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Sample records for clostridium septicum alpha-toxin

  1. Detection of neutralizing antibodies against alpha-toxin of different Clostridium septicum strains in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Roth, F; Jansen, K; Petzke, S

    1999-07-01

    Clostridium septicum, a ubiquitious organism, is the pathogen which causes the classical malignant edema after injuries. Because of its strong cytotoxic alpha-toxin, infections are often lethal. To prevent losses in animals, vaccination with alpha-toxoid vaccines is carried out. Quality control of the vaccines is done by a neutralization test in mice. A cytotoxin test and as an alternative method to detect neutralizing antibodies, a cytotoxin inhibition test was standardized. In the studies, alpha-toxin of the C. septicum reference strain (NC 547) from the National Collection of Type Cultures was compared with alpha-toxin of a field strain from an outbreak in Germany. Sera from five heterologous polyvalent and three monovalent vaccines from eight rabbit groups were available. Each vaccination had been carried out according to the procedure of the German Pharmacopoeia. In three out of the five sera of the groups vaccinated with the heterologous polyvalent vaccine, cytotoxin neutralizing antibodies were detected. High antibody titers were observed in sera of rabbits vaccinated with a vaccine of strain NC 547, lower titers in the sera of rabbits vaccinated with a vaccine of the field strain. No cytotoxin neutralizing antibodies could be found in the sera of rabbits vaccinated with the monovalent C. chauvoei vaccine. The toxins of all strains showed the same ranking of the vaccines. Vaccines which caused high antibody titers in the animals were detected by all toxins as such, as well as vaccines which had medium or low antibody inducing capacity. The results were independent of the C. septicum strain used for the production of alpha-toxin.

  2. Low Prevalence of Clostridium septicum Fecal Carriage in an Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Kopliku, Fatos; Schubert, Alyxandria M.; Mogle, Jill; Schloss, Patrick D.; Young, Vincent B.; Aronoff, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium septicum is an uncommon cause of severe infection. Real-time PCR against the C. septicum-specific alpha-toxin gene (csa) was used to estimate the prevalence of this microbe in human stool from 161 asymptomatic community-dwelling adults and 192 hospitalized patients with diarrhea. All samples were negative, suggesting a low prevalence. PMID:25481351

  3. A Quantitative Electrochemiluminescence Assay for Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-10

    Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin , Gerald A. Merrill a,b,¤, Victor R. Rivera b, Dwayne D. Neal b, Charles Young c, Mark A. Poli b a Department of...format electrochemiluminescence assay for identifying and assaying Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin. Biotinylated antibodies to C. perfringens alpha...matrix eVects. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Electrochemiluminescence (ECL); Immunoassay; Clostridium perfringens ; Alpha toxin

  4. Detection of Clostridium septicum hemolysin gene by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, S; Hashizume, N; Kinoshita, T; Kaidoh, T; Tamura, Y

    1997-09-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the detection of the hemolysin (alpha toxin) gene of Clostridium septicum. The PCR primers were designed from the sequence of the hemolysin gene and synthesized. A DNA fragment of 270 bp was amplified from 10 strains of C. septicum, but was not from strains of C. chauvoei, C. perfringens, C. novyi, or C. haemolyticum. When the PCR product was digested with Sau3AI, two DNA fragments of the expected 148 bp and 122 bp were recognized. The lowest detectable threshold of PCR for the hemolysin gene was 3.8 x 10(3) cells/ml. The PCR technique may be useful for rapid detection or identification of C. septicum associated with malignant edema.

  5. Quantitative real-time PCR assay for Clostridium septicum in poultry gangrenous dermatitis associated samples.

    PubMed

    Neumann, A P; Dunham, S M; Rehberger, T G; Siragusa, G R

    2010-08-01

    Clostridium septicum is a spore-forming anaerobe frequently implicated in cases of gangrenous dermatitis (GD) and other spontaneously occurring myonecrotic infections of poultry. Although C. septicum is readily cultured from diseased tissues it can be difficult to enumerate due to its tendency to swarm over the surface of agar plates. In this study a quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed in order to more accurately measure the levels of C. septicum in healthy as well as GD associated poultry samples. The assay was specifically designed to target the C. septicum alpha toxin gene, csa, which is, to our knowledge, carried by all strains of C. septicum and has been shown to be essential for virulence. Genomic DNAs from a diverse collection of bacterial species, including closely related Clostridium chauvoei, Clostridium carnis, Clostridium tertium as well as several strains of Clostridium perfringens, all failed to produce a positive reaction. An approximate reproducible limit of detection in spiked extracts of at least 10(3) cfu/g of C. septicum was observed for a variety of different sample types. C. septicum levels in broiler chicken field samples estimated from the results of qPCR were statistically correlated to culture based enumerations obtained from those same tissues.

  6. [Spontaneous gas gangrene in a diabetic patient with Clostridium septicum].

    PubMed

    Mischke, A; Besier, S; Walcher, F; Waibel, H; Brade, V; Brandt, C

    2005-10-01

    Atraumatic infections due to Clostridium septicum are known to be associated with immunosuppression or even malignancy. In this case report, we present a patient with severe Clostridium septicum infection related to advanced colon cancer that had not previously been diagnosed. The case demonstrates the strong association between Clostridium septicum infections and malignancy, particularly in the presence of other predisposing diseases such as diabetes mellitus. It strongly suggests excluding malignant neoplasms, especially of the gastrointestinal tract, when severe Clostridium septicum infections occur. Moreover, if patients with known colorectal or other malignancy develop septicaemia or spontaneous gas gangrene, clinicians should be aware of Clostridium septicum as one of the main causative agents, as early diagnosis and aggressive treatment are important to improve prognosis.

  7. Clostridium septicum Aortitis of the Infrarenal Abdominal Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aditya; Yousuf, Tariq; Rachid, Mohammed; Ali, Naureen; Tabriz, Muhammad; Loughry, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium septicum aortitis is a rare infection that has a strong association with occult colonic malignancy. There is also emerging evidence to support the combination of medical and surgical management over medical management alone. To the best of our knowledge, we report the 40th known case of C. septicum aortitis. PMID:26767087

  8. Role of Zinc in the Production of Clostridium perfringens Alpha Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hiroko; Murata, Ryosuke

    1973-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens was found to produce alpha toxin in a synthetic medium containing zinc; in medium containing no zinc, a little toxin was detected in the early logarithmic phase of growth and it disappeared rapidly. No intracellular accumulation of alpha toxin protein occurred whether or not zinc was present in the medium. In zinc-deficient medium, the organisms produced and released into the surrounding medium the protein specifically precipitable with alpha antitoxin in an amount comparable to that of alpha toxin produced in the zinc-containing medium. The protein combined rapidly in some unknown way with zinc to form the active and stable alpha toxin. Images PMID:4354149

  9. A case of Clostridium septicum spontaneous gas gangrene.

    PubMed

    Dylewski, Joe; Drummond, Robert; Rowen, John

    2007-03-01

    Severe skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are often life-threatening emergencies that require a rapid diagnosis. Gas gangrene is one of the most fulminant types of SSTI and is usually caused by Clostridium perfringens' contamination of an open wound. Although gas gangrene is usually associated with fecally contaminated wounds, "spontaneous" cases occur and are most commonly caused by Clostridium (C.) septicum. We report a case of spontaneous gas gangrene caused by C. septicum that only became manifest while the patient was being monitored in the emergency department. We also review the diagnosis and treatment aspects of this entity.

  10. Necrotizing gastritis associated with Clostridium septicum in a rabbit.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Jorge P; Moore, Janet; Loukopoulos, Panayiotis; Diab, Santiago S; Uzal, Francisco A

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium septicum is the causative agent of histotoxic infections, including malignant edema and braxy (necrotizing abomasitis) in several animal species. The carcass of a 2-year-old, female New Zealand white rabbit with a history of acute depression and obtundation followed by death was received at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System (San Bernardino, California) for necropsy and diagnostic workup. No gross lesions were detected at necropsy. Microscopically, there was moderate to severe, multifocal fibrinonecrotizing, transmural gastritis with numerous intralesional Gram-positive, sporulated rods, and disseminated thrombosis of the brain, lungs, heart, and liver, with occasional intravascular rods. The rods observed within the gastric wall and thrombi in the stomach and lung were positive for C. septicum by immunohistochemical staining. However, this microorganism was not isolated from stomach content. Clostridium septicum should be included in the list of possible etiologies of gastritis in rabbits.

  11. Relationship of bacteriophages to alpha toxin production in Clostridium novyi types A and B.

    PubMed Central

    Eklund, M W; Poysky, F T; Peterson, M E; Meyers, J A

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of specific bacteriophages to the production of the lethal alpha toxin in Clostridium novyi types A and B was investigated. When type A strain 5771 reverted to the phage-sensitive state, it ceased to produce alpha toxin but continued to produce the gamma and epsilon antigens. This "nontoxigenic" culture, therefore, more closely resembled C. botulinum types C and D than the other C. novyi types. Phage-sensitive type B strains also ceased to produce the alpha toxin but continued to produce the beta toxin, and therefore very colesly resembled C. novyi type D (C. haemolyticum). Alpha toxin was again produced when the phage-sensitive cultures were reinfected with the respective tox+ phages. Alpha toxin production could also be induced in the "nontoxigenic" phage-sensitive derivatives from type B strain 8024 by tox+ phages isolated from other strains of type B. tox- phages were also isolated, but they did not affect alpha toxin production. The tox+ phages also caused a marked change in the colonial morphology of type B strains. In this report we present evidence that alpha toxin production by C. novyi type A strain 5771 and type B strain 8024 depends upon the continued presence and participation of specific bacteriophages designated as NA1tox+ and NB1tox+, respectively. Images PMID:965096

  12. Clostridium septicum gas gangrene in the orbit: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fejes, I; Dégi, R; Végh, M

    2013-02-01

    Our report presents a case of Clostridium septicum gas gangrene in an unusual, orbital localization. The predisposing factors are typical: colon tumour and lymphatic malignancy. Most probably bacteria from the intestinal flora entered the bloodstream through the compromised intestinal wall and settled in the orbit resulting in the development of an abscess containing gas. At the site of the gas gangrene, an indolent B cell lymphoma was present. After surgery and antibiotic treatment, the patient healed from the C. septicum infection; but subsequently died as a consequence of the tumour.

  13. Clostridium novyi alpha-toxin-catalyzed incorporation of GlcNAc into Rho subfamily proteins.

    PubMed

    Selzer, J; Hofmann, F; Rex, G; Wilm, M; Mann, M; Just, I; Aktories, K

    1996-10-11

    The lethal and edema-inducing alpha-toxin from Clostridium novyi causes rounding up of cultured cell lines by redistribution of the actin cytoskeleton. alpha-Toxin belongs to the family of large clostridial cytotoxins that encompasses Clostridium difficile toxin A and B and the lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii. Toxin A and toxin B have been recently identified as monoglucosyltransferases to modify the low molecular mass GTPases of the Rho subfamily (Just, I., Selzer, J., Wilm, M., Von Eichel-Streiber, C., Mann, M., and Aktories, K. (1995) Nature 375, 500-503 and Just, I., Wilm, M., Selzer, J., Rex, G., Von Eichel-Streiber, C., Mann, M., and Aktories, K. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 13932-13936). We report here the identification of the alpha-toxin-catalyzed modification of Rho. Using electrospray mass spectrometry, the mass of the modification was determined as 203 Da, consistent with a N-acetyl-hexosamine moiety. UDP-N-acetyl-glucosamine selectively served as cosubstrate for alpha-toxin-catalyzed modification into the Rho subfamily proteins Rho, Rac, Cdc42, and RhoG. The acceptor amino acid of N-acetyl-glucosaminylation was identified by mutagenesis as Thr-37 in Rho (equivalent to Thr-35 in Rac/Cdc42), which is located in the effector domain of the GTPases. C. novyi alpha-toxin seems to mediate its cytotoxic effects on cells by mimicking endogenous post-translational modification of cellular proteins.

  14. Clostridium septicum: An Unusual Link to a Lower Gastrointestinal Bleed

    PubMed Central

    Jessamy, Kegan; Ojevwe, Fidelis O.; Ubagharaji, Ezinnaya; Sharma, Anuj; Anozie, Obiajulu; Gilman, Christy Ann; Rawlins, Sekou

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium septicum is a highly virulent pathogen which is associated with colorectal malignancy, hematological malignancy, immunosuppression, diabetes mellitus and cyclical neutropenia. Presentation may include disseminated clostridial infection in the form of septicemia, gas gangrene, and mycotic aortic aneurysms. We report the case of a 62-year-old female presenting with necrotizing fasciitis of her left thigh and subsequently developing rectal bleeding. While she was being treated with empiric antibiotics, her blood culture was found to be positive for C. septicum. We would like to highlight the importance of early colorectal cancer screening in minimizing the occurrence of undetected tumors which provide an optimal growth environment for C. septicum, leading to localized and/or remote infection. PMID:27721737

  15. Detection of Clostridium novyi type B alpha toxin by cell culture systems.

    PubMed

    Borrmann, E; Schulze, F

    1999-07-01

    Ten permanent cell lines were examined for their reaction to the Clostridium novyi alpha toxin. The action of the toxin was determined after 3 days by microscopic examination and the MTT assay. The alpha toxin exhibited the strongest effect on ESH-L cells rather than other cell lines. Vero and SFT-R cells reacted in a comparable way, but less sensitively. We were able to show that the cytopathic effect on the three types of cells was neutralised by the international standard for gas gangrene antitoxin (C. novyi) but in no case by heterologous antisera. Our results have shown that the three cell lines were specific indicators for the detection of the cytopathic effect of alpha toxin. The cytopathic effect can be measured reproducibly by the cell culture assay used. These results are suitable as the starting point for the development of the neutralisation test using cell cultures.

  16. Clostridium septicum infection of hepatic metastases following alcohol injection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium septicum infections are generally associated with gastrointestinal or hematologic malignancies. We report the first case of hepatic metastases infection with Clostridium septicum that followed alcohol injection of liver lesion. Clinicians should consider this possibility in patients with underlying malignancy who present with hepatic abscess, as prompt surgical drainage and empiric antibiotics may be life saving. PMID:20072687

  17. Clostridium septicum infection of hepatic metastases following alcohol injection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Neam; Sohail, Muhammad R; Hashmey, Rayhan H; Al Kaabi, Mohammed

    2009-12-31

    Clostridium septicum infections are generally associated with gastrointestinal or hematologic malignancies. We report the first case of hepatic metastases infection with Clostridium septicum that followed alcohol injection of liver lesion. Clinicians should consider this possibility in patients with underlying malignancy who present with hepatic abscess, as prompt surgical drainage and empiric antibiotics may be life saving.

  18. A recombinant carboxy-terminal domain of alpha-toxin protects mice against Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Oda, Masataka; Kobayashi, Keiko; Ochi, Sadayuki; Takagishi, Teruhisa; Shibutani, Masahiro; Sakurai, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin (CP, 370 residues) is one of the main agents involved in the development of gas gangrene. In this study, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the C-terminal domain (CP251-370) of the toxin and phospholipase C (PLC; CB, 372 residues) of Clostridum bifermentans isolated from cases of clostridium necrosis were examined. The recombinant proteins were expressed as glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins. Antibodies that cross-reacted with alpha-toxin were produced after immunization with recombinant proteins including GST-CP251-370, GST-CP281-370, GST-CP311-370, CB1-372 and GST-CB251-372. Anti-GST-CP251-370, anti-GST-CP281-370 and anti-GST-CP311-370 sera neutralized both the PLC and hemolytic activities of alpha-toxin, whereas anti-CB1-372 and anti-GST-CB251-372 weakly neutralized these activities. Immunization with GST-CP251-370 and GST-CP281-370 provided protection against the lethal effects of the toxin and C. perfringens type A NCTC8237. Partial protection from the toxin and C. perfringens was elicited by immunization with GST-CP311-370 and CB1-372. GST-CP251-370 and GST-CP281-370 are promising candidates for vaccines for clostridial-induced gas gangrene.

  19. Purification and characterization of alpha-toxin produced by Clostridium novyi type A.

    PubMed Central

    Ball, D W; Van Tassell, R L; Roberts, M D; Hahn, P E; Lyerly, D M; Wilkins, T D

    1993-01-01

    Our study describes the production, purification, and properties of alpha-toxin from Clostridium novyi type A 19402. The bacterium produced maximal amounts of alpha-toxin when grown at 37 degrees C for 72 h in dialysis flask cultures containing brain heart infusion supplemented with 0.75% Tween 80 and 2% glycerol. The alpha-toxin was purified by precipitation with polyethylene glycol 6000, followed by chromatography on Q-Sepharose, phenyl-agarose, and Mono-Q. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the toxin exhibited a single band with an M(r) of 200,000. The toxin also exhibited a single immunoprecipitin arc by crossed immunoelectrophoresis with antiserum against crude toxin. It was stable when stored at 4 degrees C and also following exposure to buffers with pHs in the range of 4 to 7. The toxin had a minimum lethal dose in mice of 5 to 10 ng, caused rounding of a variety of cells in tissue culture, and was negative in the rabbit ileal loop assay. The cytotoxic activity was inhibited by agents that affect receptor-mediated processes, and the toxin was less active on a CHO mutant cell line that is defective in endosomal acidification. The analysis of the amino acid composition revealed an unusually high proline content. The N-terminal sequence is Met-Leu-Ile-Thr-Arg-Glu-Gln-Leu-Met-Lys. Images PMID:8514395

  20. Characterization of the Catalytic Domain of Clostridium novyi Alpha-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Christian; Schömig, Kathrin; Hofmann, Fred; Aktories, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium novyi alpha-toxin belongs to the family of large clostridial cytotoxins which act on cells through the modification of small GTP-binding proteins. We present here an analysis of the catalytic domain of alpha-toxin. A NH2-terminal 551-amino-acid fragment, α551, was found to contain the full enzyme activity of the holotoxin, whereas a slightly shortened fragment encompassing 509 amino acids showed no detectable enzyme activity. Further characterization of the enzymatically active fragment α551 revealed a substrate specificity for both UDP–N-acetylglucosamine and UDP-glucose. A Michaelis-Menten constant of 17 μM was determined for the substrate UDP–N-acetylglucosamine, while that for UDP-glucose was about 20 times higher, indicating a weaker affinity of the toxin for the latter substrate. Mutation of the aspartic acids of a conserved motif DXD within α551 reduced enzyme activity >700-fold and inhibited cytotoxicity after microinjection in cells. Inhibition of enzyme activity of the DXD mutant could be partially overcome by increased concentrations of manganese ions, suggesting the involvement of these aspartic acids in Mn2+ binding. By construction of chimeras of enzymatically active fragments of C. sordellii lethal toxin and C. novyi alpha-toxin, we located the region involved in nucleotide-sugar specificity to amino acids 133 through 517. PMID:11035748

  1. Characterization of the catalytic domain of Clostridium novyi alpha-toxin.

    PubMed

    Busch, C; Schömig, K; Hofmann, F; Aktories, K

    2000-11-01

    Clostridium novyi alpha-toxin belongs to the family of large clostridial cytotoxins which act on cells through the modification of small GTP-binding proteins. We present here an analysis of the catalytic domain of alpha-toxin. A NH(2)-terminal 551-amino-acid fragment, alpha 551, was found to contain the full enzyme activity of the holotoxin, whereas a slightly shortened fragment encompassing 509 amino acids showed no detectable enzyme activity. Further characterization of the enzymatically active fragment alpha 551 revealed a substrate specificity for both UDP-N-acetylglucosamine and UDP-glucose. A Michaelis-Menten constant of 17 microM was determined for the substrate UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, while that for UDP-glucose was about 20 times higher, indicating a weaker affinity of the toxin for the latter substrate. Mutation of the aspartic acids of a conserved motif DXD within alpha 551 reduced enzyme activity >700-fold and inhibited cytotoxicity after microinjection in cells. Inhibition of enzyme activity of the DXD mutant could be partially overcome by increased concentrations of manganese ions, suggesting the involvement of these aspartic acids in Mn(2+) binding. By construction of chimeras of enzymatically active fragments of C. sordellii lethal toxin and C. novyi alpha-toxin, we located the region involved in nucleotide-sugar specificity to amino acids 133 through 517.

  2. Pharmacological and biochemical studies of cytotoxicity of Clostridium novyi type A alpha-toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Bette, P; Frevert, J; Mauler, F; Suttorp, N; Habermann, E

    1989-01-01

    The actions of apparently homogeneous alpha-toxin from Clostridium novyi type A were studied in order to develop an in vitro system which closely mimics its in vivo effects and to search for the mode of poisoning. Time to death (by intravenous injection of mice) was inversely related to dose, with a detection limit of about 200 ng/kg of body weight at 100 h. Injections of 2.5 ng or more into the rat paw led to a slowly (maximum after about 30 h) developing, dose-dependent edema which was useful as a quantitative in vivo assay based on volumetry. Vascular leakage was due to gap formation between endothelial cells. Similarly, endothelial cells cultured from pig pulmonary artery lost their "cobblestone" arrangement after a dose-dependent lag period of some hours after poisoning. The morphological changes were accompanied by depression of uptake or incorporation of [3H]uridine. A quantitative in vitro assay was established on the inhibition of [3H]uridine incorporation. As in animals, the action of alpha-toxin started with a few nanograms per milliliter and proceeded slowly for at least 1 day but became resistant to antitoxin within 2 h of exposure. The toxin action is not limited to endothelial cells, since chicken embryonic cells, a mouse fibroblast line (L-929), and a rat phaeochromocytoma line (PC-12) behaved similarly. Alpha-toxin was found to differ from other bacterial toxins investigated whose modes of action are already known. Images PMID:2744858

  3. [Cloning of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin gene and extracellular expression in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masaharu; Kikuchi, Maho; Komoriya, Tomoe; Watanabe, Kunitomo; Kouno, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that widely propagets in the soil and the gastrointestinal tract of human and animals. This bacteria causes food poisoning, gas gangrene and other various range of infectious diseases. But there is no standard diagnosis method of C. perfringens. In order to develop a new type of immunoassay for clinical purpose, we studied expression and extracellular secretion of recombinant alpha-toxin having enzyme activity in E. coli expression system. Cloning was carried out after PCR amplification from C. perfringens GAI 94074 which was clinical isolate. Three kinds of fragment were cloned using pET100/D-TOPO vector. These fragments coded for ribosome binding site, signal peptide, and alpha-toxin gene respectively. Recombinant pET100 plasmid transformed into TOP 10 cells and the obtained plasmids were transformed into BL21 (DE3) cells. Then, the transformants were induced expression with IPTG. In conclusion, we successfully cloned, expressed and exteracellular secreted C. perfringens alpha-toxin containing signal peptide. Biologically, the obtained recombinant protein was positive for phospholipase C activity.

  4. Phylogenetic positions of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, P; Capaul, S E; Nicolet, J; Frey, J

    1996-10-01

    The sequences of the 16S rRNA genes (rrs genes) of Clostridium chauvoei, the causative agent of blackleg in cattle, and the phenotypically related organism Clostridium septicum were determined. After amplification of 1,507-bp PCR fragments from the corresponding rrs genes, the sequences were determined in a single round of sequencing by using conserved region primers. A sequence similarity analysis of the sequences revealed the close phylogenetic relationship of C. chauvoei and C. septicum in Clostridium cluster I (M. D. Collins, P. A. Lawson, A. Willems, J. J. Cordoba, J. Fernandez-Garayzabal, P. Garcia, J. Cai, H. Hippe, and J. A. E. Farrow, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 44:812-826, 1994), which includes Clostridium carnis, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tetani. We found that 99.3% of the nucleotides in the genes of C. chauvoei and C. septicum are identical.

  5. Molecular and Cellular Basis of Microvascular Perfusion Deficits Induced by Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium septicum

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Michael J.; Kwan, Rain Y. Q.; Awad, Milena M.; Kennedy, Catherine L.; Young, Lauren F.; Hall, Pam; Cordner, Leanne M.; Lyras, Dena; Emmins, John J.; Rood, Julian I.

    2008-01-01

    Reduced tissue perfusion leading to tissue ischemia is a central component of the pathogenesis of myonecrosis caused by Clostridium perfringens. The C. perfringens α-toxin has been shown capable of inducing these changes, but its potential synergy with perfringolysin O (θ-toxin) is less well understood. Similarly, Clostridium septicum is a highly virulent causative agent of spontaneous gas gangrene, but its effect on the microcirculation has not been examined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use intravital microscopy to examine the effects of C. perfringens and C. septicum on the functional microcirculation, coupled with the use of isogenic toxin mutants to elucidate the role of particular toxins in the resultant microvascular perfusion deficits. This study represents the first time this integrated approach has been used in the analysis of the pathological response to clostridial toxins. Culture supernatants from wild-type C. perfringens induced extensive cell death within 30 min, as assessed by in vivo uptake of propidium iodide. Furthermore, significant reductions in capillary perfusion were observed within 60 min. Depletion of either platelets or neutrophils reduced the alteration in perfusion, consistent with a role for these blood-borne cells in obstructing perfusion. In addition, mutation of either the α-toxin or perfringolysin O structural genes attenuated the reduction in perfusion, a process that was reversed by genetic complementation. C. septicum also induced a marked reduction in perfusion, with the degree of microvascular compromise correlating with the level of the C. septicum α-toxin. Together, these data indicate that as a result of its ability to produce α-toxin and perfringolysin O, C. perfringens rapidly induces irreversible cellular injury and a marked reduction in microvascular perfusion. Since C. septicum induces a similar reduction in microvascular perfusion, it is postulated that this function is central to the pathogenesis of

  6. The synergistic necrohemorrhagic action of Clostridium perfringens perfringolysin and alpha toxin in the bovine intestine and against bovine endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis is a major cause of mortality in veal calves. Clostridium perfringens is considered as the causative agent, but there has been controversy on the toxins responsible for the disease. Recently, it has been demonstrated that a variety of C. perfringens type A strains can induce necrohemorrhagic lesions in a calf intestinal loop assay. These results put forward alpha toxin and perfringolysin as potential causative toxins, since both are produced by all C. perfringens type A strains. The importance of perfringolysin in the pathogenesis of bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis has not been studied before. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to evaluate the role of perfringolysin in the development of necrohemorrhagic enteritis lesions in calves and its synergism with alpha toxin. A perfringolysin-deficient mutant, an alpha toxin-deficient mutant and a perfringolysin alpha toxin double mutant were less able to induce necrosis in a calf intestinal loop assay as compared to the wild-type strain. Only complementation with both toxins could restore the activity to that of the wild-type. In addition, perfringolysin and alpha toxin had a synergistic cytotoxic effect on bovine endothelial cells. This endothelial cell damage potentially explains why capillary hemorrhages are an initial step in the development of bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis. Taken together, our results show that perfringolysin acts synergistically with alpha toxin in the development of necrohemorrhagic enteritis in a calf intestinal loop model and we hypothesize that both toxins act by targeting the endothelial cells. PMID:23782465

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium septicum Strain CSUR P1044, Isolated from the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Benamar, Samia; Cassir, Nadim; Caputo, Aurélia; Cadoret, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium septicum is one of the first pathogenic anaerobes to be identified. Here, we announce the genome draft sequence of C. septicum strain CSUR P1044 isolated from the gut of a healthy adult. Its chromosome genome consists of 3.2 Mbp with a plasmid of 32 Kbp. C. septicum strain CSUR P1044 has a G+C content of 27.5%, and is composed of 3,125 protein-coding genes together with 103 RNA genes, including 22 rRNA genes. PMID:27609912

  8. Detection of Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin gene in lambs by loop mediated isothermal amplification

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, B.; Kumar, N. Vinod; Sreenivasulu, D.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was standardized for rapid detection of Clostridium perfringens. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 fecal samples were collected from enterotoxemia suspected lambs were used for screening of C. perfringens cpa gene by LAMP. The specificity of the LAMP amplified products was tested by digesting with restriction enzyme XmnI for alpha toxin gene. Results: Out of 120 samples screened 112 (93.3%) samples were positive by both LAMP and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of cpa gene which indicated the equal sensitivity of both the tests. The enzyme produced single cut in 162 base pair amplified product of alpha toxin gene at 81 base pair resulting in a single band in gel electrophoresis. Conclusion: Both LAMP and PCR for detection of cpa gene indicated the equal sensitivity of both the tests. Standardization of LAMP reaction for amplification of epsilon and beta toxin genes will help to identify the C. perfringens toxin types from the clinical samples. The test could be a suitable alternative to the PCR in detection of toxin types without the help of sophisticated machinery like thermal cycler. Considering its simplicity in operation and high sensitivity, there is the potential use of this technique in clinical diagnosis and surveillance of infectious diseases. PMID:27051186

  9. Identification and sequence determination of recombinant Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin by use of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hitoshi; Inoue, Masaharu; Tomiki, Masayoshi; Nemoto, Hiroshi; Komoriya, Tomoe; Kimata, Junko; Watanabe, Kunitomo; Kohno, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Only a few methods exist for simple, sensitive and rapid detection of alpha-toxin in clinical and biological samples. The aim of our study was to establish a procedure for the production of an antibody against a recombinant antigen with confirmed sequence identity. We applied a noble approach based on proteomics using a mass spectrometer for the conclusive identification of the recombinant alpha-toxin that was subsequently used as an antigen. The recombinant alpha-toxin was produced in Escherichia coli. A clinical isolate of Clostridium perfringens GAI 94074 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequently, cloning was performed. Three different fragments were cloned using a pET100/D-TOPO vector. These fragments coded for a ribosome binding site, a signal peptide and the alpha-toxin gene, respectively. Recombinant pET100 plasmids were cloned into TOP 10 cells and the isolated plasmids were transferred into BL21 Star (DE3) cells. Their expression was then induced with isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Recombinant E. coli transformed with a plasmid encoding the alpha-toxin gene alone produced a biologically inactive protein. On the other hand, E. coli carrying the plasmid encoding the toxin sequence and its native signal peptide sequence, or the toxin sequence along with the ribosome binding sequence and the signal peptide sequence secreted an active alpha-toxin with phospholipase activity. Accordingly, the C. perfringens gene encoding the alpha-toxin protein along with its signal peptide was successfully cloned, expressed, and secreted by E. coli. Furthermore, without consideration of its activity, we used mass spectrometry to confirm that the expressed protein was indeed the alpha-toxin. Thus, the identification of alpha-toxin protein using both the biological activity testing and the mass spectrometry analysis is expected to verify the significant production of C. perfringens antibody. The study for the analysis of recombinant alpha-toxin

  10. Clostridium septicum gas gangrene in a previously healthy 8-year-old female with survival.

    PubMed

    Pinzon-Guzman, Carolina; Bashir, Dalia; McSherry, George; Beck, Michael J; Rocourt, Dorothy V

    2013-04-01

    We present the only reported case of an immunocompetent pediatric patient in the literature to have fulminate gas gangrene of the lower extremity and concomitant gastrointestinal tract infection due to Clostridium septicum coinfected with Clostridium difficile colitis respectively. The patient survived with aggressive medical and surgical treatment.

  11. Vaccination of turkeys with Clostridium septicum bacterin-toxoid: evaluation of protection against clostridial dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Thachil, Anil J; McComb, Brian; Kromm, Michelle; Nagaraja, Kakambi V

    2013-06-01

    Clostridial dermatitis is an acute disease causing high mortality in turkeys. Both Clostridium septicum and Clostridium pefringens have been isolated from these cases; however, reports from several diagnostic laboratories indicate an increased isolation rate of C septicum compared with C. perfringens from cases of clostridial dermatitis in recent years. Previous studies suggested C. septicum was more potent than C. perfringens in causing clostridial dermatitis in turkeys. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate the use of a C. septicum bacterin-toxoid to control clostridial dermatitis in turkeys. A C. septicum bacterin-toxoid was prepared and was initially tested in 6-wk-old commercial turkeys under laboratory conditions for its safety and efficacy. Subsequently, the bacterin-toxoid was evaluated for use in commercial turkey farms with a consistent history of clostridial dermatitis. Birds in the field were vaccinated subcutaneously once at 6 wk of age with C. septicum bacterin-toxoid, and then mortality in both vaccinated and unvaccinated groups was recorded and compared. Blood samples from birds in both groups were examined using ELISA to detect antibody response to the C. septicum toxoid. The C. septicum bacterin-toxoid was found to be safe and to elicit antibodies against the toxoid. In vaccinated commercial turkeys, control of clostridial dermatitis was achieved via antibiotic use and clostridial dermatitis mortality was significantly reduced compared with that of birds in the unvaccinated group. The C. septicum bacterin-toxoid seems to be a valuable tool for the turkey industry to reduce losses due to clostridial dermatitis.

  12. Morphological and biochemical study of cytoskeletal changes in cultured cells after extracellular application of Clostridium novyi alpha-toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Oksche, A; Nakov, R; Habermann, E

    1992-01-01

    Clostridium novyi alpha-toxin caused retraction and rounding of cultured endothelial cells from porcine pulmonary arteries; nevertheless, the endothelial cells firmly adhered to their supports. F-actin stained with fluorescein-labeled phalloidin was condensed around the nucleus, whereas intermediate filaments and microtubules appeared unchanged. The content of F-actin and myosin was decreased, but that of G-actin or vimentin was not. A predominant role of the microfilament system in C. novyi alpha-toxin cytopathic action is suggested. Images PMID:1612767

  13. Electron capture gas chromatography study of the acid and alcohol products of Clostridium septicum and Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J B; Selin, M J; Alley, C C

    1976-02-01

    The metabolic products produced by several strains of Clostridium septicum obtained from patients and animals, along with strains of Clostridium chauvoei, were studied in chopped meat glucose medium by electron capture gas-liquid chromatography (EC-GLC). The strains of C. septicum and C. chauvoei were shown to comprise five different metabolic groups. Both the EC-GLC study and the O and H antigenic study performed previously showed that strains of C. septicum comprise a heterogeneous group. One type of metabolic profile was found only in strains of C. chauvoei. The O antigen types and EC-GLC metabolic types of C. septicum correlated fairly well in isolates from cancer patients but not in stock culture and animal isolates.

  14. Novel Real-Time PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Differentiation of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum in Clostridial Myonecrosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Halm, Anna; Wagner, Martin; Köfer, Josef; Hein, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence was designed for differentiation of blackleg-causing Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum, a phylogenetically closely related bacterium responsible for malignant edema. In order to exclude false-negative results, an internal amplification control was included in the assay. A set of three probes, one specific for C. chauvoei, one specific for C. septicum, and one specific for both species, permitted unequivocal detection of C. chauvoei in tests of 32 Clostridium sp. strains and 10 non-Clostridium strains. The assay proved to be sensitive, detecting one genome of C. chauvoei or C. septicum per PCR and 1.79 × 103 C. chauvoei cells/g artificially contaminated muscle tissue. In tests of 11 clinical specimens, the real-time PCR assay yielded the same results as an established conventional PCR method. PMID:20129968

  15. Novel real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection and differentiation of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum in clostridial myonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Halm, Anna; Wagner, Martin; Köfer, Josef; Hein, Ingeborg

    2010-04-01

    A real-time PCR assay based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence was designed for differentiation of blackleg-causing Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum, a phylogenetically closely related bacterium responsible for malignant edema. In order to exclude false-negative results, an internal amplification control was included in the assay. A set of three probes, one specific for C. chauvoei, one specific for C. septicum, and one specific for both species, permitted unequivocal detection of C. chauvoei in tests of 32 Clostridium sp. strains and 10 non-Clostridium strains. The assay proved to be sensitive, detecting one genome of C. chauvoei or C. septicum per PCR and 1.79 x 10(3) C. chauvoei cells/g artificially contaminated muscle tissue. In tests of 11 clinical specimens, the real-time PCR assay yielded the same results as an established conventional PCR method.

  16. MLST analysis reveals a highly conserved core genome among poultry isolates of Clostridium septicum.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Anthony P; Rehberger, Thomas G

    2009-06-01

    Clostridium septicum is a highly virulent, anaerobic bacterium capable of establishing necrotizing tissue infections and forming heat resistant endospores. Disease is primarily facilitated by secretion of numerous toxic products including a lethal pore-forming cytolysin. Spontaneously occurring clostridial myonecrosis involving C. septicum has recently reemerged as a concern for many poultry producers. However, despite its increasing prevalence, the epidemiology of infection and population structure of C. septicum remains largely unknown. In this study a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) approach was utilized to examine evolutionary relationships within a diverse collection of C. septicum isolates recovered from poultry flocks experiencing episodes of gangrenous dermatitis. The 109 isolates examined represented 42 turkey flocks and 24 different flocks of broiler chickens as well as C. septicum type strain, ATCC 12464. Isolates were recovered predominantly from gangrenous lesions although isolates from livers, gastrointestinal tracts, spleens and blood were included. The loci analyzed were csa, the major lethal toxin produced by C. septicum, and the housekeeping genes gyrA, groEL, dnaK, recA, tpi, ddl, colA and glpK. These loci were included in part because of their previous use in MLST analysis of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile. Results indicated a high level of conservation present within these housekeeping gene fragments when compared to what has been previously reported for the aforementioned clostridia. Of the 5352 bp of sequence data examined for each isolate, 99.7% (5335/5352) was absolutely conserved among the 109 isolates. Only one of the ten unique sequence types, or allelic profiles, identified among the isolates was recovered from both turkeys and broiler chickens suggesting some host species preference. Phylogenetic analyses identified two unique clusters, or clonal complexes, among these poultry isolates which may have important

  17. Diversity in molecular mass of the common EDTA-soluble antigens of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum.

    PubMed

    Hamaoka, T; Terakado, N; Nakamura, S

    1994-01-01

    Common EDTA-soluble antigens of Clostridium chauvoei and C. septicum were examined by indirect-immunofluorescence (IFA) and immunoblot analysis. The monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for the 35 kDa antigen of C. chauvoei strain ATCC 10092 were used. These mAbs reacted with all 11 strains, 6 of C. chauvoei and 5 of C. septicum, in IFA. In immunoblot analysis with the mAbs, the bands at molecular mass of 35 kDa were found in all C. chauvoei strains, while the bands at 36 kDa were found in 4 of 5 strains of C. septicum. These results indicate that the 35 kDa antigen of C. chauvoei and the 36 kDa antigen of C. septicum possess a similar epitope recognized by the mAb.

  18. Phospholipase C produced by Clostridium botulinum types C and D: comparison of gene, enzymatic, and biological activities with those of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin.

    PubMed

    Fatmawati, Ni Nengah Dwi; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Oda, Masataka; Shimizu, Kenta; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Sakurai, Jun; Matsushita, Osamu; Oguma, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum type C and D strains recently have been found to produce PLC on egg yolk agar plates. To characterize the gene, enzymatic and biological activities of C. botulinum PLCs (Cb-PLCs), the cb-plc genes from 8 strains were sequenced, and 1 representative gene was cloned and expressed as a recombinant protein. The enzymatic and hemolytic activities of the recombinant Cb-PLC were measured and compared with those of the Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin. Each of the eight cb-plc genes encoded a 399 amino acid residue protein preceded by a 27 residue signal peptide. The protein consists of 2 domains, the N- and C-domains, and the overall amino acid sequence identity between Cb-PLC and alpha-toxin was greater than 50%, suggesting that Cb-PLC is homologous to the alpha-toxin. The key residues in the N-domain were conserved, whereas those in the C-domain which are important in membrane interaction were different than in the alpha-toxin. As expected, Cb-PLC could hydrolyze egg yolk phospholipid, p-nitrophenylphosphorylcholine, and sphingomyelin, and also exhibited hemolytic activity;however, its activities were about 4- to over 200-fold lower than those of alpha-toxin. Although Cb-PLC showed weak enzymatic and biological activities, it is speculated that Cb-PLC might play a role in the pathogenicity of botulism or for bacterial survival.

  19. Lipidomic profile of GM95 cell death induced by Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin.

    PubMed

    Manni, Marco M; Valero, Juan G; Pérez-Cormenzana, Miriam; Cano, Ainara; Alonso, Cristina; Goñi, Félix M

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin (ATX) is considered as a prototype of cytotoxic bacterial phospholipases C, and is the major virulence factor in C. perfringens-induced gas gangrene. It is known that, depending on the dose, ATX causes membrane disruption and cytolysis or only limited hydrolysis of its substrates. In the latter case, toxin activity leads to the unregulated generation of bioactive lipids that can ultimately induce cell death. We have characterized apoptosis and necrosis in highly ATX-sensitive, ganglioside-deficient cells exposed to different concentrations of ATX and we have studied the lipidomic profile of cells treated with ATX as compared to native cells to detect the main changes in the lipidomic profile and the possible involvement of lipid signals in cell death. ATX causes both apoptosis and necrosis, depending on dose and time. ATX activates cell death, stimulating the release of cytochrome C from mitochondria and the consequent activation of caspases-3. Moreover GM95 cells treated with ATX showed important lipidomic alterations, among them we detected a general decrease in several phospholipid species and important changes in lipids involved in programmed cell death e.g. ceramide. The data suggest two different mechanisms of cell death caused by ATX, one leading to (mainly saturated) glycerophospholipid hydrolysis related to an increase in diacylglycerols and associated to membrane damage and necrosis, and a second mechanism involving chiefly sphingomyelin hydrolysis and generation of proapoptotic lipidic mediators such as ceramide, N-acylethanolamine and saturated non-esterified fatty acids.

  20. Heterologous protection against alpha toxins of Clostridium perfringens and Staphylococcus aureus induced by binding domain recombinant chimeric protein.

    PubMed

    Uppalapati, Siva R; Kingston, Joseph J; Murali, Harishchandra S; Batra, Harsh V

    2014-05-23

    Clostridium perfringens and Staphylococcus aureus are the two important bacteria frequently associated with majority of the soft tissue infections. The severity and progression of the diseases caused by these pathogens are attributed primarily to the alpha toxins they produce. Previously, we synthesized a non-toxic chimeric molecule r-αCS encompassing the binding domains of C. perfringens and S. aureus alpha toxins and demonstrated that the r-αCS hyperimmune polysera reacts with both the native wild type toxins. In the present report, we evaluated efficacy of r-αCS in conferring protection against C. perfringens and S. aureus alpha toxin infections in murine model. Immunization of BALB/c with r-αCS was effective in inducing both high titers of serum anti-r-αCS antibodies after three administrations. Sub-typing the antibody pool revealed high proportions of IgG1 indicating a Th2-polarized immune response. The r-αCS stimulated the proliferation of splenocytes from the immunized mice upon re-induction by the antigen, in vitro. The levels of interleukin-10 increased while TNF-α was found to be downregulated in the r-αCS induced splenocytes. Mice immunized with r-αCS were protected against intramuscular challenge with 5×LD100 doses of C. perfringens and S. aureus alpha toxins with >80% survival, which killed control animals within 48-72h. Passive immunization of mice with anti-r-αCS serum resulted in 50-80% survival. Our results indicate that r-αCS is a remarkable antigen with protective efficacy against alpha toxin mediated C. perfringens and S. aureus soft tissue co-infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development and validation of a multiplex real-time PCR for detection of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum.

    PubMed

    Lange, Martin; Neubauer, Heinrich; Seyboldt, Christian

    2010-08-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the causative agent of blackleg in cattle and sheep. The clinical symptoms of this severe disease are very similar to that of malignant edema (Clostridium septicum), infections of other Clostridium species belonging to the gas edema complex, and anthrax (Bacillus anthracis). C. chauvoei and C. septicum are closely related taxa and share many phenotypic properties hampering diagnosis by using traditional microbiological methods. Thus, there is a need for a fast and reliable identification method for specific detection of both species in clinical samples. The multiplex real-time PCR assay presented here is based on the detection of the spo0A gene and enables the simultaneous identification of C. chauvoei and C. septicum. The assay design includes an amplification control DNA template for the recognition of PCR-inhibitors. Assay validation was performed using a collection of 29 C. chauvoei, 38 C. septicum strains and 26 strains of other Clostridium species. Furthermore, the real-time PCR assay was successfully tested on tissue samples from 19 clinical blackleg cases. The assay allowed the reliable detection of one picogram DNA which represents approximate 239 genome equivalents.

  2. [Detection of Clostridium novyi type B alpha toxin using cell culture systems

    PubMed

    Borrmann, Erika; Schulze, Frank

    1998-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate if a cell culture assay can replace the toxin neutralisation test in mice for the potency testing of alpha toxoid containing clostridial vaccines for veterinary use. The basis for the development of our cell culture assay was the detection of the cytotoxic/cytopathic action of alpha toxin on cells in culture. Nine permanent cell lines were examined for their reaction to the alpha toxin. The action of the toxin was determined after three days by microscopic examination and MTT assay. The alpha toxin exhibited the strongest effect on the ESH-L cells. We were able to show that the cytopathic effect was neutralised by the international standard for gas gangrene antitoxin (C.novyi) but never by heterologous antisera. Our results showed that the ESH-L cell line was a suitable indicator for the detection of the cytotoxic effect of alpha toxin.

  3. [Cell cultures as a system for distinguishing between strains ofClostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum isolated in northeastern Mexico].

    PubMed

    Wong González, A; Roth, F

    1999-01-01

    Clostridium chauvoei and C. septicum have similar characteristics as far as results from biochemical methods and gas chromatography (GC) are concerned. A total of 267 samples collected from sick or dead animals in the fields from Northeast Mexico, were bacteriologically analysed and differentiated by the GC technique. From these strains, 16 belong to the group of C. chauvoei/C. septicum. Studies on the effect of toxin on cell cultures of the lines EBL, 3T3, BHK21-BSR/PK5/88, CHO-K1 and MDCK were performed. The objective was to obtain further data for identification, as the results from GC do not allow exact differentiation between C. chauvoei and C. septicum species. The results were obtained in tests with BHK21-BSR/PK5/88 cells as this had proved to be the most sensitive cell line, closely followed by 3T3 and CHO-K1 cells. MDCK cells were of little sensitivity. Results of the cytotoxin test of the 16 strains were reproducible and suggested a differentiation between C. chauvoei and C. septicum other than indicated by GC. The cytotoxin test is a highly specific system that provides also an additional method to distinguish between C. chauvoei and C. septicum strains.

  4. Amplification of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region for rapid detection of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Yamamoto, K; Amimoto, K; Kojima, A; Ogikubo, Y; Norimatsu, M; Ogata, H; Tamura, Y

    2001-12-01

    Amplification of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for the rapid detection of Clostridium chauvoei and C septicum. To assess its specificity, PCR was performed with total DNA from 42 strains of clostridia and three strains of other genera. PCR products specific to C chauvoei or to C septicum were generated from homologous cultures only. Clostridium chauvoer-specific or C septicum-specific amplicons were also generated from tissues of cows experimentally infected with C chauvoei or C septicum and in DNA samples from cows clinically diagnosed as having blackleg or malignant oedema. These results suggest that a species-specific PCR may be useful for the rapid and direct detection of C chauvoei and C septicum in clinical specimens.

  5. Fatal spontaneous Clostridium septicum gas gangrene: a possible association with iatrogenic gastric acid suppression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiru E; Baras, Alexander; Cornish, Toby; Riedel, Stefan; Burton, Elizabeth C

    2014-06-01

    The long-term use of proton pump inhibitors has been linked to an increased risk for the development of gastric polyps, hip fractures, pneumonia, and Clostridium difficile colitis. There is evidence that chronic acid suppression from long-term use of proton pump inhibitors poses some risk for the development of C difficile-associated diarrhea by decreasing the elimination of pathogenic microbes before reaching the lower gastrointestinal tract. Here we present a case of a 51-year-old woman with a recent history of abdominal pain and fever who presented to the emergency department with rapidly progressive spontaneous necrotizing fasciitis and gas gangrene and died within hours of presentation. Postmortem examination confirmed spreading tissue gas gangrene and myonecrosis. In addition, multiple intestinal ulcers containing Clostridium septicum were present at autopsy. This case illustrates a possible association between proton pump inhibitor therapy and fatal C septicum infection.

  6. Inositol hexakisphosphate-dependent processing of Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin and Clostridium novyi alpha-toxin.

    PubMed

    Guttenberg, Gregor; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Genisyuerek, Selda; Lü, Wei; Jank, Thomas; Einsle, Oliver; Aktories, Klaus

    2011-04-29

    Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin and Clostridium novyi α-toxin, which are virulence factors involved in the toxic shock and gas gangrene syndromes, are members of the family of clostridial glucosylating toxins. The toxins inactivate Rho/Ras proteins by glucosylation or attachment of GlcNAc (α-toxin). Here, we studied the activation of the autoproteolytic processing of the toxins by inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP(6)) and compared it with the processing of Clostridium difficile toxin B. In the presence of low concentrations of InsP(6) (<1 μM), toxin fragments consisting of the N-terminal glucosyltransferase (or GlcNAc-transferase) domains and the cysteine protease domains (CPDs) of C. sordellii lethal toxin, C. novyi α-toxin, and C. difficile toxin B were autocatalytically processed. The cleavage sites of lethal toxin (Leu-543) and α-toxin (Leu-548) and the catalytic cysteine residues (Cys-698 of lethal toxin and Cys-707 of α-toxin) were identified. Affinity of the CPDs for binding InsP(6) was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. In contrast to full-length toxin B and α-toxin, autocatalytic cleavage and InsP(6) binding of full-length lethal toxin depended on low pH (pH 5) conditions. The data indicate that C. sordellii lethal toxin and C. novyi α-toxin are InsP(6)-dependently processed. However, full-length lethal toxin, but not its short toxin fragments consisting of the glucosyltransferase domain and the CPD, requires a pH-sensitive conformational change to allow binding of InsP(6) and subsequent processing of the toxin.

  7. Necrotizing Fasciitis and Toxic Shock Syndrome from Clostridium septicum following a Term Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rimawi, B. H.; Graybill, W.; Pierce, J. Y.; Kohler, M.; Eriksson, E. A.; Shary, M. T.; Crookes, B.; Soper, D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome are life-threatening conditions that can be seen after any surgical procedure. With only 4 previous published case reports in the obstetrics and gynecology literature of these two conditions occurring secondary to Clostridium septicum, we describe a case of necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome occurring after a term cesarean delivery caused by this microorganism, requiring aggressive medical and surgical intervention. PMID:24822140

  8. Myonecrosis by Clostridium septicum in a dog, diagnosed by a new multiplex-PCR.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Martinho, Anna Paula Vitirito; Lucas, Thays Mizuki; Teixeira, Ana Izabel Passarela; Paes, Antonio Carlos; Barros, Claudenice Batista; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2012-10-01

    Clostridial myositis is an acute, generally fatal toxemia that is considered to be rare in pet animals. The present report describes an unusual canine clostridial myositis that was diagnosed by a new multiplex-PCR (mPCR) designed for simultaneous identification of Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium septicum, Clostridium perfringens type A, Clostridium chauvoei, and Clostridium novyi type A. A ten-month-old male Rottweiler dog, that had displayed lameness and swelling of the left limb for 12 h, was admitted to a veterinary hospital. The animal was weak, dyspneic and hyperthermic, and a clinical examination indicated the presence of gas and edema in the limb. Despite emergency treatment, the animal died in only a few minutes. Samples of muscular tissue from the necrotic area were aseptically collected and plated onto defibrinated sheep blood agar (5%) in anaerobic conditions. Colonies suggestive of Clostridium spp. were submitted to testing by multiplex-PCR. Impression smears of the tissues, visualized with Gram and also with panoptic stains, revealed long rod-shaped organisms, and specimens also tested positive using the fluorescent antibody technique (FAT). The FAT and mPCR tests enabled a diagnosis of C. septicum myonecrosis in the dog.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis and PCR detection of Clostridium chauvoei, Clostridium haemolyticum, Clostridium novyi types A and B, and Clostridium septicum based on the flagellin gene.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yoshimasa; Kojima, Akemi; Aoki, Hiroshi; Ogikubo, Yasuaki; Takikawa, Noriyasu; Tamura, Yutaka

    2002-05-01

    The flagellin genes (fliC) of Clostridium chauvoei, Clostridium haemolyticum, Clostridium novyi types A and B, and Clostridium septicum were analysed by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. The five Clostridium species have at least two copies of the flagellin gene (fliC) arranged in tandem on the chromosome. The deduced N- and C-terminal aminoacid sequences of the flagellin proteins (FliCs) of these clostridia are well conserved but their central region aminoacid sequences are not. Phylogenic analysis based on the N-terminal aminoacid sequence of the FliC protein revealed that these clostridia, which belong to Clostridium 16S rDNA phylogenic cluster I (), are more closely related to Bacillus subtilis than to Clostridium difficile, which belongs to the cluster XI. Moreover, a multiplex polymerase reaction (PCR) system based on the fliC sequence was developed to rapidly identify C. chauvoei, C. haemolyticum, C. novyi types A and B, and C. septicum. PCR of each Clostridium amplified a species-specific band. The multiplex PCR system may be useful for rapid identification of pathogenic clostridia.

  10. Fatal clostridium septicum myonecrosis in a captive canada lynx (Lynx canadensis).

    PubMed

    Izer, Jenelle M; Wilson, Ronald P; Cooper, Timothy K

    2014-09-01

    A 1-yr-old female Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) presented for sudden onset of rapidly progressive bilateral pelvic limb paralysis. The lynx was chemically immobilized to perform a physical examination but expired shortly thereafter. On postmortem radiographs, there were myriad small irregular, round-to-spherical gas densities within the skeletal muscle of the right thigh and epaxial musculature. At gross necropsy, the muscles of the right thigh, right lateral abdominal wall, and epaxial region were emphysematous and necrohemorrhagic, with subcutaneous and muscular crepitant swelling. Multiple skin puncture wounds, consistent with bites, were present over the affected tissues. Clostridium septicum was isolated in pure anaerobic culture from the musculature of the right hind limb. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute, severe necrohemorrhagic and gangrenous myositis and cellulitis. Gram stains demonstrated large gram-positive bacilli with subterminal spores. This is the first known documented case of C. septicum myonecrosis in a nondomestic felid.

  11. [Cloning and expression of ScFv gene against alpha-toxin of Clostridium perfringens type A].

    PubMed

    Zhao, B H; Xu, C B

    2001-09-01

    The VH and VL genes from a hybridoma cell line producing mouse McAb against alpha-toxin of Clostridium perfringens type A were amplified by RT-PCR. The VH and VL genes were connected thought a flexible linker (Gly4Ser)3 and the VH-linker-VL (ScFv) gene was cloned into a vector pGEM-T. The ScFv gene consists of 726 bp encoding 242 amino acid residues. Both VH and VL genes were confirmed as functionally rearranged mouse immunoglobulin variable region. According to kabat classed method, the VH and VL gene segments belong to mouse Ig heavy chain subgroup II (B) and kappa light chain subgroup III respectively. The ScFv gene was amplified inserted the expression vector pHOG21 and transformed into E coli XL1-BLUE. The ScFv protein was highly expressed in recombinant strain XL1-BLUE (pHOG-2E3) and the expression level of the ScFv was about 25% of total bacteria protein by SDS-PAGE. The neutralization assay showed that the expressed ScFv protein could neutralize the phospholipase C activities of alpha-toxin.

  12. Clostridium septicum Gas Gangrene in Colon Cancer: Importance of Early Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Sowmya; Shah, Sweta; Pabbathi, Smitha

    2015-01-01

    The Clostridia species are responsible for some of the deadliest diseases including gas gangrene, tetanus, and botulism. Clostridium septicum is a rare subgroup known to cause atraumatic myonecrosis and is associated with colonic malignancy or immunosuppression. It is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming bacillus found in the gastrointestinal tract and can lead to direct, spontaneous infections of the bowel and peritoneal cavity. The anaerobic glycolysis of the tumor produces an acidic, hypoxic environment favoring germination of clostridial spores. Tumor-induced mucosal ulceration allows for translocation of sporulated bacteria from the bowel into the bloodstream, leading to fulminant sepsis. C. septicum bacteremia can have a variable presentation and is associated with greater than 60% mortality rate. The majority of deaths occur within the first 24 hours if diagnosis and appropriate treatment measures are not promptly started. We report a case of abdominal myonecrosis in a patient with newly diagnosed colon cancer. The aim of this study is to stress the importance of maintaining a high suspicion of C. septicum infection in patients with underlying colonic malignancy.

  13. Construction of an alpha toxin gene knockout mutant of Clostridium perfringens type A by use of a mobile group II intron.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; McClane, Bruce A; Fisher, Derek J; Rood, Julian I; Gupta, Phalguni

    2005-11-01

    In developing Clostridium perfringens as a safe vaccine vector, the alpha toxin gene (plc) in the bacterial chromosome must be permanently inactivated. Disrupting genes in C. perfringens by traditional mutagenesis methods is very difficult. Therefore, we developed a new strategy using group II intron-based Target-Tron technology to inactivate the plc gene in C. perfringens ATCC 3624. Western blot analysis showed no production of alpha toxin protein in the culture supernatant of the plc mutant. Advantages of this technology, such as site specificity, relatively high frequency of insertion, and introduction of no antibiotic resistance genes into the chromosome, could facilitate construction of other C. perfringens mutants.

  14. Toxin Synthesis and Mucin Breakdown Are Related to Swarming Phenomenon in Clostridium septicum

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Sandra; Hopkins, Mark J.; Macfarlane, George T.

    2001-01-01

    Clostridium septicum is responsible for several diseases in humans and animals. The bacterium is capable of a simple kind of multicellular behavior known as swarming. In this investigation, environmental and physiologic factors affecting growth and swarm cell formation in C. septicum were studied over a range of dilution rates (D = 0.02 to 0.65 h−1) in glucose-limited, glucose-excess, and mucin-limited chemostats. Cellular differentiation was observed at low specific growth rates, irrespective of the carbon and energy source, showing that swarming occurred in response to nutrient depletion. Differential expression of virulence determinants was detected in swarm cells. Hemolysin was secreted by short motile rods but not swarm cells, whereas in cultures grown with glucose, only swarm cells formed DNase, hyaluronidase, and neuraminidase. However, neuraminidase and, to a lesser degree, hyaluronidase were induced in short motile rods in mucin-limited cultures. Both swarm cells and short rods were cytotoxic to Vero cells. Mucin was chemotaxic to C. septicum, and large amounts of mucin-degrading enzymes (β-galactosidase, N-acetyl β-glucosaminidase, glycosulfatase, and neuraminidase) were produced. Synthesis of these enzymes was catabolite regulated. In chemostat experiments, glycosulfatase secretion occurred only in swarm cells at low dilution rates in mucin-limited cultures. Determinations of oligosaccharide utilization demonstrated that N-acetylglucosamine, galactose, and N-acetylgalactosamine were the main carbon sources for C. septicum in mucin. Neuraminic acid was not assimilated, showing that neuraminidase does not have a direct nutritional function in this pathogen. PMID:11160009

  15. A noncytolytic α toxin recombinant protein protects turkeys against Clostridium septicum challenge.

    PubMed

    Lancto, Cheryl A; Foster, Linda K; Kromm, Michelle M; McComb, Brian; Williams, James; Luke, Jeremy; Aaron Carnes; Hodgson, Clague P; Foster, Douglas N

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium septicum and its associated cytolytic α toxin, along with several other clostridial species, has been implicated as the causative agent of gangrenous dermatitis. A recombinant noncytolytic C. septicum α toxin (NCAT) peptide was developed for use as a vaccine and demonstrated to be safe at concentrations as high as 1 mg/ml. NCAT, used as a purified antigen, partially purified antigen, or in combination with native antigens, was compared to salt-fractionated α toxin combined with denatured C septicum bacteria (native) in a vaccination trial. Three-day-old poults were placed into one of five groups and received two, 0.2-ml vaccinations 5 wk apart. Subcutaneous challenge with 3.2 x 10(7) log phase C. septicum resulted in 78% to 95% of the vaccinated birds surviving challenge compared to 48% of sham-injected controls. By ELISA analysis on NCAT-coated plates, birds receiving vaccines containing the recombinant NCAT peptide showed significantly higher blood serum antibody concentrations than did birds receiving vaccines containing native antigens or alum controls. Additionally, high levels of maternally transferred antibodies reactive to NCAT-purified antigens found in the pre-immune sera from naive 3-day-old poults suggest that the tertiary structure of the NCAT peptide has a high homology to the native protein structure. In conclusion, our study showed that the use of a vaccine comprised of a noncytolytic recombinant α toxin peptide antigen provided clinical protection equal to the use of vaccines formulated with inactivated native proteins at a reduced overall cost.

