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Sample records for clostridium sordellii infection

  1. The clinical spectrum of Clostridium sordellii bacteraemia: two case reports and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Abdulla, A.; Yee, L.

    2000-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii is rarely associated with disease in humans. Since its first report in 1922 only a few cases of bacteraemia have been reported. This report describes two cases of C sordellii bacteraemia; the oldest and youngest patients reported to date. The first, is a previously well 81 year old woman presented with perianal infection, which was later complicated by thrombosis of the aorta, and the second is a 12 year old boy with epilepsy who presented with an ear infection. These cases are also highlighted to demonstrate the wide spectrum of presentation of sordellii bacteraemia. Key Words: Clostridium sordellii • bacteraemia • aortic thrombosis • acute renal failure • renal cortical necrosis PMID:11041062

  2. Lethal Toxin is a Critical Determinant of Rapid Mortality in Rodent Models of Clostridium sordellii Endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yibai; Senn, Tennille; Opp, Judy; Young, Vincent B.; Thiele, Teri; Srinivas, Geetha; Huang, Steven K.; Aronoff, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The toxigenic anaerobe Clostridium sordellii is an uncommon but highly lethal cause of human infection and toxic shock syndrome, yet few studies have addressed its pathogenetic mechanisms. To better characterize the microbial determinants of rapid death from infection both in vitro and in vivo studies were performed to compare a clinical strain of C. sordellii strain (DA-108), isolated from a patient who survived a disseminated infection unaccompanied by toxic shock syndrome, to a virulent reference strain (ATCC9714). Rodent models of endometrial and peritoneal infection with C. sordellii ATCC9714 were rapidly lethal, while infections with DA-108 were not. Extensive genetic and functional comparisons of virulence factor and toxin expression between these two bacterial strains yielded many similarities, with the noted exception that strain DA-108 lacked the tcsL gene, which encodes the large clostridial glucosyltransferase enzyme lethal toxin (TcsL). The targeted removal by immunoprecipitation of TcsL protected animals from death following injection of crude culture supernatants from strain ATCC9714. Injections of a monoclonal anti-TcsL IgG protected animals from death during C. sordellii ATCC9714 infection, suggesting that such an approach might improve the treatment of patients with C. sordellii-induced toxic shock syndrome. PMID:19527792

  3. Clostridium sordellii as a Cause of Fatal Septic Shock in a Child with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beyers, Rebekah; Baldwin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii is a toxin producing ubiquitous gram-positive anaerobe, mainly associated with trauma, soft tissue skin infections, and gynecologic infection. We report a unique case of a new strain of Clostridium sordellii (not present in the Center for Disease Control (CDC) database) infection induced toxic shock syndrome in a previously healthy two-year-old male with colitis-related hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The patient presented with dehydration, vomiting, and bloody diarrhea. He was transferred to the pediatric critical care unit (PICU) for initiation of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Due to increased edema and intolerance of PD, he was transitioned to hemodialysis through a femoral vascular catheter. He subsequently developed severe septic shock with persistent leukocytosis and hypotension, resulting in subsequent death. Stool culture confirmed Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli 0157:H7. A blood culture was positively identified for Clostridium sordellii. Clostridium sordelli is rarely reported in children; to our knowledge this is the first case described in a pediatric patient with HUS. PMID:24891968

  4. Necrotic Enteritis in Chickens Associated with Clostridium sordellii.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Guillermo; Uzal, Francisco; Chin, R P; Palombo, Enzo A; Awad, Milena; Lyras, Dena; Shivaprasad, H L

    2015-09-01

    Three outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordelii were diagnosed in commercial broiler chicken flocks with 18,000 to 31,000 birds between 18 and 26 days old. Clinical signs in the affected flocks included high mortality up to 2% a day, depression, and diarrhea. The main gross changes included segmental dilation of the small intestine with watery contents, gas, mucoid exudate, and roughened and uneven mucosa, occasionally covered with a pseudomembrane. Microscopic lesions in the small intestine were characterized by extensive areas of coagulative necrosis of the villi, fibrinous exudate in the lumen, and high numbers of large, Gram-positive rods, occasionally containing subterminal spores, seen in the necrotic tissue and lumen. These rods were identified as C. sordellii by immunohistochemistry. Clostridium sordellii was isolated in an almost pure culture from the intestine of affected birds. A retrospective study of commercial broiler chicken and turkey submissions to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System revealed that C. sordellii had been isolated from intestinal lesions in outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease in 8 of 39 cases, 5 times together with Clostridium perfringens and 3 times alone. The latter three cases are reported here.

  5. Ulcerative enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordellii in quail.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Rocio; Franca, Monique; Shivaprasad, H L

    2013-09-01

    A natural outbreak of ulcerative enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordellii was diagnosed in two commercial quail flocks. Clinical signs in the quail included anorexia, weakness, and increased mortality in the flocks. Lesions in the intestine were characterized by ulcers covered with fibrinonecrotic exudate in the small intestine and occasional hemorrhages. There were also multifocal pale areas of necrosis in the liver. Clostridium sordellii was isolated from the intestine and liver. A retrospective study of avian cases submitted to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratories revealed that C. sordellii had been isolated in 45 avian submissions, most commonly in chickens and turkeys. In most of these cases the birds were diagnosed with necrotic enteritis, with or without hepatitis. Clostridium sordellii has occasionally been associated with gangrenous dermatitis in poultry, but this is the first report of enteritis in an avian species.

  6. Clostridium sordellii Lethal-Toxin Autoprocessing and Membrane Localization Activities Drive GTPase Glucosylation Profiles in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium sordellii infections cause gangrene and edema in humans and gastrointestinal infections in livestock. One of the principle virulence factors is TcsL, a large protein toxin which glucosylates host GTPases to cause cytopathic and cytotoxic effects. TcsL has two enzymatic domains, an N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain (GTD) and an autoprocessing domain responsible for release of the GTD within the cell. The GTD can then use its N-terminal membrane localization domain (MLD) for orientation on membranes and modification of GTPases. This study describes the use of conditionally immortalized murine pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells as a model for the study of TcsL functional activities. Point mutations that disrupt the glucosyltransferase, autoprocessing, or membrane localization activities were introduced into a recombinant version of TcsL, and the activities of these mutants were compared to those of wild-type toxin. We observed that all mutants are defective or impaired in cytotoxicity but differ in their modification of Rac1 and Ras. The data suggest a model where differences in GTPase localization dictate cellular responses to intoxication and highlight the importance of autoprocessing in the function of TcsL. IMPORTANCE Clostridium sordellii is a bacterium that can infect humans and cause serious disease and death. The principle virulence factor associated with clinical symptoms is a large protein toxin known as lethal toxin. The mechanism of lethal-toxin intoxication is assumed to be similar to that of the homologous toxins from C. difficile, but very few studies have been done in the context of endothelial cells, a relevant target in C. sordellii infections. This study was designed to test the role of the lethal-toxin enzymatic activities and membrane localization in endothelial cell toxicity and host substrate modification. PMID:27303685

  7. Development of ELISA based detection system for lethal toxin of Clostridium sordellii

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Preetika; Ponmariappan, S.; Singh, Lokendra; Kumar, Om

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Clostridium sordellii and its toxins are associated with diseases in animals as well as human. C. sordellii produces two protein toxins (lethal toxin and haemorrhagic toxin). Lethal toxin has gained more importance due its high toxicity. The present study was carried out to develop a sandwich ELISA for detection of lethal toxin of C. sordellii. Methods: The catalytic domain (1.6kb) of lethal toxin of C. sordellii was PCR amplified, cloned into pQE30 UA vector and transformed into Escherichia coli SG 13009. Expression conditions were optimized and the recombinant protein was purified under native condition using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography, confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Antibody was generated against the purified recombinant protein using Freund's complete and incomplete adjuvants (FCA and FIA) in BALB/c mice and rabbit. A sandwich ELISA was optimized for the detection of lethal toxin. Results: The maximum recombinant protein expression was achieved at 0.5 mM IPTG (isopropylthiogalactoside) induction 4.0 h of post-induction. The polyclonal antibody raised in mice and rabbit showed a titre up to 1:512000. The produced antibody was highly sensitive with the detection limit of 0.3 ng/ml of lethal toxin at 1:4000 dilutions of mice (capturing) and rabbit (revealing) antibody. Interpretation & conclusions: An ELISA based detection system was developed for the detection of lethal toxin of C. sordellii. The developed detection system was found to be specific as there was no cross-reactivity with any other clostridial toxins. It will be useful for the detection of lethal toxin of C. sordellii in clinical and environmental samples. PMID:23852299

  8. The Sialidase NanS Enhances Non-TcsL Mediated Cytotoxicity of Clostridium sordellii

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Milena M.; Singleton, Julie; Lyras, Dena

    2016-01-01

    The clostridia produce an arsenal of toxins to facilitate their survival within the host environment. TcsL is one of two major toxins produced by Clostridium sordellii, a human and animal pathogen, and is essential for disease pathogenesis of this bacterium. C. sordellii produces many other toxins, but the role that they play in disease is not known, although previous work has suggested that the sialidase enzyme NanS may be involved in the characteristic leukemoid reaction that occurs during severe disease. In this study we investigated the role of NanS in C. sordellii disease pathogenesis. We constructed a nanS mutant and showed that NanS is the only sialidase produced from C. sordellii strain ATCC9714 since sialidase activity could not be detected from the nanS mutant. Complementation with the wild-type gene restored sialidase production to the nanS mutant strain. Cytotoxicity assays using sialidase-enriched culture supernatants applied to gut (Caco2), vaginal (VK2), and cervical cell lines (End1/E6E7 and Ect1/E6E7) showed that NanS was not cytotoxic to these cells. However, the cytotoxic capacity of a toxin-enriched supernatant to the vaginal and cervical cell lines was substantially enhanced in the presence of NanS. TcsL was not the mediator of the observed cytotoxicity since supernatants harvested from a TcsL-deficient strain displayed similar cytotoxicity levels to TcsL-containing supernatants. This study suggests that NanS works synergistically with an unknown toxin or toxins to exacerbate C. sordellii-mediated tissue damage in the host. PMID:27322322

  9. Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin Kills Mice by Inducing a Major Increase in Lung Vascular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Geny, Blandine; Khun, Huot; Fitting, Catherine; Zarantonelli, Leticia; Mazuet, Christelle; Cayet, Nadège; Szatanik, Marek; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Huerre, Michel; Popoff, Michel R.

    2007-01-01

    When intraperitoneally injected into Swiss mice, Clostridium sordellii lethal toxin reproduces the fatal toxic shock syndrome observed in humans and animals after natural infection. This animal model was used to study the mechanism of lethal toxin-induced death. Histopathological and biochemical analyses identified lung and heart as preferential organs targeted by lethal toxin. Massive extravasation of blood fluid in the thoracic cage, resulting from an increase in lung vascular permeability, generated profound modifications such as animal dehydration, increase in hematocrit, hypoxia, and finally, cardiorespiratory failure. Vascular permeability increase induced by lethal toxin resulted from modifications of lung endothelial cells as evidenced by electron microscopy. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that VE-cadherin, a protein participating in intercellular adherens junctions, was redistributed from membrane to cytosol in lung endothelial cells. No major sign of lethal toxin-induced inflammation was observed that could participate in the toxic shock syndrome. The main effect of the lethal toxin is the glucosylation-dependent inactivation of small GTPases, in particular Rac, which is involved in actin polymerization occurring in vivo in lungs leading to E-cadherin junction destabilization. We conclude that the cells most susceptible to lethal toxin are lung vascular endothelial cells, the adherens junctions of which were altered after intoxication. PMID:17322384

  10. Metal Ion Activation of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium difficile Toxin B.

    PubMed

    Genth, Harald; Schelle, Ilona; Just, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Lethal Toxin from Clostridium sordellii (TcsL) and Toxin B from Clostridium difficile (TcdB) belong to the family of the "Large clostridial glycosylating toxins." These toxins mono-O-glucosylate low molecular weight GTPases of the Rho and Ras families by exploiting UDP-glucose as a hexose donor. TcsL is casually involved in the toxic shock syndrome and the gas gangrene. TcdB-together with Toxin A (TcdA)-is causative for the pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). Here, we present evidence for the in vitro metal ion activation of the glucosyltransferase and the UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity of TcsL and TcdB. The following rating is found for activation by divalent metal ions: Mn(2+) > Co(2+) > Mg(2+) > Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+). TcsL and TcdB thus require divalent metal ions providing an octahedral coordination sphere. The EC50 values for TcsL were estimated at about 28 µM for Mn(2+) and 180 µM for Mg(2+). TcsL and TcdB further require co-stimulation by monovalent K⁺ (not by Na⁺). Finally, prebound divalent metal ions were dispensible for the cytopathic effects of TcsL and TcdB, leading to the conclusion that TcsL and TcdB recruit intracellular metal ions for activation of the glucosyltransferase activity. With regard to the intracellular metal ion concentrations, TcsL and TcdB are most likely activated by K⁺ and Mg(2+) (rather than Mn(2+)) in mammalian target cells. PMID:27089365

  11. Clostridium Sordellii as an Uncommon Cause of Fatal Toxic Shock Syndrome in a Postpartum 33-Year-Old Asian Woman, and the Need for Antepartum Screening for This Clostridia Species in the General Female Population.

    PubMed

    Guzzetta, Melissa; Williamson, Alex; Duong, Scott

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium sordellii (C. sordellii) is an anaerobic gram-positive rod most commonly found in the soil and sewage but also as part of the normal flora of the gastrointestinal tract and vagina of a small percentage of healthy individuals. C. sordellii infection is considered to result from childbirth, abortion, and/or gynecological procedures. Although many strains of C. sordellii are nonpathogenic, virulent toxin-producing strains exist. Infection with this organism typically manifests as a patient experiencing septic shock rapidly followed by end-organ failure. Identification of C. sordelli has been successful by traditional culture, mass spectrometry methods, and via molecular methods. Herein, we present a fatal case of C. sordellii infection of a postpartum 33-year-old Asian woman. The organism was isolated by culture and identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) technology. With the advent of rapid detection methods, antepartum screening for the fatal Clostridium species should be implemented in the general female population. PMID:27371657

  12. Characterization and regulation of the NADP-linked 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene from Clostridium sordellii.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, J P; Hudson, L L; Adams, M J

    1994-01-01

    A bile acid-inducible NADP-linked 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (7 alpha-HSDH) from Clostridium sordellii ATCC 9714 was purified 310-fold by ion-exchange, gel filtration, and dye-ligand affinity chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the purified enzyme showed one predominant peptide band (30,000 Da). The N-terminal sequence was determined, and the corresponding oligonucleotides were synthesized and used to screen EcoRI and HindIII genomic digests of C. sordellii. Two separate fragments (4,500 bp, EcoRI; 3,200 bp, HindIII) were subsequently cloned by ligation to pUC19 and transformation into Escherichia coli DH5 alpha-MCR. The EcoRI fragment was shown to contain a truncated 7 alpha-HSDH gene, while the HindIII fragment contained the entire coding region. E. coli clones containing the HindIII insert expressed high levels of an NADP-linked 7 alpha-HSDH. Nucleotide sequence analyses suggest that the 7 alpha-HSDH is encoded by a monocistronic transcriptional unit, with DNA sequence elements resembling rho-independent terminators located in both the upstream and downstream flanking regions. The transcriptional start site was located by primer extension analysis. Northern (RNA) blot analysis indicated that induction is mediated at the transcriptional level in response to the presence of bile acid in the growth medium. In addition, growth-phase-dependent expression is observed in uninduced cultures. Analysis of the predicted protein sequence indicates that the enzyme can be classified in the short-chain dehydrogenase group. Images PMID:8050999

  13. Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heinlen, Latisha; Ballard, Jimmy D.

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in Europe and North America and is a serious re-emerging pathogen. Recent outbreaks have led to increasing morbidity and mortality and have been associated with a new strain (BI/NAP1/027) of C. difficile that produces more toxin than historical strains. With the increasing incidence of C. difficile infection, clinicians have also seen a change in the epidemiology with increased infections in previously low-risk populations. This chapter highlights the current knowledge on C. difficile virulence, human disease, epidemic outbreaks, and optimal treatment strategies. PMID:20697257

  14. Clostridium Difficile Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a bacterium that causes diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions such as colitis. Symptoms include Watery ... Nausea Abdominal pain or tenderness You might get C. difficile disease if you have an illness that ...

  15. Fidaxomicin: in Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sean T

    2011-12-24

    Fidaxomicin is a first-in-class macrocyclic antibacterial that primarily demonstrates activity against species of clostridia, predominantly Clostridium difficile, while having limited or no activity against normal faecal microflora. Fidaxomicin is minimally absorbed following oral administration and is excreted almost solely in the faeces. Fidaxomicin displayed a high level of antibacterial activity against C. difficile in vitro, with a minimum inhibitory concentration required to inhibit 90% of C. difficile strains of 0.125-0.5 μg/mL, and was ≈2- to 8-fold more active than vancomycin or metronidazole. Fidaxomicin demonstrated a prolonged postantibiotic effect against C. difficile relative to vancomycin and metronidazole. In two randomized, double-blind, phase III trials, oral fidaxomicin 200 mg every 12 hours for 10 days was no less effective than oral vancomycin 125 mg every 6 hours for 10 days in the treatment of C. difficile infection, based on noninferiority analyses of clinical cure rates (primary endpoint). Fidaxomicin therapy was associated with a significantly lower rate of recurrence, as well as a significantly higher rate of global cure (i.e. sustained clinical response; resolution of diarrhoea without recurrence) compared with vancomycin therapy in the two clinical trials. Fidaxomicin was generally well tolerated in patients with C. difficile infection, with a tolerability profile generally similar to that of vancomycin.

  16. The Challenge of Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Olson, David C; Scobey, Martin W

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is a major problem in the United States, resulting in significant morbidity, mortality, and financial costs to the health care system. This commentary provides an update regarding the epidemiology, diagnosis, current recommended management, and challenges surrounding C. difficile infection. PMID:27154892

  17. Clostridium difficile infection and fecal bacteriotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Indya; Shropshire, Kasheena; Ruel, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, also called "C. diff," is a gram-positive bacillus associated with nosocomial infections involving diarrhea, most often seen in developing countries. The severity of C. diff-associated diarrhea varies tremendously from mild and self-limiting to fulminant and life-threatening. C. diff has become an extremely important pathogen in community health but can be minimized with attention to proper hygiene. This article presents a case study regarding the treatment and management options of C. diff infection using a recent update of clinical guidelines for patient management.

