a holin were encoded in the viral genomes. Several ORFs encoded proteins that gave BLASTP matches with proteins from Clostridium spp. and other Gram-positive bacterial and bacteriophage genomes as well as unknown putative Collinsella aerofaciens proteins. Proteomics analysis of the purified viruses resulted in the identification of the putative pre-neck/appendage protein and a minor structural protein encoded by large open reading frames. Variants of the portal protein were identified, and several mycobacteriophage gp6-like protein variants were detected in large amounts relative to other virion proteins. The predicted amino acid sequences of the pre-neck/appendage proteins had major differences in the central portion of the protein between the two phage gene products. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the large

  10. Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin C-terminal domain labeled to fluorescent dyes for in vivo visualization of micrometastatic chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Emiliano; Shapiro, Erik M; Gasparrini, Sara; Lopez, Salvatore; Schwab, Carlton L; Bellone, Stefania; Bortolomai, Ileana; Sumi, Natalia J; Bonazzoli, Elena; Nicoletti, Roberta; Deng, Yang; Saltzman, W Mark; Zeiss, Caroline J; Centritto, Floriana; Black, Jonathan D; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Ratner, Elena; Azodi, Masoud; Rutherford, Thomas J; Schwartz, Peter E; Pecorelli, Sergio; Santin, Alessandro D

    2015-12-01

    Identification of micrometastatic disease at the time of surgery remains extremely challenging in ovarian cancer patients. We used fluorescence microscopy, an in vivo imaging system and a fluorescence stereo microscope to evaluate fluorescence distribution in Claudin-3- and -4-overexpressing ovarian tumors, floating tumor clumps isolated from ascites and healthy organs. To do so, mice harboring chemotherapy-naïve and chemotherapy-resistant human ovarian cancer xenografts or patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) were treated with the carboxyl-terminal binding domain of the Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (c-CPE) conjugated to FITC (FITC-c-CPE) or the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent tag IRDye CW800 (CW800-c-CPE) either intraperitoneally (IP) or intravenously (IV). We found tumor fluorescence to plateau at 30 min after IP injection of both the FITC-c-CPE and the CW800-c-CPE peptides and to be significantly higher than in healthy organs (p < 0.01). After IV injection of CW800-c-CPE, tumor fluorescence plateaued at 6 hr while the most favorable tumor-to-background fluorescence ratio (TBR) was found at 48 hr in both mouse models. Importantly, fluorescent c-CPE was highly sensitive for the in vivo visualization of peritoneal micrometastatic tumor implants and the identification of ovarian tumor spheroids floating in malignant ascites that were otherwise not detectable by conventional visual observation. The use of the fluorescent c-CPE peptide may represent a novel and effective optical approach at the time of primary debulking surgery for the real-time detection of micrometastatic ovarian disease overexpressing the Claudin-3 and -4 receptors or the identification of residual disease at the time of interval debulking surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment.

  11. Molecular characteristics of Clostridium perfringens TpeL toxin and consequences of mono-O-GlcNAcylation of Ras in living cells.

    PubMed

    Guttenberg, Gregor; Hornei, Sven; Jank, Thomas; Schwan, Carsten; Lü, Wei; Einsle, Oliver; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Aktories, Klaus

    2012-07-20

    TpeL is a member of the family of clostridial glucosylating toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens type A, B, and C strains. In contrast to other members of this toxin family, it lacks a C-terminal polypeptide repeat domain, which is suggested to be involved in target cell binding. It was shown that the glucosyltransferase domain of TpeL modifies Ras in vitro by mono-O-glucosylation or mono-O-GlcNAcylation (Nagahama, M., Ohkubo, A., Oda, M., Kobayashi, K., Amimoto, K., Miyamoto, K., and Sakurai, J. (2011) Infect. Immun. 79, 905-910). Here we show that TpeL preferably utilizes UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) as a sugar donor. Change of alanine 383 of TpeL to isoleucine turns the sugar donor preference from UDP-GlcNAc to UDP-glucose. In contrast to previous studies, we show that Rac is a poor substrate in vitro and in vivo and requires 1-2 magnitudes higher toxin concentrations for modification by TpeL. The toxin is autoproteolytically processed in the presence of inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6)) by an intrinsic cysteine protease domain, located next to the glucosyltransferase domain. A C-terminally extended TpeL full-length variant (TpeL1-1779) induces apoptosis in HeLa cells (most likely by mono-O-GlcNAcylation of Ras), and inhibits Ras signaling including Ras-Raf interaction and ERK activation. In addition, TpeL blocks Ras signaling in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. TpeL is a glucosylating toxin, which modifies Ras and induces apoptosis in target cells without having a typical C-terminal polypeptide repeat domain.

  12. Influence of high gas production during thermophilic anaerobic digestion in pilot-scale and lab-scale reactors on survival of the thermotolerant pathogens Clostridium perfringens and Campylobacter jejuni in piggery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Skillman, L C; Bajsa, O; Ho, L; Santhanam, B; Kumar, M; Ho, G

    2009-07-01

    Safe reuse of animal wastes to capture energy and nutrients, through anaerobic digestion processes, is becoming an increasingly desirable solution to environmental pollution. Pathogen decay is the most important safety consideration and is in general, improved at elevated temperatures and longer hydraulic residence times. During routine sampling to assess pathogen decay in thermophilic digestion, an inversely proportional relationship between levels of Clostridium perfringens and gas production was observed. Further samples were collected from pilot-scale, bench-scale thermophilic reactors and batch scale vials to assess whether gas production (predominantly methane) could be a useful indicator of decay of the thermotolerant pathogens C. perfringens and Campylobacter jejuni. Pathogen levels did appear to be lower where gas production and levels of methanogens were higher. This was evident at each operating temperature (50, 57, 65 degrees C) in the pilot-scale thermophilic digesters, although higher temperatures also reduced the numbers of pathogens detected. When methane production was higher, either when feed rate was increased, or pH was lowered from 8.2 (piggery wastewater) to 6.5, lower numbers of pathogens were detected. Although a number of related factors are known to influence the amount and rate of methane production, it may be a useful indicator of the removal of the pathogens C. perfringens and C. jejuni.

  13. The resolvase/invertase domain of the site-specific recombinase TnpX is functional and recognizes a target sequence that resembles the junction of the circular form of the Clostridium perfringens transposon Tn4451.

    PubMed Central

    Crellin, P K; Rood, J I

    1997-01-01

    Tn4451 is a 6.3-kb chloramphenicol resistance transposon from Clostridium perfringens and is found on the conjugative plasmid pIP401. The element undergoes spontaneous excision from multicopy plasmids in Escherichia coli and C. perfringens and conjugative excision from pIP401 in C. perfringens. Tn4451 is excised as a circular molecule which is probably the transposition intermediate. Excision of Tn4451 is dependent upon the site-specific recombinase TnpX, which contains potential motifs associated with both the resolvase/invertase and integrase families of recombinases. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved amino acid residues within these domains was used to show that the resolvase/invertase domain was essential for TnpX-mediated excision of Tn4451 from multicopy plasmids in E. coli. An analysis of Tn4451 target sites revealed that the transposition process showed target site specificity. The Tn4451 target sequence resembled the junction of the circular form, and insertion occurred at a GA dinucleotide. Tn4451 insertions were flanked by directly repeated GA dinucleotides, and there was also a GA at the junction of the circular form, where the left and right termini of Tn4451 were fused. We propose a model for Tn4451 excision and insertion in which the resolvase/invertase domain of TnpX introduces 2-bp staggered cuts at these GA dinucleotides. Analysis of Tn4451 derivatives with altered GA dinucleotides provided experimental evidence to support the model. PMID:9260958

  14. Predictive model for growth of Clostridium perfringens during cooling of cooked beef supplemented with NaCl, sodium nitrite and sodium pyrophosphate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a model for predicting relative growth of C. perfringens in ground beef products at different percentages of salt (0%, 1%, 2% and 3%) and nitrite (0 and 200 ppm). Included in the experiments were different levels of sodium pyrophosphate (SPP). The results of the experiments indic...

  15. [Experimental reproduction of necrotic enteritis in the chicken. 1. Mono- and polyinfections with Clostridium perfringens and coccidia with reference to cage managemen].

    PubMed

    Balauca, N

    1976-01-01

    Experimental mono-infection and poly-infection, using vegetative germs of a CL. perfringens Type A strain 1663 and its toxin as well as E. acervulina, necatrix or mitis oocysts, were applied to 100 SPF chicken aged seven days. While clostridial or coccidial mono-infection did not cause any loss and only unspecific pathologic-anatomic changes, polyinfection was accompanied by diarrhoea and slower weight increase, with 55.4 per cent of the chicken having been lost three to nine days from the outbreak of the infection. The pathologic-anatomic findings recorded from the chicken with poly-infections included haemorrhagic, ulcerative, and necrotic intestinal inflammations, primarily in the small intestin. The results of these experimental infections indicated a possible correlation between CL. perfringens and coccidia in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis.

  16. Application of quantitative microbial risk assessments for estimation of risk management metrics: Clostridium perfringens in ready-to-eat and partially cooked meat and poultry products as an example.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Edmund A; Labarre, David; Golden, Neal J; Kause, Janell R; Dearfield, Kerry L

    2009-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service is exploring quantitative risk assessment methodologies to incorporate the use of the Codex Alimentarius' newly adopted risk management metrics (e.g., food safety objectives and performance objectives). It is suggested that use of these metrics would more closely tie the results of quantitative microbial risk assessments (QMRAs) to public health outcomes. By estimating the food safety objective (the maximum frequency and/or concentration of a hazard in a food at the time of consumption) and the performance objective (the maximum frequency and/or concentration of a hazard in a food at a specified step in the food chain before the time of consumption), risk managers will have a better understanding of the appropriate level of protection (ALOP) from microbial hazards for public health protection. We here demonstrate a general methodology that allows identification of an ALOP and evaluation of corresponding metrics at appropriate points in the food chain. It requires a two-dimensional probabilistic risk assessment, the example used being the Monte Carlo QMRA for Clostridium perfringens in ready-to eat and partially cooked meat and poultry products, with minor modifications to evaluate and abstract required measures. For demonstration purposes, the QMRA model was applied specifically to hot dogs produced and consumed in the United States. Evaluation of the cumulative uncertainty distribution for illness rate allows a specification of an ALOP that, with defined confidence, corresponds to current industry practices.

  17. Claudin-4 Overexpression in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Is Associated with Hypomethylation and Is a Potential Target for Modulation of Tight Junction Barrier Function Using a C-Terminal Fragment of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin1

    PubMed Central

    Litkouhi, Babak; Kwong, Joseph; Lo, Chun-Min; Smedley, James G; McClane, Bruce A; Aponte, Margarita; Gao, Zhijian; Sarno, Jennifer L; Hinners, Jennifer; Welch, William R; Berkowitz, Ross S; Mok, Samuel C; Garner, Elizabeth I O

    2007-01-01

    Background Claudin-4, a tight junction (TJ) protein and receptor for the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE), is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Previous research suggests DNA methylation is a mechanism for claudin-4 overexpression in cancer and that C-CPE acts as an absorption-enhancing agent in claudin-4-expressing cells. We sought to correlate claudin-4 overexpression in EOC with clinical outcomes and TJ barrier function, investigate DNA methylation as a mechanism for overexpression, and evaluate the effect of C-CPE on the TJ. Methods Claudin-4 expression in EOC was quantified and correlated with clinical outcomes. Claudin-4 methylation status was determined, and claudin-4-negative cell lines were treated with a demethylating agent. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing was used to calculate junctional (paracellular) resistance (Rb) in EOC cells after claudin-4 silencing and after C-CPE treatment. Results Claudin-4 overexpression in EOC does not correlate with survival or other clinical endpoints and is associated with hypomethylation. Claudin-4 overexpression correlates with Rb and C-CPE treatment of EOC cells significantly decreased Rb in a dose- and claudin-4-dependent noncytotoxic manner. Conclusions C-CPE treatment of EOC cells leads to altered TJ function. Further research is needed to determine the potential clinical applications of C-CPE in EOC drug delivery strategies. PMID:17460774

  18. Comparative studies on Enterococcus, Clostridium perfringens and Staphylococcus aureus as quality indicators in tropical seawater at a Pacific Mexican beach resort.

    PubMed

    Curiel-Ayala, F; Quiñones-Ramírez, E I; Pless, R C; González-Jasso, Eva

    2012-10-01

    Three microorganisms were assayed to evaluate the microbiological quality in the seawater at a resort on the Mexican Pacific coast, and to test for possible associations among the titers of the various bacteria, their possible correlations with environmental conditions, and with the location of potential wastewater outflows. Significant microorganism levels were found (at Caletilla beach, Hornos beach, and Papagayo beach, respectively: for Enterococcus 157, 153, and 149, for C. perfringens 35, 89, and 56, for S. aureus 244,137, and 279CFU/100ml), often in excess of the presently set guideline values. In general, bacterial titers were higher during rainy season than in dry season. For S. aureus, in both seasons, highest concentrations were found at 3pm, the time of highest tourist presence at the beaches. Our results argue for the use of these three microorganisms as part of a set of indicators in the routine microbiological evaluation of Mexican beachwaters.

  19. Glycoside Hydrolase Family 89 α-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Clostridium perfringens Specifically Acts on GlcNAcα1,4Galβ1R at the Non-reducing Terminus of O-Glycans in Gastric Mucin*

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Masaya; Tsuchida, Akiko; Hirata, Akiko; Kobayashi, Natsumi; Goto, Kohtaro; Osumi, Kenji; Hirose, Yuriko; Nakayama, Jun; Yamanoi, Takashi; Ashida, Hisashi; Mizuno, Mamoru

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, α-linked GlcNAc is primarily found in heparan sulfate/heparin and gastric gland mucous cell type mucin. α-N-Acetylglucosaminidases (αGNases) belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 89 are widely distributed from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. Human lysosomal αGNase is well known to degrade heparin and heparan sulfate. Here, we reveal the substrate specificity of αGNase (AgnC) from Clostridium perfringens strain 13, a bacterial homolog of human αGNase, by chemically synthesizing a series of disaccharide substrates containing α-linked GlcNAc. AgnC was found to release GlcNAc from GlcNAcα1,4Galβ1pMP and GlcNAcα1pNP substrates (where pMP and pNP represent p-methoxyphenyl and p-nitrophenyl, respectively). AgnC also released GlcNAc from porcine gastric mucin and cell surface mucin. Because AgnC showed no activity against any of the GlcNAcα1,2Galβ1pMP, GlcNAcα1,3Galβ1pMP, GlcNAcα1,6Galβ1pMP, and GlcNAcα1,4GlcAβ1pMP substrates, this enzyme may represent a specific glycosidase required for degrading α-GlcNAc-capped O-glycans of the class III mucin secreted from the stomach and duodenum. Deletion of the C-terminal region containing several carbohydrate-binding module 32 (CBM32) domains significantly reduced the activity for porcine gastric mucin; however, activity against GlcNAcα1,4Galβ1pMP was markedly enhanced. Dot blot and ELISA analyses revealed that the deletion construct containing the C-terminal CBM-C2 to CBM-C6 domains binds strongly to porcine gastric mucin. Consequently, tandem CBM32 domains located near the C terminus of AgnC should function by increasing the affinity for branched or clustered α-GlcNAc-containing glycans. The agnC gene-disrupted strain showed significantly reduced growth on the class III mucin-containing medium compared with the wild type strain, suggesting that AgnC might have an important role in dominant growth in intestines. PMID:21177247

  20. Method for creating polynucleotide and polypeptide sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Frances (Inventor); Shao, Zhixin (Inventor); Volkov, Alexander (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The invention provides methods for evolving a polynucleotide toward acquisition of a desired property. Such methods entail incubating a population of parental polynucleotide variants under conditions to generate annealed polynucleotides comprising heteroduplexes. The heteroduplexes are then exposed to a cellular DNA repair system to convert the heteroduplexes to parental polynucleotide variants or recombined polynucleotide variants. The resulting polynucleotides are then screened or selected for the desired property.

  1. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-10-14

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  2. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-09-09

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the cellobiohydrolase variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the cellobiohydrolase variants.

  3. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2013-09-24

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  4. Concurrent infection with Clostridium and Plasmodium in a captive king penguin Aptenodytes patagonicus.

    PubMed

    Penrith, M L; Huchzermeyer, F W; De Wet, S C; Penrith, M J

    1994-06-01

    Concurrent infection with Plasmodium relictum and Clostridium perfringens Type B was diagnosed in a king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) that died in the National Zoological Gardens, Pretoria. Macro- and microscopic pathological changes were mainly due to C. perfringens. The relative significance of the two pathogens is discussed. PMID:18671104

  5. Acute Hemolysis with Renal Failure due to Clostridium Bacteremia in a Patient with AML

    PubMed Central

    Medrano-Juarez, R. M.; Sotello, D.; D'Cuhna, L.; Payne, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of acute hemolytic anemia, renal failure, and Clostridium perfringens bacteremia in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. The high fatality of C. perfringens bacteremia requires that clinicians recognize and rapidly treat patients at risk for this infection. Although other hemolytic processes are in the differential diagnosis of these events, the presence of high fever, chills, and rapidly positive blood cultures may help narrow the diagnosis. Most cases of C. perfringens bacteremia have a concomitant coinfection, which makes broad spectrum empiric therapy essential. There is a high mortality rate of C. perfringens infections associated with leukemia. PMID:27774325

  6. Clostridium infection (jisizheng) in yaks in Qinghai, China.

    PubMed

    Changqing, Q; Xueli, Y

    2001-10-01

    Since the mid-1980s, outbreaks of a disease characterized by a sudden onset, acute deaths and extensive haemorrhages in the viscera and digestive tract of yaks have been prevalent in Qilian, Qinghai, China. The disease is known as jisiheng by local people. Virulent Clostridium perfringens type A and Clostridium haemolytica were isolated from yaks that had died of jisizheng. In 1996 and 1997, yaks were immunized with a polyvalent inactivated vaccine against C. perfringens and with an inactivated vaccine against C. haemolyticum, and this prevented the occurrence of jisizheng. PMID:11583378

  7. Phylogenetic positions of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, P; Capaul, S E; Nicolet, J; Frey, J

    1996-10-01

    The sequences of the 16S rRNA genes (rrs genes) of Clostridium chauvoei, the causative agent of blackleg in cattle, and the phenotypically related organism Clostridium septicum were determined. After amplification of 1,507-bp PCR fragments from the corresponding rrs genes, the sequences were determined in a single round of sequencing by using conserved region primers. A sequence similarity analysis of the sequences revealed the close phylogenetic relationship of C. chauvoei and C. septicum in Clostridium cluster I (M. D. Collins, P. A. Lawson, A. Willems, J. J. Cordoba, J. Fernandez-Garayzabal, P. Garcia, J. Cai, H. Hippe, and J. A. E. Farrow, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 44:812-826, 1994), which includes Clostridium carnis, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tetani. We found that 99.3% of the nucleotides in the genes of C. chauvoei and C. septicum are identical.