  16. Evidence for coupling of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin-induced hemolysis to stimulated phosphatidic acid formation in rabbit erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, J; Ochi, S; Tanaka, H

    1993-01-01

    When rabbit erythrocytes were exposed to low concentrations of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin, hot-cold hemolysis was observed. The toxin induced production of phosphatidic acid (PA) in a dose-dependent manner when incubated with erythrocytes at 37 degrees C. When erythrocyte membranes were incubated with the toxin and [gamma-32P]ATP in the presence or absence of ethanol, [32P]PA formation was maximal within 30 s, then sharply decreased, and began again after 5 min of incubation. Ethanol had no effect on the early appearance (at approximately 5 min) of PA formation induced by the toxin but significantly inhibited formation of PA over 10 min of incubation. Treatment of erythrocyte membranes with alpha-toxin resulted in the biphasic formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol and PA as well as an increase of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and decrease of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) within 30 s. Neomycin inhibited the toxin-induced increase in turbidity of egg yolk suspensions but did not inhibit the toxin-induced hemolysis of intact erythrocytes. On the other hand, neomycin inhibited the toxin-induced hemolysis of saponin-treated erythrocytes. In addition, neomycin inhibited PA formation induced by the toxin in erythrocyte membranes. IP3 was released by incubation of PIP2 with erythrocyte membranes but not by incubation of PIP2 with the toxin. The toxin stimulated the membrane-induced release of IP3 from PIP2. These data suggest that the toxin-induced hemolysis is dependent on the action of phospholipase C in erythrocyte membranes. PMID:8395469

  17. Sequencing and analysis of the gene encoding the alpha-toxin of Clostridium novyi proves its homology to toxins A and B of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, F; Herrmann, A; Habermann, E; von Eichel-Streiber, C

    1995-06-25

    A library of total Clostridium novyi DNA was established and screened for the alpha-toxin gene (tcn alpha) by hybridization with oligonucleotides derived from a partial N-terminal sequence and by using specific antisera. Overlapping subgenic tcn alpha fragments were isolated and subsequently the total sequence of tcn alpha was determined. The 6534 nucleotide open reading frame encodes a polypeptide of M(r) 250,166 and pI 5.9. The N-terminal alpha-toxin (Tcn alpha) sequence MLITREQLMKIASIP determined by Edman degradation confirmed the identity of the reading frame and the assignment of the translation start point. The toxin is not modified posttranslationally at its N-terminus nor does it consist of different subunits. Overall the amino acid sequence shows 48% homology between the Tcn alpha and both toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB) of Clostridium difficile. The C-terminal 382 residues of Tcn alpha constitute a repetitive domain similar to those reported for TcdA and TcdB of C. difficile. The individual repeat motifs of these three toxins consist of oligopeptides some 19-52 amino acids in length, arranged in four to five different groups. Genetic, biochemical and pharmacological data thus confirm that the three toxins belong to one subgroup, designated large clostridial cytotoxins (LCT). Further definition of their structure and detailed molecular action should allow the LCTs to be used tools for the analysis of microfilament assembly and function.

  18. Development of a cell culture assay for the quantitative determination of vaccination-induced antibodies in rabbit sera against Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin and Clostridium novyi alpha toxin.

    PubMed

    Borrmann, E; Schulze, F; Cussler, K; Hänel, I; Diller, R

    2006-04-16

    Cell culture assays are possible alternatives to replace in vivo neutralization tests currently required for potency testing of clostridial vaccines. Cell culture assays based on the MDCK cell line and the Vero cell line which are sensitive to the Clostridium (C.) perfringens type D epsilon toxin and Clostridium novyi type B alpha toxin, respectively, were developed, and the test conditions were standardized. The antibody titres of vaccinated rabbits measured in vitro were compared with the results of current test procedures recommended by European Pharmacopoeia. The correlation coefficients calculated were significant for all sera tested. The cell culture assays proved to be sensitive, specific, reproducible and reliable. Therefore, these cell culture assays could be suitable in vitro alternatives to the in vivo mouse neutralization experiments required for potency tests of clostridial vaccines, but further validation studies are necessary.

  19. Development of a real time PCR Taqman assay based on the TPI gene for simultaneous identification of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum.

    PubMed

    Garofolo, G; Galante, D; Serrecchia, L; Buonavoglia, D; Fasanella, A

    2011-02-01

    In the present study, a Taqman allelic discrimination assay based on three SNPs of the TPI gene is described. It was used as a differential diagnostic tool to detect blackleg and malignant edema. Sudden deaths of grazing ruminants, such as cattle, sheep and goats, which show clinical signs related to hyperacute infective processes, encouraged the development of a rapid and precise diagnostic molecular method. Specific primers and probes for Clostridium septicum and Clostridium chauvoei were designed on the basis of the TPI gene sequence. The multiplex PCR was tested on the DNA of a total of 57 strains, including 24 Clostridium chauvoei, 20 Clostridium septicum, 1 Bacillus anthracis and 12 other Clostridium spp. The DNA samples from Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum strains were amplified. Amplification of other DNA samples was not observed, with the exception of Clostridium tertium, which showed a weak positive signal. To avoid misdiagnosis, a confirmatory assay based on a Sybr green real time PCR was proposed. The authors confirmed the efficacy and the specificity of the test used in this study, which proved to be a useful tool for the diagnosis of clostridiosis that are often diagnosed using only traditional tools.

  20. Similarity in the EDTA-soluble antigens of Clostridium chauvoei and C. septicum.

    PubMed

    Hamaoka, T; Mori, Y; Terakado, N; Nakamura, S

    1993-03-01

    The EDTA-soluble antigens were prepared from whole cells of six strains of Clostridium chauvoei and five strains of C. septicum and were compared by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblot analysis. SDS-PAGE profiles of the 11 strains were nearly identical, although there were slight variations in molecular mass in adjacent bands. In immunoblot analysis with two antisera against C. chauvoei and three against C. septicum, the antigens of all strains tested reacted with all five antisera and there were no differences in reactivities to the same antiserum between homologous and heterologous antigens. In an immunoblot reacted with a single antiserum, band patterns of 10 of the 11 strains were quite similar. After cross-absorption, antisera to both species lost most of their reactivities not only to heterologous antigens but also to homologous antigens. These results indicate that the two species share many common antigens and that there is a marked similarity in the antigenic properties of EDTA-soluble material.

  1. Clostridium perfringens strains from bovine enterotoxemia cases are not superior in in vitro production of alpha toxin, perfringolysin O and proteolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine enterotoxemia is a major cause of mortality in veal calves. Predominantly veal calves of beef cattle breeds are affected and losses due to enterotoxemia may account for up to 20% of total mortality. Clostridium perfringens type A is considered to be the causative agent. Recently, alpha toxin and perfringolysin O have been proposed to play an essential role in the development of disease. However, other potential virulence factors also may play a role in the pathogenesis of bovine enterotoxemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether strains originating from bovine enterotoxemia cases were superior in in vitro production of virulence factors (alpha toxin, perfringolysin O, mucinase, collagenase) that are potentially involved in enterotoxemia. To approach this, a collection of strains originating from enterotoxemia cases was compared to bovine strains isolated from healthy animals and to strains isolated from other animal species. Results Strains originating from bovine enterotoxemia cases produced variable levels of alpha toxin and perfringolysin O that were not significantly different from levels produced by strains isolated from healthy calves and other animal species. All tested strains exhibited similar mucinolytic activity independent of the isolation source. A high variability in collagenase activity between strains could be observed, and no higher collagenase levels were produced in vitro by strains isolated from enterotoxemia cases. Conclusions Bovine enterotoxemia strains do not produce higher levels of alpha toxin, perfringolysin O, mucinase and collagenase, as compared to strains derived from healthy calves and other animal species in vitro. PMID:24479821

  2. Role of alpha-toxin in Clostridium perfringens infection determined by using recombinants of C. perfringens and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Ninomiya, M; Matsushita, O; Minami, J; Sakamoto, H; Nakano, M; Okabe, A

    1994-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A strains which differed in alpha-toxin (phospholipase C [PLC]) productivity were inoculated intraperitoneally or intravenously into mice, and then their 50% mouse lethal doses (LD50) were determined. Strain NCTC 8237 produced ninefold higher PLC activity than strain 13. The mean LD50 for the former was 1 log unit lower than that for the latter. Two isogenic strains were constructed from strain 13: strain 13(pJIR418 alpha) (pJIR418 alpha contains the plc gene), which produced ninefold higher PLC activity than strain 13; and strain 13 PLC-, which showed no PLC productivity at all because of transformation-mediated gene disruption. The mean LD50 for strain 13(pJIR418 alpha) was 1 log unit lower than those for strain 13 PLC- and strain 13. These results indicate that PLC functions as a virulence-determining factor when it is produced in a sufficient amount. Such a difference in LD50 was also observed between Bacillus subtilis with and without the cloned plc gene. Inoculation of B. subtilis PLC+ intravenously into mice caused marked thrombocytopenia and leukocytosis. Mice inoculated with B. subtilis at 2 LD50 died because of circulatory collapse. Histological examination revealed that intravascular coagulation and vascular congestion occurred most prominently in the lungs. These results suggest that PLC plays a key role in the systemic intoxication of clostridial myonecrosis, probably by affecting the functions of platelets and phagocytes. Images PMID:7927785

  3. Intracellular Glycosylphosphatidylinositols Accumulate on Endosomes: Toxicity of Alpha-Toxin to Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhifeng; Tweten, Rodney K.; Mensa-Wilmot, Kojo

    2005-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) are ubiquitous glycolipids in eukaryotes. In the protozoan Leishmania major, GPIs occur “free” or covalently linked to proteins (e.g., gp63) and polysaccharides. While some free GPIs are detected on the plasma membrane, specific sites where GPIs accumulate intracellularly are unknown in most cells, although the glycolipids are synthesized within the secretory system. Herein, we describe a protocol for identifying intracellular sites of GPI accumulation by using alpha-toxin (from Clostridium septicum). Alpha-toxin bound to gp63 and GPIs from L. major. Intracellular binding sites for alpha-toxin were determined in immunofluorescence assays after removal of GPI-anchored macromolecules (e.g., gp63) from the plasma membrane of fixed cells by using detergent. Endosomes were a major site for GPI accretion in L. major. GPI-less gp63 was detected at the endoplasmic reticulum. In studies with live parasites, alpha-toxin killed L. major with a 50% lethal concentration of 0.77 nM. PMID:15755918

  4. Development of Clostridium septicum gas gangrene as an adverse effect of clindamycin-induced Clostridium difficile infection in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Kiser, Casey J; Urish, Kenneth L; Boateng, Henry A

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium myonecrosis or gas gangrene is a life-threatening infection characterized by either traumatic or atraumatic etiology. It has been widely described in patients with traumatic open wounds and in immunocompromised patients, including malignancy. A third source can result from natural flora in the gastrointestinal tract after bowel ischemia. This is a rare occurrence and is even less commonly described in the pediatric population. We present a pediatric patient who developed Clostridium septicum myonecrosis as an iatrogenic complication from clindamycin-induced Clostridium difficile ischemic colitis.

  5. Site-specific mutagenesis of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin: replacement of Asp-56, Asp-130, or Glu-152 causes loss of enzymatic and hemolytic activities.

    PubMed Central

    Nagahama, M; Nakayama, T; Michiue, K; Sakurai, J

    1997-01-01

    The current study has investigated the role of D-56, D-130, and E-152 in zinc ion binding properties, as well as the hemolytic, phospholipase C (PLC), and sphingomyelinase (SMase) activities of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin, based upon crystallography studies of the Bacillus cereus PLC, which had suggested these residues might be important for these functional activities. The replacement of D-56 in alpha-toxin resulted in complete loss of hemolytic, PLC, and SMase activities. The variant toxins at D-130 showed an approximately 100-fold reduction of biological activities compared to that of the wild-type toxin. The substitution of glutamine or glycine for E-152 caused complete loss of these activities, but substitution of aspartic acid for E-152 reduced but did not completely inhibit these activities. The variant toxins at D-56 and D-130, as well as the wild-type toxin, possessed approximately 2 mol of zinc atoms per mol of the protein, but E152G and E152Q contained approximately 1 mol of zinc metal per mol of the protein. On the other hand, the zinc content in E152D was calculated as about 1.4 mol in the toxin molecule. The replacement of D-56, D-130, or E-152 had no effect on binding to sheep erythrocytes and uptake of free zinc ion from the solution. The variant toxins at D-130 showed partial antigenic identity with the wild-type toxin on a double gel diffusion test. These observations suggest that D-56 in alpha-toxin is required for catalytic activity of alpha-toxin, D-130 is essential for maintenance of structure, and the carboxyl group of E-152 tightly ligands one zinc ion, which is essential for catalytic activity of the toxin. PMID:9234819

  6. Demonstration of common antigens on cell surface of Clostridium chauvoei and C. septicum by indirect-immunofluorescence assay.

    PubMed

    Hamaoka, T; Terakado, N

    1994-04-01

    The common antigens between Clostridium chauvoei and C. septicum were examined by indirect-immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Antisera to formalized cells of C. chauvoei and C. septicum strains and to EDTA-soluble antigens of these strains were used. The antisera to formalized cells, which have reacted only with homologous antigens in agglutination tests, reacted not only with homologous antigens but also with heterologous antigens in IFA. The antisera to EDTA-soluble antigens, which have shown no reactivities in somatic agglutination tests, reached with both homologous and heterologous antigens in IFA. These results indicate that these species possess common antigens, which are undetected by agglutination tests, on the cell surface and a some of them are solubilized by EDTA-treatment.

  7. Colorectal neoplasm in cases of Clostridium septicum and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Corredoira, Juan; Grau, Imma; Garcia-Rodriguez, José F; García-País, María Jose; Rabuñal, Ramón; Ardanuy, Carmen; García-Garrote, Fernando; Coira, Amparo; Alonso, Maria Pilar; Boleij, Annemarie; Pallares, Roman

    2017-06-01

    Bacteremia with Clostridium septicum (CS) and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (SGG) have both been associated with colorectal neoplasms (CRN) and colonoscopic examination is advised, however the differences and similarities in colorectal findings are not well known. This is a multicenter, comparative study of patients with CS bacteremia [44 of 664 cases (6.6%) of Clostridium spp.] and SGG bacteremia [257 of 596 cases (44.2%) of S. bovis group], carried out in three hospitals from Spain. Clinical findings related to bacteremia and associated CRN were collected. The main sources of infection were abdominal (77.7%) for CS bacteremia and endovascular (75%) for SGG bacteremia. CS bacteremia was more often associated with malignancies, (72.6% vs. 19.4%) and neutropenia (29.5% vs. 3.1%), and was more acute, with shock at presentation (63.6% vs. 3.9%) and higher 30-day mortality (47.7% vs. 9.7%) compared to SGG (P<0.05 for all). Both, patients with CS and SGG bacteremia often had concomitant CRN (43.1% vs. 49.8%) and most of them presented as occult CRN (73.7% vs. 91.4%; P=0.02). CS cases more often had invasive carcinomas (94.7% vs. 19.5%), location of CRN in the right colon (73.7% vs. 23.4%), larger tumor size (median 7 vs. 1.5cm), and a higher overall CRN related mortality rate (68.4% vs. 7.8%) compared to SGG cases (P<0.05 for all). Both, CS and SGG bacteremia are associated with occult CRN. CS cases more often had advanced carcinomas than SGG cases, suggesting a distinct temporal association with CRN. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A PCR approach to determine the distribution of toxin genes in closely related Clostridium species: Clostridium botulinum type C and D neurotoxins and C2 toxin, and Clostridium novyi alpha toxin.

    PubMed

    Heffron, Ann; Poxton, Ian R

    2007-02-01

    The closely related Clostridium novyi and Clostridium botulinum types C and D are of current interest because of their association with serious infections in injecting drug users (C. novyi type A) and equine and feline dysautonomias (C. botulinum types C/D). The species are defined by the major toxins they produce: the alpha toxin of C. novyi, and the type C and D neurotoxins of C. botulinum (BoNT/C and BoNT/D). The other major toxin produced by this group, and previously thought to be restricted to the botulinum types, is the chromosomally encoded C2--a binary toxin consisting of two components, I and II. In the current study 44 of these clostridia from the authors' culture collection were investigated--most of which had been identified previously by conventional biochemical tests as 'C. novyi type A'. The aim was to check the distribution of toxin genes by PCR to see if the identities were consistent with the genes carried, and to ascertain if the C2 gene was only found in authentic C. botulinum strains. Several combinations of the species-defining genes and the two components of the C2 genes were detected. Only the authentic BoNT/C- and BoNT/D-positive C. botulinum strains and one of two non-neurotoxic variants of type C carried genes for both components of the C2 toxin. Of the remaining 40 C. novyi type A-like strains, the gene for the alpha toxin was found in 22, with 19 of these also possessing the gene for component I (16) or component II (3) but not both. In the alpha toxin-negative strains (22), both of the C2 genes were detected in 5 strains (3 C. botulinum), with component I in 11 strains and neither gene in 6 strains.

  9. Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin and NetB toxin antibodies and their possible role in protection against necrotic enteritis and gangrenous dermatitis in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Lee, K W; Lillehoj, H S; Park, M S; Jang, S I; Ritter, G D; Hong, Y H; Jeong, W; Jeoung, H Y; An, D J; Lillehoj, E P

    2012-03-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) are important infectious diseases of poultry. Although NE and GD share a common pathogen, Clostridium perfringens, they differ in other important aspects such as clinical signs, pathologic symptoms, and age of onset. The primary virulence factors of C perfringens are its four major toxins (alpha, beta, epsilon, iota) and the newly described NE B-like (NetB) toxin. While neutralizing antibodies against some C perfingens toxins are associated with protection against infection in mammals, the serologic responses of NE- and GD-afflicted birds to these toxins have not been evaluated. Therefore, we measured serum antibody levels to C perfringens alpha-toxin and NetB toxin in commercial birds from field outbreaks of NE and GD using recombinant toxin-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initially, we used this ELISA system to detect antibody titers against C perfringens alpha-toxin and NetB toxin that were increased in birds experimentally coinfected with Eimeria maxima and C perfringens compared with uninfected controls. Next, we applied this ELISA to field serum samples from flock-mated birds with or without clinical signs of NE or GD. The results showed that the levels of antibodies against both toxins were significantly higher in apparently healthy chickens compared to birds with clinical signs of NE or GD, suggesting that these antitoxin antibodies may play a role in protection against NE and GD.

  10. A microbiological hazard of rural living: Clostridium septicum brain abscess in a child with E coli 0157 associated haemolytic uraemic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Eleri J; Mitchell, Patrick; Mitra, Dipayan; Clark, Julia E

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium septicum infection in humans is rare and this is the second case report of focal C septicum brain abscesses associated with Escherichia coli 0157 haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). The case presented in a child who lived on a rural farm. The abscesses initially progressed despite 7 months of appropriate antibiotic therapy and repeated image-guided aspiration. After definitive resection and prolonged antibiotic therapy, there was no recurrence. This case reminds us of this rare but important neurological complication of HUS and supports consideration of early definitive neurosurgical intervention in similar unusual cases. PMID:22736786

  11. Foudroyant Course of an Extensive Clostridium septicum Gas Gangrene in a Diabetic Patient with Occult Carcinoma of the Colon.

    PubMed

    Hartel, Maximilian; Kutup, Asad; Gehl, Axel; Zustin, Jozef; Grossterlinden, Lars G; Rueger, Johannes M; Lehmann, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background. Spontaneous gas gangrene is a rare disease in which Clostridium septicum frequently can be detected. After an incubation period of 5-48 hours, a very painful swelling is accompanied by a rapidly spreading toxic-infectious clinical picture ultimately leading to septic shock and multiple organ failure. We present a case of a completely documented rare infectious disease with triage findings including initial vital signs, initial medical findings, and the emergency lab., radiological, intraoperative, histopathological, microbiological, and postmortem results. After initial diagnosis of the underlying disease, the patient has been immediately transferred to the operating theatre. The laboratory findings reflect the devastating effect of toxin α which is a toxin typically produced by C. septicum. The patient presented both an anaemia and a manifest coagulopathy as well as an onset of multiple organ failure. Despite the aggressive medical and surgical measures that have been taken, this patient could not be saved. Discussion. The case presented vividly emphasises the difficulty to identify these cases early enough to save a patient. This documentation may help health care providers to identify this life threatening disease as early as possible in future cases.

  12. Immunization with recombinant bivalent chimera r-Cpae confers protection against alpha toxin and enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens type A in murine model.

    PubMed

    Shreya, Das; Uppalapati, Siva R; Kingston, Joseph J; Sripathy, Murali H; Batra, Harsh V

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A, an anaerobic pathogen is the most potent cause of soft tissue infections like gas gangrene and enteric diseases like food poisoning and enteritis. The disease manifestations are mediated via two important exotoxins, viz. myonecrotic alpha toxin (αC) and enterotoxin (CPE). In the present study, we synthesized a bivalent chimeric protein r-Cpae comprising C-terminal binding regions of αC and CPE using structural vaccinology rationale and assessed its protective efficacy against both alpha toxin (αC) and enterotoxin (CPE) respectively, in murine model. Active immunization of mice with r-Cpae generated high circulating serum IgG (systemic), significantly increased intestinal mucosal s-IgA antibody titres and resulted in substantial protection to the immunized animals (100% and 75% survival) with reduced tissue morbidity when administered with 5×LD(100) doses of αC (intramuscular) and CPE (intra-gastric gavage) respectively. Mouse RBCs and Caco-2 cells incubated with a mixture of anti-r-Cpae antibodies and αC and CPE respectively, illustrated significantly higher protection against the respective toxins. Passive immunization of mice with a similar mixture resulted in 91-100% survival at the end of the 15 days observation period while mice immunized with a concoction of sham sera and respective toxins died within 2-3 days. This work demonstrates the efficacy of the rationally designed r-Cpae chimeric protein as a potential sub unit vaccine candidate against αC and CPE of C. perfringens type A toxemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of a group II intron without an open reading frame in the alpha-toxin gene of Clostridium perfringens isolated from a broiler chicken.

    PubMed

    Ma, Menglin; Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru; Misawa, Naoaki

    2007-03-01

    A DNA insertion of 834 bp, designated CPF-G2Im, was identified within the alpha toxin gene (cpa) of Clostridium perfringens strain CPBC16ML, isolated from a broiler chicken. Sequence analysis of CPF-G2Im indicated that it was integrated 340 nucleotides downstream of the start codon of cpa. However, the insertion did not abolish the phospholipase C and hemolytic activities of CPBC16ML. To investigate the expression of its alpha toxin, the intact copy of cpa was cloned into an expression vector and transformed into Escherichia coli M15 cells. Immunoblotting analysis showed that the protein expressed from the transformant as well as in the culture supernatant of C. perfringens strain CPBC16ML had the expected molecular weight detected in reference strains of C. perfringens. Northern hybridization and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that the entire CPF-G2Im insertion was completely spliced from the cpa precursor mRNA transcripts. The sequence of the insertion fragment has 95% and 97% identity to two noncoding regions corresponding to sequences that flank a predicted group II RT gene present in the pCPF4969 plasmid of C. perfringens. However, an RT was not encoded by the CPF-G2Im fragment. Based on the secondary structure prediction analysis, CPF-G2Im revealed typical features of group II introns. The present study shows that CPF-G2Im is capable of splicing in both C. perfringens and E. coli. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a group II intron without an open reading frame (ORF) is located in the cpa ORF of C. perfringens.

  14. [Microbiological diagnosis of gas gangrene caused by Clostridium septicum (a clinical case)].

    PubMed

    Men'shikova, E D; Titova, G P; Kartavenko, V I; Sokolov, V A; Shabanov, A K; Men'shikov, D D

    2010-08-01

    Microscopy of gram-stained impression smears is used for the rapid diagnosis of microorganisms in the wound. The shin tissues of patient P. with suspected gas gangrene of lower extremity soft tissues were microscopically found to have gram-positive spore-forming bacteria that were morphologically similar to C. bifermentans that were identified as C. septicum on cultural diagnosis. The pathogenic C. septicum strain spores were likely to be formed in the macroorganism upon exposure of the pathogen to a patient's defense factors and to a package of therapeutic measures. Microbiological data should be used only in combination with clinical and instrumental findings and the results of other laboratory studies when the optimal technology is chosen to treat gas infection. By keeping in mind that there may be clostridial gangrene in the patients and the experience of clinicians and bacteriologists may be insufficient in diagnosing this pathology, it is necessary to strengthen the training of physicians in the diagnosis of this pathology.

  15. Presence of periaortic gas in Clostridium septicum-infected aortic aneurysm aids in early diagnosis: a case report and systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ito, Fumihito; Inokuchi, Ryota; Matsumoto, Akinori; Kumada, Yoshibumi; Yokoyama, Hideyuki; Ishida, Tokiya; Hashimoto, Katsuhiko; Narita, Masashi; Shinohara, Kazuaki

    2017-09-21

    Clostridium septicum-infected aortic aneurysm is a fatal and rare disease. We present a fatal case of C. septicum-infected aortic aneurysm and a pertinent literature review with treatment suggestions for reducing mortality rates. A 58-year-old Japanese man with an unremarkable medical history presented with a 3-day history of mild weakness in both legs, and experienced paraplegia and paresthesia a day before admission. Upon recognition of signs of an abdominal aortic aneurysm and paraplegia, we suspected an occluded Adamkiewicz artery and performed a contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan, which revealed an aortic aneurysm with periaortic gas extending from his chest to his abdomen and both kidneys. Antibiotics were initiated followed by emergency surgery for source control of the infection. However, owing to his poor condition and septic shock, aortic repair was not possible. We performed bilateral nephrectomy as a possible source control, after which we initiated mechanical ventilation, continuous hemodialysis, and hemoperfusion. A culture of the samples taken from the infected region and four consecutive blood cultures yielded C. septicum. His condition gradually improved postoperatively; however, on postoperative day 10, massive hemorrhage due to aortic rupture resulted in his death. In this patient, C. septicum was thought to have entered his blood through a gastrointestinal tumor, infected the aorta, and spread to his kidneys. However, we were uncertain whether there was an associated malignancy. A literature review of C. septicum-related aneurysms revealed the following: 6-month mortality, 79.5%; periaortic gas present in 92.6% of cases; no standard operative procedure and no guidelines for antimicrobial administration established; and C. septicum was associated with cancer in 82.5% of cases. Thus, we advocate for early diagnosis via the identification of periaortic gas, as an aortic aneurysm progresses rapidly. To reduce the risk of reinfection as well

  16. In Silico, In Vitro and In Vivo Analysis of Binding Affinity between N and C-Domains of Clostridium perfringens Alpha Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Uppalapati, Siva Ramakrishna; Kingston, Joseph Jeyabalaji; Qureshi, Insaf Ahmed; Murali, Harishchandra Sripathy; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin/phospholipase C (CP-PLC) is one of the most potent bacterial toxins known to cause soft tissue infections like gas gangrene in humans and animals. It is the first bacterial toxin demonstrated to be an enzyme with phospholipase, sphingomyelinase and lecithinase activities. The toxin is comprised of an enzymatic N-domain and a binding C-domain interconnected by a flexible linker. The N-domain alone is non-toxic to mammalian cells, but incubation with C-domain restores the toxicity, the mechanism of which is still not elucidated. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the formation of a stable N and C-domain complex, to determine possible interactions between the two domains in silico and to characterize the in vitro and in vivo correlates of the interaction. To establish the existence of a stable N and C-domain hybrid, in vitro pull down assay and dot-Far Western blotting assays were employed, where it was clearly revealed that the two domains bound to each other to form an intermediate. Using bioinformatics tools like MetaPPISP, PatchDock and FireDock, we predicted that the two domains may interact with each other through electrostatic interactions between at least six pairs of amino acids. This N and C-domains interacted with each other in 1:1 ratio and the hybrid lysed mouse erythrocytes in a slower kinetics when compared with wild type native Cp-PLC. BALB/c mice when challenged with N and C-domain hybrid demonstrated severe myonecrosis at the site of injection while no death was observed. Our results provide further insight into better understanding the mechanism for the toxicity of Cp-PLC N and C-domain mixture. PMID:24349173

  17. The pore-forming α-toxin from clostridium septicum activates the MAPK pathway in a Ras-c-Raf-dependent and independent manner.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Anjana; Awad, Milena M; Cheung, Jackie K; Hiscox, Thomas J; Lyras, Dena; Rood, Julian I

    2015-02-10

    Clostridium septicum is the causative agent of atraumatic gas gangrene, with α-toxin, an extracellular pore-forming toxin, essential for disease. How C. septicum modulates the host's innate immune response is poorly defined, although α-toxin-intoxicated muscle cells undergo cellular oncosis, characterised by mitochondrial dysfunction and release of reactive oxygen species. Nonetheless, the signalling events that occur prior to the initiation of oncosis are poorly characterised. Our aims were to characterise the ability of α-toxin to activate the host mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of Vero cells with purified α-toxin activated the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 arms of the MAPK pathway and stimulated the release of TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. Studies using inhibitors of all three MAPK components suggested that activation of ERK occurred in a Ras-c-Raf dependent manner, whereas activation of JNK and p38 occurred by a Ras-independent mechanism. Toxin-mediated activation was dependent on efficient receptor binding and pore formation and on an influx of extracellular calcium ions. In the mouse myonecrosis model we showed that the MAPK pathway was activated in tissues of infected mice, implying that it has an important role in the disease process.

  18. Variable protection against experimental broiler necrotic enteritis after immunization with the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin and a non-toxic NetB variant

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P.; Mot, Dorien; Geeraerts, Sofie; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Van Immerseel, Filip; Titball, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Necrotic enteritis toxin B (NetB) is a pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens and has been shown to play a key role in avian necrotic enteritis, a disease causing significant costs to the poultry production industry worldwide. The aim of this work was to determine whether immunization with a non-toxic variant of NetB (NetB W262A) and the C-terminal fragment of C. perfringens alpha-toxin (CPA247–370) would provide protection against experimental necrotic enteritis. Immunized birds with either antigen or a combination of antigens developed serum antibody levels against NetB and CPA. When CPA247–370 and NetB W262A were used in combination as immunogens, an increased protection was observed after oral challenge by individual dosing, but not after in-feed-challenge. PMID:26743457

  19. Abilities of the mCP Agar method and CRENAME alpha toxin-specific real-time PCR assay to detect Clostridium perfringens spores in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Maheux, Andrée F; Bérubé, Eve; Boudreau, Dominique K; Villéger, Romain; Cantin, Philippe; Boissinot, Maurice; Bissonnette, Luc; Bergeron, Michel G

    2013-12-01

    We first determined the analytical specificity and ubiquity (i.e., the ability to detect all or most strains) of a Clostridium perfringens-specific real-time PCR (rtPCR) assay based on the cpa gene (cpa rtPCR) by using a bacterial strain panel composed of C. perfringens and non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains. All non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains tested negative, whereas all C. perfringens strains tested positive with the cpa rtPCR, for an analytical specificity and ubiquity of 100%. The cpa rtPCR assay was then used to confirm the identity of 116 putative C. perfringens isolates recovered after filtration of water samples and culture on mCP agar. Colonies presenting discordant results between the phenotype on mCP agar and cpa rtPCR were identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA and cpa genes. Four mCP(-)/rtPCR(+) colonies were identified as C. perfringens, whereas 3 mCP(+)/rtPCR(-) colonies were identified as non-C. perfringens. The cpa rtPCR was negative with all 51 non-C. perfringens strains and positive with 64 of 65 C. perfringens strains. Finally, we compared mCP agar and a CRENAME (concentration and recovery of microbial particles, extraction of nucleic acids, and molecular enrichment) procedure plus cpa rtPCR (CRENAME + cpa rtPCR) for their abilities to detect C. perfringens spores in drinking water. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR detected as few as one C. perfringens CFU per 100 ml of drinking water sample in less than 5 h, whereas mCP agar took at least 25 h to deliver results. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR also allows the simultaneous and sensitive detection of Escherichia coli and C. perfringens from the same potable water sample. In itself, it could be used to assess the public health risk posed by drinking water potentially contaminated with pathogens more resistant to disinfection.

  20. Abilities of the mCP Agar Method and CRENAME Alpha Toxin-Specific Real-Time PCR Assay To Detect Clostridium perfringens Spores in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, Andrée F.; Bérubé, Ève; Boudreau, Dominique K.; Villéger, Romain; Cantin, Philippe; Boissinot, Maurice; Bissonnette, Luc

    2013-01-01

    We first determined the analytical specificity and ubiquity (i.e., the ability to detect all or most strains) of a Clostridium perfringens-specific real-time PCR (rtPCR) assay based on the cpa gene (cpa rtPCR) by using a bacterial strain panel composed of C. perfringens and non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains. All non-C. perfringens Clostridium strains tested negative, whereas all C. perfringens strains tested positive with the cpa rtPCR, for an analytical specificity and ubiquity of 100%. The cpa rtPCR assay was then used to confirm the identity of 116 putative C. perfringens isolates recovered after filtration of water samples and culture on mCP agar. Colonies presenting discordant results between the phenotype on mCP agar and cpa rtPCR were identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA and cpa genes. Four mCP−/rtPCR+ colonies were identified as C. perfringens, whereas 3 mCP+/rtPCR− colonies were identified as non-C. perfringens. The cpa rtPCR was negative with all 51 non-C. perfringens strains and positive with 64 of 65 C. perfringens strains. Finally, we compared mCP agar and a CRENAME (concentration and recovery of microbial particles, extraction of nucleic acids, and molecular enrichment) procedure plus cpa rtPCR (CRENAME + cpa rtPCR) for their abilities to detect C. perfringens spores in drinking water. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR detected as few as one C. perfringens CFU per 100 ml of drinking water sample in less than 5 h, whereas mCP agar took at least 25 h to deliver results. CRENAME + cpa rtPCR also allows the simultaneous and sensitive detection of Escherichia coli and C. perfringens from the same potable water sample. In itself, it could be used to assess the public health risk posed by drinking water potentially contaminated with pathogens more resistant to disinfection. PMID:24077714

  1. Sensitive quantification of Clostridium perfringens in human feces by quantitative real-time PCR targeting alpha-toxin and enterotoxin genes.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Ravinder; Ogata, Kiyohito; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Matsuda, Kazunori; Takahashi, Takuya; Nomoto, Koji; Suzuki, Yoshio; Kawashima, Kazunari; Nagata, Satoru; Yamashiro, Yuichiro

    2015-10-19

    Clostridium perfringens is a widespread pathogen, but the precise quantification of this subdominant gut microbe remains difficult due to its low fecal count (particularly in asymptomatic subjects) and also due to the presence of abundant polymerase-inhibitory substances in human feces. Also, information on the intestinal carriage of toxigenic C. perfringens strains in healthy subjects is sparse. Therefore, we developed a sensitive quantitative real-time PCR assays for quantification of C. perfringens in human feces by targeting its α-toxin and enterotoxin genes. To validate the assays, we finally observed the occurrence of α-toxigenic and enterotoxigenic C. perfringens in the fecal microbiota of healthy Japanese infants and young adults. The plc-specific qPCR assay was newly validated, while primers for 16S rRNA and cpe genes were retrieved from literature. The assays were validated for specificity and sensitivity in pre-inoculated fecal samples, and were finally applied to quantify C. perfringens in stool samples from apparently healthy infants (n 124) and young adults (n 221). The qPCR assays were highly specific and sensitive, with a minimum detection limit of 10(3) bacterial cells/g feces. Alpha-toxigenic C. perfringens was detected in 36% infants and 33% adults, with counts ranging widely (10(3)-10(7) bacterial cells/g). Intriguingly, the mean count of α-toxigenic C. perfringens was significantly higher in infants (6.0±1.5 log10 bacterial cells/g), as compared to that in adults (4.8±1.2). Moreover, the prevalence of enterotoxigenic C. perfringens was also found to be significantly higher in infants, as compared to that in adults. The mean enterotoxigenic C. perfringens count was 5.9±1.9 and 4.8±0.8 log10 bacterial cells/g in infants and adults, respectively. These data indicate that some healthy infants and young adults carry α-toxigenic and enterotoxigenic C. perfringens at significant levels, and may be predisposed to related diseases. Thus, high

  2. Alpha-toxin of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Bhakdi, S; Tranum-Jensen, J

    1991-01-01

    Alpha-toxin, the major cytotoxic agent elaborated by Staphylococcus aureus, was the first bacterial exotoxin to be identified as a pore former. The protein is secreted as a single-chain, water-soluble molecule of Mr 33,000. At low concentrations (less than 100 nM), the toxin binds to as yet unidentified, high-affinity acceptor sites that have been detected on a variety of cells including rabbit erythrocytes, human platelets, monocytes and endothelial cells. At high concentrations, the toxin additionally binds via nonspecific absorption to lipid bilayers; it can thus damage both cells lacking significant numbers of the acceptor and protein-free artificial lipid bilayers. Membrane damage occurs in both cases after membrane-bound toxin molecules collide via lateral diffusion to form ring-structured hexamers. The latter insert spontaneously into the lipid bilayer to form discrete transmembrane pores of effective diameter 1 to 2 nm. A hypothetical model is advanced in which the pore is lined by amphiphilic beta-sheets, one surface of which interacts with lipids whereas the other repels apolar membrane constitutents to force open an aqueous passage. The detrimental effects of alpha-toxin are due not only to the death of susceptible targets, but also to the presence of secondary cellular reactions that can be triggered via Ca2+ influx through the pores. Well-studied phenomena include the stimulation of arachidonic acid metabolism, triggering of granule exocytosis, and contractile dysfunction. Such processes cause profound long-range disturbances such as development of pulmonary edema and promotion of blood coagulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1779933

  3. Specific and Nonspecific Staining in Detecting Staphylococcal Alpha Toxin on Erythrocytes by Immunofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Milton T.

    1972-01-01

    Specifically stained staphylococcal alpha toxin particles were detected on unstained and nonspecifically stained ghost membranes when rabbit erythrocytes were exposed to alpha toxin and stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled specific antitoxin. Fading of the nonspecific staining was observed and was attributed to the degradation of the membranes by alpha toxin. Images PMID:4118044

  4. Purification of Clostridium toxoids.

    PubMed

    Buchowicz, I; Hay, M; Schiller, B; Korbecki, M; Sochańska, R

    1977-01-01

    A two-step fractionation procedure was applied for purification and concentration of the individual Clostridium toxoids. The toxoids were precipitated with hydrochloric acid in the presence of sodium sextametaphosphate, then antigenic fractions were separated from inactive contaminants by Sephadex G-75 filtration. Specific activity of the preparations thus obtained, as determined by Mancini radial immunodiffusion, was 150--565 binding units per mg of protein nitrogen for Clostridium perfringens toxoid, 204--352 binding units for Clostridium oedematiens toxoid and 26.6 -- 51.2 binding units for Clostridium septicum toxoid.

  5. Inhibitory effects of various plant polyphenols on the toxicity of Staphylococcal alpha-toxin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Oksun; Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Morinaga, Naoko; Miyazaki, Masaru; Noda, Masatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Staphylococcal alpha-toxin, known for its wide spectrum of biological activities, is involved in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcal infectious diseases. In recent years, various phytochemicals have been found to have antimicrobiological, including antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal, and antitoxic activities. We investigated whether several plant polyphenols inhibit alpha-toxin activities in vitro and in vivo. We found hop bract tannin (HBT) and apple condensed tannin (ACT) to exert inhibitory effects on alpha-toxin cytotoxicity. HBT also reduced the murine skin inflammatory effect and the lethality of alpha-toxin. These polyphenols formed aggregates with alpha-toxin and thereby inhibited its activities. Inhibition of alpha-toxin by HBT and ACT was dose dependent, suggesting that these polyphenols may be a useful adjunct to current treatments for alpha-toxin catalyzed Staphylococcal infectious diseases.

  6. Characterization of Alpha-Toxin hla Gene Variants, Alpha-Toxin Expression Levels, and Levels of Antibody to Alpha-Toxin in Hemodialysis and Postsurgical Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuling; Tabor, David E.; Mok, Hoyin; Sellman, Bret R.; Jenkins, Amy; Yu, Li; Jafri, Hasan S.; Rude, Thomas H.; Ruffin, Felicia; Schell, Wiley A.; Park, Lawrence P.; Yan, Qin; Thaden, Joshua T.; Messina, Julia A.; Esser, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-toxin is a major Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor. This study evaluated potential relationships between in vitro alpha-toxin expression of S. aureus bloodstream isolates, anti-alpha-toxin antibody in serum of patients with S. aureus bacteremia (SAB), and clinical outcomes in 100 hemodialysis and 100 postsurgical SAB patients. Isolates underwent spa typing and hla sequencing. Serum anti-alpha-toxin IgG and neutralizing antibody levels were measured by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a red blood cell (RBC)-based hemolysis neutralization assay. Neutralization of alpha-toxin by an anti-alpha-toxin monoclonal antibody (MAb MEDI4893) was tested in an RBC-based lysis assay. Most isolates encoded hla (197/200; 98.5%) and expressed alpha-toxin (173/200; 86.5%). In vitro alpha-toxin levels were inversely associated with survival (cure, 2.19 μg/ml, versus failure, 1.09 μg/ml; P < 0.01). Both neutralizing (hemodialysis, 1.26 IU/ml, versus postsurgical, 0.95; P < 0.05) and IgG (hemodialysis, 1.94 IU/ml, versus postsurgical, 1.27; P < 0.05) antibody levels were higher in the hemodialysis population. Antibody levels were also significantly higher in patients infected with alpha-toxin-expressing S. aureus isolates (P < 0.05). Levels of both neutralizing antibodies and IgG were similar among patients who were cured and those not cured (failures). Sequence analysis of hla revealed 12 distinct hla genotypes, and all genotypic variants were susceptible to a neutralizing monoclonal antibody in clinical development (MEDI4893). These data demonstrate that alpha-toxin is highly conserved in clinical S. aureus isolates. Higher in vitro alpha-toxin levels were associated with a positive clinical outcome. Although patients infected with alpha-toxin-producing S. aureus exhibited higher anti-alpha-toxin antibody levels, these levels were not associated with a better clinical outcome in this study. PMID:25392350

  7. Interferon-γ Protects from Staphylococcal Alpha Toxin-Induced Keratinocyte Death through Apolipoprotein L1.

    PubMed

    Brauweiler, Anne M; Goleva, Elena; Leung, Donald Y M

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a bacterial pathogen that frequently infects the skin, causing lesions and cell destruction through its primary virulence factor, alpha toxin. Here we show that interferon gamma (IFN-?) protects human keratinocytes from cell death induced by staphylococcal alpha toxin. We find that IFN-? prevents alpha toxin binding and reduces expression of the alpha toxin receptor, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10). We determine that the mechanism for IFN-?-mediated resistance to alpha toxin involves the induction of autophagy, a process of cellular adaptation to sublethal damage. We find that IFN-? potently stimulates activation of the primary autophagy effector, light chain 3 (LC3). This process is dependent on upregulation of apolipoprotein L1. Depletion of apolipoprotein L1 by small interfering RNA significantly increases alpha toxin-induced lethality and inhibits activation of light chain 3. We conclude that IFN-? plays a significant role in protecting human keratinocytes from the lethal effects of staphylococcal alpha toxin through apolipoprotein L1-induced autophagy.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus In Vitro Secretion of Alpha Toxin (hla) Correlates with the Affiliation to Clonal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Monecke, Stefan; Müller, Elke; Büchler, Joseph; Stieber, Bettina; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    The alpha toxin of Staphylococcus aureus is a pore forming toxin that penetrates host cell membranes causing osmotic swelling, rupture, lysis and subsequently cell death. Haemolysin alpha is toxic to a wide range of different mammalian cells; i.e., neurotoxic, dermonecrotic, haemolytic, and it can cause lethality in a wide variety of animals. In this study, the in vitro alpha toxin production of 648 previously genotyped isolates of S. aureus was measured quantitatively using antibody microarrays. Isolates originated from medical and veterinary settings and were selected in order to represent diverse clonal complexes and defined clinical conditions. Generally, the production of alpha toxin in vitro is related to the clonal complex affiliation. For clonal complexes CC22, CC30, CC45, CC479, CC705 and others, invariably no alpha toxin production was noted under the given in vitro conditions, while others, such as CC1, CC5, CC8, CC15 or CC96 secreted variable or high levels of alpha toxin. There was no correlation between alpha toxin yield and clinical course of the disease, or between alpha toxin yield and host species. PMID:24940872

  9. Foot Infection by Clostridium sordellii: Case Report and Review of 15 Cases in France

    PubMed Central

    Sautereau, Jean; Le Coustumier, Alain; Mory, Francine; Bouchier, Christiane; Popoff, Michel-R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of foot infection by Clostridium sordellii and review 15 human infections registered at a Reference Center in France during the period 1998 to 2011. All strains were found nontoxigenic, lacking the lethal toxin gene coding for TcsL. Like Clostridium septicum, several C. sordellii infections were associated with intestinal neoplasms. PMID:25609723

  10. LYSIS OF BACTERIAL PROTOPLASTS AND SPHEROPLASTS BY STAPHYLOCOCCAL ALPHA-TOXIN AND STREPTOLYSIN S.

    PubMed

    BERNHEIMER, A W; SCHWARTZ, L L

    1965-05-01

    Bernheimer, Alan W. (New York University School of Medicine, New York, N.Y.), and Lois L. Schwartz. Lysis of bacterial protoplasts and spheroplasts by staphylococcal alpha-toxin and streptolysin S. J. Bacteriol. 89:1387-1392. 1965.-Protoplasts of Bacillus megaterium, Sarcina lutea, and Streptococcus pyogenes, and spheroplasts of Escherichia coli were lysed by staphylococcal alpha-toxin, whereas spheroplasts of Vibrio metschnikovii and V. comma were not. In the spectrum of its lytic action, streptolysin S qualitatively resembled staphylococcal alpha-toxin except for failure to lyse S. pyogenes protoplasts. In contrast to the two foregoing agents, streptolysin O did not lyse protoplasts and spheroplasts. The observations are interpreted in relation to similarities and differences in lipid composition of bacterial and mammalian cell membranes.

  11. ATP Release from Human Airway Epithelial Cells Exposed to Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Baaske, Romina; Richter, Mandy; Möller, Nils; Ziesemer, Sabine; Eiffler, Ina; Müller, Christian; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Airway epithelial cells reduce cytosolic ATP content in response to treatment with S. aureus alpha-toxin (hemolysin A, Hla). This study was undertaken to investigate whether this is due to attenuated ATP generation or to release of ATP from the cytosol and extracellular ATP degradation by ecto-enzymes. Exposure of cells to rHla did result in mitochondrial calcium uptake and a moderate decline in mitochondrial membrane potential, indicating that ATP regeneration may have been attenuated. In addition, ATP may have left the cells through transmembrane pores formed by the toxin or through endogenous release channels (e.g., pannexins) activated by cellular stress imposed on the cells by toxin exposure. Exposure of cells to an alpha-toxin mutant (H35L), which attaches to the host cell membrane but does not form transmembrane pores, did not induce ATP release from the cells. The Hla-mediated ATP-release was completely blocked by IB201, a cyclodextrin-inhibitor of the alpha-toxin pore, but was not at all affected by inhibitors of pannexin channels. These results indicate that, while exposure of cells to rHla may somewhat reduce ATP production and cellular ATP content, a portion of the remaining ATP is released to the extracellular space and degraded by ecto-enzymes. The release of ATP from the cells may occur directly through the transmembrane pores formed by alpha-toxin. PMID:27929417

  12. Molecular determinants conferring alpha-toxin resistance in recombinant DNA-derived acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Keller, S H; Kreienkamp, H J; Kawanishi, C; Taylor, P

    1995-02-24

    Sequences of the alpha-subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from the snake and mongoose contain several differences in the region between amino acids 183 and 200. Receptors from both of these species reveal resistance to the snake alpha-toxins presumably arising as a protective evolutionary mechanism. Sequence differences include the added glycosylation signals at residue 187 in the mongoose and at residues 189 and 111 in snake. Although previous observations with peptides and fusion proteins either synthesized chemically or in a bacterial expression system indicate that certain amino acid residues may contribute to the resistance, our findings with the intact receptor in an eukaryotic expression system indicate the major role for glycosylation. In this study, we show that addition of glycosylation signals gives rise to virtually complete glycosylation at the added sites, although heterogeneity of oligosaccharide processing is evident. By analysis of combinations of mutants, we document that glycosylation exerts the predominant influence on alpha-toxin binding. Substitutions at other residues are largely without influence as single mutations but appear to decrease affinity further in multiple mutants, particularly where the receptor is glycosylated at the 187 and 189 positions. Glycosylation exerts a major influence on the dissociation as well as the association rates of the alpha-toxin-receptor complex, suggesting that the decrease for alpha-toxin affinity is not simply a consequence of restricted diffusional access, rather glycosylation affects the conformation and stability of the bound complex.

  13. Discrimination of clostridium species using a magnetic bead based hybridization assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlow, Susanne; Seise, Barbara; Pollok, Sibyll; Seyboldt, Christian; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the causative agent of blackleg, which is an endogenous bacterial infection. Mainly cattle and other ruminants are affected. The symptoms of blackleg are very similar to those of malignant edema, an infection caused by Clostridium septicum. [1, 2] Therefore a reliable differentiation of Clostridium chauvoei from other Clostridium species is required. Traditional microbiological detection methods are time consuming and laborious. Additionally, the unique identification is hindered by the overgrowing tendency of swarming Clostridium septicum colonies when both species are present. [1, 3, 4] Thus, there is a crucial need to improve and simplify the specific detection of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum. Here we present an easy and fast Clostridium species discrimination method combining magnetic beads and fluorescence spectroscopy. Functionalized magnetic particles exhibit plentiful advantages, like their simple manipulation in combination with a large binding capacity of biomolecules. A specific region of the pathogenic DNA is amplified and labelled with biotin by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These PCR products were then immobilized on magnetic beads exploiting the strong biotin-streptavidin interaction. The specific detection of different Clostridium species is achieved by using fluorescence dye labeled probe DNA for the hybridization with the immobilized PCR products. Finally, the samples were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. [5

  14. Human hyperimmune globulin protects against the cytotoxic action of staphylococcal alpha-toxin in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bhakdi, S; Mannhardt, U; Muhly, M; Hugo, F; Ronneberger, H; Hungerer, K D

    1989-01-01

    Alpha-toxin, the major cytolysin of Staphylococcus aureus, preferentially attacks human platelets and cultured monocytes, thereby promoting coagulation and the release of interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor. Titers of naturally occurring antibodies in human blood are not high enough to substantially inhibit these pathological reactions. In the present study, F(ab')2 fragment preparations from hyperimmune globulin obtained from immunized volunteers were tested for their capacity to inhibit the cytotoxic action of alpha-toxin in vitro and in vivo. These antibody preparations exhibited neutralizing anti-alpha-toxin titers of 80 to 120 IU/ml, whereas titers in commercial immunoglobulin preparations were 1 to 4 IU/ml. In vitro, the presence of 2 to 4 mg of hyperimmune globulin per ml protected human platelets against the action of 1 to 2 micrograms of alpha-toxin per ml. Similarly, these antibodies fully protected human monocytes against the ATP-depleting and cytokine-liberating effects of 0.1 to 1 microgram of alpha-toxin per ml. Intravenous application of 0.5 mg (85 to 120 micrograms/kg of body weight) of alpha-toxin in cynomolgus monkeys elicited acute pathophysiological reactions which were heralded by a selective drop in blood platelet counts. Toxin doses of 1 to 2 mg (170 to 425 micrograms/kg) had a rapid lethal effect, the animals presenting with signs of cardiovascular collapse and pulmonary edema. Prior intravenous application of 4 ml of hyperimmune globulins per kg inhibited the systemic toxic and lethal effects of 1 mg (200 micrograms/kg) of alpha-toxin. In contrast, normal human immunoglobulins exhibited no substantial protective efficacy in vitro and only marginal effects in vivo. It is concluded that high-titered anti-alpha-toxin antibodies effectively protect against the cytotoxic actions of alpha-toxin. PMID:2777380

  15. Activation of syndecan-1 ectodomain shedding by Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin and beta-toxin.

    PubMed

    Park, Pyong Woo; Foster, Timothy J; Nishi, Eiichiro; Duncan, Sheila J; Klagsbrun, Michael; Chen, Ye

    2004-01-02

    Exploitation of host components by microbes to promote their survival in the hostile host environment has been a recurring theme in recent years. Available data indicate that bacterial pathogens activate ectodomain shedding of host cell surface molecules to enhance their virulence. We reported previously that several major bacterial pathogens activate ectodomain shedding of syndecan-1, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan of epithelial cells. Here we define the molecular basis of how Staphylococcus aureus activates syndecan-1 shedding. We screened mutant S. aureus strains devoid of various toxin and protease genes and found that only strains lacking both alpha-toxin and beta-toxin genes do not stimulate shedding. Mutations in the agr global regulatory locus, which positively regulates expression of alpha- and beta-toxins and other exoproteins, also abrogated the capacity to stimulate syndecan-1 shedding. Furthermore, purified S. aureus alpha- and beta-toxins, but not enterotoxin A and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, rapidly potentiated shedding in a concentration-dependent manner. These results establish that S. aureus activates syndecan-1 ectodomain shedding via its two virulence factors, alpha- and beta-toxins. Toxin-activated shedding was also selectively inhibited by antagonists of the host cell shedding mechanism, indicating that alpha- and beta-toxins shed syndecan-1 ectodomains through stimulation of the host cell's shedding machinery. Interestingly, beta-toxin, but not alpha-toxin, also enhanced ectodomain shedding of syndecan-4 and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor. Because shedding of these ectodomains has been implicated in promoting bacterial pathogenesis, activation of ectodomain shedding by alpha-toxin and beta-toxin may be a previously unknown virulence mechanism of S. aureus.

  16. Mechanisms of luteinizing-hormone exocytosis in Staphylococcus aureus-alpha-toxin-permeabilized sheep gonadotropes.

    PubMed Central

    van der Merwe, P A; Millar, R P; Wakefield, I K; Davidson, J S

    1989-01-01

    We have used primary gonadotropes permeabilized with the pore-forming protein Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin to investigate luteinizing hormone (lutropin, LH) exocytosis. The diameter of the alpha-toxin pores (2-3 nm) allows the exchange of small molecules, whereas larger cytosolic proteins are retained. Because of the slow exchange of small molecules through the pores, we have developed a protocol which combines prolonged pre-equilibration of the permeabilized cells at 0 degrees C before stimulation with strong Ca2+ buffering. Under these conditions, increasing the free Ca2+ concentration from 0.1 microM to 10 microM [EC50 (concentration effecting half-maximal response) 2-3 microM] resulted in a 15-20-fold increase in LH exocytosis. LH exocytosis was maximal in the first 3 min and completed by 12 min. When permeabilized cells were equilibrated for prolonged periods in the absence of MgATP, Ca2(+)-stimulated LH secretion gradually declined (greater than 90% decrease by 60 min). Addition of MgATP (5 mM) rapidly restored full Ca2(+)-stimulated LH secretion. MgATP supported Ca2(+)-stimulated LH secretion at a half-maximal concentration of 1.5 mM. UTP and adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate were 40 and 31% as effective as MgATP, whereas other nucleotide triphosphates were ineffective. The protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 50 nM) stimulated LH exocytosis at free Ca2+ concentrations as low as 1 nM and was additive with Ca2+ at higher free Ca2+ concentrations. PMA-stimulated exocytosis required MgATP at concentrations similar to those required for Ca2(+)-stimulated LH exocytosis. These results demonstrate that LH exocytosis can be triggered both by micromolar Ca2+ concentrations or, in the virtual absence of Ca2+, by PKC activation. Both mechanisms of stimulated exocytosis have an absolute requirement for millimolar ATP. Because they retain cytosolic proteins, alpha-toxin-permeabilized cells may have advantages over alternative

  17. Mechanisms of luteinizing-hormone exocytosis in Staphylococcus aureus-alpha-toxin-permeabilized sheep gonadotropes.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, P A; Millar, R P; Wakefield, I K; Davidson, J S

    1989-12-15

    We have used primary gonadotropes permeabilized with the pore-forming protein Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin to investigate luteinizing hormone (lutropin, LH) exocytosis. The diameter of the alpha-toxin pores (2-3 nm) allows the exchange of small molecules, whereas larger cytosolic proteins are retained. Because of the slow exchange of small molecules through the pores, we have developed a protocol which combines prolonged pre-equilibration of the permeabilized cells at 0 degrees C before stimulation with strong Ca2+ buffering. Under these conditions, increasing the free Ca2+ concentration from 0.1 microM to 10 microM [EC50 (concentration effecting half-maximal response) 2-3 microM] resulted in a 15-20-fold increase in LH exocytosis. LH exocytosis was maximal in the first 3 min and completed by 12 min. When permeabilized cells were equilibrated for prolonged periods in the absence of MgATP, Ca2(+)-stimulated LH secretion gradually declined (greater than 90% decrease by 60 min). Addition of MgATP (5 mM) rapidly restored full Ca2(+)-stimulated LH secretion. MgATP supported Ca2(+)-stimulated LH secretion at a half-maximal concentration of 1.5 mM. UTP and adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate were 40 and 31% as effective as MgATP, whereas other nucleotide triphosphates were ineffective. The protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 50 nM) stimulated LH exocytosis at free Ca2+ concentrations as low as 1 nM and was additive with Ca2+ at higher free Ca2+ concentrations. PMA-stimulated exocytosis required MgATP at concentrations similar to those required for Ca2(+)-stimulated LH exocytosis. These results demonstrate that LH exocytosis can be triggered both by micromolar Ca2+ concentrations or, in the virtual absence of Ca2+, by PKC activation. Both mechanisms of stimulated exocytosis have an absolute requirement for millimolar ATP. Because they retain cytosolic proteins, alpha-toxin-permeabilized cells may have advantages over alternative

  18. Foot infection by Clostridium sordellii: case report and review of 15 cases in France.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Philippe; Sautereau, Jean; Le Coustumier, Alain; Mory, Francine; Bouchier, Christiane; Popoff, Michel-R

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of foot infection by Clostridium sordellii and review 15 human infections registered at a Reference Center in France during the period 1998 to 2011. All strains were found nontoxigenic, lacking the lethal toxin gene coding for TcsL. Like Clostridium septicum, several C. sordellii infections were associated with intestinal neoplasms. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Minimal requirements for exocytosis. A study using PC 12 cells permeabilized with staphylococcal alpha-toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnert-Hilger, G.; Bhakdi, S.; Gratzl, M.

    1985-10-15

    The membrane-permeabilizing effects of streptolysin O, staphylococcal alpha-toxin, and digitonin on cultured rat pheochromocytoma cells were studied. All three agents perturbed the plasma membrane, causing release of intracellular YWRb and uptake of trypan blue. In addition, streptolysin O and digitonin also damaged the membranes of secretory vesicles, including a parallel release of dopamine. In contrast, the effects of alpha-toxin appeared to be strictly confined to the plasma membrane, and no dopamine release was observed with this agent. The exocytotic machinery, however, remained intact and could be triggered by subsequent introduction of micromolar concentrations of Ca2+ into the medium. Dopamine release was entirely Ca2+ specific and occurred independent of the presence or absence of other cations or anions including K+ glutamate, K+ acetate, or Na+ chloride. Ca2+-induced exocytosis did not require the presence of Mg2+-ATP in the medium. The process was insensitive to pH alterations in the range pH 6.6-7.2, and appeared optimal at an osmolarity of 300 mosm/kg. Toxin permeabilization seems to be an excellent method for studying the minimal requirements for exocytosis.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the complex between a human anti-alpha toxin antibody fragment and alpha toxin.

    PubMed

    Oganesyan, Vaheh; Barnes, Arnita; Tkaczyk, Christine; Ferguson, Andrew; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F

    2013-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha toxin (AT) has been crystallized in complex with the Fab fragment of a human antibody (MEDI4893). This constitutes the first reported crystals of AT bound to an antibody. The monoclinic crystals belonged to space group P2₁, with unit-cell parameters a=85.52, b=148.50, c=93.82 Å, β=99.82°. The diffraction of the crystals extended to 2.56 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained two MEDI4893 Fab-AT complexes. This corresponds to a crystal volume per protein weight (VM) of 2.3 Å3 Da(-1) and a solvent content of 47%. The three-dimensional structure of this complex will contribute to an understanding of the molecular basis of the interaction of MEDI4893 with AT. It will also shed light on the mechanism of action of this antibody, the current evaluation of which in the field of S. aureus-mediated diseases makes it a particularly interesting case study. Finally, this study will provide the three-dimensional structure of AT in a monomeric state for the first time.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms Induce Macrophage Dysfunction Through Leukocidin AB and Alpha-Toxin.