  18. Blastocystis sp. Infection Mimicking Clostridium Difficile Colitis.

    PubMed

    Gil, Gaby S; Chaudhari, Shobhana; Shady, Ahmed; Caballes, Ana; Hong, Joe

    2016-01-01

    We report an unusual case of severe diarrhea related to Blastocystis sp. infection in a patient with end stage renal disease on hemodialysis. The patient was admitted due to profuse diarrhea associated with fever and leukocytosis. Pertinent stool work-up such as leukocytes in stool, stool culture, clostridium difficile toxin B PCR, and serology for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C and cytomegalovirus screening were all negative. Ova and parasite stool examination revealed Blastocystis sp. The patient was given intravenous metronidazole with clinical improvement by day three and total resolution of symptoms by day ten. PMID:27247810

  19. Antibodies for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have been demonstrated to be effective in the research and clinical environments. Early uncertainties about molecular and treatment modalities now appear to have converged upon the systemic dosing of mixtures of human IgG1. Although multiple examples of high-potency monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) exist, significant difficulties were initially encountered in their discovery. This minireview describes historical and contemporary MAbs and highlights differences between the most potent MAbs, which may offer insight into the pathogenesis and treatment of CDI. PMID:24789799

  20. Diagnostic pitfalls in Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Planche, Tim; Wilcox, Mark H

    2015-03-01

    Accurate diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is important not only for patient care but also for epidemiology and disease research. As it is not possible clinically to reliably differentiate CDI from other causes of health care-associated diarrhea, the laboratory confirmation of CDI is essential. Rapid commercial assays, including nucleic acid amplification tests and immunoassays for C difficile toxin and glutamate dehydrogenase, have largely superseded the use of older assays. Although assays that detect the presence of free C difficile toxin in feces are less frequently positive than tests for organism, they are preferable for the detection of CDI.

  1. Clostridium difficile infection in horses: a review.

    PubMed

    Diab, S S; Songer, G; Uzal, F A

    2013-11-29

    Clostridium difficile is considered one of the most important causes of diarrhea and enterocolitis in horses. Foals and adult horses are equally susceptible to the infection. The highly resistant spore of C. difficile is the infectious unit of transmission, which occurs primarily via the fecal-oral route, with sources of infection including equine feces, contaminated soil, animal hospitals, and feces of other animals. Two major risk factors for the development of C. difficile associated disease (CDAD) in adult horses are hospitalization and antimicrobial treatment, although sporadically, cases of CDAD can occur in horses that have not received antimicrobials or been hospitalized. The most common antibiotics associated with CDAD in horses are erythromycin, trimethoprim/sulfonamides, β-lactam antimicrobials, clindamycin, rifampicin, and gentamicin. Clinical signs and intestinal lesions of CDAD infection are not specific and they cannot be used to distinguish infections by C. difficile from infections by other agents, such as Clostridium perfringens or Salmonella sp. The distribution of lesions throughout the intestinal tract seems to be age-dependent. Small intestine is invariably affected, and colon and cecum may or may not have lesions in foals<1-month old. Naturally acquired disease in older foals and adult horses has a more aboral distribution, affecting colon and sometimes cecum, but rarely the small intestine. Detection of toxin A, toxin B or both in intestinal contents or feces is considered the most reliable diagnostic criterion for CDAD in horses. Isolation of toxigenic strains of C. difficile from horses with intestinal disease is highly suggestive of CDAD. A better understanding of pathogenesis, reservoirs of infection, and vaccines and other methods of control is needed. Also further studies are recommended to investigate other possible predisposing factors and/or etiological agents of enteric diseases of horses. PMID:23642413

  2. Tea and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Starley, Brad; Galagan, Jack Carl; Yabes, Joseph Michael; Evans, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Studies have shown effects of diet on gut microbiota. We aimed to identify foods associated with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Methods. In this cross-sectional survey, consecutive patients diagnosed with CDI were identified by electronic medical records. Colitis symptoms and positive Clostridium difficile assay were confirmed. Health-care onset-health-care facility associated CDI was excluded. Food surveys were mailed to 411 patients. Survey responses served as the primary outcome measure. Spearman's rank correlation identified risk factors for CDI recurrence. Results. Surveys were returned by 68 patients. Nineteen patients experienced CDI recurrence. Compared to patients without CDI recurrence, patients with CDI recurrence had more antibiotics prescribed preceding their infection (p = 0.003). Greater numbers of the latter also listed tea (p = 0.002), coffee (p = 0.013), and eggs (p = 0.013), on their 24-hour food recall. Logistic regression identified tea as the only food risk factor for CDI recurrence (adjusted OR: 5.71; 95% CI: 1.26–25.89). Conclusion. The present results indicate a possible association between tea and CDI recurrence. Additional studies are needed to characterize and confirm this association. PMID:27651790

  3. Tea and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Oman Evans Ii, Martin; Starley, Brad; Galagan, Jack Carl; Yabes, Joseph Michael; Evans, Sara; Salama, Joseph John

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Studies have shown effects of diet on gut microbiota. We aimed to identify foods associated with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Methods. In this cross-sectional survey, consecutive patients diagnosed with CDI were identified by electronic medical records. Colitis symptoms and positive Clostridium difficile assay were confirmed. Health-care onset-health-care facility associated CDI was excluded. Food surveys were mailed to 411 patients. Survey responses served as the primary outcome measure. Spearman's rank correlation identified risk factors for CDI recurrence. Results. Surveys were returned by 68 patients. Nineteen patients experienced CDI recurrence. Compared to patients without CDI recurrence, patients with CDI recurrence had more antibiotics prescribed preceding their infection (p = 0.003). Greater numbers of the latter also listed tea (p = 0.002), coffee (p = 0.013), and eggs (p = 0.013), on their 24-hour food recall. Logistic regression identified tea as the only food risk factor for CDI recurrence (adjusted OR: 5.71; 95% CI: 1.26-25.89). Conclusion. The present results indicate a possible association between tea and CDI recurrence. Additional studies are needed to characterize and confirm this association.

  4. Tea and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Oman Evans Ii, Martin; Starley, Brad; Galagan, Jack Carl; Yabes, Joseph Michael; Evans, Sara; Salama, Joseph John

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Studies have shown effects of diet on gut microbiota. We aimed to identify foods associated with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Methods. In this cross-sectional survey, consecutive patients diagnosed with CDI were identified by electronic medical records. Colitis symptoms and positive Clostridium difficile assay were confirmed. Health-care onset-health-care facility associated CDI was excluded. Food surveys were mailed to 411 patients. Survey responses served as the primary outcome measure. Spearman's rank correlation identified risk factors for CDI recurrence. Results. Surveys were returned by 68 patients. Nineteen patients experienced CDI recurrence. Compared to patients without CDI recurrence, patients with CDI recurrence had more antibiotics prescribed preceding their infection (p = 0.003). Greater numbers of the latter also listed tea (p = 0.002), coffee (p = 0.013), and eggs (p = 0.013), on their 24-hour food recall. Logistic regression identified tea as the only food risk factor for CDI recurrence (adjusted OR: 5.71; 95% CI: 1.26-25.89). Conclusion. The present results indicate a possible association between tea and CDI recurrence. Additional studies are needed to characterize and confirm this association. PMID:27651790

  5. Tea and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Starley, Brad; Galagan, Jack Carl; Yabes, Joseph Michael; Evans, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Studies have shown effects of diet on gut microbiota. We aimed to identify foods associated with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Methods. In this cross-sectional survey, consecutive patients diagnosed with CDI were identified by electronic medical records. Colitis symptoms and positive Clostridium difficile assay were confirmed. Health-care onset-health-care facility associated CDI was excluded. Food surveys were mailed to 411 patients. Survey responses served as the primary outcome measure. Spearman's rank correlation identified risk factors for CDI recurrence. Results. Surveys were returned by 68 patients. Nineteen patients experienced CDI recurrence. Compared to patients without CDI recurrence, patients with CDI recurrence had more antibiotics prescribed preceding their infection (p = 0.003). Greater numbers of the latter also listed tea (p = 0.002), coffee (p = 0.013), and eggs (p = 0.013), on their 24-hour food recall. Logistic regression identified tea as the only food risk factor for CDI recurrence (adjusted OR: 5.71; 95% CI: 1.26–25.89). Conclusion. The present results indicate a possible association between tea and CDI recurrence. Additional studies are needed to characterize and confirm this association.

  6. Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection With Probiotics.

    PubMed

    Evans, Charlesnika T; Johnson, Stuart

    2015-05-15

    Despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and prevention efforts to reduce the spread of C. difficile, CDI remains a significant challenge to healthcare systems worldwide. Further advances in prevention of CDI may need to focus on those who continue to be exposed to the organism and who are susceptible. Interventions directed toward this susceptible population, particularly hospitalized patients who receive antibiotics, may be effective. There is moderate evidence on the effectiveness of probiotics to prevent primary CDI, but there are few data to support use in secondary prevention of recurrent CDI. This review discusses the literature available on the use of probiotics to prevent primary and secondary CDI.

  7. [New aspects on Clostridium difficile infection].

    PubMed

    von Müller, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a frequent and complex disease which is influenced by the repertoire of bacterial virulence factors, by host immunity and by the intestinal microbiome. These complex interaction opens a number of options which may be used for treatment in the future. One example for new treatment options is fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). Driven by C. difficile related research activities the knowledge of protective microorganism is increasing and it may be assumed that bacteriotherapy by next-generation probiotics may be used very soon also for other diseases. Very often, CDI reflects to the clinician that antibiotic therapy is associated with side effects. Therefore, C. difficile is the guilty conscience which helps to implement targeted and restrictive antibiotic use in the daily practice. PMID:27509341

  8. Flooding and Clostridium difficile infection: a case-crossover analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospttalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community­ associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more ...

  9. The Changing Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, J.; Bauer, M. P.; Baines, S. D.; Corver, J.; Fawley, W. N.; Goorhuis, B.; Kuijper, E. J.; Wilcox, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed dramatically during this millennium. Infection rates have increased markedly in most countries with detailed surveillance data. There have been clear changes in the clinical presentation, response to treatment, and outcome of CDI. These changes have been driven to a major degree by the emergence and epidemic spread of a novel strain, known as PCR ribotype 027 (sometimes referred to as BI/NAP1/027). We review the evidence for the changing epidemiology, clinical virulence and outcome of treatment of CDI, and the similarities and differences between data from various countries and continents. Community-acquired CDI has also emerged, although the evidence for this as a distinct new entity is less clear. There are new data on the etiology of and potential risk factors for CDI; controversial issues include specific antimicrobial agents, gastric acid suppressants, potential animal and food sources of C. difficile, and the effect of the use of alcohol-based hand hygiene agents. PMID:20610822

  10. Fecal microbiota transplantation in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Austin, Matthew; Mellow, Mark; Tierney, William M

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, Clostridium difficile infections have become more frequent, more severe, more refractory to standard treatment, and more likely to recur. Current antibiotic treatment regimens for Clostridium difficile infection alter the normal gut flora, which provide colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile. Over the past few years, there has been a marked increase in the knowledge of the gut microbiota and its role in health maintenance and disease causation. This has, fortuitously, coincided with the use of a unique microbial replacement therapy, fecal microbiota transplantation, in the treatment of patients with multiple recurrent Clostridium difficile infections. We briefly review current knowledge of the gut microbiota's functions. We then review the indications for use of fecal microbiota transplantation in Clostridium difficile infection, the techniques employed, and results of treatment. Fecal microbiota transplantation has been shown to be efficacious for patients with multiply recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (reported cure rates of 90%), with an excellent short-term safety profile, and has been included in the American College of Gastroenterology treatment guidelines for this troublesome disease.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of endemic Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed Central

    Fawley, W. N.; Wilcox, M. H.

    2001-01-01

    This is the first study to provide a comprehensive insight into the molecular epidemiology of endemic Clostridium difficile and particularly that associated with a recently recognized epidemic strain. We DNA fingerprinted all C. difficile isolates from the stools of patients with symptomatic antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and from repeated samples of the inanimate ward environment on two elderly medicine hospital wards over a 22-month period. Notably, C. difficile was not recoverable from either ward immediately before opening, but was found on both wards within 1-3 weeks of opening, and the level of environmental contamination rose markedly during the first 6 months of the study period. C. difficile infection (CDI) incidence data correlated significantly with the prevalence of environmental C. difficile on ward B (r = 0.76, P < 0.05) but not on ward A (r = 0.26, P > 0.05). We found that RAPD and RS-PCR typing had similar discriminatory power, although, despite fingerprinting over 200 C. difficile isolates, we identified only six distinct types. Only two distinct C. difficile strains were identified as causing both patient infection and ward contamination. Attempts to determine whether infected patients or contaminated environments are the prime source for cross-infection by C. difficile had limited success, as over 90% of C. difficile isolates were the UK epidemic clone. However, a non-epidemic strain caused a cluster of six cases of CDI, but was only isolated from the environment after the sixth patient became symptomatic. The initial absence of this strain from the environment implies patient-to-patient and/or staff-to-patient spread. In general, routine cleaning with detergent was unsuccessful at removing C. difficile from the environment. Understanding the epidemiology and virulence of prevalent strains is important if CDI is to be successfully controlled. PMID:11467790

  12. Clostridium difficile associated infection, diarrhea and colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hookman, Perry; Barkin, Jamie S

    2009-01-01

    A new, hypervirulent strain of Clostridium difficile, called NAP1/BI/027, has been implicated in C. difficile outbreaks associated with increased morbidity and mortality since the early 2000s. The epidemic strain is resistant to fluoroquinolones in vitro, which was infrequent prior to 2001. The name of this strain reflects its characteristics, demonstrated by different typing methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (NAP1), restriction endonuclease analysis (BI) and polymerase chain reaction (027). In 2004 and 2005, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) emphasized that the risk of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) is increased, not only by the usual factors, including antibiotic exposure, but also gastrointestinal surgery/manipulation, prolonged length of stay in a healthcare setting, serious underlying illness, immune-compromising conditions, and aging. Patients on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have an elevated risk, as do peripartum women and heart transplant recipients. Before 2002, toxic megacolon in C. difficile-associated colitis (CDAC), was rare, but its incidence has increased dramatically. Up to two-thirds of hospitalized patients may be infected with C. difficile. Asymptomatic carriers admitted to healthcare facilities can transmit the organism to other susceptible patients, thereby becoming vectors. Fulminant colitis is reported more frequently during outbreaks of C. difficile infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). C. difficile infection with IBD carries a higher mortality than without underlying IBD. This article reviews the latest information on C. difficile infection, including presentation, vulnerable hosts and choice of antibiotics, alternative therapies, and probiotics and immunotherapy. We review contact precautions for patients with known or suspected C. difficile-associated disease. Healthcare institutions require accurate and rapid diagnosis for early detection of possible outbreaks, to initiate

  13. Models for the study of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Best, Emma L; Freeman, Jane; Wilcox, Mark H

    2012-01-01

    Models of Clostridium difficile infection (C. difficile) have been used extensively for Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) research. The hamster model of C. difficile infection has been most extensively employed for the study of C. difficile and this has been used in many different areas of research, including the induction of C. difficile, the testing of new treatments, population dynamics and characterization of virulence. Investigations using in vitro models for C. difficile introduced the concept of colonization resistance, evaluated the role of antibiotics in C. difficile development, explored population dynamics and have been useful in the evaluation of C. difficile treatments. Experiments using models have major advantages over clinical studies and have been indispensible in furthering C. difficile research. It is important for future study programs to carefully consider the approach to use and therefore be better placed to inform the design and interpretation of clinical studies. PMID:22555466

  14. Fecal microbiota transplantation for the management of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Rao, Krishna; Young, Vincent B

    2015-03-01

    This article discusses the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The disruption of the normal gut microbiota is central to the pathogenesis of CDI, and disruption persists in recurrent disease. The use of FMT for recurrent CDI is characterized by a high response rate and short term safety is excellent, although the long-term effects of FMT are as yet unknown.

  15. Treatment of Clostridium difficile infection: recent trial results

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Sarah S; Anderson, Deverick J

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of infection worldwide and is associated with increasing morbidity and mortality in vulnerable patient populations. Metronidazole and oral vancomycin are the currently recommended therapies for the treatment of C. difficile infection (CDI) but are associated with unacceptably high rates of disease recurrence. Novel therapies for the treatment of CDI and prevention of recurrent CDI are urgently needed. Important developments in the treatment of CDI are currently underway and include: novel antibacterial agents with narrower antimicrobial spectra of activity, manipulation of the gut microbiota and enhancement of the host antibody immune response. PMID:25525499

  16. Community-Acquired Clostridium Difficile Infection: Awareness and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Juneau, Cheryl; Mendias, Elnora (Nonie) P.; Wagal, Nihas; Loeffelholz, Michael; Savidge, Tor; Croisant, Sharon; Dann, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is changing. CDI, usually depicted as a nosocomial infection in the elderly, is now occurring in community-dwelling persons who are younger and otherwise dissimilar. A more virulent isolate (North American Pulsed Field type 1 (NAP1) associated with increased morbidity and mortality, has been identified. In 2005, similar strains were associated with severe disease in community-dwelling patients at a rate of 7.6/100,000. Screening patients with potential CDI symptoms and implementing preventative measures, including judicious use of antibiotics, can reduce disease burden. PMID:23814528

  17. Clostridium difficile Infection in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, David J.; Dubberke, Erik R.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is becoming more common worldwide. The morbidity and mortality associated with C. difficile is also increasing at an alarming rate. Critically ill patients are at particularly high risk for this disease due to the prevalence of multiple risk factors in the patient population. Treatment of C. difficile continues to be a difficult problem in patients with severe or recurrent disease. This article seeks to provide a broad understanding of CDI in the intensive care unit, with special emphasis on risk factor identification, treatment options, and disease prevention. PMID:19665092

  18. Optimizing the Laboratory Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, Peter H

    2015-06-01

    The best laboratory diagnostic approach to detect Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the subject of ongoing debate. In the United States, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) have become the most widely used tests for making this diagnosis. Detection of toxin in stool may be a better predictor of CDI disease and severity. Laboratories that have switched from toxin-based to NAAT-based methods have significantly higher CDI detection rates. The important issue is whether all NAAT-positive patients have CDI or at least some of those patients are excretors of the organism and do not have clinical disease.