  8. Monitoring of anti-C. perfringens bacteriophage CpV1 persistence in gastrointestinal tracts of broilers.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A factor limiting promotion of poultry products to the world market is any contamination of birds with pathogens, including Clostridium perfringens. The latter is often accountable for significant economical losses in production of commercial birds because of a possibility of the development of necr...

  9. Coupled isothermal polynucleotide amplification and translation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A cell-free system for polynucleotide amplification and translation is disclosed. Also disclosed are methods for using the system and a composition which allows the various components of the system to function under a common set of reaction conditions.

  10. Nanoparticulate systems for polynucleotide delivery

    PubMed Central

    Basarkar, Ashwin; Singh, Jagdish

    2007-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendously influenced gene therapy research in recent years. Nanometer-size systems have been extensively investigated for delivering genes at both local and systemic levels. These systems offer several advantages in terms of tissue penetrability, cellular uptake, systemic circulation, and cell targeting as compared to larger systems. They can protect the polynucleotide from a variety of degradative and destabilizing factors and enhance delivery efficiency to the cells. A variety of polymeric and non-polymeric nanoparticles have been investigated in an effort to maximize the delivery efficiency while minimizing the toxic effects. This article provides a review on the most commonly used nanoparticulate systems for gene delivery. We have discussed frequently used polymers, such as, polyethyleneimine, poly (lactide-co-glycolide), chitosan, as well as non-polymeric materials such as cationic lipids and metallic nanoparticles. The advantages and limitations of each system have been elaborated. PMID:18019834

  11. Agouti polynucleotide compositions and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Woychik, Richard P.; Bultman, Scott J.; Michaud, Edward J.

    2003-02-04

    Disclosed are methods and compositions comprising novel agouti polypeptides and the polynucleotides which encode them. Also disclosed are DNA segments encoding these proteins derived from human and murine cell lines, and the use of these polynucleotides and polypeptides in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Methods, compositions, kits, and devices are also provided for identifying compounds which are inhibitors of agouti activity, and for altering fatty acid synthetase activity and intracellular calcium levels in transformed cells.

  12. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-07-15

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  13. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-06-24

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  14. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-06-24

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  15. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-07-08

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  16. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-07-15

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  17. Polypeptides having endoglucanse activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-07-08

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  18. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  19. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-10-27

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  20. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-11-17

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  1. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-11-17

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  2. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-03-10

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  3. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2016-06-28

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  4. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-10-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  5. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activitiy and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan; Duan, Junxin

    2015-12-15

    The present invention provides isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also provides nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  6. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Tang, Lan

    2015-09-22

    The present invention provides isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also provides nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cell comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  7. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-07-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  8. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-02-10

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  9. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-07-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  10. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-08-18

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  11. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Yu; Duan, Junxin; Tang, Lan; Wu, Wenping

    2015-06-09

    Provided are isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. Also provided are nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  12. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also provides nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  13. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Yu; Tang, Lan; Henriksen, Svend Hostgaard Bang

    2016-05-17

    The present invention provides isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also provides nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  14. Cyclin Polynucleotides, Polypeptides And Uses Thereof.

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, Keith S.; Tao, Yumin; Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Gregory, Carolyn A.; Hoerster, George J.; McElver, John A.

    2003-02-11

    The invention provides isolated polynucleotides and their encoded proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation. The invention further provides recombinant expression cassettes, host cells, transgenic plants, and antibody compositions. The present invention provides methods and compositions relating to altering cell cycle protein content and/or composition of plants.

  15. [Normal status of Bac. cereus and Cl. perfringens in the body of healthy slaughter animals].

    PubMed

    Milev, M

    1976-01-01

    Studied were cattle, pigs, sheep, and young calves intended for slaughter. The experiments were carried out under productional conditions, strictly observing the routinely adopted practice of preslaughter handling. The blood of the animals was sampled prior to slaughter. Samples from the meat (musculature), spleen, kidneys, liver, mesenterial and body lymph nodes as well as feces were taken immediately after slaughter. It was established that Bacillus cereus and Clostridium perfringens were almost lacking in the musculature, mesenterial and body lymph nodes and in some of the parenchymal organs. These organisms were chiefly found in the intestinal tract. Eighty-three up to 100 per cent of the isolated cultures of Cl. perfringens and from 62.5 up to 100 per cent of the isolated cultures of Bac. cereus originated from the feces.

  16. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L + dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard... of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for...

  17. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L + dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice... until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall...

  18. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L + dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice... until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall...

  19. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L + dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice... until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall...

  20. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L + dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard... of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for...

  1. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L + dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice... until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall...

  2. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L + dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard... of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for...

  3. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L + dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard... of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall be used for...

  4. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L + dose. The smallest quantity of toxin which can be mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice... until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white mice, each weighing 16-20 grams, shall...

  5. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... each serial shall be tested using the toxin-neutralization test for Beta Antitoxin provided in this... following words and terms shall mean: (i) International antitoxin unit. (I.U.) That quantity of Beta... antitoxin. The Beta Antitoxin preparation which has been standardized as to antitoxin unitage on the...

  6. Quality assurance of C. perfringens epsilon toxoid vaccines--ELISA versus mouse neutralisation test.

    PubMed

    Rosskopf-Streicher, Ute; Volkers, Peter; Noeske, Kerstin; Werner, Esther

    2004-01-01

    Clostridium (C.) perfringens is a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming bacterium. Disease caused by C. perfringens infection is called enterotoxaemia. C. perfringens strains are classified on the basis of the lethal exotoxins formed by the bacteria. Epsilon toxin is one of the major lethal toxins and is formed by C. perfringens types B and D. C. perfringens is an ubiquitous bacterium. Infection occurs via food, water, animal litter or soil. Affected animals include mainly sheep, pigs and cattle. C. perfringens infection manifests as pulpy kidney disease and diarrhoea in suckling lambs. Enterotoxaemia development is peracute in most cases. Animals die suddenly while grazing on the pasture, without any prior signs of disease. Therefore, treatment is possible only in very rare cases. Suitable immunoprophylactic measures are the treatment of choice to combat the disease: Vaccines and immunosera have therefore been used extensively for a long time. The requirements for quality, efficacy and safety testing of the inactivated vaccines are laid down in the Ph. Eur. in the monograph: Clostridium perfringens vaccines for veterinary use. After a marketing authorisation is attained, the product batches must be tested in laboratory animal models for their potency against all vaccine components (Pharmeuropa, 1997). For potency testing (batch control) of C. perfringens types B and D, the induction of specific antibodies against epsilon toxin in rabbits must be verified. For this purpose, 10 rabbits are immunised twice with the product to be tested. Their blood is taken 14 days after the last immunisation and the serum is pooled. The pooled serum is then tested for its protective effect. This is done by means of the toxin neutralisation test in mice (optionally also in guinea pigs) in comparison with an international reference serum. The evaluation criterion is the death rate of the mice in the test and reference groups after administration of lethal doses of epsilon toxin. The

  7. Restriction/modification polypeptides, polynucleotides, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Westpheling, Janet; Chung, DaeHwan; Huddleston, Jennifer; Farkas, Joel A

    2015-02-24

    The present invention relates to the discovery of a novel restriction/modification system in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii. The discovered restriction enzyme is a HaeIII-like restriction enzyme that possesses a thermophilic activity profile. The restriction/modification system also includes a methyltransferase, M.CbeI, that methylates at least one cytosine residue in the CbeI recognition sequence to m.sup.4C. Thus, the invention provides, in various aspects, isolated CbeI or M.CbeI polypeptides, or biologically active fragments thereof; isolated polynucleotides that encode the CbeI or M.CbeI polypeptides or biologically active fragments thereof, including expression vectors that include such polynucleotide sequences; methods of digesting DNA using a CbeI polypeptide; methods of treating a DNA molecule using a M.CbeI polypeptide; and methods of transforming a Caldicellulosiruptor cell.

  8. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael

    2016-05-31

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  9. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Yu; Duan, Junxin; Tang, Lan; Wu, Wenping

    2016-06-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  10. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Paul; Golightly, Elizabeth

    2011-06-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  11. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Morant, Marc D; Patkar, Shamkant; Ding, Hanshu

    2013-11-12

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  12. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Paul; Golightly, Elizabeth

    2007-07-17

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  13. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Paul; Golightly, Elizabeth

    2012-11-27

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  14. Polynucleotides encoding polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Paul; Golightly, Elizabeth

    2010-03-02

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  15. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael

    2015-03-10

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  16. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael

    2015-01-27

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  17. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Morant, Marc

    2014-01-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity, beta-xylosidase, or beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  18. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj [Bagsvaed, DK

    2014-01-07

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The inventino also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  19. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ye; Harris, Paul; Tang, Lan; Wu, Wenping

    2013-11-19

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  20. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Lopez De Leon, Alfredo; Merino, Sandra

    2007-05-22

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  1. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj; Shagasi, Tarana

    2015-06-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity, catalytic domains, cellulose binding domains and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides, catalytic domains or cellulose binding domains. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides, catalytic domains or cellulose binding domains.

  2. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael

    2013-06-18

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  3. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Maiyuran, Suchindra; Kramer, Randall; Harris, Paul

    2013-10-29

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  4. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-10-21

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  5. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan

    2015-11-20

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  6. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Morant, Marc D.; Harris, Paul

    2015-10-13

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  7. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-11-17

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  8. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Morant, Marc Dominique

    2014-10-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity, beta-xylosidase activity, or beta-glucosidase and beta-xylosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  9. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Hanshu, Ding

    2012-10-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  10. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Paul; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael; Ding, Hanshu; Vlasenko, Elena

    2010-11-02

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  11. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael

    2010-12-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  12. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Ding, Hanshu; Brown, Kimberly

    2012-06-26

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  13. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Ding, Hanshu; Brown, Kimberly

    2011-10-25

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  14. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael

    2012-09-18

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  15. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Schnorr, Kirk; Kramer, Randall

    2016-08-09

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  16. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Schnorr, Kirk; Kramer, Randall

    2016-04-05

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  17. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2016-02-23

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  18. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu; Joergensen, Christian; Kramer, Randall

    2014-09-16

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  19. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Ding, Hanshu

    2013-04-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  20. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu; Jorgensen, Christian Isak; Kramer, Randall

    2013-12-24

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  1. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu; Jorgensen, Christian Isak; Kramer, Randall

    2012-04-03

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  2. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Wu, Wenping; Kramer, Randall

    2013-11-19

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  3. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan; Harris, Paul; Wu, Wenping

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  4. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu; Jorgensen, Christian Isak; Kramer, Randall

    2013-04-16

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  5. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Junxin; Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Wu, Wenping; Quinlan, Jason; Kramer, Randall

    2013-06-18

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  6. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Junxin; Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan; Wu, Wenping; Quinlan, Jason; Kramer, Randall

    2012-03-27

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  7. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Wu, Wenping; Kramer, Randall

    2014-10-21

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  8. Recombination of polynucleotide sequences using random or defined primers

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Affholter, Joseph A.; Zhao, Huimin H; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2000-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  9. Recombination of polynucleotide sequences using random or defined primers

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Affholter, Joseph A.; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2001-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  10. Oligo/Polynucleotide-Based Gene Modification: Strategies and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, R. Geoffrey; Kim, Soya

    2011-01-01

    Oligonucleotide- and polynucleotide-based gene modification strategies were developed as an alternative to transgene-based and classical gene targeting-based gene therapy approaches for treatment of genetic disorders. Unlike the transgene-based strategies, oligo/polynucleotide gene targeting approaches maintain gene integrity and the relationship between the protein coding and gene-specific regulatory sequences. Oligo/polynucleotide-based gene modification also has several advantages over classical vector-based homologous recombination approaches. These include essentially complete homology to the target sequence and the potential to rapidly engineer patient-specific oligo/polynucleotide gene modification reagents. Several oligo/polynucleotide-based approaches have been shown to successfully mediate sequence-specific modification of genomic DNA in mammalian cells. The strategies involve the use of polynucleotide small DNA fragments, triplex-forming oligonucleotides, and single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides to mediate homologous exchange. The primary focus of this review will be on the mechanistic aspects of the small fragment homologous replacement, triplex-forming oligonucleotide-mediated, and single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated gene modification strategies as it relates to their therapeutic potential. PMID:21417933

  11. Antibacterial activity against Clostridium genus and antiradical activity of the essential oils from different origin.

    PubMed

    Kačániová, Miroslava; Vukovič, Nenad; Horská, Elena; Salamon, Ivan; Bobková, Alica; Hleba, Lukáš; Fiskelová, Martina; Vatľák, Alexander; Petrová, Jana; Bobko, Marek

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the antimicrobial and antiradical activities of 15 essential oils were investigated. The antimicrobial activities were determined by using agar disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods against Clostridium genus and antioxidant properties of essential oils by testing their scavenging effect on DPPH radicals activities. We determined the antibacterial activity of Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium hystoliticum, Clostridium intestinale, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium ramosum. We obtained the original commercial essential oils samples of Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus montana, Mentha piperita, Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia montana, Origanum vulgare L. (2 samples), Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abies alba Mill., Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch and Thymus vulgaris L. produced in Slovakia (Calendula a.s., Nova Lubovna, Slovakia). The results of the disk diffusion method showed very high essential oils activity against all tested strains of microorganisms. The best antimicrobial activity against C. butyricum was found at Pimpinella anisum, against C. hystoliticum was found at Pinus sylvestris, against C. intestinale was found at Satureia hortensis L., against C. perfringens was found at Origanum vulgare L. and against C. ramosum was found at Pinus sylvestris. The results of broth microdilution assay showed that none of the essential oils was active against C. hystoliticum. The best antimicrobial activity against C. butyricum was found at Abies alba Mill., against C. intestinale was found at Abies alba Mill., against C. perfringens was found at Satureia montana and against C. ramosum was found at Abius alba and Carum carvi. Antioxidant DPPH radical scavenging activity was determined at several solutions of oil samples (50 μL.mL(-1)-0.39 μL.mL(-1)) and the best scavenging effect for the highest concentration (50 μL.mL(-1)) was observed. The antioxidant properties

  12. Antibacterial activity against Clostridium genus and antiradical activity of the essential oils from different origin.

    PubMed

    Kačániová, Miroslava; Vukovič, Nenad; Horská, Elena; Salamon, Ivan; Bobková, Alica; Hleba, Lukáš; Fiskelová, Martina; Vatľák, Alexander; Petrová, Jana; Bobko, Marek

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the antimicrobial and antiradical activities of 15 essential oils were investigated. The antimicrobial activities were determined by using agar disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods against Clostridium genus and antioxidant properties of essential oils by testing their scavenging effect on DPPH radicals activities. We determined the antibacterial activity of Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium hystoliticum, Clostridium intestinale, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium ramosum. We obtained the original commercial essential oils samples of Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus montana, Mentha piperita, Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia montana, Origanum vulgare L. (2 samples), Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abies alba Mill., Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch and Thymus vulgaris L. produced in Slovakia (Calendula a.s., Nova Lubovna, Slovakia). The results of the disk diffusion method showed very high essential oils activity against all tested strains of microorganisms. The best antimicrobial activity against C. butyricum was found at Pimpinella anisum, against C. hystoliticum was found at Pinus sylvestris, against C. intestinale was found at Satureia hortensis L., against C. perfringens was found at Origanum vulgare L. and against C. ramosum was found at Pinus sylvestris. The results of broth microdilution assay showed that none of the essential oils was active against C. hystoliticum. The best antimicrobial activity against C. butyricum was found at Abies alba Mill., against C. intestinale was found at Abies alba Mill., against C. perfringens was found at Satureia montana and against C. ramosum was found at Abius alba and Carum carvi. Antioxidant DPPH radical scavenging activity was determined at several solutions of oil samples (50 μL.mL(-1)-0.39 μL.mL(-1)) and the best scavenging effect for the highest concentration (50 μL.mL(-1)) was observed. The antioxidant properties

  13. Clostridium and Bacillus Binary Enterotoxins: Bad for the Bowels, and Eukaryotic Being

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Bradley G.; Pradhan, Kisha; Fleming, Jodie M.; Samy, Ramar Perumal; Barth, Holger; Popoff, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    Some pathogenic spore-forming bacilli employ a binary protein mechanism for intoxicating the intestinal tracts of insects, animals, and humans. These Gram-positive bacteria and their toxins include Clostridium botulinum (C2 toxin), Clostridium difficile (C. difficile toxin or CDT), Clostridium perfringens (ι-toxin and binary enterotoxin, or BEC), Clostridium spiroforme (C. spiroforme toxin or CST), as well as Bacillus cereus (vegetative insecticidal protein or VIP). These gut-acting proteins form an AB complex composed of ADP-ribosyl transferase (A) and cell-binding (B) components that intoxicate cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and endosomal trafficking. Once inside the cytosol, the A components inhibit normal cell functions by mono-ADP-ribosylation of globular actin, which induces cytoskeletal disarray and death. Important aspects of each bacterium and binary enterotoxin will be highlighted in this review, with particular focus upon the disease process involving the biochemistry and modes of action for each toxin. PMID:25198129

  14. Physiology and Sporulation in Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Dürre, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Clostridia are Gram-positive, anaerobic, endospore-forming bacteria, incapable of dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Comprising approximately 180 species, the genus Clostridium is one of the largest bacterial genera. Physiology is mostly devoted to acid production. Numerous pathways are known, such as the homoacetate fermentation by acetogens, the propionate fermentation by Clostridium propionicum, and the butyrate/butanol fermentation by C. acetobutylicum, a well-known solvent producer. Clostridia degrade sugars, alcohols, amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, and polymers such as starch and cellulose. Energy conservation can be performed by substrate-level phosphorylation as well as by the generation of ion gradients. Endospore formation resembles the mechanism elucidated in Bacillus. Morphology, contents, and properties of spores are very similar to bacilli endospores. Sporulating clostridia usually form swollen mother cells and accumulate the storage substance granulose. However, clostridial sporulation differs by not employing the so-called phosphorelay. Initiation starts by direct phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A. The cascade of sporulation-specific sigma factors is again identical to what is known from Bacillus. The onset of sporulation is coupled in some species to either solvent (acetone, butanol) or toxin (e.g., C. perfringens enterotoxin) formation. The germination of spores is often induced by various amino acids, often in combination with phosphate and sodium ions. In medical applications, C. butyricum spores are used as a C. difficile prophylaxis and as treatment against diarrhea. Recombinant spores are currently under investigation and testing as antitumor agents, because they germinate only in hypoxic tissues (i.e., tumor tissue), allowing precise targeting and direct killing of tumor cells. PMID:26104199

  15. Physical and genetic map of the Clostridium saccharobutylicum (formerly Clostridium acetobutylicum) NCP 262 chromosome.