    PubMed

    Scherr, Tyler D; Hanke, Mark L; Huang, Ouwen; James, David B A; Horswill, Alexander R; Bayles, Kenneth W; Fey, Paul D; Torres, Victor J; Kielian, Tammy

    2015-08-25

    The macrophage response to planktonic Staphylococcus aureus involves the induction of proinflammatory microbicidal activity. However, S. aureus biofilms can interfere with these responses in part by polarizing macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory profibrotic phenotype. Here we demonstrate that conditioned medium from mature S. aureus biofilms inhibited macrophage phagocytosis and induced cytotoxicity, suggesting the involvement of a secreted factor(s). Iterative testing found the active factor(s) to be proteinaceous and partially agr-dependent. Quantitative mass spectrometry identified alpha-toxin (Hla) and leukocidin AB (LukAB) as critical molecules secreted by S. aureus biofilms that inhibit murine macrophage phagocytosis and promote cytotoxicity. A role for Hla and LukAB was confirmed by using hla and lukAB mutants, and synergy between the two toxins was demonstrated with a lukAB hla double mutant and verified by complementation. Independent confirmation of the effects of Hla and LukAB on macrophage dysfunction was demonstrated by using an isogenic strain in which Hla was constitutively expressed, an Hla antibody to block toxin activity, and purified LukAB peptide. The importance of Hla and LukAB during S. aureus biofilm formation in vivo was assessed by using a murine orthopedic implant biofilm infection model in which the lukAB hla double mutant displayed significantly lower bacterial burdens and more macrophage infiltrates than each single mutant. Collectively, these findings reveal a critical synergistic role for Hla and LukAB in promoting macrophage dysfunction and facilitating S. aureus biofilm development in vivo. Staphylococcus aureus has a propensity to form multicellular communities known as biofilms. While growing in a biofilm, S. aureus displays increased tolerance to nutrient deprivation, antibiotic insult, and even host immune challenge. Previous studies have shown that S. aureus biofilms thwart host immunity in part by preventing macrophage

  2. Glycosylation sites selectively interfere with alpha-toxin binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Kreienkamp, H J; Sine, S M; Maeda, R K; Taylor, P

    1994-03-18

    Sequence analysis reveals unique features in the alpha-subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from the alpha-toxin-resistant cobra and mongoose. Included are N-linked glycosylation signals just amino-terminal to the Tyr190, Cys192-Cys193 region of the ligand binding domain, substitution of Trp187 and Phe189 by non-aromatic residues and alteration of the proline sequence Pro194-X-X-Pro197. Glycosylation signals were inserted into the toxin-sensitive mouse alpha-subunit by the mutations F189N and W187N/F189T. The F189N alpha-subunit, when transfected with beta, gamma and delta, showed a 140-fold loss of alpha-bungarotoxin affinity, whereas the W187N/F189T double mutation exhibited a divergence in alpha-toxin affinities at the two sites, one class showing a 600-fold and the other showing an 11-fold reduction. The W187N mutant and the double mutant F189N/S191A lacking the requisite glycosylation signals exhibited little alteration in affinity, as did the P194L and P197H mutations. The glycosylation sites had little or no influence on binding of toxins of intermediate (alpha-conotoxin, 1500 Da) or small mass (lophotoxin, 500 Da) and of the agonist, carbamylcholine. The two sites for the binding of alpha-conotoxin M1 have widely divergent dissociation constants of 2.1 and 14,800 nM. Expression of alpha/gamma- and alpha/delta-subunit pairs indicated that the high and low affinity sites are formed by the alpha/delta and alpha/gamma contacts, respectively.

  3. Exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field changes the efficiency of the scorpion alpha toxin.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Milena; Pawlowska-Mainville, Agnieszka; Stankiewicz, Maria; Rogalska, Justyna; Wyszkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) is produced by electric power transmission lines and electronic devices of everyday use. Some phenomena are proposed as "first effects" of ELF-EMF: the discrete changes in the membrane potential and the increase of the calcium channel activity as well as the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+). Interaction of the scorpion alpha toxin with the sodium channel depends on the orientation of the charges and may be perturbed by changes in the membrane polarization. The toxin induces overexcitability in the nervous system and an increase in the neurotransmitters released with different consequences, mainly the paralysis of muscles. We assumed that the exposure to ELF-EMF 0.7 mT will change the effects of the insect selective scorpion alpha toxin (recombinant LqhαIT from Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus) at the level of the cercal nerve function, the synaptic transmission and on the level of entire insect organism. Taking into account the compensatory mechanisms in organisms, we tested in addition ten times higher ELF-EMF on whole insects. Experiments were performed in vivo on cockroaches (Periplaneta americana) and in vitro - on isolated cockroach abdominal nerve cord with cerci. In biotests, the effects of LqhαIT (10(-8) M) were estimated on the basis of the insect ability to turn back from dorsal to ventral side. Three groups were compared: the control one and the two exposed to ELF-EMF - 0.7 and 7 mT. Bioelectrical activity of the cercal nerve and of the connective nerve that leaves the terminal abdominal ganglion was recorded using extracellular electrodes. LqhαIT (5 × 10(-8) M) induced modifications of neuronal activity that were observed in the control cockroach preparations and in the ones exposed to ELF-EMF (0.7 mT). The exposure to ELF-EMF was carried out using coils with a size appropriate to the examined objects. The exposure to ELF-EMF (0.7 mT) modified the effects of LqhαIT (5

  4. A chimeric scorpion alpha-toxin displays de novo electrophysiological properties similar to those of alpha-like toxins.

    PubMed

    Bouhaouala-Zahar, Balkiss; Benkhalifa, Rym; Srairi, Najet; Zenouaki, Ilhem; Ligny-Lemaire, Caroline; Drevet, Pascal; Sampieri, François; Pelhate, Marcel; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Ménez, André; Karoui, Habib; Ducancel, Frédéric

    2002-06-01

    BotXIV and LqhalphaIT are two structurally related long chain scorpion alpha-toxins that inhibit sodium current inactivation in excitable cells. However, while LqhalphaIT from Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus is classified as a true and strong insect alpha-toxin, BotXIV from Buthus occitanus tunetanus is characterized by moderate biological activities. To assess the possibility that structural differences between these two molecules could reflect the localization of particular functional topographies, we compared their sequences. Three structurally deviating segments located in three distinct and exposed loops were identified. They correspond to residues 8-10, 19-22, and 38-43. To evaluate their functional role, three BotXIV/LqhalphaIT chimeras were designed by transferring the corresponding LqhalphaIT sequences into BotXIV. Structural and antigenic characterizations of the resulting recombinant chimera show that BotXIV can accommodate the imposed modifications, confirming the structural flexibility of that particular alpha/beta fold. Interestingly, substitution of residues 8-10 yields to a new electrophysiological profile of the corresponding variant, partially comparable to that one of alpha-like scorpion toxins. Taken together, these results suggest that even limited structural deviations can reflect functional diversity, and also that the structure-function relationships between insect alpha-toxins and alpha-like scorpion toxins are probably more complex than expected.

  5. Effectiveness of Alpha-toxin Fab Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Limiting the Pathology of Staphylococcus aureus Keratitis.

    PubMed

    Caballero, A; Foletti, D; Bierdeman, M; Tang, A; Arana, A; Hasa-Moreno, A; Sangalang, E; O'Callaghan, R J

    2014-06-09

    Abstract Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of a high-affinity human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment to Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin (LTM14 Fab) as therapy for S. aureus keratitis. Methods: A single topical drop of the LTM14 Fab antibody to alpha-toxin alone, or in 0.006% benzalkonium chloride (BAK), was applied every 30 min to S. aureus-infected rabbit corneas from 9 to 14 hours post-infection. Erosions and pathology were measured at 15 h post-infection. Results: LTM14 Fab with BAK limited corneal erosions better than LTM14 Fab alone (p = 0.036), and both limited erosions compared to untreated eyes (p ≤ 0.0001). Overall pathology was similar in all groups (p ≥ 0.070), but iritis and chemosis were reduced by treatment (p ≤ 0.036). Conclusions: The high-affinity human monoclonal Fab fragment antibody (LTM14 Fab) to S. aureus alpha-toxin was effective in reducing corneal damage during S. aureus keratitis.

  6. BjalphaIT: a novel scorpion alpha-toxin selective for insects--unique pharmacological tool.

    PubMed

    Arnon, Tal; Potikha, Tamara; Sher, Daniel; Elazar, Menashe; Mao, Wenfu; Tal, Tzachy; Bosmans, Frank; Tytgat, Jan; Ben-Arie, Nissim; Zlotkin, Eliahu

    2005-03-01

    Long-chain neurotoxins derived from the venom of the Buthidae scorpions, which affect voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) can be subdivided according to their toxicity to insects into insect-selective excitatory and depressant toxins (beta-toxins) and the alpha-like toxins which affect both mammals and insects. In the present study by the aid of reverse-phase HPLC column chromatography, RT-PCR, cloning and various toxicity assays, a new insect selective toxin designated as BjalphaIT was isolated from the venom of the Judean Black Scorpion (Buthotus judaicus), and its full primary sequence was determined: MNYLVVICFALLLMTVVESGRDAYIADNLNCAYTCGSNSYCNTECTKNGAVSGYCQWLGKYGNACWCINLPDKVPIRIPGACR (leader sequence is underlined). Despite its lack of toxicity to mammals and potent toxicity to insects, BjalphaIT reveals an amino acid sequence and an inferred spatial arrangement that is characteristic of the well-known scorpion alpha-toxins highly toxic to mammals. BjalphaITs sharp distinction between insects and mammals was also revealed by its effect on sodium conductance of two cloned neuronal VGSCs heterloguously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and assayed with the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. BjalphaIT completely inhibits the inactivation process of the insect para/tipE VGSC at a concentration of 100 nM, in contrast to the rat brain Na(v)1.2/beta1 which is resistant to the toxin. The above categorical distinction between mammal and insect VGSCs exhibited by BjalphaIT enables its employment in the clarification of the molecular basis of the animal group specificity of scorpion venom derived neurotoxic polypeptides and voltage-gated sodium channels.

  7. Evaluation of Genetically Inactivated Alpha Toxin for Protection in Multiple Mouse Models of Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Rebecca A.; Mocca, Christopher P.; Prabhakara, Ranjani; Plaut, Roger D.; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Merkel, Tod J.; Burns, Drusilla L.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Development of a vaccine against this pathogen is an important goal. While S. aureus protective antigens have been identified in the literature, the majority have only been tested in a single animal model of disease. We wished to evaluate the ability of one S. aureus vaccine antigen to protect in multiple mouse models, thus assessing whether protection in one model translates to protection in other models encompassing the full breadth of infections the pathogen can cause. We chose to focus on genetically inactivated alpha toxin mutant HlaH35L. We evaluated the protection afforded by this antigen in three models of infection using the same vaccine dose, regimen, route of immunization, adjuvant, and challenge strain. When mice were immunized with HlaH35L and challenged via a skin and soft tissue infection model, HlaH35L immunization led to a less severe infection and decreased S. aureus levels at the challenge site when compared to controls. Challenge of HlaH35L-immunized mice using a systemic infection model resulted in a limited, but statistically significant decrease in bacterial colonization as compared to that observed with control mice. In contrast, in a prosthetic implant model of chronic biofilm infection, there was no significant difference in bacterial levels when compared to controls. These results demonstrate that vaccines may confer protection against one form of S. aureus disease without conferring protection against other disease presentations and thus underscore a significant challenge in S. aureus vaccine development. PMID:23658662

  8. Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms Induce Macrophage Dysfunction Through Leukocidin AB and Alpha-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Scherr, Tyler D.; Hanke, Mark L.; Huang, Ouwen; James, David B. A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Bayles, Kenneth W.; Fey, Paul D.; Torres, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The macrophage response to planktonic Staphylococcus aureus involves the induction of proinflammatory microbicidal activity. However, S. aureus biofilms can interfere with these responses in part by polarizing macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory profibrotic phenotype. Here we demonstrate that conditioned medium from mature S. aureus biofilms inhibited macrophage phagocytosis and induced cytotoxicity, suggesting the involvement of a secreted factor(s). Iterative testing found the active factor(s) to be proteinaceous and partially agr-dependent. Quantitative mass spectrometry identified alpha-toxin (Hla) and leukocidin AB (LukAB) as critical molecules secreted by S. aureus biofilms that inhibit murine macrophage phagocytosis and promote cytotoxicity. A role for Hla and LukAB was confirmed by using hla and lukAB mutants, and synergy between the two toxins was demonstrated with a lukAB hla double mutant and verified by complementation. Independent confirmation of the effects of Hla and LukAB on macrophage dysfunction was demonstrated by using an isogenic strain in which Hla was constitutively expressed, an Hla antibody to block toxin activity, and purified LukAB peptide. The importance of Hla and LukAB during S. aureus biofilm formation in vivo was assessed by using a murine orthopedic implant biofilm infection model in which the lukAB hla double mutant displayed significantly lower bacterial burdens and more macrophage infiltrates than each single mutant. Collectively, these findings reveal a critical synergistic role for Hla and LukAB in promoting macrophage dysfunction and facilitating S. aureus biofilm development in vivo. PMID:26307164

  9. Optimization of the Production of Inactivated Clostridium novyi Type B Vaccine Using Computational Intelligence Techniques.

    PubMed

    Aquino, P L M; Fonseca, F S; Mozzer, O D; Giordano, R C; Sousa, R

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium novyi causes necrotic hepatitis in sheep and cattle, as well as gas gangrene. The microorganism is strictly anaerobic, fastidious, and difficult to cultivate in industrial scale. C. novyi type B produces alpha and beta toxins, with the alpha toxin being linked to the presence of specific bacteriophages. The main strategy to combat diseases caused by C. novyi is vaccination, employing vaccines produced with toxoids or with toxoids and bacterins. In order to identify culture medium components and concentrations that maximized cell density and alpha toxin production, a neuro-fuzzy algorithm was applied to predict the yields of the fermentation process for production of C. novyi type B, within a global search procedure using the simulated annealing technique. Maximizing cell density and toxin production is a multi-objective optimization problem and could be treated by a Pareto approach. Nevertheless, the approach chosen here was a step-by-step one. The optimum values obtained with this approach were validated in laboratory scale, and the results were used to reload the data matrix for re-parameterization of the neuro-fuzzy model, which was implemented for a final optimization step with regards to the alpha toxin productivity. With this methodology, a threefold increase of alpha toxin could be achieved.

  10. PCR detection of Clostridium chauvoei in pure cultures and in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Uzal, F A; Hugenholtz, P; Blackall, L L; Petray, S; Moss, S; Assis, R A; Fernandez Miyakawa, M; Carloni, G

    2003-02-02

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify specific segments of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of Clostridium chauvoei, a major pathogen of ruminants. Three sets of primers were used to produce amplicons of 159, 836 and 959 base pairs (bp), respectively. The PCR was evaluated by testing clinically important strains of Clostridium, including 21 strains of C. chauvoei, five strains each of Clostridium septicum and Clostridium perfringens and two strains each of Clostridium novyi, Clostridium histolyticum and Clostridium sordellii. Both purified DNA and biomass from pure cultures of each of these microorganisms were evaluated as templates in the PCR. In addition, extracts of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of eight sheep experimentally inoculated with C. chauvoei or C. septicum (four animals each) were also tested by the PCR using the three sets of primers. Purified DNA template of all C. chauvoei strains produced PCR amplicons of the expected size for all three primer pairs. However, when biomass from pure cultures of C. chauvoei or tissue extracts were used as templates, only the primer pair designed to produce the 159bp amplicon gave consistently positive results. No positive results were obtained with any primer pair when purified DNA or biomass from pure cultures of non-target clostridial species were used as templates. Therefore, the PCR primer sets appear to be very specific for identifying C. chauvoei in both cultures and tissues.

  11. First chemical synthesis of a scorpion alpha-toxin affecting sodium channels: the Aah I toxin of Androctonus australis hector.

    PubMed

    M'Barek, Sarrah; Fajloun, Ziad; Cestèle, Sandrine; Devaux, Christiane; Mansuelle, Pascal; Mosbah, Amor; Jouirou, Besma; Mantegazza, Massimo; Van Rietschoten, Jurphaas; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Rochat, Hervé; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Sampieri, François

    2004-11-01

    Aah I is a 63-residue alpha-toxin isolated from the venom of the Buthidae scorpion Androctonus australis hector, which is considered to be the most dangerous species. We report here the first chemical synthesis of Aah I by the solid-phase method, using a Fmoc strategy. The synthetic toxin I (sAah I) was renatured in DMSO-Tris buffer, purified and subjected to thorough analysis and comparison with the natural toxin. The sAah I showed physico-chemical (CD spectrum, molecular mass, HPLC elution), biochemical (amino-acid composition, sequence), immunochemical and pharmacological properties similar to those of the natural toxin. The synthetic toxin was recognized by a conformation-dependent monoclonal anti-Aah I antibody, with an IC50 value close to that for the natural toxin. Following intracerebroventricular injection, the synthetic and the natural toxins were similarly lethal to mice. In voltage-clamp experiments, Na(v) 1.2 sodium channel inactivation was inhibited by the application of sAah I or of the natural toxin in a similar way. This work describes a simple protocol for the chemical synthesis of a scorpion alpha-toxin, making it possible to produce structural analogues in time.

  12. Plasmidome interchange between Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum converts strains of independent lineages into distinctly different pathogens.

    PubMed

    Skarin, Hanna; Segerman, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum (group III), Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum are well-known pathogens causing animal botulism, gas gangrene/black disease, and bacillary hemoglobinuria, respectively. A close genetic relationship exists between the species, which has resulted in the collective term C. novyi sensu lato. The pathogenic traits in these species, e.g., the botulinum neurotoxin and the novyi alpha toxin, are mainly linked to a large plasmidome consisting of plasmids and circular prophages. The plasmidome of C. novyi sensu lato has so far been poorly characterized. In this study we explored the genomic relationship of a wide range of strains of C. novyi sensu lato with a special focus on the dynamics of the plasmidome. Twenty-four genomes were sequenced from strains selected to represent as much as possible the genetic diversity in C. novyi sensu lato. Sixty-one plasmids were identified in these genomes and 28 of them were completed. The genomic comparisons revealed four separate lineages, which did not strictly correlate with the species designations. The plasmids were categorized into 13 different plasmid groups on the basis of their similarity and conservation of plasmid replication or partitioning genes. The plasmid groups, lineages and species were to a large extent entwined because plasmids and toxin genes had moved across the lineage boundaries. This dynamic process appears to be primarily driven by phages. We here present a comprehensive characterization of the complex species group C. novyi sensu lato, explaining the intermixed genetic properties. This study also provides examples how the reorganization of the botulinum toxin and the novyi alpha toxin genes within the plasmidome has affected the pathogenesis of the strains.

  13. Plasmidome Interchange between Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum Converts Strains of Independent Lineages into Distinctly Different Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Skarin, Hanna; Segerman, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum (group III), Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum are well-known pathogens causing animal botulism, gas gangrene/black disease, and bacillary hemoglobinuria, respectively. A close genetic relationship exists between the species, which has resulted in the collective term C. novyi sensu lato. The pathogenic traits in these species, e.g., the botulinum neurotoxin and the novyi alpha toxin, are mainly linked to a large plasmidome consisting of plasmids and circular prophages. The plasmidome of C. novyi sensu lato has so far been poorly characterized. In this study we explored the genomic relationship of a wide range of strains of C. novyi sensu lato with a special focus on the dynamics of the plasmidome. Twenty-four genomes were sequenced from strains selected to represent as much as possible the genetic diversity in C. novyi sensu lato. Sixty-one plasmids were identified in these genomes and 28 of them were completed. The genomic comparisons revealed four separate lineages, which did not strictly correlate with the species designations. The plasmids were categorized into 13 different plasmid groups on the basis of their similarity and conservation of plasmid replication or partitioning genes. The plasmid groups, lineages and species were to a large extent entwined because plasmids and toxin genes had moved across the lineage boundaries. This dynamic process appears to be primarily driven by phages. We here present a comprehensive characterization of the complex species group C. novyi sensu lato, explaining the intermixed genetic properties. This study also provides examples how the reorganization of the botulinum toxin and the novyi alpha toxin genes within the plasmidome has affected the pathogenesis of the strains. PMID:25254374

  14. Cloning of alpha-beta fusion gene from Clostridium perfringens and its expression.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jia-Ning; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Bao-Hua

    2006-02-28

    To study the cloning of alpha-beta fusion gene from Clostridium perfringens and the immunogenicity of alpha-beta fusion expression. Cloning was accomplished after PCR amplification from strains NCTC64609 and C58-1 of the protective antigen genes of alpha-toxin and beta-toxin. The fragment of the gene was cloned using plasmid pZCPAB. This fragment coded for the gene with the stable expression of alpha-beta fusion gene binding. In order to verify the exact location of the alpha-beta fusion gene, domain plasmids were constructed. The two genes were fused into expression vector pBV221. The expressed alpha-beta fusion protein was identified by ELISA, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and neutralization assay. The protective alpha-toxin gene (cpa906) and the beta-toxin gene (cpb930) were obtained. The recombinant plasmid pZCPAB carrying alpha-beta fusion gene was constructed and transformed into BL21(DE3). The recombinant strain BL21(DE3)(pZCPAB) was obtained. After the recombinant strain BL21(DE3)(pZCPAB) was induced by 42 degC, its expressed product was about 22.14% of total cellular protein at SDS-PAGE and thin-layer gel scanning analysis. Neutralization assay indicated that the antibody induced by immunization with alpha-beta fusion protein could neutralize the toxicity of alpha-toxin and beta-toxin. The obtained alpha-toxin and beta-toxin genes are correct. The recombinant strain BL21(DE3)(pZCPAB) could produce alpha-beta fusion protein. This protein can be used for immunization and is immunogenic. The antibody induced by immunization with alpha-beta fusion protein could neutralize the toxicity of alpha-toxin and beta-toxin.

  15. Clostridium septicum myositis in a western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Deidre K; Terrell, Scott P; Miller, Michele; Robbins, Patricia K; Stetter, Mark; Weber, Martha

    2005-09-01

    A 10-yr-old male gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) with a history of conspecific bite wounds was evaluated for acute onset of depression, anorexia, and right hemiparesis. The animal was immobilized for diagnostic examination and treatment for suspected toxic shock from a necrotizing, emphysematous wound infection, but was euthanized due to complications during recovery. Gross and histopathologic examination revealed acute necrotizing myositis, fasciitis, cellulitis, and emphysema in the affected wound area, with large numbers of large Gram-positive rods among necrotic muscle fibers. Severe pulmonary edema with airways containing fibrin, acute hemorrhage in multiple body sites, thrombosis in blood vessels in the skeletal muscle, liver, and lung, and lymph node hyperplasia with lymphoid necrosis and hemorrhage. Immunohistochemical fluorescent antibody staining of muscle from the wound site was positive for

  16. Toxin-neutralizing antibodies protect against Clostridium perfringens-induced necrosis in an intestinal loop model for bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Evy; Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Valgaeren, Bonnie R; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Schauvliege, Stijn; Rodrigo-Mocholí, Diego; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet R; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2016-06-13

    Bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis is caused by Clostridium perfringens type A. Due to the rapid progress and fatal outcome of the disease, vaccination would be of high value. In this study, C. perfringens toxins, either as native toxins or after formaldehyde inactivation, were evaluated as possible vaccine antigens. We determined whether antisera raised in calves against these toxins were able to protect against C. perfringens challenge in an intestinal loop model for bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis. Alpha toxin and perfringolysin O were identified as the most immunogenic proteins in the vaccine preparations. All vaccines evoked a high antibody response against the causative toxins, alpha toxin and perfringolysin O, as detected by ELISA. All antibodies were able to inhibit the activity of alpha toxin and perfringolysin O in vitro. However, the antibodies raised against the native toxins were more inhibitory to the C. perfringens-induced cytotoxicity (as tested on bovine endothelial cells) and only these antibodies protected against C. perfringens challenge in the intestinal loop model. Although immunization of calves with both native and formaldehyde inactivated toxins resulted in high antibody titers against alpha toxin and perfringolysin O, only antibodies raised against native toxins protect against C. perfringens challenge in an intestinal loop model for bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis.

  17. The protective effect of Clostridium novyi type B alpha-toxoid against challenge with spores in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Amimoto, K; Sasaki, O; Isogai, M; Kitajima, T; Oishi, E; Okada, N; Yasuhara, H

    1998-06-01

    Clostridium novyi (C. novyi) Type B alpha-toxin was purified from culture supernatant by column chromatography, and was inactivated by formalin. A purified alpha-toxoid vaccine was prepared by mixing it with an aluminum phosphate gel adjuvant. Guinea pigs immunized twice with 4 micrograms or more of alpha-toxin survived against challenge with C. novyi Type B spores. Anti-alpha-toxin (antitoxin) titer was measured by toxin neutralization test using Vero cells. All of the guinea pigs having antitoxin titers of 10 units (U) or more at challenge were survived. In another experiment, guinea pigs were immunized with crude alpha-toxoid vaccines prepared by inactivated culture supernatant or by adding broken bacterial cells to the former. In this experiment, 10 U of antitoxin titer was the border of survival or death after challenge. Guinea pigs with antitoxin titers of less than 5 U, 5 U and 10 U died at 2, 3 to 4 and 4 days, respectively, after challenge. These results suggest that C. novyi alpha-toxin was the main protective antigen against challenge exposure to spores in guinea pigs.

  18. Humoral immunity and injection-site reactions in cattle vaccinated with a multivalent clostridial vaccine administered via subcutaneous injection or via transdermal needle-free injection.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R; Ensley, Douglas T; Tanner, Patrick A; Fankhauser, Rebecca; Shen, Jing; Songer, J Glenn; Leard, A Timothy; Milward, Francis W; Pence, Mel E; Hurley, David J

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate injection-site reactions and serum antibody titers in cattle vaccinated with a clostridial vaccine administered SC or via needle-free transdermal injection. Sixteen 11-to 12-month-old Herefords. Cattle in 2 groups were vaccinated on days 0 and 28 with a commercially available multivalent clostridial vaccine administered SC or transdermally Injection sites and serum antibody titers were evaluated at several time points after vaccination. Serum antibody titers against Clostridium perfringens beta toxin, Clostridium novyi alpha toxin, and Clostridium septicum alpha toxin were determined with an ELISA; Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin titers were determined with a toxin neutralization assay. Firm injection site swellings developed in cattle vaccinated via either route; however, at several observation times, swellings were significantly smaller in cattle vaccinated transdermally. Serum titers against C perfringens beta toxin and C septicum alpha toxin did not differ significantly between groups after vaccination; serum titers against C novyi alpha toxin were not significantly different between groups, except on days 10 and 56, when they were significantly higher in cattle vaccinated SC. Titers against C sordellii lethal toxin were significantly higher in cattle vaccinated SC on several days after vaccination, but titers were not significantly different after day 49. Transdermal vaccination of cattle resulted in serum antibody titers that were similar to those induced via SC vaccination and caused injection-site reactions that were significantly smaller. Transdermal vaccination may be an effective technique for vaccinating cattle against clostridial diseases while minimizing local reactions that often develop after clostridial vaccination.

  19. S. aureus blocks efferocytosis of neutrophils by macrophages through the activity of its virulence factor alpha toxin

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Taylor S.; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Hotz, Meghan; Cheng, Lily; Miller, Lloyd S.; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C. Kendall; Sellman, Bret R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia, such as those caused by Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with an influx of inflammatory neutrophils into the lung tissue and airways. Regulation and clearance of recruited neutrophils is essential for preventing tissue damage by “friendly fire”, a responsibility of macrophages in a process called efferocytosis. We hypothesized that S. aureus impairs efferocytosis by alveolar macrophages (AMs) through the activity of the secreted virulence factor alpha toxin (AT), which has been implicated in altering the antimicrobial function of AMs. Infection of mice lacking AMs resulted in significantly increased numbers of neutrophils in the lung, while clearance of neutrophils delivered intranasally into uninfected mice was reduced in AM depleted animals. In vitro, sublytic levels of AT impaired uptake of apoptotic neutrophils by purified AMs. In vivo, the presence of AT reduced uptake of neutrophils by AMs. Differential uptake of neutrophils was not due to changes in either the CD47/CD172 axis or CD36 levels. AT significantly reduced lung expression of CCN1 and altered AM surface localization of DD1α, two proteins known to influence efferocytosis. We conclude that AT may contribute to tissue damage during S. aureus pneumonia by inhibiting the ability of AM to clear neutrophils at the site of infection. PMID:27739519

  20. Structural features of the pore formed by Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin inferred from chemical modification and primary structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Menestrina, G; Belmonte, G; Parisi, V; Morante, S

    1992-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin makes cells and model membranes permeable to ions and uncharged molecules by opening oligomeric pores of uniform size. Its primary sequence reveals peculiar features which give some hints on the structure of the pore. A flexible region separating the toxin into two halves, several amphiphilic beta-strands and two amphiphilic alpha-helices long enough to span the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer are predicted. In analogy to bacterial porins, we propose that the inner walls of the pore are, at least in part, built by an amphiphilic beta-barrel. The model is consistent with circular dichroism data and with the electrophysiological properties of the pore. Functional information on this toxin were obtained by chemical modification of its four histidine residues. Specific carbethoxylation suggested they have different roles: one is required for specific receptor binding, one for oligomerisation and two for unspecific lipid binding. A tentative assignment of each histidine to its specific role is done on the basis of the structural predictions. A functionally related hemolysin, Aeromonas hydrophyla aerolysin, reveals remarkably similar features including the presence and location of histidines involved in receptor binding and oligomerisation.

  1. Fate of Clostridium botulinum and incidence of pathogenic clostridia in biogas processes.

    PubMed

    Fröschle, B; Messelhäusser, U; Höller, C; Lebuhn, M

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the sanitary situation in agricultural biogas plants (BP) regarding pathogenic Clostridium spp. The incidence of Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium novyi, Clostridium haemolyticum, Clostridium septicum and Clostridium chauvoei was investigated in 154 plant and animal substrates, digester sludges and digestates from full-scale BP using a method combining microbial enrichment with Real-Time PCR. The investigated clostridia were absent in the samples, except for Cl. novyi that was barely present (3·9%) and Cl. difficile that was more frequently detected (44·8%). Clostridium botulinum exposed to lab-scale digesters in sentinel chambers was reduced with D-values of 34·6 ± 11·2 days at 38°C and 1·0 ± 0·2 days at 55°C. These findings indicate minor relevance of clostridial pathogens in BP and an improved sanitary quality of the digestion product compared to untreated substrates concerning Cl. botulinum. However, the frequent detection of Cl. difficile opens questions on the durability of this organism in manure digestion lines. This is the first study providing data on the reduction of Cl. botulinum during biogas processes that scientifically invalidate contrary claims by some media in the public. Furthermore, the results improve the fragmentary knowledge on the prevalence of several clostridial pathogens in agricultural biogas production. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. In Vitro Selection of Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Elements against S. aureus Alpha Toxin and Sensitive Detection in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ka L.; Battistella, Luisa; Salva, Alysia D.; Williams, Ryan M.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha toxin is one of the major virulence factors secreted by Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium that is responsible for a wide variety of infections in both community and hospital settings. Due to the prevalence of S. aureus related infections and the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus, rapid and accurate diagnosis of S. aureus infections is crucial in benefiting patient health outcomes. In this study, a rigorous Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) variant previously developed by our laboratory was utilized to select a single-stranded DNA molecular recognition element (MRE) targeting alpha toxin with high affinity and specificity. At the end of the 12-round selection, the selected MRE had an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 93.7 ± 7.0 nM. Additionally, a modified sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed by using the selected ssDNA MRE as the toxin-capturing element and a sensitive detection of 200 nM alpha toxin in undiluted human serum samples was achieved. PMID:25633102

  3. Age related variations of serum concentrations of normally occurring IgG antibodies to Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed Central

    Zarén, E; Schwan, A; Frenckner, B

    1987-01-01

    In studies using indirect immunofluorescence IgG antibodies to Clostridium perfringens were found in sera from healthy adults. Sera from 236 healthy children were examined. The normally occurring IgG antibodies to C perfringens were found to have an age related variation. Preliminary data suggest that they are not correlated to C perfringens alpha toxin. The antigen(s) against which the antibodies are directed is/are probably part of the cell wall, but its/their exact nature is not known. PMID:2881950

  4. Novel signal peptides improve the secretion of recombinant Staphylococcus aureus Alpha toxinH35L in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Han, SooJin; Machhi, Shushil; Berge, Mark; Xi, Guoling; Linke, Thomas; Schoner, Ronald

    2017-12-01

    Secretion of heterologous proteins into Escherichia coli cell culture medium offers significant advantages for downstream processing over production as inclusion bodies; including cost and time savings, and reduction of endotoxin. Signal peptides play an important role in targeting proteins for translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane to the periplasmic space and release into culture medium during the secretion process. Alpha toxinH35L (ATH35L) was selected as an antigen for vaccine development against Staphylococcus aureus infections. It was successfully secreted into culture medium of E. coli by using bacterial signal peptides linked to the N-terminus of the protein. In order to improve the level of secreted ATH35L, we designed a series of novel signal peptides by swapping individual domains of modifying dsbA and pelB signal peptides and tested them in a fed-batch fermentation process. The data showed that some of the modified signal peptides improved the secretion efficiency of ATH35L compared with E. coli signal peptides from dsbA, pelB and phoA proteins. Indeed, one of the novel signal peptides improved the yield of secreted ATH35L by 3.5-fold in a fed-batch fermentation process and at the same time maintained processing at the expected site for signal peptide cleavage. Potentially, these new novel signal peptides can be used to improve the secretion efficiency of other heterologous proteins in E. coli. Furthermore, analysis of the synthetic signal peptide amino acid sequences provides some insight into the sequence features within the signal peptide that influence secretion efficiency.

  5. Detection of Alpha-Toxin and Other Virulence Factors in Biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus on Polystyrene and a Human Epidermal Model

    PubMed Central

    Lemmens-den Toom, N. A.; Willemse, J.; Koning, R. A.; Demmers, J. A. A.; Dekkers, D. H. W.; Rijkers, E.; El Ghalbzouri, A.; Nibbering, P. H.; van Wamel, W.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to successfully colonize (a)biotic surfaces may be explained by biofilm formation and the actions of virulence factors. The aim of the present study was to establish the presence of 52 proteins, including virulence factors such as alpha-toxin, during biofilm formation of five different (methicillin resistant) S. aureus strains on Leiden human epidermal models (LEMs) and polystyrene surfaces (PS) using a competitive Luminex-based assay. Results All five S. aureus strains formed biofilms on PS, whereas only three out of five strains formed biofilms on LEMs. Out of the 52 tested proteins, six functionally diverse proteins (ClfB, glucosaminidase, IsdA, IsaA, SACOL0688 and nuclease) were detected in biofilms of all strains on both PS and LEMs. At the same time, four toxins (alpha-toxin, gamma-hemolysin B and leukocidins D and E), two immune modulators (formyl peptide receptor-like inhibitory protein and Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 1), and two other proteins (lipase and LytM) were detectable in biofilms by all five S. aureus strains on LEMs, but not on PS. In contrast, fibronectin-binding protein B (FnbpB) was detectable in biofilms by all S. aureus biofilms on PS, but not on LEMs. These data were largely confirmed by the results from proteomic and transcriptomic analyses and in case of alpha-toxin additionally by GFP-reporter technology. Conclusion Functionally diverse virulence factors of (methicillin-resistant) S. aureus are present during biofilm formation on LEMs and PS. These results could aid in identifying novel targets for future treatment strategies against biofilm-associated infections. PMID:26741798

  6. Detection of Alpha-Toxin and Other Virulence Factors in Biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus on Polystyrene and a Human Epidermal Model.

    PubMed

    den Reijer, P M; Haisma, E M; Lemmens-den Toom, N A; Willemse, J; Koning, R I; Koning, R A; Demmers, J A A; Dekkers, D H W; Rijkers, E; El Ghalbzouri, A; Nibbering, P H; van Wamel, W

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to successfully colonize (a)biotic surfaces may be explained by biofilm formation and the actions of virulence factors. The aim of the present study was to establish the presence of 52 proteins, including virulence factors such as alpha-toxin, during biofilm formation of five different (methicillin resistant) S. aureus strains on Leiden human epidermal models (LEMs) and polystyrene surfaces (PS) using a competitive Luminex-based assay. All five S. aureus strains formed biofilms on PS, whereas only three out of five strains formed biofilms on LEMs. Out of the 52 tested proteins, six functionally diverse proteins (ClfB, glucosaminidase, IsdA, IsaA, SACOL0688 and nuclease) were detected in biofilms of all strains on both PS and LEMs. At the same time, four toxins (alpha-toxin, gamma-hemolysin B and leukocidins D and E), two immune modulators (formyl peptide receptor-like inhibitory protein and Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 1), and two other proteins (lipase and LytM) were detectable in biofilms by all five S. aureus strains on LEMs, but not on PS. In contrast, fibronectin-binding protein B (FnbpB) was detectable in biofilms by all S. aureus biofilms on PS, but not on LEMs. These data were largely confirmed by the results from proteomic and transcriptomic analyses and in case of alpha-toxin additionally by GFP-reporter technology. Functionally diverse virulence factors of (methicillin-resistant) S. aureus are present during biofilm formation on LEMs and PS. These results could aid in identifying novel targets for future treatment strategies against biofilm-associated infections.

  7. Detection and characterization of Clostridium species in soil of Zambia.

    PubMed

    Hang'ombe, B M; Isogai, E; Lungu, J; Mubita, C; Nambota, A; Kirisawa, R; Kimura, K; Isogai, H

    2000-10-01

    In the retrospective study of soil-borne diseases of cattle in Zambia, malignant edema and blackquarter were widespread. One hundred and sixty-five cases with malignant edema and 103 cases with blackquarter were reported between 1985 and 1997. It was found that specific soil-conditions associate the emergence of the soil-borne diseases. Soil samples from five areas in Zambia were examined for the presence of genus Clostridium. Direct immunofluorescent assay (IFA) examination showed that C. septicum, C. novyi and C. chauvoei were detected in the soil of specific areas in Zambia, respectively. Causal organisms such as C. perfringens were isolated from the soil samples. The information of area-specific distribution of Clositridium species may give an efficient program in protecting cattle and man.

  8. Rapid detection and identification of Clostridium chauvoei by PCR based on flagellin gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Kojima, A; Uchida, I; Sekizaki, T; Sasaki, Y; Ogikubo, Y; Tamura, Y

    2001-02-26

    We developed a one-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system that specifically detects Clostridium chauvoei. Oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify a 516-bp fragment of the structural flagellin gene. The specificity of the PCR was investigated by analyzing 59 strains of clostridia, and seven strain of other genera. A 516-bp fragment could be amplified from all the C. chauvoei strains tested, and no amplification was observed by using DNAs from the other strains tested, including Clostridium septicum. Similarly, this PCR-based method specifically detected C. chauvoei DNA sequences in samples of muscle and exudate of obtained from mice within 12h of inoculation. In tests using samples of muscle or liver, the limit of detection was about 200 organisms per reaction. These results suggest that the one-step PCR system may be useful for direct detection and identification of C. chauvoei in clinical specimens.

  9. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of MEDI4893, an Investigational, Extended-Half-Life, Anti-Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Toxin Human Monoclonal Antibody, in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiang-Qing; Robbie, Gabriel J.; Wu, Yuling; Esser, Mark T.; Jensen, Kathryn; Schwartz, Howard I.; Bellamy, Terramika; Hernandez-Illas, Martha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MEDI4893 is an investigational immunoglobulin G1(κ) monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to and neutralizes alpha-toxin, a key Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor. A triple-amino-acid substitution, M252Y/S254T/T256E, was engineered into the MEDI4893 Fc region to extend its serum half-life. A phase 1, double-blind, dose escalation study was designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, anti-alpha-toxin-neutralizing activity, and antidrug antibody (ADA) response of MEDI4893 following a single intravenous infusion in healthy adults 18 to 65 years of age. Thirty-three subjects were randomly assigned to receive MEDI4893 at 225 mg (n = 3), 750 mg (n = 3), 2,250 mg (n = 8), or 5,000 mg (n = 12) or placebo (n = 7) and were followed for 360 days. Adverse events were mild or moderate in severity; none were serious. The MEDI4893 peak serum concentration increased dose proportionally from 77.2 μg/ml (225-mg dose) to 1,784 μg/ml (5,000-mg dose). The area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 360 days also increased dose proportionally, from 4,840 μg · day/ml (225-mg dose) to 91,493 μg · day/ml (5,000-mg dose), indicating linear pharmacokinetics. MEDI4893's terminal half-life was estimated to be 80 to 112 days, which is approximately 4-fold longer than the half-lives of other human immunoglobulin G antibodies. The alpha-toxin-neutralizing activity in serum correlated highly with the MEDI4893 concentrations in serum. Three adults transiently tested positive for ADA on day 151, but this did not have an impact on MEDI4893 serum concentrations or the MEDI4893 safety profile; no subjects exhibited serum ADA at the study end. These data support the continued development of MEDI4893 for the prevention of S. aureus-mediated pneumonia. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT02296320.) PMID:27795368

  10. Change of the donor substrate specificity of Clostridium difficile toxin B by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Jank, Thomas; Reinert, Dirk J; Giesemann, Torsten; Schulz, Georg E; Aktories, Klaus

    2005-11-11

    The large cytotoxins of Clostridia species glycosylate and thereby inactivate small GTPases of the Rho family. Clostridium difficile toxins A and B and Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin use UDP-glucose as the donor for glucosylation of Rho/Ras GTPases. In contrast, alpha-toxin from Clostridium novyi N-acetylglucosaminylates Rho GTPases by using UDP-N-acetylglucosamine as a donor substrate. Based on the crystal structure of C. difficile toxin B, we studied the sugar donor specificity of the toxins by site-directed mutagenesis. The changing of Ile-383 and Gln-385 in toxin B to serine and alanine, respectively, largely increased the acceptance of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine as a sugar donor for modification of RhoA. The K(m) value was reduced from 960 to 26 mum for the double mutant. Accordingly, the potential of the double mutant of toxin B to hydrolyze UDP-N-acetylglucosamine was higher than that for UDP-glucose. The changing of Ile-383 and Gln-385 in the lethal toxin of C. sordellii allowed modification of Ras in the presence of UDP-N-acetyl-glucosamine and reduced the acceptance of UDP-glucose as a donor for glycosylation. Vice versa, the changing of the equivalent residues in C. novyi alpha-toxin from Ser-385 and Ala-387 to isoleucine and glutamine, respectively, reversed the donor specificity of the toxin from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine to UDP-glucose. These data demonstrate that two amino acid residues are crucial for the co-substrate specificity of clostridial glycosylating toxins.

  11. Clostridium difficile

    MedlinePlus

    ... 18-21yrs. Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & ... Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention ... Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Abdominal > Clostridium difficile Health Issues ...

  12. Clostridium difficile Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) Infection Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) Infection Condition Family HealthSeniors Share ...

  13. A Multi-Omics Approach Identifies Key Hubs Associated with Cell Type-Specific Responses of Airway Epithelial Cells to Staphylococcal Alpha-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Harms, Manuela; Ventz, Katharina; Gierok, Philipp; Chilukoti, Ravi Kumar; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2015-01-01

    Responsiveness of cells to alpha-toxin (Hla) from Staphylococcus aureus appears to occur in a cell-type dependent manner. Here, we compare two human bronchial epithelial cell lines, i.e. Hla-susceptible 16HBE14o- and Hla-resistant S9 cells, by a quantitative multi-omics strategy for a better understanding of Hla-induced cellular programs. Phosphoproteomics revealed a substantial impact on phosphorylation-dependent signaling in both cell models and highlights alterations in signaling pathways associated with cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts as well as the actin cytoskeleton as key features of early rHla-induced effects. Along comparable changes in down-stream activity of major protein kinases significant differences between both models were found upon rHla-treatment including activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR and mitogen-activated protein kinases MAPK1/3 signaling in S9 and repression in 16HBE14o- cells. System-wide transcript and protein expression profiling indicate induction of an immediate early response in either model. In addition, EGFR and MAPK1/3-mediated changes in gene expression suggest cellular recovery and survival in S9 cells but cell death in 16HBE14o- cells. Strikingly, inhibition of the EGFR sensitized S9 cells to Hla indicating that the cellular capacity of activation of the EGFR is a major protective determinant against Hla-mediated cytotoxic effects. PMID:25816343

  14. [The correction action of Phosprenyl and Gamavit on the functional activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages in response to high doses of Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin].

    PubMed

    Zaĭtseva, L G; Bekhalo, V A; Vasil'ev, I K; Godunov, R S; Kireeva, I V; Kozhevnikova, T N; Nagurskaia, E V; Narovlianskiĭ, A N; Ozherelkov, S V; Pronin, A V; Sanin, A V

    2005-01-01

    The study of the functional activity of peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c mice at different stages of the toxic action caused by S. aureus alpha-toxin (ST) was carried out. The analysis of the dynamics of toxic reaction revealed the main critical points of triggering necrotic processes: the first hour and day 2. One hour after the injection of large doses of ST a sharp increase in the process of antigen binding with its subsequent sharp decrease. Simultaneously, a decrease in the activity of the lysosomal enzymes cathepsin D and acidic phosphatase was established, which was indicative of the destabilization of both lysosomal and cellular macrophage membranes. The increase of oxygen metabolism on day 2, together with the release of lysosomal proteases into the extracellular area, correlated with the maximum death rate of mice and served as the main index of the development of necrosis. The prophylactic and therapeutic use of the preparations Gamavit and Phosprenyl revealed their antitoxic activity and capacityfor stimulating the level of natural body resistance.

  15. Bacteriological and molecular studies of Clostridium perfringens infections in newly born calves.

    PubMed

    Selim, A M; Elhaig, M M; Zakaria, I; Ali, A

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is considered one of the important causes of calf diarrhea. Two hundred and twenty-seven clinical samples from newly born and dead diarrheic calves were examined bacteriologically and by PCR. Bacterial culture identified C. perfringens in 168 of 227 samples. A total of 144 of these isolates were lecithinase positive, indicating C. perfringens Type A. In addition, 154 isolates were positive by alpha toxin encoding gene-PCR assay. This study showed high agreement between the results of bacteriology and multiplex PCR. The multiplex PCR typed all isolates that were typed as C. perfringens Type A through bacteriologic methods, but ten samples that were lecithinase negative were positive in the multiplex PCR. The study showed the highest occurrence of C. perfringens Type A isolations from calves during the winter and autumn compared with other seasons.

  16. Clostridium Perfringens Infection in a Febrile Patient with Severe Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hashiba, Masamitsu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Tomonori; Kano, Hideki; Tsuda, Masanobu; Takeyama, Naoshi

    2016-04-06

    Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) can cause various infections, including gas gangrene, crepitant cellulitis, and fasciitis. While C. perfringens sepsis is uncommon, it is often rapidly fatal because the alpha toxin of this bacterium induces massive intravascular hemolysis by disrupting red blood cell membranes. We present the case of a male patient with diabetes who developed a fatal liver abscess with massive intravascular hemolysis and septic shock caused by toxigenic C. perfringens. The peripheral blood smear showed loss of central pallor, with numerous spherocytes. Multiplex PCR only detected expression of the cpa gene, indicating that the pathogen was C. perfringens type A. C. perfringens infection should be considered in a febrile patient who has severe hemolytic anemia with a very low MCV, hemolyzed blood sample, and negative Coombs test. The characteristic peripheral blood smear findings may facilitate rapid diagnosis.

  17. Towards an understanding of the role of Clostridium perfringens toxins in human and animal disease

    PubMed Central

    Uzal, Francisco A; Freedman, John C; Shrestha, Archana; Theoret, James R; Garcia, Jorge; Awad, Milena M; Adams, Vicki; Moore, Robert J; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens uses its arsenal of >16 toxins to cause histotoxic and intestinal infections in humans and animals. It has been unclear why this bacterium produces so many different toxins, especially since many target the plasma membrane of host cells. However, it is now established that C. perfringens uses chromosomally encoded alpha toxin (a phospholipase C) and perfringolysin O (a pore-forming toxin) during histotoxic infections. In contrast, this bacterium causes intestinal disease by employing toxins encoded by mobile genetic elements, including C. perfringens enterotoxin, necrotic enteritis toxin B-like, epsilon toxin and beta toxin. Like perfringolysin O, the toxins with established roles in intestinal disease form membrane pores. However, the intestinal disease-associated toxins vary in their target specificity, when they are produced (sporulation vs vegetative growth), and in their sensitivity to intestinal proteases. Producing many toxins with diverse characteristics likely imparts virulence flexibility to C. perfringens so it can cause an array of diseases. PMID:24762309

  18. Detection of alpha- and epsilon-toxigenic Clostridium perfringens type D in sheep and goats using a DNA amplification technique (PCR).

    PubMed

    Miserez, R; Frey, J; Buogo, C; Capaul, S; Tontis, A; Burnens, A; Nicolet, J

    1998-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens isolated from sheep and goat with enterotoxaemia at necropsy and from healthy animals at slaughter were typed using specific PCR assays for the detection of the alpha-, beta- and epsilon-toxin genes. Clostridium perfringens isolated from all 52 animals with pathological signs of enterotoxaemia showed the presence of the alpha- and epsilon-toxin genes but were devoid of the beta-toxin gene. These strains could therefore be identified as type D, characteristic for clostridial enterotoxaemia of sheep, lambs and goats. In contrast, Cl. perfringens isolated from 11 of 13 healthy animals only contained the alpha-toxin gene which is typical for type A. Two of the healthy animals contained Cl. perfringens with the alpha- and epsilon-toxin genes. However, when several individual Cl. perfringens colonies were analysed from each of these two animals, only a small percentage was found to contain the epsilon-toxin gene, whereas the majority of the colonies were of type A with the alpha-toxin gene only. This is in contrast to the findings from the diseased animals which contained practically only type D Cl. perfringens. The beta-toxin gene was not found in any Cl. perfringens isolate from goat and sheep. Comparison of the PCR data with results obtained by the classical biological toxin assay using the mouse model showed a good correlation.

  19. Targeting Alpha Toxin and ClfA with a Multimechanistic Monoclonal-Antibody-Based Approach for Prophylaxis of Serious Staphylococcus aureus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tkaczyk, C.; Hamilton, M. M.; Sadowska, A.; Shi, Y.; Chang, C.S.; Chowdhury, P.; Buonapane, R.; Xiao, X.; Warrener, P.; Mediavilla, J.; Kreiswirth, B.; Suzich, J.; Stover, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus produces numerous virulence factors, each contributing different mechanisms to bacterial pathogenesis in a spectrum of diseases. Alpha toxin (AT), a cytolytic pore-forming toxin, plays a key role in skin and soft tissue infections and pneumonia, and a human anti-AT monoclonal antibody (MAb), MEDI4893*, has been shown to reduce disease severity in dermonecrosis and pneumonia infection models. However, interstrain diversity and the complex pathogenesis of S. aureus bloodstream infections suggests that MEDI4893* alone may not provide adequate protection against S. aureus sepsis. Clumping factor A (ClfA), a fibrinogen binding protein, is an important virulence factor facilitating S. aureus bloodstream infections. Herein, we report on the identification of a high-affinity anti-ClfA MAb, 11H10, that inhibits ClfA binding to fibrinogen, prevents bacterial agglutination in human plasma, and promotes opsonophagocytic bacterial killing (OPK). 11H10 prophylaxis reduced disease severity in a mouse bacteremia model and was dependent on Fc effector function and OPK. Additionally, prophylaxis with 11H10 in combination with MEDI4893* provided enhanced strain coverage in this model and increased survival compared to that obtained with the individual MAbs. The MAb combination also reduced disease severity in murine dermonecrosis and pneumonia models, with activity similar to that of MEDI4893* alone. These results indicate that an MAb combination targeting multiple virulence factors provides benefit over a single MAb neutralizing one virulence mechanism by providing improved efficacy, broader strain coverage, and protection against multiple infection pathologies. PMID:27353753

  20. Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Toxin Is Conserved among Diverse Hospital Respiratory Isolates Collected from a Global Surveillance Study and Is Neutralized by Monoclonal Antibody MEDI4893

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Mok, Hoyin; Tkaczyk, Christine; Sellman, Bret R.; Wu, Yuling; Oganesyan, Vaheh; Slidel, Tim; Jafri, Hasan; McCarthy, Michael; Bradford, Patricia; Esser, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections lead to an array of illnesses ranging from mild skin infections to serious diseases, such endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and pneumonia. Alpha-toxin (Hla) is a pore-forming toxin, encoded by the hla gene, that is thought to play a key role in S. aureus pathogenesis. A monoclonal antibody targeting Hla, MEDI4893, is in clinical development for the prevention of S. aureus ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The presence of the hla gene and Hla protein in 994 respiratory isolates collected from patients in 34 countries in Asia, Europe, the United States, Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, and Australia was determined. Hla levels were correlated with the geographic location, age of the subject, and length of stay in the hospital. hla gene sequence analysis was performed, and mutations were mapped to the Hla crystal structure. S. aureus supernatants containing Hla variants were tested for susceptibility or resistance to MEDI4893. The hla gene was present and Hla was expressed in 99.0% and 83.2% of the isolates, respectively, regardless of geographic region, hospital locale, or age of the subject. More methicillin-susceptible than methicillin-resistant isolates expressed Hla (86.9% versus 78.8%; P = 0.0007), and S. aureus isolates from pediatric patients expressed the largest amounts of Hla. Fifty-seven different Hla subtypes were identified, and 91% of the isolates encoded an Hla subtype that was neutralized by MED4893. This study demonstrates that Hla is conserved in diverse S. aureus isolates from around the world and is an attractive target for prophylactic monoclonal antibody (MAb) or vaccine development. PMID:27324766

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Toxin Mediates General and Cell Type-Specific Changes in Metabolite Concentrations of Immortalized Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gierok, Philipp; Harms, Manuela; Richter, Erik; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter; Lalk, Michael; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin (Hla) is a potent pore-forming cytotoxin that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections, including pneumonia. The impact of Hla on the dynamics of the metabolome in eukaryotic host cells has not been investigated comprehensively. Using 1H-NMR, GC-MS and HPLC-MS, we quantified the concentrations of 51 intracellular metabolites and assessed alterations in the amount of 25 extracellular metabolites in the two human bronchial epithelial cell lines S9 and 16HBE14o− under standard culture conditions and after treatment with sub-lethal amounts (2 µg/ml) of recombinant Hla (rHla) in a time-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with rHla caused substantial decreases in the concentrations of intracellular metabolites from different metabolic pathways in both cell lines, including ATP and amino acids. Concomitant increases in the extracellular concentrations were detected for various intracellular compounds, including nucleotides, glutathione disulfide and NAD+. Our results indicate that rHla has a major impact on the metabolome of eukaryotic cells as a consequence of direct rHla-mediated alterations in plasma membrane permeability or indirect effects mediated by cellular signalling. However, cell-specific changes also were observed. Glucose consumption and lactate production rates suggest that the glycolytic activity of S9 cells, but not of 16HBE14o− cells, is increased in response to rHla. This could contribute to the observed higher level of resistance of S9 cells against rHla-induced membrane damage. PMID:24733556

  2. A spider toxin that induces a typical effect of scorpion alpha-toxins but competes with beta-toxins on binding to insect sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Gerardo; Escoubas, Pierre; Villegas, Elba; Karbat, Izhar; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Nakajima, Terumi; Gilles, Nicolas

    2005-02-08

    Delta-palutoxins from the spider Paracoelotes luctuosus (Araneae: Amaurobiidae) are 36-37 residue long peptides that show preference for insect sodium channels (NaChs) and modulate their function. Although they slow NaCh inactivation in a fashion similar to that of receptor site 3 modifiers, such as scorpion alpha-toxins, they actually bind with high affinity to the topologically distinct receptor site 4 of scorpion beta-toxins. To resolve this riddle, we scanned by Ala mutagenesis the surface of delta-PaluIT2, a delta-palutoxin variant with the highest affinity for insect NaChs, and compared it to the bioactive surface of a scorpion beta-toxin. We found three regions on the surface of delta-PaluIT2 important for activity: the first consists of Tyr-22 and Tyr-30 (aromatic), Ser-24 and Met-28 (polar), and Arg-8, Arg-26, Arg-32, and Arg-34 (basic) residues; the second is made of Trp-12; and the third is made of Asp-19, whose substitution by Ala uncoupled the binding from toxicity to lepidopteran larvae. Although spider delta-palutoxins and scorpion beta-toxins have developed from different ancestors, they show some commonality in their bioactive surfaces, which may explain their ability to compete for an identical receptor (site 4) on voltage-gated NaChs. Yet, their different mode of channel modulation provides a novel perspective about the structural relatedness of receptor sites 3 and 4, which until now have been considered topologically distinct.

  3. Identification of Clostridium chauvoei in cultures and clinical material from blackleg using PCR.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, P; Krampe, M; Capaul, S E; Frey, J; Nicolet, J

    1997-09-01

    An identification system for Clostridium chauvoei, using PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene (rrs) with specific oligonucleotide primers and subsequent restriction digestion of the amplification product is described. The specific oligonucleotide primers were designed based on the rrs gene sequences of C. chauvoei by comparing it to the DNA sequences of the rrs genes of its most closely related species Clostridium septicum and Clostridium carnis. A subsequent restriction digestion of the 960 bp amplification product was used in order to unambiguously identify C. chauvoei. The developed identification system was evaluated on clinical material during a recent outbreak of blackleg in cattle. Thereby, C. chauvoei was identified as the etiologic agent of the outbreak either directly from clinical samples of muscle, liver, spleen and kidney or from primary cultures made with this material. A comparison of the newly developed method with standard diagnostic tools for C. chauvoei showed that it has advantages over the immunofluorescence and is, therefore, a useful option to it. Moreover, the assay is a valuable tool for the phylogenetic identification of C. chauvoei which can assist to substitute the fastidious traditional identification methods and replace laboratory animal testing currently used.

  4. The NanI and NanJ sialidases of Clostridium perfringens are not essential for virulence.

    PubMed

    Chiarezza, Martina; Lyras, Dena; Pidot, Sacha J; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Awad, Milena M; Kennedy, Catherine L; Cordner, Leanne M; Phumoonna, Tongted; Poon, Rachael; Hughes, Meredith L; Emmins, John J; Alape-Girón, Alberto; Rood, Julian I

    2009-10-01

    The essential toxin in Clostridium perfringens-mediated gas gangrene or clostridial myonecrosis is alpha-toxin, although other toxins and extracellular enzymes may also be involved. In many bacterial pathogens extracellular sialidases are important virulence factors, and it has been suggested that sialidases may play a role in gas gangrene. C. perfringens strains have combinations of three different sialidase genes, two of which, nanI and nanJ, encode secreted sialidases. The nanI and nanJ genes were insertionally inactivated by homologous recombination in derivatives of sequenced strain 13 and were shown to encode two functional secreted sialidases, NanI and NanJ. Analysis of these derivatives showed that NanI was the major sialidase in this organism. Mutation of nanI resulted in loss of most of the secreted sialidase activity, and the residual activity was eliminated by subsequent mutation of the nanJ gene. Only a slight reduction in the total sialidase activity was observed in a nanJ mutant. Cytotoxicity assays using the B16 melanoma cell line showed that supernatants containing NanI or overexpressing NanJ enhanced alpha-toxin-mediated cytotoxicity. Finally, the ability of nanI, nanJ, and nanIJ mutants to cause disease was assessed in a mouse myonecrosis model. No attenuation of virulence was observed for any of these strains, providing evidence that neither the NanI sialidase nor the NanJ sialidase is essential for virulence.

  5. Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Scott R.

    2017-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) have emerged as one of the principal threats to the health of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. Nucleic acid testing for C. difficile toxin genes has eclipsed traditional clinical diagnostics for CDI in sensitivity and is now widespread in clinical use, but preliminary evidence suggests that this may have come at a cost of substantially reduced positive predictive value. The importance of C. difficile colonization is increasingly recognized not only as a source for false positive clinical testing but also as a source of new infections within hospitals and other healthcare environments. In the last five years, several new treatment strategies that capitalize on the increasing understanding of the altered microbiome and host defenses in CDI patients have completed clinical trials, including fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). This article highlights the changing epidemiology, laboratory diagnostics, pathogenesis, and treatment of CDI. PMID:20513554

  6. Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is used to treat Dupuytren's contracture (a painless thickening and tightening of tissue [cord] beneath ... of tissue can be felt upon examination. Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is also used to treat Peyronie's ...