  19. Flooding and Clostridium difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cynthia J.; Wade, Timothy J.; Hilborn, Elizabeth D.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospitalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community-associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more commonly reported. A case-crossover study was used to assess emergency room (ER) and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection following flood events in Massachusetts from 2003 through 2007. Exposure status was based on whether or not a flood occurred prior to the case/control date during the following risk periods: 0–6 days, 7–13 days, 14–20 days, and 21–27 days. Fixed-effects logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of diagnosis with C. difficile infection following a flood. There were 129 flood events and 1575 diagnoses of C. difficile infection. Among working age adults (19–64 years), ER and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection were elevated during the 7–13 days following a flood (Odds Ratio, OR = 1.69; 95% Confidence Interval, CI: 0.84, 3.37). This association was more substantial among males (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.01–10.19). Associations during other risk periods were not observed (p < 0.05). Although we were unable to differentiate community-associated versus nosocomial infections, a potential increase in C. difficile infections should be considered as more flooding is projected due to climate change. PMID:26090609

  20. Flooding and Clostridium difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cynthia J; Wade, Timothy J; Hilborn, Elizabeth D

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water. It often causes acute gastrointestinal illness in older adults who are hospitalized and/or receiving antibiotics; however, community-associated infections affecting otherwise healthy individuals have become more commonly reported. A case-crossover study was used to assess emergency room (ER) and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection following flood events in Massachusetts from 2003 through 2007. Exposure status was based on whether or not a flood occurred prior to the case/control date during the following risk periods: 0-6 days, 7-13 days, 14-20 days, and 21-27 days. Fixed-effects logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of diagnosis with C. difficile infection following a flood. There were 129 flood events and 1575 diagnoses of C. difficile infection. Among working age adults (19-64 years), ER and outpatient visits for C. difficile infection were elevated during the 7-13 days following a flood (Odds Ratio, OR = 1.69; 95% Confidence Interval, CI: 0.84, 3.37). This association was more substantial among males (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.01-10.19). Associations during other risk periods were not observed (p < 0.05). Although we were unable to differentiate community-associated versus nosocomial infections, a potential increase in C. difficile infections should be considered as more flooding is projected due to climate change.

  1. Fidaxomicin in Clostridium difficile infection: latest evidence and clinical guidance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has risen 400% in the last decade. It currently ranks as the third most common nosocomial infection. CDI has now crossed over as a community-acquired infection. The major failing of current therapeutic options for the management of CDI is recurrence of disease after the completion of treatment. Fidaxomicin has been proven to be superior to vancomycin in successful sustained clinical response to therapy. Improved outcomes may be due to reduced collateral damage to the gut microflora by fidaxomicin, bactericidal activity, inhibition of Clostridial toxin formation and inhibition of new sporulation. This superiority is maintained in groups previously reported as being at high risk for CDI recurrence including those: with relapsed infection after a single treatment course; on concomitant antibiotic therapy; aged >65 years; with cancer; and with chronic renal insufficiency. Because the acquisition cost of fidaxomicin far exceeds that of metronidazole or vancomycin, in order to rationally utilize this agent, it should be targeted to those populations who are at high risk for relapse and in whom the drug has demonstrated superiority. In this manuscript is reviewed the changing epidemiology of CDI, current treatment options for this infection, proposed benefits of fidaxomicin over currently available antimicrobial options, available analysis of cost effectiveness of the drug, and is given recommendations for judicious use of the drug based upon the available published literature. PMID:24587892

  2. Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection: From Colonization to Cure

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Kelsey; Araujo-Castillo, Roger V.; Theethira, Thimmaiah G.; Alonso, Carolyn D.; Kelly, Ciaran

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is increasingly prevalent, dangerous and challenging to prevent and manage. Despite intense national and international attention the incidence of primary and of recurrent CDI (PCDI and RCDI, respectively) have risen rapidly throughout the past decade. Of major concern is the increase in cases of RCDI resulting in substantial morbidity, morality and economic burden. RCDI management remains challenging as there is no uniformly effective therapy, no firm consensus on optimal treatment, and reliable data regarding RCDI-specific treatment options is scant. Novel therapeutic strategies are critically needed to rapidly, accurately, and effectively identify and treat patients with, or at-risk for, RCDI. In this review we consider the factors implicated in the epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of RCDI, evaluate current management options for RCDI and explore novel and emerging therapies. PMID:25930686

  3. Comparative analysis of different methods to detect Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, Adriana; Buttrini, Mirko; Martinelli, Monica; Gorrini, Chiara; Montecchini, Sara; Medici, Maria Cristina; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora; Covan, Silvia; Chezzi, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The increased incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection, particularly in North America and Europe, have brought renewed focus on the most appropriate method to detect C. difficile and/or its toxins in stools. This prospective study evaluated the usefulness of the Illumigene TM C. difficile assay in diagnostic practice for the detection of toxigenic C. difficile DNA in clinical samples. A total of 88 out of 306 stool samples analysed were positive both by Illumigene and the combination of toxigenic C. difficile culture (TC) and immunochromatographic assay (IC) with a concordance of 100%. Of the 218 samples negative by the combination of TC and IC, 204 were negative also by Illumigene with a concordance of 93.57%. In our experience, compared to conventional assays Illumigene assay proved to be easy to perform, accurate and prompt giving results within 1 hour at a cost of 28 euro per sample. PMID:23435816

  4. Clostridium Difficile Infection and Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: Is There a Relation?

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Inayat, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Context: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) mimics acute coronary syndrome and is accompanied by reversible left ventricular apical ballooning in the absence of angiographically significant coronary artery stenosis. It is a transient condition that typically precedes physical or emotional triggers. Case Report: We describe the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented to our institution with symptomatic Clostridium difficile infection. 24 hours after admission, the patient complained of severe, retrosternal chest pain. Electrocardiogram showed diffuse elevation of ST-segment in the chest leads; however, coronary angiography demonstrated normal coronary arteries. Therein, an echocardiography was performed, which revealed apical ballooning and hypercontractile base with global left ventricular hypokinesis. These features were consistent with TCM. The patient was managed conservatively. Repeat echocardiogram 2 weeks later showed resolution of heart failure. Conclusion: To our research, this is the first report of TCM caused by C. difficile infection. Clinicians involved in the care of patients with C. difficile infection must be aware of this complication and should consider TCM in those who develop atypical chest pain. PMID:27583241

  5. Advances in the Microbiome: Applications to Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Culligan, Eamonn P.; Sleator, Roy D.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing over 400,000 infections and approximately 29,000 deaths in the United States alone each year. C. difficile is the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in the developed world, and, in recent years, the emergence of hyper-virulent (mainly ribotypes 027 and 078, sometimes characterised by increased toxin production), epidemic strains and an increase in the number of community-acquired infections has caused further concern. Antibiotic therapy with metronidazole, vancomycin or fidaxomicin is the primary treatment for C. difficile infection (CDI). However, CDI is unique, in that, antibiotic use is also a major risk factor for acquiring CDI or recurrent CDI due to disruption of the normal gut microbiota. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative, non-antibiotic therapeutics to treat or prevent CDI. Here, we review a number of such potential treatments which have emerged from advances in the field of microbiome research. PMID:27657145

  6. Advances in the Microbiome: Applications to Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Culligan, Eamonn P; Sleator, Roy D

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing over 400,000 infections and approximately 29,000 deaths in the United States alone each year. C. difficile is the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in the developed world, and, in recent years, the emergence of hyper-virulent (mainly ribotypes 027 and 078, sometimes characterised by increased toxin production), epidemic strains and an increase in the number of community-acquired infections has caused further concern. Antibiotic therapy with metronidazole, vancomycin or fidaxomicin is the primary treatment for C. difficile infection (CDI). However, CDI is unique, in that, antibiotic use is also a major risk factor for acquiring CDI or recurrent CDI due to disruption of the normal gut microbiota. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative, non-antibiotic therapeutics to treat or prevent CDI. Here, we review a number of such potential treatments which have emerged from advances in the field of microbiome research. PMID:27657145

  7. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... potency using the toxin-neutralization test provided in this paragraph. (1) When used in this test, the... antitoxin content of the rabbit serums shall be determined by the serum neutralization test as follows: (i....0 Lo doses of Standard Toxin die, the results of the serum neutralization test are inconclusive...

  8. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... potency using the toxin-neutralization test provided in this paragraph. (1) When used in this test, the... antitoxin content of the rabbit serums shall be determined by the serum neutralization test as follows: (i....0 Lo doses of Standard Toxin die, the results of the serum neutralization test are inconclusive...

  9. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... potency using the toxin-neutralization test provided in this paragraph. (1) When used in this test, the... antitoxin content of the rabbit serums shall be determined by the serum neutralization test as follows: (i....0 Lo doses of Standard Toxin die, the results of the serum neutralization test are inconclusive...

  10. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... potency using the toxin-neutralization test provided in this paragraph. (1) When used in this test, the... antitoxin content of the rabbit serums shall be determined by the serum neutralization test as follows: (i....0 Lo doses of Standard Toxin die, the results of the serum neutralization test are inconclusive...

  11. 9 CFR 113.109 - Clostridium Sordellii Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... potency using the toxin-neutralization test provided in this paragraph. (1) When used in this test, the... antitoxin content of the rabbit serums shall be determined by the serum neutralization test as follows: (i....0 Lo doses of Standard Toxin die, the results of the serum neutralization test are inconclusive...

  12. Using a Novel Lysin To Help Control Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiong; Euler, Chad W.; Delaune, Aurelia

    2015-01-01

    As a consequence of excessive antibiotic therapies in hospitalized patients, Clostridium difficile, a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming intestinal pathogen, is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea and colitis. Drug treatments for these diseases are often complicated by antibiotic-resistant strains and a high frequency of treatment failures and relapse; therefore, novel nonantibiotic approaches may prove to be more effective. In this study, we recombinantly expressed a prophage lysin identified from a C. difficile strain, CD630, which we named PlyCD. PlyCD was found to have lytic activity against specific C. difficile strains. However, the recombinantly expressed catalytic domain of this protein, PlyCD1–174, displayed significantly greater lytic activity (>4-log kill) and a broader lytic spectrum against C. difficile strains while still retaining a high degree of specificity toward C. difficile versus commensal clostridia and other bacterial species. Our data also indicated that noneffective doses of vancomycin and PlyCD1–174 when combined in vitro could be significantly more bactericidal against C. difficile. In an ex vivo treatment model of mouse colon infection, we found that PlyCD1–174 functioned in the presence of intestinal contents, significantly decreasing colonizing C. difficile compared to controls. Together, these data suggest that PlyCD1–174 has potential as a novel therapeutic for clinical application against C. difficile infection, either alone or in combination with other preexisting treatments to improve their efficacy. PMID:26392484

  13. The Systemic Inflammatory Response to Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Krishna; Erb-Downward, John R.; Walk, Seth T.; Micic, Dejan; Falkowski, Nicole; Santhosh, Kavitha; Mogle, Jill A.; Ring, Cathrin; Young, Vincent B.; Huffnagle, Gary B.; Aronoff, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The systemic inflammatory response to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is incompletely defined, particularly for patients with severe disease. Methods Analysis of 315 blood samples from 78 inpatients with CDI (cases), 100 inpatients with diarrhea without CDI (inpatient controls), and 137 asymptomatic outpatient controls without CDI was performed. Serum or plasma was obtained from subjects at the time of CDI testing or shortly thereafter. Severe cases had intensive care unit admission, colectomy, or death due to CDI within 30 days after diagnosis. Thirty different circulating inflammatory mediators were quantified using an antibody-linked bead array. Principal component analysis (PCA), multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), and logistic regression were used for analysis. Results Based on MANOVA, cases had a significantly different inflammatory profile from outpatient controls but not from inpatient controls. In logistic regression, only chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5) levels were associated with cases vs. inpatient controls. Several mediators were associated with cases vs. outpatient controls, especially hepatocyte growth factor, CCL5, and epithelial growth factor (inversely associated). Eight cases were severe and associated with elevations in IL-8, IL-6, and eotaxin. Conclusions A broad systemic inflammatory response occurs during CDI and severe cases appear to differ from non-severe infections. PMID:24643077

  14. Clostridium difficile infection: a review of current and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ofosu, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) is the most common cause of ­healthcare-associated infections in US hospitals. The epidemic strain NAP1/BI/ribotype 027 accounts for outbreaks worldwide, with increasing mortality and severity. CDI is acquired from an endogenous source or from spores in the environment, most easily acquired during the hospital stay. The use of antimicrobials disrupts the intestinal microflora enabling C. difficile to proliferate in the colon and produce toxins. Clinical diagnosis in symptomatic patients requires toxin detection from stool specimens and rarely in combination with stool culture to increase sensitivity. However, stool culture is essential for epidemiological studies. Oral metronidazole is the recommended therapy for milder cases of CDI and oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for more severe cases. Treatment of first recurrence involves the use of the same therapy used in the initial CDI. In the event of a second recurrence oral vancomycin often given in a tapered dose or intermittently, or fidaxomicin may be used. Fecal transplantation is playing an immense role in therapy of recurrent CDI with remarkable results. Fulminant colitis and toxic megacolon warrant surgical intervention. Novel approaches including new antibiotics and immunotherapy against CDI or its toxins appear to be of potential value. PMID:27065726

  15. Clostridium difficile infection: epidemiology, diagnosis and understanding transmission.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica S H; Monaghan, Tanya M; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) continues to affect patients in hospitals and communities worldwide. The spectrum of clinical disease ranges from mild diarrhoea to toxic megacolon, colonic perforation and death. However, this bacterium might also be carried asymptomatically in the gut, potentially leading to 'silent' onward transmission. Modern technologies, such as whole-genome sequencing and multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis, are helping to track C. difficile transmission across health-care facilities, countries and continents, offering the potential to illuminate previously under-recognized sources of infection. These typing strategies have also demonstrated heterogeneity in terms of CDI incidence and strain types reflecting different stages of epidemic spread. However, comparison of CDI epidemiology, particularly between countries, is challenging due to wide-ranging approaches to sampling and testing. Diagnostic strategies for C. difficile are complicated both by the wide range of bacterial targets and tests available and the need to differentiate between toxin-producing and non-toxigenic strains. Multistep diagnostic algorithms have been recommended to improve sensitivity and specificity. In this Review, we describe the latest advances in the understanding of C. difficile epidemiology, transmission and diagnosis, and discuss the effect of these developments on the clinical management of CDI. PMID:26956066

  16. Fecal microbiota transplantation for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Rao, Krishna; Safdar, Nasia

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, a major cause of healthcare-associated diarrhea due to perturbation of the normal gastrointestinal microbiome, is responsible for significant morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditures. The incidence and severity of C difficile infection (CDI) is increasing, and recurrent disease is common. Recurrent infection can be difficult to manage with conventional antibiotic therapy. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), which involves instillation of stool from a healthy donor into the gastrointestinal tract of the patient, restores the gut microbiome to a healthy state. FMT has emerged as a promising new treatment for CDI. There are limited data on FMT for treatment of primary CDI, but FMT appears safe and effective for recurrent CDI. The safety and efficacy of FMT in patients with severe primary or severe recurrent CDI has not been established. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who undergo FMT for CDI may be at increased risk of IBD flare, and caution should be exercised with use of FMT in that population. The long-term safety of FMT is unknown; thus, rigorously conducted prospective studies are needed.

  17. Outbreak of Clostridium difficile Infections at an Outpatient Hemodialysis Facility—Michigan, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    See, Isaac; Bagchi, Suparna; Booth, Stephanie; Scholz, Daniel; Geller, Andrew I.; Anderson, Lydia; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Finks, Jennie L.; Kelley, Karen; Gould, Carolyn V.; Patel, Priti R.

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of an outbreak of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) at a hemodialysis facility revealed evidence that limited intra-facility transmission occurred despite adherence to published infection control standards for dialysis clinics. Outpatient dialysis facilities should consider CDI prevention, including environmental disinfection for C. difficile, when formulating their infection control plans. PMID:25913501

  18. Life-threatening clostridial infections.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Dennis L; Aldape, Michael J; Bryant, Amy E

    2012-04-01

    Life-threatening soft tissue infections caused by Clostridium species have been described in the medical literature for hundreds of years largely because of their fulminant nature, distinctive clinical presentations and complex management issues. The Clostridium species perfringens, septicum and histolyticum are the principal causes of trauma-associated gas gangrene and their incidence increases dramatically in times of war, hurricanes, earthquakes and other mass casualty conditions. Recently, there has also been an increased incidence of spontaneous gas gangrene caused by Clostridium septicum in association with gastrointestinal abnormalities and neutropenia. Similarly, over the last 15 years there has been increased recognition of a toxic shock-like syndrome associated with Clostridium sordellii in individuals skin-popping black tar heroin, in women undergoing childbirth or other gynecologic procedures including medically-induced abortion. Like their cousins Clostridium tetanus and Clostridium botulinum, the pathogenesis of these clostridial infections is largely the consequence of potent exotoxin production. Strategies to inhibit toxin production, neutralize circulating toxins and prevent their interaction with cells of the innate immune response are sorely needed. Recent studies have elucidated novel targets that may hold promise for newer therapeutic modalities.