    PubMed

    Keis, S; Sullivan, J T; Jones, D T

    2001-07-01

    A physical and genetic map of the Clostridium saccharobutylicum NCP 262 chromosome was constructed. The order of macrorestriction fragments was determined by analysing fragments generated after single and double digestion with the restriction enzymes BssHII, I-CeuI, Sse8387I, RsrII and SfiI and separation by PFGE. The I-CeuI backbone of C. saccharobutylicum was constructed by indirect end-labelling with rrs- and 3' rrl-specific probes located on either side of the I-CeuI site in the rrn operon, and reciprocal separation of BssHII and I-CeuI digestion products by two-dimensional PFGE. The positions of BssHII fragments on the physical map were determined using a library of linking clones containing BssHII cleavage sites. The size of the circular genome was estimated to be 5.3 Mb with a mean resolution of approximately 140 kb. The chromosome of C. saccharobutylicum contains 12 rrn operons, located on 46% of the chromosome, which are transcribed divergently from the deduced origin of replication. The genetic map was constructed by determining the location of 28 genes involved in house-keeping, heat-shock response, sporulation, electron transfer and acid- and solvent-formation. Comparison of the C. saccharobutylicum genetic map with those of the spore-forming bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium beijerinckii indicated C. saccharobutylicum to be most similar to the latter two Clostridium species, with the order of the genes within the gyrAB and recA loci being conserved.

  16. Isolated Polynucleotides and Methods of Promoting a Morphology in a Fungus

    DOEpatents

    Lasure, Linda L [Fall City, WA; Dai, Ziyu [Richland, WA

    2008-10-21

    The invention includes isolated polynucleotide molecules that are differentially expressed in a native fungus exhibiting a first morphology relative to the native fungus exhibiting a second morphology. The invention includes a method of enhancing a bioprocess utilizing a fungus. A transformed fungus is produced by transforming a fungus with a recombinant polynucleotide molecule. The recombinant polynucleotide molecule contains an isolated polynucleotide sequence linked operably to a promoter. The polynucleotide sequence is expressed to promote a first morphology. The first morphology of the transformed fungus enhances a bioprocess relative to the bioprocess utilizing a second morphology.

  17. Methods of using viral replicase polynucleotides and polypeptides

    DOEpatents

    Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Lowe, Keith S.; Bailey, Matthew A.; Gregory, Carolyn A.; Hoerster, George J.; Larkins, Brian A.; Dilkes, Brian R.; Burnett, Ronald; Woo, Young Min

    2007-12-18

    The invention provides novel methods of using viral replicase polypeptides and polynucleotides. Included are methods for increasing transformation frequencies, increasing crop yield, providing a positive growth advantage, modulating cell division, transiently modulating cell division, and for providing a means of positive selection.

  18. The Clostridium Sporulation Programs: Diversity and Preservation of Endospore Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A.; Jones, Shawn W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacillus and Clostridium organisms initiate the sporulation process when unfavorable conditions are detected. The sporulation process is a carefully orchestrated cascade of events at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels involving a multitude of sigma factors, transcription factors, proteases, and phosphatases. Like Bacillus genomes, sequenced Clostridium genomes contain genes for all major sporulation-specific transcription and sigma factors (spo0A, sigH, sigF, sigE, sigG, and sigK) that orchestrate the sporulation program. However, recent studies have shown that there are substantial differences in the sporulation programs between the two genera as well as among different Clostridium species. First, in the absence of a Bacillus-like phosphorelay system, activation of Spo0A in Clostridium organisms is carried out by a number of orphan histidine kinases. Second, downstream of Spo0A, the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of the canonical set of four sporulation-specific sigma factors (σF, σE, σG, and σK) display different patterns, not only compared to Bacillus but also among Clostridium organisms. Finally, recent studies demonstrated that σK, the last sigma factor to be activated according to the Bacillus subtilis model, is involved in the very early stages of sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. perfringens, and C. botulinum as well as in the very late stages of spore maturation in C. acetobutylicum. Despite profound differences in initiation, propagation, and orchestration of expression of spore morphogenetic components, these findings demonstrate not only the robustness of the endospore sporulation program but also the plasticity of the program to generate different complex phenotypes, some apparently regulated at the epigenetic level. PMID:25631287

  19. Necrotic Enteritis in Chickens Associated with Clostridium sordellii.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Guillermo; Uzal, Francisco; Chin, R P; Palombo, Enzo A; Awad, Milena; Lyras, Dena; Shivaprasad, H L

    2015-09-01

    Three outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordelii were diagnosed in commercial broiler chicken flocks with 18,000 to 31,000 birds between 18 and 26 days old. Clinical signs in the affected flocks included high mortality up to 2% a day, depression, and diarrhea. The main gross changes included segmental dilation of the small intestine with watery contents, gas, mucoid exudate, and roughened and uneven mucosa, occasionally covered with a pseudomembrane. Microscopic lesions in the small intestine were characterized by extensive areas of coagulative necrosis of the villi, fibrinous exudate in the lumen, and high numbers of large, Gram-positive rods, occasionally containing subterminal spores, seen in the necrotic tissue and lumen. These rods were identified as C. sordellii by immunohistochemistry. Clostridium sordellii was isolated in an almost pure culture from the intestine of affected birds. A retrospective study of commercial broiler chicken and turkey submissions to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System revealed that C. sordellii had been isolated from intestinal lesions in outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease in 8 of 39 cases, 5 times together with Clostridium perfringens and 3 times alone. The latter three cases are reported here.

  20. Structural and biochemical analysis of the phosphate donor specificity of the polynucleotide kinase component of the bacterial pnkp•hen1 RNA repair system.

    PubMed

    Das, Ushati; Wang, Li Kai; Smith, Paul; Shuman, Stewart

    2013-07-01

    Clostridium thermocellum Pnkp is the end-healing and end-sealing subunit of a bacterial RNA repair system. CthPnkp is composed of three catalytic modules: an N-terminal 5'-OH polynucleotide kinase, a central 2',3' phosphatase, and a C-terminal ligase. The crystal structure of the kinase domain bound to ATP•Mg(2+) revealed a rich network of ionic and hydrogen-bonding contacts to the α, β, and γ phosphates. By contrast, there are no enzymic contacts to the ribose and none with the adenine base other than a π-cation interaction with Arg116. Here we report that the enzyme uses ATP, GTP, CTP, UTP, or dATP as a phosphate donor for the 5'-OH kinase reaction. The enzyme also catalyzes the reverse reaction, in which a polynucleotide 5'-PO4 group is transferred to ADP, GDP, CDP, UDP, or dADP to form the corresponding NTP. We report new crystal structures of the kinase in complexes with GTP, CTP, UTP, and dATP in which the respective nucleobases are stacked on Arg116 but make no other enzymic contacts. Mutating Arg116 to alanine elicits a 10-fold increase in Km for ATP but has little effect on kcat. These findings illuminate the basis for nonspecific donor nucleotide utilization by a P-loop phosphotransferase. PMID:23721485

  1. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase and beta-xylosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Morant, Marc Dominique

    2014-05-06

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity, beta-xylosidase activity, or beta-glucosidase and beta-xylosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  2. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and beta-xylosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Morant, Marc Dominique

    2014-04-29

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity, beta-xylosidase activity, or beta-glucosidase and beta-xylosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  3. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and beta-xylosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Morant, Marc Dominique

    2014-05-06

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity, beta-xylosidase activity, or beta-glucosidase and beta-xylosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  4. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul

    2013-12-17

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  5. Clostridium difficile infection in horses: a review.

    PubMed

    Diab, S S; Songer, G; Uzal, F A

    2013-11-29

    Clostridium difficile is considered one of the most important causes of diarrhea and enterocolitis in horses. Foals and adult horses are equally susceptible to the infection. The highly resistant spore of C. difficile is the infectious unit of transmission, which occurs primarily via the fecal-oral route, with sources of infection including equine feces, contaminated soil, animal hospitals, and feces of other animals. Two major risk factors for the development of C. difficile associated disease (CDAD) in adult horses are hospitalization and antimicrobial treatment, although sporadically, cases of CDAD can occur in horses that have not received antimicrobials or been hospitalized. The most common antibiotics associated with CDAD in horses are erythromycin, trimethoprim/sulfonamides, β-lactam antimicrobials, clindamycin, rifampicin, and gentamicin. Clinical signs and intestinal lesions of CDAD infection are not specific and they cannot be used to distinguish infections by C. difficile from infections by other agents, such as Clostridium perfringens or Salmonella sp. The distribution of lesions throughout the intestinal tract seems to be age-dependent. Small intestine is invariably affected, and colon and cecum may or may not have lesions in foals<1-month old. Naturally acquired disease in older foals and adult horses has a more aboral distribution, affecting colon and sometimes cecum, but rarely the small intestine. Detection of toxin A, toxin B or both in intestinal contents or feces is considered the most reliable diagnostic criterion for CDAD in horses. Isolation of toxigenic strains of C. difficile from horses with intestinal disease is highly suggestive of CDAD. A better understanding of pathogenesis, reservoirs of infection, and vaccines and other methods of control is needed. Also further studies are recommended to investigate other possible predisposing factors and/or etiological agents of enteric diseases of horses. PMID:23642413

  6. Clostridium difficile toxin CDT induces formation of microtubule-based protrusions and increases adherence of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schwan, Carsten; Stecher, Bärbel; Tzivelekidis, Tina; van Ham, Marco; Rohde, Manfred; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Wehland, Jürgen; Aktories, Klaus

    2009-10-01

    Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis by production of the Rho GTPase-glucosylating toxins A and B. Recently emerging hypervirulent Clostridium difficile strains additionally produce the binary ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase), which ADP-ribosylates actin and inhibits actin polymerization. Thus far, the role of CDT as a virulence factor is not understood. Here we report by using time-lapse- and immunofluorescence microscopy that CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins, including Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin and Clostridium perfringens iota toxin, induce redistribution of microtubules and formation of long (up to >150 microm) microtubule-based protrusions at the surface of intestinal epithelial cells. The toxins increase the length of decoration of microtubule plus-ends by EB1/3, CLIP-170 and CLIP-115 proteins and cause redistribution of the capture proteins CLASP2 and ACF7 from microtubules at the cell cortex into the cell interior. The CDT-induced microtubule protrusions form a dense meshwork at the cell surface, which wrap and embed bacterial cells, thereby largely increasing the adherence of Clostridia. The study describes a novel type of microtubule structure caused by less efficient microtubule capture and offers a new perspective for the pathogenetic role of CDT and other binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins in host-pathogen interactions.

  7. Clostridium botulinum type E occurs and grows in the alga Cladophora glomerata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, M.N.; Whitman, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, massive avian die-offs from Clostridium botulinum type E infection have occurred in the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) area of Lake Michigan. These outbreaks have been coincidental with massive blooms of the green algae Cladophora, mostly Cladophora glomerata. We tested the hypothesis that Clostridium botulinum type E can grow under suitable conditions in these algal mats. In a lab mesocosm study, Cladophora from four outbreak-impacted beaches from SLBE were compared with four unimpacted beaches in the Milwaukee–Racine area for bontE gene of Clostridium botulinum. Frequency of the bontE gene was higher after incubation (25 °C for up to 6 weeks) of Cladophora from impacted vs. the unimpacted area. Since no type E gene was detected initially in Cladophora from any of the eight locations, we infer that the increased occurrence of type E gene arose from spore germination or vegetative Clostridium growth within the existing algal mats of SLBE. Moreover, we found that the congener Clostridium perfringens readily grows in mesocosms containing Cladophora.

  8. Gas discharge plasmas are effective in inactivating Bacillus and Clostridium spores.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shawn; Abramzon, Nina; Jackson, James O; Lin, Wei-Jen

    2012-03-01

    Bacterial spores are the most resistant form of life and have been a major threat to public health and food safety. Nonthermal atmospheric gas discharge plasma is a novel sterilization method that leaves no chemical residue. In our study, a helium radio-frequency cold plasma jet was used to examine its sporicidal effect on selected strains of Bacillus and Clostridium. The species tested included Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, and Clostridium botulinum type A and type E. The plasmas were effective in inactivating selected Bacillus and Clostridia spores with D values (decimal reduction time) ranging from 2 to 8 min. Among all spores tested, C. botulinum type A and C. sporogenes were significantly more resistant to plasma inactivation than other species. Observations by phase contrast microscopy showed that B. subtilis spores were severely damaged by plasmas and the majority of the treated spores were unable to initiate the germination process. There was no detectable fragmentation of the DNA when the spores were treated for up to 20 min. The release of dipicolinic acid was observed almost immediately after the plasma treatment, indicating the spore envelope damage could occur quickly resulting in dipicolinic acid release and the reduction of spore resistance.

  9. Quantitative real-time PCR assay for Clostridium septicum in poultry gangrenous dermatitis associated samples.

    PubMed

    Neumann, A P; Dunham, S M; Rehberger, T G; Siragusa, G R

    2010-08-01

    Clostridium septicum is a spore-forming anaerobe frequently implicated in cases of gangrenous dermatitis (GD) and other spontaneously occurring myonecrotic infections of poultry. Although C. septicum is readily cultured from diseased tissues it can be difficult to enumerate due to its tendency to swarm over the surface of agar plates. In this study a quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed in order to more accurately measure the levels of C. septicum in healthy as well as GD associated poultry samples. The assay was specifically designed to target the C. septicum alpha toxin gene, csa, which is, to our knowledge, carried by all strains of C. septicum and has been shown to be essential for virulence. Genomic DNAs from a diverse collection of bacterial species, including closely related Clostridium chauvoei, Clostridium carnis, Clostridium tertium as well as several strains of Clostridium perfringens, all failed to produce a positive reaction. An approximate reproducible limit of detection in spiked extracts of at least 10(3) cfu/g of C. septicum was observed for a variety of different sample types. C. septicum levels in broiler chicken field samples estimated from the results of qPCR were statistically correlated to culture based enumerations obtained from those same tissues.

  10. Gas discharge plasmas are effective in inactivating Bacillus and Clostridium spores.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shawn; Abramzon, Nina; Jackson, James O; Lin, Wei-Jen

    2012-03-01

    Bacterial spores are the most resistant form of life and have been a major threat to public health and food safety. Nonthermal atmospheric gas discharge plasma is a novel sterilization method that leaves no chemical residue. In our study, a helium radio-frequency cold plasma jet was used to examine its sporicidal effect on selected strains of Bacillus and Clostridium. The species tested included Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, and Clostridium botulinum type A and type E. The plasmas were effective in inactivating selected Bacillus and Clostridia spores with D values (decimal reduction time) ranging from 2 to 8 min. Among all spores tested, C. botulinum type A and C. sporogenes were significantly more resistant to plasma inactivation than other species. Observations by phase contrast microscopy showed that B. subtilis spores were severely damaged by plasmas and the majority of the treated spores were unable to initiate the germination process. There was no detectable fragmentation of the DNA when the spores were treated for up to 20 min. The release of dipicolinic acid was observed almost immediately after the plasma treatment, indicating the spore envelope damage could occur quickly resulting in dipicolinic acid release and the reduction of spore resistance. PMID:22075631

  11. Clostridium Difficile Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a bacterium that causes diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions such as colitis. Symptoms include Watery ... Nausea Abdominal pain or tenderness You might get C. difficile disease if you have an illness that ...

  12. Electronic excited States of polynucleotides: a study by electroabsorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Stanislaw; Luchowski, Rafal

    2007-02-01

    Electroabsorption spectra were obtained for single-stranded polynucleotides poly(U), poly(C), poly(A), and poly(G) in glycerol/water glass at low temperature, and the differences in permanent dipole moment (Deltamu) and polarizability (Deltaalpha) were estimated for several spectral ranges covering the lowest energy absorption band around 260 nm. In each spectral range, the electrooptical parameters associated with apparent features in the absorption spectrum exhibit distinct values representing either a dominant single transition or the resultant value for a group of a relatively narrow cluster of overlapping transitions. The estimated spacing in energy between electronic origins of these transitions is larger than the electronic coupling within the Coulombic interaction model which is usually adopted in computational studies. The electroabsorption data allow us to distinguish a weak electronic transition associated with a wing in polynucleotide absorption spectra, at an energy below the electronic origin in absorption spectra of monomeric nucleobases. In poly(C) and poly(G), these low-energy transitions are related to increased values of Deltamu and Deltaalpha, possibly indicating a weak involvement of charge resonance in the respective excited states. A model capable of explaining the origin of low-energy excited states, based on the interaction of pipi* and npi* transitions in neighboring bases, is introduced and briefly discussed on the grounds of point dipole interaction. PMID:17266277

  13. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii... Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Epsilon... temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white...