  7. Effects of pH and inorganic phosphate on force production in alpha-toxin-permeabilized isolated rat uterine smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, C A; Taggart, M J; Wray, S; Smith, G L

    1993-01-01

    1. Strips of longitudinal smooth muscle isolated from rat uterus were permeabilized using crude alpha-toxin from the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. This treatment rendered the surface membrane permeable to small molecular weight substances. Simultaneous measurements of tension and calcium concentration ([Ca2+]) (using indo-1 fluorescence) were used to investigate the effects of pH and inorganic phosphate concentration ([Pi]) on Ca(2+)-activated force generated by the contractile proteins. 2. Raising the [Pi] from 1 to 11 mM at a pH of 7.2 depressed both maximal and submaximal Ca(2+)-activated force. This effect of Pi was concentration dependent having the majority of its effect by 6 mM. 3. Further experiments at a submaximal [Ca2+] showed that Ca(2+)-activated force was enhanced by raising [Pi] from 6 to 11 mM suggesting that Pi increased the Ca2+ sensitivity of tension production. Based on these results, calculations indicate that the apparent affinity constant of Ca2+ for the contractile proteins increased from 4 x 10(6) M-1 to 6 x 10(6) M-1 on raising [Pi] from 1 to 11 mM. 4. Lowering pH from 7.2 to 6.7 at a [Pi] of 1 mM potentiated Ca(2+)-activated force with a small depression in the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity of tension production. This effect of pH on maximum (100 microM Ca2+) and submaximum (0.3 microM Ca2+) Ca(2+)-activated force was observed over a range of acidic pHs (7.0-6.7). 5. Increasing pH from 7.2 to 7.7 at a [Pi] of 1 mM depressed Ca(2+)-activated force with no effect on Ca2+ sensitivity of tension production. 6. Spontaneous contractions in intact rat myometrium are abolished under hypoxic conditions. Under these same conditions intracellular [Pi] rises and pH falls. The results of this study suggest that taken individually neither the effect of a rise in [Pi] nor a fall in pH on Ca(2+)-activated force generated by the contractile proteins can account for the effect of hypoxia on spontaneous contractions. PMID:8229854

  8. An unusual necrotic myositis by Clostridium perfringens in a German Shepherd dog: A clinical report, bacteriological and molecular identification

    PubMed Central

    Salari Sedigh, Hamideh; Rajabioun, Masoud; Razmyar, Jamshid; Kazemi Mehrjerdi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Clostridial myositis, considered to be rare in pet animals, is an acutely fatal toxaemic condition. Some species of clostridia are responsible for necrotic myositis. A 2-year-old male German shepherd dog was admitted with non-weight bearing lameness and massive swelling of the left hind limb. Clostridium perfringens type A with alpha toxin was diagnosed as a pathogenic agent. Based on the history, the bacteria were introduced inside the tissue via contaminated needle following intramuscular injection. Urgent medical therapy followed by surgical intervention was performed. The dog was discharged completely healthy after hospitalization for four weeks. The objective of this report was to describe necrotic myositis in a dog with an emphasis on clinical signs and treatment as well as bacteriological and molecular identification of the micro-organism. Because of the fatal entity of the disease, prompt diagnosis as well as proper and urgent treatment is very important for successful therapy. PMID:26973773

  9. Epsilon toxin: a fascinating pore-forming toxin.

    PubMed

    Popoff, Michel R

    2011-12-01

    Epsilon toxin (ETX) is produced by strains of Clostridium perfringens classified as type B or type D. ETX belongs to the heptameric β-pore-forming toxins including aerolysin and Clostridium septicum alpha toxin, which are characterized by the formation of a pore through the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells consisting in a β-barrel of 14 amphipatic β strands. By contrast to aerolysin and C. septicum alpha toxin, ETX is a much more potent toxin and is responsible for enterotoxemia in animals, mainly sheep. ETX induces perivascular edema in various tissues and accumulates in particular in the kidneys and brain, where it causes edema and necrotic lesions. ETX is able to pass through the blood-brain barrier and stimulate the release of glutamate, which accounts for the symptoms of nervous excitation observed in animal enterotoxemia. At the cellular level, ETX causes rapid swelling followed by cell death involving necrosis. The precise mode of action of ETX remains to be determined. ETX is a powerful toxin, however, it also represents a unique tool with which to vehicle drugs into the central nervous system or target glutamatergic neurons.

  10. Membrane vesicles of Clostridium perfringens Type A strains induce innate and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanlong; Kong, Qingke; Roland, Kenneth L.; Curtiss, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle shedding from bacteria is a universal process in most Gram-negative bacteria and a few Gram-positive bacteria. In this report, we isolate extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs) from the supernatants of Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens). We demonstrated vesicle production in a variety of virulent and nonvirulent type A strains. MVs did not contain alpha-toxin and NetB toxin demonstrated by negative reaction to specific antibody and absence of specific proteins identified by LC-MS/MS. C. perfringens MVs contained DNA components such as 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rRNA), alpha-toxin gene (plc) and the perfringolysin O gene (pfoA) demonstrated by PCR. We also identified a total of 431 proteins in vesicles by 1-D gel separation and LC-MS/MS analysis. In vitro studies demonstrated that vesicles could be internalized into murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells without direct cytotoxicity effects, causing release of inflammation cytokines including granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1), which could also be detected in mice injected with MVs through intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. Mice immunized with C. perfringens MVs produced high titer IgG, especially IgG1, antibodies against C. perfringens membrane proteins. However, this kind of antibody could not provide protection in mice following challenge, though it could slightly postpone the time of death. Our results indicate that release of MVs from C. perfringens could provide a previously unknown mechanism to induce release of inflammatory cytokines, especially TNF-α, these findings may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infection. PMID:24631214

  11. Expression and purification of functional Clostridium perfringens alpha and epsilon toxins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yao; Kang, Lin; Gao, Shan; Zhou, Yang; Su, Libo; Xin, Wenwen; Su, Yuxin; Wang, Jinglin

    2011-06-01

    The alpha and epsilon toxins are 2 of the 4 major lethal toxins of the pathogen Clostridium perfringens. In this study, the expression of the epsilon toxin (etx) gene of C. perfringens was optimized by replacing rare codons with high-frequency codons, and the optimized gene was synthesized using overlapping PCR. Then, the etx gene or the alpha-toxin gene (cpa) was individually inserted into the pTIG-Trx expression vector with a hexahistidine tag and a thioredoxin (Trx) to facilitate their purification and induce the expression of soluble proteins. The recombinant alpha toxin (rCPA) and epsilon toxin (rETX) were highly expressed as soluble forms in the recipient Escherichia coli BL21 strain, respectively. The rCPA and rETX were purified using Ni(2+)-chelating chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography. And the entire purification process recovered about 40% of each target protein from the starting materials. The purified target toxins formed single band at about 42kDa (rCPA) or 31kDa (rETX) in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and their functional activity was confirmed by bioactivity assays. We have shown that the production of large amounts of soluble and functional proteins by using the pTIG-Trx vector in E. coli is a good alternative for the production of native alpha and epsilon toxins and could also be useful for the production of other toxic proteins with soluble forms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Recombinant Probiotic, Lactobacillus casei, Expressing the Clostridium perfringens α-toxoid, as an Orally Vaccine Candidate Against Gas Gangrene and Necrotic Enteritis.

    PubMed

    Alimolaei, Mojtaba; Golchin, Mehdi; Abshenas, Jalil; Ezatkhah, Majid; Bafti, Mehrdad Shamsaddini

    2017-04-11

    The alpha-toxin is one of the virulence factors of Clostridium perfringens for gas gangrene in humans and animals or necrotic enteritis in poultry. The C-terminal domain of this toxin ( cpa 247-370 ) was synthesized and cloned into pT1NX vector to construct the pT1NX-alpha plasmid. This surface-expressing plasmid was electroporated into Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393, generating the recombinant L. casei strain expressing alpha-toxoid (LC-α strain). Expression of this modified alpha-toxoid was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, immunoblotting, and direct immunofluorescence microscopy. BALB/c mice, immunized orally by the recombinant LC-α strain, elicited mucosal and significantly humoral immune responses (p < 0.05) and developed a protection against 900 MLD/mL of the standard alpha-toxin. This study showed that this recombinant LC-α strain could be a promising vaccine candidate against gas gangrene and necrotic enteritis.

  13. Biofilms of Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Pantaléon, Véronique; Bouttier, Sylvie; Soavelomandroso, Anna Philibertine; Janoir, Claire; Candela, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The biofilm is a microbial community embedded in a synthesized matrix and is the main bacterial way of life. A biofilm adheres on surfaces or is found on interfaces. It protects bacteria from the environment, toxic molecules and may have a role in virulence. Clostridium species are spread throughout both environments and hosts, but their biofilms have not been extensively described in comparison with other bacterial species. In this review we describe all biofilms formed by Clostridium species during both industrial processes and in mammals where biofilms may be formed either during infections or associated to microbiota in the gut. We have specifically focussed on Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens biofilms, which have been studied in vitro. Regulatory processes including sporulation and germination highlight how these Clostridium species live in biofilms. Furthermore, biofilms may have a role in the survival and spreading of Clostridium species.

  14. Clostridium Perfringens Infection in a Febrile Patient with Severe Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hashiba, Masamitsu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Tomonori; Kano, Hideki; Tsuda, Masanobu; Takeyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 82 Final Diagnosis: Clostridium perfringens infection Symptoms: Anemia • fever • shock Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Antimicrobial chemotherapy Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) can cause various infections, including gas gangrene, crepitant cellulitis, and fasciitis. While C. perfringens sepsis is uncommon, it is often rapidly fatal because the alpha toxin of this bacterium induces massive intravascular hemolysis by disrupting red blood cell membranes. Case Report: We present the case of a male patient with diabetes who developed a fatal liver abscess with massive intravascular hemolysis and septic shock caused by toxigenic C. perfringens. The peripheral blood smear showed loss of central pallor, with numerous spherocytes. Multiplex PCR only detected expression of the cpa gene, indicating that the pathogen was C. perfringens type A. Conclusions: C. perfringens infection should be considered in a febrile patient who has severe hemolytic anemia with a very low MCV, hemolyzed blood sample, and negative Coombs test. The characteristic peripheral blood smear findings may facilitate rapid diagnosis. PMID:27049736

  15. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) of C. perfringens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungwoo; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Li, Guangxing; Park, Myeong-Seon; Jang, Seung I; Jeong, Wooseog; Jeoung, Hye-Young; An, Dong-Jun; Lillehoj, Erik P

    2011-12-01

    Clostridium-related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by reaction with immune sera from commercial meat-type chickens with clinical outbreak of Clostridium infections. In addition to the genes encoding EF-Tu and PFO, C. perfringens alpha-toxin and necrotic enteritis B-like (NetB) toxin were also expressed in Escherichia coli and their corresponding recombinant proteins were purified. Using the four recombinant proteins as target antigens in ELISA immunoassays, high serum antibody titers were observed not only in chickens with clinical signs of Clostridium infections, but also in apparently healthy animals from the same disease-endemic farm. By contrast, no antibodies against any of the proteins were present in the serum of a specific pathogen-free bird. In ELISA using recombinant proteins of C. perfringens, the levels of anti-bacterial protein antibodies were also higher in chickens which were experimentally induced to show NE clinical signs after co-infection with C. perfringens and Eimeria maxima compared with uninfected controls. These results show that two antigenic C. perfringens proteins, EF-Tu and PFO can be useful detection antigens for C. perfringens-afflicted infections in commercial poultry.

  16. The NanI and NanJ Sialidases of Clostridium perfringens Are Not Essential for Virulence▿

    PubMed Central

    Chiarezza, Martina; Lyras, Dena; Pidot, Sacha J.; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Awad, Milena M.; Kennedy, Catherine L.; Cordner, Leanne M.; Phumoonna, Tongted; Poon, Rachael; Hughes, Meredith L.; Emmins, John J.; Alape-Girón, Alberto; Rood, Julian I.

    2009-01-01

    The essential toxin in Clostridium perfringens-mediated gas gangrene or clostridial myonecrosis is alpha-toxin, although other toxins and extracellular enzymes may also be involved. In many bacterial pathogens extracellular sialidases are important virulence factors, and it has been suggested that sialidases may play a role in gas gangrene. C. perfringens strains have combinations of three different sialidase genes, two of which, nanI and nanJ, encode secreted sialidases. The nanI and nanJ genes were insertionally inactivated by homologous recombination in derivatives of sequenced strain 13 and were shown to encode two functional secreted sialidases, NanI and NanJ. Analysis of these derivatives showed that NanI was the major sialidase in this organism. Mutation of nanI resulted in loss of most of the secreted sialidase activity, and the residual activity was eliminated by subsequent mutation of the nanJ gene. Only a slight reduction in the total sialidase activity was observed in a nanJ mutant. Cytotoxicity assays using the B16 melanoma cell line showed that supernatants containing NanI or overexpressing NanJ enhanced alpha-toxin-mediated cytotoxicity. Finally, the ability of nanI, nanJ, and nanIJ mutants to cause disease was assessed in a mouse myonecrosis model. No attenuation of virulence was observed for any of these strains, providing evidence that neither the NanI sialidase nor the NanJ sialidase is essential for virulence. PMID:19651873

  17. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol predisposes for the development of Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Antonissen, Gunther; Van Immerseel, Filip; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Timbermont, Leen; Verlinden, Marc; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (P<0.001). DON significantly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance in duodenal segments (P<0.001) and decreased duodenal villus height (P = 0.014) indicating intestinal barrier disruption and intestinal epithelial damage, respectively. This may lead to an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and decreased absorption of dietary proteins. Protein analysis of duodenal content indeed showed that DON contamination resulted in a significant increase in total protein concentration (P = 0.023). Furthermore, DON had no effect on in vitro growth, alpha toxin production and netB toxin transcription of Clostridium perfringens. In conclusion, feed contamination with DON at concentrations below the European maximum guidance level of 5,000 µg/kg feed, is a predisposing factor for the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens.

  18. The Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Predisposes for the Development of Clostridium perfringens-Induced Necrotic Enteritis in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Antonissen, Gunther; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Timbermont, Leen; Verlinden, Marc; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (P<0.001). DON significantly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance in duodenal segments (P<0.001) and decreased duodenal villus height (P = 0.014) indicating intestinal barrier disruption and intestinal epithelial damage, respectively. This may lead to an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and decreased absorption of dietary proteins. Protein analysis of duodenal content indeed showed that DON contamination resulted in a significant increase in total protein concentration (P = 0.023). Furthermore, DON had no effect on in vitro growth, alpha toxin production and netB toxin transcription of Clostridium perfringens. In conclusion, feed contamination with DON at concentrations below the European maximum guidance level of 5,000 µg/kg feed, is a predisposing factor for the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens. PMID:25268498

  19. A novel toxin homologous to large clostridial cytotoxins found in culture supernatant of Clostridium perfringens type C.

    PubMed

    Amimoto, Katsuhiko; Noro, Taichi; Oishi, Eiji; Shimizu, Mitsugu

    2007-04-01

    An unknown cytotoxin was identified in the culture supernatant of Clostridium perfringens type C. The cytotoxin, named TpeL, which was purified using mAb-based affinity chromatography, had a lethal activity of 62 minimum lethal dose (MLD) mg(-1) in mice and a cytotoxic activity of 6.2x10(5) cytotoxic units (CU) mg(-1) in Vero cells. The nucleotide sequence of TpeL was determined. The entire ORF had a length of 4953 bases, and the same nucleotide sequence was not recorded in the GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ databases. The molecular mass calculated from the deduced amino acid sequence was 191 kDa, and a signal peptide region was not found within the ORF. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited 30-39 % homology to Clostridium difficile toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB), Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin (TcsL) and Clostridium novyi alpha-toxin (TcnA). The amino acid sequence of TpeL is shorter than these toxins, and the homologous region was located at the N-terminal site. Eighteen strains of C. perfringens types A, B and C were surveyed for the presence of the tpeL gene by PCR. The tpeL gene was detected in all type B (one strain) and C strains (five strains), but not in any type A strains (12 strains). TpeL was detected in culture filtrates of the five type C strains by dot-blot analysis, but not in the type B strain. It was concluded that TpeL is a novel toxin similar to the known large clostridial cytotoxins. Furthermore, the data indicated that TpeL is produced by many C. perfringens type C strains.

  20. Clostridium Difficile Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a bacterium that causes diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions such as colitis. Symptoms include Watery ... Nausea Abdominal pain or tenderness You might get C. difficile disease if you have an illness that ...

  1. Contact with enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells induces rapid upregulation of toxin production by Clostridium perfringens type C isolates

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Jorge E.; Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru; McClane, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C isolates cause necrotizing enteritis in humans and domestic animals. In vitro, type C isolates often produce beta toxin (CPB), beta2 toxin (CPB2), alpha toxin (CPA), perfringolysin O (PFO), and TpeL during (or after) late log-phase growth. In contrast, the current study found that many type C isolates respond to close contact with enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells by producing all toxins, except TpeL, much more rapidly than occurs during in vitro growth. This in vivo effect involves rapid transcriptional upregulation of the cpb, cpb2, pfoA and plc toxin genes. Rapid Caco-2 cell-induced upregulation of CPB and PFO production involves the VirS/VirR two-component system, since upregulated in vivo transcription of the pfoA and cpb genes was blocked by inactivating the virR gene and was reversible by complementation to restore VirR expression. However, the luxS quorum sensing system is not required for the rapid upregulation of type C toxin production induced by contact with Caco-2 cells. These results provide the first indication of host cell:pathogen cross-talk affecting toxin production kinetics by any pathogenic Clostridium spp., identify in vivo vs. in vitro differences in C. perfringens toxin expression, and implicate VirS/VirR as a possible contributor to some C. perfringens enteric diseases. PMID:19438515

  2. Lethal human neutropenic entercolitis caused by Clostridium chauvoei in the United States: tip of the iceberg?

    PubMed

    Weatherhead, Jill E; Tweardy, David J

    2012-02-01

    The patient is a 44-year-old woman with metastatic grade 3 intra-ductal carcinoma of the breast who was started on palliative chemotherapy (docetaxel) 10 days prior to admission and presented to the emergency center complaining of diffuse abdominal pain and generalized weakness. CT abdomen showed diffuse bowel wall thickening from the cecum to the transverse colon with free fluid in the pelvis. The patient was neutropenic on admission (absolute neutrophil count of 600 cells/μl). She received antibiotics for 21 days for neutropenic enterocolitis. Blood culture isolate from admission was sent for 16s rRNA gene sequencing, which identified Clostridium chauvoei. While C. chauvoei has a long history of veterinary importance, this is the first documented case of infection caused by C. chauvoei in a human in the United States. C. chauvoei has a close phylogenetic relationship with C. septicum making the two species difficult to differentiate using conventional microbiologic methods. With increased use of more reliable detection methods the actual prevalence of C. chauvoei causing human disease may be higher than currently recognized.

  3. Gas gangrene due to Clostridium perfringens in two injecting drug users in Vienna, Austria.

    PubMed

    Assadian, Ojan; Assadian, Afshin; Senekowitsch, Christian; Makristathis, Athanasios; Hagmüller, George

    2004-04-30

    We describe two cases of severe myonecrotic infections caused by Clostridium perfringens in injecting drug users (IDUs) in Vienna, Austria. Clostridial myonecrosis, or gas gangrene, is a clostridial infection primarily of muscle tissue. C. perfringens is isolated in 90% of these infections. Other clostridial species isolated are C. novyi, C. septicum, C. histolyticum, C. fallax, and C. bifermentans. Classically, clostridial myonecrosis has an acute presentation and a fulminant clinical course. It is diagnosed mainly on a clinical basis. The infection may be so rapidly progressive that any delay in recognition or treatment may be fatal. The onset is sudden, often within 4 to 6 hours after an injury. An early clinical finding is sudden severe pain in the area of infection. Swelling and edema in the area of infection is pronounced. At surgery, the infected muscle is dark-red to black, is noncontractile, and does not bleed when cut. Crepitus, although not prominent, is sometimes detected. We were able to demonstrate spores that were morphologically indistinguishable from spores of C. perfringens in a drug sample obtained from case 2. General practitioners and accident and emergency staff should be aware of the possibility of C. perfringens infection in IDUs, especially if injection into soft tissue is suspected.

  4. Amino acid sequence of TsTX-V, an alpha-toxin from Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom, and its effect on K+ permeability of beta-cells from isolated rat islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, S; Toyama, M H; Arantes, E C; Giglio, J R; da Silva, C A; Carneiro, E M; Gonçalves, A A; Oliveira, B

    1995-04-13

    Highly purified Tityustoxin V (TsTX-V), an alpha-toxin isolated from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus, was obtained by ion exchange chromatography on carboxymethylcellulose-52. It was shown to be homogeneous by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography, N-terminal sequencing (first 39 residues) of the reduced and alkylated protein and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecylsulfate and tricine. Following enzymatic digestion, the complete amino acid sequence (64 residues) was determined. The sequence showed higher homology with the toxins from the venoms of the North African than with those of the North and South American scorpions. Using the rate of 86Rb+ release from depolarized rat pancreatic beta-cells as a measure of K+ permeability changes, TsTX-V (5.6 micrograms/ml) was found to increase by 2.0-2.4-fold the rate of marker outflow in the presence of 8.3 mM glucose. This effect was persistent and slowly reversible, showing similarity to that induced by 100 microM veratridine, an agent that increases the open period of Na+ channels, delaying their inactivation. It is suggested that, by extending the depolarized period, TsTX-V indirectly affects beta-cell voltage-dependent K+ channels, thus increasing K+ permeability.

  5. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens Strains Isolated from Healthy and Necrotic Enteritis-Afflicted Broiler Chickens.

    PubMed

    Li, Charles; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Gadde, Ujvala Deepthi; Ritter, Don; Oh, SungTaek

    2017-06-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is an important enteric disease in poultry, and Clostridium perfringens (CP) type A strains are the primary etiology. NE is responsible for annual losses of US $6 billion to the poultry industry in the United States. An increase in the incidence of NE has been also associated with withdrawal of antibiotic growth promoters from poultry feed. In this study, CP strains isolated from healthy and NE-afflicted birds were characterized microbiologically and molecularly, and their virulence was experimentally tested in chickens. All strains were hemolytic, lecithinase positive, and identified as CP by biochemical tests. Three distinct colony morphologies were seen in brain-heart infusion media with 0.3% agarose, FeSO4, and ZnCl2. The CP strains responded differently to iron chelation with 2,2'-bidypinol. PCR toxinotyping showed that all tested strains were alpha toxin-positive, seven (N11, N10, CP1, CP5, CP13, JGS, and Del1) were beta2-toxin-positive, and only one (Del1) was necrotic enteritis toxin B-like-positive. In vivo studies indicated that most isolates, including strain N11 isolated from the normal chicken gut, were sufficiently virulent to produce NE disease in the Eimeria/CP dual infection model. The Del1 and N11 strains merit further investigation to identify their virulence factors and immune-protective antigens.

  6. [Molecular characterization and antimicrobial resistance of Clostridium perfringens isolates of different origins from Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Coronado, María del Mar; Mau-Inchaustegui, Silvia; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn

    2011-12-01

    Clostridium perfringens, a Gram positive, spore-forming anaerobe, is widely distributed in nature. Based upon their production of four major toxins alpha, beta, epsilon and iota, C. perfringens is classified into five toxinotypes (A-E). Some strains produce an enterotoxin (CPE), encoded by the cpe gene, which causes diarrhea in humans and some animals. C. perfringens strains that had been previously isolated and been kept at -80 degrees C were analyzed for the presence of toxin genes and for antimicrobial resistance: 20 from soils, 20 from animal, 20 from human origin and 21 from food non related to outbreaks. According to PCR results, all strains were classified as C. perfringens type A, since only alpha toxin gene was detected, while cpe was detected in two strains (2.5%) isolated from food, as it has been described in other world regions. Antibiotic resistance to at least one antibiotic was detected in 44% of the strains, 41% was resistant to clindamycin, 25% to chloramphenicol, 22% to penicillin and 20% to metronidazole. Soils strains showed the highest resistance percentages to almost all antibiotics. Multiresistance (to three or more antibiotic groups) was detected in the strains from soil (40%), human origin (30%), food (14%) and animal origin (5%). The high resistance rates found may be explained by the widespread use of antimicrobials as growth promoters in plants and animals; also these resistant strains may act as reservoir of resistance genes that may be transferred between bacteria in different environments.

  7. First report of two complete Clostridium chauvoei genome sequences and detailed in silico genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Prasad; Semmler, Torsten; Eichhorn, Inga; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Werckenthin, Christiane; Abdel-Glil, Mostafa Y; Wieler, Lothar H; Neubauer, Heinrich; Seyboldt, Christian

    2017-10-01

    Clostridium (C.) chauvoei is a Gram-positive, spore forming, anaerobic bacterium. It causes black leg in ruminants, a typically fatal histotoxic myonecrosis. High quality circular genome sequences were generated for the C. chauvoei type strain DSM 7528(T) (ATCC 10092(T)) and a field strain 12S0467 isolated in Germany. The origin of replication (oriC) was comparable to that of Bacillus subtilis in structure with two regions containing DnaA boxes. Similar prophages were identified in the genomes of both C. chauvoei strains which also harbored hemolysin and bacterial spore formation genes. A CRISPR type I-B system with limited variations in the repeat number was identified. Sporulation and germination process related genes were homologous to that of the Clostridia cluster I group but novel variations for regulatory genes were identified indicative for strain specific control of regulatory events. Phylogenomics showed a higher relatedness to C. septicum than to other so far sequenced genomes of species belonging to the genus Clostridium. Comparative genome analysis of three C. chauvoei circular genome sequences revealed the presence of few inversions and translocations in locally collinear blocks (LCBs). The species genome also shows a large number of genes involved in proteolysis, genes for glycosyl hydrolases and metal iron transportation genes which are presumably involved in virulence and survival in the host. Three conserved flagellar genes (fliC) were identified in each of the circular genomes. In conclusion this is the first comparative analysis of circular genomes for the species C. chauvoei, enabling insights into genome composition and virulence factor variation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Clostridium chauvoei in hens.

    PubMed

    Prukner-Radovcic, E; Milakovic-Novak, L; Ivesa-Petricevic, S; Grgic, N

    1995-03-01

    The bacterium Clostridium chauvoei causes disease in certain animals, most frequently in cattle and sheep. It occurs rarely in pigs, while equines and poultry appear to be resistant to infection. Two cases are presented in which C. chauvoei was isolated from disease of complex aetiology in hens. In Case I, 15-week-old light hybrid chickens were affected with chronic respiratory disease, coccidiosis, ascariasis and inflammation of the skin on the head, with necrosis of the comb. Growth was uneven and mortality reached 24%. Clostridium chauvoei was isolated from two of three combs examined. In Case II a flock of broiler breeders aged 11 weeks developed coccidiosis and, owing to disease or death, 60% were excluded from production. Clostridium chauvoei was isolated from all of 10 livers examined. These results demonstrate that C. chauvoei can infect chickens and that its possible role as a pathogen under certain circumstances should be further investigated.

  9. Characterization of polymorphisms and isoforms of the Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C gene (plc) reveals high genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Flávia F; Almeida, Marcelle O; Barroca, Tatiana M; Horta, Carolina C R; Carmo, Anderson O; Silva, Rodrigo O S; Pires, Prhiscylla S; Lobato, Francisco C F; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes

    2012-10-12

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (Cp-PLC), also called alpha-toxin, is encoded by the plc gene and has been implicated in several diseases; however, only a few studies have described polymorphisms in this gene. The aim of this study was to analyze polymorphisms in the Cp-PLC nucleotide and amino acid sequences obtained from isolates from different regions and to compare them to Clostridium phospholipase C sequences deposited in the NCBI database. Environmental samples (sediment, poultry feed, sawdust) and stool samples (from poultry, bovine, swine, horse, caprine, bird, dog, rabbit, toucan) were collected from healthy and sick animals. A total of 73 isolates were analyzed with the majority of samples belonging to the toxin type A subtype and possessing the gene encoding for the beta-2 toxin. Comparison of plc gene sequences from respective isolates revealed a high genetic diversity in the nucleotide sequences of mature Cp-PLC. Sequence comparisons identified 30 amino acid substitutions and 34 isoforms including some isoforms with substitutions in amino acids critical to toxin function. Comparison of sequences obtained in this study to Cp-PLC sequences obtained from the NCBI database resulted in the identification of 11 common haplotypes and 22 new isoforms. Phylogenetic analysis of phospholipase C sequences obtained from other Clostridium species identified relationships previously described. This report describes a broad characterization of the genetic diversity in the C. perfringens plc gene resulting in the identification of various isoforms. A better understanding of sequences encoding phospholipase C isoforms may reveal changes associated with protein function and C. perfringens virulence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacteriophages of Clostridium perfringens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The specific aims of the book chapter are to: (1) Briefly review the nomenclature of bacteriophages and how these agents are classified. (2) Discuss the problems associated with addition/removal of antibiotics in commercial animal feeds. (3) Provide a brief overview of Clostridium perfringens biolog...

  11. Clostridium tetani bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Hallit, Rabih Riad; Afridi, Muhammad; Sison, Raymund; Salem, Elie; Boghossian, Jack; Slim, Jihad

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus is a neuromuscular disease in which Clostridium tetani exotoxin (tetanospasmin) produces muscle spasms, incapacitating its host. To our knowledge, C. tetani bacteraemia has never been reported in the literature. The ideal management of this entity remains unresolved given that there is no literature to guide the therapy.

  12. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens in the feces of adult horses and foals with acute enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Gohari, Iman Mehdizadeh; Arroyo, Luis; MacInnes, Janet I.; Timoney, John F.; Parreira, Valeria R.; Prescott, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Up to 60% of cases of equine colitis have no known cause. To improve understanding of the causes of acute colitis in horses, we hypothesized that Clostridium perfringens producing enterotoxin (CPE) and/or beta2 toxin (CPB2) are common and important causes of severe colitis in horses and/or that C. perfringens producing an as-yet-undescribed cytotoxin may also cause colitis in horses. Fecal samples from 55 horses (43 adults, 12 foals) with clinical evidence of colitis were evaluated by culture for the presence of Clostridium difficile, C. perfringens, and Salmonella. Feces were also examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for C. difficile A/B toxins and C. perfringens alpha toxin (CPA), beta2 toxin (CPB2), and enterotoxin (CPE). Five C. perfringens isolates per sample were genotyped for the following genes: cpa, cpb, cpb2 consensus, cpb2 atypical, cpe (enterotoxin), etx (epsilon toxin), itx (iota toxin), netB (necrotic enteritis toxin B), and tpeL (large C. perfringens cytotoxin). The supernatants of these isolates were also evaluated for toxicity for an equine cell line. All fecal samples were negative for Salmonella. Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile were isolated from 40% and 5.4% of samples, respectively. All fecal samples were negative for CPE. Clostridium perfringens CPA and CPB2 toxins were detected in 14.5% and 7.2% of fecal samples, respectively, all of which were culture-positive for C. perfringens. No isolates were cpe, etx, netB, or tpeL gene-positive. Atypical cpb2 and consensus cpb2 genes were identified in 15 (13.6%) and 4 (3.6%) of 110 isolates, respectively. All equine C. perfringens isolates showed far milder cytotoxicity effects than a CPB-producing positive control, although cpb2-positive isolates were slightly but significantly more cytotoxic than negative isolates. Based on this studied population, we were unable to confirm our hypothesis that CPE and CPB2-producing C. perfringens are common in horses with colitis in

  13. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens in the feces of adult horses and foals with acute enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Gohari, Iman Mehdizadeh; Arroyo, Luis; Macinnes, Janet I; Timoney, John F; Parreira, Valeria R; Prescott, John F

    2014-01-01

    Up to 60% of cases of equine colitis have no known cause. To improve understanding of the causes of acute colitis in horses, we hypothesized that Clostridium perfringens producing enterotoxin (CPE) and/or beta2 toxin (CPB2) are common and important causes of severe colitis in horses and/or that C. perfringens producing an as-yet-undescribed cytotoxin may also cause colitis in horses. Fecal samples from 55 horses (43 adults, 12 foals) with clinical evidence of colitis were evaluated by culture for the presence of Clostridium difficile, C. perfringens, and Salmonella. Feces were also examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for C. difficile A/B toxins and C. perfringens alpha toxin (CPA), beta2 toxin (CPB2), and enterotoxin (CPE). Five C. perfringens isolates per sample were genotyped for the following genes: cpa, cpb, cpb2 consensus, cpb2 atypical, cpe (enterotoxin), etx (epsilon toxin), itx (iota toxin), netB (necrotic enteritis toxin B), and tpeL (large C. perfringens cytotoxin). The supernatants of these isolates were also evaluated for toxicity for an equine cell line. All fecal samples were negative for Salmonella. Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile were isolated from 40% and 5.4% of samples, respectively. All fecal samples were negative for CPE. Clostridium perfringens CPA and CPB2 toxins were detected in 14.5% and 7.2% of fecal samples, respectively, all of which were culture-positive for C. perfringens. No isolates were cpe, etx, netB, or tpeL gene-positive. Atypical cpb2 and consensus cpb2 genes were identified in 15 (13.6%) and 4 (3.6%) of 110 isolates, respectively. All equine C. perfringens isolates showed far milder cytotoxicity effects than a CPB-producing positive control, although cpb2-positive isolates were slightly but significantly more cytotoxic than negative isolates. Based on this studied population, we were unable to confirm our hypothesis that CPE and CPB2-producing C. perfringens are common in horses with colitis in

  14. Ca/sup 2 +/-stimulated catecholamine release from. cap alpha. -toxin-permeabilized PC12 cells: biochemical evidence for exocytosis and its modulation by protein kinase C and G protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnert-Hilger, G.; Braeutigam, M.; Gratzl, M.

    1987-12-01

    Two possible cellular pathways of catecholamines from the chromaffin vesicles of PC12 cells to the surrounding medium are explored in this study. The direct one circumventing the cytoplasm can be activated in ..cap alpha..-toxin-permeabilized cells with micromolar levels of free Ca/sup 2 +/. Catecholamine metabolites formed in the cytoplasm (i.e., 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol) are neither formed nor released from the cells under these conditions. However, when vesicular catecholamines were discharged into the cytoplasm by addition of the ionophore nigericin, such metabolites are formed and released into the medium independent of Ca/sup 2 +/. Both types of experiments provide direct evidence for the operation of Ca/sup 2 +/-induced exocytosis of dopamine and noradrenaline in permeabilized PC12 cells. The Ca/sup 2 +/ dependence of dopamine or noradrenaline release, as measured by the determination of the endogenous catecholamines using the high-performance liquid chromatography technique, exhibits two different phases. One is already activated below ..mu..M free Ca/sup 2 +/ and plateaus at 1-5 ..mu..M free Ca/sup 2 +/, while a second occurs in the presence of larger amounts of free Ca/sup 2 +/ (10-100 ..mu..M). Ca/sup 2 +/-induced catecholamine release from the permeabilized cells can be modulated in different ways: It is enhanced by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate and the diacylglycerol 1-oleyl-2-acetylglycerol provided Mg/sup 2 +//ATP is present, and it is inhibited by guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). The latter effect is abolished by pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin but not by cholera toxin. Thus, it appears that Ca/sup 2 +/-induced exocytosis can be modulated via the protein kinase C system, as well as via GTP binding proteins.

  15. Toxigenicity of Clostridium histolyticum

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Shoki; Imaizumi, Masaaki

    1966-01-01

    Nishida, Shoki (Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan), and Masaaki Imaizumi. Toxigenicity of Clostridium histolyticum. J. Bacteriol. 91:477–483. 1966.—From 234 soil samples, 21 strains of Clostridium histolyticum of different levels of α-toxigenicity were isolated by a new method specially designed for the isolation of this species. The α-toxigenicity of freshly isolated strains and of stock strains was closely associated with the potentiality for sporulation, growth, and smooth-colony formation. The presence of sugars, particularly xylose and arabinose, was inhibitory for growth. A few controversies on the biological properties of this species seem to be due to disregard for the growth-inhibiting effects of these sugars. PMID:5935337

  16. Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heinlen, Latisha; Ballard, Jimmy D.

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in Europe and North America and is a serious re-emerging pathogen. Recent outbreaks have led to increasing morbidity and mortality and have been associated with a new strain (BI/NAP1/027) of C. difficile that produces more toxin than historical strains. With the increasing incidence of C. difficile infection, clinicians have also seen a change in the epidemiology with increased infections in previously low-risk populations. This chapter highlights the current knowledge on C. difficile virulence, human disease, epidemic outbreaks, and optimal treatment strategies. PMID:20697257

  17. ET-58THE GENETICALLY ENGINEERED CLOSTRIDIUM NOVYI-NT IS EFFICACIOUS IN THE TREATMENT OF INTRACRANIAL GLIOBLASTOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Staedtke, Verena; Bai, Renyuan; Kinzler, Kenneth; Zhou, Shibin; Vogelstein, Bert; Riggins, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) exhibit a remarkable histopathologic heterogeneity with extensive necrotic regions intermixed with cell proliferation that generate local hypoxia and thus, limit the effectiveness greatly of traditional cancer therapies. The spore-forming bacterium Clostridium spp., however, has the ability to precisely target and lyse tumor cells in hypoxic environments. Here we show that Clostridium novyi-NT (C. novyi-NT), an engineered strain devoid of the lethal alpha-toxin, induces a microscopically tumor-localized response in orthotopically implanted syngeneic F98 and human xenograft 060919 rat GBM models. Both, intravenous and intratumoral, injections of C. novyi-NT spores resulted in germination within 24 hours and a rapid fall in luciferase activity, an indicator of tumor burden, in both animal models. C. novyi-NT germination was evidenced by the appearance of vegetative forms of C. novyi-NT bacteria. Strikingly, C. novyi-NT precisely localized to the tumor and micro-invasive tumor islands buried in the normal brain parenchyma, sparing adjacent normal cells only a few microns away. This bacterial "biosurgery" led to a significant survival advantage in these extremely aggressive rat models. Brain edema and increased intracranial pressure as a result of C. novyi-NT infection was common and medically managed while brain abscess formation was not clearly observed with appropriate use of antibiotics. Abscessation, however, is a potential side effect and can develop in human patients possibly requiring neurosurgical abscess drainage, a routine clinical procedure. In summary, C. novyi-NT can act as a tool to precisely eradicate GBM and significantly extend survival. Despite concerns on treatment-related toxicity, bacterial C. novyi-NT treatment may have a place in selected GBM patients in the future given the lack of alternative therapy options and dismal prognosis.

  18. Antibiotic Sensitivity of Clostridium perfringens Isolated From Faeces in Tabriz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Bidar Asl, Saeid; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Naghili, Behruz; Yeganeh, Fatemeh; Memar, Yousef; Mohammadzadeh, Yalda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clostridium perfringens, a Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium that produces at least 16 virulence factors including 12 toxins (α-ν), enterotoxin, hemolysin and neuraminidase, can create variable pathogenic condition, ranging from a food poisoning to life-threatening myonecrosis. Among C. perfringens strains, resistance to the drug choices such as penicillin as well as to alternatives of penicillin like metronidazole and clindamycin has also been observed. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the resistance of isolated toxigenic and non-toxigenic C. perfringens strains against common antimicrobial agents. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, a total of 136 stool specimens were collected. At first, cooked meat medium enrichment method was performed on samples at 45°C. Thereafter, a loopful of the enriched culture was transferred to blood agar and incubated anaerobically at 37°C for 24-72 hours. Colonies with double zone of hemolysis were identified by different biochemical tests such as phospholipase C (lecithinase) test, indole and urease production. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) for common antibiotics was determined by Etests (Epsilometer) and duplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) reaction was performed with specific primers for amplification of cpe (426 bp) and plc (283 bp) Genes. Results: Of 136 stool samples including diarrhea [48] and non-diarrhea [88] ones, 83 (61.02%) C. perfringens were cultured. Of these 83, 79 C. perfringens isolates showed the alpha-toxin (phospholipase C) production gene by PCR. Respectively, 3 (9.09%) and 2 (4.34%) cpe genes were present in diarrhea and non-diarrhea samples. Of 79 isolates of C. perfringens, 34 (43.03%) cases showed no resistance, 18 (22.78%) had one resistance and 27 (34.17%) isolates had multiple resistance to imipenem, metronidazole, ceftriaxone, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, and penicillin. Conclusions: Periodic evaluation of antimicrobial susceptibility for C

  19. Virulence for chickens of Clostridium perfringens isolated from poultry and other sources.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Kerry K; Theoret, James R; Stewart, Bernard A; Trinh, Hien T; Glock, Robert D; Songer, J Glenn

    2010-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A is the most common cause of poultry necrotic enteritis (NE). Of the four "major" toxins, type A strains produce only alpha toxin (CPA), which has long been considered a major factor in pathogenesis of NE. We investigated the virulence for poultry of type A strains from a variety of enteric sources. Newly-hatched CornishxRock chicks were fed a low protein diet for one week, a high protein diet for a second week, and then challenged with log-phase cultures of C. perfringens, mixed 3:4 (v/v) with high protein feed. Strain JGS4143 [genotype A, beta2 positive (cpb2(pos)), from a field case of NE] produced gross lesions compatible with NE in >85% of challenged birds. However, strains JGS1714 (enterotoxigenic genotype A, cpb2(pos), human food poisoning), JGS1936 (genotype A, cpb2(neg), bovine neonatal enteritis), JGS4142 (genotype A, cpb2(pos), bovine jejunal hemorrhage syndrome), JGS1473 (genotype A, cpb2(pos), chicken normal flora), JGS1070 (genotype C, cpb2(pos), porcine hemorrhagic enteritis), JGS1882 (genotype A, cpb2(pos), porcine neonatal enteritis), JGS1120 (ATCC 13124, genotype A, cpb2(neg), gas gangrene), JGS4151 (strain 13, genotype A, cpb2(pos), canine), and JGS4303 (SM101, enterotoxigenic genotype A, cpb2(neg), human food poisoning) failed to produce disease. In vivo passage failed to increase virulence of the non-NE strains. NE strains must have specific poultry-associated virulence attributes, such as the recently identified NetB and other factors, which allow for the development of disease.

  20. Coccidia-induced mucogenesis promotes the onset of necrotic enteritis by supporting Clostridium perfringens growth.

    PubMed

    Collier, C T; Hofacre, C L; Payne, A M; Anderson, D B; Kaiser, P; Mackie, R I; Gaskins, H R

    2008-03-15

    This study tested the hypothesis that a host mucogenic response to an intestinal coccidial infection promotes the onset of necrotic enteritis (NE). A chick NE model was used in which birds were inoculated with Eimeria acervulina and E. maxima and subsequently with Clostridium perfringens (EAM/CP). A second group of EAM/CP-infected birds was treated with the ionophore narasin (NAR/EAM/CP). These groups were compared to birds that were either non-infected (NIF), or infected only with E. acervulina and E. maxima (EAM), or C. perfringens (CP). The impact of intestinal coccidial infection and anti-coccidial treatment on host immune responses and microbial community structure were evaluated with histochemical-, cultivation- and molecular-based techniques. Barrier function was compromised in EAM/CP-infected birds as indicated by elevated CFUs for anaerobic bacteria and C. perfringens in the spleen when compared to NIF controls at day 20, with a subsequent increase in intestinal NE lesions and mortality at day 22. These results correlate positively with a host inflammatory response as evidenced by increased ileal interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IFN-gamma RNA expression. Concurrent increases in chicken intestinal mucin RNA expression, and goblet cell number and theca size indicate that EAM/CP induced an intestinal mucogenic response. Correspondingly, the growth of mucolytic bacteria and C. perfringens as well as alpha toxin production was greatest in EAM/CP-infected birds. The ionophore narasin, which directly eliminates coccidia, reduced goblet cell theca size, IL-10 and IFN-gamma expression, the growth of mucolytic bacteria including C. perfringens, coccidial and NE lesions and mortality in birds that were co-infected with coccidia and C. perfringens. Collectively the data support the hypothesis that coccidial infection induces a host mucogenic response providing a growth advantage to C. perfringens, the causative agent of NE.

  1. Effect of tannins on the in vitro growth of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Elizondo, Ana M; Mercado, Elsa C; Rabinovitz, Bettina C; Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2010-10-26

    Vegetable tannins are water-soluble polyphenolic compounds of varying molecular weights that occur abundantly in nature. The diet of many free-ranging wild animals contains significant amounts of tannins. Also, commercial tannins are used in animal industry as food additives to improve animal performance. In order to further determine the capacity of tannins to inhibit the development of intestinal diseases produced by Clostridium pefringens, we evaluated here the effect of tannins from quebracho, chestnut or combinations of both on C. perfringens and their toxins. The C. perfringens (types A, B, C, D and E) growth obtained from the intestine of healthy and diseased animals was reduced in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of quebracho tannins, chestnut tannins, combinations of both or a commercial formula based in these tannins. Although the minimal inhibitory concentration of both tannins varied between isolates, no statistically significant differences were observed between isolates from healthy or sick animals. Comparative analysis showed that the concentrations of quebracho tannin inhibiting the growth of C. perfringens were higher than chestnut tannin. In fact, antibacterial effect of quebracho tannin was increased up to 20 times with the addition of 25% of chestnut tannin and 85 times with 75% of chestnut tannin. Antibacterial activity of the commercial product was up to ~50 times higher than quebracho tannin alone. Quebracho tannin showed partial bactericidal activity, whereas chestnut tannin activity was stronger. Both tannins were able to reduce the alpha toxin lecithinase activity and epsilon toxin cytotoxicity in MDCK cells. These results suggest that tannin-supplemented diet could be useful to prevent some clostridial diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Vaccines against Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Leuzzi, Rosanna; Adamo, Roberto; Scarselli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is recognized as a major cause of nosocomial diseases ranging from antibiotic related diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Emergence during the last 2 decades of C. difficile strains associated with high incidence, severity and lethal outcomes has increased the challenges for CDI treatment. A limited number of drugs have proven to be effective against CDI and concerns about antibiotic resistance as well as recurring disease solicited the search for novel therapeutic strategies. Active vaccination provides the attractive opportunity to prevent CDI, and intense research in recent years led to development of experimental vaccines, 3 of which are currently under clinical evaluation. This review summarizes recent achievements and remaining challenges in the field of C. difficile vaccines, and discusses future perspectives in view of newly-identified candidate antigens. PMID:24637887

  3. Vaccines against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Leuzzi, Rosanna; Adamo, Roberto; Scarselli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is recognized as a major cause of nosocomial diseases ranging from antibiotic related diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Emergence during the last 2 decades of C. difficile strains associated with high incidence, severity and lethal outcomes has increased the challenges for CDI treatment. A limited number of drugs have proven to be effective against CDI and concerns about antibiotic resistance as well as recurring disease solicited the search for novel therapeutic strategies. Active vaccination provides the attractive opportunity to prevent CDI, and intense research in recent years led to development of experimental vaccines, 3 of which are currently under clinical evaluation. This review summarizes recent achievements and remaining challenges in the field of C. difficile vaccines, and discusses future perspectives in view of newly-identified candidate antigens.

  4. [Clostridium difficile enteritis].

    PubMed

    Ramos Martínez, Antonio; Romero Pizarro, Yolanda; Martínez Arrieta, Félix; Balandín Moreno, Bárbara; Múñez Rubio, Elena; Cuiñas León, Karina; Sánchez Romero, Isabel; Cantos López de Ibargüen, Blanca; Asensio Vegas, Angel

    2011-10-01

    Clostridium difficile infection of the small intestine is infrequent. We present the first case of C. difficile enteritis (CDE) diagnosed in Spain and provide a review of the literature. A 30-year-old man underwent surgery for recurrence of a retroperitoneal germ cell tumor. Seven days later the patient developed vomiting, diarrhea and, finally, intestinal obstruction due to pseudomembranes caused by CDE. Only 57 cases of CDE have been reported in the literature. The mean age was 52±17 years with a range of 18 to 86 years. Twenty-nine patients (50%) had inflammatory bowel disease. Forty-seven (81%) had a history of colon or small intestine surgery. Mortality was higher in older patients and in those without inflammatory bowel disease. CDE is characterized by high severity and mortality. 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Alcalá Hernández, Luis; Reigadas Ramírez, Elena; Bouza Santiago, Emilio

    2017-05-23

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the main cause of nosocomial diarrhea in industrialized countries and the source of a growing number of cases of diarrhea in the community. The outbreak of the hypervirulent strain belonging to ribotype 027 has increased the incidence and severity of CDI in some countries. Although CDI usually courses as a mild diarrhea it can lead to severe forms such as toxic megacolon or septic shock. One of every 2 episodes of CDI is not diagnosed in Spanish hospitals due to a lack of clinical suspicion or the use of insensitive diagnostic methods. The diagnostic techniques of choice are algorithms based on the detection of glutamate dehydrogenase and molecular detection of the genes of the toxins with or without the direct detection of the toxins. The recommended treatment for CDI depends on the type of infection and the characteristics of the patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Tips to Prevent Illness from Clostridium Perfringens

    MedlinePlus

    ... C. perfringens Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Clostridium perfringens ( C. perfringens ) is one of the most common ... gov More Information More Information Learn more about Clostridium perfringens Find out safe minimum cooking temperatures for foods ...

  7. Proposal to restrict the genus Clostridium (Prazmowski) to Clostridium butyricum and related species.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Paul A; Rainey, Fred A

    2015-12-07

    The genus Clostridium as presently constituted is phylogenetically and phenotypically incoherent. Polyphasic taxonomic data indicate that the genus comprises a collection of very heterogeneous species. Numerous phylogenetic studies, principally based on sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene indicate that the genus Clostridium should be restricted to Clostridium cluster I as Clostridium sensu stricto. Despite these findings, authors continue to add new species to the genus Clostridium that do not fall within the radiation of cluster I and the type species C. butryicum thus perpetuating the confusion associated with the taxonomy of this group. Here we formally propose that members of the Clostridium (Prazmowski) be restricted to the type species Clostridium butyricum and cluster I species. Eubacterium moniliforme, Eubacterium tarantellae, Sarcina maxima, and Sarcina ventriculi should be transferred to the genus Clostridium as Clostridium moniliforme comb. nov., Clostridium tarantellae comb. nov., Clostridium maximum comb. nov., and Clostridium ventriculi comb. nov. A novel genus Hathewaya gen. nov.is proposed for the species Clostridium histolyticum, Clostridium limosum and Clostridium proteolyticum as Hathewaya histolytica gen. nov. com. nov., Hathewaya limosa com. nov. and Hathewaya proteolytica comb. nov. The type species of Hathewaya is Hathewaya histolytica.

  8. Effect of 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid in a broiler Clostridium perfringens infection model.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Mussarat; Rempel, Heidi; Kuang, Xiaomei Tallie; Allen, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M; Malouin, François; Diarra, Moussa S

    2013-10-01

    In an effort to explore strategies to control Clostridium perfringens, we investigated the synergistic effect of a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) with penicillin G in a broiler challenge model. All chicks were inoculated in the crop by gavage on d 14, 15, and 16 with a mixture of 4 C. perfringens strains. Birds were treated with saline (control group) or 20 nmol of c-di-GMP by gavage or intramuscularly (IM) on d 24, all in conjunction with penicillin G in water for 5 d. Weekly samplings of ceca and ileum were performed on d 21 to 35 for C. perfringens and Lactobacillus enumeration. On d 35 of age, the IM treatment significantly (P < 0.05) reduced C. perfringens in the ceca, suggesting possible synergistic activity between penicillin G and c-di-GMP against C. perfringens in broiler ceca. Moreover, analysis of ceca DNA for the presence of a series of C. perfringens virulence genes showed a prevalence of 30% for the Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin gene (cpa) from d 21 to 35 in the IM-treated group, whereas the occurrence of the cpa gene increased from 10 to 60% in the other 2 groups (control and gavage) from d 21 to 35. Detection of β-lactamase genes (blaCMY-2, blaSHV, and blaTEM) indicative of gram-negative bacteria in the same samples from d 21 to 35 did not show significant treatment effects. Amplified fragment-length polymorphism showed a predominant 92% similarity between the ceca of 21-d-old control birds and the 35-d-old IM-treated c-di-GMP group. This suggests that c-di-GMP IM treatment might be effective at restoring the normal microflora of the host on d 35 after being challenged by C. perfringens. Our results suggest that c-di-GMP can reduce the colonization of C. perfringens in the gut without increasing the selection pressure for some β-lactamase genes or altering the commensal bacterial population.

  9. Relative disease susceptibility and clostridial toxin antibody responses in three commercial broiler lines coinfected with Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seung I; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Lee, Sung-Hyen; Lee, Kyung Woo; Lillehoj, Erik P; Hong, Yeong Ho; An, Dong-Jun; Jeoung, D Hye-Young; Chun, Ji-Eun

    2013-09-01

    Necrotic enteritis is an enteric disease of poultry resulting from infection by Clostridium perfringens with coinfection by Eimeria spp. constituting a major risk factor for disease pathogenesis. This study compared three commercial broiler chicken lines using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis. Day-old male Cobb, Ross, and Hubbard broilers were orally infected with viable C. perfringens and E. maxima and fed a high-protein diet to promote the development of experimental disease. Body weight loss, intestinal lesions, and serum antibody levels against alpha-toxin and necrotic enteritis B-like (NetB) toxin were measured as parameters of disease susceptibility and host immune response. Cobb chickens exhibited increased body weight loss compared with Ross and Hubbard breeds and greater gut lesion severity compared with Ross chickens. NetB antibody levels were greater in Cobb chickens compared with the Ross or Hubbard groups. These results suggest that Cobb chickens may be more susceptible to necrotic enteritis in the field compared with the Ross and Hubbard lines.

  10. In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element against Clostridium difficile Toxin B and Sensitive Detection in Human Fecal Matter

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Eamonn; Williams, Ryan M.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2015-01-01

    Toxin B is one of the major virulence factors of Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that is responsible for a significant number of diarrhea cases in acute care settings. Due to the prevalence of C. difficile induced diarrhea, rapid and correct diagnosis is crucial in the disease management. In this study, we have employed a stringent in vitro selection method to identify single-stranded DNA molecular recognition elements (MRE) specific for toxin B. At the end of the 12-round selection, one MRE with high affinity (Kd = 47.3 nM) for toxin B was identified. The selected MRE demonstrated low cross binding activities on negative targets: bovine serum albumin, Staphylococcus aureus alpha toxin, Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A, and cholera toxin of Vibrio cholera. A modified sandwich ELISA assay was developed utilizing the selected ssDNA MRE as the antigen capturing element and achieved a sensitive detection of 50 nM of toxin B in human fecal preparations. PMID:25734010

  11. Genomics of Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Chapeton-Montes, Diana; Plourde, Lucile; Speck, Denis; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Genomic information about Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of the tetanus disease, is scarce. The genome of strain E88, a strain used in vaccine production, was sequenced about 10 years ago. One additional genome (strain 12124569) has recently been released. Here we report three new genomes of C. tetani and describe major differences among all five C. tetani genomes. They all harbor tetanus-toxin-encoding plasmids that contain highly conserved genes for TeNT (tetanus toxin), TetR (transcriptional regulator of TeNT) and ColT (collagenase), but substantially differ in other plasmid regions. The chromosomes share a large core genome that contains about 85% of all genes of a given chromosome. The non-core chromosome comprises mainly prophage-like genomic regions and genes encoding environmental interaction and defense functions (e.g. surface proteins, restriction-modification systems, toxin-antitoxin systems, CRISPR/Cas systems) and other fitness functions (e.g. transport systems, metabolic activities). This new genome information will help to assess the level of genome plasticity of the species C. tetani and provide the basis for detailed comparative studies.

  12. Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Wiep Klaas; Lyras, Dena; Lacy, D. Borden; Wilcox, Mark H.; Kuijper, Ed J.

    2017-01-01

    Infection of the colon with the Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium difficile is potentially life threatening, especially in elderly people and in patients who have dysbiosis of the gut microbiota following antimicrobial drug exposure. C. difficile is the leading cause of health-care-associated infective diarrhoea. The life cycle of C. difficile is influenced by antimicrobial agents, the host immune system, and the host microbiota and its associated metabolites. The primary mediators of inflammation in C. difficile infection (CDI) are large clostridial toxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), and, in some bacterial strains, the binary toxin CDT. The toxins trigger a complex cascade of host cellular responses to cause diarrhoea, inflammation and tissue necrosis — the major symptoms of CDI. The factors responsible for the epidemic of some C. difficile strains are poorly understood. Recurrent infections are common and can be debilitating. Toxin detection for diagnosis is important for accurate epidemiological study, and for optimal management and prevention strategies. Infections are commonly treated with specific antimicrobial agents, but faecal microbiota transplants have shown promise for recurrent infections. Future biotherapies for C. difficile infections are likely to involve defined combinations of key gut microbiota. PMID:27158839

  13. Autism and Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Bolte, E R

    1998-08-01

    Autism is a severe developmental disability believed to have multiple etiologies. This paper outlines the possibility of a subacute, chronic tetanus infection of the intestinal tract as the underlying cause for symptoms of autism observed in some individuals. A significant percentage of individuals with autism have a history of extensive antibiotic use. Oral antibiotics significantly disrupt protective intestinal microbiota, creating a favorable environment for colonization by opportunistic pathogens. Clostridium tetani is an ubiquitous anaerobic bacillus that produces a potent neurotoxin. Intestinal colonization by C. tetani, and subsequent neurotoxin release, have been demonstrated in laboratory animals which were fed vegetative cells. The vagus nerve is capable of transporting tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) and provides a route of ascent from the intestinal tract to the CNS. This route bypasses TeNT's normal preferential binding sites in the spinal cord, and therefore the symptoms of a typical tetanus infection are not evident. Once in the brain, TeNT disrupts the release of neurotransmitters by the proteolytic cleavage of synaptobrevin, a synaptic vesicle membrane protein. This inhibition of neurotransmitter release would explain a wide variety of behavioral deficits apparent in autism. Lab animals injected in the brain with TeNT have exhibited many of these behaviors. Some children with autism have also shown a significant reduction in stereotyped behaviors when treated with antimicrobials effective against intestinal clostridia. When viewed as sequelae to a subacute, chronic tetanus infection, many of the puzzling abnormalities of autism have a logical basis. A review of atypical tetanus cases, and strategies to test the validity of this paper's hypothesis, are included.

  14. Policy development for Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Mark H

    2012-07-01

    The Advisory Committee on Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infection (ARHAI) was created at the height of the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). This article describes the role of ARHAI in the evaluation of laboratory testing for CDI, a related consultation on the legal requirements for manufacturers of in vitro diagnostic medical devices, a CDI healthcare bundle and surveillance of CDI in children.

  15. ClosTron-mediated engineering of Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Kuehne, Sarah A; Heap, John T; Cooksley, Clare M; Cartman, Stephen T; Minton, Nigel P

    2011-01-01

    The genus Clostridium is a diverse assemblage of Gram positive, anaerobic, endospore-forming bacteria. Whilst certain species have achieved notoriety as important animal and human pathogens (e.g. Clostridium difficile, Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium tetani, and Clostridium perfringens), the vast majority of the genus are entirely benign, and are able to undertake all manner of useful biotransformations. Prominent amongst them are those species able to produce the biofuels, butanol and ethanol from biomass-derived residues, such as Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinkii, Clostridium thermocellum, and Clostridium phytofermentans. The prominence of the genus in disease and biotechnology has led to the need for more effective means of genetic modification. The historical absence of methods based on conventional strategies for "knock-in" and "knock-out" in Clostridium has led to the adoption of recombination-independent procedures, typified by ClosTron technology. The ClosTron uses a retargeted group II intron and a retro-transposition-activated marker to selectively insert DNA into defined sites within the genome, to bring about gene inactivation and/or cargo DNA delivery. The procedure is extremely efficient, rapid, and requires minimal effort by the operator.

  16. [Deoxyribonuclease activity detection in Clostridium chauvoei strains].

    PubMed

    Carloni, G H; Bentancor, L D; De Torres, R A

    2005-01-01

    Beta toxin of C. chauvoei has desoxiribonuclease (DNase) activity which is regarded as one of its virulence factors. The production of DNase was detected in strains isolated from bovines, using as controls C. chauvoei ATCC 10092, and C. perfringens Type A and C. septicum, both laboratory isolates. The enzyme activity was made evident on a DNA substrate observing the macroscopic degradation. A simple methodology was developed using a commercial medium for DNase test, with the incorporation of sterile horse serum. Each strain was streaked on the surface of the medium, incubated in anaerobic atmosphere at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. The plates were revealed with HCI 1 N. The appearance of a clear and transparent zone around and under the microbial growing was considered a positive reaction. Enzyme activity was detected in 10 of 12 strains and also in the controls. The serum addition to the commercial basal medium allows the optimum development of the microorganism showing the enzymatic digestion zone.