  19. The potential for emerging therapeutic options for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Harsh; Rea, Mary C; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is mainly a nosocomial pathogen and is a significant cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. It is also implicated in the majority of cases of pseudomembranous colitis. Recently, advancements in next generation sequencing technology (NGS) have highlighted the extent of damage to the gut microbiota caused by broad-spectrum antibiotics, often resulting in C. difficile infection (CDI). Currently the treatment of choice for CDI involves the use of metronidazole and vancomycin. However, recurrence and relapse of CDI, even after rounds of metronidazole/vancomycin administration is a problem that must be addressed. The efficacy of alternative antibiotics such as fidaxomicin, rifaximin, nitazoxanide, ramoplanin and tigecycline, as well as faecal microbiota transplantation has been assessed and some have yielded positive outcomes against C. difficile. Some bacteriocins have also shown promising effects against C. difficile in recent years. In light of this, the potential for emerging treatment options and efficacy of anti-C. difficile vaccines are discussed in this review. PMID:25564777

  20. Clostridium difficile infection in a French university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Khanafer, Nagham; Oltra, Luc; Hulin, Monique; Dauwalder, Olivier; Vandenesch, Francois; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed with an increase in incidence and severity. Prospective surveillance was therefore implemented in a French university hospital to monitor the characteristics of patients at risk and to recognize local trends. Between 2007 and 2014, all hospitalized patients (≥18 years) with CDI were included. During the survey, the mean incidence rate of CDI was 2.9 per 10,000 hospital-days. In all, 590 patients were included. Most of the episodes were healthcare-associated (76.1%). The remaining cases were community-acquired (18.1%) and unknown (5.9%). The comparison with healthcare-associated cases showed that the community-acquired group had a lower rate of antimicrobial exposure (P < 0.001), proton pump inhibitor (P < 0.001), and immunosuppressive drugs (P = 0.02). Over the study period, death occurred in 61 patients (10.3%), with 18 (29.5%) being related to CDI according to the physician in charge of the patient. Active surveillance of CDI is required to obtain an accurate picture of the real dimensions of CDI. PMID:27281101

  1. Survey of Clostridium difficile infection surveillance systems in Europe, 2011.

    PubMed

    Kola, Axel; Wiuff, Camilla; Akerlund, Thomas; van Benthem, Birgit H; Coignard, Bruno; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Weitzel-Kage, Doris; Suetens, Carl; Wilcox, Mark H; Kuijper, Ed J; Gastmeier, Petra

    2016-07-21

    To develop a European surveillance protocol for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), existing national CDI surveillance systems were assessed in 2011. A web-based electronic form was provided for all national coordinators of the European CDI Surveillance Network (ECDIS-Net). Of 35 national coordinators approached, 33 from 31 European countries replied. Surveillance of CDI was in place in 14 of the 31 countries, comprising 18 different nationwide systems. Three of 14 countries with CDI surveillance used public health notification of cases as the route of reporting, and in another three, reporting was limited to public health notification of cases of severe CDI. The CDI definitions published by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) were widely used, but there were differing definitions to distinguish between community- and healthcare-associated cases. All CDI surveillance systems except one reported annual national CDI rates (calculated as number of cases per patient-days). Only four surveillance systems regularly integrated microbiological data (typing and susceptibility testing results). Surveillance methods varied considerably between countries, which emphasises the need for a harmonised European protocol to allow consistent monitoring of the CDI epidemiology at European level. The results of this survey were used to develop a harmonised EU-wide hospital-based CDI surveillance protocol. PMID:27469420

  2. A review of the economics of treating Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Mergenhagen, Kari A; Wojciechowski, Amy L; Paladino, Joseph A

    2014-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a costly result of antibiotic use, responsible for an estimated 14,000 deaths annually in the USA according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Annual costs attributable to CDI are in excess of $US 1 billion. This review summarizes appropriate utilization of prevention and treatment methods for CDI that have the potential to reduce the economic and humanistic costs of the disease. Some cost-effective strategies to prevent CDI include screening and isolation of hospital admissions based on C. difficile carriage to reduce transmission in the inpatient setting, and probiotics, which are potentially efficacious in preventing CDI in the appropriate patient population. The most extensively studied agents for treatment of CDI are metronidazole, vancomycin, and fidaxomicin. Most economic comparisons between metronidazole and vancomycin favor vancomycin, especially with the emergence of metronidazole-resistant C. difficile strains. Metronidazole can only be recommended for mild disease. Moderate to severe CDI should be treated with vancomycin, preferably the compounded oral solution, which provides the most cost-effective therapeutic option. Fidaxomicin offers a clinically effective and potentially cost-effective alternative for treating moderate CDI in patients who do not have the NAP1/BI/027 strain of C. difficile. Probiotics and fecal microbiota transplant have variable efficacy and the US FDA does not currently regulate the content; the potential economic advantages of these treatment modalities are currently unknown.

  3. The potential for emerging therapeutic options for Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Harsh; Rea, Mary C; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is mainly a nosocomial pathogen and is a significant cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. It is also implicated in the majority of cases of pseudomembranous colitis. Recently, advancements in next generation sequencing technology (NGS) have highlighted the extent of damage to the gut microbiota caused by broad-spectrum antibiotics, often resulting in C. difficile infection (CDI). Currently the treatment of choice for CDI involves the use of metronidazole and vancomycin. However, recurrence and relapse of CDI, even after rounds of metronidazole/vancomycin administration is a problem that must be addressed. The efficacy of alternative antibiotics such as fidaxomicin, rifaximin, nitazoxanide, ramoplanin and tigecycline, as well as faecal microbiota transplantation has been assessed and some have yielded positive outcomes against C. difficile. Some bacteriocins have also shown promising effects against C. difficile in recent years. In light of this, the potential for emerging treatment options and efficacy of anti-C. difficile vaccines are discussed in this review. PMID:25564777

  4. Human Clostridium difficile infection: altered mucus production and composition

    PubMed Central

    Engevik, Melinda A.; Yacyshyn, Mary Beth; Engevik, Kristen A.; Wang, Jiang; Darien, Benjamin; Hassett, Daniel J.; Yacyshyn, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of antibiotic-induced diarrhea is caused by Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). Hospitalizations for C. difficile infection (CDI) have tripled in the last decade, emphasizing the need to better understand how the organism colonizes the intestine and maintain infection. The mucus provides an interface for bacterial-host interactions and changes in intestinal mucus have been linked host health. To assess mucus production and composition in healthy and CDI patients, the main mucins MUC1 and MUC2 and mucus oligosaccharides were examined. Compared with healthy subjects, CDI patients demonstrated decreased MUC2 with no changes in surface MUC1. Although MUC1 did not change at the level of the epithelia, MUC1 was the primary constituent of secreted mucus in CDI patients. CDI mucus also exhibited decreased N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), increased N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), and increased terminal galactose residues. Increased galactose in CDI specimens is of particular interest since terminal galactose sugars are known as C. difficile toxin A receptor in animals. In vitro, C. difficile is capable of metabolizing fucose, mannose, galactose, GlcNAc, and GalNAc for growth under healthy stool conditions (low Na+ concentration, pH 6.0). Injection of C. difficile into human intestinal organoids (HIOs) demonstrated that C. difficile alone is sufficient to reduce MUC2 production but is not capable of altering host mucus oligosaccharide composition. We also demonstrate that C. difficile binds preferentially to mucus extracted from CDI patients compared with healthy subjects. Our results provide insight into a mechanism of C. difficile colonization and may provide novel target(s) for the development of alternative therapeutic agents. PMID:25552581

  5. A bundle strategy including patient hand hygiene to decrease clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Pokrywka, Marian; Feigel, Jody; Douglas, Barbara; Grossberger, Susan; Hensler, Amelia; Hensler, Amelia; Weber, David

    2014-01-01

    Prevention strategies for Clostridium difficile infection traditionally have addressed barrier precautions, environmental disinfection, and health care worker hand hygiene. When applied as a bundle, this approach has been used widely as an evidence-based strategy to prevent hospital-acquired C. difficile infection. Expanding the bundle to include patient hand hygiene is a nurse-driven approach to prevent C. difficile transmission.

  6. Treatment of relapsing Clostridium difficile infection using fecal microbiota transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rahul; Enuh, Hill Ambrose; Patel, Anish; Wickremesinghe, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has become a global concern over the last decade. In the United States, CDI escalated in incidence from 1996 to 2005 from 31 to 64/100,000. In 2010, there were 500,000 cases of CDI with an estimated mortality up to 20,000 cases a year. The significance of this problem is evident from the hospital costs of over 3 billion dollars annually. Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) was first described in 1958 and since then about 500 cases have been published in literature in various small series and case reports. This procedure has been reported mainly from centers outside of the United States and acceptance of the practice has been difficult. Recently the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) labeled FMT as a biological drug; as a result, guidelines will soon be required to help establish it as a mainstream treatment. More US experience needs to be reported to popularize this procedure here and form guidelines. Method We did a retrospective review of our series of patients with relapsing CDI who were treated with FMT over a 3-year period. We present our experience with FMT at a community hospital as a retrospective review and describe our procedure. Results There were a total of 12 patients who underwent FMT for relapsing C. difficile. Only one patient failed to respond and required a second FMT. There were no complications associated with the transplant and all patients had resolution of symptoms within 48 hours of FMT. Conclusion FMT is a cheap, easily available, effective therapy for recurrent CDI; it can be safely performed in a community hospital setting with similar results. PMID:24421645

  7. Role of Microbiota and Innate Immunity in Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bibbò, Stefano; Lopetuso, Loris Riccardo; Ianiro, Gianluca; Di Rienzo, Teresa; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection represents a burdensome clinical issue whose epidemiology is increasing worldwide. The pathogenesis is not yet completely known. Recent observations suggest that the alteration of the intestinal microbiota and impaired innate immunity may play a leading role in the development of recurrent infection. Various factors can cause dysbiosis. The causes most involved in the process are antibiotics, NSAIDs, acid suppressing therapies, and age. Gut microbiota impairment can favor Clostridium difficile infection through several mechanisms, such as the alteration of fermentative metabolism (especially SCFAs), the alteration of bile acid metabolism, and the imbalance of antimicrobial substances production. These factors alter the intestinal homeostasis promoting the development of an ecological niche for Clostridium difficile and of the modulation of immune response. Moreover, the intestinal dysbiosis can promote a proinflammatory environment, whereas Clostridium difficile itself modulates the innate immunity through both toxin-dependent and toxin-independent mechanisms. In this narrative review, we discuss how the intestinal microbiota modifications and the modulation of innate immune response can lead to and exacerbate Clostridium difficile infection. PMID:24995345

  8. Virulence factors of Clostridium difficile and their role during infection.

    PubMed

    Janoir, Claire

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is the prominent etiological agent of healthcare-associated diarrhea. The disease symptoms range from mild diarrhea to life-threatening pseudomembranous colitis. The main risk factor for developing an infection after contamination by the resistant spores is the disruption of the gut microbiota, allowing the spores to germinate. The colonization of the gut is likely to be governed by the bacterial resistance to the host response and the bacterial adhesion to the mucosa. To date, several putative adhesins have been identified, most of them displaying MSCRAMM function, and studies of adhesin mutants have clearly underlined the multi-factorial feature of C. difficile adhesion to the host. Flagella have also been involved in the colonisation process, but their role depends on the tested strains. The clinical signs are mainly due to two large glucosylating toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which are essential for the disease manifestations. The importance of each toxin differs according to strains and experimental conditions, but TcdB seems to be the prominent one, as showed by mutant studies and the natural occurrence of pathogenic strains that do not produce TcdA. The role of the ADP ribosylating binary toxin expressed by some strains, including epidemic lineages, is not clearly established, although it has been related to higher morbidity and mortality. Production of low level of the glucosylating toxins and of the binary toxin seems to promote adhesion to host cells. Expression of the tcdA and tcdB genes is under the control of the second messenger c-di-GMP. This is also the case for other virulence factors, in particular for flagellar, pili type IV and some adhesin genes. Indeed, several studies using knock-out mutants suggest that C. difficile may undergo a switch between the adhesion phenotype and the motility phenotype during the course of infection, regulated by the c-di-GMP intracellular level. In vivo, this could result in biofilm formation that

  9. Clostridium infection (jisizheng) in yaks in Qinghai, China.

    PubMed

    Changqing, Q; Xueli, Y

    2001-10-01

    Since the mid-1980s, outbreaks of a disease characterized by a sudden onset, acute deaths and extensive haemorrhages in the viscera and digestive tract of yaks have been prevalent in Qilian, Qinghai, China. The disease is known as jisiheng by local people. Virulent Clostridium perfringens type A and Clostridium haemolytica were isolated from yaks that had died of jisizheng. In 1996 and 1997, yaks were immunized with a polyvalent inactivated vaccine against C. perfringens and with an inactivated vaccine against C. haemolyticum, and this prevented the occurrence of jisizheng. PMID:11583378

  10. Outcome of ICU patients with Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction As data from Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in intensive care unit (ICU) are still scarce, our objectives were to assess the morbidity and mortality of ICU-acquired CDI. Methods We compared patients with ICU-acquired CDI (watery or unformed stools occurring ≥ 72 hours after ICU admission with a stool sample positive for C. difficile toxin A or B) with two groups of controls hospitalized at the same time in the same unit. The first control group comprised patients with ICU-acquired diarrhea occurring ≥ 72 hours after ICU admission with a stool sample negative for C. difficile and for toxin A or B. The second group comprised patients without any diarrhea. Results Among 5,260 patients, 512 patients developed one episode of diarrhea. Among them, 69 (13.5%) had a CDI; 10 (14.5%) of them were community-acquired, contrasting with 12 (17.4%) that were hospital-acquired and 47 (68%) that were ICU-acquired. A pseudomembranous colitis was associated in 24/47 (51%) ICU patients. The median delay between diagnosis and metronidazole administration was one day (25th Quartile; 75th Quartile (0; 2) days). The case-fatality rate for patients with ICU-acquired CDI was 10/47 (21.5%), as compared to 112/443 (25.3%) for patients with negative tests. Neither the crude mortality (cause specific hazard ratio; CSHR = 0.70, 95% confidence interval; CI 0.36 to 1.35, P = 0.3) nor the adjusted mortality to confounding variables (CSHR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.4 to 1.64, P = 0.6) were significantly different between CDI patients and diarrheic patients without CDI. Compared to the general ICU population, neither the crude mortality (SHR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.34 to 1.21, P = 0.17), nor the mortality adjusted to confounding variables (CSHR = 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38 to 1.35, P = 0.3), were significantly different between the two groups. The estimated increase in the duration of stay due to CDI was 8.0 days ± 9.3 days, (P = 0.4) in comparison to the diarrheic population

  11. Concurrent infection with Clostridium and Plasmodium in a captive king penguin Aptenodytes patagonicus.

    PubMed

    Penrith, M L; Huchzermeyer, F W; De Wet, S C; Penrith, M J

    1994-06-01

    Concurrent infection with Plasmodium relictum and Clostridium perfringens Type B was diagnosed in a king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) that died in the National Zoological Gardens, Pretoria. Macro- and microscopic pathological changes were mainly due to C. perfringens. The relative significance of the two pathogens is discussed. PMID:18671104

  12. State Law Mandates for Reporting of Healthcare-Associated Clostridium difficile Infections in Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Julie; Herzig, Carolyn T.A.; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Dick, Andrew W.; Stone, Patricia W.; Divya Srinath, JD

    2015-01-01

    US state and territorial laws were reviewed to identify Clostridium difficile infection reporting mandates. Twenty states require reporting either under state law or by incorporating federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' reporting requirements. Although state law mandates are more common, the incorporation of federal reporting requirements has been increasing. PMID:25695178

  13. Contamination of the Hospital Environment From Potential Clostridium difficile Excretors Without Active Infection.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Jason S; Patel, Amita; Otter, Jonathan A; van Kleef, Esther; Goldenberg, Simon D

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile was recovered from 33 (34%) of 98 rooms of patients who were excretors compared with 36 (49%) of 73 rooms of patients with active infection. Not all laboratory algorithms can distinguish between these 2 groups, yet both may be a significant source for ongoing transmission.

  14. State law mandates for reporting of healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infections in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Julie; Herzig, Carolyn T A; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Dick, Andrew W; Stone, Patricia W; Divya Srinath, Jd

    2015-03-01

    US state and territorial laws were reviewed to identify Clostridium difficile infection reporting mandates. Twenty states require reporting either under state law or by incorporating federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' reporting requirements. Although state law mandates are more common, the incorporation of federal reporting requirements has been increasing.

  15. Overdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection in the Molecular Test Era

    PubMed Central

    Polage, Christopher R.; Gyorke, Clare E.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Leslie, Jhansi L.; Chin, David L.; Wang, Susan; Nguyen, Hien H.; Huang, Bin; Tang, Yi-Wei; Lee, Lenora W.; Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra; Romano, Patrick S.; Panacek, Edward A.; Goodell, Parker B.; Solnick, Jay V.; Cohen, Stuart H.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Clostridium difficile is a major cause of health care–associated infection, but disagreement between diagnostic tests is an ongoing barrier to clinical decision making and public health reporting. Molecular tests are increasingly used to diagnose C difficile infection (CDI), but many molecular test-positive patients lack toxins that historically defined disease, making it unclear if they need treatment. OBJECTIVE To determine the natural history and need for treatment of patients who are toxin immunoassay negative and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive (Tox−/PCR+) for CDI. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective observational cohort study at a single academic medical center among 1416 hospitalized adults tested for C difficile toxins 72 hours or longer after admission between December 1, 2010, and October 20, 2012. The analysis was conducted in stages with revisions from April 27, 2013, to January 13, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Patients undergoing C difficile testing were grouped by US Food and Drug Administration–approved toxin and PCR tests as Tox+/PCR+, Tox−/PCR+, or Tox−/PCR−. Toxin results were reported clinically. Polymerase chain reaction results were not reported. The main study outcomes were duration of diarrhea during up to 14 days of treatment, rate of CDI-related complications (ie, colectomy, megacolon, or intensive care unit care) and CDI-related death within 30 days. RESULTS Twenty-one percent (293 of 1416) of hospitalized adults tested for C difficile were positive by PCR, but 44.7% (131 of 293) had toxins detected by the clinical toxin test. At baseline, Tox−/PCR+ patients had lower C difficile bacterial load and less antibiotic exposure, fecal inflammation, and diarrhea than Tox+/PCR+ patients (P < .001 for all). The median duration of diarrhea was shorter in Tox−/PCR+ patients (2 days; interquartile range, 1-4 days) than in Tox+/PCR+ patients (3 days; interquartile range, 1-6 days) (P = .003) and was

  16. Proton Pump Inhibitors and Clostridium Difficile Infection: Are We Propagating an Already Rapidly Growing Healthcare Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rashmee; Blankenship, LeAnn

    2013-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been associated with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in several recent studies. The exact mechanism through which PPIs may cause Clostridium difficile infection is not well understood. One potential mechanism to explain this association may be that elevated gastric pH levels facilitate the growth of potentially pathogenic upper and lower gastrointestinal tract flora. Although Clostridium difficile spores are acid resistant, vegetative forms are susceptible to acidity. Higher gastric PH therefore increases vegetative bacteria counts in the small and large intestine. Other potential mechanisms include impairment of leukocytes and other immune responses and antimicrobial properties of PPIs. In recent years, much research has been contributed to prove the relationship between PPIs and CDI as causal. Most studies however, fail to prove causality due to the use of antibiotics and other medications during time of initial diagnosis of CDI. PPIs continue to also be one of the most heavily prescribed drugs in our country. As primary and recurrent infection caused by Clostridium difficile continues to rise, more data must be collected to determine better treatment, overall management, and the role that PPIs may play in its propagation.