  14. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L... death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Beta Antitoxin preparation... toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of...

  15. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L... death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Beta Antitoxin preparation... toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of...

  16. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L... death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Beta Antitoxin preparation... toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of...

  17. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii... Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Epsilon... temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white...

  18. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii... Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Epsilon... temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white...

  19. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... mixed with one unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii) L... death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Beta Antitoxin preparation... toxin-antitoxin mixtures at room temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of...

  20. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii... Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Epsilon... temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white...

  1. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... mixed with one-tenth unit of Standard Antitoxin and not cause sickness or death in injected mice. (iii... Antitoxin and cause death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Epsilon... temperature for 1 hour and hold in ice water until injections of mice can be made. (vi) Five Swiss white...

  2. Enteritis associated with Clostridium perfringens type A in 9-month-old calves

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Bozidar; Prodanovic, Radisa; Ivetic, Vojin; Radanovic, Oliver; Bojkovski, Jovan

    2012-01-01

    Four 9-month-old Simmental male calves were presented with a history of sudden death. The necropsy and microscopic findings allowed a diagnosis of enteritis and severe intraluminal hemorrhage with blood clots in the jejunum, suggestive of jejunal hemorrhage syndrome. PMID:22851779

  3. The antimicrobial peptide sublancin ameliorates necrotic enteritis induced by Clostridium perfringens in broilers.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Zeng, X F; Wang, Q W; Zhu, J L; Peng, Q; Hou, C L; Thacker, P; Qiao, S Y

    2015-10-01

    Sublancin is an antimicrobial peptide produced by 168 containing 37 amino acids. The objective of this study was to investigate its inhibitory efficacy against both in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro study, we determined that sublancin had a minimum inhibitory concentration of 8 μM against , which was much higher than the antibiotic lincomycin (0.281 μM). Scanning electron microscopy showed that sublancin damaged the morphology of . The in vivo study was conducted on broilers for a 28-d period using a completely randomized design. A total of 252 chickens at 1 d of age were randomly assigned to 1 of 6 treatments including an uninfected control; an infected control; 3 infected groups supplemented with sublancin at 2.88, 5.76, or 11.52 mg activity/L of water; and an infected group supplemented with lincomycin at 75 mg activity/L of water (positive control). Necrotic enteritis was induced in the broilers by oral inoculation of on d 15 through 21. Thereafter, the sublancin or lincomycin were administered fresh daily for a period of 7 days. The challenge resulted in a significant decrease in ADG ( < 0.05) and a remarkable deterioration in G:F ( < 0.05) during d 15 to 21 of the experiment. There was a sharp increase of numbers in the cecum ( < 0.05). The addition of sublancin or lincomycin reduced caecal counts ( < 0.05). The counts had a tendency to decrease in the lincomycin treatment ( = 0.051) but were the highest in the sublancin treatment (5.76 mg activity/L of water). A higher villus height to crypt depth ratio in the duodenum and jejunum as well as a higher villus height in the duodenum were observed in broilers treated with sublancin or lincomycin ( < 0.05) compared with infected control broilers. It was observed that sublancin and lincomycin decreased IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels ( < 0.05) in the ileum compared with the infected control. In conclusion, although sublancin's minimum inhibitory concentration is much higher than lincomycin in vitro, less sublancin is needed to control necrotic enteritis induced by in vivo than lincomycin. These novel findings indicate that sublancin could be used as a potential antimicrobial agent to control necrotic enteritis.

  4. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... completed product from each serial shall be tested for potency using the Beta toxin-neutralization test...) International antitoxin unit. (I.U.) That quantity of Beta Antitoxin which reacts with L0 and L+ doses of... death in at least 80 percent of injected mice. (iv) Standard antitoxin. The Beta Antitoxin...

  5. Characterization of individual polynucleotide molecules using a membrane channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasianowicz, J. J.; Brandin, E.; Branton, D.; Deamer, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    We show that an electric field can drive single-stranded RNA and DNA molecules through a 2.6-nm diameter ion channel in a lipid bilayer membrane. Because the channel diameter can accommodate only a single strand of RNA or DNA, each polymer traverses the membrane as an extended chain that partially blocks the channel. The passage of each molecule is detected as a transient decrease of ionic current whose duration is proportional to polymer length. Channel blockades can therefore be used to measure polynucleotide length. With further improvements, the method could in principle provide direct, high-speed detection of the sequence of bases in single molecules of DNA or RNA.

  6. Further characterization of the polynucleotide phosphorylase of Micrococcus luteus

    PubMed Central

    Letendre, Carol H.; Singer, Maxine F.

    1975-01-01

    The purification of polynucleotide phosphorylase from Micrococcus luteus by chromatography on phosphocellulose columns is described. This procedure offers several advantages over previous procedures. Previously determined molecular weights for Form-I enzyme and Form-T enzyme derived from Form-I by limited tryptic hydrolysis were confirmed as 2.7 and 2.3 × 105, respectively. Form-I appears homogeneous in the ultracentrifuge, but multiple active protein species are separable by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The multiple species are probably the result of proteolysis. On polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, Form-T yielded a single size of subunit of 71,000 daltons, and Form-I yielded several bands of different molecular sizes. These results differ from earlier determinations. The amino acid compositions of Form-I and Form-T are reported. Form-I contains only between 8 and 10 cysteine residues per molecule and Form-T half that many. Images PMID:1121422

  7. Structures of bacterial polynucleotide kinase in a michaelis complex with nucleoside triphosphate (NTP)-Mg2+ and 5'-OH RNA and a mixed substrate-product complex with NTP-Mg2+ and a 5'-phosphorylated oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Das, Ushati; Wang, Li Kai; Smith, Paul; Munir, Annum; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium thermocellum polynucleotide kinase (CthPnk), the 5'-end-healing module of a bacterial RNA repair system, catalyzes reversible phosphoryl transfer from a nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) donor to a 5'-OH polynucleotide acceptor, either DNA or RNA. Here we report the 1.5-Å crystal structure of CthPnk-D38N in a Michaelis complex with GTP-Mg(2+) and a 5'-OH RNA oligonucleotide. The RNA-binding mode of CthPnk is different from that of the metazoan RNA kinase Clp1. CthPnk makes hydrogen bonds to the ribose 2'-hydroxyls of the 5' terminal nucleoside, via Gln51, and the penultimate nucleoside, via Gln83. The 5'-terminal nucleobase is sandwiched by Gln51 and Val129. Mutating Gln51 or Val129 to alanine reduced kinase specific activity 3-fold. Ser37 and Thr80 donate functionally redundant hydrogen bonds to the terminal phosphodiester; a S37A-T80A double mutation reduced kinase activity 50-fold. Crystallization of catalytically active CthPnk with GTP-Mg(2+) and a 5'-OH DNA yielded a mixed substrate-product complex with GTP-Mg(2+) and 5'-PO4 DNA, wherein the product 5' phosphate group is displaced by the NTP γ phosphate and the local architecture of the acceptor site is perturbed. PMID:25266383

  8. Journey of poly-nucleotides through OmpF porin.

    PubMed

    Hadi-Alijanvand, Hamid; Rouhani, Maryam

    2015-05-21

    OmpF is an abundant porin in many bacteria which attracts attention as a promising biological nanopore for DNA sequencing. We study the interactions of OmpF with pentameric poly-nucleotides (poly-Ns) in silico. The poly-N molecule is forced to translocate through the lumen of OmpF. Subsequently, the structural and dynamical effects of translocation steps on protein and poly-N molecules are explored in detail. The external loops of OmpF are introduced as the main region for discrimination of poly-Ns based on their organic bases. Structural network analyses of OmpF in the presence or absence of poly-Ns characterize special residues in the structural network of porin. These residues pave the way for engineering OmpF protein. The poly-N-specific pattern of OmpF's local conductance is detected in the current study. Computing the potential of mean force for translocation steps, we define the energetic barrier ahead of poly-N to move through OmpF's lumen. We suggest that fast translocation of the examined poly-N molecules through OmpF seems unattainable by small external driving forces. Our computational results suggest some abilities for OmpF porin like OmpF's potential for being used in poly-N sequencing.

  9. Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Protects Escherichia coli against Oxidative Stress†

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinhua; Jiang, Zhe; Liu, Min; Gong, Xin; Wu, Shaohui; Burns, Christopher M.; Li, Zhongwei

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) primarily functions in RNA degradation. It is an exoribonuclease and integral component of the multienzyme RNA degradosome complex [Carpousis et al. (1994) Cell 76, 889]. PNPase was previously shown to specifically bind a synthetic RNA containing the oxidative lesion 8-hydroxyguanine (8-oxoG) [Hayakawa et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 9977], suggesting a possible role in removing oxidatively damaged RNA. Here we show that PNPase binds to RNA molecules of natural sequence that were oxidatively damaged by treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) postsynthetically. PNPase bound oxidized RNA with higher affinity than untreated RNA of the same sequence, raising the possibility that it may act against a wide variety of lesions. The importance of such a protective role is illustrated by the observation that, under conditions known to cause oxidative damage to cytoplasmic components, PNPase-deficient cells are less viable than wild-type cells. Further, when challenged with H2O2, PNPase-deficient cells accumulate 8-oxoG in cellular RNA to a greater extent than wild-type cells, suggesting that this RNase functions in minimizing oxidized RNA in vivo. Introducing the pnp gene encoding PNPase rescues defects in growth and RNA quality of the pnp mutant cells. Our results also suggest that protection against oxidative stress is an intrinsic function of PNPase because association with the RNA degradosome or with RNA helicase B (RhlB) is not required. PMID:19219992

  10. Synthetic polynucleotides as endosomolytic agents and bioenergy sources.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hana; Lee, Young Ju; Bae, You Han; Kang, Han Chang

    2015-10-28

    Nucleotides (NTs), such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and guanosine triphosphate (GTP), are signaling and bioenergy molecules to mediate a range of cellular pathways. We recently reported their significant endosomolytic activity. To evaluate whether polymeric NTs keep endosomolytic and bioenergetic functions of NTs in drug delivery and cell survival, NTs were polymerized by a coupling reaction to form polynucleotides (pNTs: pATP and pGTP) with their molecular weights around 500kDa. The cellular toxicity, indicated by IC50, of pNT was as low as that of corresponding monomeric NT. pNTs were degraded by an intracellular enzyme, alkaline phosphatase. Introduction of pNTs in a polycation-gene complex (polyplex) enhanced the extent of gene expression in cancerous, non-cancerous, and stem cells, up to 1500-fold higher than that of pNT-free polyplex. In addition, cells stored in a pATP solution resulted in a significantly higher survival rate (e.g., up to 20% increase) when exposed to low temperatures than pATP-free solution. The presence of pNT in polyplexes prevented the reduction of transfection efficiency induced by a low temperature. The findings in this study suggest that endosomolytic and bioenergetic pNTs serve as a non-toxic gene carrier component and protect cells from a cold shock or energy depletion.

  11. Neisseria meningitidis Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Affects Aggregation, Adhesion, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Engman, Jakob; Negrea, Aurel; Sigurlásdóttir, Sara; Geörg, Miriam; Eriksson, Jens; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Kuwae, Asaomi; Sjölinder, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis autoaggregation is an important step during attachment to human cells. Aggregation is mediated by type IV pili and can be modulated by accessory pilus proteins, such as PilX, and posttranslational modifications of the major pilus subunit PilE. The mechanisms underlying the regulation of aggregation remain poorly characterized. Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is a 3′–5′ exonuclease that is involved in RNA turnover and the regulation of small RNAs. In this study, we biochemically confirm that NMC0710 is the N. meningitidis PNPase, and we characterize its role in N. meningitidis pathogenesis. We show that deletion of the gene encoding PNPase leads to hyperaggregation and increased adhesion to epithelial cells. The aggregation induced was found to be dependent on pili and to be mediated by excessive pilus bundling. PNPase expression was induced following bacterial attachment to human cells. Deletion of PNPase led to global transcriptional changes and the differential regulation of 469 genes. We also demonstrate that PNPase is required for full virulence in an in vivo model of N. meningitidis infection. The present study shows that PNPase negatively affects aggregation, adhesion, and virulence in N. meningitidis. PMID:26930706

  12. Toxigenicity of Clostridium histolyticum

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Shoki; Imaizumi, Masaaki

    1966-01-01

    Nishida, Shoki (Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan), and Masaaki Imaizumi. Toxigenicity of Clostridium histolyticum. J. Bacteriol. 91:477–483. 1966.—From 234 soil samples, 21 strains of Clostridium histolyticum of different levels of α-toxigenicity were isolated by a new method specially designed for the isolation of this species. The α-toxigenicity of freshly isolated strains and of stock strains was closely associated with the potentiality for sporulation, growth, and smooth-colony formation. The presence of sugars, particularly xylose and arabinose, was inhibitory for growth. A few controversies on the biological properties of this species seem to be due to disregard for the growth-inhibiting effects of these sugars. PMID:5935337

  13. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A; Leang, C; Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2014-03-25

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis.

  14. Polynucleotides. LVII. Synthesis and properties of poly (2'-chloro-2'-deoxyinosinic acid).

    PubMed Central

    Kakiuchi, N; Fukui, T; Ikehara, M

    1979-01-01

    Poly (2'-chloro-2'-deoxyinosinic acid) [poly(Icl)] was synthesized from Icl 5'-DP by polymerization with polynucleotide phosphorylase. UV absorption properties of poly(Icl) are very similar to those of poly(I). Poly(Icl) adopted a multi-stranded ordered form in the presence of 0.95M Na ion. The Tm value of this form was 36 degrees, which resembles that of poly(I) quadruple-stranded form at high salt. CD spectra also suggested presence of these two forms. Upon mixing with poly(C), poly-(Icl) forms a double-stranded 1 : 1 complex, which had very similar Tm-log[Na+] relationship to that of poly(I) . poly(C). Thus it was concluded that the chlorine substitution at 2'-position of the polynucleotide had the similar effect to OH on physical properties of polynucleotides. PMID:461198

  15. Diarylacylhydrazones: Clostridium-Selective Antibacterials with Activity Against Stationary-Phase Cells

    PubMed Central

    Casadei, Gabriele; Bremner, John B.; Lewis, Kim; Kelso, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Current antibiotics for treating Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), i.e. metronidazole, vancomycin and more recently fidaxomicin, are mostly effective but treatment failure and disease relapse remain as significant clinical problems. The shortcomings of these agents are attributed to their low selectivity for C. difficile over normal gut microflora and their ineffectiveness against C. difficile spores. This paper reports that certain diarylacylhydrazones identified during a high-throughput screening/counter-screening campaign show selective activity against two Clostridium species (C. difficile and C. perfringens) over common gut commensals. Representative examples are shown to possess activity similar to vancomycin against clinical C. difficile strains and to kill stationary-phase C. difficile cells, which are responsible for spore production. Structure-activity relationships with additional synthesised analogues suggested a protonophoric mechanism may play a role in the observed activity/selectivity and this was supported by the well-known protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) showing selective anti-Clostridium effects and activity similar to diarylacylhydrazones against stationary-phase C. difficile cells. Two diarylacylhydrazones were shown to be non-toxic towards human FaDu and Hep G2 cells indicating that further studies with the class are warranted towards new drugs for CDI. PMID:24360560

  16. Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heinlen, Latisha; Ballard, Jimmy D.

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in Europe and North America and is a serious re-emerging pathogen. Recent outbreaks have led to increasing morbidity and mortality and have been associated with a new strain (BI/NAP1/027) of C. difficile that produces more toxin than historical strains. With the increasing incidence of C. difficile infection, clinicians have also seen a change in the epidemiology with increased infections in previously low-risk populations. This chapter highlights the current knowledge on C. difficile virulence, human disease, epidemic outbreaks, and optimal treatment strategies. PMID:20697257

  17. Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, and Clostridium spp. in fecal samples from breast-fed and bottle-fed infants with and without iron supplement.

    PubMed Central

    Mevissen-Verhage, E A; Marcelis, J H; de Vos, M N; Harmsen-van Amerongen, W C; Verhoef, J

    1987-01-01

    Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, and Clostridium spp. isolated from the feces of 23 neonates during the first 3 months of life were identified. Of the 23 neonates, 10 were breast fed, 6 received an infant formula with iron supplement (5 mg/liter), and 7 received the formula without iron supplement (iron concentration, less than 0.5 mg/liter). The Bifidobacterium spp. most frequently isolated from the three groups of infants were B. longum, B. breve, B. adolescentis, and B. bifidum. The bacteroides spp. most frequently isolated were B. fragilis and B. vulgatus. The most common Clostridium sp. in the three groups of infants was C. perfringens. The type of milk did not select for species of Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, or Clostridium, except for Clostridium butyricum, which was isolated significantly more often from bottle-fed infants with iron supplement than from the other groups, and Clostridium tertium, which was more often isolated from breast-fed infants. The species of the three anaerobic genera did not persist for a long period of time in the three groups of infants. PMID:3818925

  18. CDP-diacylglycerol synthase activity in Clostridium perfingens

    SciTech Connect

    Carmen, G.M.; Zaniewski, R.L.; Cousminer, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    CTP: phosphatidate cytidylyltransferase (CDP-diacylglycerol synthase; EC 2.7.7.41) was identified in the cell envelope fraction of the gram-positive anaerobe Clostridium perfringens. The association of this enzyme with the cell envelope fraction of cell extracts was demonstrated by glycerol density gradient centrifugation and by activity sedimenting with the 100,000 x g pellet. The enzyme exhibited a broad pH optimium between pH 6.5 and pH 7.5. Enzyme activity was dependent on magnesium (5 mM) or manganese (1 mM) ions. Activity was also dependent on the addition on the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 (5 mM). The apparent Km values for CTP and phosphatidic acid were 0.18 mM and 0.22 mM respectively. Thioreactive agents inhibited activity, indicating that a sulfhydryl group is essential for activity. Maximal enzyme activity was observed at 50 degrees C. (Refs. 24).