  17. Genome Sequencing and Analysis of a Type A Clostridium perfringens Isolate from a Case of Bovine Clostridial Abomasitis

    PubMed Central

    Nowell, Victoria J.; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Songer, J. Glenn; MacInnes, Janet I.; Parreira, Valeria R.; Prescott, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a common inhabitant of the avian and mammalian gastrointestinal tracts and can behave commensally or pathogenically. Some enteric diseases caused by type A C. perfringens, including bovine clostridial abomasitis, remain poorly understood. To investigate the potential basis of virulence in strains causing this disease, we sequenced the genome of a type A C. perfringens isolate (strain F262) from a case of bovine clostridial abomasitis. The ∼3.34 Mbp chromosome of C. perfringens F262 is predicted to contain 3163 protein-coding genes, 76 tRNA genes, and an integrated plasmid sequence, Cfrag (∼18 kb). In addition, sequences of two complete circular plasmids, pF262C (4.8 kb) and pF262D (9.1 kb), and two incomplete plasmid fragments, pF262A (48.5 kb) and pF262B (50.0 kb), were identified. Comparison of the chromosome sequence of C. perfringens F262 to complete C. perfringens chromosomes, plasmids and phages revealed 261 unique genes. No novel toxin genes related to previously described clostridial toxins were identified: 60% of the 261 unique genes were hypothetical proteins. There was a two base pair deletion in virS, a gene reported to encode the main sensor kinase involved in virulence gene activation. Despite this frameshift mutation, C. perfringens F262 expressed perfringolysin O, alpha-toxin and the beta2-toxin, suggesting that another regulation system might contribute to the pathogenicity of this strain. Two complete plasmids, pF262C (4.8 kb) and pF262D (9.1 kb), unique to this strain of C. perfringens were identified. PMID:22412860

  18. Effects of Tylosin on Bacterial Mucolysis, Clostridium perfringens Colonization, and Intestinal Barrier Function in a Chick Model of Necrotic Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Collier, C. T.; van der Klis, J. D.; Deplancke, B.; Anderson, D. B.; Gaskins, H. R.

    2003-01-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is a worldwide poultry disease caused by the alpha toxin-producing bacterium Clostridium perfringens. Disease risk factors include concurrent coccidial infection and the dietary use of cereal grains high in nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP), such as wheat, barley, rye, and oats. Outbreaks of NE can be prevented or treated by the use of in-feed antibiotics. However, the current debate regarding the prophylactic use of antibiotics in animal diets necessitates a better understanding of factors that influence intestinal colonization by C. perfringens as well as the pathophysiological consequences of its growth. We report a study with a chick model of NE, which used molecular (16S rRNA gene [16S rDNA]) and culture-based microbiological techniques to investigate the impact of the macrolide antibiotic tylosin phosphate (100 ppm) and a dietary NSP (pectin) on the community structure of the small intestinal microbiota relative to colonization by C. perfringens. The effects of tylosin and pectin on mucolytic activity of the microbiota and C. perfringens colonization and their relationship to pathological indices of NE were of particular interest. The data demonstrate that tylosin reduced the percentage of mucolytic bacteria in general and the concentration of C. perfringens in particular, and these responses correlated in a temporal fashion with a reduction in the occurrence of NE lesions and an improvement in barrier function. The presence of pectin did not significantly affect the variables measured. Thus, it appears that tylosin can control NE through its modulation of C. perfringens colonization and the mucolytic activity of the intestinal microbiota. PMID:14506046

  19. Immunogenicity of a Trivalent Recombinant Vaccine Against Clostridium perfringens Alpha, Beta, and Epsilon Toxins in Farm Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Gustavo Marçal Schmidt Garcia; Salvarani, Felipe Masiero; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo Pouey; Mendonça, Marcelo; Moreira, Ângela Nunes; Gonçalves, Luciana Aramuni; Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria; Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic bacterium that produces several toxins. Of these, the alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins are responsible for causing the most severe C. perfringens-related diseases in farm animals. The best way to control these diseases is through vaccination. However, commercially available vaccines are based on inactivated toxins and have many production drawbacks, which can be overcome through the use of recombinant antigens. In this study, we produced recombinant alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins in Escherichia coli to formulate a trivalent vaccine. Its effectiveness was evaluated through a potency test in rabbits, in which the vaccine generated 9.6, 24.4, and 25.0 IU/mL of neutralizing antibodies against the respective toxins. Following this, cattle, sheep, and goats received the same formulation, generating, respectively, 5.19 ± 0.48, 4.34 ± 0.43, and 4.70 ± 0.58 IU/mL against alpha toxin, 13.71 ± 1.17 IU/mL (for all three species) against beta toxin, and 12.74 ± 1.70, 7.66 ± 1.69, and 8.91 ± 2.14 IU/mL against epsilon toxin. These levels were above the minimum recommended by international protocols. As such, our vaccine was effective in generating protective antibodies and, thus, may represent an interesting alternative for the prevention of C. perfringens-related intoxications in farm animals. PMID:27004612

  20. CodY Is a Global Regulator of Virulence-Associated Properties for Clostridium perfringens Type D Strain CN3718

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Ma, Menglin; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT CodY is known to regulate various virulence properties in several Gram-positive bacteria but has not yet been studied in the important histotoxic and intestinal pathogen Clostridium perfringens. The present study prepared an isogenic codY-null mutant in C. perfringens type D strain CN3718 by insertional mutagenesis using the Targetron system. Western blot analysis indicated that, relative to wild-type CN3718 or a complementing strain, this isogenic codY mutant produces reduced levels of epsilon toxin (ETX). Using supernatants from cultures of the wild-type, codY-null mutant, and complementing strains, CodY regulation of ETX production was shown to have cytotoxic consequences for MDCK cells. The CodY regulatory effect on ETX production was specific, since the codY-null mutant still made wild-type levels of alpha-toxin and perfringolysin O. Sialidase activity measurements and sialidase Western blot analysis of supernatants from CN3718 and its isogenic derivatives showed that CodY represses overall exosialidase activity due to a reduced presence of NanH in culture supernatants. Inactivation of the codY gene significantly decreased the adherence of CN3718 vegetative cells or spores to host Caco-2 cells. Finally, the codY mutant showed increased spore formation under vegetative growth conditions, although germination of these spores was impaired. Overall, these results identify CodY as a global regulator of many C. perfringens virulence-associated properties. Furthermore, they establish that, via CodY, CN3718 coordinately regulates many virulence-associated properties likely needed for intestinal infection. PMID:24105766

  1. Epidemiological and pathobiological profiles of Clostridium perfringens infections: review of consecutive series of 33 cases over a 13-year period

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Yuji; Dobashi, Yoh; Sakai, Toshiyasu; Monma, Chie; Miyatani, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is well known as the causative agent of several forms of enteric disease, precise epidemiological and pathobiological aspects are still unknown. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the culture results of samples collected in our hospital from 2001 through 2013. In addition, for the detection and toxinogenic typing of C. perfringens, polymerase-chain-reaction amplification (PCR)-based rapid analysis was performed in 6 cases using DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded tissues. Results: A total of 35 samples from 33 cases were positive for C. perfringens, representing an incidence of 0.017% (35/205, 114). Among 33 patients, 21 patients manifested sepsis and 7 patients had bacteremia. One of the septic cases was complicated by fatal intravascular hemolysis and thus, the prevalence was estimated at 3.0% among C. perfringens infections (1/33). The direct causative disease or state for C. perfringens infection was identified in 18 patients: surgery or intervention for cancers, 8 patients; chemotherapy for cancer, 2 patients; surgery or intervention for non-neoplastic disease, 6 patients; liver cirrhosis, 3 patients, etc. PCR-based toxinogenic typing of C. perfringens detected the alpha-toxin gene only in tissue from a patient who died of massive hemolysis; none of the toxin genes could be amplified in the other 5 cases examined. Conclusions: The prevalence of overt C. perfringens infection is low, but upon detection, infected patients should be carefully monitored for fatal acute hemolysis caused by type A C. perfringens. Furthermore, PCR-based rapid detection of C. perfringens and toxinogenic typing by archival pathological material is applicable as a diagnostic tool. PMID:25755747

  2. THE RELATIONSHIP OF TOXIC FRACTIONS OF A FILTRATE OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS TYPE A TO THE PATHOGENESIS OF CLOSTRIDIAL MYONECROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ganley, Oswald H.; Merchant, Donald J.; Bohr, David F.

    1955-01-01

    A crude filtrate from a culture of Clostridium perfringens, type A, was fractionated by a heavy metal-alcohol technique, and some degree of concentration of biologically active factors was achieved. Both the crude material and the fractions obtained were characterized in terms of their alpha toxin, theta toxin, hyaluronidase, and collagenase activities. The filtrate and fractions were tested for their effect on the peripheral circulation of the rat, using the epinephrine threshold technique. The crude material and several fractions caused a sharp increase in epinephrine sensitivity of the capillary bed of the meso-appendix of the rat; fraction R3B1 giving an 86-fold increase in sensitivity. This reaction could be inhibited by specific antitoxic serums but not by normal serum. The "circulation factor" was shown to be heat-labile and appears to be independent of either the alpha or theta toxins. Bilateral nephrectomy greatly reduced, but did not abolish, the effect of the toxin, while the threshold response to epinephrine was not materially changed following bilateral adrenalectomy. The crude filtrate and several fractions were shown to inhibit the phagocytosis of heat-killed B. anthracis to the extent of 40 to 50 per cent. Fraction R3C2 was devoid of all biological properties studied here, except phagocytosis inhibition, suggesting that the factor responsible for this activity is distinct from the "classical" toxins and the "circulation factor." Moreover, a 1:5000 dilution of an antiserum prepared against this fraction would completely neutralize the phagocytosis inhibition factor but failed to inhibit any of the other toxic activities. Since cardiovascular collapse and absence of phagocytosis are two significant clinical findings in gas gangrene, the possible roles of the "circulation" and "phagocytosis inhibition" factors in the pathogenesis of this disease are discussed. PMID:14367682

  3. Immunogenicity of a Trivalent Recombinant Vaccine Against Clostridium perfringens Alpha, Beta, and Epsilon Toxins in Farm Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Gustavo Marçal Schmidt Garcia; Salvarani, Felipe Masiero; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo Pouey; Mendonça, Marcelo; Moreira, Ângela Nunes; Gonçalves, Luciana Aramuni; Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria; Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo

    2016-03-23

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic bacterium that produces several toxins. Of these, the alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins are responsible for causing the most severe C. perfringens-related diseases in farm animals. The best way to control these diseases is through vaccination. However, commercially available vaccines are based on inactivated toxins and have many production drawbacks, which can be overcome through the use of recombinant antigens. In this study, we produced recombinant alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins in Escherichia coli to formulate a trivalent vaccine. Its effectiveness was evaluated through a potency test in rabbits, in which the vaccine generated 9.6, 24.4, and 25.0 IU/mL of neutralizing antibodies against the respective toxins. Following this, cattle, sheep, and goats received the same formulation, generating, respectively, 5.19 ± 0.48, 4.34 ± 0.43, and 4.70 ± 0.58 IU/mL against alpha toxin, 13.71 ± 1.17 IU/mL (for all three species) against beta toxin, and 12.74 ± 1.70, 7.66 ± 1.69, and 8.91 ± 2.14 IU/mL against epsilon toxin. These levels were above the minimum recommended by international protocols. As such, our vaccine was effective in generating protective antibodies and, thus, may represent an interesting alternative for the prevention of C. perfringens-related intoxications in farm animals.

  4. Survey of neuraminidase production by Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Clostridium difficile strains from clinical and nonclinical sources.

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, M R; Dodin, A

    1985-01-01

    Neuraminidase production was investigated in 57 Clostridium butyricum strains, 16 Clostridium beijerinckii strains, and 25 Clostridium difficile strains. Neuraminidase activity was found only in C. butyricum strains originating from one human newborn with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, two newborns with hemorrhagic colitis, one infected placenta, and one adult with peritonitis, It was concluded that neuraminidase was not a major virulence factor in C. butyricum strains. PMID:4056013

  5. 9 CFR 113.107 - Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.107 Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin. Clostridium...

  6. 9 CFR 113.106 - Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.106 Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin. Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin shall be...

  7. Clostridium difficile in the Military Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-05

    USAF) Abstract: Clostridium difficile, a gram - positive , spore-forming rod bacterium, causes diarrheal morbidity, increases hospitalizations and...STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. UNCLASSIFIED 1. Background Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), a gram positive ...component U.S. service members. HL7 data identified 1,505 positive results out of 20,152 tests performed for Clostridium difficile between 2010-2014

  8. Physical Characterization of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    Clostridium sporogenes 52 2.3 An Expression System for Clostridium acetobutylicum 58 2.4 Attempted Expression of BoNT/A Hc-encoding Fragments 74 2.5 Status... Clostridium / E. coli shuttle vector pMTL500ET 56 15. The C. acetobutylicum expression vector pMTL500F 59 16. Inducible expression of a cat gene using...expression system, developed in this laboratory independently of this contract, for Clostridium acetobutylicum . Although the promoter in question (fac) is

  9. Physical Characterization of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-17

    Attention was switched to employing Clostridium acetobutylicum NCIB 8052 as the recombinant host and efforts focused on obtaining regulated...Transfer in Clostridium sporogenes 41 2.3 An Expression System for Clostridium acetobutylicum 47 CONCLUSIONS 57- 58 REFERENCES 59-64 CONTENTS Page Number...A[lac-pro] supE thi hsdDS/ F’- traD36 proA+ Br lacP lacZAM15) and 168 trpC, respectively. The Clostridium acetobutylicum strain employed was NCIB

  10. Electrophoretic study of Clostridium species.

    PubMed Central

    Cato, E P; Hash, D E; Holdeman, L V; Moore, W E

    1982-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of soluble cellular proteins (without sodium dodecyl sulfate) of 70 Clostridium species indicated that the procedure was readily applicable to the differentiation of species in the genus. The protein patterns correlated well with the available DNA homology data and with most accepted differential tests. Results indicated that several earlier names for species were synonyms of those of accepted species and that two accepted species may be synonymous. Images PMID:6175658

  11. Metastatic Gas gangrene and Colonic Perforation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Matthew J; Sasapu, Kishore K; Macklin, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium septicum myonecrosis is associated with diabetes, colorectal and haematological malignancies. We present a case of metastatic myonecrosis in a diabetic patient with a perforated caecal tumour. The literature since 1989 is reviewed and 28 cases of Clostridium septicum myonecrosis are discussed. PMID:18373865

  12. Acetone, isopropanol, and butanol production by Clostridium beijerinckii (syn. Clostridium butylicum) and Clostridium aurantibutyricum

    SciTech Connect

    George, H.A.; Johnson, J.L.; Moore, W.E.C.; Holdeman, L.V.; Chen, J.S.

    1983-03-01

    Thirty-four strains representing 15 species of anaerobic bacteria were screened for acetone, isopropanol, and n-butanol (solvent) production. Under our culture conditions, several strains of Clostridium beijerinckii and C. aurantibutyricum produced at least 40 mM n-butanol (C. acetobutylicum strains produced up to 41 mM n-butanol under similar conditions). Both solvent-producing and non-solvent-producing strains of C. beijerinckii have high DNA homology with a reference strain of C. beijerinckii. Strains labeled ''Clostridium butylicum'' are phenotypically similar to C. beijerinckii and showed at least 78% DNA homology to a reference strain of C. beijerinckii. Therefore, these ''C. butylicum'' strains are members of C. beijerinckii. An earlier DNA homology study has shown that C. beijerinckii, C. aurantibutyricum, and C. acetobutylicum are distinct species.

  13. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type D. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial found...

  14. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type D. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial found...

  15. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type D. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial found...

  16. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type D. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial found...

  17. 9 CFR 113.455 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.455 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type D. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial found...

  18. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.109 Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium sordellii which has...

  19. 9 CFR 113.108 - Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.108 Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium novyi which has been inactivated and...

  20. 9 CFR 113.106 - Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin. 113.106... Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.106 Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin. Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium chauvoei which has been inactivated and is nontoxic. Each serial...

  1. 9 CFR 113.107 - Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.107 Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin. Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium haemolyticum which has been...

  2. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type C. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial...

  3. 9 CFR 113.107 - Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.107 Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin. Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium haemolyticum which has been...

  4. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type C. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial...

  5. 9 CFR 113.106 - Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin. 113.106... Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.106 Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin. Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium chauvoei which has been inactivated and is nontoxic. Each serial...

  6. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.109 Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium sordellii which has...

  7. 9 CFR 113.108 - Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.108 Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium novyi which has been inactivated and...

  8. 9 CFR 113.108 - Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.108 Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium novyi which has been inactivated and...

  9. 9 CFR 113.106 - Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin. 113.106... Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.106 Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin. Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium chauvoei which has been inactivated and is nontoxic. Each serial...

  10. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.109 Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium sordellii which has...

  11. 9 CFR 113.107 - Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.107 Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin. Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium haemolyticum which has been...

  12. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type C. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial...

  13. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.109 Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium sordellii which has...

  14. 9 CFR 113.107 - Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.107 Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin. Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium haemolyticum which has been...

  15. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type C. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial...

  16. 9 CFR 113.108 - Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.108 Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium novyi which has been inactivated and...

  17. 9 CFR 113.106 - Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin. 113.106... Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.106 Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin. Clostridium Chauvoei Bacterin shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium chauvoei which has been inactivated and is nontoxic. Each serial...

  18. 9 CFR 113.108 - Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.108 Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Novyi Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium novyi which has been inactivated and...

  19. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.109 Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium sordellii which has...

  20. 9 CFR 113.454 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.454 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Antitoxin. Clostridium Perfringens Type... Clostridium perfringens Type C. Each serial shall be tested as provided in this section. Any serial...

  1. Clostridium difficile and the microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Seekatz, Anna M.; Young, Vincent B.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading health care–associated illness. Both human and animal models have demonstrated the importance of the gut microbiota’s capability of providing colonization resistance against C. difficile. Risk factors for disease development include antibiotic use, which disrupts the gut microbiota, leading to the loss of colonization resistance and subsequent CDI. Identification of the specific microbes capable of restoring this function remains elusive. Future studies directed at how microbial communities influence the metabolic environment may help elucidate the role of the microbiota in disease development. These findings will improve current biotherapeutics for patients with CDI, particularly those with recurrent disease. PMID:25036699

  2. Clostridium difficile and the microbiota.

    PubMed

    Seekatz, Anna M; Young, Vincent B

    2014-10-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading health care-associated illness. Both human and animal models have demonstrated the importance of the gut microbiota's capability of providing colonization resistance against C. difficile. Risk factors for disease development include antibiotic use, which disrupts the gut microbiota, leading to the loss of colonization resistance and subsequent CDI. Identification of the specific microbes capable of restoring this function remains elusive. Future studies directed at how microbial communities influence the metabolic environment may help elucidate the role of the microbiota in disease development. These findings will improve current biotherapeutics for patients with CDI, particularly those with recurrent disease.

  3. Inducible Lysis in Clostridium tetani

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Lawrence M.; Altenbern, Robert A.

    1967-01-01

    Lysis was induced in seven strains of Clostridium tetani by exposure to mitomycin C. The search for a suitable indicator strain to detect bacteriophage in lysates has, so far, been unsuccessful. Inhibition studies on macromolecular synthesis during induction have shown that deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and protein syntheses are all involved in the lysis induced by mitomycin C. In experiments comparing toxin and protein content in induced and uninduced cells of C. tetani, the toxin-protein ratio proved to be the same in both systems up to the point of lysis. Several possible hypotheses deduced from these results are discussed. PMID:4226682

  4. Regulation of toxin synthesis in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Connan, Chloé; Denève, Cécile; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R

    2013-12-01

    Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins are structurally and functionally related proteins that are potent inhibitors of neuroexocytosis. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) associates with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs) to form complexes of various sizes, whereas tetanus toxin (TeNT) does not form any complex. The BoNT and ANTP genes are clustered in a DNA segment called the botulinum locus, which has different genomic localization (chromosome, plasmid, phage) in the various Clostridium botulinum types and subtypes. The botulinum locus genes are organized in two polycistronic operons (ntnh-bont and ha/orfX operons) transcribed in opposite orientations. A gene called botR lying between the two operons in C. botulinum type A encodes an alternative sigma factor which regulates positively the synthesis of BoNT and ANTPs at the late exponential growth phase and beginning of the stationary phase. In Clostridium tetani, the gene located immediately upstream of tent encodes a positive regulatory protein, TetR, which is related to BotR. C. botulinum and C. tetani genomes contain several two-component systems and predicted regulatory orphan genes. In C. botulinum type A, four two-component systems have been found that positively or negatively regulate the synthesis of BoNT and ANTPs independently of BotR/A. The synthesis of neurotoxin in Clostridia seems to be under the control of complex network of regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Both epsilon-toxin and beta-toxin are important for the lethal properties of Clostridium perfringens type B isolates in the mouse intravenous injection model.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E; Fisher, Derek J; Poon, Rachael; Sayeed, Sameera; Adams, Vicki; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A; Uzal, Francisco A

    2007-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens is capable of producing up to 15 toxins, including alpha-toxin (CPA), beta-toxin (CPB), epsilon-toxin (ETX), enterotoxin, beta2-toxin (CPB2), and perfringolysin O. Type B isolates, which must produce CPA, CPB, and ETX, are associated with animal illnesses characterized by sudden death or acute neurological signs, with or without intestinal damage. Type B pathogenesis in ruminants is poorly understood, with some animals showing lesions and clinical signs similar to those caused by either type C or type D infections. It is unknown whether host or environmental conditions are dominant for determining the outcome of type B disease or if disease outcomes are determined by variable characteristics of type B isolates. To help clarify this issue, 19 type B isolates were evaluated for toxin production during late-log-phase growth via quantitative Western blotting and by biological activity assays. Most type B isolates produced CPB levels similar to those produced by type C isolates in vitro and have the potential to produce genotype C-like disease. The lethality of type B isolate supernatants administered intravenously to mice was evaluated with or without prior trypsin treatment, and monoclonal antibody neutralization studies also were performed. Correlation analyses comparing toxin levels in type B supernatants versus lethality and neutralization studies both found that the main contributor to lethality without pretreatment with trypsin was CPB, whereas neutralization studies indicated that CPB and ETX were both important after trypsin pretreatment. At least part of the CPB produced by type B isolates remained active after trypsin treatment. However, the overall lethalities of most supernatants were lower after trypsin pretreatment. Also, there was a significant association between ETX, CPB2, and CPA production in vitro among type B isolates. However, our results suggest that both CPB and ETX are likely the most important contributors to the

  6. Clostridium perfringens Delta Toxin Is Sequence Related to Beta Toxin, NetB, and Staphylococcus Pore-Forming Toxins, but Shows Functional Differences

    PubMed Central

    Manich, Maria; Knapp, Oliver; Gibert, Maryse; Maier, Elke; Jolivet-Reynaud, Colette; Geny, Blandine; Benz, Roland; Popoff, Michel R.

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens produces numerous toxins, which are responsible for severe diseases in man and animals. Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysins released by a number of C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. Delta toxin was characterized to be cytotoxic for cells expressing the ganglioside GM2 in their membrane. Here we report the genetic characterization of Delta toxin and its pore forming activity in lipid bilayers. Delta toxin consists of 318 amino acids, its 28 N-terminal amino acids corresponding to a signal peptide. The secreted Delta toxin (290 amino acids; 32619 Da) is a basic protein (pI 9.1) which shows a significant homology with C. perfringens Beta toxin (43% identity), with C. perfringens NetB (40% identity) and, to a lesser extent, with Staphylococcus aureus alpha toxin and leukotoxins. Recombinant Delta toxin showed a preference for binding to GM2, in contrast to Beta toxin, which did not bind to gangliosides. It is hemolytic for sheep red blood cells and cytotoxic for HeLa cells. In artificial diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine membranes, Delta and Beta toxin formed channels. Conductance of the channels formed by Delta toxin, with a value of about 100 pS to more than 1 nS in 1 M KCl and a membrane potential of 20 mV, was higher than those formed by Beta toxin and their distribution was broader. The results of zero-current membrane potential measurements and single channel experiments suggest that Delta toxin forms slightly anion-selective channels, whereas the Beta toxin channels showed a preference for cations under the same conditions. C. perfringens Delta toxin shows a significant sequence homolgy with C. perfringens Beta and NetB toxins, as well as with S. aureus alpha hemolysin and leukotoxins, but exhibits different channel properties in lipid bilayers. In contrast to Beta toxin, Delta toxin recognizes GM2 as receptor and forms anion-selective channels. PMID:19018299

  7. Recent advances in germination of Clostridium spores.

    PubMed

    Olguín-Araneda, Valeria; Banawas, Saeed; Sarker, Mahfuzur R; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Members of Clostridium genus are a diverse group of anaerobic spore-formers that includes several pathogenic species. Their anaerobic requirement enhances the importance of the dormant spore morphotype during infection, persistence and transmission. Bacterial spores are metabolically inactive and may survive for long times in the environment and germinate in presence of nutrients termed germinants. Recent progress with spores of several Clostridium species has identified the germinant receptors (GRs) involved in nutrient germinant recognition and initiation of spore germination. Signal transduction from GRs to the downstream effectors remains poorly understood but involves the release of dipicolinic acid. Two mechanistically different cortex hydrolytic machineries are present in Clostridium spores. Recent studies have also shed light into novel biological events that occur during spore formation (accumulation of transcriptional units) and transcription during early spore outgrowth. In summary, this review will cover all of the recent advances in Clostridium spore germination. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence for antibiotic induced Clostridium perfringens diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Modi, N; Wilcox, M

    2001-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a well documented cause of antibiotic associated diarrhoea in hospitalised patients, but may account for only approximately 20% of all cases. This leader reviews the current knowledge and understanding of the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and diagnosis of non-food borne Clostridium perfringens diarrhoea. Although enterotoxigenic C perfringens has been implicated in some C difficile negative cases of antibiotic associated diarrhoea, C perfringens enterotoxin detection methods are not part of the routine laboratory investigation of such cases. Testing for C perfringens enterotoxin in faecal samples from patients with antibiotic associated diarrhoea and sporadic diarrhoea on a routine basis would have considerable resource implications. Therefore, criteria for initiating investigations and optimum laboratory tests need to be established. In addition, establishing the true burden of C perfringens antibiotic associated diarrhoea is important before optimum control and treatment measures can be defined. Key Words: Clostridium perfringens • Clostridium difficile • hospital acquired infective diarrhoea PMID:11577119

  9. Lytic Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage 39-O Genomic

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Screening for bacteriophages lytic for Clostridium perfringens was completed utilizing filtered samples obtained from poultry (intestinal material), soil, sewage and poultry processing drainage water. Following limit dilution cloning and three rounds of plaque purification lytic phage preparations ...

  10. [Preliminary identification of clinically significant Clostridium species].

    PubMed

    Balejová, Magda

    2010-06-01

    Preliminary identification of clinically significant Clostridium spp. is based on evaluating their microscopic and macroscopic morphology, Gram staining (Gram stain-positive structure of the bacterial wall), positive production of lecithinase, lipase and proteolytic activity on egg yolk agar, and simple chemical tests. If this preliminary identification is not sufficient, biochemical identification is performed, along with 16S-rRNA sequencing of the bacterial genome. The article comments on options of preliminary identification of clinically significant Clostridium spp.

  11. Biofilm formation by Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Dapa, Tanja; Unnikrishnan, Meera

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major healthcare-associated disease worldwide. Recurring infections and increasing antibiotic resistance have complicated treatment of CDI. While C. difficile spores are important for transmission and persistence of CDI, other factors such as gut colonization and formation of bacterial communities in the gut may also contribute to pathogenesis and persistence, but have not been well investigated. Recently, we reported that important clinical C. difficile strains are able to form composite biofilms in vitro. C. difficile biofilm formation is a complex process, modulated by several different factors, including cell surface components and regulators. We also reported that bacteria within biofilms are more resistant to high concentrations of vancomycin, the antibiotic of choice for treatment of CDI. Here we summarize our recent findings and discuss the implications of biofilm formation by this anaerobic gut pathogen in disease pathogenesis and treatment. PMID:23892245

  12. Constipation in Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Kawsar, Hameem I; Gopal, K V; Shahnewaz, Jamila; Daw, Hamed A

    2012-07-03

    A patient presented to our hospital with worsening shortness of breath, cough and respiratory distress that slowly worsened over 7-10 days. She had a viral-like illness with runny nose and cough for 1 week, which became productive of yellowish sputum. She was treated with antibiotic and steroid with clinical improvement. Her leucocyte count continued to increase despite discontinuation of both antibiotic and steroid. All culture results returned negative. She did not have any abdominal pain or diarrhoea. Her stool was positive for Clostridium difficile toxin assayed by PCR. A CT of abdomen showed distension of cecum and proximal colon. She was treated with intravenous metronidazole, oral and rectal vancomycin and intravenous immunoglobulin. She developed multi-organ failure and died.

  13. Constipation in Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Kawsar, Hameem I; Gopal, K V; Shahnewaz, Jamila; Daw, Hamed A

    2012-01-01

    A patient presented to our hospital with worsening shortness of breath, cough and respiratory distress that slowly worsened over 7–10 days. She had a viral-like illness with runny nose and cough for 1 week, which became productive of yellowish sputum. She was treated with antibiotic and steroid with clinical improvement. Her leucocyte count continued to increase despite discontinuation of both antibiotic and steroid. All culture results returned negative. She did not have any abdominal pain or diarrhoea. Her stool was positive for Clostridium difficile toxin assayed by PCR. A CT of abdomen showed distension of cecum and proximal colon. She was treated with intravenous metronidazole, oral and rectal vancomycin and intravenous immunoglobulin. She developed multi-organ failure and died. PMID:22761206

  14. [Clostridium-difficile-associated diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Bujanda, Luis; Cosme, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea and is a significant cause of morbidity among hospitalized patients. The inflammation is produced as a result of a non-specific response to toxins. In the last few years, a hypervirulent strain, NAP1/BI/027, has been reported. Symptoms usually consist of abdominal pain and diarrhea. The diagnosis should be suspected in any patient who develops diarrhea during antibiotic therapy or 6-8 weeks after treatment. Diagnosis should be confirmed by the detection of CD toxin in stool and by colonoscopy in special situations. The treatment of choice is metronidazole or vancomycin. In some patients who do not respond to this therapy or who have complications, subtotal colectomy may be required. Relapse is frequent and must be distinguished from reinfection. Prevention and control in healthcare settings requires careful attention.

  15. Identification of Clostridium Species and DNA Fingerprinting of Clostridium perfringens by Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis▿

    PubMed Central

    Keto-Timonen, Riikka; Heikinheimo, Annamari; Eerola, Erkki; Korkeala, Hannu

    2006-01-01

    An amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method was applied to 129 strains representing 24 different Clostridium species, with special emphasis on pathogenic clostridia of medical or veterinary interest, to assess the potential of AFLP for identification of clostridia. In addition, the ability of the same AFLP protocol to type clostridia at the strain level was assessed by focusing on Clostridium perfringens strains. All strains were typeable by AFLP, so the method seemed to overcome the problem of extracellular DNase production. AFLP differentiated all Clostridium species tested, except for Clostridium ramosum and Clostridium limosum, which clustered together with a 45% similarity level. Other Clostridium species were divided into species-specific clusters or occupied separate positions. Wide genetic diversity was observed among Clostridium botulinum strains, which were divided into seven species-specific clusters. The same AFLP protocol was also suitable for typing C. perfringens at the strain level. A total of 29 different AFLP types were identified for 37 strains of C. perfringens; strains initially originating from the same isolate showed identical fingerprinting patterns and were distinguished from unrelated strains. AFLP proved to be a highly reproducible, easy-to-perform, and relatively fast method which enables high throughput of samples and can serve in the generation of identification libraries. These results indicate that the AFLP method provides a promising tool for the identification and characterization of Clostridium species. PMID:16971642

  16. Identification of Clostridium species and DNA fingerprinting of Clostridium perfringens by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Keto-Timonen, Riikka; Heikinheimo, Annamari; Eerola, Erkki; Korkeala, Hannu

    2006-11-01

    An amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method was applied to 129 strains representing 24 different Clostridium species, with special emphasis on pathogenic clostridia of medical or veterinary interest, to assess the potential of AFLP for identification of clostridia. In addition, the ability of the same AFLP protocol to type clostridia at the strain level was assessed by focusing on Clostridium perfringens strains. All strains were typeable by AFLP, so the method seemed to overcome the problem of extracellular DNase production. AFLP differentiated all Clostridium species tested, except for Clostridium ramosum and Clostridium limosum, which clustered together with a 45% similarity level. Other Clostridium species were divided into species-specific clusters or occupied separate positions. Wide genetic diversity was observed among Clostridium botulinum strains, which were divided into seven species-specific clusters. The same AFLP protocol was also suitable for typing C. perfringens at the strain level. A total of 29 different AFLP types were identified for 37 strains of C. perfringens; strains initially originating from the same isolate showed identical fingerprinting patterns and were distinguished from unrelated strains. AFLP proved to be a highly reproducible, easy-to-perform, and relatively fast method which enables high throughput of samples and can serve in the generation of identification libraries. These results indicate that the AFLP method provides a promising tool for the identification and characterization of Clostridium species.

  17. Vancomycin-resistant Clostridium innocuum bacteremia following oral vancomycin for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yuan-Pin; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chen, Po-Lin; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Liu, Hsiao-Chieh; Wu, Yi-Hui; Yeh, Fang Hao; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2014-12-01

    An 85 year-old male initially admitted for septic shock due to urinary tract infection experienced Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea during hospitalization and was treated by oral vancomycin. His clinical course was complicated by cytomegalovirus colitis and then vancomycin-resistant Clostridium innocuum bacteremia, which was cured by uneventfully parenteral piperacillin-tazobactam therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative pathogenomics of Clostridium tetani

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jonathan E.; Wang, Rong; Wu, Wells W.

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum produce two of the most potent neurotoxins known, tetanus neurotoxin and botulinum neurotoxin, respectively. Extensive biochemical and genetic investigation has been devoted to identifying and characterizing various C. botulinum strains. Less effort has been focused on studying C. tetani likely because recently sequenced strains of C. tetani show much less genetic diversity than C. botulinum strains and because widespread vaccination efforts have reduced the public health threat from tetanus. Our aim was to acquire genomic data on the U.S. vaccine strain of C. tetani to better understand its genetic relationship to previously published genomic data from European vaccine strains. We performed high throughput genomic sequence analysis on two wild-type and two vaccine C. tetani strains. Comparative genomic analysis was performed using these and previously published genomic data for seven other C. tetani strains. Our analysis focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and four distinct constituents of the mobile genome (mobilome): a hypervariable flagellar glycosylation island region, five conserved bacteriophage insertion regions, variations in three CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems, and a single plasmid. Intact type IA and IB CRISPR/Cas systems were within 10 of 11 strains. A type IIIA CRISPR/Cas system was present in two strains. Phage infection histories derived from CRISPR-Cas sequences indicate C. tetani encounters phages common among commensal gut bacteria and soil-borne organisms consistent with C. tetani distribution in nature. All vaccine strains form a clade distinct from currently sequenced wild type strains when considering variations in these mobile elements. SNP, flagellar glycosylation island, prophage content and CRISPR/Cas phylogenic histories provide tentative evidence suggesting vaccine and wild type strains share a common ancestor

  19. Comparative pathogenomics of Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan E; Wang, Rong; Shen, Rong-Fong; Wu, Wells W; Keller, James E

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum produce two of the most potent neurotoxins known, tetanus neurotoxin and botulinum neurotoxin, respectively. Extensive biochemical and genetic investigation has been devoted to identifying and characterizing various C. botulinum strains. Less effort has been focused on studying C. tetani likely because recently sequenced strains of C. tetani show much less genetic diversity than C. botulinum strains and because widespread vaccination efforts have reduced the public health threat from tetanus. Our aim was to acquire genomic data on the U.S. vaccine strain of C. tetani to better understand its genetic relationship to previously published genomic data from European vaccine strains. We performed high throughput genomic sequence analysis on two wild-type and two vaccine C. tetani strains. Comparative genomic analysis was performed using these and previously published genomic data for seven other C. tetani strains. Our analysis focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and four distinct constituents of the mobile genome (mobilome): a hypervariable flagellar glycosylation island region, five conserved bacteriophage insertion regions, variations in three CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems, and a single plasmid. Intact type IA and IB CRISPR/Cas systems were within 10 of 11 strains. A type IIIA CRISPR/Cas system was present in two strains. Phage infection histories derived from CRISPR-Cas sequences indicate C. tetani encounters phages common among commensal gut bacteria and soil-borne organisms consistent with C. tetani distribution in nature. All vaccine strains form a clade distinct from currently sequenced wild type strains when considering variations in these mobile elements. SNP, flagellar glycosylation island, prophage content and CRISPR/Cas phylogenic histories provide tentative evidence suggesting vaccine and wild type strains share a common ancestor.

  20. Physiology and Sporulation in Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Dürre, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Clostridia are Gram-positive, anaerobic, endospore-forming bacteria, incapable of dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Comprising approximately 180 species, the genus Clostridium is one of the largest bacterial genera. Physiology is mostly devoted to acid production. Numerous pathways are known, such as the homoacetate fermentation by acetogens, the propionate fermentation by Clostridium propionicum, and the butyrate/butanol fermentation by C. acetobutylicum, a well-known solvent producer. Clostridia degrade sugars, alcohols, amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, and polymers such as starch and cellulose. Energy conservation can be performed by substrate-level phosphorylation as well as by the generation of ion gradients. Endospore formation resembles the mechanism elucidated in Bacillus. Morphology, contents, and properties of spores are very similar to bacilli endospores. Sporulating clostridia usually form swollen mother cells and accumulate the storage substance granulose. However, clostridial sporulation differs by not employing the so-called phosphorelay. Initiation starts by direct phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A. The cascade of sporulation-specific sigma factors is again identical to what is known from Bacillus. The onset of sporulation is coupled in some species to either solvent (acetone, butanol) or toxin (e.g., C. perfringens enterotoxin) formation. The germination of spores is often induced by various amino acids, often in combination with phosphate and sodium ions. In medical applications, C. butyricum spores are used as a C. difficile prophylaxis and as treatment against diarrhea. Recombinant spores are currently under investigation and testing as antitumor agents, because they germinate only in hypoxic tissues (i.e., tumor tissue), allowing precise targeting and direct killing of tumor cells.

  1. Clostridium tepidum sp. nov., a close relative of Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium botulinum Group I.

    PubMed

    Dobritsa, Anatoly P; Kutumbaka, Kirthi K; Werner, Kirsten; Wiedmann, Martin; Asmus, Aaron; Samadpour, Mansour

    2017-07-01

    Obligately anaerobic, Gram-stain-positive, spore-forming bacteria indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were isolated from non-dairy protein shakes in bloated bottles. One of the isolates, strain IEH 97212T, was selected for further study. The strain was closely related to Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium botulinum Group 1 based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities. Phylogenetic analysis also showed that strain IEH 97212T and strain PE (=DSM 18688), a bacterium isolated from solfataric mud, had identical 16S rRNA gene sequences. Strains IEH 97 212T and DSM 18 688 were relatively more thermophilic (temperature range for growth: 30-55 °C) and less halotolerant [growth range: 0-2.5 % (w/v) NaCl] than C. sporogenes and C. botulinum. They were negative for catalase, oxidase, urease and l-pyrrolidonyl-arylamidase and did not produce indole. The strains produced acid from d-glucose, maltose and trehalose, and hydrolysed gelatin, but did not hydrolyse aesculin. The end-products of growth included acetic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid, isobutyric acid, valeric acid, isovaleric acid, isocaproic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 2-piperidinone, 2-pyrrolidinone and gas(es). The predominant fatty acids were C14 : 0, C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω9c. The genomic DNA G+C content of strains IEH 97212T and DSM 18688 was 26.9 and 26.7 mol%, respectively. According to the digital DNA-DNA hybridization data, the relatedness of these strains was 98.4 %, while they showed only 35.7-36.0 % relatedness to C. sporogenes. Based on the results of this polyphasic study, these strains represent a novel species, for which the name Clostridium tepidum sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain IEH 97212T (=NRRL B-65463T=DSM 104389T).

  2. Taxonomic relationships among Clostridium novyi Types A and B, Clostridium haemolyticum and Clostridium botulinum type C.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Kimura, I; Yamakawa, K; Nishida, S

    1983-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the genetic relationships among the closely related species, Clostridium novyi types A and B, C. haemolyticum and C. botulinum type C. These species were tested for DNA-DNA homology and thermostability of DNA duplexes and sorted into three genetically related groups: I, C. novyi type A; II, C. novyi type B, C. haemolyticum and one C. botulinum type C strain (Stockholm); III, the remaining C. botulinum type C strains. A few biochemical criteria corresponding to the genetic differences were recommended to differentiate each group. These studies imply that C. haemolyticum might be considered as C. novyi type D and that there are two genetically different groups in C. botulinum type C.

  3. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) fermentation by sequential culture of Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium beijerinckii: effect of particle size on gas production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fuel alcohols can be produced by fermenting cellulosic biomass. Clostridium beijerinckii produces both ethanol and butanol, but it is non-cellulolytic. Cellulose requires saccharification prior to fermentation by C. beijerinckii. In contrast, the thermophile, Clostridium thermocellum, is highly ce...

  4. Adjuvants for Clostridium tetani and Clostridium diphtheriae vaccines updating.

    PubMed

    Alshanqiti, Fatimah M; Al-Masaudi, Saad B; Al-Hejin, Ahmed M; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2017-01-01

    It's known that diphtheria and tetanus are a contagious lethal diseases over the years, they caused by pathogenic microbes corynebacterium diphtheria and Clostridium tetani, respectively. The diseases result from the production of bacterial toxin. Vaccination with bacterial toxoid vaccines adsorbed on particulates adjuvants still are the best way to prevent this epidemic diseases from spread. The particulate vaccines have been shown to be more efficient than soluble one for the induction of the immune responses. Nanoparticles can be engineered to enhance the immune responses. As well known the immune response to inactivate killed and subunit vaccine enhances by alum adjuvants. The adjuvants examined and tested after reducing its size to particle size, thus mimic size of viruses which is considered smallest units can derive the immune system. The major issue is minimizing the adjuvant particles, to gain insight of resulting immunity types and impact on immune response. The adjuvant effect of micro/nanoparticles appears to largely be a consequence of their uptake into antigen presenting cells.

  5. [Development of Clostridium perfringens selective chromogenic medium].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Ping; Li, Qianqian; Ren, Changfei

    2013-07-01

    To screen the Clostridium perfringens selective composition to develop a Clostridium perfringens selective chromogenic media. To evaluate the role in promoting the growth of the target bacteria of growth factor such as mannitol, sodium pyruvate, and magnesium sulfate. Comparing the inhibition of antibiotics such as cycloserine, neomycin, polymyxin and sulfadiazine of target bacteria and non-target bacteria. To compare the reaction of chromogenic substrates such as BCIP, PNPP, X-Gal, Mu-Gal and ONPG. Screening the best enzymatic factors among magnesium sulfate, calcium sulfate, manganese sulfate, zinc sulfate. Then to determine the optimal dose. To determine the ultimate composition of chromogenic media. Ultimately determines the composition of media, sodium pyruvate 200 mg, cycloserine 0.5 mg, BCIP 6 mg, Mu-Gal 6 mg, magnesium sulfate 72 mg. Add all the composition into 100 mL nutritional broth medium to prepare the medium. Clostridium perfringens growth in chromogenic medium, TSC medium and SPS medium have no significant difference. Clostridium perfringens selective chromogenic medium can be used in detection of Clostridium perfringens.

  6. Autophagy Mediates Tolerance to Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Katie; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; Alonzo, Francis; Durbin, Joan; Torres, Victor J.; Cadwell, Ken

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Resistance and tolerance are two defense strategies employed by the host against microbial threats. Autophagy-mediated degradation of bacteria has been extensively described as a major resistance mechanism. Here we find that the dominant function of autophagy proteins during infections with the epidemic community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA 300 is to mediate tolerance rather than resistance. Atg16L1 hypomorphic mice (Atg16L1HM), which have reduced autophagy, were highly susceptible to lethality in both sepsis and pneumonia models of USA300 infection. Autophagy confers protection by limiting the damage caused by α-toxin, particularly to endothelial cells. Remarkably, Atg16L1HM mice display enhanced survival rather than susceptibility upon infection with α-toxin deficient S. aureus. These results identify an essential role for autophagy in tolerance to Staphylococcal disease and highlight how a single virulence factor encoded by a pathogen can determine whether a given host factor promotes tolerance or resistance. PMID:25816775

  7. Autophagy mediates tolerance to Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Katie; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; Alonzo, Francis; Durbin, Joan; Torres, Victor J; Cadwell, Ken

    2015-04-08

    Resistance and tolerance are two defense strategies employed by the host against microbial threats. Autophagy-mediated degradation of bacteria has been extensively described as a major resistance mechanism. Here we find that the dominant function of autophagy proteins during infections with the epidemic community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 is to mediate tolerance rather than resistance. Atg16L1 hypomorphic mice (Atg16L1(HM)), which have reduced autophagy, were highly susceptible to lethality in both sepsis and pneumonia models of USA300 infection. Autophagy confers protection by limiting the damage caused by α-toxin, particularly to endothelial cells. Remarkably, Atg16L1(HM) mice display enhanced survival rather than susceptibility upon infection with α-toxin-deficient S. aureus. These results identify an essential role for autophagy in tolerance to Staphylococcal disease and highlight how a single virulence factor encoded by a pathogen can determine whether a given host factor promotes tolerance or resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermostable chaperonin from Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Cross, S J; Ciruela, A; Poomputsa, K; Romaniec, M P; Freedman, R B

    1996-06-01

    Homologues of the chaperonins Cpn60 and Cpn10 have been purified from the Gram-positive cellulolytic thermophile Clostridium thermocellum. The Cpn60 protein was purified by ATP-affinity chromatography and the Cpn10 protein was purified by gel-filtration, ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatographies. The identities of the proteins were confirmed by N-terminal sequence analysis and antigenic cross-reactivity. The Cpn60 homologue is a weak, thermostable ATPase (t1/2 at 70 decrees C more than 90 min) with optimum activity (Kcat 0.07 S-1) between 60 degrees C and 70 degrees C. The ATPase activity of the authentic Cpn60 was inhibited by Escherichia coli GroES. The catalytic properties of a recombinant C. thermocellum Cpn60 purified from a GST-Cpn60 fusion protein expressed in E. coli [Ciruela (1995) Ph.D. Thesis, University of Kent] were identical with those of the authentic C. thermocellum Cpn60. Gel-filtration studies show that at room temperature the Cpn60 migrates mainly as a heptamer. Electron microscopy confirms the presence of complexes showing 7-fold rotational symmetry and also reveals a small number of particles that seem to be tetradecamers with a similar structure to E. coli GroEL complexes.

  9. Fidaxomicin: in Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sean T

    2011-12-24

    Fidaxomicin is a first-in-class macrocyclic antibacterial that primarily demonstrates activity against species of clostridia, predominantly Clostridium difficile, while having limited or no activity against normal faecal microflora. Fidaxomicin is minimally absorbed following oral administration and is excreted almost solely in the faeces. Fidaxomicin displayed a high level of antibacterial activity against C. difficile in vitro, with a minimum inhibitory concentration required to inhibit 90% of C. difficile strains of 0.125-0.5 μg/mL, and was ≈2- to 8-fold more active than vancomycin or metronidazole. Fidaxomicin demonstrated a prolonged postantibiotic effect against C. difficile relative to vancomycin and metronidazole. In two randomized, double-blind, phase III trials, oral fidaxomicin 200 mg every 12 hours for 10 days was no less effective than oral vancomycin 125 mg every 6 hours for 10 days in the treatment of C. difficile infection, based on noninferiority analyses of clinical cure rates (primary endpoint). Fidaxomicin therapy was associated with a significantly lower rate of recurrence, as well as a significantly higher rate of global cure (i.e. sustained clinical response; resolution of diarrhoea without recurrence) compared with vancomycin therapy in the two clinical trials. Fidaxomicin was generally well tolerated in patients with C. difficile infection, with a tolerability profile generally similar to that of vancomycin.

  10. Clostridium difficile infection in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Putsathit, Papanin; Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Ngamwongsatit, Puriya; Riley, Thomas V

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the aetiological agent in ca. 20% of cases of antimicrobial-associated diarrhoea in hospitalised adults. Diseases caused by this organism range from mild diarrhoea to occasional fatal pseudomembranous colitis. The epidemiology of C. difficile infection (CDI) has changed notably in the past decade, following epidemics in the early 2000s of PCR ribotype (RT) 027 infection in North America and Europe, where there was an increase in disease severity and mortality. Another major event has been the emergence of RT 078, initially as the predominant ribotype in production animals in the USA and Europe, and then in humans in Europe. Although there have been numerous investigations of the epidemiology of CDI in North America and Europe, limited studies have been undertaken elsewhere, particularly in Asia. Antimicrobial exposure remains the major risk factor for CDI. Given the high prevalence of indiscriminate and inappropriate use of antimicrobials in Asia, it is conceivable that CDI is relatively common among humans and animals. This review describes the level of knowledge in Thailand regarding C. difficile detection methods, prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility profile, as well as the clinical features of, treatment options for and outcomes of the disease. In addition, antimicrobial usage in livestock in Thailand will be reviewed. A literature search yielded 18 studies mentioning C. difficile in Thailand, a greater number than from any other Asian country. It is possible that the situation in Thailand in relation to CDI may mirror the situation in other developing Asians countries.

  11. Management of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jashaami, Layth S.

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the 1970s, there has been an increase in the incidence, severity, and recurrence rate of the disease. We reviewed the recent CDI literature in PubMed published before February 28, 2016 that focused on advances in therapy. Despite a large number of studies describing methods for diagnosing the disease, there is currently no definitive test that identifies this infection with certainty, which complicates therapy. Recommended therapy for CDI includes oral metronidazole for mild cases and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for moderate to severe cases, each given for 10 to 14 days. For infection with spore-forming C difficile, this length of treatment may be insufficient to lead to cure; however, continuing antibiotics for longer periods of time may unfavorably alter the microbiome, preventing recovery. Treatment with metronidazole has been associated with an increasing failure rate, and the only clear recommended form of metronidazole for treatment of CDI is the intravenous formulation for patients unable to take oral medications. For vancomycin or fidaxomicin treatment of first CDI recurrences, the drug used in the initial bout can be repeated. For second or future recurrences, vancomycin can be given in pulsed or tapered doses. New modalities of treatment, such as bacteriotherapy and immunotherapy, show promise for the treatment of recurrent CDI. PMID:27917075

  12. Clostridium difficile binary toxin CDT

    PubMed Central

    Gerding, Dale N; Johnson, Stuart; Rupnik, Maja; Aktories, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Binary toxin (CDT) is frequently observed in Clostridium difficile strains associated with increased severity of C. difficile infection (CDI). CDT belongs to the family of binary ADP-ribosylating toxins consisting of two separate toxin components: CDTa, the enzymatic ADP-ribosyltransferase which modifies actin, and CDTb which binds to host cells and translocates CDTa into the cytosol. CDTb is activated by serine proteases and binds to lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor. ADP-ribosylation induces depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton. Toxin-induced actin depolymerization also produces microtubule-based membrane protrusions which form a network on epithelial cells and increase bacterial adherence. Multiple clinical studies indicate an association between binary toxin genes in C. difficile and increased 30-d CDI mortality independent of PCR ribotype. Further studies including measures of binary toxin in stool, analyses of CDI mortality caused by CDT-producing strains, and examination of the relationship of CDT expression to TcdA and TcdB toxin variants and PCR ribotypes are needed. PMID:24253566

  13. Management of Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Al-Jashaami, Layth S; DuPont, Herbert L

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the 1970s, there has been an increase in the incidence, severity, and recurrence rate of the disease. We reviewed the recent CDI literature in PubMed published before February 28, 2016 that focused on advances in therapy. Despite a large number of studies describing methods for diagnosing the disease, there is currently no definitive test that identifies this infection with certainty, which complicates therapy. Recommended therapy for CDI includes oral metronidazole for mild cases and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for moderate to severe cases, each given for 10 to 14 days. For infection with spore-forming C difficile, this length of treatment may be insufficient to lead to cure; however, continuing antibiotics for longer periods of time may unfavorably alter the microbiome, preventing recovery. Treatment with metronidazole has been associated with an increasing failure rate, and the only clear recommended form of metronidazole for treatment of CDI is the intravenous formulation for patients unable to take oral medications. For vancomycin or fidaxomicin treatment of first CDI recurrences, the drug used in the initial bout can be repeated. For second or future recurrences, vancomycin can be given in pulsed or tapered doses. New modalities of treatment, such as bacteriotherapy and immunotherapy, show promise for the treatment of recurrent CDI.

  14. Update on Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Le Monnier, A; Zahar, J-R; Barbut, F

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) occur primarily in hospitalized patients with risk factors such as concomitant or recent use of antibiotics. CDI related additional costs are important for the global population and health-care facilities. CDI epidemiology has changed since 2003: they became more frequent boosted by large outbreaks, more severe, more resistant to antibiotic treatment, and spread to new groups of population without any risk factor. This is partly due to the emergence and worldwide dissemination of new and more virulent C. difficile strains such as the epidemic clone 027/NAP1/BI. The host immune response plays a central role in the pathogenesis of CDI and could also be involved in the occurrence of recurrent or severe forms. New guidelines including new molecular tests (NAAT) have recently clarified and simplified the diagnostic strategies for the microbiological diagnosis of CDI. The CDI incidence was proven to be related to the level of clinical suspicion and the frequency of microbiological screening for C. difficile. The current recommendations for the treatment of CDI mention oral metronidazole as the first line treatment for mild to moderate diarrhea. Oral vancomycin use should be restricted to severe cases. In the absence of consensus, the treatment of multiple recurrences remains a major concern. New and more targeted antibiotics and innovative therapeutic strategies (fecal transplantation, monoclonal antibodies, and vaccination) have emerged as new therapies for CDI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Cellulolytic Activity of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Lee, S F; Forsberg, C W; Gibbins, L N

    1985-08-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum NRRL B527 and ATCC 824 exhibited extracellular and cell-bound endoglucanase and cellobiase activities during growth in a chemically defined medium with cellobiose as the sole source of carbohydrate. For both strains, the endoglucanase was found to be mainly extracellular (70 to 90%) during growth in continuous or batch cultures with the pH maintained at 5.2, whereas the cellobiase was mainly cell associated (60 to 90%). During continuous cultivation of strain B527 with cellobiose as the limiting nutrient, maximum production of the endoglucanase and cellobiase occurred at pH values of 5.2 and 4.8, respectively. In the carbon-limited continuous cultures, strain 824 produced similar levels of endoglucanase, cellobiosidase, and cellobiase activities regardless of the carbon source used. However, in ammonium- or phosphate-limited cultures, with an excess of glucose, only 1/10 of the endoglucanase was produced, and neither cellobiosidase nor cellobiase activities were detectable. A crude extracellular enzyme preparation from strain B527 hydrolyzed carboxymethylcellulose and phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose readily and microcrystalline cellulose (A vicel) to a lesser extent. Glucose accounted for more than 90% of the reducing sugar produced by the hydrolysis of acid-swollen cellulose and Avicel. Strain B527 did not grow in medium with acid-swollen cellulose as the sole source of carbohydrate, although it grew readily on the products obtained by hydrolyzing the cellulose in vitro with a preparation of extracellular cellulase derived from the same organism.

  16. Carbon Monoxide Oxidation by Clostridium thermoaceticum and Clostridium formicoaceticum

    PubMed Central

    Diekert, Gabriele B.; Thauer, Rudolf K.

    1978-01-01

    Cultures of Clostridium formicoaceticum and C. thermoaceticum growing on fructose and glucose, respectively, were shown to rapidly oxidize CO to CO2. Rates up to 0.4 μmol min−1 mg of wet cells−1 were observed. Carbon monoxide oxidation by cell suspensions was found (i) to be dependent on pyruvate, (ii) to be inhibited by alkyl halides and arsenate, and (iii) to stimulate CO2 reduction to acetate. Cell extracts catalyzed the oxidation of carbon monoxide with methyl viologen at specific rates up to 10 μmol min−1 mg of protein−1 (35°C, pH 7.2). Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and ferredoxin from C. pasteurianum were ineffective as electron acceptors. The catalytic mechanism of carbon monoxide oxidation was “ping-pong,” indicating that the enzyme catalyzing carbon monoxide oxidation can be present in an oxidized and a reduced form. The oxidized form was shown to react reversibly with cyanide, and the reduced form was shown to react reversibly with alkyl halides: cyanide inactivated the enzyme only in the absence of carbon monoxide, and alkyl halides inactivated it only in the presence of carbon monoxide. Extracts inactivated by alkyl halides were reactivated by photolysis. The findings are interpreted to indicate that carbon monoxide oxidation in the two bacteria is catalyzed by a corrinoid enzyme and that in vivo the reaction is coupled with the reduction of CO2 to acetate. Cultures of C. acidi-urici and C. cylindrosporum growing on hypoxanthine were found not to oxidize CO, indicating that clostridia mediating a corrinoid-independent total synthesis of acetate from CO2 do not possess a CO-oxidizing system. PMID:711675

  17. ISOLATION OF CLOSTRIDIUM TETANI FROM SOIL.

    PubMed

    SANADA, I; NISHIDA, S

    1965-03-01

    Sanada, Ichiro (Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan), and Shoki Nishida. Isolation of Clostridium tetani from soil. J. Bacteriol. 89:626-629. 1965.-The higher the temperatures applied to soil specimens, the weaker the toxigenicity of Clostridium tetani strains isolated from them. The glucose- and maltose-fermenting ability of these isolates was inversely proportional to their toxigenicity. The biological properties of atoxic strains were indistinguishable from those of C. tetanomorphum. Since a considerable number of toxic strains fermented glucose and maltose, these criteria are of doubtful value for differentiating C. tetani from C. tetanomorphum.

  18. Isolation of Clostridium tetani from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Sanada, Ichiro; Nishida, Shoki

    1965-01-01

    Sanada, Ichiro (Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan), and Shoki Nishida. Isolation of Clostridium tetani from soil. J. Bacteriol. 89:626–629. 1965.—The higher the temperatures applied to soil specimens, the weaker the toxigenicity of Clostridium tetani strains isolated from them. The glucose- and maltose-fermenting ability of these isolates was inversely proportional to their toxigenicity. The biological properties of atoxic strains were indistinguishable from those of C. tetanomorphum. Since a considerable number of toxic strains fermented glucose and maltose, these criteria are of doubtful value for differentiating C. tetani from C. tetanomorphum. PMID:14275651

  19. Prevention of Infection Due to Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christopher C; Jump, Robin L P; Chopra, Teena

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is one of the foremost nosocomial pathogens. Preventing infection is particularly challenging. Effective prevention efforts typically require a multifaceted bundled approach. A variety of infection control procedures may be advantageous, including strict hand decontamination with soap and water, contact precautions, and using chlorine-containing decontamination agents. Additionally, risk factor reduction can help reduce the burden of disease. The risk factor modification is principally accomplished though antibiotic stewardship programs. Unfortunately, most of the current evidence for prevention is in acute care settings. This review focuses on preventative approaches to reduce the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection in healthcare settings.

  20. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins.

  1. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R.; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  2. Identification of Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium argentinense, and related organisms by cellular fatty acid analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, F M; Ridpath, A C; Moore, W E; Moore, L V

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of 686 analyses of 285 strains of Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium argentinense (formerly C. botulinum type G), and phenotypically related organisms, 14 cellular fatty acid (CFA) groups of toxic organisms and 6 CFA groups of nontoxic organisms were delineated. The CFA groups of toxic strains included two of type A, three of proteolytic strains of type B, two of proteolytic strains of type F, one each of nonproteolytic strains of types B, E, and F, and one each of types C alpha, C beta, and D and C. argentinense. The groups of phenotypically similar nontoxic strains included Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium putrificum, nontoxic strains with phenotypic characteristics similar to those of nonproteolytic strains of C. botulinum types B, E, and F (BEF-like), two groups of nontoxigenic organisms with phenotypic characteristics similar to those of C. botulinum types C and D and Clostridium novyi (CDN-like), and Clostridium subterminale, which has phenotypic characteristics similar to those of C. argentinense. Within the toxin types, 89 to 100% of the strains were correctly identified by CFA analysis, and 74 to 100% of the analyses were correct. Of 36 strains of C. sporogenes, 30 (83%) were correctly identified; 17% of the strains of C. sporogenes were incorrectly identified as C. botulinum type A or B. All analyses of C. putrificum and C. subterminale were correctly identified. There was no significant level of similarity between strains of C. botulinum and phenotypically similar organisms and 85 other species of clostridia or 407 other taxa of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Additionally, the one strain each of Clostridium baratii and Clostridium butyricum previously reported to produce C. botulinum toxin could be differentiated from C.botulinum types as well as from strains of C. baratii and C. butyricum that did not produce neurotoxin. PMID:1864927

  3. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  4. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Katherine R.; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however, developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarize the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics. Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage–host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution. No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using “whole-phages” are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem-free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen. PMID:24808893

  5. Coculture Production of Butanol by Clostridium Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, S. L.; Foutch, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Production of butanol by anaerobic fermentation of sugars enhanced by use of two Clostridium species, one of which feeds on metabolic product of other. Renewed interest in fermentation process for making butanol stimulated by potential use of butanol as surfactant in enhanced oil recovery. Butanol also used as fuel or as chemical feedstock and currently produced synthetically from petroleum.