  17. [Recent epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in Japan].

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a major pathogen for diarrhea in hospitalized patients and because of outbreak of highly virulent strain in EU and US, increased length of hospital stay and increased numbers of severe patients and deaths have become major challenges. In recent years, transmissions through community-acquired or food-borne infections are reported. National surveillance has been already performed overseas. Guidelines for preventing C. difficile infection (CDI) is available, and education activities are promoted for preventing the infection spread. Meanwhile, in Japan, medical hospitals are reporting individual CDI incidence, however, a large-scale research has not been conducted up to the present date and therefore the entire status of CDI including infection of the highly virulent strain has yet to be revealed. This time, we performed a questionnaire-based survey at 2,537 hospitals nationwide between April 15, 2013 and May 31, 2013 to investigate CDI incidence, diagnosis and treatment. Valid responses were obtained from 321 hospitals. Regarding the annual number of CDI patients at all the hospitals, the highest group of hospitals responding "1 to 5 patients a year" was 17.8%, and the second highest group of hospitals responding "no patients a year" was 13.1%. In contrast, there was a group of hospitals with "more than 101 patients a year", which was 3.1%. This indicates that there was the difference in the CDI incidences among hospitals. According to the questionnaire results, a highest group of hospitals responding "0-20%" for CDI patients with serious complication such as toxic megacolon, gastrointestinal perforation, ileus paralytic, bacteremia, sepsis, crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis was 62.6%, and for CDI patients with recurrence more than one, a group of hospitals answering "0 to 20%" was 56.4%, which was the highest. This suggested that there was only a small number of serious CDI patients and recurrence CDI patients in Japan

  18. Probiotics and Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea and Clostridium difficile Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surawicz, Christina M.

    Diarrhea is a common side effect of antibiotics. Antibiotics can cause diarrhea in 5-25% of individuals who take them but its occurrence is unpredictable. Diarrhea due to antibiotics is called antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Diarrhea may be mild and resolve when antibiotics are discontinued, or it may be more severe. The most severe form of AAD is caused by overgrowth of Clostridium difficile which can cause severe diarrhea, colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, or even fatal toxic megacolon. Rates of diarrhea vary with the specific antibiotic as well as with the individual susceptibility.

  19. The potential of probiotics to prevent Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Allen, Stephen J

    2015-03-01

    Exposure to antibiotics is the major risk factor for Clostridium difficile diarrhea (CDD), suggesting that impairment of colonization resistance due to depletion of the gut flora is a significant underlying disease susceptibility factor. Many properties of probiotic organisms indicate that they may be able to replenish the depleted gut flora and restore colonization resistance. However, despite numerous clinical trials, the evidence base for probiotics in the prevention of CDD remains weak. A recent large trial of a multistrain, high-dose probiotic did not show clear evidence of efficacy. The role of probiotics in the prevention of CDD remains unclear.

  20. Antibiotic therapy and Clostridium difficile infection – primum non nocere – first do no harm

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Grace S; Wilcox, Mark H

    2015-01-01

    Treatment options for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remain limited despite this usually nosocomial infection posing an urgent threat to public health. A major paradox of the management of CDI is the use of antimicrobial agents to treat infection, which runs the risk of prolonged gut microbiota perturbation and so recurrence of infection. Here, we explore alternative CDI treatment and prevention options currently available or in development. Notably, strategies that aim to reduce the negative effects of antibiotics on gut microbiota offer the potential to alter current antimicrobial stewardship approaches to preventing CDI. PMID:26396535

  1. [Fecal microbiota transplantation, a novel therapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection].

    PubMed

    Terveer, E M; van Beurden, Y H; Kuijper, E J; Keller, J J

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is caused by a disturbance of the gut microbiota, often resulting from the use of antibiotics. Among a sub group of patients with this disorder, treatment with antibiotics is not effective. They develop a chronic, recurrent infection. Such patients can be treated with a fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), or fecal transplantation. The crucial steps for safe application of fecal transplantation are central donor selection and screening. To optimise safety and to guarantee the availability of donor feces for fecal transplantation, the Nederlandse Donor Feces Bank (Dutch Donor Feces Bank) was established. At this facility, ready-to-use, screened donor feces can be ordered for patients with (recurrent) Clostridium difficile infections, who can then be treated at their own hospital. PMID:27643493

  2. [Septic shock due to a community acquired Clostridium difficile infection. A case study and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bermejo, C; Maseda, E; Salgado, P; Gabilondo, G; Gilsanz, F

    2014-04-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection has changed in the past decade. The incidence rate of community acquired cases has increased in patients with no typical risk factors. We present a patient who was diagnosed with community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection who presented with acute abdominal pain, and subsequently developed acute renal failure and septic shock. We describe the diagnosis, treatment and outcome and brief review of the literature.

  3. A quality committee's evaluation of surgical intervention for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Vasaly, Fran White; Reines, David

    2009-08-01

    Clostridium difficile (C diff) is an anaerobic bacterium that causes antibiotic-associated colitis, which can progress to a life-threatening illness for some patients. Clostridium difficile is highly transmissible in health care settings and has high morbidity and mortality rates. The increased prevalence of this bacterium and the consequences of infection necessitate an understanding of its transmission and use of stringent infection control practices. A two-year retrospective evaluation was performed to examine the effectiveness of a screening tool for patients requiring surgical intervention for C diff and to determine whether treatment was timely and effective. Early, aggressive surgical intervention appears to bel the single most effective treatment for fulminant C diff colitis.

  4. Risk Factors and Outcomes for Bloodstream Infections Secondary to Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Alessandro; Iraci, Federica; Carfagna, Paolo; Goldoni, Paola; Vullo, Vincenzo; Venditti, Mario

    2015-01-01

    We determined the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of bloodstream infections (BSI) subsequent to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We performed a retrospective study of all patients with definite diagnosis of CDI admitted from January 2014 to December 2014 in two large hospitals in Rome. Two groups of patients were analyzed: those with CDI and subsequent BSI (CDI/BSI+) and those with CDI and no evidence of primary BSI (CDI/BSI−). Data about clinical features, microbiology, treatments, and mortality were obtained. Overall, 393 cases of CDI were included in the final analysis: 72 developed a primary nosocomial BSI, while 321 had CDI without microbiological and clinical evidence of BSI. Etiologic agents of BSI were Candida species (47.3%), Enterobacteriaceae (19.4%), enterococci (13.9%), and mixed infections (19.4%). In multivariate analysis, ribotype 027 status (odds ratio [OR], 6.5), CDI recurrence (OR, 5.5), severe CDI infection (OR, 8.3), and oral vancomycin at >500 mg/day (OR, 3.1) were recognized as factors independently associated with the development of nosocomial BSI. Thirty-day mortality from CDI diagnosis was higher for patients of the CDI/BSI+ group than for the controls (38.9 versus 13.1%; P < 0.001). Among patients of the CDI/BSI+ group, mortality attributable to primary BSI was as high as 57%. Our findings suggest that severe CDI is complicated by the development of nosocomial BSI. Candida species and enteric bacteria appear to be the leading causative pathogens and are associated with poor outcomes. PMID:26482315

  5. Microbiome manipulation with faecal microbiome transplantation as a therapeutic strategy in Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Mullish, B H; Marchesi, J R; Thursz, M R; Williams, H R T

    2015-05-01

    Faecal microbiome transplantation (FMT) has generated huge recent interest as it presents a potential solution to a significant clinical problem--the increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). In the short term, however, there remain many practical questions regarding its use, including the optimal selection of donors, material preparation and the mechanics of delivery. In the longer term, enhanced understanding of the mechanisms of action of FMT may potentiate novel therapies, such as targeted manipulation of the microbiome in CDI and beyond.

  6. Clostridium welchii and Bacillus cereus infection and intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Betty C.

    1974-01-01

    Clostridium welchii type A is a common agent of food poisoning when allowed to proliferate to large numbers in cooked foods, usually meat and poultry. The main factors of importance are survival of the spores, frequently found on raw products, through the cooking process, and possible contamination of cooked meats transferred to unclean containers; subsequent germination of spores and rapid multiplication of the vegetative cells during long slow cooling and non-refrigerated storage lead to heavy contamination. The toxin responsible is different from the soluble antigens, and its formation in the intestine is associated with sporulation. Large numbers of Cl. welchii of the same serological types in food and faeces is the main diagnostic factor. Important preventive measures are rapid cooling and cold storage to prevent growth. Bacillus cereus is an aerobic sporulating organism commonly found in cereals. Outbreaks described from Europe have a different aetiology with regard to food vehicles, incubation period and symptoms from those that have been reported recently in the U.K. from fried and boiled rice. The spores survive through cooking procedures and grow out to cells which sporulate readily in the cooked food and which are assumed to produce toxin in the food. Large numbers of B. cereus are found in foods causing illness and, as with Cl. welchii, the main preventive measure is inhibition of growth by quick cooling and cold storage of foods cooked ahead of requirements. A comparative table of the characteristics and clinical symptoms of Cl. welchii and B. cereus is given. PMID:4377580

  7. Fecal microbiota transplantation via nasogastric tube for recurrent clostridium difficile infection in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kronman, Matthew P; Nielson, Heather J; Adler, Amanda L; Giefer, Matthew J; Wahbeh, Ghassan; Singh, Namita; Zerr, Danielle M; Suskind, David L

    2015-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a safe and effective therapy for adults with recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis, but data regarding FMT in children are limited and focus on colonoscopic administration of FMT. We present 10 consecutive children who received FMT via nasogastric tube for treatment of recurrent C difficile infection. Median age was 5.4 years, and 30% were receiving simultaneous immunosuppression. Median follow-up was 44 days, and 90% of patients resolved their C difficile infection; one patient relapsed 2 months later after receiving antibiotics. FMT via nasogastric tube appears safe, well tolerated, and effective in treating pediatric recurrent C difficile colitis.

  8. Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Clostridium Difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Meera B.; Avila, Nathaniel P.; Dupont, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has become the most frequently reported health care-associated infection in the United States [1]. As the incidence of CDI rises, so too does the burden it produces on health care and society. In an attempt to decrease the burden of CDI and provide the best outcomes for patients affected by CDI, there have been many recent advancements in the understanding, diagnosis, and management of CDI. In this article, we review the current recommendations regarding CDI testing and treatment strategies.

  9. Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Clostridium Difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Meera B.; Avila, Nathaniel P.; Dupont, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has become the most frequently reported health care-associated infection in the United States [1]. As the incidence of CDI rises, so too does the burden it produces on health care and society. In an attempt to decrease the burden of CDI and provide the best outcomes for patients affected by CDI, there have been many recent advancements in the understanding, diagnosis, and management of CDI. In this article, we review the current recommendations regarding CDI testing and treatment strategies. PMID:26918176

  10. Impact of sink location on hand hygiene compliance for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Zellmer, Caroline; Blakney, Rebekah; Van Hoof, Sarah; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-04-01

    Hand hygiene with soap and water after the care of a patient with Clostridium difficile infection is essential to reduce nosocomial transmission in an outbreak situation. Factors that may pose barriers to user completion of infection prevention measures, such as hand hygiene, are of interest. We undertook a quantitative study to evaluate the relationship between sink location and compliance with handwashing among health care workers and visitors in a surgical transplant unit. We found that placement of 2 more easily visible sinks in a surgical transplant unit was associated with improved adherence to handwashing. PMID:25704256

  11. Role of obesity and adipose tissue-derived cytokine leptin during Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Madan, Rajat; Petri, William A

    2015-08-01

    Obesity is among the most pressing health concerns in the world since it is increasingly common even in the developing world, and is clearly associated with increased risk for chronic debilitating diseases and death. Furthermore, obesity can influence the pathogenesis of infectious diseases by affecting the balance of pathogen clearance and pathological inflammation. The mechanisms that result in enhanced inflammation in obese individuals are poorly understood. Clostridium difficile is a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Recent studies have shown that obesity is associated with increased risk of C. difficile infections. In this review, we will discuss our current knowledge of the role of obesity in determining risk of C. difficile infections, and focus on the role of the adipose tissue-derived cytokine leptin in C. difficile infections.

  12. BACTERIOCIN E1073 PRODUCED BY ENTEROCOCCUS FAECIUM LWP1073 IS EFFECTIVE FOR TREATING COMMENSAL CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS INFECTION IN BROILERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterotoxin-producing Clostridium perfringens type A bacteria occupy a significant place in the etiological structure of food-borne infections in humans. One potential approach to minimize infections associated with food-borne pathogens is to control the carriage of C. perfringens in broilers. For ...

  13. An In Vitro Model of the Human Colon: Studies of Intestinal Biofilms and Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Grace S; Wilcox, Mark H; Chilton, Caroline H

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro gut model is an invaluable research tool to study indigenous gut microbiota communities, the behavior of pathogenic organisms, and the therapeutic and adverse effect of antimicrobial administration on these communities. The model has been validated against the intestinal contents of sudden death victims to reflect the physicochemical and microbiological conditions of the proximal to distal colon, and has been extensively used to investigate the interplay between gut microbiota populations, antibiotic exposure, and Clostridium difficile infection. More recently the gut model has been adapted to additionally model intestinal biofilm. Here we describe the structure, assembly, and application of the biofilm gut model. PMID:27507345

  14. The effect of pharmacy restriction of clindamycin on Clostridium difficile infection rates in an orthopedics ward.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Rodríguez, Nora Cecilia; Hernández-García, Raúl; Salinas-Caballero, Ana Gabriela; Pérez-Rodríguez, Edelmiro; Garza-González, Elvira; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián

    2014-06-01

    A high consumption of clindamycin was noted in an orthopedics ward with high rates of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We restricted clindamycin for the entire ward. A reduction of 88% in CDI (1.07 to 0.12 × 1,000 patients-days, P = .056) and 84% for all-cause diarrhea (2.40 to 0.38 × 1,000 patients-days, P = .021) was achieved. Clindamycin was reduced 92.61% without an increase in other antibiotics. We identified high consumption of clindamycin as a risk factor for CDI.

  15. Antibiotic overuse and Clostridium difficile infections: the Indian paradox and the possible role of dietary practices.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, N; Sriram, K

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic abuse is rampant in India, such that one may expect to see an increase of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). However, we found that the incidence of CDI in India (1.67%) is no different from that reported in USA (1.6%) using similar techniques of detection (polymerase chain reaction test). We offer a possible explanation for this paradox. It is likely that a diet rich in fiber, yogurt, and possibly turmeric may have a protective role in decreasing the incidence of CDIs in India.

  16. A Review of Clostridium difficile Infection at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Clare-Pascoe, N; Lee, MG; Murphy, T; Nicholson, A; Ferguson, TS

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: This study examined the frequency of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) among hospital admission and diarrhoeal stool samples over a six-year period. Methods: A review of all suspected cases of C difficile positive patients from 2007 to 2012 at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI), Jamaica, was performed. Clostridium difficile infection was confirmed by clinical features and a positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) stool test for Clostridium Toxins A and B. The demographics, clinical features, risk factors, treatment and outcomes were also collated. Results: There were 56 patients reviewed. The most commonly affected age group was 40–59 years of age. The proportion of CDI cases per total stool samples increased from 0.5% in 2007 to 5.9% in 2010 then fell to 2.2% in 2011 but increased again to 4.3% in 2012. The proportion of cases per total UHWI admissions also increased from 0.12 cases per 1000 admissions in 2007 to 1.16 in 2010 and 1.36 in 2012 (p < 0.001). Most CDI cases were nosocomial (76% males, 48.6% females). Co-morbidities included hypertension and end-stage renal disease. Ceftazidime was the most common antibiotic associated with the development of CDI. Resolution occurred in 62.5% of patients. Duration of hospital stay was longer in males than females (≥ 21 versus < 7 days) and males had more adverse outcomes, with death in 23.8% versus 11.4%. Conclusion: There has been an increase in the frequency of CDI at UHWI with a greater than expected frequency of community acquired CDI. Increased awareness is needed of the increasing risk for CDI and measures must be taken to prevent the disease, especially in hospitalized patients. PMID:26624597

  17. Therapeutic Success of Rifaximin for Clostridium difficile Infection Refractory to Metronidazole and Vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, George; Neff, Guy; Kemmer, Nyingi

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 46-year-old white male with confirmed Clostridium difficile infection for >4 weeks after fluoroquinolone therapy. The patient received two courses of metronidazole 500 mg three times daily (t.i.d.) during which time diarrhea resolved; however, symptoms recurred 14–15 days after treatment termination. He received a 2-week course of vancomycin 125 mg four times daily, with symptoms recurring 10 days after treatment conclusion. The patient then received a pulsed tapering schedule of vancomycin with adjunctive Saccharomyces boulardii. Diarrhea recurred 12 days after treatment completion. He received rifaximin 400 mg t.i.d. while hospitalized for diarrhea-associated complications. Symptoms resolved within 24 h. The patient received a 4-week regimen of rifaximin 400 mg orally t.i.d. after discharge. No further episodes of diarrhea were reported within 6 months after treatment termination. The present case supports the potential benefit of rifaximin for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. PMID:21060709

  18. Dynamics and establishment of Clostridium difficile infection in the murine gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Koenigsknecht, Mark J; Theriot, Casey M; Bergin, Ingrid L; Schumacher, Cassie A; Schloss, Patrick D; Young, Vincent B

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) following antibiotic therapy is a major public health threat. While antibiotic disruption of the indigenous microbiota underlies the majority of cases of CDI, the early dynamics of infection in the disturbed intestinal ecosystem are poorly characterized. This study defines the dynamics of infection with C. difficile strain VPI 10463 throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract using a murine model of infection. After inducing susceptibility to C. difficile colonization via antibiotic administration, we followed the dynamics of spore germination, colonization, sporulation, toxin activity, and disease progression throughout the GI tract. C. difficile spores were able to germinate within 6 h postchallenge, resulting in the establishment of vegetative bacteria in the distal GI tract. Spores and cytotoxin activity were detected by 24 h postchallenge, and histopathologic colitis developed by 30 h. Within 36 h, all infected mice succumbed to infection. We correlated the establishment of infection with changes in the microbiota and bile acid profile of the small and large intestines. Antibiotic administration resulted in significant changes to the microbiota in the small and large intestines, as well as a significant shift in the abundance of primary and secondary bile acids. Ex vivo analysis suggested the small intestine as the site of spore germination. This study provides an integrated understanding of the timing and location of the events surrounding C. difficile colonization and identifies potential targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  19. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of Clostridium difficile infection in patients with discordant diagnostic test results.