  19. Probing the interaction of spermine and 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine with DNA polynucleotides: a comparative biophysical and thermodynamic investigation.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Ayesha; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2014-05-01

    The interaction of spermine and its analogue, 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine with four double stranded DNA polynucleotides has been studied to understand the structural and thermodynamic basis of the binding. The efficacy and specificity of DNA binding of this analogue has not yet been revealed. The energetics of the interaction was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, UV-thermal melting and ethidium bromide displacement assay have been employed to characterize the association. Circular dichroism studies showed that 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine caused a stronger structural perturbation in the polynucleotides. Among the adenine-thymine polynucleotides the alternating polynucleotide was more preferred by naphthyl acetyl spermine compared to the preference of spermine for the homo sequence. The higher melting stabilization revealed by the optical melting and differential scanning calorimetry results suggested that the binding of 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine increased the melting temperature and the total standard molar enthalpy of the transition of adenine-thymine polynucleotides. Microcalorimetry results revealed that unlike spermine the binding of 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine was endothermic. The interaction was characterized by total enthalpy-entropy compensation and high standard molar heat capacity values. There are differences in the mode of association of 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine and spermine. 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine binds with an enhanced affinity with the adenine-thymine hetero polynucleotide. Thus, the result suggests the importance of polyamine analogues and their ability to interfere with normal polyamine interactions.

  20. Nucleic acid-like structures. II - Polynucleotide analogues as possible primitive precursors of nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Alan W.; Visscher, J.; Bakker, C. G.; Niessen, J.

    1987-01-01

    Activated derivatives of purine-containing deoxynucleoside- diphosphates spontaneously oligomerize to produce pyrophosphate- linked oligodeoxynucleotide analogs. These analogs are of potential interest as models of primitive, polynucleotide precursors. The efficiency of oligomerization (ImpdGpIm and ImpdApIm much greater than ImpdIpIm) appears to reflect a combination of stacking forces and the specific geometric orientations of the stacked units. Under favorable conditions, chain lengths greater than 20 have been obtained for oligomers containing pdGp in the absence of a template. In the presence of a complementary template, the activated derivatives of pdGp and pdAp oligomerize much more extensively. An acyclo-analog of G has also been shown to undergo template-directed oligomerization on poly(C). These observations suggest the possibility that primitive information transfer might have evolved in much simpler systems and that this function was taken over by polynucleotides at a later stage in evolution.

  1. Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins having cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Oda, Michael N.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2007-05-29

    Functional Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins, having one or more cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same, can be used to modulate paraoxonase's arylesterase activity. These ApoA-I mutant proteins can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, acute phase response and other inflammatory related diseases. The invention also includes modifications and optimizations of the ApoA-I nucleotide sequence for purposes of increasing protein expression and optimization.

  2. Clostridium difficile colitis.

    PubMed

    Trnka, Y M; Lamont, J T

    1984-01-01

    Clostridium difficile has become one of the commonest pathogens of the lower intestinal tract. This organism appears unique in that infection almost always occurs during or after antibiotic therapy, suggesting that some component of the normal microflora prevents colonization by C. difficile. Once it has overgrown in the colon, C. difficile releases several toxins which cause tissue damage and diarrhea. Infection can range from a simple self-limited diarrheal illness to fulminant colitis with perforation and megacolon. Assay of stool filtrates reveals the presence of cytotoxin in nearly all patients with antibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis, and in approximately one third to one half of those with less severe infections. Effective therapy is available in the form of oral vancomycin, although the expense of this antibiotic has led to the use of oral metronidazole or bacitracin, which appear to be equally efficacious and considerably cheaper. Although we have learned a great deal about C. difficile in the past decade, a number of fascinating puzzles remain. We know very little about the immune response to this organism or its toxin, or whether a vaccine might someday be feasible. Similarly, we have very little insight into what effects antibodies exert on the normal colonic flora and how these effects allow C. difficile infection in a small percentage of patients. Studies of this pathogen will undoubtedly lead to a fuller understanding of the enormously complex and still mysterious microbial ferment which lives within our gastrointestinal tract. PMID:6369936

  3. Quantitative Analysis of the Nanopore Translocation Dynamics of Simple Structured Polynucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Schink, Severin; Renner, Stephan; Alim, Karen; Arnaut, Vera; Simmel, Friedrich C.; Gerland, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Nanopore translocation experiments are increasingly applied to probe the secondary structures of RNA and DNA molecules. Here, we report two vital steps toward establishing nanopore translocation as a tool for the systematic and quantitative analysis of polynucleotide folding: 1), Using α-hemolysin pores and a diverse set of different DNA hairpins, we demonstrate that backward nanopore force spectroscopy is particularly well suited for quantitative analysis. In contrast to forward translocation from the vestibule side of the pore, backward translocation times do not appear to be significantly affected by pore-DNA interactions. 2), We develop and verify experimentally a versatile mesoscopic theoretical framework for the quantitative analysis of translocation experiments with structured polynucleotides. The underlying model is based on sequence-dependent free energy landscapes constructed using the known thermodynamic parameters for polynucleotide basepairing. This approach limits the adjustable parameters to a small set of sequence-independent parameters. After parameter calibration, the theoretical model predicts the translocation dynamics of new sequences. These predictions can be leveraged to generate a baseline expectation even for more complicated structures where the assumptions underlying the one-dimensional free energy landscape may no longer be satisfied. Taken together, backward translocation through α-hemolysin pores combined with mesoscopic theoretical modeling is a promising approach for label-free single-molecule analysis of DNA and RNA folding. PMID:22225801

  4. Effect of polynucleotides on the dimerization of glycine. [abiological protein synthesis in primitive earth conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizutani, H.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1981-01-01

    Results from experiments to determine the effect of polynucleotides on abiological formation of peptide bonds are reported. The reaction between glycine molecules in an aqueous phase in the presence of a condensing agent was chosen as a model, with polyphosphates being selected as the condensing agent for biologically relevant peptide formation. Four types of polynucleotides were used: polygluanic acid (G), polyuridic acid (U), polyadenylic acid (A), and polycytidylic acid (C); the effects of small anions, acetate, chloride, and phosphate, were also studied. Procedures are given, including concentrations, pH, and incubation time, and the type of amino acid analyzer. The diglycine yields were, in order of most to least: G, C, A, U, and are diagrammed as a function of time; rate of formation followed the same order of magnitude as the final yields. Anion presence displayed no discernible effect. The results are taken to indicate that polynucleotides do have an effect on the formation of peptide bonds, an effect significant in the understanding of chemical evolution.

  5. Autism and Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Bolte, E R

    1998-08-01

    Autism is a severe developmental disability believed to have multiple etiologies. This paper outlines the possibility of a subacute, chronic tetanus infection of the intestinal tract as the underlying cause for symptoms of autism observed in some individuals. A significant percentage of individuals with autism have a history of extensive antibiotic use. Oral antibiotics significantly disrupt protective intestinal microbiota, creating a favorable environment for colonization by opportunistic pathogens. Clostridium tetani is an ubiquitous anaerobic bacillus that produces a potent neurotoxin. Intestinal colonization by C. tetani, and subsequent neurotoxin release, have been demonstrated in laboratory animals which were fed vegetative cells. The vagus nerve is capable of transporting tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) and provides a route of ascent from the intestinal tract to the CNS. This route bypasses TeNT's normal preferential binding sites in the spinal cord, and therefore the symptoms of a typical tetanus infection are not evident. Once in the brain, TeNT disrupts the release of neurotransmitters by the proteolytic cleavage of synaptobrevin, a synaptic vesicle membrane protein. This inhibition of neurotransmitter release would explain a wide variety of behavioral deficits apparent in autism. Lab animals injected in the brain with TeNT have exhibited many of these behaviors. Some children with autism have also shown a significant reduction in stereotyped behaviors when treated with antimicrobials effective against intestinal clostridia. When viewed as sequelae to a subacute, chronic tetanus infection, many of the puzzling abnormalities of autism have a logical basis. A review of atypical tetanus cases, and strategies to test the validity of this paper's hypothesis, are included. PMID:9881820

  6. MLST analysis reveals a highly conserved core genome among poultry isolates of Clostridium septicum.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Anthony P; Rehberger, Thomas G

    2009-06-01

    Clostridium septicum is a highly virulent, anaerobic bacterium capable of establishing necrotizing tissue infections and forming heat resistant endospores. Disease is primarily facilitated by secretion of numerous toxic products including a lethal pore-forming cytolysin. Spontaneously occurring clostridial myonecrosis involving C. septicum has recently reemerged as a concern for many poultry producers. However, despite its increasing prevalence, the epidemiology of infection and population structure of C. septicum remains largely unknown. In this study a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) approach was utilized to examine evolutionary relationships within a diverse collection of C. septicum isolates recovered from poultry flocks experiencing episodes of gangrenous dermatitis. The 109 isolates examined represented 42 turkey flocks and 24 different flocks of broiler chickens as well as C. septicum type strain, ATCC 12464. Isolates were recovered predominantly from gangrenous lesions although isolates from livers, gastrointestinal tracts, spleens and blood were included. The loci analyzed were csa, the major lethal toxin produced by C. septicum, and the housekeeping genes gyrA, groEL, dnaK, recA, tpi, ddl, colA and glpK. These loci were included in part because of their previous use in MLST analysis of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile. Results indicated a high level of conservation present within these housekeeping gene fragments when compared to what has been previously reported for the aforementioned clostridia. Of the 5352 bp of sequence data examined for each isolate, 99.7% (5335/5352) was absolutely conserved among the 109 isolates. Only one of the ten unique sequence types, or allelic profiles, identified among the isolates was recovered from both turkeys and broiler chickens suggesting some host species preference. Phylogenetic analyses identified two unique clusters, or clonal complexes, among these poultry isolates which may have important

  7. Structures of bacterial polynucleotide kinase in a Michaelis complex with GTP•Mg2+ and 5'-OH oligonucleotide and a product complex with GDP•Mg2+ and 5'-PO4 oligonucleotide reveal a mechanism of general acid-base catalysis and the determinants of phosphoacceptor recognition.

    PubMed

    Das, Ushati; Wang, Li Kai; Smith, Paul; Jacewicz, Agata; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum polynucleotide kinase (CthPnk), the 5' end-healing module of a bacterial RNA repair system, catalyzes reversible phosphoryl transfer from an NTP donor to a 5'-OH polynucleotide acceptor. Here we report the crystal structures of CthPnk-D38N in a Michaelis complex with GTP•Mg(2+) and a 5'-OH oligonucleotide and a product complex with GDP•Mg(2+) and a 5'-PO4 oligonucleotide. The O5' nucleophile is situated 3.0 Å from the GTP γ phosphorus in the Michaelis complex, where it is coordinated by Asn38 and is apical to the bridging β phosphate oxygen of the GDP leaving group. In the product complex, the transferred phosphate has undergone stereochemical inversion and Asn38 coordinates the 5'-bridging phosphate oxygen of the oligonucleotide. The D38N enzyme is poised for catalysis, but cannot execute because it lacks Asp38-hereby implicated as the essential general base catalyst that abstracts a proton from the 5'-OH during the kinase reaction. Asp38 serves as a general acid catalyst during the 'reverse kinase' reaction by donating a proton to the O5' leaving group of the 5'-PO4 strand. The acceptor strand binding mode of CthPnk is distinct from that of bacteriophage T4 Pnk. PMID:24150947

  8. Structures of bacterial polynucleotide kinase in a Michaelis complex with GTP•Mg2+ and 5'-OH oligonucleotide and a product complex with GDP•Mg2+ and 5'-PO4 oligonucleotide reveal a mechanism of general acid-base catalysis and the determinants of phosphoacceptor recognition.

    PubMed

    Das, Ushati; Wang, Li Kai; Smith, Paul; Jacewicz, Agata; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum polynucleotide kinase (CthPnk), the 5' end-healing module of a bacterial RNA repair system, catalyzes reversible phosphoryl transfer from an NTP donor to a 5'-OH polynucleotide acceptor. Here we report the crystal structures of CthPnk-D38N in a Michaelis complex with GTP•Mg(2+) and a 5'-OH oligonucleotide and a product complex with GDP•Mg(2+) and a 5'-PO4 oligonucleotide. The O5' nucleophile is situated 3.0 Å from the GTP γ phosphorus in the Michaelis complex, where it is coordinated by Asn38 and is apical to the bridging β phosphate oxygen of the GDP leaving group. In the product complex, the transferred phosphate has undergone stereochemical inversion and Asn38 coordinates the 5'-bridging phosphate oxygen of the oligonucleotide. The D38N enzyme is poised for catalysis, but cannot execute because it lacks Asp38-hereby implicated as the essential general base catalyst that abstracts a proton from the 5'-OH during the kinase reaction. Asp38 serves as a general acid catalyst during the 'reverse kinase' reaction by donating a proton to the O5' leaving group of the 5'-PO4 strand. The acceptor strand binding mode of CthPnk is distinct from that of bacteriophage T4 Pnk.

  9. Electrotransformation of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Tyurin, Michael V; Desai, Sunil G; Lynd, Lee R

    2004-02-01

    Electrotransformation of several strains of Clostridium thermocellum was achieved using plasmid pIKm1 with selection based on resistance to erythromycin and lincomycin. A custom-built pulse generator was used to apply a square 10-ms pulse to an electrotransformation cuvette consisting of a modified centrifuge tube. Transformation was verified by recovery of the shuttle plasmid pIKm1 from presumptive transformants of C. thermocellum with subsequent PCR specific to the mls gene on the plasmid, as well as by retransformation of Escherichia coli. Optimization carried out with strain DSM 1313 increased transformation efficiencies from <1 to (2.2 +/- 0.5) x 10(5) transformants per micro g of plasmid DNA. Factors conducive to achieving high transformation efficiencies included optimized periods of incubation both before and after electric pulse application, chilling during cell collection and washing, subculture in the presence of isoniacin prior to electric pulse application, a custom-built cuvette embedded in an ice block during pulse application, use of a high (25-kV/cm) field strength, and induction of the mls gene before plating the cells on selective medium. The protocol and preferred conditions developed for strain DSM 1313 resulted in transformation efficiencies of (5.0 +/- 1.8) x 10(4) transformants per micro g of plasmid DNA for strain ATCC 27405 and approximately 1 x 10(3) transformants per micro g of plasmid DNA for strains DSM 4150 and 7072. Cell viability under optimal conditions was approximately 50% of that of controls not exposed to an electrical pulse. Dam methylation had a beneficial but modest (7-fold for strain ATCC 27405; 40-fold for strain DSM 1313) effect on transformation efficiency. The effect of isoniacin was also strain specific. The results reported here provide for the first time a gene transfer method functional in C. thermocellum that is suitable for molecular manipulations involving either the introduction of genes associated with foreign

  10. Trapping of DNA-reactive metabolites of therapeutic or carcinogenic agents by /sup 14/C-labeled synthetic polynucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, J.R.; Ludlum, D.B.

    1982-08-01

    Many substances which do not react with DNA directly are metabolized into important DNA-modifying intermediates. We have devised a method for trapping these intermediates with /sup 14/C-labeled nucleosides contained in a synthetic polynucleotide. The polynucleotide structure protects the labeled nucleoside from metabolism; thus, it is unaltered when the polymer is incubated with a drug-metabolizing system. However, when the polymer is incubated with this system and a compound which can be metabolized into a reactive species, these intermediates are trapped by the /sup 14/C-labeled nucleoside and subsequently are detected as new peaks of radioactivity in a digest of the labeled polynucleotide. This system has been used to detect reactive intermediates of cyclophosphamide generated by a liver homogenate.

  11. Preparation, proteolysis and reversible oxidation of highly purified Azotobacter vinelandii polynucleotide phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Gajda, A. T.; de Behrens, G. Zaror; Fitt, P. S.

    1970-01-01

    1. A new method has been developed for the preparation in good yield of highly purified Azotobacter vinelandii polynucleotide phosphorylase in its reduced form. 2. Aging or digestion with trypsin causes the enzyme to develop a primer requirement that is not eliminated by β-mercaptoethanol. 3. The development of a primer requirement is accompanied by marked changes of the electrophoretic mobility of the enzyme in polyacrylamide gels. 4. The enzyme is inactivated by aerial oxidation or thiol-specific reagents. The lost activity is restored by β-mercaptoethanol, but not by oligonucleotide primers. PMID:5495150

  12. Simultaneous detection of kinase and phosphatase activities of polynucleotide kinase using molecular beacon probes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changbei; Fang, Hefei; Wang, Kemin; Xia, Kun; Chen, Hanchun; He, Hailun; Zeng, Weimin

    2013-12-15

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of DNA by polynucleotide kinase (PNK) has an important role in DNA damage repair, replication, and recombination. Traditionally, it is assayed by denaturing gel electrophoresis and autoradiography, which are tedious and not sensitive. We report on the development of a sensitive and simple method for PNK assay based on DNA ligation using a molecular beacon. Enzyme activity of PNK is measured down to a limit of 0.002 unit/ml. The method not only provides a universal platform for simultaneous monitoring of kinase and phosphatase activities, but also shows great potential in biological research, drug discovery, and clinical diagnostics.