  6. Isolation of Clostridium tetani from anaerobic empyema.

    PubMed

    Mayall, B C; Snashall, E A; Peel, M M

    1998-11-01

    We report the isolation of Clostridium tetani (along with Fusobacterium mortiferum) from empyema pus. The patient, a 68 year old retired farmer from rural NSW, had recently undergone cholecystectomy, had heart failure and developed an empyema. He improved after drainage of the empyema and penicillin therapy, but died suddenly during convalescence.

  7. Coculture Production of Butanol by Clostridium Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, S. L.; Foutch, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Production of butanol by anaerobic fermentation of sugars enhanced by use of two Clostridium species, one of which feeds on metabolic product of other. Renewed interest in fermentation process for making butanol stimulated by potential use of butanol as surfactant in enhanced oil recovery. Butanol also used as fuel or as chemical feedstock and currently produced synthetically from petroleum.

  8. Comparative Analysis of Clostridium perfringens Bacteriophage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Clostridium perfringens are Gram-positive bacteria that are a major bacterial cause of food-borne disease and gas gangrene among humans. These anaerobic bacteria are also the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Pathogenesis and symptoms of a necrotic enterit...

  9. Lumbar Discitis Caused by Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, M. R.; Degand, Nicolas; Lotte, Laurene; Bouvet, Philippe; Baudin, Guillaume; Cua, Eric; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Ruimy, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    We report here a rare case of chronic lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens in an elderly patient that was treated with a combination of β-lactams and clindamycin. Molecular analysis performed on the strain revealed an unusual toxin gene pattern. PMID:25056327

  10. Lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Lotte, Romain; Popoff, M R; Degand, Nicolas; Lotte, Laurene; Bouvet, Philippe; Baudin, Guillaume; Cua, Eric; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Ruimy, Raymond

    2014-10-01

    We report here a rare case of chronic lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens in an elderly patient that was treated with a combination of β-lactams and clindamycin. Molecular analysis performed on the strain revealed an unusual toxin gene pattern. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Clostridium difficile in poultry and poultry meat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer t...

  12. Epsilon-Toxin Production by Clostridium perfringens Type D Strain CN3718 Is Dependent upon the agr Operon but Not the VirS/VirR Two-Component Regulatory System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianming; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium perfringens type B and D strains cause enterotoxemias and enteritis in livestock after proliferating in the intestines and producing epsilon-toxin (ETX), alpha-toxin (CPA), and, usually, perfringolysin O (PFO). Although ETX is one of the most potent bacterial toxins, the regulation of ETX production by type B or D strains remains poorly understood. The present work determined that the type D strain CN3718 upregulates production of ETX upon close contact with enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This host cell-induced upregulation of ETX expression was mediated at the transcriptional level. Using an isogenic agrB null mutant and complemented strain, the agr operon was shown to be required when CN3718 produces ETX in broth culture or, via a secreted signal consistent with a quorum-sensing (QS) effect, upregulates ETX production upon contact with host cells. These findings provide the first insights into the regulation of ETX production, as well as additional evidence that the Agr-like QS system functions as a global regulator of C. perfringens toxin production. Since it was proposed previously that the Agr-like QS system regulates C. perfringens gene expression via the VirS/VirR two-component regulatory system, an isogenic virR null mutant of CN3718 was constructed to evaluate the importance of VirS/VirR for CN3718 toxin production. This mutation affected production of CPA and PFO, but not ETX, by CN3718. These results provide the first indication that C. perfringens toxin expression regulation by the Agr-like quorum-sensing system may not always act via the VirS/VirR two-component system. PMID:22167225

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium clariflavum DSM 19732

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Lynne A.; Davenport, Karen W.; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Han, James; Pitluck, Sam; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Amy; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Liolios, Konstantinos; Woyke, Tanja; Lynd, Lee R

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium clariflavum is a Cluster III Clostridium within the family Clostridiaceae isolated from thermophilic anaerobic sludge (Shiratori et al, 2009). This species is of interest because of its similarity to the model cellulolytic organism Clostridium thermocellum and for the ability of environmental isolates to break down cellulose and hemicellulose. Here we describe features of the 4,897,678 bp long genome and its annotation, consisting of 4,131 proteincoding and 98 RNA genes, for the type strain DSM 19732.

  14. Genetic Engineering of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-14

    AD N o GENETIC ENGINEERING OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE TOXIN A VACCINE 0 C%" ANNUAL REPORT ! Lycurgus L. Muldrow Joe Johnson July 14, 1988 Supported by...17. COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Clostridium difficile Vaccine ...development of vaccines . Improvement of vaccine biotechnology in the area of recombinant DNA studies using Clostridium difficile toxin A as the model, is

  15. Revised nomenclature of Clostridium difficile toxins and associated genes.

    PubMed

    Rupnik, Maja; Dupuy, Bruno; Fairweather, Neil F; Gerding, Dale N; Johnson, Stuart; Just, Ingo; Lyerly, David M; Popoff, Michel R; Rood, Julian I; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Thelestam, Monica; Wren, Brendan W; Wilkins, Tracy D; von Eichel-Streiber, Christoph

    2005-02-01

    Several different nomenclatures have been applied to the Clostridium difficile toxins and their associated genes. This paper summarizes the new nomenclature that has been agreed to by the research groups currently active in the field. The revised nomenclature includes C. difficile toxins and other related large clostridial toxins produced by Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium novyi, and corresponding toxin genes, as well as toxin production types of C. difficile strains.

  16. Immunization strategies for Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Rebeaud, Fabien; Bachmann, Martin F

    2012-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is a major cause of nosocomial disease in Western countries. The recent emergence of hypervirulent strains resistant to most antibiotics correlates with increasing disease incidence, severity and lethal outcomes. Current treatments rely on metronidazol and vancomycin, but the limited ability of these antibiotics to cure infection and prevent relapse highlights the need for new strategies. A better knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the disease, the host immune response and identification of key virulence factors of Clostridium difficile now permits the development of new products specifically targeting the pathogen. Immune-based strategies relying on active vaccination or passive administration of antibody products are the focus of intense research and, today, the efficacy of monoclonal antibodies and of two vaccines are evaluated clinically. This review presents recent data, discusses the different strategies and highlights the challenges linked to the development of immunization strategies against this emerging threat.

  17. Phylogenetic positions of Clostridium novyi and Clostridium haemolyticum based on 16S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Takikawa, N; Kojima, A; Norimatsu, M; Suzuki, S; Tamura, Y

    2001-05-01

    The partial sequences (1465 bp) of the 16S rDNA of Clostridium novyi types A, B and C and Clostridium haemolyticum were determined. C. novyi types A, B and C and C. haemolyticum clustered with Clostridium botulinum types C and D. Moreover, the 16S rDNA sequences of C. novyi type B strains and C. haemolyticum strains were completely identical; they differed by 1 bp (level of similarity > 99.9%) from that of C. novyi type C, they were 98.7% homologous to that of C. novyi type A (relative positions 28-1520 of the Escherichia coli 16S rDNA sequence) and they exhibited a higher similarity to the 16S rDNA sequence of C. botulinum types D and C than to that of C. novyi type A. These results suggest that C. novyi types B and C and C. haemolyticum may be one independent species generated from the same phylogenetic origin.

  18. Cellulose fermentation by a coculture of a mesophilic cellulolytic Clostridium and Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Fond, O.; Petitdemange, E.; Petitdemange, H.; Engasser, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    A coculture of a mesophilic cellulolytic Clostridium with Clostridium acetobutylicum can yield a direct conversion of cellulose into chemicals. In 13 days 30 g/l Solka Floc is degraded and fermented into 14 g/l butyric acid, 4 g/l acetic acid, 3 g/l ethanol, and 1 g/l butanol. A four times higher rate of cellulose hydrolysis than in pure culture of the cellulolytic Clostridium is thus obtained. Fed-batch fermentations of C. acetobutylicum at different glucose feeding rate show that solvents are only produced at a sufficient high rate of glucose supply to the medium. Acids are thus the main products of the coculture because of the limited rate of cellulolysis by the mesophilic strain. 7 references, 5 figures.

  19. Genetic Analysis of Nitroaromatic Degradation by Clostridium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-30

    Phenazine, a molecule produced by some soil bacteria was found to have a significant effect on metabolite pattern in two clostridium test strains...found certain other redox active dyes (some naturally occurring in soil environments) also generate this change in acid profile of anaerobic fermenters ...Insulation of a synthetic hydrogen metabolism circuit in bacteria . J Biol Eng. 2010 Feb 25;4:3. Akhtar MK, Jones PR. Engineering of a synthetic hydF

  20. Persistent and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Shola A.; Stahl, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea. It has become a significant dilemma in the treatment of patients, and causes increasing morbidity that, in extreme cases, may result in death. Persistent and recurrent disease hamper attempts at eradication of this infection. Escalating levels of treatment and novel therapeutics are being utilized and developed to treat CDI. Further trials are warranted to definitively determine what protocols can be used to treat persistent and recurrent disease. PMID:26034401

  1. Septic arthritis due to Clostridium ramosum.

    PubMed

    García-Jiménez, Antonio; Prim, Núria; Crusi, Xavier; Benito, Natividad

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium species are anaerobic bacilli that are rarely reported as etiologic agents of infectious arthritis. Previous cases of arthritis caused by Clostridium ramosum have not been reported. We describe the first 2 cases of C. ramosum arthritis. We reviewed the etiology of arthritis in our hospital during the previous 15 years. Both patients had underlying immunocompromising conditions and their infections involved a joint with preexisting disease: patient 1 had rheumatic arthritis and a prosthetic joint; patient 2, chronic renal failure on dialysis and hip osteoarthritis. The infection was hematogenously acquired and the course was indolent but destructive in both the cases. Management included open arthrotomy and resection arthroplasty. The infection had a persisting and relapsing course, and prolonged antibiotic treatment was required. In the literature review, we found 55 previous cases of arthritis caused by Clostridium species between 1966 and 2014; Clostridium perfringens was the most common infecting species; the infection was traumatically acquired in most of the cases. A total of 15 patients have been described with infections caused by C. ramosum; none had septic arthritis. The majority were elderly or immunocompromised adults. Proper collection, transportation and processing of clinical specimens is essential for diagnosing clostridial infections. More information about the best management of clostridial arthritis are needed. We describe the first 2 cases of septic arthritis caused by C. ramosum. They shared several pathogenic and clinical features. The possibility of anaerobic arthritis should always be considered when collecting diagnostic specimens. An increasing number of clostridial arthritis cases are likely to be diagnosed in future years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clostridium celerecrescens, often misidentified as "Clostridium clostridioforme group," is involved in rare human infection cases.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Philippe; K'Ouas, Guylène; Le Coustumier, Alain; Popoff, Michel R

    2012-11-01

    Misidentification of rare Clostridium species often originated from the environment as clinically relevant species is problematic. A strain isolated from a traumatic leg wound first identified as C. clostridioforme was finally identified as the rare Clostridium celerecrescens. Two similar misidentifications are reported in the literature. In order to help the phenotypic differentiation of C. celerecrescens from the close species of the "C. clostridioforme group", an identification table and differential susceptibilities to 4 selected antibiotics are proposed. Once a clinical isolate is referred to this group, identification should be definitively confirmed by unambiguous methods such as 16s rDNA sequencing.

  3. Detection of beta2 and major toxin genes by PCR in Clostridium perfringens field isolates of domestic animals suffering from enteritis or enterotoxaemia.

    PubMed

    Sting, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The production of Clostridium (C.) perfringens toxins in the intestine is an important cause of enteritis and enterotoxaemia in livestock. In the present study, the alpha toxin and the genes encoding beta2 and epsilon toxin could be frequently detected by means of phenotypical and PCR examinations in these bacteria. The C. perfringens isolates originated from 1213 field samples taken from diseased or perished livestock located in the north-eastern administrative districts of Baden-Württemberg (Germany) from 2005 to 2008. The beta2 toxin gene of C perfringens was detected in all animal species examined, comprising pigs, the small ruminants sheep and goats, cattle, horses, rabbits, alpacas and lamas, and fallow deer. Among all the animal species included in this study, pigs attracted attention by a high quota of 74.2% (610 of 822) cpb2-positive C. perfringens isolates in comparison to the other animal species tested, revealing a quota of 20.8% (72 of 346). Beta2 toxigenic isolates could be predominantly cultivated from the faeces of young piglets. The beta toxin gene was detected in isolates from piglets and small ruminants only, amounting to 82.5% (33 of 40) in piglets in combination with the cpb2 gene. In this context, cpb2/cpb-positive C. perfringens isolates of piglets could be clearly detected more often in the intestine of perished animals (18 of 158) than in faeces (15 of 629). Furthermore, cpb2-bearing C. perfringens isolates were detected in cattle, horses, rabbits, alpacas and lamas, and fallow deer to a notable degree. The detection of C. perfringens isolates carrying the epsilon toxin gene was restricted to sheep and goats. Of a total of 242 small ruminants that succumbed to sudden death, 71 (29.3%) harboured epsilon toxin-positive C. perfringens isolates in their intestines. These cases clustered seasonally in the second quarter (April, May, and June) of the year. Neither the isolates bearing the beta2 nor beta toxin gene nor those carrying the epsilon

  4. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nathaniel A; Ben Ami, Ronen; Guzner-Gur, Hanan; Santo, Moshe E; Halpern, Zamir; Maharshak, Nitsan

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a problem most hospital-based physicians will face in their career. This review aims to refresh current knowledge with regard to Clostridium difficile infection and bring physicians up to date with the latest developments in the growing field of fecal microbiota transplantation, the benefits it offers, and the promise this and other developments hold for the future.

  5. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.112 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Clostridium Perfringens Type D...

  6. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.111 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Clostridium Perfringens Type C...

  7. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.112 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Clostridium Perfringens Type D...

  8. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.111 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Clostridium Perfringens Type C...

  9. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.111 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Clostridium Perfringens Type C...

  10. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.112 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Clostridium Perfringens Type D...

  11. 9 CFR 113.112 - Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.112 Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Perfringens Type D Toxoid and Clostridium Perfringens Type D...

  12. 9 CFR 113.111 - Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.111 Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Perfringens Type C Toxoid and Clostridium Perfringens Type C...

  13. 9 CFR 113.110 - Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.110 Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium botulinum Type C which...

  14. 9 CFR 113.110 - Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.110 Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium botulinum Type C which...

  15. 9 CFR 113.110 - Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.110 Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium botulinum Type C which...

  16. 9 CFR 113.110 - Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.110 Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium botulinum Type C which...

  17. Development of a microarray for identification of pathogenic Clostridium species

    PubMed Central

    Janvilisri, Tavan; Scaria, Joy; Gleed, Robin; Fubini, Susan; Bonkosky, Michelle M.; Gröhn, Yrjö T.; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Clostridium species have rapidly reemerged as human and animal pathogens. The detection and identification of pathogenic Clostridium species is therefore critical for clinical diagnosis and antimicrobial therapy. Traditional diagnostic techniques for clostridia are laborious, time-consuming and may adversely affect the therapeutic outcome. In this study, we developed an oligonucleotide diagnostic microarray for pathogenic Clostridium species. The microarray specificity was tested against 65 Clostridium isolates. The applicability of this microarray in a clinical setting was assessed with the use of mock stool samples. The microarray was successful in discriminating at least four species with the limit of detection as low as 104 CFU/ml. In addition, the pattern of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes of tested strains were determined through the microarrays. This approach demonstrates the high-throughput detection and identification of Clostridium species and provides advantages over traditional methods. Microarray-based techniques are promising applications for clinical diagnosis and epidemiological investigations. PMID:19879710

  18. An Atypical Clostridium Strain Related to the Clostridium botulinum Group III Strain Isolated from a Human Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ruimy, Raymond; Bouchier, Christiane; Faucher, Nathalie; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    A nontoxigenic strain isolated from a fatal human case of bacterial sepsis was identified as a Clostridium strain from Clostridium botulinum group III, based on the phenotypic characters and 16S rRNA gene sequence, and was found to be related to the mosaic C. botulinum D/C strain according to a multilocus sequence analysis of 5 housekeeping genes. PMID:24088855

  19. An atypical Clostridium strain related to the Clostridium botulinum group III strain isolated from a human blood culture.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Philippe; Ruimy, Raymond; Bouchier, Christiane; Faucher, Nathalie; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R

    2014-01-01

    A nontoxigenic strain isolated from a fatal human case of bacterial sepsis was identified as a Clostridium strain from Clostridium botulinum group III, based on the phenotypic characters and 16S rRNA gene sequence, and was found to be related to the mosaic C. botulinum D/C strain according to a multilocus sequence analysis of 5 housekeeping genes.

  20. Finished Whole-Genome Sequences of Clostridium butyricum Toxin Subtype E4 and Clostridium baratii Toxin Subtype F7 Strains.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Jessica L; Hill, Karen; Johnson, Shannon L; Bruce, David Carlton; Shirey, T Brian; Dykes, Janet K; Lúquez, Carolina

    2017-07-20

    Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium baratii species have been known to produce botulinum toxin types E and F, respectively, which can cause botulism, a rare but serious neuroparalytic disease. Here, we present finished genome sequences for two of these clinically relevant strains. Copyright © 2017 Halpin et al.

  1. A roadmap for gene system development in Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Minton, Nigel P; Ehsaan, Muhammad; Humphreys, Christopher M; Little, Gareth T; Baker, Jonathan; Henstra, Anne M; Liew, Fungmin; Kelly, Michelle L; Sheng, Lili; Schwarz, Katrin; Zhang, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium species are both heroes and villains. Some cause serious human and animal diseases, those present in the gut microbiota generally contribute to health and wellbeing, while others represent useful industrial chassis for the production of chemicals and fuels. To understand, counter or exploit, there is a fundamental requirement for effective systems that may be used for directed or random genome modifications. We have formulated a simple roadmap whereby the necessary gene systems maybe developed and deployed. At its heart is the use of 'pseudo-suicide' vectors and the creation of a pyrE mutant (a uracil auxotroph), initially aided by ClosTron technology, but ultimately made using a special form of allelic exchange termed ACE (Allele-Coupled Exchange). All mutants, regardless of the mutagen employed, are made in this host. This is because through the use of ACE vectors, mutants can be rapidly complemented concomitant with correction of the pyrE allele and restoration of uracil prototrophy. This avoids the phenotypic effects frequently observed with high copy number plasmids and dispenses with the need to add antibiotic to ensure plasmid retention. Once available, the pyrE host may be used to stably insert all manner of application specific modules. Examples include, a sigma factor to allow deployment of a mariner transposon, hydrolases involved in biomass deconstruction and therapeutic genes in cancer delivery vehicles. To date, provided DNA transfer is obtained, we have not encountered any clostridial species where this technology cannot be applied. These include, Clostridium difficile, Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium pasteurianum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Clostridium autoethanogenum and even Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Small RNAs in the genus Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yili; Indurthi, Dinesh C; Jones, Shawn W; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2011-01-25

    The genus Clostridium includes major human pathogens and species important to cellulose degradation, the carbon cycle, and biotechnology. Small RNAs (sRNAs) are emerging as crucial regulatory molecules in all organisms, but they have not been investigated in clostridia. Research on sRNAs in clostridia is hindered by the absence of a systematic method to identify sRNA candidates, thus delegating clostridial sRNA research to a hit-and-miss process. Thus, we wanted to develop a method to identify potential sRNAs in the Clostridium genus to open up the field of sRNA research in clostridia. Using comparative genomics analyses combined with predictions of rho-independent terminators and promoters, we predicted sRNAs in 21 clostridial genomes: Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. beijerinckii, C. botulinum (eight strains), C. cellulolyticum, C. difficile, C. kluyveri (two strains), C. novyi, C. perfringens (three strains), C. phytofermentans, C. tetani, and C. thermocellum. Although more than one-third of predicted sRNAs have Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences, only one-sixth have a start codon downstream of SD sequences; thus, most of the predicted sRNAs are noncoding RNAs. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) and Northern analysis were employed to test the presence of a randomly chosen set of sRNAs in C. acetobutylicum and several C. botulinum strains, leading to the confirmation of a large fraction of the tested sRNAs. We identified a conserved, novel sRNA which, together with the downstream gene coding for an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene, responds to the antibiotic clindamycin. The number of predicted sRNAs correlated with the physiological function of the species (high for pathogens, low for cellulolytic, and intermediate for solventogenic), but not with 16S rRNA-based phylogeny.

  3. Faecal microbiota transplantation for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Dodin, M; Katz, D E

    2014-03-01

    To review the current clinical literature regarding the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for severe and recurrent Clostridium difficile disease (CDAD). Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a gram positive, spore forming bacteria, and an important nosocomial pathogen causing healthcare associated diarrhoea in hospitalized patients in developed and developing countries. During the past several years, CDAD has become more frequent, severe, refractory, and more likely to relapse. It has become apparent that C. difficile is no longer just a nosocomial infection, with a rising rate of infection in populations not previously affected. Standard treatment regimens and new medications exist, but recurrence rates are high. Using PubMed, we conducted a Boolean search with the following medical subject headings (MeSH): Clostridium difficile infection and fecal transplantation or recurrent C. difficile infection. We restricted the search to human studies, published in English, between 2011 through June 1, 2013. There were 104 publications identified. Of those related to FMT, there were 20 clinical reviews, 6 case reports, 3 clinical trials (one, a randomized control trial), and 1 meta-analysis. Since 1958 there have been 36 published reports of FMT for C. difficile infection (CDI) representing 583 patients. Success rates were higher when FMT was administered via colonoscopy (representing the majority of patients, 79.2%). The overall success rate for FMT, regardless of administration method, was 80-98%. Fecal microbiota transplantation attempts to restore the normal microbiome of the colon, and has achieved a cure rate reaching more than 90%. Mounting evidence supports the utility of FMT for severe and recurrent cases of CDI. Barriers that will need to be addressed are patient perceptions and fears, standard protocol development, and further clinical trials. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The History of Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kevin K; Bennett, Nelson

    2015-10-01

    After its U.S. FDA approval in 2013, Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCh) has seen increasing use as a nonoperative treatment for Peyronie's disease (PD). We review the history of CCh and trials that led to its adoption. To provide a historical and contemporary context for the evolution of Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum as a treatment modality for Peyronie's disease. A comprehensive search of peer-reviewed literature was performed pertaining to CCh and its biochemical and clinical significance. The main outcome studied was the efficacy and safety profile of CCh in PD. CCh use in other diseases processes and its associated outcomes are also described. CCh injection yields objective improvement in penile curvature across multiple trials in PD patients. Recently, level 1 strength of evidence has emerged supporting its widespread use. As such, CCh stands as the only FDA-approved injectable therapy for PD. Adverse events were namely limited to local reactions. Serious systemic complications and need for intervention were rare. CCh is a safe and effective treatment for PD patients with deformities and plaque configuration amenable to injectable therapy. Multiple trials have demonstrated improvements in objective and subjective metrics such as penile curvature and bother scores. However, multiyear follow-up is needed to assess durability and its sustained clinical significance. Currently, refinement in dosing and technique has established a niche for CCh in PD patients who are affected by their symptoms but are not yet committed to surgical intervention. Yang KK and Bennett N. The history of collagenase clostridium histolyticum. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Protective cellular antigen of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J R; Stonger, K A

    1980-04-01

    Cellular antigens of Clostridium chauvoei, strain IRP-128, were demonstrated to be important in induction of immunity against this bacterium in guinea pigs. At least one major component of the cellular antigen complex was heat-labile. Acid extraction of the bacterial cells, followed by selective purification for flagella, led to the preparation of an acid extract antigen that possessed a high degree of immunogenicity. The acid extract antigen contained flagellar components and was resolved into two major and approximately five minor protein components by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis.

  6. Annotation of the Clostridium Acetobutylicum Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, M. J.

    2004-06-09

    The genome sequence of the solvent producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC824, has been determined by the shotgun approach. The genome consists of a 3.94 Mb chromosome and a 192 kb megaplasmid that contains the majority of genes responsible for solvent production. Comparison of C. acetobutylicum to Bacillus subtilis reveals significant local conservation of gene order, which has not been seen in comparisons of other genomes with similar, or, in some cases, closer, phylogenetic proximity. This conservation allows the prediction of many previously undetected operons in both bacteria.

  7. Regulation of Toxin Production in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens is widely distributed in nature, especially in soil and the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. C. perfringens causes gas gangrene and food poisoning, and it produces extracellular enzymes and toxins that are thought to act synergistically and contribute to its pathogenesis. A complicated regulatory network of toxin genes has been reported that includes a two-component system for regulatory RNA and cell-cell communication. It is necessary to clarify the global regulatory system of these genes in order to understand and treat the virulence of C. perfringens. We summarize the existing knowledge about the regulatory mechanisms here. PMID:27399773

  8. Antibodies for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have been demonstrated to be effective in the research and clinical environments. Early uncertainties about molecular and treatment modalities now appear to have converged upon the systemic dosing of mixtures of human IgG1. Although multiple examples of high-potency monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) exist, significant difficulties were initially encountered in their discovery. This minireview describes historical and contemporary MAbs and highlights differences between the most potent MAbs, which may offer insight into the pathogenesis and treatment of CDI. PMID:24789799

  9. Continuous Production of Clostridium tetani Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Zacharias, Bengt; Björklund, Marianne

    1968-01-01

    The continuous production of Clostridium tetani toxin has been carried out in a 1-liter stirred culture vessel for as long as 65 days. Toxin production of approximately 120 flocculating units per ml was maintained with a dilution rate of 0.125 hr-1, a temperature of 34 C, a pH of 7.4, and the addition to the medium of 0.1 g of potassium chloride per liter. The average minimal lethal intraperitoneal dose of the toxin in mice was approximately 106 per ml. PMID:4865906

  10. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    Leber, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    The detection and diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection in pediatric populations have some unique considerations in comparison to testing in adults. The testing methodologies, including toxigenic culture, cell cytotoxicity, antigen detection, and, more recently, molecular testing, are the same in all age groups. However, limited data exist on the specific performance characteristics in children. In this review, we focus on the challenges of testing in pediatric populations and assess the available data on test performance in these populations. Additionally, a review of the existing guidance for testing is provided. PMID:26912759

  11. An Update on Clostridium difficile Toxinotyping.

    PubMed

    Rupnik, Maja; Janezic, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Toxinotyping is a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based method for differentiation of Clostridium difficile strains according to the changes in the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc), a region coding for toxins A and B. Toxinotypes are a heterogenous group of strains that are important in the development of molecular diagnostic tests and vaccines and are a good basis for C. difficile phylogenetic studies. Here we describe an overview of the 34 currently known toxinotypes (I to XXXIV) and some changes in nomenclature.

  12. An Update on Clostridium difficile Toxinotyping

    PubMed Central

    Janezic, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Toxinotyping is a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based method for differentiation of Clostridium difficile strains according to the changes in the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc), a region coding for toxins A and B. Toxinotypes are a heterogenous group of strains that are important in the development of molecular diagnostic tests and vaccines and are a good basis for C. difficile phylogenetic studies. Here we describe an overview of the 34 currently known toxinotypes (I to XXXIV) and some changes in nomenclature. PMID:26511734

  13. Alternative strategies for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Martijn P; van Dissel, Jaap T

    2009-03-01

    Although antibiotics are generally effective in achieving symptomatic recovery from Clostridium difficile infection, the disease frequently relapses, partly because antibiotics not only kill C. difficile, but also disrupt colonisation resistance of the gut microflora. Non-antibiotic strategies for the prevention and treatment of the infection include probiotics, deliberate colonisation by non-toxigenic C. difficile strains, toxin-binding agents, active immunisation, passive immunotherapy with intravenous immunoglobulin, monoclonal antibodies or bovine anti-C. difficile whey concentrate, and faecal transplantation. None of these alternative therapies has proven benefit in therapy or prevention, and prospective randomised trials are urgently needed.

  14. Clostridium difficile: from obscurity to superbug.

    PubMed

    Brazier, J S

    2008-01-01

    According to the UK media and popular press, Clostridium difficile is now a fully fledged member of that notorious but ill-defined group of microorganisms portrayed to the general public as superbugs. Following the trail blazed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), C. difficile has made the transition from being an obscure anaerobic bacterium, mainly of interest to specialist anaerobic microbiologists, to that of an infamous superbug responsible for outbreaks of hospital-acquired infection that commonly result in serious disease and death. This review tracks the rise in scientific knowledge and public awareness of this organism.

  15. Chronic Clostridium botulinum infections in farmers.

    PubMed

    Rodloff, Arne C; Krüger, Monika

    2012-04-01

    Although botulism is usually an acute, often lethal disease that is caused by the ingestion of botulinum neurotoxin, there are also recognized forms like infant botulism, wound botulism, or "botulism of undefined origin" that are characterized by the fact that Clostridium botulinum colonizes the host and produces its toxin in the host. Evidence is presented here that a disease in cattle and in human care takers of diseased animals that has evolved over the past two decades, may be a chronic, visceral form of C. botulinum infection.

  16. Clostridium difficile infection: Updates in management.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Raseen; Khanna, Sahil

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was first identified in 1978 as a diarrhea-causing bacterium in humans. In the last three decades, C. difficile infection (CDI) has reached an epidemic state, both in health care and community settings worldwide. There has been substantial progress in the field of CDI, including identification of novel risk factors, presence of CDI in individuals not considered at risk previously, and treatment options including new drugs, monoclonal antibodies, and fecal microbiota transplantation. This review discusses epidemiology, novel and traditional risk factors, and updates in management for CDI.

  17. Clostridium difficile infection and fecal bacteriotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Indya; Shropshire, Kasheena; Ruel, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, also called "C. diff," is a gram-positive bacillus associated with nosocomial infections involving diarrhea, most often seen in developing countries. The severity of C. diff-associated diarrhea varies tremendously from mild and self-limiting to fulminant and life-threatening. C. diff has become an extremely important pathogen in community health but can be minimized with attention to proper hygiene. This article presents a case study regarding the treatment and management options of C. diff infection using a recent update of clinical guidelines for patient management.

  18. Clostridium difficile colitis: pathogenesis and host defence.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; McKenney, Peter T; Pamer, Eric G

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of intestinal infection and diarrhoea in individuals following antibiotic treatment. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that induce spore formation and germination and have determined the roles of C. difficile toxins in disease pathogenesis. Exciting progress has also been made in defining the role of the microbiome, specific commensal bacterial species and host immunity in defence against infection with C. difficile. This Review will summarize the recent discoveries and developments in our understanding of C. difficile infection and pathogenesis.

  19. Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized children in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nylund, Cade M.; Goudie, Anthony; Garza, Jose M.; Fairbrother, Gerry; Cohen, Mitchell B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the trend, impact, severity and risk factors of Clostridium difficile infections in hospitalized children in the United States. Design A retrospective cohort study utilizing the triennial Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids’ Inpatient Database years: 1997, 2000, 2003, and 2006. Setting Hospitalized children in the United States. Participants 10,495,728 nationally weighted hospital discharges and 21,274 with Clostridium difficile infection. Main Exposure Discharge diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection. Outcome measures Trend in cases; impact and severity was measured by length of stay, hospital charges, colectomy rate and death rate. Results There was an increasing trend in cases of Clostridium difficile infection from 3,565 in 1997 to 7,779 in 2006 (p<.001). Clostridium difficile infections had an increased risk of death with an adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval); 1.20 (1.01–1.43), colectomy; 1.36 (1.04–1.79), longer length of stay; 4.34 (3.97–4.83) and higher charges; 2.12 (1.98–2.26). There was no trend in death, colectomy, length of stay, or charges over the four time periods. The risk of comorbid diagnoses associated with Clostridium difficile infection included inflammatory bowel disease, with an odds ratio of 11.42 (10.16–12.83), and other comorbid diagnoses associated with immunosuppression, or antibiotic administration. Conclusions There is an increasing trend and a significant impact of Clostridium difficile infections on hospitalized children. In contrast to adults, there is no increasing trend in the severity of Clostridium difficile infections in children. Children with medical conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, immunosuppression, or conditions requiring antibiotic administration are at high risk of Clostridium difficile infection. PMID:21199971

  20. Clostridium perfringens infection after transarterial chemoembolization for large hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Huan; Yao, Rong-Rong; Shen, Hu-Jia; Zhang, Lan; Xie, Xiao-Ying; Chen, Rong-Xin; Wang, Yan-Hong; Ren, Zheng-Gang

    2015-04-14

    We report an unusual case of Clostridium perfringens liver abscess formation after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for large hepatocellular carcinoma. Severe deterioration in liver and renal function accompanied with hemocytolysis was found on the 2(nd) day after TACE. Blood culture found Clostridium perfringens and abdominal computed tomography revealed a gas-containing abscess in the liver. Following antibiotics administration and support care, the infection was controlled and the liver and renal function turned normal. The 2(nd) TACE procedure was performed 1.5 mo later and no recurrent Clostridium perfringens infection was found.

  1. Clostridium novyi, sordellii, and tetani: mechanisms of disease.

    PubMed

    Aronoff, David M

    2013-12-01

    Clostridia represent a diverse group of spore-forming gram positive anaerobes that include several pathogenic species. In general, diseases caused by clostridia are a result of intoxication of the infected host. Thus, clostridial toxins have been targeted for diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive strategies against infection. Studying the mechanisms of action of clostridial toxins has not only shed light on the pathogenesis of infection but has provided important new insights into cell biology and immunology. A primary purpose of this manuscript is to provide a succinct review on the mechanisms of disease caused by intoxication by the pathogens Clostridium tetani, Clostridium novyi, and Clostridium sordellii.

  2. Genetic Engineering of Clostridium Difficile Toxin A Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-04

    AD-A242 265 AD GENETIC ENGINEERING OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE TOXIN A VACCINE ANNUAL/FINAL REPORT DTIC LYCJRGUS L. MULDROW F EIECTE JOE JOHNSON ’ N OVI...62770A 62770A871 AA DA314471 (U) Genetic Engineering of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Vaccine 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lycurgus L. Muldrow and Joe... Clostridium difficile Vaccine 06 o2 Recombinant DNA 06 o3 RA 1 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on revere if n.ece•x••y and itd•entify by 0o/ r ou er).. .... Recombinant

  3. Tea and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Starley, Brad; Galagan, Jack Carl; Yabes, Joseph Michael; Evans, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Studies have shown effects of diet on gut microbiota. We aimed to identify foods associated with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Methods. In this cross-sectional survey, consecutive patients diagnosed with CDI were identified by electronic medical records. Colitis symptoms and positive Clostridium difficile assay were confirmed. Health-care onset-health-care facility associated CDI was excluded. Food surveys were mailed to 411 patients. Survey responses served as the primary outcome measure. Spearman's rank correlation identified risk factors for CDI recurrence. Results. Surveys were returned by 68 patients. Nineteen patients experienced CDI recurrence. Compared to patients without CDI recurrence, patients with CDI recurrence had more antibiotics prescribed preceding their infection (p = 0.003). Greater numbers of the latter also listed tea (p = 0.002), coffee (p = 0.013), and eggs (p = 0.013), on their 24-hour food recall. Logistic regression identified tea as the only food risk factor for CDI recurrence (adjusted OR: 5.71; 95% CI: 1.26–25.89). Conclusion. The present results indicate a possible association between tea and CDI recurrence. Additional studies are needed to characterize and confirm this association. PMID:27651790

  4. [Selected aspects of Clostridium difficile infection].

    PubMed

    Mehlich, Agnieszka; Górska, Sabina; Gamian, Andrzej; Myc, Andrzej

    2015-05-05

    Clostridium difficile pathogen is a cause of the most frequent nosocomial infection, which is antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Antibiotic treatment causes disruption of the microbiome balance, which makes the gut a friendly environment for the pathogen. It leads to pseudomembranous colitis, toxic megacolon and even death. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is particularly dangerous to elderly patients, leading to the highest mortality rate. C. difficile is equipped with many virulence factors such as toxin A and B, binary toxin CDT, flagellum, S-layer proteins, Cwp66 and GroEL proteins, protease Cwp84, fibronectin-binding protein and the ability to form biofilm and spores. Problems with anti-CDI therapy prompt researchers and clinicians to seek alternative ways of therapy. Identification of immunological epitopes in outer layer proteins and the use of them as antigens for anti-CDI vaccines would be a rational approach to prevent the disease, but unfortunately such vaccines are not available yet. In this article we review the course of the disease, virulence and risk factors. We summarize briefly epidemiological data and the latest achievements in CDI treatment.

  5. The Pangenome of the genus Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2017-03-21

    We present the pangenome for the genus Clostridium sensu stricto, which was obtained using highly curated and annotated genomes from 16 species, some of these cause disease, while others are used for the production of added-value chemicals. Multilocus sequencing analysis revealed that species of this genus group into at least two clades that include non-pathogenic and pathogenic strains, suggesting that pathogenicity is dispersed across the phylogenetic tree. The core genome of the genus includes 546 protein families, which mainly comprise those involved in protein translation and DNA repair. The GS-GOGAT may represent the central pathway for generating organic nitrogen from inorganic nitrogen sources. Glycerol and glucose metabolism genes are well represented in the core genome together with a set of energy conservation systems. A metabolic network comprising proteins/enzymes, RNAs and metabolites, whose topological structure is a non-random and scale-free network with hierarchically structured modules was built. These modules shed light on the interactions between RNAs, proteins and metabolites, revealing biological features of transcription and translation, cell wall biosynthesis, C1 metabolism and N metabolism. Network analysis identified four nodes that function as hubs and bottlenecks, namely, coenzyme A, HPr kinases, S-adenosylmethionine and the ribonuclease P-protein, suggesting pivotal roles for them in Clostridium. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Clostridium to treat cancer: dream or reality?

    PubMed

    Theys, Jan; Lambin, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    In their paper "Intratumoral injection of Clostridium novyi-NT spores induces antitumor responses", Roberts et al. describe the induction of antitumor responses following local spore administration of an attenuated C. novyi strain (C. novyi-NT). Stereotactic intratumoral spore injection led to significant survival advantages in a murine orthotopic brain model and local bacterial treatment produced robust responses in a set of spontaneous canine soft tissue carcinomas. Their preclinical findings in both models, provided the basis for a phase 1 investigational clinical study in patients with solid tumors that were either refractory to standard treatment or without an available standard treatment available (NCT01924689). The results of the first patient enrolled in this trial, a 53-year-old female with a retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma, are described. Next to the non-armed C. novyi-NT described in this paper, very potent genetically modified Clostridium expressing anti-cancer therapeutic genes are also being developed. Are treatments with these non-pathogenic clostridia a viable alternative cancer treatment?

  7. Secretion of clostridium cellulase by E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Ida Kuo

    1998-01-01

    A gene, encoding an endocellulase from a newly isolated mesophilic Clostridium strain IY-2 which can digest bamboo fibers, cellulose, rice straw, and sawdust, was isolated by shotgun cloning in an E. coli expression plasmid pLC2833. E. coli positive clones were selected based on their ability to hydrolyze milled bamboo fibers and cellulose present in agar plates. One clone contained a 2.8 kb DNA fragment that was responsible for cellulase activity. Western blot analyses indicated that the positive clone produced a secreted cellulase with a mass of about 58,000 daltons that was identical in size to the subunit of one of the three major Clostridium cellulases. The products of cellulose digestion by this cloned cellulase were cellotetraose and soluble higher polymers. The cloned DNA contained signal sequences capable of directing the secretion of heterologous proteins from an E. coli host. The invention describes a bioprocess for the treatment of cellulosic plant materials to produce cellular growth substrates and fermentation end products suitable for production of liquid fuels, solvents, and acids.

  8. [Experience with laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile].

    PubMed

    Bareková, L; Zálabská, E; Hanovcová, I

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is currently a significant cause of nosocomial diarrhea. For several years, the number of infectious cases in the community has also been increasing. Since the beginning of 2010, quite a large increase in the number of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) has been noted in Pardubice Regional Hospital (PRH). The objectives of this study were to describe and evaluate the methods used in the laboratory diagnosis of CDIs in PRH, and to describe the laboratory diagnostic algorithm used here. Samples of stools were taken from symptomatic patients hospitalized or examined in the outpatient departments of PRH from 1 July 2010 to 31 December 2012. For the detection of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and toxin A/B, the dual test based upon the principle enzyme immunoassays C. Diff Quik Chek Complete, Techlabo (D-EIA) was used. The system GeneXpert PCR Cepheid (PCR) was used for confirmation of laboratory findings. Since the beginning of 2011, all the GDH-positive samples were cultured. A total of 2,040 samples were examined. The D-EIA test was used for examination of 2,014 samples. Of those, 1,373 (68.2 %) samples were GDH- and toxin A/B-negative. In 359 (17.8 %) samples, both GDH and toxin A/B were detected. The D-EIA sensitivity and specificity for detecting toxigenic strains in stool samples were 21.8% and 97.2%, respectively. The PPV and NPV rates calculated for the populations with prevalence rates of disorders of 5%, 10%, 20% and 50 % were 0.29, 0.46, 0.66, 0.88 and 0.96, 0.92, 0.83, 0.55, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of GDH for the detection of Clostridium difficile in stools were 100.0% and 96.2%, respectively. PCR examination was carried out in 140 samples. Of those, 82 samples were PCR-positive. The gene for the production of toxin B was detected in 47%, the finding suspected for ribotype 027 (gene for toxin B, binary toxin and deletion of tcdC) in 48%. In 5% of the samples, the gene for toxin B and the gene for the binary

  9. Clostridium-DT(DB): a comprehensive database for potential drug targets of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Ankush; Ezhilarasan, Vijayalakshmi; Prakash Sharma, Om; Pan, Archana

    2013-05-01

    Clostridium difficile is considered to be one of the most important causes of health care-associated infections currently. The prevalence and severity of C. difficile infection have increased significantly worldwide in the past decade which has led to the increased research interest. Here, using comparative genomics strategy coupled with bioinformatics tools we have identified potential drug targets in C. difficile and determined their three-dimensional structures in order to develop a database, named Clostridium-DT(DB). Currently, the database comprises the potential drug targets with their structural information from three strains of C. difficile, namely hypervirulent PCR-ribotype 027 strain R20291, PCR-ribotype 012 strain 630, and PCR-ribotype 027 strain CD196. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection of toxigenic Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum from food sold in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chukwu, Emelda E; Nwaokorie, Francisca O; Coker, Akitoye O; Avila-Campos, Mario J; Solis, Rosa L; Llanco, Luis A; Ogunsola, Folasade T

    2016-12-01

    Food-borne diseases contribute to the huge burden of sickness and death globally and in the last decade, have become more frequently reported in Africa. In line with this, food safety is becoming a significant and growing public health problem in Nigeria. Diarrhoea is a common problem in Nigeria and has been reported but there has been little data on the possibility of clostridia as aetiological agents. Clostridium species are ubiquitous in the environment and in the gastrointestinal tract of man and animals and can serve as a marker for faecal contamination. We set out to determine the potential of these foods to transmit Clostridium species. A total of 220 food commodities from six local governments in Lagos State were sampled. Isolates obtained were identified based on cultural, morphological and biochemical characteristics. Toxinotyping was done using multiplex-PCR with primers specific for alpha, beta, epsilon and iota-toxin genes, enterotoxigenic cpe gene and neurotoxigenic BoNt gene. Fifty (22.7%) clostridial species were isolated of which 29 (58%) were identified as C. perfringens. Toxinotyping of the 29 strains showed that 28 (96.6%) were toxin producing C. perfringens type A while one (3.4%) was C. perfringens type D. Two (4%) C. botulinum species were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA sequencing, both harbouring BoNt/A gene. The contamination rates of food with Clostridium species show that food hygiene is a problem and Clostridium species may be a source of food borne disease in Lagos State, Nigeria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. First Report of Clostridium lavalense Isolated in Human Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Garceau, Richard; Bourque, Christine; Thibault, Louise; Côté, Jean-Charles; Longtin, Jean; Domingo, Marc-Christian

    2016-01-01

    An 88-year-old man was admitted to the hospital with worsening malaise, fever, and weakness. Anaerobic blood culture bottles revealed the presence of an anaerobic, Gram-positive sporulated bacillus. Empirical antibiotherapy with intravenous piperacillin-tazobactam was initiated. The patient defervesced after four days and was switched to oral amoxicillin on his 6th day of antibiotic therapy and later discharged from the hospital. Four months later, he had recovered. The bacterium was initially identified as Clostridium butyricum using anaerobic manual identification panel. 16S rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed the bacterium to be Clostridium lavalense, a recently described species with no previously published case of isolation in human diagnostic samples so far. This is the first report of Clostridium lavalense isolation from human blood cultures. Further studies are needed in order to elucidate the role of Clostridium lavalense in human disease and its virulence factors.

  12. Production and counting of spores of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Bagadi, H O

    1977-06-01

    The concentration and viability of spores produced by four different strains of Clostridium chauvoei (C. feseri) grown in a modified medium for 18 days are described. The medium yielded enough viable spores for experimental work.

  13. Characterization of Clostridium sp. RKD producing botulinum-like neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Aparna; Dhaked, Ram Kumar; Alam, Syed Imteyaz; Singh, Lokendra

    2005-07-01

    A Gram positive, motile, rod-shaped, strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from intestine of decaying fish was identified as Clostridium sp. RKD and produced a botulinum type B-like neurotoxin as suggested by mouse bioassay and protection with anti botulinum antibodies. The neurotoxicity was functionally characterized by the phrenic nerve hemi-diaphragm assay. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence, placed it at a different position from the reported strains of Clostridium botulinum. The strain exhibited differences from both Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani with respect to morphological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic characteristics. Botulinum group specific and serotype specific primers amplified the DNA fragments of 260 and 727 bp, respectively, indicating presence of botulinum type 'B' toxin gene. Sequence of nearly 700 bp amplified using primers specific for botulinum neurotoxin type B gene, did not show any significant match in the database when subjected to BLAST search.

  14. Flooding and Clostridium difficile infection: a case-crossover analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospttalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community­ associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more ...

  15. First Report of Clostridium lavalense Isolated in Human Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Bourque, Christine; Thibault, Louise; Côté, Jean-Charles; Domingo, Marc-Christian

    2016-01-01

    An 88-year-old man was admitted to the hospital with worsening malaise, fever, and weakness. Anaerobic blood culture bottles revealed the presence of an anaerobic, Gram-positive sporulated bacillus. Empirical antibiotherapy with intravenous piperacillin-tazobactam was initiated. The patient defervesced after four days and was switched to oral amoxicillin on his 6th day of antibiotic therapy and later discharged from the hospital. Four months later, he had recovered. The bacterium was initially identified as Clostridium butyricum using anaerobic manual identification panel. 16S rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed the bacterium to be Clostridium lavalense, a recently described species with no previously published case of isolation in human diagnostic samples so far. This is the first report of Clostridium lavalense isolation from human blood cultures. Further studies are needed in order to elucidate the role of Clostridium lavalense in human disease and its virulence factors. PMID:27478446

  16. Flooding and Clostridium difficile infection: a case-crossover analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospttalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community­ associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more ...

  17. Small RNAs in the Genus Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yili; Indurthi, Dinesh C.; Jones, Shawn W.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    2011-01-01

    The genus Clostridium includes major human pathogens and species important to cellulose degradation, the carbon cycle, and biotechnology. Small RNAs (sRNAs) are emerging as crucial regulatory molecules in all organisms, but they have not been investigated in clostridia. Research on sRNAs in clostridia is hindered by the absence of a systematic method to identify sRNA candidates, thus delegating clostridial sRNA research to a hit-and-miss process. Thus, we wanted to develop a method to identify potential sRNAs in the Clostridium genus to open up the field of sRNA research in clostridia. Using comparative genomics analyses combined with predictions of rho-independent terminators and promoters, we predicted sRNAs in 21 clostridial genomes: Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. beijerinckii, C. botulinum (eight strains), C. cellulolyticum, C. difficile, C. kluyveri (two strains), C. novyi, C. perfringens (three strains), C. phytofermentans, C. tetani, and C. thermocellum. Although more than one-third of predicted sRNAs have Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences, only one-sixth have a start codon downstream of SD sequences; thus, most of the predicted sRNAs are noncoding RNAs. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) and Northern analysis were employed to test the presence of a randomly chosen set of sRNAs in C. acetobutylicum and several C. botulinum strains, leading to the confirmation of a large fraction of the tested sRNAs. We identified a conserved, novel sRNA which, together with the downstream gene coding for an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene, responds to the antibiotic clindamycin. The number of predicted sRNAs correlated with the physiological function of the species (high for pathogens, low for cellulolytic, and intermediate for solventogenic), but not with 16S rRNA-based phylogeny. PMID:21264064

  18. Injectable collagenase clostridium histolyticum for Dupuytren's contracture.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Lawrence C; Badalamente, Marie A; Hentz, Vincent R; Hotchkiss, Robert N; Kaplan, F Thomas D; Meals, Roy A; Smith, Theodore M; Rodzvilla, John

    2009-09-03

    Dupuytren's disease limits hand function, diminishes the quality of life, and may ultimately disable the hand. Surgery followed by hand therapy is standard treatment, but it is associated with serious potential complications. Injection of collagenase clostridium histolyticum, an office-based, nonsurgical option, may reduce joint contractures caused by Dupuytren's disease. We enrolled 308 patients with joint contractures of 20 degrees or more in this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. The primary metacarpophalangeal or proximal interphalangeal joints of these patients were randomly assigned to receive up to three injections of collagenase clostridium histolyticum (at a dose of 0.58 mg per injection) or placebo in the contracted collagen cord at 30-day intervals. One day after injection, the joints were manipulated. The primary end point was a reduction in contracture to 0 to 5 degrees of full extension 30 days after the last injection. Twenty-six secondary end points were evaluated, and data on adverse events were collected. Collagenase treatment significantly improved outcomes. More cords that were injected with collagenase than cords injected with placebo met the primary end point (64.0% vs. 6.8%, P < 0.001), as well as all secondary end points (P < or = 0.002). Overall, the range of motion in the joints was significantly improved after injection with collagenase as compared with placebo (from 43.9 to 80.7 degrees vs. from 45.3 to 49.5 degrees, P < 0.001). The most commonly reported adverse events were localized swelling, pain, bruising, pruritus, and transient regional lymph-node enlargement and tenderness. Three treatment-related serious adverse events were reported: two tendon ruptures and one case of complex regional pain syndrome. No significant changes in flexion or grip strength, no systemic allergic reactions, and no nerve injuries were observed. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum significantly reduced

  19. The effect of probiotics on Clostridium difficile diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Pochapin, M

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomially acquired intestinal infection in the United States, affecting virtually all cases of pseudomembranous colitis and up to 20% of cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Even after receiving antibiotic treatment with either metronidazole or vancomycin, 20% of patients will have recurrent Clostridium difficile diarrhea. An innovative approach to the problem involves the introduction of competing, nonpathogenic (probiotic) organisms into the intestinal tract to restore microbial balance. The theoretical premise behind this approach is that the protective intestinal microflora is damaged by antibiotic treatment; the initial antibiotic exposure thus leaves the host susceptible to colonization and subsequent infection by Clostridium difficile. A so-called "second-hit" to the intestinal microflora occurs when the infected host is treated with flagyl or vancomycin, further destroying susceptible bacterial flora. Probiotic agents, such as Lactobacillus GG and Saccharomyces boulardii, have been studied for the treatment of Clostridium difficile. We are currently running a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus GG in combination with standard antibiotics for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. Although it is too early to draw statistically significant conclusions, two patterns seem to be emerging: Lactobacillus GG is effective in reducing the 3-wk recurrence rate of Clostridium difficile, and patients feel better when taking Lactobacillus GG, as compared with the placebo, with early disappearance of abdominal cramps and diarrhea. In conclusion, the use of probiotics for the treatment of primary and recurrent Clostridium difficile diarrhea looks promising. Patients seem to have less recurrent Clostridium difficile diarrhea and early symptomatic improvement when using the probiotic Lactobacillus GG.

  20. Fecal microbiota transplantation in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Austin, Matthew; Mellow, Mark; Tierney, William M

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, Clostridium difficile infections have become more frequent, more severe, more refractory to standard treatment, and more likely to recur. Current antibiotic treatment regimens for Clostridium difficile infection alter the normal gut flora, which provide colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile. Over the past few years, there has been a marked increase in the knowledge of the gut microbiota and its role in health maintenance and disease causation. This has, fortuitously, coincided with the use of a unique microbial replacement therapy, fecal microbiota transplantation, in the treatment of patients with multiple recurrent Clostridium difficile infections. We briefly review current knowledge of the gut microbiota's functions. We then review the indications for use of fecal microbiota transplantation in Clostridium difficile infection, the techniques employed, and results of treatment. Fecal microbiota transplantation has been shown to be efficacious for patients with multiply recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (reported cure rates of 90%), with an excellent short-term safety profile, and has been included in the American College of Gastroenterology treatment guidelines for this troublesome disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Updates on the sporulation process in Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Prabhat K; Olguín-Araneda, Valeria; Alnoman, Maryam; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2015-05-01

    Sporulation is an important strategy for certain bacterial species within the phylum Firmicutes to survive longer periods of time in adverse conditions. All spore-forming bacteria have two phases in their life; the vegetative form, where they can maintain all metabolic activities and replicate to increase numbers, and the spore form, where no metabolic activities exist. Although many essential components of sporulation are conserved among the spore-forming bacteria, there are differences in the regulation and the pathways among different genera, even at the species level. While we have gained much information from the most studied spore-forming bacterial genus, Bacillus, we still lack an in-depth understanding of spore formation in the genus Clostridium. Clostridium and Bacillus share the master regulator of sporulation, Spo0A, and its downstream pathways, but there are differences in the activation of the Spo0A pathway. While Bacillus species use a multi-component phosphorylation pathway for phosphorylation of Spo0A, termed phosphorelay, such a phosphorelay system is absent in Clostridium. On the other hand, a number of genes regulated by the different sporulation-specific transcription factors are conserved between different Clostridium and Bacillus species. In this review, we discuss the recent findings on Clostridium sporulation and compare the sporulation mechanism in Clostridium and Bacillus. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Butanol Production from Crystalline Cellulose by Cocultured Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum N1-4 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Shunichi; Kiyoshi, Keiji; Kadokura, Toshimori; Nakazato, Atsumi

    2011-01-01

    We investigated butanol production from crystalline cellulose by cocultured cellulolytic Clostridium thermocellum and the butanol-producing strain, Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum (strain N1-4). Butanol was produced from Avicel cellulose after it was incubated with C. thermocellum for at least 24 h at 60°C before the addition of strain N1-4. Butanol produced by strain N1-4 on 4% Avicel cellulose peaked (7.9 g/liter) after 9 days of incubation at 30°C, and acetone was undetectable in this coculture system. Less butanol was produced by cocultured Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii than by strain N1-4, indicating that strain N1-4 was the optimal strain for producing butanol from crystalline cellulose in this coculture system. PMID:21764954

  3. Characterization of flagellin from Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Kojima, A; Amimoto, K; Ohgitani, T; Tamura, Y

    1999-06-30

    Differential centrifugation and cesium chloride-equilibrium centrifugation were used to purify the flagella from the strain Okinawa of the formalin-fixed Clostridium chauvoei. SDS-PAGE profile of purified flagella showed that a major protein band with a molecular mass of 46 kDa, corresponding to the flagellin monomer, and at least two minor protein bands with molecular masses of approximately 73 and 100 kDa were found. The amino acid composition of C. chauvoei flagellin was similar to the flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus subtilis. In addition, C. chauvoei flagellin monomer shared limited sequence homology with the N-terminal amino acid sequence reported for other bacterial flagellins. N-terminal sequences of two minor bands corresponded to the flagellin monomer, indicating that higher molecular mass bands were polymeric forms of the flagellin monomer.

  4. Patho-genetics of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Frey, Joachim; Falquet, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    The genomic sequence of Clostridium chauvoei, the etiological agent of blackleg, a severe disease of ruminants with high mortality specified by a myonecrosis reveals a chromosome of 2.8 million base-pairs and a cryptic plasmid of 5.5 kilo base-pairs. The chromosome contains the main pathways like glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, sugar metabolism, purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, but the notable absence of genes of the citric acid cycle and deficient or partially deficient amino acid metabolism for Histidine, Tyrosine, Phenylalanine, and Tryptophan. These essential amino acids might be acquired from host tissue damage caused by various toxins and by protein metabolism that includes 57 genes for peptidases, and several ABC transporters for amino acids import.

  5. Clostridium difficile in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Welkon, C J; Long, S S; Thompson, C M; Gilligan, P H

    1985-08-01

    One hundred seven patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and 54 other patients with risk factors for Clostridium difficile-associated disease were entered into a bacteriologic study to compare the rate of recovery of C difficile and cytotoxin in feces with occurrence of diarrhea and to investigate potentially protective or permissive relationships of fecal flora. Toxigenic C difficile was recovered from 22% of CF patients and 11% of patients with other diagnoses. Unlike the latter group, the majority (12/15) of CF patients who had cytotoxin recovered had formed stools and no history of diarrhea. Explanations for the lack of symptoms are speculative. Stool flora of CF patients was significantly more likely to include several bacteria with known inhibitory effects on C difficile. Recovery of C difficile and cytotoxin, however, was not associated with the decrease in rate of recovery or the mean bacterial count of any bacterium of fecal flora.

  6. Clostridium difficile Infection: New Insights Into Management

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Sahil; Pardi, Darrell S.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile was first described as a cause of diarrhea in 1978 and is now among the leading 3 hospital-acquired infections in the United States, along with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci. In the past 2 decades, there has been an increase in the incidence, severity, and recurrence rates of C difficile infection, all of which are associated with poor outcomes. In addition, several novel risk factors and newer treatment methods are emerging, including fidaxomicin therapy, treatment using monoclonal antibodies, and fecal microbiota transplantation, that have shown promise for the treatment of C difficile infection. This review focuses on the changing epidemiology, risk factors, and newer methods for treatment of C difficile infection. PMID:23127735

  7. Clostridium difficile: An Emerging Pathogen in Children

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Natalia; Crews, Jonathan; DuPont, Herbert L.; Koo, Hoonmo L.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is emerging as an important enteric pathogen in children. Historically considered as an asymptomatic colonizer of the gastrointestinal tract, C. difficile infection (CDI) has not been well-studied in pediatric populations. While asymptomatic carriage remains high among infants, recent epidemiological surveillance has demonstrated a rise in the prevalence of CDI in both healthcare and community settings, particularly in children 1-5 years of age. The pathogenesis of pediatric CDI, including the factors underlying the absence of toxin-mediated effects among colonized infants, remains ill-defined. Studies suggest that traditional adult CDI risk factors such as antibiotic and healthcare exposure may not be as important for children who acquire CDI in the community. As recognition of the significant impact of CDI in children increases, the pressing need for deepening our understanding of this disease and identifying optimal therapeutic and preventative strategies is becoming apparent. PMID:22935207

  8. Clostridium difficile infection and intestinal microbiota interactions.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, C; Taminiau, B; Van Broeck, J; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile remains the leading cause of healthcare-associated diarrhoea and outbreaks continue to occur worldwide. Aside from nosocomial C. difficile infection, the bacterium is also increasingly important as a community pathogen. Furthermore, asymptomatic carriage of C. difficile in neonates, adults and animals is also well recognised. The investigation of the gut's microbial communities, in both healthy subjects and patients suffering C. difficile infection (CDI), provides findings and information relevant for developing new successful approaches for its treatment, such as faecal microbiota transplantation, or for the prophylaxis of the infection by modification of the gut microbiota using functional foods and beverages. The analysis of all available data shows new insights into the role of intestinal microbiota in health and disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clostridium difficile Infection and Fecal Microbiota Transplant.