    PubMed

    Kaltsas, Anna; Simon, Matt; Unruh, Larissa H; Son, Crystal; Wroblewski, Danielle; Musser, Kimberlee A; Sepkowitz, Kent; Babady, N Esther; Kamboj, Mini

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and laboratory characteristics of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients with discordant test results for the cytotoxin assay (CYT) and PCR assays. A retrospective study from May to August 2008 and March to May 2010 was performed. CDI was diagnosed in 128 patients. PCR increased the yield of C. difficile cases by 2-fold compared to that of the CYT assay. Fifty-six cases (44%) were detected by PCR only (CYT negative). Forty-nine percent of patients with non-NAP1 strains were detected by PCR only, compared to 28% of those infected with NAP1 strains (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found in the clinical severity of illness and outcome among patients that tested positive for CDI by both tests (CYT and PCR) compared to those that tested positive by PCR only. PMID:22238444

  20. An update on antibody-based immunotherapies for Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Hussack, Greg; Tanha, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile continues to be one of the most prevalent hospital-acquired bacterial infections in the developed world, despite the recent introduction of a novel and effective antibiotic agent (fidaxomicin). Alternative approaches under investigation to combat the anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria include fecal transplantation therapy, vaccines, and antibody-based immunotherapies. In this review, we catalog the recent advances in antibody-based approaches under development and in the clinic for the treatment of C. difficile infection. By and large, inhibitory antibodies that recognize the primary C. difficile virulence factors, toxin A and toxin B, are the most popular passive immunotherapies under investigation. We provide a detailed summary of the toxin epitopes recognized by various antitoxin antibodies and discuss general trends on toxin inhibition efficacy. In addition, antibodies to other C. difficile targets, such as surface-layer proteins, binary toxin, motility factors, and adherence and colonization factors, are introduced in this review. PMID:27536153

  1. Clostridium difficile Infection and Proton Pump Inhibitor Use in Hospitalized Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Pohl, John F; Patel, Raza; Zobell, Jeffery T; Lin, Ellen; Korgenski, E Kent; Crowell, Kody; Mackay, Mark W; Richman, Aleesha; Larsen, Christian; Chatfield, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    Children with cystic fibrosis (CF) often take proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which helps improve efficacy of fat absorption with pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. However, PPI use is known to be associated with Clostridium difficile-(C. diff-) associated diarrhea (CDAD). We retrospectively evaluated the incidence of C. diff infection from all pediatric hospital admissions over a 5-year period at a single tertiary children's hospital. We found significantly more C. diff-positive stool tests in hospitalized patients with CF compared to patients with no diagnosis of CF. However, use of a PPI was not associated with an increased risk of CDAD in hospitalized CF patients. In summary, C. diff infection is more common in hospitalized pediatric CF patients although PPI use may not be a risk factor for CDAD development in this patient population.

  2. The intestinal microbiota dysbiosis and Clostridium difficile infection: is there a relationship with inflammatory bowel disease?

    PubMed Central

    Bien, Justyna; Palagani, Vindhya

    2013-01-01

    Gut microbiota is a compilation of microorganisms dwelling in the entire mammalian gastrointestinal tract. They display a symbiotic relationship with the host contributing to its intestinal health and disease. Even a slight fluctuation in this equipoise may be deleterious to the host, leading to many pathological conditions like Clostridium difficile infection or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this review, we focus on the role of microbial dysbiosis in initiation of C. difficile infection and IBD, and we also touch upon the role of specific pathogens, particularly C. difficile, as causative agents of IBD. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms activated by C. difficile that contribute to the development and exacerbation of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23320050

  3. Clinical update for the diagnosis and treatment of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    IV, Edward C Oldfield; III, Edward C Oldfield; Johnson, David A

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) presents a rapidly evolving challenge in the battle against hospital-acquired infections. Recent advances in CDI diagnosis and management include rapid changes in diagnostic approach with the introduction of newer tests, such as detection of glutamate dehydrogenase in stool and polymerase chain reaction to detect the gene for toxin production, which will soon revolutionize the diagnostic approach to CDI. New medications and multiple medical society guidelines have introduced changing concepts in the definitions of severity of CDI and the choice of therapeutic agents, while rapid expansion of data on the efficacy of fecal microbiota transplantation heralds a revolutionary change in the management of patients suffering multiple relapses of CDI. Through a comprehensive review of current medical literature, this article aims to offer an intensive review of the current state of CDI diagnosis, discuss the strengths and limitations of available laboratory tests, compare both current and future treatments options and offer recommendations for best practice strategies. PMID:24729930

  4. Complicated fecal microbiota transplantation in a tetraplegic patient with severe Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Brechmann, Thorsten; Swol, Justyna; Knop-Hammad, Veronika; Willert, Jörg; Aach, Mirko; Cruciger, Oliver; Schmiegel, Wolff; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Hamsen, Uwe

    2015-03-28

    A 65-year-old male suffering from acute spinal cord injury leading to incomplete tetraplegia presented with severe recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection subsequent to antibiotic treatment for pneumonia. After a history of ineffective antimicrobial therapies, including metronidazole, vancomycin, fidaxomicin, rifaximin and tigecycline, leading to several relapses, the patient underwent colonoscopic fecal microbiota transplantation from his healthy son. Four days subsequent to the procedure, the patient showed a systemic inflammation response syndrome. Without detecting an infectious cause, the patient received antimicrobial treatment, including tigecycline, metronidazole, vancomycin via polyethylene glycol and an additional enema for a period of seven days, leading to a prompt recovery and no reported C. difficile infection relapse during a 12 wk follow up. PMID:25834343

  5. Bacteriotherapy for the treatment of intestinal dysbiosis caused by Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Adamu, Blessing O; Lawley, Trevor D

    2013-10-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been used for more than five decades to treat a variety of intestinal diseases associated with pathological imbalances within the resident microbiota, termed dysbiosis. FMT has been particularly effective for treating patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection who are left with few clinical options other than continued antibiotic therapy. Our increasing knowledge of the structure and function of the human intestinal microbiota and C. difficile pathogenesis has led to the understanding that FMT promotes intestinal ecological restoration and highlights the microbiota as a viable therapeutic target. However, the use of undefined faecal samples creates a barrier for widespread clinical use because of safety and aesthetic issues. An emerging concept of bacteriotherapy, the therapeutic use of a defined mixture of harmless, health-associated bacteria, holds promise for the treatment of patients with severe C. difficile infection, and possibly represents a paradigm shift for the treatment of diseases linked to intestinal dysbiosis. PMID:23866975

  6. Incidence and Clinical Outcomes of Clostridium difficile Infection after Treatment with Tuberculosis Medication

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Mi; Huh, Kyu Chan; Yoon, Soon Man; Jang, Byung Ik; Shin, Jeong Eun; Koo, Hoon Sup; Jung, Yunho; Kim, Sae Hee; Moon, Hee Seok; Lee, Seung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To determine the incidence and clinical characteristics of tuberculosis (TB) medication-associated Clostridium difficile infection. Methods This multicenter study included patients from eight tertiary hospitals enrolled from 2008 to 2013. A retrospective analysis was conducted to identify the clinical features of C. difficile infection in patients who received TB medication. Results C. difficile infection developed in 54 of the 19,080 patients prescribed TB medication, representing a total incidence of infection of 2.83 cases per 1,000 adults. Fifty-one of the 54 patients (94.4%) were treated with rifampin. The patients were usually treated with oral metronidazole, which produced improvement in 47 of the 54 patients (87%). Twenty-three patients clinically improved with continuous rifampin therapy for C. difficile infection. There were no significant differences in improvement between patients treated continuously (n=21) and patients in whom treatment was discontinued (n=26). Conclusions The incidence of C. difficile infection after TB medication was not low considering the relatively low TB medication dosage compared to other antibiotics. It may not be always necessary to discontinue TB medication. Instead, decisions concerning discontinuation of TB medication should be based on TB status. PMID:26260753

  7. Clostridium difficile ribotype 033 colitis in a patient following broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment for KPCproducing Klebsiella pneumoniae infection, Italy.

    PubMed

    Grandesso, Stefano; Arena, Fabio; Eseme, Franklin Esoka; Panese, Sandro; Henrici De Angelis, Lucia; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2016-09-01

    This report describes a case of Clostridium difficile ribotype 033 colitis in a patient treated with multiple antibiotics for KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae pancreatitis. Diagnostic, clinical and therapeutic features are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of C. difficile ribotype 033 clinical infection reported from Italy. PMID:27602425

  8. Epidemiology and factors associated with candidaemia following Clostridium difficile infection in adults within metropolitan Atlanta, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Vallabhaneni, S; Almendares, O; Farley, M M; Reno, J; Smith, Z T; Stein, B; Magill, S S; Smith, R M; Cleveland, A A; Lessa, F C

    2016-05-01

    We assessed prevalence of and risk factors for candidaemia following Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) using longitudinal population-based surveillance. Of 13 615 adults with CDI, 113 (0·8%) developed candidaemia in the 120 days following CDI. In a matched case-control analysis, severe CDI and CDI treatment with vancomycin + metronidazole were associated with development of candidaemia following CDI.

  9. Skin and Environmental Contamination in Patients Diagnosed With Clostridium difficile Infection but Not Meeting Clinical Criteria for Testing.

    PubMed

    Kundrapu, Sirisha; Sunkesula, Venkata; Tomas, Myreen; Donskey, Curtis J

    2015-11-01

    Of 134 patients diagnosed with Clostridium difficile infection, 30 (22%) did not meet clinical criteria for testing because they lacked significant diarrhea or had alternative explanations for diarrhea and no recent antibiotic exposure. For these patients, skin and/or environmental contamination was common only in those with prior antibiotic exposure.

  10. Clostridium Difficile Infection Worsen Outcome of Hospitalized Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Lin, Qian-Yun; Fei, Jia-Xi; Zhang, Yan; Lin, Min-Yi; Jiang, Shuang-Hong; Wang, Pu; Chen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased rapidly over the past several decades in North America and Europe. However, the exact global epidemiology remains unclear because of insufficient data from developing countries. A total of 646 hospitalized adult IBD patients were enrolled; and their fresh stool specimens were obtained and used for Clostridium difficile detection. The incidence of CDI in Crohn’s disease (CD) patients (12.7%) was significantly lower than that in Ulcerative disease (UC) patients (19.3%). Among the toxin types, A+B+ strain was the most common. Length of stay, hospitalization frequency and bowel surgery rate were significantly higher in the CDI than in the non-CDI group in CD or UC patients. More patients in CDI-CD group were still in active and even clinical moderate or severe CD stage than non-CDI-CD group after 2 years of following-up. Fistula, antibiotics and infliximab usage likely increased the CDI rate in CD patients, Infliximab treatment was considered a risk factor in UC patients. CDI is an exacerbating public health issue that may influence IBD course, increase expenditures, and delay the remission of IBD patients. IBD patients with CDI require urgent attention. PMID:27417996

  11. Discovery of LFF571: An Investigational Agent for Clostridium difficile Infection

    SciTech Connect

    LaMarche, Matthew J.; Leeds, Jennifer A.; Amaral, Adam; Brewer, Jason T.; Bushell, Simon M.; Deng, Gejing; Dewhurst, Janetta M.; Ding, Jian; Dzink-Fox, JoAnne; Gamber, Gabriel; Jain, Akash; Lee, Kwangho; Lee, Lac; Lister, Troy; McKenney, David; Mullin, Steve; Osborne, Colin; Palestrant, Deborah; Patane, Michael A.; Rann, Elin M.; Sachdeva, Meena; Shao, Jian; Tiamfook, Stacey; Trzasko, Anna; Whitehead, Lewis; Yifru, Aregahegn; Yu, Donghui; Yan, Wanlin; Zhu, Qingming

    2012-11-09

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a Gram positive, anaerobic bacterium that infects the lumen of the large intestine and produces toxins. This results in a range of syndromes from mild diarrhea to severe toxic megacolon and death. Alarmingly, the prevalence and severity of C. difficile infection are increasing; thus, associated morbidity and mortality rates are rising. 4-Aminothiazolyl analogues of the antibiotic natural product GE2270 A (1) were designed, synthesized, and optimized for the treatment of C. difficile infection. The medicinal chemistry effort focused on enhancing aqueous solubility relative to that of the natural product and previous development candidates (2, 3) and improving antibacterial activity. Structure-activity relationships, cocrystallographic interactions, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy in animal models of infection were characterized. These studies identified a series of dicarboxylic acid derivatives, which enhanced solubility/efficacy profile by several orders of magnitude compared to previously studied compounds and led to the selection of LFF571 (4) as an investigational new drug for treating C. difficile infection.

  12. Clostridium difficile infection in Chilean patients submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pilcante, Javier; Rojas, Patricio; Ernst, Daniel; Sarmiento, Mauricio; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Bertin, Pablo; García, Maria; Rodriguez, Maria; Jara, Veronica; Ajenjo, Maria; Ramirez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have an increased risk of Clostridium difficile infection and multiple risk factors have been identified. Published reports have indicated an incidence from 9% to 30% of transplant patients however to date there is no information about infection in these patients in Chile. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of patients who developed C. difficile infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantations from 2000 to 2013. Statistical analysis used the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Results Two hundred and fifty patients were studied (mean age: 39 years; range: 17–69), with 147 (59%) receiving allogeneic transplants and 103 (41%) receiving autologous transplants. One hundred and ninety-two (77%) patients had diarrhea, with 25 (10%) cases of C. difficile infection being confirmed. Twenty infected patients had undergone allogeneic transplants, of which ten had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, three had acute myeloid leukemia and seven had other diseases (myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, severe aplastic anemia). In the autologous transplant group, five patients had C. difficile infection; two had multiple myeloma, one had amyloidosis, one had acute myeloid leukemia and one had germinal carcinoma. The overall incidence of C. difficile infection was 4% within the first week, 6.4% in the first month and 10% in one year, with no difference in overall survival between infected and non-infected groups (72.0% vs. 67.6%, respectively; p-value = 0.56). Patients infected after allogeneic transplants had a slower time to neutrophil engraftment compared to non-infected patients (17.5 vs. 14.9 days, respectively; p-value = 0.008). In the autologous transplant group there was no significant difference in the neutrophil engraftment time between infected and non-infected patients (12.5 days vs. 11.8 days, respectively; p-value = 0.71). In the allogeneic

  13. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation: Expanding Horizons for Clostridium difficile Infections and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Borody, Thomas J; Peattie, Debra; Mitchell, Scott W

    2015-07-06

    Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) methodology has been progressively refined over the past several years. The procedure has an extensive track record of success curing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) with remarkably few adverse effects. It achieves similar levels of success whether the CDI occurs in the young or elderly, previously normal or profoundly ill patients, or those with CDI in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). While using FMT to treat CDI, however, we learned that using the procedure in other gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, such as IBD without CDI, generally fails to effect cure. To improve results in treating other non-CDI diseases, innovatively designed Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) will be required to address questions about mechanisms operating within particular diseases. Availability of orally deliverable FMT products, such as capsules containing lyophilised fecal microbiota, will simplify CDI treatment and open the door to convenient, prolonged FMT delivery to the GI tract and will likely deliver improved results in both CDI and non-CDI diseases.

  14. How do Clostridium difficile infections affect nurses' everyday hospital work: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Guillemin, Isabelle; Marrel, Alexia; Beriot-Mathiot, Axelle; Doucet, Carole; Kazoglou, Odysseas; Luxemburger, Christine; Reygrobellet, Camille; Arnould, Benoit

    2015-05-01

    This qualitative study explored the impact of Clostridium difficile infections on nurses' everyday work in the hospital. Twelve nurses (six in France and six in the United States) were interviewed in depth using a semi-structured interview guide. Thematic analysis of the interviews was performed. Managing diarrhoea and taking precautionary measures for infection control were the two most inconvenient aspects nurses reported with C. difficile patient management. Precautions included contact isolation, hand hygiene and reorganization/coordination of nursing care and ward. Precautions were time consuming and significantly increased nurses' workload when combined with caring for patients with uncontrollable, frequent bouts of diarrhoea. Management of C. difficile infection is extremely burdensome for nurses in their everyday work and disruptive to hospital organizations as a whole. Prevention of C. difficile infections, together with coordinated team work and communication, would therefore contribute to decreasing nurses' workload and the burden to health-care facilities associated with caring for these patients.