  13. Electrophoretic study of Clostridium species.

    PubMed Central

    Cato, E P; Hash, D E; Holdeman, L V; Moore, W E

    1982-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of soluble cellular proteins (without sodium dodecyl sulfate) of 70 Clostridium species indicated that the procedure was readily applicable to the differentiation of species in the genus. The protein patterns correlated well with the available DNA homology data and with most accepted differential tests. Results indicated that several earlier names for species were synonyms of those of accepted species and that two accepted species may be synonymous. Images PMID:6175658

  14. Some properties of the irreversible complexes of nitracrine (ledakrin, C-283) with polynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowski, M; Ciesielska, E; Szmigiero, L

    1981-03-15

    In the presence of sulfhydryl compounds an anticancer drug nitracrine (NA), 1-nitro-9-aminoalkylacridine derivative forms strong, probably covalent complexes with DNA. It has been found that it binds with similar efficiency to RNA and DNA exhibiting a certain preference for single-stranded structure. At NA/polynucleotide ratio of 0.15 and nucleic acids concentration 100 microgram/ml the numbers of drug molecules bound per 10(3) nucleotides were about 10--13 for native calf thymus DNA, 19--28 for denatured DNA and 23--36 for RNA. Some base specificity to guanine is observed both in polydeoxyribo- and polyribonucleotides. The complexes of NA with DNA and double-stranded synthetic polynucleotides exhibit decreased transcriptional template activity in bacterial RNA synthesis in vitro system except poly(A) synthesis on poly(dA) x poly(dT) which is insensitive to the drug. The drug binding in vitro leads to cross-link formation in DNA as shown by means of ultraviolet spectrophotometry and hydroxylapatite chromatography of heat-denatured NA-DNA complexes. The amount of the double bonds introduced by the drug is however relatively low as compared with cross-linking of irradiated 8-methoxy-psoralen-DNA (MOP-DNA) complexes. PMID:6161711

  15. Dihedral-based segment identification and classification of biopolymers II: polynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Gabor; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-01-27

    In an accompanying paper (Nagy, G.; Oostenbrink, C. Dihedral-based segment identification and classification of biopolymers I: Proteins. J. Chem. Inf. Model. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ci400541d), we introduce a new algorithm for structure classification of biopolymeric structures based on main-chain dihedral angles. The DISICL algorithm (short for DIhedral-based Segment Identification and CLassification) classifies segments of structures containing two central residues. Here, we introduce the DISICL library for polynucleotides, which is based on the dihedral angles ε, ζ, and χ for the two central residues of a three-nucleotide segment of a single strand. Seventeen distinct structural classes are defined for nucleotide structures, some of which--to our knowledge--were not described previously in other structure classification algorithms. In particular, DISICL also classifies noncanonical single-stranded structural elements. DISICL is applied to databases of DNA and RNA structures containing 80,000 and 180,000 segments, respectively. The classifications according to DISICL are compared to those of another popular classification scheme in terms of the amount of classified nucleotides, average occurrence and length of structural elements, and pairwise matches of the classifications. While the detailed classification of DISICL adds sensitivity to a structure analysis, it can be readily reduced to eight simplified classes providing a more general overview of the secondary structure in polynucleotides. PMID:24364355

  16. Dihedral-based segment identification and classification of biopolymers II: polynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Gabor; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-01-27

    In an accompanying paper (Nagy, G.; Oostenbrink, C. Dihedral-based segment identification and classification of biopolymers I: Proteins. J. Chem. Inf. Model. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ci400541d), we introduce a new algorithm for structure classification of biopolymeric structures based on main-chain dihedral angles. The DISICL algorithm (short for DIhedral-based Segment Identification and CLassification) classifies segments of structures containing two central residues. Here, we introduce the DISICL library for polynucleotides, which is based on the dihedral angles ε, ζ, and χ for the two central residues of a three-nucleotide segment of a single strand. Seventeen distinct structural classes are defined for nucleotide structures, some of which--to our knowledge--were not described previously in other structure classification algorithms. In particular, DISICL also classifies noncanonical single-stranded structural elements. DISICL is applied to databases of DNA and RNA structures containing 80,000 and 180,000 segments, respectively. The classifications according to DISICL are compared to those of another popular classification scheme in terms of the amount of classified nucleotides, average occurrence and length of structural elements, and pairwise matches of the classifications. While the detailed classification of DISICL adds sensitivity to a structure analysis, it can be readily reduced to eight simplified classes providing a more general overview of the secondary structure in polynucleotides.

  17. Dihedral-Based Segment Identification and Classification of Biopolymers II: Polynucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In an accompanying paper (Nagy, G.; Oostenbrink, C. Dihedral-based segment identification and classification of biopolymers I: Proteins. J. Chem. Inf. Model. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ci400541d), we introduce a new algorithm for structure classification of biopolymeric structures based on main-chain dihedral angles. The DISICL algorithm (short for DIhedral-based Segment Identification and CLassification) classifies segments of structures containing two central residues. Here, we introduce the DISICL library for polynucleotides, which is based on the dihedral angles ε, ζ, and χ for the two central residues of a three-nucleotide segment of a single strand. Seventeen distinct structural classes are defined for nucleotide structures, some of which—to our knowledge—were not described previously in other structure classification algorithms. In particular, DISICL also classifies noncanonical single-stranded structural elements. DISICL is applied to databases of DNA and RNA structures containing 80,000 and 180,000 segments, respectively. The classifications according to DISICL are compared to those of another popular classification scheme in terms of the amount of classified nucleotides, average occurrence and length of structural elements, and pairwise matches of the classifications. While the detailed classification of DISICL adds sensitivity to a structure analysis, it can be readily reduced to eight simplified classes providing a more general overview of the secondary structure in polynucleotides. PMID:24364355

  18. Binary Bacterial Toxins: Biochemistry, Biology, and Applications of Common Clostridium and Bacillus Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Holger; Aktories, Klaus; Popoff, Michel R.; Stiles, Bradley G.

    2004-01-01

    Certain pathogenic species of Bacillus and Clostridium have developed unique methods for intoxicating cells that employ the classic enzymatic “A-B” paradigm for protein toxins. The binary toxins produced by B. anthracis, B. cereus, C. botulinum, C. difficile, C. perfringens, and C. spiroforme consist of components not physically associated in solution that are linked to various diseases in humans, animals, or insects. The “B” components are synthesized as precursors that are subsequently activated by serine-type proteases on the targeted cell surface and/or in solution. Following release of a 20-kDa N-terminal peptide, the activated “B” components form homoheptameric rings that subsequently dock with an “A” component(s) on the cell surface. By following an acidified endosomal route and translocation into the cytosol, “A” molecules disable a cell (and host organism) via disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, increasing intracellular levels of cyclic AMP, or inactivation of signaling pathways linked to mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases. Recently, B. anthracis has gleaned much notoriety as a biowarfare/bioterrorism agent, and of primary interest has been the edema and lethal toxins, their role in anthrax, as well as the development of efficacious vaccines and therapeutics targeting these virulence factors and ultimately B. anthracis. This review comprehensively surveys the literature and discusses the similarities, as well as distinct differences, between each Clostridium and Bacillus binary toxin in terms of their biochemistry, biology, genetics, structure, and applications in science and medicine. The information may foster future studies that aid novel vaccine and drug development, as well as a better understanding of a conserved intoxication process utilized by various gram-positive, spore-forming bacteria. PMID:15353562

  19. Human polynucleotide phosphorylase (hPNPase old-35): an RNA degradation enzyme with pleiotrophic biological effects.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B

    2006-05-01

    Identification of small inhibitory RNAs and microRNA established that regulation of RNA metabolism plays an essential role in controlling intracellular biochemical processes. Interferons induce a number of RNA degradation enzymes involved in innate immunity by degrading viral RNAs. We cloned human polynucleotide phosphorylase (hPNPase(old-35)), a type I interferon-inducible 3'-5' exoribonuclease, as a transcript induced during terminal differentiation and senescence, two physiological processes marked by irreversible growth arrest. Our studies in the last four years show that hPNPase(old-35) plays an essential role in mediating IFN-mediated growth inhibition and its upregulation might mediate chronic inflammatory pathological processes during aging. The present review recaps these findings and provides a framework for the future understanding of the versatile functions of this interesting molecule. PMID:16687933

  20. [Morphological changes in human embryonic lung fibroblasts caused by cytotoxins of various Clostridium species].

    PubMed

    Schallehn, G; Wolff, M H

    1988-01-01

    A total of 243 strains of 35 Clostridium species were tested for cytotoxin production in cooked meat medium or liver broth within 48-72 h at 37 degrees C, using human embryonal lung fibroblasts in tissue-culture as indicator cells. Cytotoxin could be detected in the culture-filtrates of all toxigenic strains of C. chauvoei, C. difficile, C. histolyticum, C. novyi types A and B, C. septicum and C. tetani, but not in the atoxigenic ones. The cytotoxin of C. novyi correlated with alpha-toxin in the culture filtrate. All strains of C. perfringens and C. novyi D tested were not cytotoxic for lung fibroblasts despite their pathogenicity for guinea-pigs. Further cytotoxigenic strains were found among C. hastiforme, C. limosum, C. oceanicum, C. putrificum, C. ramosum, C. sordellii, C. sporogenes, and C. subterminale. The morphological changes in lung fibroblasts caused by the culture filtrates were characteristic and species-specific and corresponded with pathogenicity for guinea-pigs and/or mice. No cytotoxin was produced by C. absonum, C. barati, C. bifermentans, C. botulinum (atoxic), C. butyricum, C. cadaveris, C. carnis, C. clostridioforme, C. cochlearium, C. glycolicum, C. innocuum, C. malenominatum, C. mangenotii, C. paraputrificum, C. putrefaciens, C. rectum, C. tertium, and C. tyrobutyricum.

  1. Clostridium difficile and C. difficile Toxin Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... C diff antigen; GDH Formal name: Clostridium difficile Culture; C. difficile Toxin, A and B; C. difficile Cytotoxin Assay; Glutamate Dehydrogenase Test Related tests: Stool Culture ; O&P At a Glance Test Sample The ...

  2. Clostridium acetobutylicum protoplast formation and regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Allcock, E.R.; Reid, S.J.; Jones, D.T.; Woods, D.R.

    1982-03-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is already used for the industrial production of acetone and butanol from molasses. Further advantages include its ability to utilize pentose sugars and produce a carboxymethyl cellulase and a cellobiase. The development of genetic transfer systems enabling the use of genetic manipulation techniques would greatly enhance the potential of the fermentation system. Techniques and media for the production and regeneration of stable Clostridium acetobutylicum protoplasts are described. (Refs. 12).

  3. Detection of single-copy functional genes in prokaryotic cells by two-pass TSA-FISH with polynucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Shuji; Hasegawa, Takuya; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Harada, Hideki; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Kubota, Kengo

    2012-02-01

    In situ detection of functional genes with single-cell resolution is currently of interest to microbiologists. Here, we developed a two-pass tyramide signal amplification (TSA)-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol with PCR-derived polynucleotide probes for the detection of single-copy genes in prokaryotic cells. The mcrA gene and the apsA gene in methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria, respectively, were targeted. The protocol showed bright fluorescence with a good signal-to-noise ratio and achieved a high efficiency of detection (>98%). The discrimination threshold was approximately 82-89% sequence identity. Microorganisms possessing the mcrA or apsA gene in anaerobic sludge samples were successfully detected by two-pass TSA-FISH with polynucleotide probes. The developed protocol is useful for identifying single microbial cells based on functional gene sequences.

  4. Clostridium difficile in paediatric populations

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Upton D

    2014-01-01

    An increase in Clostridium difficile infection incidence has been observed among hospitalized children in the United States. The present statement, targeted at clinicians caring for infants and children in community and institutional settings, summarizes the relevant information relating to the role of C difficile in childhood diarrhea and provides recommendations for diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Significant differences between adult and paediatric risk factors and disease are discussed, along with emerging therapies. The relationship between age and disease severity in children with a newly emergent and more fluoroqinolone-resistant strain of C difficile (North American Pulse-field type-1 [NAP1]) remains unknown. The importance of antimicrobial stewardship as a preventive strategy is highlighted. This statement replaces a previous Canadian Paediatric Society position statement on C difficile published in 2000. PMID:24627655

  5. Structure-Function Analysis of the 3' Phosphatase Component of T4 Polynucleotide Kinase/phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu,H.; Smith, P.; Wang, L.; Shuman, S.

    2007-01-01

    T4 polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (Pnkp) exemplifies a family of bifunctional enzymes with 5'-kinase and 3' phosphatase activities that function in nucleic acid repair. T4 Pnkp is a homotetramer of a 301-aa polypeptide, which consists of an N-terminal kinase domain of the P-loop phosphotransferase superfamily and a C-terminal phosphatase domain of the DxD acylphosphatase superfamily. The homotetramer is formed via pairs of phosphatase-phosphatase and kinase-kinase homodimer interfaces. Here we identify four side chains-Asp187, Ser211, Lys258, and Asp277-that are required for 3' phosphatase activity. Alanine mutations at these positions abolished phosphatase activity without affecting kinase function or tetramerization. Conservative substitutions of asparagine or glutamate for Asp187 did not revive the 3' phosphatase, nor did arginine or glutamine substitutions for Lys258. Threonine in lieu of Ser211 and glutamate in lieu of Asp277 restored full activity, whereas asparagine at position 277 had no salutary effect. We report a 3.0 A crystal structure of the Pnkp tetramer, in which a sulfate ion is coordinated between Arg246 and Arg279 in a position that we propose mimics one of the penultimate phosphodiesters (5'NpNpNp-3') of the polynucleotide 3'-PO(4) substrate. The amalgam of mutational and structural data engenders a plausible catalytic mechanism for the phosphatase that includes covalent catalysis (via Asp165), general acid-base catalysis (via Asp167), metal coordination (by Asp165, Asp277 and Asp278), and transition state stabilization (via Lys258, Ser211, backbone amides, and the divalent cation). Other critical side chains play architectural roles (Arg176, Asp187, Arg213, Asp254). To probe the role of oligomerization in phosphatase function, we introduced six double-alanine cluster mutations at the phosphatase-phosphatase domain interface, two of which (R297A-Q295A and E292A-D300A) converted Pnkp from a tetramer to a dimer and ablated phosphatase activity.

  6. Polynucleotide phosphorylase negatively controls spv virulence gene expression in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Ygberg, Sofia Eriksson; Clements, Mark O; Rytkönen, Anne; Thompson, Arthur; Holden, David W; Hinton, Jay C D; Rhen, Mikael

    2006-02-01

    Mutational inactivation of the cold-shock-associated exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase; encoded by the pnp gene) in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was previously shown to enable the bacteria to cause chronic infection and to affect the bacterial replication in BALB/c mice (M. O. Clements et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99:8784-8789, 2002). Here, we report that PNPase deficiency results in increased expression of Salmonella plasmid virulence (spv) genes under in vitro growth conditions that allow induction of spv expression. Furthermore, whole-genome microarray-based transcriptome analyses of bacteria growing inside murine macrophage-like J774.A.1 cells revealed six genes as being significantly up-regulated in the PNPase-deficient background, which included spvABC, rtcB, entC, and STM2236. Mutational inactivation of the spvR regulator diminished the increased expression of spv observed in the pnp mutant background, implying that PNPase acts upstream of or at the level of SpvR. Finally, competition experiments revealed that the growth advantage of the pnp mutant in BALB/c mice was dependent on spvR as well. Combined, our results support the idea that in S. enterica PNPase, apart from being a regulator of the cold shock response, also functions in tuning the expression of virulence genes and bacterial fitness during infection. PMID:16428774

  7. Defects in polynucleotide phosphorylase impairs virulence in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is reported to regulate virulence in Salmonella, Yersinia sp. and Campylobacter jejuni, yet its role in Escherichia coli O157:H7 has not been investigated. To gain insights into its roles in E. coli O157:H7 virulence, pnp deletion mutants were generated and the major virulence factors were compared to their parental wild type strains. Deletion of pnp in E. coli O157:H7 dramatically decreased stx2 mRNA expression and Stx2 protein production, and impaired lambdoid prophage activation in E. coli O157:H7. Quantitative PCR further confirmed that the Stx2 phage lytic growth was repressed by pnp deletion. Consistent with reduced Stx2 production and Stx2 phage activation, the transcriptional levels of genes involved in phage lysis and replication were down-regulated. In addition, disruption of pnp in E. coli O157:H7 decreased its adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells as well as cattle colonic explant tissues. On the other hand, PNPase inactivation in E. coli O157:H7 enhanced Tir protein content and the transcription of type three secretion system components, including genes encoding intimin, Tir, and EspB as well as locus of enterocyte and effacement positive regulator, Ler. Collectively, data indicate that PNPase has pleiotropic effects on the virulence of E. coli O157:H7. PMID:26347717

  8. The structural basis for substrate recognition by mammalian polynucleotide kinase 3’ phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Garces, Fernando; Pearl, Laurence H.; Oliver, Antony W.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian polynucleotide kinase 3’ phosphatase (PNK) plays a key role in the repair of DNA damage, functioning as part of both the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and base-excision repair (BER) pathways. Through its two catalytic activities, PNK ensures that DNA termini are compatible with extension and ligation by either removing 3’-phosphates from, or by phosphorylating 5’-hydroxyl groups on, the ribose sugar of the DNA backbone. We have now determined crystal structures of murine PNK with DNA molecules bound to both of its active sites. The structure of ssDNA engaged with the 3’-phosphatase domain suggests a mechanism of substrate interaction that assists DNA end-seeking. The structure of dsDNA bound to the 5’-kinase domain reveals a mechanism of DNA bending that facilitates recognition of DNA-ends in the context of single-strand and double-strand breaks, and suggests a close functional cooperation in substrate recognition between the kinase and phosphatase active sites. PMID:22055185

  9. A conserved loop in polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) essential for both RNA and ADP/phosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Mazzantini, Elisa; Nardini, Marco; Regonesi, Maria Elena; Greco, Claudio; Briani, Federica; De Gioia, Luca; Dehò, Gianni; Tortora, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) reversibly catalyzes RNA phosphorolysis and polymerization of nucleoside diphosphates. Its homotrimeric structure forms a central channel where RNA is accommodated. Each protomer core is formed by two paralogous RNase PH domains: PNPase1, whose function is largely unknown, hosts a conserved FFRR loop interacting with RNA, whereas PNPase2 bears the putative catalytic site, ∼20 Å away from the FFRR loop. To date, little is known regarding PNPase catalytic mechanism. We analyzed the kinetic properties of two Escherichia coli PNPase mutants in the FFRR loop (R79A and R80A), which exhibited a dramatic increase in Km for ADP/Pi binding, but not for poly(A), suggesting that the two residues may be essential for binding ADP and Pi. However, both mutants were severely impaired in shifting RNA electrophoretic mobility, implying that the two arginines contribute also to RNA binding. Additional interactions between RNA and other PNPase domains (such as KH and S1) may preserve the enzymatic activity in R79A and R80A mutants. Inspection of enzyme structure showed that PNPase has evolved a long-range acting hydrogen bonding network that connects the FFRR loop with the catalytic site via the F380 residue. This hypothesis was supported by mutation analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of PNPase domains and RNase PH suggests that such network is a unique feature of PNPase1 domain, which coevolved with the paralogous PNPase2 domain.