    PubMed

    Liubakka, Alyssa; Vaughn, Byron P

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major source of morbidity and mortality for hospitalized patients. Although most patients have a clinical response to existing antimicrobial therapies, recurrent infection develops in up to 30% of patients. Fecal microbiota transplant is a novel approach to this complex problem, with an efficacy rate of nearly 90% in the setting of multiple recurrent CDI. This review covers the current epidemiology of CDI (including toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains, risk factors for infection, and recurrent infection), methods of diagnosis, existing first-line therapies in CDI, the role of fecal microbiota transplant for multiple recurrent CDIs, and the potential use of fecal microbial transplant for patients with severe or refractory infection. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  10. Engineering Clostridium Strain to Accept Unmethylated DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Dai, Zongjie; Li, Yin

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to genetically manipulate the medically and biotechnologically important genus Clostridium due to the existence of the restriction and modification (RM) systems. We identified and engineered the RM system of a model clostridial species, C. acetobutylicum, with the aim to allow the host to accept the unmethylated DNA efficiently. A gene CAC1502 putatively encoding the type II restriction endonuclease Cac824I was identified from the genome of C. acetobutylicum DSM1731, and disrupted using the ClosTron system based on group II intron insertion. The resulting strain SMB009 lost the type II restriction endonuclease activity, and can be transformed with unmethylated DNA as efficiently as with methylated DNA. The strategy reported here makes it easy to genetically modify the clostridial species using unmethylated DNA, which will help to advance the understanding of the clostridial physiology from the molecular level. PMID:20161730

  11. Clostridium difficile infection in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Robin LP

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection, the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea, disproportionately affects older adults. The two most important risk factors for developing C. difficile infection are antimicrobial exposure and age >65 years old. Risk factors specific to older adults are frequent interactions with healthcare systems and age-related changes in physiology, including immune senescence and changes to the gut microbiome. Metronidazole and oral vancomcyin are the mainstays of conventional treatment for C. difficile infection. Alternative therapies include fidaxomicin, a narrow-spectrum macrocyclic antibiotic, and fectal bacteriotherapy, which offers an excellent therapeutic outcome. Strategies to prevent C. difficile infections include enhanced infection control measures and reducing inappropriate antimicrobial use through stewardship. PMID:24955106

  12. Carbohydrate-based Clostridium difficile vaccines.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Mario A; Ma, Zuchao; Bertolo, Lisa; Jiao, Yuening; Arroyo, Luis; Hodgins, Douglas; Mallozzi, Michael; Vedantam, Gayatri; Sagermann, Martin; Sundsmo, John; Chow, Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is responsible for thousands of deaths each year and a vaccine would be welcomed, especially one that would disrupt bacterial maintenance, colonization and persistence in carriers and convalescent patients. Structural explorations at the University of Guelph (ON, Canada) discovered that C. difficile may express three phosphorylated polysaccharides, named PSI, PSII and PSIII; this review captures our recent efforts to create vaccines based on these glycans, especially PSII, the common antigen that has precipitated immediate attention. The authors describe the design and immunogenicity of vaccines composed of raw polysaccharides and conjugates thereof. So far, it has been observed that anti-PSII antibodies can be raised in farm animals, mice and hamster models; humans and horses carry anti-PSII IgA and IgG antibodies from natural exposure to C. difficile, respectively; phosphate is an indispensable immunogenic epitope and vaccine-induced PSII antibodies recognize PSII on C. difficile outer surface.

  13. Therapeutic approaches for Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Jane W; Curry, Scott R

    2013-10-02

    Metronidazole and vancomycin remain the front-line therapies for most Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). However, recurrent CDI occurs in ∼ 25% of patients, causing significant morbidity and mortality and healthcare costs. For this population, traditional antibiotic therapies fail and new treatment options are greatly needed. The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved fidaxomicin for CDI treatment. This narrow-spectrum antibiotic preserves the normal gut microbiota and shows promise as a treatment for severe and recurrent CDI. Monoclonal antibodies and vaccines directed against toxin are currently in clinical trials and represent alternative, non-antibiotic therapies. Less traditional therapeutic interventions include bacteriotherapy with non-toxigenic C. difficile and fecal transplant. This commentary will provide an overview of current and forthcoming CDI therapies.

  14. Investigational new treatments for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Mattias E; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Castagner, Bastien

    2015-05-01

    Significant progress has been made by industry and academia in the past two years to address the medical threats posed by Clostridium difficile infection. These developments provide an excellent example of how patient need has driven a surge of innovation in drug discovery. Indeed, only two drugs were approved for the infection in the past 30 years but there are 13 treatment candidates in clinical trials today. What makes the latter number even more remarkable is the diversity in the strategies represented (antibiotics, microbiota supplements, vaccines, antibiotic quenchers and passive immunization). In this review, we provide a snapshot of the current stage of these breakthroughs and argue that there is still room for further innovation in treating C. difficile infection.

  15. Clostridium difficile: clinical disease and diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, F C; Owens, M; Crocker, I C

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a spectrum of disease ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis. Although the disease was first described in 1893, the etiologic agent was not isolated and identified until 1978. Since clinical and pathological features of C. difficile-associated disease are not easily distinguished from those of other gastrointestinal diseases, including ulcerative colitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, and Crohn's disease, diagnostic methods have relied on either isolation and identification of the microorganism or direct detection of bacterial antigens or toxins in stool specimens. The current review focuses on the sensitivity, specificity, and practical use of several diagnostic tests, including methods for culture of the etiologic agent, cellular cytotoxicity assays, latex agglutination tests, enzyme immunoassay systems, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, fluorescent-antibody assays, and polymerase chain reactions. PMID:8358706

  16. Harbingers for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Pant, Chaitanya; Madonia, Phillip N; Jordan, Paul; Manas, Kenneth; Bass, Pat

    2009-01-01

    : Recent research has recognized surrogate markers for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). Among the most consistently identified markers are the leukocyte count, platelet count, and albumin level. Previous investigators failed to exclude patients with hematologic disorders that may have confounded their results. Therefore, the exclusion of this subset from our study lends it a unique perspective. : We undertook a retrospective review of inpatients at our institution that were diagnosed with nosocomial diarrhea and subsequently had a stool sample sent for C. difficile toxins A and B. Patients with major hematologic disorders were excluded. : A total of 77 C. difficile-positive patients and 91 C. difficile-negative patients were studied. Patients with CDAD had a significantly higher leukocyte and platelet count but a lower albumin level compared with patients without CDAD. : Our results support the conclusion of preceding studies that leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, and hypoalbuminemia are reliable clinical predictors for CDAD even after careful exclusion of confounding factors.

  17. Biotechnological potential of Clostridium butyricum bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Szymanowska-Powałowska, Daria; Orczyk, Dorota; Leja, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    In response to demand from industry for microorganisms with auspicious biotechnological potential, a worldwide interest has developed in bacteria and fungi isolation. Microorganisms of interesting metabolic properties include non-pathogenic bacteria of the genus Clostridium, particularly C. acetobutylicum, C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum. A well-known property of C. butyricum is their ability to produce butyric acid, as well as effectively convert glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (38.2 g/L). A conversion rate of 0.66 mol 1,3-propanediol/mol of glycerol has been obtained. Results of the studies described in the present paper broaden our knowledge of characteristic features of C. butyricum specific isolates in terms of their phylogenetic affiliation, fermentation capacity and antibacterial properties. PMID:25477923

  18. Nonantimicrobial drug targets for Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Darkoh, Charles; Deaton, Magdalena; DuPont, Herbert L

    2017-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major public health problem worldwide. Treatment has become complicated due to the emergence of strains with increased toxigenicity and sporulation rate, together with rampant antibiotics use that disrupts colonization resistance of the colonic microbiota. As a result, there is a critical need for nonantibiotic treatments. Therapies based on inhibiting the toxins, bacterial structures responsible for colonization, virulence and restoration of the gut microbiota are the most important nonantibiotic targets to combat CDI. This report outlines these targets and how they could become the focus of future therapeutic agents. Inhibiting colonization and virulence factors during CDI will disrupt pathogen persistence and decrease exposure to the inflammatory toxins, allowing the immune system to clear the infection.

  19. [Laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection].

    PubMed

    Alcalá-Hernández, Luis; Mena-Ribas, Ana; Niubó-Bosh, Jordi; Marín-Arriaza, Mercedes

    2016-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in developed countries, and is one of the main aetiologic agents of community diarrhea. The eruption of the hypervirulent strain BI/NAP1/027 has given rise to an increase in the morbidity and mortality of C.difficile infection (CDI). This document aims to review the main clinical pictures of CDI and the laboratory diagnosis, including sampling, transport and storage of specimens, specimen processing, diagnostic procedures, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and molecular characterisation of the isolates. The main purpose of the article is to develop a practical document that provides answers to the main questions that arise in the laboratory diagnosis of CDI.

  20. The Enterotoxicity of Clostridium difficile Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xingmin; Savidge, Tor; Feng, Hanping

    2010-01-01

    The major virulence factors of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) are two large exotoxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). However, our understanding of the specific roles of these toxins in CDI is still evolving. It is now accepted that both toxins are enterotoxic and proinflammatory in the human intestine. Both purified TcdA and TcdB are capable of inducing the pathophysiology of CDI, although most studies have focused on TcdA. C. difficile toxins exert a wide array of biological activities by acting directly on intestinal epithelial cells. Alternatively, the toxins may target immune cells and neurons once the intestinal epithelial barrier is disrupted. The toxins may also act indirectly by stimulating cells to produce chemokines, proinflammatory cytokines, neuropeptides and other neuroimmune signals. This review considers the mechanisms of TcdA- and TcdB-induced enterotoxicity, and recent developments in this field. PMID:22069662

  1. Clostridium difficile outbreaks: prevention and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Fernando J; Leffler, Daniel A; Kelly, Ciaran P

    2012-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have increased dramatically over the past decade. Its treatment, however, has largely remained the same with the exception of oral vancomycin use as a first-line agent in severe disease. From 1999 to 2004, 20,642 deaths were attributed to CDI in the United States, almost 7 times the rate of all other intestinal infections combined. Worldwide, several major CDI outbreaks have occurred, and many of these were associated with the NAP1 strain. This ‘epidemic’ strain has contributed to the rising incidence and mortality of CDI. The purpose of this article is to review the current management, treatment, infection control, and prevention strategies that are needed to combat this increasingly morbid disease. PMID:22826646

  2. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation: Beyond Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Millan, Braden; Laffin, Michael; Madsen, Karen

    2017-09-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been established as standard of care in the treatment of antibiotic refractory Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI). This review examines the current evidence that exists to support the use of FMT in the treatment of human disease beyond C. difficile infection. Beneficial effects of FMT have been described in case series or small prospective trials on a wide spectrum of conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, functional gastrointestinal disorders, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, alcoholic hepatitis, hepatic encephalopathy, and neuropsychiatric conditions, and in limiting antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. Each of these proposed indications for FMT is associated with an underlying dysbiosis of the gastrointestinal microbiota and generally a clinical response is linked with a restoration of the gut microbiota. The potential of fecal microbial transplantation to alter disease course shows promise but further large-scale studies are necessary to understand limitations as well as how best to utilize this therapy.

  3. The enterotoxicity of Clostridium difficile toxins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xingmin; Savidge, Tor; Feng, Hanping

    2010-07-01

    The major virulence factors of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) are two large exotoxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). However, our understanding of the specific roles of these toxins in CDI is still evolving. It is now accepted that both toxins are enterotoxic and proinflammatory in the human intestine. Both purified TcdA and TcdB are capable of inducing the pathophysiology of CDI, although most studies have focused on TcdA. C. difficile toxins exert a wide array of biological activities by acting directly on intestinal epithelial cells. Alternatively, the toxins may target immune cells and neurons once the intestinal epithelial barrier is disrupted. The toxins may also act indirectly by stimulating cells to produce chemokines, proinflammatory cytokines, neuropeptides and other neuroimmune signals. This review considers the mechanisms of TcdA- and TcdB-induced enterotoxicity, and recent developments in this field.

  4. Clostridium difficile infection in horses: a review.

    PubMed

    Diab, S S; Songer, G; Uzal, F A

    2013-11-29

    Clostridium difficile is considered one of the most important causes of diarrhea and enterocolitis in horses. Foals and adult horses are equally susceptible to the infection. The highly resistant spore of C. difficile is the infectious unit of transmission, which occurs primarily via the fecal-oral route, with sources of infection including equine feces, contaminated soil, animal hospitals, and feces of other animals. Two major risk factors for the development of C. difficile associated disease (CDAD) in adult horses are hospitalization and antimicrobial treatment, although sporadically, cases of CDAD can occur in horses that have not received antimicrobials or been hospitalized. The most common antibiotics associated with CDAD in horses are erythromycin, trimethoprim/sulfonamides, β-lactam antimicrobials, clindamycin, rifampicin, and gentamicin. Clinical signs and intestinal lesions of CDAD infection are not specific and they cannot be used to distinguish infections by C. difficile from infections by other agents, such as Clostridium perfringens or Salmonella sp. The distribution of lesions throughout the intestinal tract seems to be age-dependent. Small intestine is invariably affected, and colon and cecum may or may not have lesions in foals<1-month old. Naturally acquired disease in older foals and adult horses has a more aboral distribution, affecting colon and sometimes cecum, but rarely the small intestine. Detection of toxin A, toxin B or both in intestinal contents or feces is considered the most reliable diagnostic criterion for CDAD in horses. Isolation of toxigenic strains of C. difficile from horses with intestinal disease is highly suggestive of CDAD. A better understanding of pathogenesis, reservoirs of infection, and vaccines and other methods of control is needed. Also further studies are recommended to investigate other possible predisposing factors and/or etiological agents of enteric diseases of horses.

  5. First isolation of Clostridium amygdalinum from a patient with chronic osteitis.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Jean-Philippe; Manich, Maria; Loïez, Caroline; Migaud, Henri; Courcol, René J

    2006-10-01

    We describe a case of osteitis caused by a new and unusual Clostridium species, Clostridium amygdalinum, an environmental, moderately thermophilic bacterium. This is the first documented report of human infection caused by this organism.

  6. First Isolation of Clostridium amygdalinum from a Patient with Chronic Osteitis

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, Jean-Philippe; Manich, Maria; Loïez, Caroline; Migaud, Henri; Courcol, René J.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a case of osteitis caused by a new and unusual Clostridium species, Clostridium amygdalinum, an environmental, moderately thermophilic bacterium. This is the first documented report of human infection caused by this organism. PMID:17021125

  7. Detection of A/B toxin and isolation of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens from foals.

    PubMed

    Silva, R O S; Ribeiro, M G; Palhares, M S; Borges, A S; Maranhão, R P A; Silva, M X; Lucas, T M; Olivo, G; Lobato, F C F

    2013-11-01

    Toxin detection and screening could contribute to knowledge of the transmission patterns, risk factors and epidemiology of Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens. To isolate C. difficile and C. perfringens and to detect A/B toxins in faecal samples from diarrhoeic and nondiarrhoeic foals. Cross-sectional observational study. A total of 153 samples from foals were collected: 139 samples from farms and 14 samples from diarrhoeic foals admitted to a veterinary hospital. The A/B toxins were detected by cytotoxicity assay. All suspected colonies of C. perfringens were subjected to polymerase chain reaction for detection of the major toxin genes (α, β, ε and ι) and for detection of β2-, NetB- and enterotoxin-encoding genes. Furthermore, C. difficile and C. perfringens isolates were evaluated for in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility. Seven of 153 (4.6%) samples, all from diarrhoeic foals, were positive for C. difficile A/B toxin. Of these, 5 of 14 (35.7%) were from hospitalised foals, and only 2 of 63 (3.2%) diarrhoeic foal samples were from farms (P = 0.002). Clostridium perfringens was isolated from 31 (20.3%) foals, of which 21 of 76 (27.6%) were diarrhoeic and 10 of 76 (13.2%) were nondiarrhoeic, demonstrating a difference between these 2 groups (P = 0.045). Only 4 strains were positive for the β2-encoding gene (cpb2). All C. difficile and C. perfringens isolates were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. The present report highlights the need for laboratory diagnostics to differentiate C. difficile-associated infection in foals from other causes of diarrhoea to facilitate adequate antimicrobial therapy. More studies are needed to clarify the role of C. perfringens as a primary agent of diarrhoea in foals. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  8. Simultaneous detection of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium colinum by duplex-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Roussan, D A; Shaheen, Ibrahem A; Totanji, W S; Khawaldeh, G Y; Al Rifai, R H

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we provide a protocol for detection of Clostridium colinum and Clostridium perfringens by the single-tube duplex-PCR (dPCR) test for simultaneous and specific detection of both bacteria from pure cultures and fecal samples spiked with these pathogens. Specific primers for each pathogen were selected that amplified products of predicted sizes from bacteria in the dPCR as well as in the single-tube PCR (sPCR) assays. The sensitivity and specificity of dPCR assay were compared with those of the sPCR. No product amplification was obtained with DNA from reference strains belonging to the genus Clostridium (except C. colinum and C. perfringens) and isolates belonging to other genera using these primer sets. The dPCR assay was as sensitive as the sPCR assay because bacterial detection limits were similar in both assays. The detection limits of sPCR and dPCR in bacterial suspension were 20 and 25 cfu/mL for C. colinum and C. perfringens, respectively. Meanwhile, in the presence of feces the sensitivity of both assays decreased to a detection limit of 1.25 × 10(4) and 1.94 × 10(4) cfu/g of feces for C. colinum and C. perfringens, respectively. In summary, dPCR assay holds potential to be an economical and rapid diagnostic method for the simultaneous detection of C. colinum and C. perfringens in pure cultures and could be used to screen fecal samples for the presence of these pathogens.

  9. Inositol Hexakisphosphate-dependent Processing of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium novyi α-Toxin*

    PubMed Central

    Guttenberg, Gregor; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Genisyuerek, Selda; Lü, Wei; Jank, Thomas; Einsle, Oliver; Aktories, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin and Clostridium novyi α-toxin, which are virulence factors involved in the toxic shock and gas gangrene syndromes, are members of the family of clostridial glucosylating toxins. The toxins inactivate Rho/Ras proteins by glucosylation or attachment of GlcNAc (α-toxin). Here, we studied the activation of the autoproteolytic processing of the toxins by inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6) and compared it with the processing of Clostridium difficile toxin B. In the presence of low concentrations of InsP6 (<1 μm), toxin fragments consisting of the N-terminal glucosyltransferase (or GlcNAc-transferase) domains and the cysteine protease domains (CPDs) of C. sordellii lethal toxin, C. novyi α-toxin, and C. difficile toxin B were autocatalytically processed. The cleavage sites of lethal toxin (Leu-543) and α-toxin (Leu-548) and the catalytic cysteine residues (Cys-698 of lethal toxin and Cys-707 of α-toxin) were identified. Affinity of the CPDs for binding InsP6 was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. In contrast to full-length toxin B and α-toxin, autocatalytic cleavage and InsP6 binding of full-length lethal toxin depended on low pH (pH 5) conditions. The data indicate that C. sordellii lethal toxin and C. novyi α-toxin are InsP6-dependently processed. However, full-length lethal toxin, but not its short toxin fragments consisting of the glucosyltransferase domain and the CPD, requires a pH-sensitive conformational change to allow binding of InsP6 and subsequent processing of the toxin. PMID:21385871

  10. Phylogeny of the ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, and Clostridium aminophilum sp. nov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paster, B. J.; Russell, J. B.; Yang, C. M.; Chow, J. M.; Woese, C. R.; Tanner, R.

    1993-01-01

    In previous studies, gram-positive bacteria which grew rapidly with peptides or an amino acid as the sole energy source were isolated from bovine rumina. Three isolates, strains C, FT (T = type strain), and SR, were considered to be ecologically important since they produced up to 20-fold more ammonia than other ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria. On the basis of phenotypic criteria, the taxonomic position of these new isolates was uncertain. In this study, the 16S rRNA sequences of these isolates and related bacteria were determined to establish the phylogenetic positions of the organisms. The sequences of strains C, FT, and SR and reference strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, Clostridium coccoides, Clostridium aminovalericum, Acetomaculum ruminis, Clostridium leptum, Clostridium lituseburense, Clostridium acidiurici, and Clostridium barkeri were determined by using a modified Sanger dideoxy chain termination method. Strain C, a large coccus purported to belong to the genus Peptostreptococcus, was closely related to P. anaerobius, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.6%. Strain SR, a heat-resistant, short, rod-shaped organism, was closely related to C. sticklandii, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.9%. However, strain FT, a heat-resistant, pleomorphic, rod-shaped organism, was only distantly related to some clostridial species and P. anaerobius. On the basis of the sequence data, it was clear that strain FT warranted designation as a separate species. The closest known relative of strain FT was C. coccoides (level of similarity, only 90.6%). Additional strains that are phenotypically similar to strain FT were isolated in this study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  11. Phylogeny of the ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, and Clostridium aminophilum sp. nov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paster, B. J.; Russell, J. B.; Yang, C. M.; Chow, J. M.; Woese, C. R.; Tanner, R.

    1993-01-01

    In previous studies, gram-positive bacteria which grew rapidly with peptides or an amino acid as the sole energy source were isolated from bovine rumina. Three isolates, strains C, FT (T = type strain), and SR, were considered to be ecologically important since they produced up to 20-fold more ammonia than other ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria. On the basis of phenotypic criteria, the taxonomic position of these new isolates was uncertain. In this study, the 16S rRNA sequences of these isolates and related bacteria were determined to establish the phylogenetic positions of the organisms. The sequences of strains C, FT, and SR and reference strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, Clostridium coccoides, Clostridium aminovalericum, Acetomaculum ruminis, Clostridium leptum, Clostridium lituseburense, Clostridium acidiurici, and Clostridium barkeri were determined by using a modified Sanger dideoxy chain termination method. Strain C, a large coccus purported to belong to the genus Peptostreptococcus, was closely related to P. anaerobius, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.6%. Strain SR, a heat-resistant, short, rod-shaped organism, was closely related to C. sticklandii, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.9%. However, strain FT, a heat-resistant, pleomorphic, rod-shaped organism, was only distantly related to some clostridial species and P. anaerobius. On the basis of the sequence data, it was clear that strain FT warranted designation as a separate species. The closest known relative of strain FT was C. coccoides (level of similarity, only 90.6%). Additional strains that are phenotypically similar to strain FT were isolated in this study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  12. Phylogeny of the ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, and Clostridium aminophilum sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Paster, B J; Russell, J B; Yang, C M; Chow, J M; Woese, C R; Tanner, R

    1993-01-01

    In previous studies, gram-positive bacteria which grew rapidly with peptides or an amino acid as the sole energy source were isolated from bovine rumina. Three isolates, strains C, FT (T = type strain), and SR, were considered to be ecologically important since they produced up to 20-fold more ammonia than other ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria. On the basis of phenotypic criteria, the taxonomic position of these new isolates was uncertain. In this study, the 16S rRNA sequences of these isolates and related bacteria were determined to establish the phylogenetic positions of the organisms. The sequences of strains C, FT, and SR and reference strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, Clostridium coccoides, Clostridium aminovalericum, Acetomaculum ruminis, Clostridium leptum, Clostridium lituseburense, Clostridium acidiurici, and Clostridium barkeri were determined by using a modified Sanger dideoxy chain termination method. Strain C, a large coccus purported to belong to the genus Peptostreptococcus, was closely related to P. anaerobius, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.6%. Strain SR, a heat-resistant, short, rod-shaped organism, was closely related to C. sticklandii, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.9%. However, strain FT, a heat-resistant, pleomorphic, rod-shaped organism, was only distantly related to some clostridial species and P. anaerobius. On the basis of the sequence data, it was clear that strain FT warranted designation as a separate species. The closest known relative of strain FT was C. coccoides (level of similarity, only 90.6%). Additional strains that are phenotypically similar to strain FT were isolated in this study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Clostridium kogasensis sp. nov., a novel member of the genus Clostridium, isolated from soil under a corroded gas pipeline.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yeseul; Kang, Seok-Seong; Paek, Jayoung; Jin, Tae Eun; Song, Hong Seok; Kim, Hongik; Park, Hee-Moon; Chang, Young-Hyo

    2016-06-01

    Two bacterial strains, YHK0403(T) and YHK0508, isolated from soil under a corroded gas pipe line, were revealed as Gram-negative, obligately anaerobic, spore-forming and mesophilic bacteria. The cells were rod-shaped and motile by means of peritrichous flagella. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolates were members of the genus Clostridium and were the most closely related to Clostridium scatologenes KCTC 5588(T) (95.8% sequence similarity), followed by Clostridium magnum KCTC 15177(T) (95.8%), Clostridium drakei KCTC 5440(T) (95.7%) and Clostridium tyrobutyricum KCTC 5387(T) (94.9%). The G + C contents of the isolates were 29.6 mol%. Peptidoglycan in the cell wall was of the A1γ type with meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major polar lipid was diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), and other minor lipids were revealed as phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), two unknown glycolipids (GL1 and GL2), an unknown aminoglycolipid (NGL), two unknown aminophospholipids (PN1 and PN2) and four unknown phospholipids (PL1 to PL4). Predominant fatty acids were C16:0 and C16:1cis9 DMA. The major end products from glucose fermentation were identified as butyrate (12.2 mmol) and acetate (9.8 mmol). Collectively, the results from a wide range of phenotypic tests, chemotaxonomic tests, and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two isolates represent novel species of the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium kogasensis sp. nov. (type strain, YHK0403(T) = KCTC 15258(T) = JCM 18719(T)) is proposed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Clostridium difficile infection in an Iranian hospital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality internationally, yet there are important regional differences in the epidemiology and microbiology of disease. Most reports have come from North America and Europe, with limited information from other regions, including the Middle East. Given the changes in the epidemiology of CDI in developed countries, particularly associated with the dissemination of hypervirulent epidemic clones, an understanding of the epidemiology and microbiology of CDI in diverse regions is warranted. This study involved collection of stool samples from individuals with diarrhea at the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences Teaching Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, between October 2010 and March 2011. Selective enrichment culture for C. difficile was performed and isolates were characterised using ribotyping, PCR for the detection of tcdA, tcdB and cdtB genes, and tcdC sequence analysis. Findings Clostridium difficile was isolated from 19/89 (21%) stool samples of 17/86 (20%) patients. 13/17 (77%) cases of CDI were hospital-associated. Patients with CDI were significantly older (43 ± 28y) than those with non-CDI diarrhea (24, ± 26y)(P = 0.018). All isolates were toxigenic, and possessed genes encoding for toxins A and B. Six (32%) of 19 isolates also possessed cdtB. Twelve ribotypes were identified. Ribotype 078/toxinotype V was most common, accounting for 4 (21%) of isolates. A single isolate of a different toxinotype V ribotype was identified, as was a toxinotype XXIV isolate. The remaining isolates consisted of 9 different toxinotype 0 ribotypes. Conclusions CDI is an important cause of diarrhea in patients in this hospital. The diversity of ribotypes was striking, and the number of different types suggests the presence of a broad range of strains in the community, the hospital or both. The predominance of toxinotype V strains, which have been associated with community-associated disease and food

  15. Antimicrobial stewardship and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Piacenti, Frank J; Leuthner, Kimberly D

    2013-10-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs are essential to health care institutions to promote the appropriate use of antibiotics not only to decrease antimicrobial resistance but to prevent the spread and infection of Clostridium difficile. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is increasing rapidly in the United States and is now considered a major public health problem that poses an immediate threat to the health of patients prescribed antibiotics, more so than antimicrobial resistance. Clostridium difficile-associated disease is the result of collateral damage to the normal bacterial flora of the human body, which is an inevitable consequence of any antibiotic use. Antimicrobial stewardship programs such as audit with feedback and antibiotic restriction are designed to help limit Clostridium difficile infections and other hospital-associated organisms by optimizing antimicrobial selection, dosing, de-escalation, and duration of therapy. These programs also incorporate implementation of hospital-wide guidelines, staff education, enforcement of infection-control policies, and the use of electronic medical records when possible to help control antibiotic use. This article reviews the literature on how antimicrobial stewardship programs impact Clostridium difficile rates and discusses experiences in designing, implementing, monitoring, and follow-through of such programs.

  16. Cryptic polyketide synthase genes in non-pathogenic Clostridium SPP.

    PubMed

    Behnken, Swantje; Hertweck, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Modular type I polyketide synthases (PKS) produce a vast array of bacterial metabolites with highly diverse biological functions. Notably, all known polyketides were isolated from aerobic bacteria, and yet no example has been reported for strict anaerobes. In this study we explored the diversity and distribution of PKS genes in the genus Clostridium. In addition to comparative genomic analyses combined with predictions of modular type I polyketide synthase (PKS) gene clusters in sequenced genomes of Clostridium spp., a representative selection of other species inhabiting a variety of ecological niches was investigated by PCR screening for PKS genes. Our data reveal that all studied pathogenic Clostridium spp. are devoid of putative PKS genes. In stark contrast, cryptic PKS genes are widespread in genomes of non-pathogenic Clostridium species. According to phylogenetic analyses, the Clostridium PKS genes have unusual and diverse origins. However, reverse transcription quantitative PCR demonstrates that these genes are silent under standard cultivation conditions, explaining why the related metabolites have been overlooked until now. This study presents clostridia as a putative source for novel bioactive polyketides.

  17. Clostridium phytofermentans sp. nov., a cellulolytic mesophile from forest soil.

    PubMed

    Warnick, Thomas A; Methé, Barbara A; Leschine, Susan B

    2002-07-01

    An obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, strain ISDgT, was isolated from forest soil. Cells of this isolate stained Gram-negative, despite possessing a Gram-positive cell-wall ultrastructure, and were motile, straight rods that formed spherical terminal spores that swelled the sporangium. Cellulose, pectin, polygalacturonic acid, starch, xylan, arabinose, cellobiose, fructose, galactose, gentiobiose, glucose, lactose, maltose, mannose, ribose and xylose supported growth. The major end products of fermentation were ethanol, acetate, CO2 and H2; formate and lactate were minor products. The optimum temperature for growth was 35-37 degrees C. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA sequence comparisons showed that strain ISDgT was related to a group of anaerobes that included Clostridium herbivorans, Clostridium polysaccharolyticum and Clostridium populeti. The G+C content of this strain was 35.9 mol%. On the basis of numerous genotypic and phenotypic differences between strain ISDgT and its close relatives, strain ISDgT is proposed as a novel species in the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium phytofermentans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ISDgT (= ATCC 700394T).

  18. Cryptic Polyketide Synthase Genes in Non-Pathogenic Clostridium SPP

    PubMed Central

    Behnken, Swantje; Hertweck, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Modular type I polyketide synthases (PKS) produce a vast array of bacterial metabolites with highly diverse biological functions. Notably, all known polyketides were isolated from aerobic bacteria, and yet no example has been reported for strict anaerobes. In this study we explored the diversity and distribution of PKS genes in the genus Clostridium. In addition to comparative genomic analyses combined with predictions of modular type I polyketide synthase (PKS) gene clusters in sequenced genomes of Clostridium spp., a representative selection of other species inhabiting a variety of ecological niches was investigated by PCR screening for PKS genes. Our data reveal that all studied pathogenic Clostridium spp. are devoid of putative PKS genes. In stark contrast, cryptic PKS genes are widespread in genomes of non-pathogenic Clostridium species. According to phylogenetic analyses, the Clostridium PKS genes have unusual and diverse origins. However, reverse transcription quantitative PCR demonstrates that these genes are silent under standard cultivation conditions, explaining why the related metabolites have been overlooked until now. This study presents clostridia as a putative source for novel bioactive polyketides. PMID:22235310

  19. CRISPR-based genome editing and expression control systems in Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Chen, Jun; Minton, Nigel P; Zhang, Ying; Wen, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jinle; Yang, Haifeng; Zeng, Zhe; Ren, Xiaodan; Yang, Junjie; Gu, Yang; Jiang, Weihong; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Solventogenic clostridia are important industrial microorganisms that produce various chemicals and fuels. Effective genetic tools would facilitate physiological studies aimed both at improving our understanding of metabolism and optimizing solvent productivity through metabolic engineering. Here we have developed an all-in-one, CRISPR-based genome editing plasmid, pNICKclos, that can be used to achieve successive rounds of gene editing in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 with efficiencies varying from 6.7% to 100% and 18.8% to 100%, respectively. The plasmid specifies the requisite target-specific guide RNA, the gene encoding the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 nickase and the genome editing template encompassing the gene-specific homology arms. It can be used to create single target mutants within three days, with a further two days required for the curing of the pNICKclos plasmid ready for a second round of mutagenesis. A S. pyogenes dCas9-mediated gene regulation control system, pdCASclos, was also developed and used in a CRISPRi strategy to successfully repress the expression of spo0A in C. acetobutylicum and C. beijerinckii. The combined application of the established high efficiency CRISPR-Cas9 based genome editing and regulation control systems will greatly accelerate future progress in the understanding and manipulation of metabolism in solventogenic clostridia. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Organization and regulation of the neurotoxin genes in Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Raffestin, Stéphanie; Marvaud, Jean Christophe; Cerrato, Rosario; Dupuy, Bruno; Popoff, Michel R

    2004-04-01

    Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins are structurally and functionally related 150 kDa proteins that are potent inhibitors of neuroexocytosis. Botulinum neurotoxin associates with non-toxic proteins to form complexes of various sizes. The botulinum neurotoxin and non-toxic protein genes are clustered in a DNA segment called the botulinum locus. This locus is probably located on a mobile or degenerate mobile element, which accounts for the various genomic localizations (chromosome, plasmid, phage) in different Clostridium botulinum types. The botulinum neurotoxin and non-toxic protein genes are organized in two polycistronic operons (ntnh-bont and ha operons) transcribed in opposite orientations. The gene that separates the two operons of the botulinum locus in C. botulinum A encodes a 21 kDa protein BotR/A, which is a positive regulator of the expression of the botulinum locus genes. Similarly, in Clostridium tetani, the gene located immediately upstream of the tetanus toxin gene, encodes a positive regulatory protein, TetR. BotR and TetR are possibly alternative sigma factors related to TxeR and UviA, which regulate C. difficile toxin and C. perfringens bacteriocin production, respectively. TxeR and UviA define a new sub-group of the sigma(70) family of RNA polymerase initiation factors. In addition, the C. botulinum genome contains predicted two-component system genes, some of which are possibly involved in regulation of toxinogenesis.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of phospholipase C genes from Clostridium perfringens types A to E and Clostridium novyi.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, K; Minami, J; Matsushita, O; Katayama, S; Taniguchi, Y; Nakamura, S; Nishioka, M; Okabe, A

    1995-01-01

    The phylogenetic interrelationships between strains of 5 toxin types (A to E) of Clostridium perfringens were examined by analysis of differences in the nucleotide sequences of phospholipase C genes (plc genes) among 10 strains, including 3 strains for which the plc gene sequences have been previously reported. A plc gene was also cloned from a Clostridium novyi type A strain and sequenced to analyze the interspecies diversity of plc genes. Phylogenetic trees constructed by the neighbor-joining method revealed that the phylogeny of C. perfringens strains is not related to toxin typing, in agreement with the results of a comparative genome mapping study by Canard et al. (B. Canard, B. Saint-Joanis, and S. T. Cole, Mol. Microbiol. 6:1421-1429, 1992). Various C. perfringens phospholipase C enzymes were purified from cultures of Escherichia coli cells into which the encoding plc genes had been cloned. All of the enzymes showed the same specific activity. On the other hand, the level of plc transcripts differed greatly (up to 40-fold) from one C. perfringens strain to another. No significant difference in the nucleotide sequence of the plc promoter region was observed for any of the plc genes. These results suggest that the variation in phospholipase C activity among different strains is not due to mutation in the plc coding region but to that in an extragenic region. The evolution of C. perfringens phospholipase C is discussed on the basis of similarities and differences between clostridial plc genes. PMID:8522524

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of phospholipase C genes from Clostridium perfringens types A to E and Clostridium novyi.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, K; Minami, J; Matsushita, O; Katayama, S; Taniguchi, Y; Nakamura, S; Nishioka, M; Okabe, A

    1995-12-01

    The phylogenetic interrelationships between strains of 5 toxin types (A to E) of Clostridium perfringens were examined by analysis of differences in the nucleotide sequences of phospholipase C genes (plc genes) among 10 strains, including 3 strains for which the plc gene sequences have been previously reported. A plc gene was also cloned from a Clostridium novyi type A strain and sequenced to analyze the interspecies diversity of plc genes. Phylogenetic trees constructed by the neighbor-joining method revealed that the phylogeny of C. perfringens strains is not related to toxin typing, in agreement with the results of a comparative genome mapping study by Canard et al. (B. Canard, B. Saint-Joanis, and S. T. Cole, Mol. Microbiol. 6:1421-1429, 1992). Various C. perfringens phospholipase C enzymes were purified from cultures of Escherichia coli cells into which the encoding plc genes had been cloned. All of the enzymes showed the same specific activity. On the other hand, the level of plc transcripts differed greatly (up to 40-fold) from one C. perfringens strain to another. No significant difference in the nucleotide sequence of the plc promoter region was observed for any of the plc genes. These results suggest that the variation in phospholipase C activity among different strains is not due to mutation in the plc coding region but to that in an extragenic region. The evolution of C. perfringens phospholipase C is discussed on the basis of similarities and differences between clostridial plc genes.

  3. Enhanced butanol production by coculture of Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Ai, Hongxia; Zhang, Shexi; Li, Shuang; Liang, Zexin; Wu, Zhen-Qiang; Yang, Shang-Tian; Wang, Ju-Fang

    2013-09-01

    Cocultures of Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium tyrobutyricum in free-cell and immobilized-cell fermentation modes were investigated as a means of enhancing butanol production. The immobilized fermentation was performed in a fibrous-bed bioreactor (FBB). The results demonstrated that two-strain coculture significantly enhanced butanol production, yield and volumetric productivity compared with those in pure culture with or without butyric acid. Further, continuous immobilized-cell cocultures in two FBBs using glucose, cassava starch, or cane molasses were conducted at a dilution rate of 0.144 h(-1). The butanol production (6.66 g/L), yield (0.18 g/g), and productivity (0.96 g/L/h) were obtained with cassava starch as the substrate. Meanwhile, the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) yield (0.36 g/g) was the highest among all processes investigated, suggesting that this continuous coculture mode may be suitable for industrial ABE production with no need for repeated sterilization and inoculation.

  4. Glycolysis without pyruvate kinase in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Daniel G.; Horl, Manuel; Fuhrer, Tobias; Cui, Jingxuan; Zhou, Jilai; Maloney, Marybeth I.; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Tian, Liang; Sauer, Uwe; Lynd, Lee R.

    2016-12-01

    The metabolism of Clostridium thermocellum is notable in that it assimilates sugar via the EMP pathway but does not possess a pyruvate kinase enzyme. In the wild type organism, there are three proposed pathways for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate, which differ in their cofactor usage. One path uses pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), another pathway uses the combined activities of PEP carboxykinase (PEPCK) and oxaloacetate decarboxylase (ODC). Yet another pathway, the malate shunt, uses the combined activities of PEPCK, malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. First we showed that there is no flux through the ODC pathway by enzyme assay. Flux through the remaining two pathways (PPDK and malate shunt) was determined by dynamic 13C labeling. In the wild-type strain, the malate shunt accounts for about 33 ± 2% of the flux to pyruvate, with the remainder via the PPDK pathway. Deletion of the ppdk gene resulted in a redirection of all pyruvate flux through the malate shunt. Lastly, this provides the first direct evidence of the in-vivo function of the malate shunt.

  5. Action of nitroheterocyclic drugs against Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Adhikari, Sudip; Hurdle, Julian G.

    2014-01-01

    The nitroheterocyclic classes of drugs have a long history of use in treating anaerobic infections, as exemplified by metronidazole as a first-line treatment for mild-to-moderate Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Since direct comparisons of the three major classes of nitroheterocyclic drugs (i.e. nitroimidazole, nitazoxanide and nitrofurans) and nitrosating agents against C. difficile are under-examined, in this study their actions against C. difficile were compared. Results show that whilst transient resistance occurs to metronidazole and nitazoxanide, stable resistance arises to nitrofurans upon serial passage. All compounds killed C. difficile at high concentrations in addition to the host defence nitrosating agent S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). This suggests that GSNO killing of C. difficile contributes to its efficacy in murine CDI. Although nitric oxide production could not be detected for the nitroheterocyclic drugs, the cellular response to metronidazole and nitrofurans has some overlap with the response to GSNO, causing significant upregulation of the hybrid-cluster protein Hcp that responds to nitrosative stress. These findings provide new insights into the action of nitroheterocyclic drugs against C. difficile. PMID:25129314

  6. Molecular genetics and pathogenesis of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed Central

    Rood, J I; Cole, S T

    1991-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the causative agent of a number of human diseases, such as gas gangrene and food poisoning, and many diseases of animals. Recently significant advances have been made in the development of C. perfringens genetics. Studies on bacteriocin plasmids and conjugative R plasmids have led to the cloning and analysis of many C. perfringens genes and the construction of shuttle plasmids. The relationship of antibiotic resistance genes to similar genes from other bacteria has been elucidated. A detailed physical map of the C. perfringens chromosome has been prepared, and numerous genes have been located on that map. Reproducible transformation methods for the introduction of plasmids into C. perfringens have been developed, and several genes coding for the production of extracellular toxins and enzymes have been cloned. Now that it is possible to freely move genetic information back and forth between C. perfringens and Escherichia coli, it will be possible to apply modern molecular methods to studies on the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infections. PMID:1779929

  7. Glycolysis without pyruvate kinase in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Daniel G.; Horl, Manuel; Fuhrer, Tobias; ...

    2016-12-01

    The metabolism of Clostridium thermocellum is notable in that it assimilates sugar via the EMP pathway but does not possess a pyruvate kinase enzyme. In the wild type organism, there are three proposed pathways for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate, which differ in their cofactor usage. One path uses pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), another pathway uses the combined activities of PEP carboxykinase (PEPCK) and oxaloacetate decarboxylase (ODC). Yet another pathway, the malate shunt, uses the combined activities of PEPCK, malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. First we showed that there is no flux through the ODC pathway by enzyme assay.more » Flux through the remaining two pathways (PPDK and malate shunt) was determined by dynamic 13C labeling. In the wild-type strain, the malate shunt accounts for about 33 ± 2% of the flux to pyruvate, with the remainder via the PPDK pathway. Deletion of the ppdk gene resulted in a redirection of all pyruvate flux through the malate shunt. Lastly, this provides the first direct evidence of the in-vivo function of the malate shunt.« less

  8. The continually evolving Clostridium difficile species.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Michelle D; Stabler, Richard A; Shetty, Nandini; Wren, Brendan W

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming Gram-positive bacterium that causes chronic diarrhea and sometimes life-threatening disease mainly in elderly and hospitalized patients. The reported incidence of C. difficile infection has changed dramatically over the last decade and has been related to the emergence of distinct clonal lineages that appear more transmissible and cause more severe infection. These include PCR ribotypes 027, 017 and more recently 078. Population biology studies using multilocus sequence typing and whole-genome comparisons has helped to define the C. difficile species into four clonal complexes that include PCR ribotypes 027, 017, 078 and 023, as well as a general grouping of most other PCR ribotypes. Further analysis of strains from diverse sources and geographical origins reveal significant microdiversity of clonal complexes and confirms that C. difficile is continuing to evolve. The study of C. difficile represents a real-time global evolutionary experiment where the pathogen is responding to a range of selective pressures created by human activity and practices in healthcare settings. The advent of whole-genome sequencing coupled with phylogeny (phylogeography and phylohistory) will provide unprecedented detail on the local and global emergence and disappearance of C. difficile clones, and facilitate more rational approaches to disease control. This review will highlight the emergence of virulent C. difficile clones and our current understanding of molecular epidemiology of the species.

  9. Perfringolysin O: The Underrated Clostridium perfringens Toxin?

    PubMed Central

    Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Goossens, Evy; Valgaeren, Bonnie; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet; Wade, Kristin R.; Tweten, Rodney; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as θ toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250–300 Å in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis. PMID:26008232

  10. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-11

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  11. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Nicole M; Rutherford, Stacey A; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A; Lisher, John P; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P; Spiller, Benjamin W; Melnyk, Roman A; Lacy, D Borden

    2016-01-11

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  12. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Nicole M; Rutherford, Stacey A; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A; Lisher, John P; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P; Spiller, Benjamin W; Melnyk, Roman A; Lacy, D Borden

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon(1,2). The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host(3,4). The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  13. Transport of molybdate by Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed

    Elliott, B B; Mortenson, L E

    1975-12-01

    The transport of 99MoO42- into dinitrogen-fixing cells of Clostridium pasteurianum was investigated. Transport of molybdate in this organism is energy dependent; sucrose is required in the minimal media, and the system is inhibited by the glycolysis inhibitors, NaF, iodoacetic acid, and arsenate. The cells accumulate molybdate against a concentration gradient, and the uptake shows a marked dependence on temperature (optimum 37 C) and pH (optimum 6.0). The rate of molybdate uptake with increasing molybdate concentrations shows saturation kinetics with an apparent Km and Vmax of 4.8 X 10(-5) M and 55 nmol/g of dry cells per min, respectively. Inhibition studies with the anions SO42-, S2O32-, WO42-, and VO32- show that SO42- and WO42- competitively inhibit MoO42- uptake (apparent Ki [SO42-] is 3.0 X 10(-5) M; apparent Ki [WO42-] is 2.4 X 10(-5), whereas S2O32- and VO32- have no inhibitory effect. Exchange experiments with MoO42- show that only a small percentage of the 99MoO42- taken up by the cells is exchangeable. Exchange experiments with WO42- and SO42- indicate that once inside the cells WO42- and SO42- cannot substitute for MoO42-.

  14. Genomics of Clostridium botulinum group III strains.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Oguma, Keiji

    2015-05-01

    In Clostridium botulinum, the characteristics of type C and D strains are quite different from other types, and they are classified as group III. They produce C2 binary toxin and C3 exoenzyme in addition to type C and D neurotoxins. Two different phages and many plasmids are identified in the organisms. The genes of neurotoxin and C3 exoenzyme are converted from toxigenic strains to non-toxigenic strains by the specific bacteriophages (phages), whereas, the C2 toxin gene is carried by large or small plasmids. Classification of type C and D strains has been in confusion because 1) antigenicity of type C and D neurotoxins is complex, 2) the cells produce two types of toxins, neurotoxin and C2 toxin, and 3) some non-toxigenic strains can be converted to produce C or D neurotoxin by the infection with phages. Until now, entire nucleotide sequences of cell chromosomes, phages, and plasmids have been determined. Since both genetic and protein-chemical analyses have been clarifying the above confusions, these data are reviewed historically.

  15. Precipitation of cadmium by Clostridium thermoaceticum.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, D P; Lundie, L L

    1993-01-01

    Cadmium at an initial concentration of 1 mM was completely precipitated by cultures of Clostridium thermoaceticum in complex medium. The precipitation was energy dependent and required cysteine, although cysteine alone did not act as a growth substrate. Electron microscopic analysis revealed localized areas of precipitation at the surfaces of nonstarved cells as well as precipitate in the surrounding medium. The addition of cadmium had no apparent effect on growth or acetogenesis. However, nickel and cadmium were synergistically toxic at a concentration (1 mM) at which neither alone was toxic. The amount of protein extracted from cadmium-treated cultures was twofold higher than that in control extracts, and the amount of total sulfide was fourfold higher in cultures containing cadmium than in control cultures. Comparable levels of cysteine desulfhydrase activity were observed in extracts of both cadmium-treated and control cultures, but the enzyme activity was expressed maximally about 24 h earlier in the cadmium-treated cultures than in the untreated controls. Images PMID:8439169

  16. Secretome analysis of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Boetzkes, Alexander; Felkel, Katharina Wiebke; Zeiser, Johannes; Jochim, Nelli; Just, Ingo; Pich, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile causes infections ranging from mild C. difficile-associated diarrhea to severe pseudomembranous colitis. Since 2003 new hypervirulent C. difficile strains (PCR ribotype 027) emerged characterized by a dramatically increased mortality. The secretomes of the three C. difficile strains CDR20291, CD196, and CD630 were analyzed and compared. Proteins were separated and analyzed by means of SDS--PAGE and LC-MS. MS data were analyzed using Mascot and proteins were checked for export signals with SecretomeP and SignalP. LC-MS analysis revealed 158 different proteins in the supernatant of C. difficile. Most of the identified proteins originate from the cytoplasm. Thirty-two proteins in CDR20291, 36 in CD196 and 26 in CD630 were identified to be secreted by C. difficile strains. Those were mainly S-layer proteins, substrate-binding proteins of ABC-transporters, cell wall hydrolases, pilin and unknown hypothetical proteins. Toxin A and toxin B were identified after growth in brain heart infusion medium using immunological techniques. The ADP-ribosyltransferase-binding component protein, which is a part of the binary toxin CDT, was only identified in the hypervirulent ribotype 027 strains. Further proteins that are secreted specifically by hypervirulent strains were identified.

  17. Regulation of protease production in Clostridium sporogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, C; Macfarlane, G T

    1990-01-01

    The physiological and nutritional factors that regulate protease synthesis in Clostridium sporogenes C25 were studied in batch and continuous cultures. Formation of extracellular proteases occurred at the end of active growth and during the stationary phase in batch cultures. Protease production was inversely related to growth rate in glucose-excess and glucose-limited chemostats over the range D = 0.05 to 0.70 h-1. In pulse experiments, glucose, ammonia, phosphate, and some amino acids (tryptophan, proline, tyrosine, and isoleucine) strongly repressed protease synthesis. This repression was not relieved by addition of 4 mM cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Protease formation was markedly inhibited by 4 mM ATP and ADP, but GTP and GDP had little effect on the process. It is concluded that protease production by C. sporogenes is strongly influenced by the amount of energy available to the cells, with the highest levels of protease synthesis occurring under energy-limiting conditions. PMID:2268158

  18. Parameters affecting solvent production by Clostridium pasteurianum

    SciTech Connect

    Dabrock, B.; Bahl, H.; Gottschalk, G. )

    1992-04-01

    The effect of pH, growth rate, phosphate and iron limitation, carbon monoxide, and carbon source on product formation by Clostridium pasteurianum was determined. Under phosphate limitation, glucose was fermented almost exclusively to acetate and butyrate independently of the pH and growth rate. Iron limitation caused lactate production (38 mol/100 mol) from glucose in batch and continuous culture. At 15% (vol/vol) carbon monoxide in the atmosphere, glucose was fermented to ethanol (24 mol/100 mol), lactate (32 mol/100 mol), and butanol (36 mol/100 mol) in addition to the usual products, acetate (38 mol/100 mol) and butyrate (17 mol/100 mol). During glycerol fermentation, a completely different product pattern was found. In continuous culture under phosphate limitation, acetate and butyrate were produced only in trace amounts, whereas ethanol (30 mol/10 mol), butanol (18 mol/100 mol), and 1,3-propanediol (18 mol/100 mol) were the major products. Under iron limitation, the ratio of these products could be changed in favor of 1,3-propanediol (34 mol/100 mol). In addition, lactate was produced in significant amounts (25 mol/100 mol). The tolerance of C. pasteurianum to glycerol was remarkably high; growth was not inhibited by glycerol concentrations up to 17% (wt/vol). Increasing glycerol concentrations favored the production of 1,3-propanediol.

  19. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum for Dupuytren's contracture.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shaunak S; Hentz, Vincent R

    2010-09-01

    Dupuytren's disease is a non-malignant, progressive disorder of the hands that can severely limit hand function and diminish overall quality of life. With global life expectancy increasing, the prevalence of this disease appears to be increasing amongst all ethnic groups. Treatment has traditionally remained surgical with few effective, nonsurgical options. However, with the introduction of collagenase clostridium histolyticum to treat Dupuytren's contractures, physicians and surgeons may be provided with a new, office-based, non-surgical option to treat this disease. The literature behind the use of collagenase to treat Dupuytren's disease; including its mechanism of action, safety, efficacy and clinical evidence behind its recent FDA approval. The latest information available on collagenase through a comprehensive review of PubMed and the websites of licensing organizations for medicinal products. Phase III, clinical trials on collagenase for treatment of Dupuytren's contractures have recently been completed. Meeting primary and secondary objectives, collagenase has obtained FDA approval for clinical use. Collagenase now provides a non-operative option for Dupuytren's disease. Although short-term results show that collagenase is safe and efficacious, long-term effects of repeat injections and contracture recurrence rates have yet to be examined.

  20. Capsular polysaccharide of Clostridium perfringens Hobbs 10.

    PubMed

    Lee, L; Cherniak, R

    1974-02-01

    A capsular polysaccharide was isolated from a strain of Clostridium perfringens Hobbs 10 type A by cold-water extraction of whole, heavily encapsulated cells. The water-soluble polymer was isolated by alcohol precipitation and purified by treatment with chloroform-butanol, cetytrimethylammonium bromide, and column gel permeation chromatography by using Bio-Gel A-5m agarose. The formation of a single precipitin line, when the isolated polysaccharide was reacted with its homologous antisera by double diffusion in gel, was considered a criterion of immunochemical purity. The purified polymer appeared as a single peak when eluted from diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex with a linear gradient of NaCl. The polysaccharide was composed of glucose, galactose, galactosamine, and iduronic acid in a molar ratio of 4.1:5.1.7:1, respectively. These constituents accounted for 83% of the dry weight. The polysaccharide appeared to have a molecular weight of 40,000 and exhibited aggregation up to 120,000. A trace of peptide material could not be removed during purification.

  1. Capsular Polysaccharide of Clostridium perfringens Hobbs 10

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda; Cherniak, Robert

    1974-01-01

    A capsular polysaccharide was isolated from a strain of Clostridium perfringens Hobbs 10 type A by cold-water extraction of whole, heavily encapsulated cells. The water-soluble polymer was isolated by alcohol precipitation and purified by treatment with chloroform-butanol, cetytrimethylammonium bromide, and column gel permeation chromatography by using Bio-Gel A-5m agarose. The formation of a single precipitin line, when the isolated polysaccharide was reacted with its homologous antisera by double diffusion in gel, was considered a criterion of immunochemical purity. The purified polymer appeared as a single peak when eluted from diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex with a linear gradient of NaCl. The polysaccharide was composed of glucose, galactose, galactosamine, and iduronic acid in a molar ratio of 4.1:5.1.7:1, respectively. These constituents accounted for 83% of the dry weight. The polysaccharide appeared to have a molecular weight of 40,000 and exhibited aggregation up to 120,000. A trace of peptide material could not be removed during purification. PMID:4361293

  2. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Clostridium difficile▿

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, David; Fawley, Warren; Kachrimanidou, Melina; Bowden, Rory; Crook, Derrick W.; Fung, Rowena; Golubchik, Tanya; Harding, Rosalind M.; Jeffery, Katie J. M.; Jolley, Keith A.; Kirton, Richard; Peto, Tim E.; Rees, Gareth; Stoesser, Nicole; Vaughan, Alison; Walker, A. Sarah; Young, Bernadette C.; Wilcox, Mark; Dingle, Kate E.

    2010-01-01

    A robust high-throughput multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for Clostridium difficile was developed and validated using a diverse collection of 50 reference isolates representing 45 different PCR ribotypes and 102 isolates from recent clinical samples. A total of 49 PCR ribotypes were represented overall. All isolates were typed by MLST and yielded 40 sequence types (STs). A web-accessible database was set up (http://pubmlst.org/cdifficile/) to facilitate the dissemination and comparison of C. difficile MLST genotyping data among laboratories. MLST and PCR ribotyping were similar in discriminatory abilities, having indices of discrimination of 0.90 and 0.92, respectively. Some STs corresponded to a single PCR ribotype (32/40), other STs corresponded to multiple PCR ribotypes (8/40), and, conversely, the PCR ribotype was not always predictive of the ST. The total number of variable nucleotide sites in the concatenated MLST sequences was 103/3,501 (2.9%). Concatenated MLST sequences were used to construct a neighbor-joining tree which identified four phylogenetic groups of STs and one outlier (ST-11; PCR ribotype 078). These groups apparently correlate with clades identified previously by comparative genomics. The MLST scheme was sufficiently robust to allow direct genotyping of C. difficile in total stool DNA extracts without isolate culture. The direct (nonculture) MLST approach may prove useful as a rapid genotyping method, potentially benefiting individual patients and informing hospital infection control. PMID:20042623

  3. Clostridium difficile: its disease and toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Lyerly, D M; Krivan, H C; Wilkins, T D

    1988-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis, a severe, sometimes fatal disease that occurs in adults undergoing antimicrobial therapy. The disease, ironically, has been most effectively treated with antibiotics, although some of the newer methods of treatment such as the replacement of the bowel flora may prove more beneficial for patients who continue to relapse with pseudomembranous colitis. The organism produces two potent exotoxins designated toxin A and toxin B. Toxin A is an enterotoxin believed to be responsible for the diarrhea and mucosal tissue damage which occur during the disease. Toxin B is an extremely potent cytotoxin, but its role in the disease has not been as well studied. There appears to be a cascade of events which result in the expression of the activity of these toxins, and these events, ranging from the recognition of a trisaccharide receptor by toxin A to the synergistic action of the toxins and their possible dissemination in the body, are discussed in this review. The advantages and disadvantages of the various assays, including tissue culture assay, enzyme immunoassay, and latex agglutination, currently used in the clinical diagnosis of the disease also are discussed. PMID:3144429

  4. Clostridium difficile infection: monoclonal or polyclonal genesis?

    PubMed

    Hell, M; Permoser, M; Chmelizek, G; Kern, J M; Maass, M; Huhulescu, S; Indra, A; Allerberger, F

    2011-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is considered to be a leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea. C. difficile (CDI) infection shows a high rate of recurrence. There would have to be a predominantly monoclonal mechanism of CDI within individual patients in order for molecular epidemiologic tools such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotyping to be useful in outbreak investigation or differentiation between infection relapse versus re-infection. It was the aim of our study to determine whether CDI is of monoclonal or of polyclonal genesis. Between December 2009 and June 2010, 11 patients with nosocomial CDI were chosen arbitrarily. Five individual colonies of C. difficile were picked from each of the primary culture plates. Of 55 isolates gained, 47 were available for PCR ribotyping (eight isolates failed attempts to re-culture). Among these 47 isolates, eight different PCR ribotypes were identified. Only one of the 11 patients had a stool sample that yielded more than one ribotype (PCR ribotypes 438 and 232); this 67-year-old female cancer patient was already suffering from recurring diarrhea prior to the fatal episode of colitis which was subsequently investigated. We conclude that polyclonal infections may occasionally occur in patients with CDI. Our findings of predominantly monoclonal origin of CDI within patients suggest that molecular epidemiologic investigations can be used reliably for outbreak investigations or discrimination between relapse and re-infection.

  5. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon1,2. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host3,4. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics. PMID:27571750

  6. The Tcp conjugation system of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Jessica A; Rood, Julian I

    2017-03-07

    The Gram-positive pathogen Clostridium perfringens possesses a family of large conjugative plasmids that is typified by the tetracycline resistance plasmid pCW3. Since these plasmids may carry antibiotic resistance genes or genes encoding extracellular or sporulation-associated toxins, the conjugative transfer of these plasmids appears to be important for the epidemiology of C. perfringens-mediated diseases. Sequence analysis of members of this plasmid family identified a highly conserved 35kb region that encodes proteins with various functions, including plasmid replication and partitioning. The tcp conjugation locus also was identified in this region, initially based on low-level amino acid sequence identity to conjugation proteins from the integrative conjugative element Tn916. Genetic studies confirmed that the tcp locus is required for conjugative transfer and combined with biochemical and structural analyses have led to the development of a functional model of the Tcp conjugation apparatus. This review summarises our current understanding of the Tcp conjugation system, which is now one of the best-characterized conjugation systems in Gram-positive bacteria.

  7. Clostridium botulinum in cattle and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Miia; Myllykoski, Jan; Sivelä, Seppo; Korkeala, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    The use of plastic-wrapped and nonacidified silage as cattle feed has led to an increasing number of botulism outbreaks due to Clostridium botulinum Groups I-III in dairy cattle. The involvement of Groups I and II organisms in cattle botulism has raised concern of human botulism risk associated with the consumption of dairy products. Multiplication of C. botulinum in silage and in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle with botulism has been reported, thus contamination of the farm environment and raw milk, and further transmission through the dairy chain, are possible. The standard milk pasteurization treatment does not eliminate spores, and the intrinsic factors of many dairy products allow botulinal growth and toxin production. Although rare, several large botulism outbreaks due to both commercial and home-prepared dairy products have been reported. Factors explaining these outbreaks include most importantly temperature abuse, but also unsafe formulation, inadequate fermentation, insufficient thermal processing, post-process contamination, and lack of adequate quality control for adjunct ingredients were involved. The small number of outbreaks is probably explained by a low incidence of spores in milk, the presence of competitive bacteria in pasteurized milk and other dairy products, and growth-inhibitory combinations of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in cultured and processed dairy products.

  8. Clostridium difficile in poultry and poultry meat.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Roger B; Norman, Keri N; Andrews, Kathleen; Hume, Michael E; Scanlan, Charles M; Callaway, Todd R; Anderson, Robin C; Nisbet, David J

    2011-12-01

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer to human beings. The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of toxigenic C. difficile in chickens and retail poultry meat in Texas. Seven C. difficile isolates were detected in fecal samples of 300 (2.3%) broiler chickens. Three cultivation procedures were evaluated for isolation of C. difficile from poultry meat and detected 1/32 (3.1%), 2/32 (6.2%), and 4/32 (12.5%) for the three procedures, respectively. Chicken and poultry meat isolates were characterized as toxinotype V and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis gel type-NAP7 or NAP7-variant. Susceptibilities to 11 antimicrobial agents in the current study suggested somewhat reduced resistance than reported for other meat or animal toxinotype V isolates.