  15. The challenge of Clostridium difficile infection: Overview of clinical manifestations, diagnostic tools and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Postma, Nynke; Kiers, Dorien; Pickkers, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The most important infectious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and colitis is Clostridium difficile, which is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming, toxin-producing bacillus. In this overview we will discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients presenting with suspected or proven C. difficile infection (CDI). The clinical spectrum varies from asymptomatic C. difficile carriers to fulminant colitis with multi-organ failure. The onset of symptoms is usually within 2 weeks after initiation of antibiotic treatment. Diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical symptoms and either a positive stool test for C. difficile toxins or endoscopic or histological findings of pseudomembranous colitis. There is no indication for treatment of asymptomatic carriers, but patients with proven CDI should be treated. Treatment consists of cessation of the provoking antibiotic treatment, secondary prevention by infection control strategies, and treatment with metronidazole or vancomycin. Treatment of recurring CDI, severe infection, the need for surgery, and novel alternative potential treatment strategies will be discussed. The concurrent increase in multiresistant colonisation and increasing numbers of asymptomatic carriers of C. difficile will lead to an increase of the situation in which patients with severe infections, treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics, will develop concurrent severe CDI. We will discuss possible therapy strategies for these patients.

  16. Risk factors for recurrent hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection in a Japanese university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Hikone, Mayu; Ainoda, Yusuke; Tago, Sayaka; Fujita, Takahiro; Hirai, Yuji; Takeuchi, Kaori; Totsuka, Kyoichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a highly prevalent hospital-associated infection. Although most patients respond well to discontinuation of antibiotics, 20%–30% of patients relapse. To initiate early therapeutic measures, the risk factors for recurrent CDI must be identified, although very few Japanese studies have used standard surveillance definitions to identify these risk factors. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with health care facility-onset CDI between August 2011 and September 2013. Patients with diarrhea who were positive for Clostridium difficile (via an enzyme immunoassay) were defined as having CDI. Clinical data (eg, demographics, comorbidities, medication, laboratory results, and clinical outcomes) were evaluated, and multivariate analysis was used to identify risk factors that were associated with recurrent CDI. Results Seventy-six health care facility-onset CDI cases were identified, with an incidence rate of 0.8 cases per 10,000 patient-days. Fourteen cases (18.4%) were recurrent, with 13 patients having experienced a single recurrent episode and one patient having experienced three recurrent episodes. The 30-day and 90-day mortality rates were 7.9% and 14.5%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that recurrent patients were more likely to have underlying malignant disease (odds ratio: 7.98; 95% confidence interval: 1.22–52.2; P=0.03) and a history of intensive care unit hospitalization (odds ratio: 49.9; 95% confidence interval: 1.01–2,470; P=0.049). Conclusion Intensive care unit hospitalization and malignancy are risk factors for recurrent CDI. Patients with these factors should be carefully monitored for recurrence and provided with appropriate antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:26203270

  17. Peri-transplant clostridium difficile infections in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Agha, Aya; Sehgal, Alison; Lim, Matthew J; Weber, David; Hou, Jing-Zhou; Farah, Rafic; Raptis, Anastasios; Im, Annie; Dorritie, Kathleen; Marks, Stanley; Agha, Mounzer; Lim, Seah H

    2016-03-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) remain the leading cause of infectious diarrhea among hospitalized patients in this country. Patients with hematologic malignancies, especially those who undergo hematopoietic progenitor cell transplants are particularly at risk for developing CDI. One hundred and forty seven consecutive allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplants were analyzed for peri-transplant Clostridium difficile infections (PT-CDI). Sixteen patients (11%) developed PT-CDI (Median time = 7 days after transplant). The probability for developing PT-CDI during the peri-transplant period was 12.3%. History of CDI was strongly associated with the development of PT-CDI (P = 0.008) (OR = 5.48) (P = 0.017). These patients also developed PT-CDI much earlier than in those without a history (median 1 day vs. 8 days, P = 0.03). The probability for developing PT-CDI for those with a history was 39%. There was a trend toward significance (P = 0.065) between matched related donor grafts and the development of PT-CDI (OR = 0.245) (P = 0.08). Age, sex, diagnosis, transplant preparative regimens, Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, grade 3/4 acute GVHD, or use of antimicrobials within 8 weeks of transplant were not associated with PT-CDI. Non-CDI-related deaths occurred in one patient in the PT-CDI group and nine in the group without PT-CDI. In the remaining 139 patients, the length of hospital stay for those with PT-CDI was significantly longer than those without (mean 27 days vs. 22 days; P = 0.02). PMID:26661725

  18. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection: an Ongoing Conundrum for Clinicians and for Clinical Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Karen C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Clostridium difficile is a formidable nosocomial and community-acquired pathogen, causing clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic colonization to self-limiting diarrhea to toxic megacolon and fulminant colitis. Since the early 2000s, the incidence of C. difficile disease has increased dramatically, and this is thought to be due to the emergence of new strain types. For many years, the mainstay of C. difficile disease diagnosis was enzyme immunoassays for detection of the C. difficile toxin(s), although it is now generally accepted that these assays lack sensitivity. A number of molecular assays are commercially available for the detection of C. difficile. This review covers the history and biology of C. difficile and provides an in-depth discussion of the laboratory methods used for the diagnosis of C. difficile infection (CDI). In addition, strain typing methods for C. difficile and the evolving epidemiology of colonization and infection with this organism are discussed. Finally, considerations for diagnosing C. difficile disease in special patient populations, such as children, oncology patients, transplant patients, and patients with inflammatory bowel disease, are described. As detection of C. difficile in clinical specimens does not always equate with disease, the diagnosis of C. difficile infection continues to be a challenge for both laboratories and clinicians. PMID:23824374

  19. Clostridium tertium isolated from a necrotizing soft tissue infection in a diabetic but otherwise nonimmunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Steensma, Elizabeth A; Ertl, Christian W; Burke, Leandra H

    2011-06-01

    Clostridium tertium has historically been regarded as nonpathogenic, and its implication as the primary microbe in infectious etiologies remains unclear. Although there have been several reports of C tertium isolated from blood, tissue, and other specimens, largely this population has consisted of patients with neutropenia, hematologic malignancies, or gastrointestinal disorders. Here we describe a case of a 39-year-old nonimmunocompromised man with a history of type 1 diabetes mellitus and intravenous drug use who presented to our institution with a necrotizing soft tissue infection involving his right upper extremity. The infection had developed after the patient had injected methamphetamines. At surgery, tissue was obtained for Gram stain and culture, yielding C tertium, after an initial misidentification as Lactobacillus species. After undergoing extensive surgical debridement and treatment with an appropriate antibiotic regimen, the patient was able to be discharged home with retained function of his extremity. Although not common, infections involving C tertium can produce severe, potentially life- and limb-threatening disease processes, which may require aggressive therapy even in the nonimmunocompromised patient.

  20. Community- and Healthcare-Associated Clostridium difficile Infections, Finland, 2008−20131

    PubMed Central

    Mentula, Silja; Ollgren, Jukka; Virolainen-Julkunen, Anni; Lyytikäinen, Outi

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated incidence, case-fatality rate, and trends of community-associated (CA) and healthcare-associated (HA) Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) in Finland during 2008–2013. CDIs were identified in the National Infectious Disease Register, deaths in the National Population Information System, hospitalizations to classify infections as CA or HA in the National Hospital Discharge Register, and genotypes in a reference laboratory. A total of 32,991 CDIs were identified: 10,643 (32.3%) were CA (32.9 cases/100,000 population) and 22,348 (67.7%) HA (69.1/100,000). Overall annual incidence decreased from 118.7/100,000 in 2008 to 92.1/100,000 in 2013, which was caused by reduction in HA-CDI rates (average annual decrease 8.1%; p<0.001). The 30-day case-fatality rate was lower for CA-CDIs than for HA-CDIs (3.2% vs. 13.3%; p<0.001). PCR ribotypes 027 and 001 were more common in HA-CDIs than in CA-CDIs. Although the HA-CDI incidence rate decreased, which was probably caused by increased awareness and improved infection control, the CA-CDI rate increased. PMID:27648884

  1. Clostridium difficile Infections amongst Patients with Haematological Malignancies: A Data Linkage Study

    PubMed Central

    Slimings, Claudia; Joske, David J. L.; Riley, Thomas V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Identify risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and assess CDI outcomes among Australian patients with a haematological malignancy. Methods A retrospective cohort study involving all patients admitted to hospitals in Western Australia with a haematological malignancy from July 2011 to June 2012. Hospital admission data were linked with all hospital investigated CDI case data. Potential risk factors were assessed by logistic regression. The risk of death within 60 and 90 days of CDI was assessed by Cox Proportional Hazards regression. Results There were 2085 patients of whom 65 had at least one CDI. Twenty percent of CDI cases were either community-acquired, indeterminate source or had only single-day admissions in the 28 days prior to CDI. Using logistic regression, having acute lymphocytic leukaemia, neutropenia and having had bacterial pneumonia or another bacterial infection were associated with CDI. CDI was associated with an increased risk of death within 60 and 90 days post CDI, but only two deaths had CDI recorded as an antecedent factor. Ribotyping information was available for 33 of the 65 CDIs. There were 19 different ribotypes identified. Conclusions Neutropenia was strongly associated with CDI. While having CDI is a risk factor for death, in many cases it may not be a direct contributor to death but may reflect patients having higher morbidity. A wide variety of C. difficile ribotypes were found and community-acquired infection may be under-estimated in these patients. PMID:27314498

  2. Tests for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection: the next generation.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Karen C

    2011-08-01

    impact of molecular tests on treatment and nosocomial spread of Clostridium difficile infections.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of LFF571 and Vancomycin in Patients with Moderate Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bhansali, Suraj G.; Mullane, Kathleen; Ting, Lillian S. L.; Leeds, Jennifer A.; Dabovic, Kristina; Praestgaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection causes diarrheal disease with potentially fatal complications. Although treatments are available, including vancomycin, metronidazole, and fidaxomicin, the recurrence of disease after therapy remains a problem. LFF571 is a novel thiopeptide antibacterial that shows in vitro potency against C. difficile that is comparable to or greater than that of other clinically used antibiotics. Here, we compare the pharmacokinetics (PK) of LFF571 and vancomycin in patients with C. difficile infection as part of an early efficacy study. This multicenter, randomized, evaluator-blind, and active-controlled study evaluated the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of LFF571 in adults with primary episodes or first relapses of moderate C. difficile infections. Patients were randomized to receive 200 mg of LFF571 or 125 mg of vancomycin four times daily for 10 days. The PK parameters were calculated from drug concentrations measured in serum and fecal samples. The systemic exposure following oral administration of 200 mg of LFF571 four times per day for 10 days in patients with C. difficile infection was limited. The highest LFF571 serum concentration observed was 41.7 ng/ml, whereas the levels in feces at the end of treatment were between 107 and 12,900 μg/g. In comparison, the peak vancomycin level observed in serum was considerably higher, at 2.73 μg/ml; the levels of vancomycin in feces were not measured. Similar to healthy volunteers, patients with C. difficile infections exhibited high fecal concentrations and low serum levels of LFF571. These results are consistent with the retention of LFF571 in the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01232595.) PMID:25534724

  4. Containment of Clostridium difficile infection without reduction in antimicrobial use in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Cheng, V C C; Chau, P H; So, S Y C; Chen, J H K; Poon, R W S; Wong, S C Y; Hung, I F N; Lee, W M; Tai, J W M; Ho, P L; Yam, W C; Yuen, K Y

    2015-07-01

    Clostridium difficile ribotype 002 with hypersporulating capacity has been increasingly identified in Hong Kong. Proactive infection control measures are important to prevent the establishment of endemicity of C. difficile ribotype 002. A total of 329 patients with healthcare-associated C. difficile infection (CDI) were recruited in our healthcare network between 1 January 2008 and 30 June 2012 in this study. The incidence rates of healthcare-associated CDI per 10,000 admissions and 10,000 patient-days increased significantly by 15.3 and 17.0%, respectively, per quarter (p < 0.001) from 2008 1Q to 2010 1Q by segmented Poisson regression. With the full implementation of enhanced infection control interventions, there was an immediate significant reduction in both healthcare-associated CDI rates per 10,000 admissions and per 10,000 patient-days by 47% (p < 0.001) in 2010 2Q, followed by a further decline of CDI per 10,000 admissions and CDI per 10,000 patient-days by -19.4 and -19.8% from 2010 2Q to 2012 2Q, respectively (p < 0.001), despite a replacement of hand washing with soap and water by alcohol-based hand rub in the healthcare network. The proportion of C. difficile ribotype 002 was not statistically different (34/177, 19.2% vs. 25/152, 16.4%, p = 0.515), and the consumption of broad-spectrum antibiotics presented as divided daily dose per 1,000 acute bed-day occupancy per quarter remained unchanged (140.9 vs. 152.3) before and after infection control interventions. Our results suggested that the reduction of healthcare-associated CDI was attributable to infection control interventions instead of replacement of ribotypes or reduction in antimicrobial selective pressure. PMID:25800414

  5. Active and Secretory IgA-Coated Bacterial Fractions Elucidate Dysbiosis in Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Džunková, Mária; Moya, Andrés; Vázquez-Castellanos, Jorge F; Artacho, Alejandro; Chen, Xinhua; Kelly, Ciaran; D'Auria, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The onset of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been associated with treatment with wide-spectrum antibiotics. Antibiotic treatment alters the activity of gut commensals and may result in modified patterns of immune responses to pathogens. To study these mechanisms during CDI, we separated bacteria with high cellular RNA content (the active bacteria) and their inactive counterparts by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of the fecal bacterial suspension. The gut dysbiosis due to the antibiotic treatment may result in modification of immune recognition of intestinal bacteria. The immune recognition patterns were assessed by FACS of bacterial fractions either coated or not with intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA). We described the taxonomic distributions of these four bacterial fractions (active versus inactive and SIgA coated versus non-SIgA coated) by massive 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and quantified the proportion of C. difficile toxin genes in the samples. The overall gut microbiome composition was more robustly influenced by antibiotics than by the C. difficile toxins. Bayesian networks revealed that the C. difficile cluster was preferentially SIgA coated during CDI. In contrast, in the CDI-negative group Fusobacterium was the characteristic genus of the SIgA-opsonized fraction. Lactobacillales and Clostridium cluster IV were mostly inactive in CDI-positive patients. In conclusion, although the proportion of C. difficile in the gut is very low, it is able to initiate infection during the gut dysbiosis caused by environmental stress (antibiotic treatment) as a consequence of decreased activity of the protective bacteria. IMPORTANCE C. difficile is a major enteric pathogen with worldwide distribution. Its expansion is associated with broad-spectrum antibiotics which disturb the normal gut microbiome. In this study, the DNA sequencing of highly active bacteria and bacteria opsonized by intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIg

  6. Active and Secretory IgA-Coated Bacterial Fractions Elucidate Dysbiosis in Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moya, Andrés; Vázquez-Castellanos, Jorge F.; Artacho, Alejandro; Chen, Xinhua; Kelly, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The onset of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been associated with treatment with wide-spectrum antibiotics. Antibiotic treatment alters the activity of gut commensals and may result in modified patterns of immune responses to pathogens. To study these mechanisms during CDI, we separated bacteria with high cellular RNA content (the active bacteria) and their inactive counterparts by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of the fecal bacterial suspension. The gut dysbiosis due to the antibiotic treatment may result in modification of immune recognition of intestinal bacteria. The immune recognition patterns were assessed by FACS of bacterial fractions either coated or not with intestinal secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA). We described the taxonomic distributions of these four bacterial fractions (active versus inactive and SIgA coated versus non-SIgA coated) by massive 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and quantified the proportion of C. difficile toxin genes in the samples. The overall gut microbiome composition was more robustly influenced by antibiotics than by the C. difficile toxins. Bayesian networks revealed that the C. difficile cluster was preferentially SIgA coated during CDI. In contrast, in the CDI-negative group Fusobacterium was the characteristic genus of the SIgA-opsonized fraction. Lactobacillales and Clostridium cluster IV were mostly inactive in CDI-positive patients. In conclusion, although the proportion of C. difficile in the gut is very low, it is able to initiate infection during the gut dysbiosis caused by environmental stress (antibiotic treatment) as a consequence of decreased activity of the protective bacteria. IMPORTANCE C. difficile is a major enteric pathogen with worldwide distribution. Its expansion is associated with broad-spectrum antibiotics which disturb the normal gut microbiome. In this study, the DNA sequencing of highly active bacteria and bacteria opsonized by intestinal secretory immunoglobulin

  7. Faecal microbiota transplantation in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection: Recommendations from the French Group of Faecal microbiota Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Harry; Galperine, Tatiana; Kapel, Nathalie; Bourlioux, Pierre; Seksik, Philippe; Barbut, Frederic; Scanzi, Julien; Chast, François; Batista, Rui; Joly, Francisca; Joly, Anne-Christine; Collignon, Anne; Guery, Benoit; Beaugerie, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation is effective for treating recurrent forms of Clostridium difficile infection and its use in this indication is recommended in the most recent European and North American guidelines. In this context, faecal microbiota transplantation is beginning to be performed in France in clinical practice, while the rules governing this procedure have been defined in France only for clinical trials. To unify, secure, and evaluate practice in this field in France, the French Group of Faecal microbiota Transplantation (FGFT) was created in October 2014 with the support of the French National Society of Gastroenterology, the French Infectious Disease Society, and the National Academy of Pharmacy. We present here the deliberations of this group regarding the use of faecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. The issues addressed are the indications, therapeutic sequence, delivery procedures, donor selection, methods and conditions of specimen preparation, and traceability.