  10. Cold-temperature induction of Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase occurs by reversal of its autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Beran, R K; Simons, R W

    2001-01-01

    When Escherichia coli cells are shifted to low temperatures (e.g. 15 degrees C), growth halts while the 'cold shock response' (CSR) genes are induced, after which growth resumes. One CSR gene, pnp, encodes polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), a 3'-exoribonuclease and component of the RNA degradosome. At 37 degrees C, ribonuclease III (RNase III, encoded by rnc) cleaves the pnp untranslated leader, whereupon PNPase represses its own translation by an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that PNPase cold-temperature induction involves several post-transcriptional events, all of which require the intact pnp mRNA leader. The bulk of induction results from reversal of autoregulation at a step subsequent to RNase III cleavage of the pnp leader. We also found that pnp translation occurs throughout cold-temperature adaptation, whereas lacZ(+) translation was delayed. This difference is striking, as both mRNAs are greatly stabilized upon the shift to 15 degrees C. However, unlike the lacZ(+) mRNA, which remains stable during adaptation, pnp mRNA decay accelerates. Together with other evidence, these results suggest that mRNA is generally stabilized upon a shift to cold temperatures, but that a CSR mRNA-specific decay process is initiated during adaptation.

  11. Condensation of activated diguanylates on a Poly/C/ template. [prebiotic polynucleotide replication mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohrmann, R.; Bridson, P. K.; Orgel, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    The metal-ion catalysis of the oligomerization of activated diguanylate isomers on a polycytidylic acid template is studied in an investigation of possible early prebiotic polynucleotide replication mechanisms. The 5'-imidazolides of diguanylates linked 2' to 5' or 3' to 5' were reacted with polyC in a 1-methylimidazole or a 2,6-lutidine buffer in the presence of a Zn(+2) or a Pb(+2) catalyst, and reaction products were determined by paper chromatography, paper electrophoresis and liquid chromatography. In the lutidine buffer, the presence of both the Zn(+2) catalyst and the polyC template is found to result in the production of 3'-5' linked oligomers with up to 10 diguanylate units, and from diguanylates in the presence of the monomer. In the reactions conducted in the 1-methylimidazole buffer, the addition of Pb(+2) is found to lead to less marked increases in oligomerization in the presence of template, with approximately equal proportions of 2'-5' and 3'-5' oligomers formed from the 2'-5' substrate and mainly 3'-5' bonds from the 3'-5' linked dimer.

  12. A mutation in polynucleotide phosphorylase from Escherichia coli impairing RNA binding and degradosome stability

    PubMed Central

    Regonesi, Maria Elena; Briani, Federica; Ghetta, Andrea; Zangrossi, Sandro; Ghisotti, Daniela; Tortora, Paolo; Dehò, Gianni

    2004-01-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), a 3′ to 5′ exonuclease encoded by pnp, plays a key role in Escherichia coli RNA decay. The enzyme, made of three identical 711 amino acid subunits, may also be assembled in the RNA degradosome, a heteromultimeric complex involved in RNA degradation. PNPase autogenously regulates its expression by promoting the decay of pnp mRNA, supposedly by binding at the 5′-untranslated leader region of an RNase III-processed form of this transcript. The KH and S1 RNA-binding domains at the C-terminus of the protein (amino acids 552–711) are thought to be involved in pnp mRNA recognition. Here we show that a G454D substitution in E.coli PNPase impairs autogenous regulation whereas it does not affect the catalytic activities of the enzyme. Although the mutation maps outside of the KH and S1 RNA-binding domains, analysis of the mutant protein revealed a defective RNA binding, thus suggesting that other determinants may be involved in PNPase–RNA interactions. The mutation also caused a looser association with the degradosome and an abnormal electrophoretic mobility in native gels. The latter feature suggests an altered structural conformation of PNPase, which may account for the properties of the mutant protein. PMID:14963263

  13. Fidaxomicin: in Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sean T

    2011-12-24

    Fidaxomicin is a first-in-class macrocyclic antibacterial that primarily demonstrates activity against species of clostridia, predominantly Clostridium difficile, while having limited or no activity against normal faecal microflora. Fidaxomicin is minimally absorbed following oral administration and is excreted almost solely in the faeces. Fidaxomicin displayed a high level of antibacterial activity against C. difficile in vitro, with a minimum inhibitory concentration required to inhibit 90% of C. difficile strains of 0.125-0.5 μg/mL, and was ≈2- to 8-fold more active than vancomycin or metronidazole. Fidaxomicin demonstrated a prolonged postantibiotic effect against C. difficile relative to vancomycin and metronidazole. In two randomized, double-blind, phase III trials, oral fidaxomicin 200 mg every 12 hours for 10 days was no less effective than oral vancomycin 125 mg every 6 hours for 10 days in the treatment of C. difficile infection, based on noninferiority analyses of clinical cure rates (primary endpoint). Fidaxomicin therapy was associated with a significantly lower rate of recurrence, as well as a significantly higher rate of global cure (i.e. sustained clinical response; resolution of diarrhoea without recurrence) compared with vancomycin therapy in the two clinical trials. Fidaxomicin was generally well tolerated in patients with C. difficile infection, with a tolerability profile generally similar to that of vancomycin.

  14. Carbon Monoxide Oxidation by Clostridium thermoaceticum and Clostridium formicoaceticum

    PubMed Central

    Diekert, Gabriele B.; Thauer, Rudolf K.

    1978-01-01

    Cultures of Clostridium formicoaceticum and C. thermoaceticum growing on fructose and glucose, respectively, were shown to rapidly oxidize CO to CO2. Rates up to 0.4 μmol min−1 mg of wet cells−1 were observed. Carbon monoxide oxidation by cell suspensions was found (i) to be dependent on pyruvate, (ii) to be inhibited by alkyl halides and arsenate, and (iii) to stimulate CO2 reduction to acetate. Cell extracts catalyzed the oxidation of carbon monoxide with methyl viologen at specific rates up to 10 μmol min−1 mg of protein−1 (35°C, pH 7.2). Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and ferredoxin from C. pasteurianum were ineffective as electron acceptors. The catalytic mechanism of carbon monoxide oxidation was “ping-pong,” indicating that the enzyme catalyzing carbon monoxide oxidation can be present in an oxidized and a reduced form. The oxidized form was shown to react reversibly with cyanide, and the reduced form was shown to react reversibly with alkyl halides: cyanide inactivated the enzyme only in the absence of carbon monoxide, and alkyl halides inactivated it only in the presence of carbon monoxide. Extracts inactivated by alkyl halides were reactivated by photolysis. The findings are interpreted to indicate that carbon monoxide oxidation in the two bacteria is catalyzed by a corrinoid enzyme and that in vivo the reaction is coupled with the reduction of CO2 to acetate. Cultures of C. acidi-urici and C. cylindrosporum growing on hypoxanthine were found not to oxidize CO, indicating that clostridia mediating a corrinoid-independent total synthesis of acetate from CO2 do not possess a CO-oxidizing system. PMID:711675

  15. Xylose fermentation with Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, A.; Wilke, C.R.; Blanch, H.W.

    1982-12-01

    In this study, the fermentation of xylose to ethanol with a thermophilic, strictly anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum, was examined. The focus of this investigation was on the physiological parameters which most strongly affect the economic feasibility of using this bacterium for industrial ethanol production. In rich medium (containing economically impractical concentrations of yeast extract) yields as high as 0.43 gm ethanol/gm xylose and growth rates of 0.4 to 0.5 hr/sup -1/ were observed. The predominant by-products of the fermentation were acetate and lactate. Nutritional studies indicated that the cost of the growth medium could be dramatically reduced by replacing most of the yeast extract used with nicotinic acid and vitamin B/sup 12/. Ethanol was found to be very inhibitory to growth and ethanol formation. To overcome the problem of inhibition, cells were gradually adapted to high concentrations (up to 4.2%) of ethanol. However, the ethanol yield of adapted cells was typically 30 to 40% less than the yield of non-adapted cells. Environmental parameters such as pH and by-product concentrations had only a slight effect on the ethanol yield produced by tolerant cells. A mutant, selected from an adapted strain, was found to produce 60% less lactate than its parent. This low-lactate producing mutant had a slightly improved ethanol yield. The results obtained with the tolerant, low-lactate producing mutant were used in the design of an industrial-scale fermentation process. An economic evaluation of the process indicates that ethanol production with this bacterium is currently uneconomical.

  16. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Katherine R.; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however, developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarize the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics. Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage–host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution. No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using “whole-phages” are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem-free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen. PMID:24808893

  17. Slow translocation of polynucleotides and their discrimination by α-hemolysin inside a single track-etched nanopore designed by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Aguilar, Simon; Balme, Sébastien; Chaaya, Adib Abou; Bechelany, Mikhael; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Janot, Jean-Marc; Pochat-Bohatier, Celine; Miele, Philippe; Dejardin, Philippe

    2013-10-21

    We report the formation of a hybrid biological/artificial nanopore by the direct insertion of non-modified α-hemolysin at the entrance of a high aspect ratio (length/diameter) biomimetic nanopore. In this robust hybrid system, the protein exhibits the same polynucleotide discrimination properties as in the biological membrane and the polynucleotide dwell time is strongly increased. This nanopore is very promising for DNA sequencing applications where the high DNA translocation velocity and the fragility of the support are the main bottlenecks.

  18. A WS2 nanosheet based sensing platform for highly sensitive detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase and its inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jia; Tang, Li-Juan; Xi, Qiang; Li, Xi-Ping; Yu, Ru-Qin; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Chu, Xia

    2014-05-01

    DNA phosphorylation, catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK), plays significant regulatory roles in many biological events. Here, a novel fluorescent nanosensor based on phosphorylation-specific exonuclease reaction and efficient fluorescence quenching of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by a WS2 nanosheet has been developed for monitoring the activity of PNK using T4 polynucleotide kinase (T4 PNK) as a model target. The fluorescent dye-labeled double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) remains highly fluorescent when mixed with WS2 nanosheets because of the weak adsorption of dsDNA on WS2 nanosheets. While dsDNA is phosphorylated by T4 PNK, it can be specifically degraded by λ exonuclease, producing ssDNA strongly adsorbed on WS2 nanosheets with greatly quenched fluorescence. Because of the high quenching efficiency of WS2 nanosheets, the developed platform presents excellent performance with a wide linear range, low detection limit and high signal-to-background ratio. Additionally, inhibition effects from adenosine diphosphate, ammonium sulfate, and sodium chloride have been investigated. The method may provide a universal platform for PNK activity monitoring and inhibitor screening in drug discovery and clinic diagnostics.DNA phosphorylation, catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK), plays significant regulatory roles in many biological events. Here, a novel fluorescent nanosensor based on phosphorylation-specific exonuclease reaction and efficient fluorescence quenching of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by a WS2 nanosheet has been developed for monitoring the activity of PNK using T4 polynucleotide kinase (T4 PNK) as a model target. The fluorescent dye-labeled double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) remains highly fluorescent when mixed with WS2 nanosheets because of the weak adsorption of dsDNA on WS2 nanosheets. While dsDNA is phosphorylated by T4 PNK, it can be specifically degraded by λ exonuclease, producing ssDNA strongly adsorbed on WS2 nanosheets with greatly quenched fluorescence

  19. Polynucleotide kinase as a potential target for enhancing cytotoxicity by ionizing radiation and topoisomerase I inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, N. K.; Karimi-Busheri, F.; Rasouli-Nia, A.; Mani, R.; Dianov, G.; Glover, J. N. M.; Weinfeld, M.

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of many antineoplastic agents is due to their capacity to damage DNA and there is evidence indicating that DNA repair contributes to the cellular resistance to such agents. DNA strand breaks constitute a significant proportion of the lesions generated by a broad range of genotoxic agents, either directly, or during the course of DNA repair. Strand breaks that are caused by many agents including ionizing radiation, topoisomerase I inhibitors, and DNA repair glycosylases such as NEIL1 and NEIL2, often contain 5’-hydroxyl and/or 3’-phosphate termini. These ends must be converted to 5’-phosphate and 3’-hydroxyl termini in order to allow DNA polymerases and ligases to catalyze repair synthesis and strand rejoining. A key enzyme involved in this end-processing is polynucleotide kinase (PNK), which possesses two enzyme activities, a DNA 5’-kinase activity and a 3’-phosphatase activity. PNK participates in the single-strand break repair pathway and the non-homologous end joining pathway for double-strand break repair. RNAi-mediated down-regulation of PNK renders cells more sensitive to ionizing radiation and camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor. Structural analysis of PNK revealed the protein is composed of three domains, the kinase domain at the C-terminus, the phosphatase domain in the centre and a forkhead associated (FHA) domain at the N-terminus. The FHA domain plays a critical role in the binding of PNK to other DNA repair proteins. Thus each PNK domain may be a suitable target for small molecule inhibition to effectively reduce resistance to ionizing radiation and topoisomerase I inhibitors. PMID:18473721

  20. Polynucleotide phosphorylase has an impact on cell biology of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Nabila; Tresse, Odile; Rivoal, Katell; Chevret, Didier; Nonglaton, Quentin; Burns, Christopher M.; Prévost, Hervé; Cappelier, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), encoded by the pnp gene, is known to degrade mRNA, mediating post-transcriptional regulation and may affect cellular functions. The role of PNPase is pleiotropic. As orthologs of the two major ribonucleases (RNase E and RNase II) of Escherichia coli are missing in the Campylobacter jejuni genome, in the current study the focus has been on the C. jejuni ortholog of PNPase. The effect of PNPase mutation on C. jejuni phenotypes and proteome was investigated. The inactivation of the pnp gene reduced significantly the ability of C. jejuni to adhere and to invade Ht-29 cells. Moreover, the pnp mutant strain exhibited a decrease in C. jejuni swimming ability and chick colonization. To explain effects of PNPase on C. jejuni 81-176 phenotype, the proteome of the pnp mutant and parental strains were compared. Overall, little variation in protein production was observed. Despite the predicted role of PNPase in mRNA regulation, the pnp mutation did not induce profound proteomic changes suggesting that other ribonucleases in C. jejuni might ensure this biological function in the absence of PNPase. Nevertheless, synthesis of proteins which are involved in virulence (LuxS, PEB3), motility (N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase), stress-response (KatA, DnaK, Hsp90), and translation system (EF-Tu, EF-G) were modified in the pnp mutant strain suggesting a more specific role of PNPase in C. jejuni. In conclusion, PNPase deficiency induces limited but important consequences on C. jejuni biology that could explain swimming limitation, chick colonization delay, and the decrease of cell adhesion/invasion ability. PMID:22919622

  1. Bacillus subtilis polynucleotide phosphorylase 3'-to-5' DNase activity is involved in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Paula P; Carrasco, Begoña; Sanchez, Humberto; Deikus, Gintaras; Bechhofer, David H; Alonso, Juan C

    2009-07-01

    In the presence of Mn(2+), an activity in a preparation of purified Bacillus subtilis RecN degrades single-stranded (ss) DNA with a 3' --> 5' polarity. This activity is not associated with RecN itself, because RecN purified from cells lacking polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) does not show the exonuclease activity. We show here that, in the presence of Mn(2+) and low-level inorganic phosphate (P(i)), PNPase degrades ssDNA. The limited end-processing of DNA is regulated by ATP and is inactive in the presence of Mg(2+) or high-level P(i). In contrast, the RNase activity of PNPase requires Mg(2+) and P(i), suggesting that PNPase degradation of RNA and ssDNA occur by mutually exclusive mechanisms. A null pnpA mutation (DeltapnpA) is not epistatic with Delta recA, but is epistatic with DeltarecN and Delta ku, which by themselves are non-epistatic. The addA5, Delta recO, Delta recQ (Delta recJ), Delta recU and Delta recG mutations (representative of different epistatic groups), in the context of DeltapnpA, demonstrate gain- or loss-of-function by inactivation of repair-by-recombination, depending on acute or chronic exposure to the damaging agent and the nature of the DNA lesion. Our data suggest that PNPase is involved in various nucleic acid metabolic pathways, and its limited ssDNA exonuclease activity plays an important role in RecA-dependent and RecA-independent repair pathways. PMID:19433509

  2. Highly specific fluorescence detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity via photo-induced electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Mangjuan; Shi, Zhilu; Cheng, Rui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Baoxin; Jin, Yan

    2015-09-15

    Sensitive and reliable study of the activity of polynucleotide kinase (PNK) and its potential inhibitors is of great importance for biochemical interaction related to DNA phosphorylation as well as development of kinase-targeted drug discovery. To achieve facile and reliable detection of PNK activity, we report here a novel fluorescence method for PNK assay based on a combination of exonuclease cleavage reaction and photo-induced electron transfer (PIET) by using T4 PNK as a model target. The fluorescence of 3'-carboxyfluorescein-labeled DNA probe (FDNA) is effectively quenched by deoxyguanosines at the 5' end of its complementary DNA (cDNA) due to an effective PIET between deoxyguanosines and fluorophore. Whereas FDNA/cDNA hybrid is phosphorylated by PNK and then immediately cleaved by lambda exonuclease (λ exo), fluorescence is greatly restored due to the break of PIET. This homogeneous PNK activity assay does not require a complex design by taking advantage of the quenching ability of deoxyguanosines, making the proposed strategy facile and cost-effective. The activity of PNK can be sensitively detected in the range of 0.005 to 10 U mL(-1) with a detection limit of 2.1×10(-3) U mL(-1). Research on inhibition efficiency of different inhibitors demonstrated that it can be explored to evaluate inhibition capacity of inhibitors. The application for detection of PNK activity in complex matrix achieved satisfactory results. Therefore, this PIET strategy opens a promising avenue for studying T4 PNK activity as well as evaluating PNK inhibitors, which is of great importance for discovering kinase-targeted drugs. PMID:26050629

  3. Coculture Production of Butanol by Clostridium Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, S. L.; Foutch, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Production of butanol by anaerobic fermentation of sugars enhanced by use of two Clostridium species, one of which feeds on metabolic product of other. Renewed interest in fermentation process for making butanol stimulated by potential use of butanol as surfactant in enhanced oil recovery. Butanol also used as fuel or as chemical feedstock and currently produced synthetically from petroleum.