  9. Laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile disease.

    PubMed

    Delmée, M

    2001-08-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) is based on culture and toxin detection in fecal specimens. Culture is performed on a commercially available selective media. C. difficile colony morphology is typical when viewed under a dissecting microscope. Definitive identification is best obtained by gas liquid chromatography. Culture is very sensitive but, when used alone without toxin testing, it leads to low specificity and misdiagnosis of CDAD when high rates of asymptomatic carriage exist. Toxin detection by a tissue culture cytotoxin assay followed by neutralisation with specific antiserum is often considered the standard. However, this approach lacks sensitivity and has not detected up to 30% of patients with confirmed CDAD. Multiple enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) have been introduced by various manufacturers for the detection of toxin A alone or for both toxins A and B. Some of these are designed to give results in less than 1 h. Comparative studies of EIA kits reported that the sensitivity and specificity are slightly lower than cytotoxin assays. Toxigenic culture tests C. difficile isolates for toxin production: colonies isolated on selective media are tested for in-vitro toxin production either by a cytotoxicity assay or by direct EIA. It has higher sensitivity than the cytotoxicity assay and equivalent specificity. In the routine laboratory, culture and toxin detection should be performed on every specimen and, in culture-positive and fecal toxin-negative cases, toxigenic cultures should be performed on isolated colonies.

  10. Effects of butanol on Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, L K; Ellefson, W L

    1985-01-01

    The internal pH of Clostridium acetobutylicum was determined at various stages during the growth of the organism. Even in the presence of significant quantities of acetic, butyric, and lactic acids, an internal pH of 6.2 was maintained. Experiments using N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide indicated that a functioning H+-ATPase is necessary for internal pH control. Butanol, one of the end products of the fermentation, had numerous harmful effects on C. acetobutylicum. At a concentration high enough to inhibit growth, butanol destroyed the ability of the cell to maintain internal pH, lowered the intracellular level of ATP, and inhibited glucose uptake. Experiments done at two different external pH values suggested that the butanol-mediated decrease in ATP concentration was independent of the drop in internal pH. Glucose uptake was not affected by arsenate, suggesting that uptake was not ATP dependent. The effects of butanol on C. acetobutylicum are complex, inhibiting several interrelated membrane processes. PMID:2868690

  11. Current Status of Clostridium difficile Infection Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Lessa, Fernanda C.; Gould, Carolyn V.; McDonald, L. Clifford

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic changes in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) during recent years, with increases in incidence and severity of disease in several countries, have made CDI a global public health challenge. Increases in CDI incidence have been largely attributed to the emergence of a previously rare and more virulent strain, BI/NAP1/027. Increased toxin production and high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones have made this strain a very successful pathogen in healthcare settings. In addition, populations previously thought to be at low risk are now being identified as having severe CDI. Recent genetic analysis suggests that C. difficile has a highly fluid genome with multiple mechanisms to modify its content and functionality, which can make C. difficile adaptable to environmental changes and potentially lead to the emergence of more virulent strains. In the face of these changes in the epidemiology and microbiology of CDI, surveillance systems are necessary to monitor trends and inform public health actions. PMID:22752867

  12. The Changing Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, J.; Bauer, M. P.; Baines, S. D.; Corver, J.; Fawley, W. N.; Goorhuis, B.; Kuijper, E. J.; Wilcox, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed dramatically during this millennium. Infection rates have increased markedly in most countries with detailed surveillance data. There have been clear changes in the clinical presentation, response to treatment, and outcome of CDI. These changes have been driven to a major degree by the emergence and epidemic spread of a novel strain, known as PCR ribotype 027 (sometimes referred to as BI/NAP1/027). We review the evidence for the changing epidemiology, clinical virulence and outcome of treatment of CDI, and the similarities and differences between data from various countries and continents. Community-acquired CDI has also emerged, although the evidence for this as a distinct new entity is less clear. There are new data on the etiology of and potential risk factors for CDI; controversial issues include specific antimicrobial agents, gastric acid suppressants, potential animal and food sources of C. difficile, and the effect of the use of alcohol-based hand hygiene agents. PMID:20610822

  13. Elimination of formate production in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Rydzak, Thomas; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-07-11

    We study the ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly degrade cellulose and ferment resulting hydrolysis products into ethanol makes it a promising platform organism for cellulosic biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Currently, however, ethanol yield are far below theoretical maximum due to branched product pathways that divert carbon and electrons towards formate, H2, lactate, acetate, and secreted amino acids. To redirect carbon and electron flux away from formate, pyruvate:formate lyase (pfl) and respective PFL-activating enzyme were deleted. Formate production in the resulting Δpfl strain was eliminated and acetate production decreased by 50% on both complex and defined medium. Growth ratemore » of Δpfl decreased by 2.9-fold on defined medium and diauxic growth was observed on complex medium. Supplementation of defined medium with 2 mM formate restored Δpfl growth rate to 80% of the parent strain. Finally, we discuss the role of pfl in metabolic engineering strategies and C1 metabolism.« less

  14. Promoters and proteins from Clostridium thermocellum and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Wu, J. H. David; Newcomb, Michael

    2012-11-13

    The present invention relates to an inducible and a high expression nucleic acid promoter isolated from Clostridium thermocellum. These promoters are useful for directing expression of a protein or polypeptide encoded by a nucleic acid molecule operably associated with the nucleic acid promoters. The present invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs including the C. thermocellum promoters, and expression vectors and hosts containing such nucleic acid constructs. The present invention also relates to protein isolated from Clostridium thermocellum, including a repressor protein. The present invention also provides methods of using the isolated promoters and proteins from Clostridium thermocellum, including methods for directing inducible in vitro and in vivo expression of a protein or polypeptide in a host, and methods of producing ethanol from a cellulosic biomass.

  15. Induction of colonic regulatory T cells by indigenous Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Shima, Tatsuichiro; Imaoka, Akemi; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Momose, Yoshika; Cheng, Genhong; Yamasaki, Sho; Saito, Takashi; Ohba, Yusuke; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Hori, Shohei; Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Itoh, Kikuji; Honda, Kenya

    2011-01-21

    CD4(+) T regulatory cells (T(regs)), which express the Foxp3 transcription factor, play a critical role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Here, we show that in mice, T(regs) were most abundant in the colonic mucosa. The spore-forming component of indigenous intestinal microbiota, particularly clusters IV and XIVa of the genus Clostridium, promoted T(reg) cell accumulation. Colonization of mice by a defined mix of Clostridium strains provided an environment rich in transforming growth factor-β and affected Foxp3(+) T(reg) number and function in the colon. Oral inoculation of Clostridium during the early life of conventionally reared mice resulted in resistance to colitis and systemic immunoglobulin E responses in adult mice, suggesting a new therapeutic approach to autoimmunity and allergy.

  16. Botulinum neurotoxin homologs in non-Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Michael J; Adams, Jeremy B; Doxey, Andrew C

    2015-01-30

    Clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs) are the deadliest toxins known and the causative agents of botulism and tetanus. Despite their structural and functional complexity, no CNT homologs are currently known outside Clostridium. Here, we report the first homologs of Clostridium CNTs within the genome of the rice fermentation organism Weissella oryzae SG25. One gene in W. oryzae S25 encodes a protein with a four-domain architecture and HExxH protease motif common to botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). An adjacent gene with partial similarity to CNTs is also present, and both genes seem to have been laterally transferred into the W. oryzae genome from an unknown source. Identification of mobile, CNT-related genes outside of Clostridium has implications for our understanding of the evolution of this important toxin family. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A case of gas gangrene in an immunosuppressed Crohn's patient.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Natalie; Ho, Vincent; Pascoe, Andrew

    2011-09-07

    Clostridium septicum (C. septicum) gas gangrene is well documented in the literature, typically in the setting of trauma or immunosuppression. In this paper, we report a unique case of spontaneous clostridial myonecrosis in a patient with Crohn's disease and sulfasalazine-induced neutropenia. The patient presented with left thigh pain, vomiting and diarrhea. Blood tests demonstrated a profound neutropenia, and magnetic resonance imaging of the thigh confirmed extensive myonecrosis. The patient underwent emergency hip disarticulation, followed by hemicolectomy. C. septicum was cultured from the blood. Following completion of antibiotic therapy, the patient developed myonecrosis of the right pectoral muscle necessitating further debridement, and remains on lifelong prophylactic antibiotic therapy.

  18. The Clostridium Sporulation Programs: Diversity and Preservation of Endospore Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A.; Jones, Shawn W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacillus and Clostridium organisms initiate the sporulation process when unfavorable conditions are detected. The sporulation process is a carefully orchestrated cascade of events at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels involving a multitude of sigma factors, transcription factors, proteases, and phosphatases. Like Bacillus genomes, sequenced Clostridium genomes contain genes for all major sporulation-specific transcription and sigma factors (spo0A, sigH, sigF, sigE, sigG, and sigK) that orchestrate the sporulation program. However, recent studies have shown that there are substantial differences in the sporulation programs between the two genera as well as among different Clostridium species. First, in the absence of a Bacillus-like phosphorelay system, activation of Spo0A in Clostridium organisms is carried out by a number of orphan histidine kinases. Second, downstream of Spo0A, the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of the canonical set of four sporulation-specific sigma factors (σF, σE, σG, and σK) display different patterns, not only compared to Bacillus but also among Clostridium organisms. Finally, recent studies demonstrated that σK, the last sigma factor to be activated according to the Bacillus subtilis model, is involved in the very early stages of sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. perfringens, and C. botulinum as well as in the very late stages of spore maturation in C. acetobutylicum. Despite profound differences in initiation, propagation, and orchestration of expression of spore morphogenetic components, these findings demonstrate not only the robustness of the endospore sporulation program but also the plasticity of the program to generate different complex phenotypes, some apparently regulated at the epigenetic level. PMID:25631287

  19. The Clostridium sporulation programs: diversity and preservation of endospore differentiation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A; Jones, Shawn W; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2015-03-01

    Bacillus and Clostridium organisms initiate the sporulation process when unfavorable conditions are detected. The sporulation process is a carefully orchestrated cascade of events at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels involving a multitude of sigma factors, transcription factors, proteases, and phosphatases. Like Bacillus genomes, sequenced Clostridium genomes contain genes for all major sporulation-specific transcription and sigma factors (spo0A, sigH, sigF, sigE, sigG, and sigK) that orchestrate the sporulation program. However, recent studies have shown that there are substantial differences in the sporulation programs between the two genera as well as among different Clostridium species. First, in the absence of a Bacillus-like phosphorelay system, activation of Spo0A in Clostridium organisms is carried out by a number of orphan histidine kinases. Second, downstream of Spo0A, the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of the canonical set of four sporulation-specific sigma factors (σ(F), σ(E), σ(G), and σ(K)) display different patterns, not only compared to Bacillus but also among Clostridium organisms. Finally, recent studies demonstrated that σ(K), the last sigma factor to be activated according to the Bacillus subtilis model, is involved in the very early stages of sporulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. perfringens, and C. botulinum as well as in the very late stages of spore maturation in C. acetobutylicum. Despite profound differences in initiation, propagation, and orchestration of expression of spore morphogenetic components, these findings demonstrate not only the robustness of the endospore sporulation program but also the plasticity of the program to generate different complex phenotypes, some apparently regulated at the epigenetic level. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Comparative In Vitro Activities of SMT19969, a New Antimicrobial Agent, against 162 Strains from 35 Less Frequently Recovered Intestinal Clostridium Species: Implications for Clostridium difficile Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Citron, Diane M.; Tyrrell, Kerin L.

    2014-01-01

    We determined the comparative activity of SMT19969 (SMT) against 162 strains representing 35 well-characterized Clostridium species in clusters I to XIX and 13 Clostridium species that had no 16S rRNA match. SMT MICs ranged from 0.06 to >512 μg/ml and were not species related. SMT might have less impact on normal gut microbiota than other Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) antimicrobials. PMID:24247123

  1. Comparative in vitro activities of SMT19969, a new antimicrobial agent, against 162 strains from 35 less frequently recovered intestinal Clostridium species: implications for Clostridium difficile recurrence.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Tyrrell, Kerin L

    2014-01-01

    We determined the comparative activity of SMT19969 (SMT) against 162 strains representing 35 well-characterized Clostridium species in clusters I to XIX and 13 Clostridium species that had no 16S rRNA match. SMT MICs ranged from 0.06 to >512 μg/ml and were not species related. SMT might have less impact on normal gut microbiota than other Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) antimicrobials.

  2. The story of Clostridium botulinum: from food poisoning to Botox.

    PubMed

    Ting, Patricia T; Freiman, Anatoli

    2004-01-01

    In the last fifty years, Clostridium botulinum has become notorious for its ability to produce the deadly botulinum neurotoxins. While botulinum toxin A, better known as Botox, is universally recognised by the public as a cosmetic enhancement tool, the botulinum neurotoxins are commonly used off-label for many medical conditions in ophthalmology, neurology and dermatology. The versatility of these botulinum toxins has made Clostridium botulinum one of the most widely known bacterial pathogens in medical history. This article outlines the discovery of botulinum toxins through to their present day applications in medicine.

  3. Thermolabile triose phosphate isomerase in a psychrophilic Clostridium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. W.; Akagi, J. M.; Himes, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    It was found that a psychrophilic Clostridium contains a triose phosphate isomerase which is very labile at moderate temperatures. An investigation showed that the optimal growth temperature of the psychrophile was between 15 and 20 deg C. No growth occurred at 25 deg C. The thermostability of the glycolytic enzymes in the cell-free extracts of Clostridium sp. strain 69 was studied. The data obtained show that the triose phosphate isomerase is quite labile at moderate temperatures. The instability of the enzyme is sufficient to explain the low maximum growth temperature of the psychrophile.

  4. Thermolabile triose phosphate isomerase in a psychrophilic Clostridium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. W.; Akagi, J. M.; Himes, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    It was found that a psychrophilic Clostridium contains a triose phosphate isomerase which is very labile at moderate temperatures. An investigation showed that the optimal growth temperature of the psychrophile was between 15 and 20 deg C. No growth occurred at 25 deg C. The thermostability of the glycolytic enzymes in the cell-free extracts of Clostridium sp. strain 69 was studied. The data obtained show that the triose phosphate isomerase is quite labile at moderate temperatures. The instability of the enzyme is sufficient to explain the low maximum growth temperature of the psychrophile.

  5. Genetic Engineering of Clostridium Difficile Toxin a Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-16

    D’iC FILE COPY • AD I’- GENETIC ENGINEERING OF 0 CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE TOXIN A VACCINE ANNUAL REPORT Lycurgus L. Muldrow Joe Johnson August 16, 1990...62770A 1 62770A871 I AA f 348 11. TITLE (kicAld Sowufy 0aiaflcanon) (U) Genetic Engineering of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Vaccine 12. PERSONAL...FIELD GROUP ISU3.GROUP- Clastridlum difficile Vaccine __ 02IRU Recomb in nta ~ 06 1 03 -9 4W .RA-W--I It ABSTRACT (Contin. on ’erser if neconay and

  6. Clostridium novyi infection: a fatal association with injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J M; Paul, J; Curtis, S; Patel, N K

    2001-03-01

    Injecting drug users frequently use accident and emergency (A&E) departments to access emergency care for local and systemic infections. Clostridium novyi type A is a bacterium that has recently been associated with a number of fatalities among drug injecting addicts. The clinical course is described of a patient who attended an A&E department with septicaemia who was found at postmortem examination to have been infected with Clostridium novyi type A. Doctors working in A&E departments should be aware of the existence of this infection and be vigilant when treating injecting drug users with localised infection.

  7. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TOXIGENICITY AND SPORULATING POTENCY OF CLOSTRIDIUM NOVYI.

    PubMed

    NISHIDA, S; NAKAGAWARA, G

    1965-04-01

    Nishida, Shoki (Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan), and Gizo Nakagawara. Relationship between toxigenicity and sporulating potency of Clostridium novyi. J. Bacteriol. 89:993-995. 1965.-The less toxigenic the strains, the stronger was the sporulating potency of Clostridium novyi strains isolated. This was confirmed by investigation of the toxigenicity of substrains of C. novyi 140 possessing different degrees of sporulating potency. Atoxic strains or type C strains could be obtained from the parent type A strain (no. 140) by heat selection. This phenomenon was also observed in the other five strains. Prolonged storage of C. novyi strains also resulted in selection of cells with stronger sporulating ability and lower toxigenicity.

  8. Enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens: Detection and Identification

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the genetics of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens, including whole genome sequencing of a chromosomal cpe strain and sequencing of several cpe-carrying large plasmids, have led to the development of molecular approaches to more precisely investigate isolates involved in human gastrointestinal diseases and isolates present in the environment. Sequence-based PCR genotyping of the cpe locus (cpe genotyping PCR assays) has provided new information about cpe-positive type A C. perfringens including: 1) Foodborne C. perfringens outbreaks can be caused not only by chromosomal cpe type A strains with extremely heat-resistant spores, but also less commonly by less heat-resistant spore-forming plasmid cpe type A strains; 2) Both chromosomal cpe and plasmid cpe C. perfringens type A strains can be found in retail foods, healthy human feces and the environment, such as in sewage; 3) Most environmental cpe-positive C. perfringens type A strains carry their cpe gene on plasmids. Moreover, recent studies indicated that the cpe loci of type C, D, and E strains differ from the cpe loci of type A strains and from the cpe loci of each other, indicating that the cpe loci of C. perfringens have remarkable diversity. Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) indicated that the chromosomal cpe strains responsible for most food poisoning cases have distinct genetic characteristics that provide unique biological properties, such as the formation of highly heat-resistant spores. These and future advances should help elucidate the epidemiology of enterotoxigenic C. perfringens and also contribute to the prevention of C. perfringens food poisoning outbreaks and other CPE-associated human diseases. PMID:22504431

  9. CRISPR Diversity and Microevolution in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Joakim M; Shoup, Madelyn; Robinson, Cathy; Britton, Robert; Olsen, Katharina E P; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2016-09-19

    Virulent strains of Clostridium difficile have become a global health problem associated with morbidity and mortality. Traditional typing methods do not provide ideal resolution to track outbreak strains, ascertain genetic diversity between isolates, or monitor the phylogeny of this species on a global basis. Here, we investigate the occurrence and diversity of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated genes (cas) in C. difficile to assess the potential of CRISPR-based phylogeny and high-resolution genotyping. A single Type-IB CRISPR-Cas system was identified in 217 analyzed genomes with cas gene clusters present at conserved chromosomal locations, suggesting vertical evolution of the system, assessing a total of 1,865 CRISPR arrays. The CRISPR arrays, markedly enriched (8.5 arrays/genome) compared with other species, occur both at conserved and variable locations across strains, and thus provide a basis for typing based on locus occurrence and spacer polymorphism. Clustering of strains by array composition correlated with sequence type (ST) analysis. Spacer content and polymorphism within conserved CRISPR arrays revealed phylogenetic relationship across clades and within ST. Spacer polymorphisms of conserved arrays were instrumental for differentiating closely related strains, e.g., ST1/RT027/B1 strains and pathogenicity locus encoding ST3/RT001 strains. CRISPR spacers showed sequence similarity to phage sequences, which is consistent with the native role of CRISPR-Cas as adaptive immune systems in bacteria. Overall, CRISPR-Cas sequences constitute a valuable basis for genotyping of C. difficile isolates, provide insights into the micro-evolutionary events that occur between closely related strains, and reflect the evolutionary trajectory of these genomes. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. Engineering Clostridium acetobutylicum for alcohol production.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaohu; Peng, Wanfeng; Xiong, Lian; Huang, Chao; Chen, Xuefang; Chen, Xinde; Zhang, Weiguo

    2013-06-20

    While Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used for large-scale butanol production (ABE fermentation), its by-product acetone cannot be used as a biofuel. In this study, C. acetobutylicum was engineered for alcohol titers (butanol plus ethanol). The adc gene was inactivated to eliminate acetone production, and glutathione biosynthetic capability was introduced into C. acetobutylicum to improve the strain's robustness by expressing Escherichia coli's gshAB genes in the adc locus. Acetone production was reduced from 2.64±0.22 g/L to 0.15±0.08 g/L in the engineered strain 824adc::gsh, whereas butanol production was increased from 5.17±0.26 g/L to 8.27±0.27 g/L. To further improve the alcohol titers, the metabolic flux in the alcohol biosynthesis pathways was enhanced. Overlapping PCR was used to generate expression cassette EC, which expresses the hbd, thl, crt, and bcd genes, and the Sol operon was amplified to express the adhE and ctfAB genes. Butanol and alcohol production reached 14.86±0.26 g/L and 18.11±0.66 g/L, respectively, in 824adc::gsh Sol-EC. Furthermore, the butanol and alcohol yields were 0.336 g/g and 0.409 g/g, respectively, in 824adc::gsh Sol-EC. This study provided a combined strategy for enhancing alcohol production in C. acetobutylicum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Individualized treatment strategies for Clostridium difficile infections].

    PubMed

    Solbach, P; Dersch, P; Bachmann, O

    2017-07-01

    Upon hospitalization, up to 15.5% of patients are already colonized with a toxigenic Clostridium difficile strain (TCD). The rate of asymptomatic colonization is 0-3% in healthy adults and up to 20-40% in hospitalized patients. The incidence and mortality of C. difficile infection (CDI) has significantly increased during recent years. Mortality lies between 3 and 14%. CDI is generally caused by intestinal dysbiosis, which can be triggered by various factors, including antibiotics or immune suppressants. If CDI occurs, ongoing antibiotic therapy should be discontinued. The choice of treatment is guided by the clinical situation: Mild courses of CDI should be treated with metronidazole. Oral vancomycin is suitable as a first-line therapy of mild CDI occurring during pregnancy and lactation, as well as in cases of intolerance or allergy to metronidazole. Severe courses should be treated with vancomycin. Recurrence should be treated with vancomycin or fidaxomicin. Multiple recurrences should be treated with vancomycin or fidaxomicin; if necessary, a vancomycin taper regimen may also be used. An alternative is fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), with healing rates of more than 80%. Bezlotoxumab is the first available monoclonal antibody which neutralizes the C. difficile toxin B, and in combination with an antibiotic significantly reduces the rate of a new C. difficile infection compared to placebo. A better definition of clinical and microbiota-associated risk factors and the ongoing implementation of molecular diagnostics are likely to lead to optimized identification of patients at risk, and an increasing individualization of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches.

  12. Diagnosis and management of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Herbert L

    2013-10-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is increasing in frequency and severity in and out of the hospital, with a high probability of recurrence after treatment. The recent literature on CDI was reviewed using PubMed to include recent publications dealing with diagnosis and therapy. Real-time polymerase chain reaction is a sensitive and useful diagnostic test for CDI but there are growing concerns of false-positive test results if the rate of CDI is low in the patient population providing samples and/or if the population being studied commonly includes people with C difficile colonization. Recommended therapy of CDI includes oral metronidazole for milder cases of CDI and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for more severe cases, each given for 10 days. Colectomy is being performed more frequently in patients with fulminant CDI. For treatment of first recurrences the drug used in the first bout can be used again and for second recurrences longer courses of vancomycin often are given in a tapered dose or intermittently to allow gut flora reconstitution, or other treatments including fidaxomicin may be used. Bacteriotherapy with fecal transplantation is playing an increasing role in therapy of recurrent cases. Metagenomic studies of patients with CDI during successful therapy are needed to determine how best to protect the flora from assaults from antibacterial drugs and to develop optimal therapeutic approaches. Immunotherapy and immunoprophylaxis offer opportunities to prevent CDI, to speed up recovery from CDI, and to eliminate recurrent infection. Humanized monoclonal antitoxin antibodies and active immunization with vaccines against C difficile or its toxins are both in development and appear to be of potential value.

  13. Enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens: detection and identification.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the genetics of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens, including whole genome sequencing of a chromosomal cpe strain and sequencing of several cpe-carrying large plasmids, have led to the development of molecular approaches to more precisely investigate isolates involved in human gastrointestinal diseases and isolates present in the environment. Sequence-based PCR genotyping of the cpe locus (cpe genotyping PCR assays) has provided new information about cpe-positive type A C. perfringens including: 1) Foodborne C. perfringens outbreaks can be caused not only by chromosomal cpe type A strains with extremely heat-resistant spores, but also less commonly by less heat-resistant spore-forming plasmid cpe type A strains; 2) Both chromosomal cpe and plasmid cpe C. perfringens type A strains can be found in retail foods, healthy human feces and the environment, such as in sewage; 3) Most environmental cpe-positive C. perfringens type A strains carry their cpe gene on plasmids. Moreover, recent studies indicated that the cpe loci of type C, D, and E strains differ from the cpe loci of type A strains and from the cpe loci of each other, indicating that the cpe loci of C. perfringens have remarkable diversity. Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) indicated that the chromosomal cpe strains responsible for most food poisoning cases have distinct genetic characteristics that provide unique biological properties, such as the formation of highly heat-resistant spores. These and future advances should help elucidate the epidemiology of enterotoxigenic C. perfringens and also contribute to the prevention of C. perfringens food poisoning outbreaks and other CPE-associated human diseases.

  14. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Bignardi, G E

    1998-09-01

    A systematic review of the literature to identify risk factors associated with Clostridium difficile infection was conducted. Two main outcomes were considered: C. difficile diarrhoea and C. difficile carriage. A qualitative assessment, based on a set of defined and consistently applied criteria, appeared to be the best approach for risk factors other than antibiotic use, as an approach based on meta-analysis would have utilized only the information provided by a minority of the studies. Risk factors for which there was evidence suggestive or consistent with an association with C. difficile diarrhoea were: increasing age (excluding infancy), severity of underlying diseases, non-surgical gastrointestinal procedures, presence of a nasogastric tube, anti-ulcer medications, stay on ITU, duration of hospital stay, duration of antibiotic course, administration of multiple antibiotics. For malignant haematological disorders there was evidence of an association only with C. difficile carriage, but there were no suitable studies to explore a possible association of this risk factor with symptomatic infection. Antibiotic use lent itself to quantitative assessment with meta-analysis using logistic regression. Exposure to an antibiotic was shown to be statistically significantly associated with both C. difficile diarrhoea and C. difficile carriage. The meta-analysis approach enabled the ranking of individual antibiotics in relation to the risk of C. difficile infection, though the 95% confidence intervals were often wide and overlapping. Antibiotics associated with a lower risk of C. difficile diarrhoea should be considered, especially when attempting to control a C. difficile outbreak or when prescribing for a patient with other C. difficile risk factors. This systematic review of the literature enabled the identification of features it would be desirable to consider in future epidemiological studies.

  15. Production of 1,3-propanediol from glycerol by Clostridium acetobutylicum and other Clostridium species

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1987-04-01

    Glycerol was fermented with the production of 1,3-propanediol as the major fermentation product by four strains of Clostridium acetobutylicum, six of C. butylicum, two of C. beijerinckii, one of C. kainantoi, and three of C. butylicum. 1,3-Propanediol was identified by its retention times in gas chromatography and high-pressure liquid chromatography and by its mass spectrum. During growth of C. butylicum B593 in a chemostat culture at pH 6.5, 61% of the glycerol fermented was converted to 1,3-propanediol. When the pH was decreased to 4.9, growth and 1,3-propanediol production were substantially reduced.

  16. Chemical characterization of the regularly arranged surface layers of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum.

    PubMed

    Sleytr, U B; Thorne, K J

    1976-04-01

    Clostridum thermosaccharolyticum and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum possess as outermost cell wall layer a tetragonal or hexagonal ordered array of macromolecules. The subunits of the surface layer can be detached from isolated cell walls with urea (8M) or guanidine-HCl (4 to 5 M). Triton X-100, dithiothreitol, ethylenediaminetetracetate, and KCl (3 M) had no visible effect on the regular arrays. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophroesis showed that, in both organisms, the surface layer is composed of glycoprotein of molecular weight 140,000. The glycoprotein from both microorganisms has a predominantly acidic amino acid composition and an acidic isoelectric point after isoelectric focusing on polyacrylamide gels. The glycocomponent is composed of glucose, galactose, mannose, and rhamnose.

  17. Metal Ion Activation of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium difficile Toxin B

    PubMed Central

    Genth, Harald; Schelle, Ilona; Just, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Lethal Toxin from Clostridium sordellii (TcsL) and Toxin B from Clostridium difficile (TcdB) belong to the family of the “Large clostridial glycosylating toxins.” These toxins mono-O-glucosylate low molecular weight GTPases of the Rho and Ras families by exploiting UDP-glucose as a hexose donor. TcsL is casually involved in the toxic shock syndrome and the gas gangrene. TcdB—together with Toxin A (TcdA)—is causative for the pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). Here, we present evidence for the in vitro metal ion activation of the glucosyltransferase and the UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity of TcsL and TcdB. The following rating is found for activation by divalent metal ions: Mn2+ > Co2+ > Mg2+ >> Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+. TcsL and TcdB thus require divalent metal ions providing an octahedral coordination sphere. The EC50 values for TcsL were estimated at about 28 µM for Mn2+ and 180 µM for Mg2+. TcsL and TcdB further require co-stimulation by monovalent K+ (not by Na+). Finally, prebound divalent metal ions were dispensible for the cytopathic effects of TcsL and TcdB, leading to the conclusion that TcsL and TcdB recruit intracellular metal ions for activation of the glucosyltransferase activity. With regard to the intracellular metal ion concentrations, TcsL and TcdB are most likely activated by K+ and Mg2+ (rather than Mn2+) in mammalian target cells. PMID:27089365

  18. Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens from wild carnivore species in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; D'Elia, Mirella Lauria; Tostes Teixeira, Erika Procópio; Pereira, Pedro Lúcio Lithg; de Magalhães Soares, Danielle Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Álvaro Roberto; Kocuvan, Aleksander; Rupnik, Maja; Santos, André Luiz Quagliatto; Junior, Carlos Augusto Oliveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2014-08-01

    Despite some case reports, the importance of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile for wild carnivores remains unclear. Thus, the objective of this study was to identify C. perfringens and C. difficile strains in stool samples from wild carnivore species in Brazil. A total of 34 stool samples were collected and subjected to C. perfringens and C. difficile isolation. Suggestive colonies of C. perfringens were then analyzed for genes encoding the major C. perfringens toxins (alpha, beta, epsilon and iota) and the beta-2 toxin (cpb2), enterotoxin (cpe) and NetB (netb) genes. C. difficile strains were analyzed by multiplex-PCR for toxins A (tcdA) and B (tcdB) and a binary toxin gene (cdtB) and also submitted to a PCR ribotyping. Unthawed aliquots of samples positive for C. difficile isolation were subjected to the detection of A/B toxins by a cytotoxicity assay (CTA). C. perfringens was isolated from 26 samples (76.5%), all of which were genotyped as type A. The netb gene was not detected, whereas the cpb2 and cpe genes were found in nine and three C. perfringens strains, respectively. C. difficile was isolated from two (5.9%) samples. A non-toxigenic strain was recovered from a non-diarrheic maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus). Conversely, a toxigenic strain was found in the sample of a diarrheic ocelot (Leopardus pardallis); an unthawed stool sample was also positive for A/B toxins by CTA, indicating a diagnosis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea in this animal. The present work suggests that wild carnivore species could carry C. difficile strains and that they could be susceptible to C. difficile infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Vaginal and Rectal Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium perfringens Presence Among Women in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chong, Erica; Winikoff, Beverly; Charles, Dyanna; Agnew, Kathy; Prentice, Jennifer L; Limbago, Brandi M; Platais, Ingrida; Louie, Karmen; Jones, Heidi E; Shannon, Caitlin

    2016-02-01

    To characterize the presence of Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium perfringens in the vagina and rectum, identify correlates of presence, and describe strain diversity and presence of key toxins. We conducted an observational cohort study in which we screened a diverse cohort of reproductive-aged women in the United States up to three times using vaginal and rectal swabs analyzed by molecular and culture methods. We used multivariate regression models to explore predictors of presence. Strains were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and tested for known virulence factors by polymerase chain reaction assays. Of 4,152 participants enrolled between 2010 and 2013, 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.9-4.0) were positive for C sordellii and 10.4% (95% CI 9.5-11.3) were positive for C perfringens at baseline. Among the 66% with follow-up data, 94.7% (95% CI 88.0-98.3) of those positive for C sordellii and 74.4% (95% CI 69.0-79.3) of those positive for C perfringens at baseline were negative at follow-up. At baseline, recent gynecologic surgery was associated with C sordellii presence, whereas a high body mass index was associated with C perfringens presence in adjusted models. Two of 238 C sordellii isolates contained the lethal toxin gene, and none contained the hemorrhagic toxin gene. Substantial strain diversity was observed in both species with few clusters and no dominant clones identified. The relatively rare and transient nature of C sordellii and C perfringens presence in the vagina and rectum makes it inadvisable to use any screening or prophylactic approach to try to prevent clostridial infection. ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01283828.

  20. Human fulminant gas gangrene caused by Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Noriyuki; Isomine, Shinji; Kato, Haru; Sasaki, Yoshimasa; Takahashi, Motohide; Sakaida, Koji; Nagano, Yukiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2008-04-01

    The first human case of fulminant gas gangrene caused by Clostridium chauvoei, a pathogen causing ruminant blackleg, was confirmed for a 58-year-old man suffering from diabetes mellitus. The patient developed conspicuous emphysematous gangrene in the right chest wall as well as intravascular gas entrapments and died 2 h after hospital arrival.

  1. Human Fulminant Gas Gangrene Caused by Clostridium chauvoei▿

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Noriyuki; Isomine, Shinji; Kato, Haru; Sasaki, Yoshimasa; Takahashi, Motohide; Sakaida, Koji; Nagano, Yukiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2008-01-01

    The first human case of fulminant gas gangrene caused by Clostridium chauvoei, a pathogen causing ruminant blackleg, was confirmed for a 58-year-old man suffering from diabetes mellitus. The patient developed conspicuous emphysematous gangrene in the right chest wall as well as intravascular gas entrapments and died 2 h after hospital arrival. PMID:18256217

  2. Genome of a chronic osteitis-causing Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P-E; Levy, P-Y; Million, M; Croce, O; Blanc-Tailleur, C; Brouqui, P; Raoult, D

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the genome of a Clostridium tetani strain that caused chronic tibial osteitis without any clinical sign of tetanus in a 26-year-old man previously vaccinated against this disease. The genome contained a plasmid that harboured the tetX-tetR tetanospasmin operon, and was highly similar to that of a tetanus-causing strain.

  3. Clostridium difficile pancolitis in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barker, H C; Haworth, C S; Williams, D; Roberts, P; Bilton, D

    2008-09-01

    We report three cases of Clostridium difficile pancolitis in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) in whom the presenting symptoms were atypical. All three required treatment with systemic steroids, in addition to oral vancomycin and metronidazole to achieve resolution of the colitis. This experience suggests that C. difficile colitis should be considered in individuals with CF presenting with non-specific abdominal symptoms.

  4. Fecal microbiota transplantation in children with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Pierog, Anne; Mencin, Ali; Reilly, Norelle Rizkalla

    2014-11-01

    Clostridium difficile eradication using fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been successful in adults but little information is available in pediatrics. We report 6 pediatric patients with refractory C. difficile cured by FMT with no recurrences to date. Our results demonstrate that FMT can be an effective treatment for refractory C. difficile infection in pediatrics. Long-term safety and efficacy need to be studied.

  5. Ribulokinase and Transcriptional Regulation of Arabinose Metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Leyn, Semen A.; Gu, Yang; Jiang, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor AraR controls utilization of l-arabinose in Bacillus subtilis. In this study, we combined a comparative genomic reconstruction of AraR regulons in nine Clostridium species with detailed experimental characterization of AraR-mediated regulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum. Based on the reconstructed AraR regulons, a novel ribulokinase, AraK, present in all analyzed Clostridium species was identified, which was a nonorthologous replacement of previously characterized ribulokinases. The predicted function of the araK gene was confirmed by inactivation of the araK gene in C. acetobutylicum and biochemical assays using purified recombinant AraK. In addition to the genes involved in arabinose utilization and arabinoside degradation, extension of the AraR regulon to the pentose phosphate pathway genes in several Clostridium species was revealed. The predicted AraR-binding sites in the C. acetobutylicum genome and the negative effect of l-arabinose on DNA-regulator complex formation were verified by in vitro binding assays. The predicted AraR-controlled genes in C. acetobutylicum were experimentally validated by testing gene expression patterns in both wild-type and araR-inactivated mutant strains during growth in the absence or presence of l-arabinose. PMID:22194461

  6. Ribulokinase and transcriptional regulation of arabinose metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Leyn, Semen A; Gu, Yang; Jiang, Weihong; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Yang, Chen

    2012-03-01

    The transcription factor AraR controls utilization of L-arabinose in Bacillus subtilis. In this study, we combined a comparative genomic reconstruction of AraR regulons in nine Clostridium species with detailed experimental characterization of AraR-mediated regulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum. Based on the reconstructed AraR regulons, a novel ribulokinase, AraK, present in all analyzed Clostridium species was identified, which was a nonorthologous replacement of previously characterized ribulokinases. The predicted function of the araK gene was confirmed by inactivation of the araK gene in C. acetobutylicum and biochemical assays using purified recombinant AraK. In addition to the genes involved in arabinose utilization and arabinoside degradation, extension of the AraR regulon to the pentose phosphate pathway genes in several Clostridium species was revealed. The predicted AraR-binding sites in the C. acetobutylicum genome and the negative effect of L-arabinose on DNA-regulator complex formation were verified by in vitro binding assays. The predicted AraR-controlled genes in C. acetobutylicum were experimentally validated by testing gene expression patterns in both wild-type and araR-inactivated mutant strains during growth in the absence or presence of L-arabinose.

  7. Genome of a chronic osteitis-causing Clostridium tetani

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, P-E; Levy, P-Y; Million, M; Croce, O; Blanc-Tailleur, C; Brouqui, P; Raoult, D

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the genome of a Clostridium tetani strain that caused chronic tibial osteitis without any clinical sign of tetanus in a 26-year-old man previously vaccinated against this disease. The genome contained a plasmid that harboured the tetX-tetR tetanospasmin operon, and was highly similar to that of a tetanus-causing strain. PMID:25356334

  8. Ceftolozane-Tazobactam Activity against Phylogenetically Diverse Clostridium difficile Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Mark D.; Wallace, Meghan A.; Hink, Tiffany; Dubberke, Erik R.

    2015-01-01

    Ceftolozane-tazobactam (C/T) is approved for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal and urinary tract infections and has varied activity against anaerobic bacteria. Here, we evaluate the activity of C/T against a phylogenetically diverse collection of Clostridium difficile isolates and report uniformly high MICs (≥256 μg/ml) to C/T. PMID:26282409

  9. Clostridium difficile in Ready-to-Eat Salads, Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Bakri, Marwah M.; Brown, Derek J.; Butcher, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Of 40 ready-to-eat salads, 3 (7.5%) were positive for Clostridium difficile by PCR. Two isolates were PCR ribotype 017 (toxin A–, B+), and 1 was PCR ribotype 001. Isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and metronidazole but variably resistant to other antimicrobial drugs. Ready-to-eat salads may be potential sources for virulent C. difficile. PMID:19402979

  10. Clostridium difficile in ready-to-eat salads, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Bakri, Marwah M; Brown, Derek J; Butcher, John P; Sutherland, Alistair D

    2009-05-01

    Of 40 ready-to-eat salads, 3 (7.5%) were positive for Clostridium difficile by PCR. Two isolates were PCR ribotype 017 (toxin A-, B+), and 1 was PCR ribotype 001. Isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and metronidazole but variably resistant to other antimicrobial drugs. Ready-to-eat salads may be potential sources for virulent C. difficile.

  11. Diagnostic multiplex PCR for toxin genotyping of Clostridium perfringens isolates.

    PubMed

    Baums, Christoph G; Schotte, Ulrich; Amtsberg, Gunter; Goethe, Ralph

    2004-05-20

    In this study we provide a protocol for genotyping Clostridium perfringens with a new multiplex PCR. This PCR enables reliable and specific detection of the toxin genes cpa, cpb, etx, iap, cpe and cpb2 from heat lysed bacterial suspensions. The efficiency of the protocol was demonstrated by typing C. perfringens reference strains and isolates from veterinary bacteriological routine diagnostic specimens.

  12. Clostridium novyi causing necrotising fasciitis in an injecting drug user

    PubMed Central

    Noone, M; Tabaqchali, M; Spillane, J B

    2002-01-01

    Necrotising fasciitis with pronounced local oedema is described in an injecting drug user. Clostridium novyi was an unexpected single pathogen isolated from infected tissue. The patient was among a cluster of cases, all injecting drug users, presenting with toxaemia and soft tissue infection. The causal role and pathogenicity of C novyi is discussed. PMID:11865011

  13. Clostridium novyi causing necrotising fasciitis in an injecting drug user.

    PubMed

    Noone, M; Tabaqchali, M; Spillane, J B

    2002-02-01

    Necrotising fasciitis with pronounced local oedema is described in an injecting drug user. Clostridium novyi was an unexpected single pathogen isolated from infected tissue. The patient was among a cluster of cases, all injecting drug users, presenting with toxaemia and soft tissue infection. The causal role and pathogenicity of C novyi is discussed.

  14. Clostridium novyi type A infection: a sporadic fatal case.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Christopher; Roworth, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Infection with type A Clostridium novyi is rare. We report the case of a previously healthy 31-y-old woman with no known risk factors who died suddenly with a necrotizing soft tissue infection. We compare this case with a simultaneous outbreak of this infection amongst Scottish IDUs (injecting drug users).

  15. Clostridium histolyticum collagenase in the treatment of Dupuytren's contracture.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi, Ernest; Boyce, Dean E

    2012-08-01

    Dupuytren's disease is a common, costly and recurrent health issue. This review compares Clostridium histolyticum collagenase with current operative treatments. Collagenase management is an effective non-surgical alternative associated with lower risks of serious adverse events, but higher incidence of non-serious adverse events.

  16. Salvage palmar fasciectomy after initial treatment with collagenase clostridium histolyticum.

    PubMed

    Eberlin, Kyle R; Kobraei, Edward M; Nyame, Theodore T; Bloom, Jacob M; Upton, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    Collagenase clostridium histolyticum was approved for clinical use in 2010 and has become an accepted treatment modality for Dupuytren's contracture. Because longitudinal experience with injectable collagenase remains limited, the effect of treatment on future surgery is not well defined. A retrospective review of the senior author's practice from February of 2010 through March of 2014 was performed. Eleven patients were identified who had digital or palmar fasciectomy after at least one previous injection of collagenase clostridium histolyticum. Cases were reviewed for functional outcomes and operative difficulty. Seven metacarpophalangeal joints and 12 proximal interphalangeal joints in 11 patients were treated. Nine of the 11 patients were referred to the senior author after collagenase clostridium histolyticum injections by other hand surgeons; two patients had previous injections by the senior author. The average interval between most recent injection and salvage fasciectomy was 12 months. Intraoperative findings demonstrated disruption of normal architecture and areolar tissue, with extensive scar in the dissection planes after previous injection. Mean preoperative/postinjection joint contracture for metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints was 42 and 60 degrees, respectively; after surgery, joint contractures were 0 and 21 degrees, respectively. Significant improvement in postoperative range of motion was seen for both metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints after palmar fasciectomy. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum injections may produce a deeply scarred bed and increase the technical difficulty of salvage fasciectomy. However, results of palmar fasciectomy are comparable to those of primary fasciectomy even in the setting of recurrent or progressive disease. Therapeutic, IV.

  17. Four phage endolysins that are lytic for clostridium perfringens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Clostridium perfringens is a bacterial pathogen and the cause of necrotic enteritis in poultry, and a source of food poisoning and gas gangrene in people. C. perfringens can also cause mild to severe enteritis in pigs. In the EU, the occurrence of C. perfringens-associated necrotic enteritis in pou...

  18. Clostridium difficile from healthy food animals: Optimized isolation and prevalence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two isolation methods were compared for isolation of Clostridium difficile from food animal feces. The single alcohol shock method (SS) used selective enrichment in cycloserine-cefoxitin fructose broth supplemented with 0.1% sodium taurocholate (TCCFB) followed by alcohol shock and isolation on tryp...

  19. Biosynthesis of a thiamin antivitamin in Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Lisa E; O'Leary, Seán E; Begley, Tadhg P

    2014-04-15

    Bacimethrin-derived 2'-methoxythiamin pyrophosphate inhibits microbial growth by disrupting metabolic pathways dependent on thiamin-utilizing enzymes. This study describes the discovery of the bacimethrin biosynthetic gene cluster of Clostridium botulinum A ATCC 19397 and in vitro reconstitution of bacimethrin biosynthesis from cytidine 5'-monophosphate.

  20. Prevention of Healthcare-Associated Clostridium difficile: What Works?

    PubMed Central

    Dubberke, Erik R.

    2013-01-01

    Prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has become extremely important because of increases in CDI incidence and severity. Unfortunately CDI prevention efforts are hampered by lack of data to support optimal prevention methods, especially for endemic CDI. Studies are needed to define optimal prevention practices and to investigate novel prevention methods. PMID:20929366

  1. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in a hepatology ward.

    PubMed

    Vanjak, Dominique; Girault, Guillaume; Branger, Catherine; Rufat, Pierre; Valla, Dominique-Charles; Fantin, Bruno

    2007-02-01

    During 2001, Clostridium difficile infection was observed in 23 patients hospitalized in a hepatology ward (attack rate, 0.9%). Since strain typing ruled out a clonal dissemination, we performed a case-control study. In addition to antibiotic use as a risk factor, the C. difficile infection rate was higher among patients with autoimmune hepatitis (P<.01).

  2. Clostridium difficile in retail meat and processing plants in Texas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile (Cd) have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains of Cd. Toxigenic Cd has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer ...

  3. PREVALENCE OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE IN AN INTEGRATED SWINE OPERATION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006 and to compare our isolates to other animal and human isolates. Isolation of C. difficile was performed u...

  4. Isolation of Clostridium difficile from healthy food animals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Clostridium difficile-associated disease is increasingly reported and studies indicate that food animals may be sources of human infections. Methods: The presence of C. difficile in 345 swine fecal, 1,325 dairy cattle fecal, and 371 dairy environmental samples were examined. Two isolati...

  5. Evaluation of hydrogen production by clostridium strains on beet molasses.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ayşe; Kiliç, Nur Koçberber; Dönmez, Gönöl; Dönmez, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792, C. acetobutylicum DSM 1731 and two newly isolated bacteria defined as the members of genus Clostridium - based on the 16S rRNA analysis and biochemical traits - were characterized with regard to their hydrogen production in media containing increasing beet molasses concentrations. The highest hydrogen yield was observed for C. acetobutylicum DSM 792 with a yield of 2.8 mol H2 mol-1 hexose in medium including 60 g L-1 molasses. This bacterium also produced the maximum amount of hydrogen (5908.8 mL L-1) at the same molasses concentration. A slightly lower hydrogen yield was measured for C. acetobutylicum DSM 1731 (2.5 mol H2 mol-1 hexose) when grown on 40 g L-1 molasses. The new isolates Clostridium roseum C and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum PF produced hydrogen with yields of 2.0 mol H2 mol-1 hexose at 40 and 60 g L-1 molasses and 2.1 mol H2 mol-1 hexose at 40 gL-1 molasses, respectively.

  6. ANALYSES OF WOUND EXUDATES FOR CLOSTRIDIAL TOXINS

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Howard E.; Pritchard, William L.; Brinkley, Floyd B.; Mendelson, Janice A.

    1964-01-01

    Noyes, Howard E. (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C.), William L. Pritchard, Floyd B. Brinkley, and Janice A. Mendelson. Analyses of wound exudates for clostridial toxins. J. Bacteriol. 87:623–629. 1964.—Earlier studies indicated that death of goats with traumatic wounds of the hindquarter could be related to the number of clostridia in the wounds, and that toxicity of wound exudates for mice and guinea pigs could be partially neutralized by commercial trivalent gas gangrene antitoxin. This report describes in vitro and in vivo analyses of wound exudates for known clostridial toxins. Wounds were produced by detonation of high-explosive pellets. Wound exudates were obtained by cold saline extraction of both necrotic tissues and gauze sponges used to cover the wounds. Exudates were sterilized by Seitz filtration in the cold. In vitro tests were used to measure alpha-, theta-, and mu-toxins of Clostridium perfringens and the epsilon-toxin of C. novyi. Mouse protection tests, employing commercial typing antisera, were used to analyze exudates for other clostridial toxins. Lethality of wound exudates for mice could be related to (i) the numbers of clostridia present in the wound, (ii) survival time of the goats, and (iii) positive lecithovitellin (LV) tests of the exudates. However, the LV tests could not be neutralized by antitoxin specific for C. perfringens alpha-toxin. Mice were not protected by typing antisera specific for types A, C, or D C. perfringens or C. septicum but were protected by antisera specific for type B C. perfringens and types A and B C. novyi. PMID:14127581

  7. Development of a triplex real-time PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium tyrobutyricum in milk.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Stefano; Cremonesi, Paola; Silvetti, Tiziana; Castiglioni, Bianca; Brasca, Milena

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium tyrobutyricum are considered the leading bacteria implicated in late blowing defects affecting semi-hard and hard cheese production. The aim of this study was to develop a multiplex Real-Time PCR (qPCR) analysis for a rapid and simultaneous detection of C. beijerinckii, C. sporogenes and C. tyrobutyricum, using specific primers respectively targeting the nifH, gerAA and enr genes. The limits of detection in raw milk were 300 CFU/50 mL in the case of C. beijerinckii, 2 CFU/50 mL for C. sporogenes and 5 CFU/50 mL for C. tyrobutyricum spores. The qPCR method was applied to artificially contaminated raw milk samples, and molecular quantification showed good correlation (R(2) = 0.978) with microbiological counting. Our results demonstrate that this method, combined with a DNA extraction protocol optimized for spore lysis, could be a useful tool for the direct quantification of the considered clostridia species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genome Sequence of Clostridium paraputrificum 373-A1 Isolated in Chile from a Patient Infected with Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Araya, Enzo; Plaza-Garrido, Angela; Díaz-Yañez, Fernando; Pizaro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Valenzuela, Sandro L; Meneses, Claudio; Gil, Fernando; Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2016-11-03

    Clostridium paraputrificum is a gut microbiota member reported in several cases of bacteremia and coinfections. So far, only one genome sequence of a C. paraputrificum (AGR2156) isolate is available. Here, we present the draft genome of C. paraputrificum strain 373-A1, isolated from stools from a patient with C. difficile infection.

  9. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum sequential culture in a continuous flow reactor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The study was conducted to evaluate fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum and C. saccharoperbutylacetonicum in a continuous-flow, high-solids reactor. Liquid medium was continuously flowed through switchgrass (2 mm particle size) at one of three flow rates: 83.33 mL h-1 (2 L d-1), 41.66 mL h-1(1 ...

  10. Genome Sequence of Clostridium paraputrificum 373-A1 Isolated in Chile from a Patient Infected with Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Araya, Enzo; Plaza-Garrido, Angela; Díaz-Yañez, Fernando; Pizaro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Valenzuela, Sandro L.; Meneses, Claudio; Gil, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium paraputrificum is a gut microbiota member reported in several cases of bacteremia and coinfections. So far, only one genome sequence of a C. paraputrificum (AGR2156) isolate is available. Here, we present the draft genome of C. paraputrificum strain 373-A1, isolated from stools from a patient with C. difficile infection. PMID:27811092

  11. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium beijerinckii sequential culture: effect of feedstock particle size on gas production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fermentation of cellulosic biomass can be done in a single step with cellulolytic, solventogenic bacteria, such as Clostridium thermocellum. However, the suite of products is limited in consolidated bioprocessing. Fortunately, the thermophilic nature of C. thermocellum can be exploited in sequenti...

  12. Application of long sequence reads to improve genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7

    DOE PAGES

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Bayer, Edward A.; Borovok, Ilya; ...

    2016-09-29

    Here, we and others have shown the utility of long sequence reads to improve genome assembly quality. In this study, we generated PacBio DNA sequence data to improve the assemblies of draft genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7.

  13. First isolation of Clostridium indolis in a patient with chronic osteitis: a case report and literature review of human infections related to Clostridium saccharolyticum group species.

    PubMed

    Lotte, Romain; Lotte, Laurène; Bouvet, Philippe; Degand, Nicolas; Bal, Antonin; Carles, Michel; de Dompsure, Regis Bernard; Popoff, Michel-Robert; Ruimy, Raymond

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium indolis is an anaerobic spore-forming Gram-positive bacillus belonging to the Clostridium saccharolyticum group. Its clinical significance in human remains poorly known. We describe the first case of osteitis related to C. indolis, identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and provide a literature review of human infections related to C. saccharolyticum group species.

  14. Application of Long Sequence Reads To Improve Genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7.

    PubMed

    Utturkar, Sagar M; Bayer, Edward A; Borovok, Ilya; Lamed, Raphael; Hurt, Richard A; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn M; Elias, Dwayne; Zhou, Jizhong; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Brown, Steven D

    2016-09-29

    We and others have shown the utility of long sequence reads to improve genome assembly quality. In this study, we generated PacBio DNA sequence data to improve the assemblies of draft genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7.

  15. Application of Long Sequence Reads To Improve Genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7

    PubMed Central

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Bayer, Edward A.; Borovok, Ilya; Lamed, Raphael; Hurt, Richard A.; Land, Miriam L.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    We and others have shown the utility of long sequence reads to improve genome assembly quality. In this study, we generated PacBio DNA sequence data to improve the assemblies of draft genomes for Clostridium thermocellum AD2, Clostridium thermocellum LQRI, and Pelosinus fermentans R7. PMID:27688341

  16. Clostridium difficile associated infection, diarrhea and colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hookman, Perry; Barkin, Jamie S

    2009-01-01

    A new, hypervirulent strain of Clostridium difficile, called NAP1/BI/027, has been implicated in C. difficile outbreaks associated with increased morbidity and mortality since the early 2000s. The epidemic strain is resistant to fluoroquinolones in vitro, which was infrequent prior to 2001. The name of this strain reflects its characteristics, demonstrated by different typing methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (NAP1), restriction endonuclease analysis (BI) and polymerase chain reaction (027). In 2004 and 2005, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) emphasized that the risk of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is increased, not only by the usual factors, including antibiotic exposure, but also gastrointestinal surgery/manipulation, prolonged length of stay in a healthcare setting, serious underlying illness, immune-compromising conditions, and aging. Patients on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have an elevated risk, as do peripartum women and heart transplant recipients. Before 2002, toxic megacolon in C. difficile-associated colitis (CDAC), was rare, but its incidence has increased dramatically. Up to two-thirds of hospitalized patients may be infected with C. difficile. Asymptomatic carriers admitted to healthcare facilities can transmit the organism to other susceptible patients, thereby becoming vectors. Fulminant colitis is reported more frequently during outbreaks of C. difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). C. difficile infection with IBD carries a higher mortality than without underlying IBD. This article reviews the latest information on C. difficile infection, including presentation, vulnerable hosts and choice of antibiotics, alternative therapies, and probiotics and immunotherapy. We review contact precautions for patients with known or suspected C. difficile-associated disease. Healthcare institutions require accurate and rapid diagnosis for early detection of possible outbreaks, to initiate

  17. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea and colitis.

    PubMed

    Gerding, D N; Johnson, S; Peterson, L R; Mulligan, M E; Silva, J

    1995-08-01

    To review and summarize the status of diagnosis, epidemiology, infection control, and treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD). A case definition of CDAD should include the presence of symptoms (usually diarrhea) and at least one of the following positive tests: endoscopy revealing pseudomembranes, stool cytotoxicity test for toxin B, stool enzyme immunoassay for toxin A or B, or stool culture for C difficile (preferably with confirmation of organism toxicity if a direct stool toxin test is negative or not done). Testing of asymptomatic patients, including those who are asymptomatic after treatment, is not recommended other than for epidemiologic purposes. Lower gastrointestinal endoscopy is the only diagnostic test for pseudomembranous colitis, but it is expensive, invasive, and insensitive (51% to 55%) for the diagnosis of CDAD. Stool culture is the most sensitive laboratory test currently in clinical use, but it is not as specific as the cell cytotoxicity assay. C difficile is the most frequently identified cause of nosocomial diarrhea. The majority of C difficile infections are acquired nosocomially, and most patients remain asymptomatic following acquisition. Antimicrobial exposure is the greatest risk factor for patients, especially clindamycin, cephalosporins, and penicillins, although virtually every antimicrobial has been implicated. Cases of CDAD unassociated with prior antimicrobial or antineoplastic use are very rare. Hands of personnel, as well as a variety of environmental sites within institutions, have been found to be contaminated with C difficile, which can persist as spores for many months. Contaminated commodes, bathing tubs, and electronic thermometers have been implicated as sources of C difficile. Symptomatic and asymptomatic infected patients are the major reservoirs and sources for environmental contamination. Both genotypic and phenotypic typing systems for C difficile are available and have enhanced epidemiologic

  18. Biology and genomic analysis of Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Peck, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    The ability to form botulinum neurotoxin is restricted to six phylogenetically and physiologically distinct bacteria (Clostridium botulinum Groups I-IV and some strains of C. baratii and C. butyricum). The botulinum neurotoxin is the most potent toxin known, with as little as 30-100 ng potentially fatal, and is responsible for botulism, a severe neuroparalytic disease that affects humans, animals, and birds. In order to minimize the hazards presented by the botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia, it is necessary to extend understanding of the biology of these bacteria. Analyses of recently available genome sequences in conjunction with studies of bacterial physiology are beginning to reveal new and exciting information on the biology of these dangerous bacteria. At the whole organism level, substantial differences between the six botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia have been reported. For example, the genomes of proteolytic C. botulinum (C. botulinum Group I) and non-proteolytic C. botulinum (C. botulinum Group II) are highly diverged and show neither synteny nor homology. It has also emerged that the botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia are not overtly pathogenic (unlike C. difficile), but saprophytic bacteria that use the neurotoxin to kill a host and create a source of nutrients. One important feature that has contributed to the success of botulinum neurotoxin-forming clostridia is their ability to form highly resistant endospores. The spores, however, also present an opportunity to control these bacteria if escape from lag phase (and hence growth) can be prevented. This is dependent on extending understanding of the biology of these processes. Differences in the genetics and physiology of spore germination in proteolytic C. botulinum and non-proteolytic C. botulinum have been identified. The biological variability in lag phase and its stages has been described for individual spores, and it has been shown that various adverse treatments extend different

  19. Clostridium Difficile, Colitis, and Colonoscopy: Pediatric Perspective.

    PubMed

    McConnie, Randolph; Kastl, Arthur

    2017-08-01

    Review tests available for detection of Clostridium difficile (C. Diff) induced disease, including when such tests should be done in children and how they should be interpreted. Multiple tests are available for detecting disease due to C. diff. These include colonoscopy and stool analysis. Colonoscopy with biopsy is the most sensitive test for detecting the presence of colitis. The toxins produced by the C. diff. (toxin A, toxin B, and binary toxin) are the agents that cause injury and disease. Only toxin producing C. diff. Strains will cause disease. Binary toxin by itself is not thought to produce disease. Binary toxin causes disease in humans when present with toxin A and B producing bacteria, and has been implicated with fulminant life threatening disease. Stool analyses vary in sensitivity and specificity depending on the assay used. The presence of toxin producing strains of C diff. in the stool does not equate with disease. The presence of a toxin-producing bacteria or toxins (A or B) only equates with disease if diarrhea or a diseased colon (toxic megacolon, ileus, and sepsis) is present. Nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT), when used in the stool from patients with diarrhea, appears to be the most efficient study to detect the gene that encodes for toxin A and B and thus to diagnose C. diff.-induced disease. Infants have a high carriage rate of C. diff. and are believed not to develop disease from it or its toxins. Infants should not be tested for C. difficile. The NAAT is most specific when done on patients with diarrhea with liquid stools. Testing for C. difficile should only be done on patients with diarrhea. One can assume that a patient who has no diarrhea and is not ill does not have C. diff.-induced disease. Treatment should be limited to patients with diarrhea who test positive for C. diff. toxin (A or B) or toxin-producing bacteria. Direct testing for binary toxin is not commercially available. Binary toxin is only thought to cause disease

  20. Self-Administered Home Series Fecal "Minitransplants" for Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection on a Rectal Remnant.

    PubMed

    Popa, Daniel; Laszlo, Mihaela; Ciobanu, Lidia; Ucenic, Elena; Mihalache, Manuela; Pascu, Oliviu

    2015-12-01

    A fecal microbiota transplant has proved to be an extremely effective method for patients with recurrent infections with Clostridium difficile. We present the case of a 65-year-old female patient with multiple Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) relapses on the rectal remnant, post-colectomy for a CDI-related toxic megacolon. The patient also evidenced associated symptomatic Clostridium difficile vaginal infection. She was successfully treated with serial fecal "minitransplants" (self-administered at home) and metronidazole ovules.