  4. Isolation of Clostridium tetani from anaerobic empyema.

    PubMed

    Mayall, B C; Snashall, E A; Peel, M M

    1998-11-01

    We report the isolation of Clostridium tetani (along with Fusobacterium mortiferum) from empyema pus. The patient, a 68 year old retired farmer from rural NSW, had recently undergone cholecystectomy, had heart failure and developed an empyema. He improved after drainage of the empyema and penicillin therapy, but died suddenly during convalescence.

  5. Clostridium jejuense sp. nov., isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyunyoung; Yi, Hana; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Muramatsu, Mizuho; Kamagata, Yoichi; Chun, Jongsik

    2004-09-01

    A strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, endospore-forming bacterium, designated strain HY-35-12T, was isolated from a soil sample in Jeju, Korea. Cells of this isolate were Gram-positive, motile rods that formed oval to spherical terminal spores. Strain HY-35-12T grew optimally at 30 degrees C, pH 7.0 and 0-0.5 % (w/v) NaCl. The isolate produced pyruvate, lactate, acetate, formate and hydrogen as fermentation end products from glucose. The G + C content of DNA of the isolate was 41 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the organism formed a monophyletic clade with Clostridium xylanovorans and Clostridium aminovalericum in cluster XIVa of the genus Clostridium. The closest phylogenetic neighbour was C. xylanovorans, with 96.65 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Several physiological and chemotaxonomic properties were identified that enable strain HY-35-12T to be distinguished from phylogenetically related clostridia. On the basis of polyphasic characteristics, it is proposed that strain HY-35-12T (= IMSNU 40003T = KCTC 5026T = DSM 15929T) represents a novel species, Clostridium jejuense sp. nov.

  6. Clostridium difficile in poultry and poultry meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer t...

  7. The Challenge of Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Olson, David C; Scobey, Martin W

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is a major problem in the United States, resulting in significant morbidity, mortality, and financial costs to the health care system. This commentary provides an update regarding the epidemiology, diagnosis, current recommended management, and challenges surrounding C. difficile infection. PMID:27154892

  8. Clostridium Sacroiliitis (Gas Gangrene) Following Sacroiliac Joint Injection--Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Kurnutala, Lakshmi N; Ghatol, Dipti; Upadhyay, Aman

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old woman presented with chronic lumbosacral pain since her laminectomy and instrumentation 10 years ago. Examination was consistent with left sacroiliitis, and the patient underwent an elective left sacroiliac joint injection. Two days following her procedure she fell and landed on her left hip and on the next day, she presented to the emergency room with acutely worsening left gluteal pain. On evaluation in the emergency department, she was found to be suffering from a fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, and dysuria. A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed and this showed extensive foci of gas throughout the posterior aspect of the left iliopsoas muscle, sacrum, and ileum surrounding the left sacroiliac joint. The patient underwent emergent surgical debridement. The microbiology report of blood culture revealed clostridium perfringens, while her pathology showed necrosis and acute inflammation of fibroadipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and fat. The patient's hospital course resulted in multi-organ failure and the family elected for comfort care measures only. Unfortunately, she passed away 36 hours later. Septic arthritis is a potential catastrophic complication following intra-articular steroid therapy. The cause of the septic joint can be multifactorial but is likely caused by one of the following processes: direct inoculation of bacteria by the injection, hematogenous seeding of the percutaneous injection tract, or due to activation of a quiescent infection by the injected steroid. Clostridial spores are very resistant to standard aseptic skin preparations, including chlorhexidine and betadine solutions. The only effective methods to eliminate the spores is to heat them at a temperature greater than 100 degrees Celsius for 10 minutes or with use of a 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution. We hypothesize that clostridium spores were present on the patient's skin from previous stool soiling, and that these were introduced directly into the soft

  9. Clostridium botulinum: a bug with beauty and weapon.

    PubMed

    Shukla, H D; Sharma, S K

    2005-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum, a Gram-positive, anaerobic spore-forming bacteria, is distinguished by its significant clinical applications as well as its potential to be used as bioterror agent. Growing cells secrete botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most poisonous of all known poisons. While BoNT is the causative agent of deadly neuroparalytic botulism, it also serves as a remarkably effective treatment for involuntary muscle disorders such as blepharospasm, strabismus, hemifacial spasm, certain types of spasticity in children, and other ailments. BoNT is also used in cosmetology for the treatment of glabellar lines, and is well-known as the active component of the anti-aging medications Botox and Dysport. In addition, recent reports show that botulinum neurotoxin can be used as a tool for pharmaceutical drug delivery. However, BoNT remains the deadliest of all toxins, and is viewed by biodefense researchers as a possible agent of bioterrorism (BT). Among seven serotypes, C. botulinum type A is responsible for the highest mortality rate in botulism, and thus has the greatest potential to act as biological weapon. Genome sequencing of C. botulinum type A Hall strain (ATCC 3502) is now complete, and has shown the genome size to be 3.89 Mb with a G+C content of approximately 28.2%. The bacterium harbors a 16.3 kb plasmid with a 26.8% G+C content--slightly lower than that of the chromosome. Most of the virulence factors in C. botulinum are chromosomally encoded; bioinformatic analysis of the genome sequence has shown that the plasmid does not harbor toxin genes or genes for related virulence factors. Interestingly, the plasmid does harbor genes essential to replication, including dnaE, which encodes the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase III which has close similarity with its counterpart in C. perfringens strain 13. The plasmid also contains similar genes to those that encode the ABC-type multidrug transport ATPase, and permease. The presence of ABC-type multidrug transport

  10. Slow translocation of polynucleotides and their discrimination by α-hemolysin inside a single track-etched nanopore designed by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabello-Aguilar, Simon; Balme, Sébastien; Chaaya, Adib Abou; Bechelany, Mikhael; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Janot, Jean-Marc; Pochat-Bohatier, Celine; Miele, Philippe; Dejardin, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    We report the formation of a hybrid biological/artificial nanopore by the direct insertion of non-modified α-hemolysin at the entrance of a high aspect ratio (length/diameter) biomimetic nanopore. In this robust hybrid system, the protein exhibits the same polynucleotide discrimination properties as in the biological membrane and the polynucleotide dwell time is strongly increased. This nanopore is very promising for DNA sequencing applications where the high DNA translocation velocity and the fragility of the support are the main bottlenecks.We report the formation of a hybrid biological/artificial nanopore by the direct insertion of non-modified α-hemolysin at the entrance of a high aspect ratio (length/diameter) biomimetic nanopore. In this robust hybrid system, the protein exhibits the same polynucleotide discrimination properties as in the biological membrane and the polynucleotide dwell time is strongly increased. This nanopore is very promising for DNA sequencing applications where the high DNA translocation velocity and the fragility of the support are the main bottlenecks. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials, nanopore fabrication and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03683a

  11. Detection of polynucleotide kinase activity by using a gold electrode modified with magnetic microspheres coated with titanium dioxide nanoparticles and a DNA dendrimer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangfeng; Chen, Ling; He, Xiuping; Zhu, Yanhong; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2014-08-21

    In this paper, we have designed a signal amplified method for the electrochemical determination of polynucleotide kinase activity. It is based on (a) the peroxidase-like activity of magnetite microspheres (MNPs), (b) the specific recognition capabilities of titanium dioxide (TiO2) with the phosphate groups of the capture probe and (c) the DNA dendrimer structure for signal amplification. MNPs coated with TiO2 (TMNPs) were prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. TMNP-DNA dendrimers were formed by the hybridization of captured nucleic acids with a link probe. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were carried out to study the electrocatalytic process. The formation of the TMNP-DNA dendrimer structures was related to the phosphorylated capture probe and further to the activity of polynucleotide kinase, which was the base of the polynucleotide kinase detection. The TMNP-DNA dendrimer based biosensor showed sensitive detection of polynucleotide kinase with a satisfying result; a low detection of 0.003 U mL(-1) and wide linear range of 0.01 to 30 U mL(-1) were achieved. Additionally, the present TMNP-DNA dendrimer based biosensor also demonstrated excellent selectivity, stability and reproducibility. PMID:24918936

  12. Binding of IKe gene 5 protein to polynucleotides. Fluorescence binding experiments of IKe gene 5 protein and mutual cooperativity of IKe and M13 gene 5 proteins.

    PubMed

    de Jong, E A; Harmsen, B J; Konings, R N; Hilbers, C W

    1987-04-01

    Fluorescence studies of the binding of IKe gene 5 protein to various polynucleotides were performed to obtain insight into the question as to what extent the binding characteristics of the gene 5 proteins of the IKe and M13 phages resemble and/or differ from each other. The fluorescence of IKe gene 5 protein is quenched 60% upon binding to most polynucleotides. At moderate salt concentrations, i.e., below 1 M salt, the binding stoichiometry is 4.0 +/- 0.5 nucleotides per IKe gene 5 protein monomer. The affinity of the protein for homopolynucleotides depends strongly on sugar and base type; in order of increasing affinities we find poly(rC) less than poly(dA) less than poly(rA) less than poly(dI) less than poly(rU) less than poly(dU) less than poly(dT). For most polynucleotides studied, the affinity depends linearly on the salt concentration: [d log (Kint omega)]/(d log [M+]) = -3. The binding is highly cooperative. The cooperativity parameter omega, as deduced from protein titration curves, is 300 +/- 150 and appears independent of the type of polynucleotide studied. Estimation of this binding parameter from salt titrations of gene 5 protein-polynucleotide complexes results in systematically higher values. A comparison of the binding data of the IKe and M13 gene 5 proteins shows that the fluorescence quenching, stoichiometry, order of binding affinities, and cooperativity in the binding are similar for both proteins. From this it is concluded that at least the DNA binding grooves of both proteins must show a close resemblance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Persistent and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Shola A.; Stahl, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea. It has become a significant dilemma in the treatment of patients, and causes increasing morbidity that, in extreme cases, may result in death. Persistent and recurrent disease hamper attempts at eradication of this infection. Escalating levels of treatment and novel therapeutics are being utilized and developed to treat CDI. Further trials are warranted to definitively determine what protocols can be used to treat persistent and recurrent disease. PMID:26034401

  14. Genomic diversity of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Janezic, Sandra; Rupnik, Maja

    2015-05-01

    Approaches to exploring Clostridium difficile genomic diversity have ranged from molecular typing methods to use of comparative genome microarrays and whole genome sequence comparisons. The C. difficile population structure is clonal and distributed into six clades, which correlate well with MLST STs (multilocus sequence types) and PCR ribotypes. However, toxigenic strains and strains with increased virulence are distributed throughout several clades. Here we summarize studies on C. difficile genomic diversity, with emphasis on phylogenetic aspects, epidemiological aspect and variability of some virulence factors.

  15. Environmental interventions to control Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Loo, Vivian G

    2015-03-01

    The control of Clostridium difficile infection is paramount. C difficile spores are difficult to eradicate and can survive on surfaces for prolonged periods of time. Hand washing with either plain or antimicrobial soap is effective in removing C difficile spores from hands. Patients should be placed in private rooms and under contact precautions to prevent transmission to other patients. Regular hospital germicides are not sporicidal and hypochlorite solutions are required for surface disinfection. In outbreak situations, a multifaceted approach is required. PMID:25573675

  16. Development of an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Clostridium perfringens beta2-toxin in porcine feces and the neonatal piglet intestine.

    PubMed

    Kircanski, Jasmina; Hodgins, Douglas; Soltes, Glenn; Pei, Yanlong; Parreira, Valeria R; Songer, J Glenn; Prescott, John F

    2012-09-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for detection and quantitation of beta2-toxin in neonatal piglet intestinal contents. Polystyrene plates were coated with polyclonal capture antibodies prepared against consensus recombinant beta2-toxin. The ELISA was developed using consensus recombinant beta2-toxin, atypical recombinant beta2-toxin, purified consensus native beta2-toxin, and field samples of neonatal porcine intestinal contents. Captured antigen was detected using a horseradish peroxidase-labeled monoclonal antibody against consensus recombinant beta2-toxin. The limit of detection of the ELISA for consensus beta2-toxin was between 2.0 and 3.5 ng/ml. The ELISA detected atypical recombinant beta2-toxin only weakly. Optical density was protein concentration dependent. The test confirmed differences between consensus and atypical recombinant beta2-toxin, but similar results obtained when testing pure consensus recombinant beta2-toxin and native beta2-toxin. Results obtained from intestinal content samples, particularly from the small intestine, were highly inconsistent and suggested variable protease activity. Addition of protease inhibitors partially prevented degradation of the toxin; however, sample processing at low temperature, at a lower pH (citrate buffer with 5% of bovine serum albumin, pH 6.1), and "cold incubation" of applied antigens abolished protease activity. The recombinant toxin was preserved in spiked intestinal samples by freezing at -70°C, suggesting that necropsy samples can be stored frozen for periodic testing. With appropriate sample preparation, antigen-capture ELISA can detect beta2-toxin in the intestinal content and feces of neonatal piglets.

  17. Humulus lupus Beta-acids Administered Through Water Reduce Clostridium perfringens Challenge Strains in the Chicken Intestinal Tract Midgut and Ceca.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antimicrobial activity activity of extracts of the hop plant Humulus lupus was studied in chickens fed diets without antibiotic growth promotants. Beta-acid resins of the hop plant were administered by water to 13 day old chickens subsequently challenged per so with necrotic enteritis-associate...

  18. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nathaniel A; Ben Ami, Ronen; Guzner-Gur, Hanan; Santo, Moshe E; Halpern, Zamir; Maharshak, Nitsan

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a problem most hospital-based physicians will face in their career. This review aims to refresh current knowledge with regard to Clostridium difficile infection and bring physicians up to date with the latest developments in the growing field of fecal microbiota transplantation, the benefits it offers, and the promise this and other developments hold for the future.

  19. Interaction between adenovirus DNA-binding protein and single-stranded polynucleotides studied by circular dichroism and ultraviolet absorption.

    PubMed

    van Amerongen, H; van Grondelle, R; van der Vliet, P C

    1987-07-28

    The adenovirus DNA-binding protein (AdDBP) is a multifunctional protein required for viral DNA replication and control of transcription. We have studied the binding of AdDBP to single-stranded M13 DNA and to the homopolynucleotides poly(rA), poly(dA), and poly(dT) by means of circular dichroism (CD) and optical density (OD) measurements. The binding to all these polynucleotides was strong and nearly stoichiometric. Titration experiments showed that the size of the binding site is 9-11 nucleotides long for M13 DNA, poly(dA), and poly(rA). A higher value (15.0 +/- 0.8) was found for poly(dT). Pronounced changes in the circular dichroism and optical density spectra were observed upon binding of AdDBP. In general, both the positive peak around 260-270 nm and the negative peak around 240-250 nm in the CD spectra decreased in intensity, and a shift of the crossover point to longer wavelengths was found. The OD spectra observed upon binding of AdDBP are remarkably similar to those obtained with prokaryotic helix-destabilizing proteins like bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein and fd gene 5 protein. The data can best be interpreted by assuming that the AdDBP-polynucleotide complex has a regular, rigid, and extended configuration that satifies two criteria: (1) a considerable tilt of the bases in combination with (2) a small rotation per base and/or a shift of the bases closer to the helix axis.

  20. Time-resolved fluorescence of bacteriophage Pf1 DNA-binding protein. Determination of oligonucleotide and polynucleotide binding parameters.

    PubMed

    Kneale, G G; Wijnaendts van Resandt, R W

    1985-05-15

    The binding of oligonucleotides and polynucleotides to the Pf1 DNA-binding protein was followed by fluorescence spectral shift and lifetime measurements, which gave an anomalous value for the stoichiometry of binding. The anomaly was investigated in detail using fluorescence depolarisation to measure the aggregation during the titration and showed that all the fluorescence parameters are related to the specific aggregation of dimers on ligand binding. At saturation, complexes of the protein with the octanucleotide d(GCGTTGCG) and the hexadecanucleotide (dT)16 have rotational correlation times, phi, of 50 ns and 85 ns, corresponding to protein tetramers and octamers, respectively. In the presence of the tetranucleotide d(CGCA) the protein remains as the native dimer (phi = 19 ns). The titration curves could be analysed in terms of two non-equivalent binding sites, with binding constants K1 and K2. Comparison of K1 values for oligonucleotide binding leads to an estimated (single-site) intrinsic binding constant Kint approximately equal to 3 X 10(4) M-1 and a cooperativity parameter omega approximately equal to 100, in agreement with the apparent binding constant Kapp approximately equal to 3 X 10(6) M-1 for polynucleotides. Binding to the second site on the protein dimer is greatly reduced and cannot be determined accurately. The results suggest that the protein dimers bind cooperatively by lateral association along the DNA and that occupation of only one of the two DNA-binding sites of the protein dimers is sufficient to stabilize the nucleoprotein complexes.