  8. Faecal microbiota transplantation in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection: Recommendations from the French Group of Faecal microbiota Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Harry; Galperine, Tatiana; Kapel, Nathalie; Bourlioux, Pierre; Seksik, Philippe; Barbut, Frederic; Scanzi, Julien; Chast, François; Batista, Rui; Joly, Francisca; Joly, Anne-Christine; Collignon, Anne; Guery, Benoit; Beaugerie, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation is effective for treating recurrent forms of Clostridium difficile infection and its use in this indication is recommended in the most recent European and North American guidelines. In this context, faecal microbiota transplantation is beginning to be performed in France in clinical practice, while the rules governing this procedure have been defined in France only for clinical trials. To unify, secure, and evaluate practice in this field in France, the French Group of Faecal microbiota Transplantation (FGFT) was created in October 2014 with the support of the French National Society of Gastroenterology, the French Infectious Disease Society, and the National Academy of Pharmacy. We present here the deliberations of this group regarding the use of faecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. The issues addressed are the indications, therapeutic sequence, delivery procedures, donor selection, methods and conditions of specimen preparation, and traceability. PMID:26433619

  9. A small-molecule antivirulence agent for treating Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Bender, Kristina Oresic; Garland, Megan; Ferreyra, Jessica A; Hryckowian, Andrew J; Child, Matthew A; Puri, Aaron W; Solow-Cordero, David E; Higginbottom, Steven K; Segal, Ehud; Banaei, Niaz; Shen, Aimee; Sonnenburg, Justin L; Bogyo, Matthew

    2015-09-23

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a worldwide health threat that is typically triggered by the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, which disrupt the natural gut microbiota and allow this Gram-positive anaerobic pathogen to thrive. The increased incidence and severity of disease coupled with decreased response, high recurrence rates, and emergence of multiple antibiotic-resistant strains have created an urgent need for new therapies. We describe pharmacological targeting of the cysteine protease domain (CPD) within the C. difficile major virulence factor toxin B (TcdB). Through a targeted screen with an activity-based probe for this protease domain, we identified a number of potent CPD inhibitors, including one bioactive compound, ebselen, which is currently in human clinical trials for a clinically unrelated indication. This drug showed activity against both major virulence factors, TcdA and TcdB, in biochemical and cell-based studies. Treatment in a mouse model of CDI that closely resembles the human infection confirmed a therapeutic benefit in the form of reduced disease pathology in host tissues that correlated with inhibition of the release of the toxic glucosyltransferase domain (GTD). Our results show that this non-antibiotic drug can modulate the pathology of disease and therefore could potentially be developed as a therapeutic for the treatment of CDI. PMID:26400909

  10. Animal models to study the pathogenesis of human and animal Clostridium perfringens infections.

    PubMed

    Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A; Cheung, Jackie K; Theoret, James; Garcia, Jorge P; Moore, Robert J; Rood, Julian I

    2015-08-31

    The most common animal models used to study Clostridium perfringens infections in humans and animals are reviewed here. The classical C. perfringens-mediated histotoxic disease of humans is clostridial myonecrosis or gas gangrene and the use of a mouse myonecrosis model coupled with genetic studies has contributed greatly to our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Similarly, the use of a chicken model has enhanced our understanding of type A-mediated necrotic enteritis in poultry and has led to the identification of NetB as the primary toxin involved in disease. C. perfringens type A food poisoning is a highly prevalent bacterial illness in the USA and elsewhere. Rabbits and mice are the species most commonly used to study the action of enterotoxin, the causative toxin. Other animal models used to study the effect of this toxin are rats, non-human primates, sheep and cattle. In rabbits and mice, CPE produces severe necrosis of the small intestinal epithelium along with fluid accumulation. C. perfringens type D infection has been studied by inoculating epsilon toxin (ETX) intravenously into mice, rats, sheep, goats and cattle, and by intraduodenal inoculation of whole cultures of this microorganism in mice, sheep, goats and cattle. Molecular Koch's postulates have been fulfilled for enterotoxigenic C. perfringens type A in rabbits and mice, for C. perfringens type A necrotic enteritis and gas gangrene in chickens and mice, respectively, for C. perfringens type C in mice, rabbits and goats, and for C. perfringens type D in mice, sheep and goats. PMID:25770894

  11. [Fecal microbiota transplantation in recurrent Clostridium difficile infections. Framework and pharmaceutical preparation aspects].

    PubMed

    Batista, R; Kapel, N; Megerlin, F; Chaumeil, J-C; Barbut, F; Bourlioux, P; Chast, F

    2015-09-01

    The fecal microbiota transplantation consists in introducing a preparation constituted by a dilution of stools of a healthy donor in the digestive tract of a patient recipient, to restore his intestinal physiological balance. This therapeutic approach was the subject of numerous studies showing its efficiency in the treatment of the recurrent infections with Clostridium difficile. The fecal microbiota transplantation has now a high level of clinical evidence, which explains that it appears in various international recommendations. In France, the fecal microbiota transplantation responds to the definition of a medication and can be executed as a pharmaceutical preparation or as an experimental drug for clinical trials under the responsibility of a hospital pharmacy. The objective of this paper is to propose a definition of a framework and to describe the methods of preparation of the fecal microbiota transplantation in the treatment of the recurrent infections with C. difficile and the interactions to consider for hospital pharmacies that do not have technical means to operate this technique.

  12. Survey of diagnostic and typing capacity for Clostridium difficile infection in Europe, 2011 and 2014.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Sofie M; Notermans, Daan W; Alblas, Jeroen; Gastmeier, Petra; Mentula, Silja; Nagy, Elisabeth; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Ivanova, Katiusha; Fitzpatrick, Fidelma; Barbut, Frédéric; Morris, Trefor; Wilcox, Mark H; Kinross, Pete; Suetens, Carl; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-07-21

    Suboptimal laboratory diagnostics for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) impedes its surveillance and control across Europe. We evaluated changes in local laboratory CDI diagnostics and changes in national diagnostic and typing capacity for CDI during the European C. difficile Infection Surveillance Network (ECDIS-Net) project, through cross-sectional surveys in 33 European countries in 2011 and 2014. In 2011, 126 (61%) of a convenience sample of 206 laboratories in 31 countries completed a survey on local diagnostics. In 2014, 84 (67%) of these 126 laboratories in 26 countries completed a follow-up survey. Among laboratories that participated in both surveys, use of CDI diagnostics deemed 'optimal' or 'acceptable' increased from 19% to 46% and from 10% to 15%, respectively (p  < 0.001). The survey of national capacity was completed by national coordinators of 31 and 32 countries in 2011 and 2014, respectively. Capacity for any C. difficile typing method increased from 22/31 countries in 2011 to 26/32 countries in 2014; for PCR ribotyping from 20/31 countries to 23/32 countries, and specifically for capillary PCR ribotyping from 7/31 countries to 16/32 countries. While our study indicates improved diagnostic capability and national capacity for capillary PCR ribotyping across European laboratories between 2011 and 2014, increased use of 'optimal' diagnostics should be promoted. PMID:27469624

  13. Clostridium difficile infection in patients with haematological malignant disease. Risk factors, faecal toxins and pathogenic strains.

    PubMed Central

    Heard, S. R.; Wren, B.; Barnett, M. J.; Thomas, J. M.; Tabaqchali, S.

    1988-01-01

    Two hundred and forty-eight patients from shared oncology and general medical wards were prospectively studied over a 6-month period for carriage of Clostridium difficile during an outbreak of clinical disease with an epidemic strain of the organism. Risk factors for infection were assessed. Acute leukaemia and/or its treatment were identified as significantly increasing the risk of infection. The relationship between the type of C. difficile isolated (as defined by a typing system based on the incorporation of [35S]methionine into bacterial proteins followed by gel electrophoresis), the presence of faecal toxins A and B and clinical symptoms were analysed. Carriage of the epidemic strain, type X, had a significant association with symptoms amongst oncology patients, with two thirds of these patients having detectable faecal toxin A and one third detectable faecal toxin B. During an outbreak of C. difficile-associated disease, typing the organism and assaying for both faecal toxins in symptomatic patients may be of benefit in determining which patients require specific, urgent treatment. PMID:3123260

  14. Risk factors for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Mani, S; Rybicki, L; Jagadeesh, D; Mossad, S B

    2016-05-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections in recent times. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) confers increased risk for CDI because of prolonged hospital stay, immunosuppression, the need to use broad-spectrum antibiotics and a complex interplay of preparative regimen and GvHD-induced gut mucosal damage. Our study evaluated risk factors (RF) for recurrent CDI in HSCT recipients given the ubiquity of traditional RF for CDI in this population. Of the 499 allogeneic HSCT recipients transplanted between 2005 and 2012, 61 (12%) developed CDI within 6 months before transplant or 2 years after transplant and were included in the analysis. Recurrent CDI occurred in 20 (33%) patients. One year incidence of CDI recurrence was 31%. Multivariable analyses identified the number of antecedent antibiotics other than those used to treat CDI as the only significant RF for recurrence (hazard ratio 1.96, 95% confidence interval 1.09-3.52, P=0.025). Most recurrences occurred within 6 months of the first CDI, and the recurrence of CDI was associated with a trend for increased risk of mortality. This prompts the need for further investigation into secondary prophylaxis to prevent recurrent CDI. PMID:26726944

  15. First clinical and microbiological characterization of Clostridium difficile infection in a Croatian University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Novak, Anita; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Tonkic, Marija

    2014-12-01

    Clinical background and molecular epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the University Hospital Centre Split were investigated from January 2010 to December 2011. In total, 54 patients with first episode of CDI were consecutively included in the study based on the positive EIA test specific for A and B toxins. Demographic and clinical data were prospectively analyzed from medical records. CDI incidence rate was 0.6 per 10,000 patient-days. Thirty six cases (70.6%) were healthcare-associated, twelve cases (23.5%) were community-associated and three (5.9%) were indeterminate. Six patients (11.7%) had suffered one or more recurrences and 37 patients (72.5%) showed severe CDI. Prior therapy with third generation cephalosporin was significantly associated with severe CDI (P<0.021). Fifty four toxigenic C. difficile strains were isolated and 50 of them were available for PCR-ribotyping. Sixteen different PCR-ribotypes were identified. The most prevalent were PCR-ribotype 001 (27.8%) and 014/020 (24.1%). Twenty three strains were resistant to at least one of the antibiotics tested. Among resistant strains, three (13.0%)--all PCR-ribotype 001--were multi-resistant. Resistance to fluoroquinolones was significantly higher in strains that caused infection after previous use of fluoroquinolones (P=0.04).

  16. Hospital-Acquired Clostridium difficile Infections Estimating All-Cause Mortality and Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Lofgren, Eric T.; Cole, Stephen R.; Weber, David J.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Moehring, Rebekah W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is a health care–associated infection of increasing importance. The purpose of this study was to estimate the time until death from any cause and time until release among patients with C. difficile, comparing the burden of those in the intensive care unit (ICU) with those in the general hospital population. Methods A parametric mixture model was used to estimate event times, as well as the case-fatality ratio in ICU and non-ICU patients within a cohort of 609 adult incident cases of C. difficile in the Southeastern United States between 1 July 2009 and 31 December 2010. Results ICU patients had twice the median time to death (relative time = 1.97 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.96–4.01]) and nearly twice the median time to release (1.88 [1.40–2.51]) compared with non-ICU patients. ICU patients also experienced 3.4 times the odds of mortality (95% CI = 1.8–6.2). Cause-specific competing risks analysis underestimated the relative survival time until death (0.65 [0.36–1.17]) compared with the mixture model. Conclusions Patients with C. difficile in the ICU experienced higher mortality and longer lengths of stay within the hospital. ICU patients with C. difficile infection represent a population in need of particular attention, both to prevent adverse patient outcomes and to minimize transmission of C. difficile to other hospitalized patients. PMID:24815305

  17. Molecular Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile Infection in a Major Chinese Hospital: an Underrecognized Problem in Asia?

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Clare; Liu, Wen En; Jian, Zi Juan; Gao, Qian; Ling, Thomas Kin Wah; Chow, Viola; So, Erica; Chan, Raphael; Hardy, Katie; Xu, Li; Manzoor, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is almost unrecognized in mainland China. We have undertaken a study in a large Chinese teaching hospital in Changsha, Hunan, China, to identify cases of C. difficile, record patient characteristics, and define the molecular epidemiology with respect to ribotype distribution and cross-infection. Between April 2009 and February 2010, we examined fecal samples from 70 hospitalized patients with diarrhea who were receiving or had received antibiotics within the previous 6 weeks. Clinical information was collected and the samples were cultured for C. difficile retrospectively. Isolates were ribotyped, and multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat assay (MLVA) subtyping was performed on clusters of the same ribotype. The mean age of patients from whom C. difficile was cultured was 58 years, with only 4/21 patients aged >65 years. All patients, with a single exception, had received a third-generation cephalosporin and/or a quinolone antibiotic. Twenty-one isolates of C. difficile were recovered, and seven different ribotypes were identified, the dominant types being 017 (48%), 046 (14%), and 012 (14%). We identified two clusters of cross-infection with indistinguishable isolates of ribotype 017, with evidence of spread both within and between wards. We have identified C. difficile as a possibly significant problem, with cross-infection and a distinct ribotype distribution, in a large Chinese hospital. C. difficile may be underrecognized in China, and further epidemiological studies across the country together with the introduction of routine diagnostic testing are needed to ascertain the size of this potentially significant problem. PMID:23903542

  18. Recent advances in the understanding of antibiotic resistance in Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile epidemiology has changed in recent years, with the emergence of highly virulent types associated with severe infections, high rates of recurrences and mortality. Antibiotic resistance plays an important role in driving these epidemiological changes and the emergence of new types. While clindamycin resistance was driving historical endemic types, new types are associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones. Furthermore, resistance to multiple antibiotics is a common feature of the newly emergent strains and, in general, of many epidemic isolates. A reduced susceptibility to antibiotics used for C. difficile infection (CDI) treatment, in particular to metronidazole, has recently been described in several studies. Furthermore, an increased number of strains show resistance to rifamycins, used for the treatment of relapsing CDI. Several mechanisms of resistance have been identified in C. difficile, including acquisition of genetic elements and alterations of the antibiotic target sites. The C. difficile genome contains a plethora of mobile genetic elements, many of them involved in antibiotic resistance. Transfer of genetic elements among C. difficile strains or between C. difficile and other bacterial species can occur through different mechanisms that facilitate their spread. Investigations of the fitness cost in C. difficile indicate that both genetic elements and mutations in the molecular targets of antibiotics can be maintained regardless of the burden imposed on fitness, suggesting that resistances may persist in the C. difficile population also in absence of antibiotic selective pressure. The rapid evolution of antibiotic resistance and its composite nature complicate strategies in the treatment and prevention of CDI. The rapid identification of new phenotypic and genotypic traits, the implementation of effective antimicrobial stewardship and infection control programs, and the development of alternative therapies are needed to prevent and

  19. Recent advances in the understanding of antibiotic resistance in Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Spigaglia, Patrizia

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile epidemiology has changed in recent years, with the emergence of highly virulent types associated with severe infections, high rates of recurrences and mortality. Antibiotic resistance plays an important role in driving these epidemiological changes and the emergence of new types. While clindamycin resistance was driving historical endemic types, new types are associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones. Furthermore, resistance to multiple antibiotics is a common feature of the newly emergent strains and, in general, of many epidemic isolates. A reduced susceptibility to antibiotics used for C. difficile infection (CDI) treatment, in particular to metronidazole, has recently been described in several studies. Furthermore, an increased number of strains show resistance to rifamycins, used for the treatment of relapsing CDI. Several mechanisms of resistance have been identified in C. difficile, including acquisition of genetic elements and alterations of the antibiotic target sites. The C. difficile genome contains a plethora of mobile genetic elements, many of them involved in antibiotic resistance. Transfer of genetic elements among C. difficile strains or between C. difficile and other bacterial species can occur through different mechanisms that facilitate their spread. Investigations of the fitness cost in C. difficile indicate that both genetic elements and mutations in the molecular targets of antibiotics can be maintained regardless of the burden imposed on fitness, suggesting that resistances may persist in the C. difficile population also in absence of antibiotic selective pressure. The rapid evolution of antibiotic resistance and its composite nature complicate strategies in the treatment and prevention of CDI. The rapid identification of new phenotypic and genotypic traits, the implementation of effective antimicrobial stewardship and infection control programs, and the development of alternative therapies are needed to prevent and

  20. A Role for TLR4 in Clostridium difficile Infection and the Recognition of Surface Layer Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Anthony; Lynch, Mark; Smith, Sinead M.; Amu, Sylvie; Nel, Hendrik J.; McCoy, Claire E.; Dowling, Jennifer K.; Draper, Eve; O'Reilly, Vincent; McCarthy, Ciara; O'Brien, Julie; Ní Eidhin, Déirdre; O'Connell, Mary J.; Keogh, Brian; Morton, Charles O.; Rogers, Thomas R.; Fallon, Padraic G.; O'Neill, Luke A.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the etiological agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (AAD) and pseudomembranous colitis in humans. The role of the surface layer proteins (SLPs) in this disease has not yet been fully explored. The aim of this study was to investigate a role for SLPs in the recognition of C. difficile and the subsequent activation of the immune system. Bone marrow derived dendritic cells (DCs) exposed to SLPs were assessed for production of inflammatory cytokines, expression of cell surface markers and their ability to generate T helper (Th) cell responses. DCs isolated from C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice were used in order to examine whether SLPs are recognised by TLR4. The role of TLR4 in infection was examined in TLR4-deficient mice. SLPs induced maturation of DCs characterised by production of IL-12, TNFα and IL-10 and expression of MHC class II, CD40, CD80 and CD86. Furthermore, SLP-activated DCs generated Th cells producing IFNγ and IL-17. SLPs were unable to activate DCs isolated from TLR4-mutant C3H/HeJ mice and failed to induce a subsequent Th cell response. TLR4−/− and Myd88−/−, but not TRIF−/− mice were more susceptible than wild-type mice to C. difficile infection. Furthermore, SLPs activated NFκB, but not IRF3, downstream of TLR4. Our results indicate that SLPs isolated from C. difficile can activate innate and adaptive immunity and that these effects are mediated by TLR4, with TLR4 having a functional role in experimental C. difficile infection. This suggests an important role for SLPs in the recognition of C. difficile by the immune system. PMID:21738466

  1. Racial Differences in Clostridium difficile Infection Rates Are Attributable to Disparities in Health Care Access.

    PubMed

    Mao, Eric J; Kelly, Colleen R; Machan, Jason T

    2015-10-01

    This study confirms previously reported racial differences in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) rates in the United States and explores the nature of those differences. We conducted a retrospective study using the 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, the largest all-payer database of hospital discharges in the United States. We identified hospital stays most likely to include antibiotic treatment for infections, based on hospital discharge diagnoses, and we examined how CDI rates varied, in an attempt to distinguish between genotypic and environmental racial differences. Logistic regressions for the survey design were used to test hypotheses. Among patients likely to have received antibiotics, white patients had higher CDI rates than black, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American patients (P < 0.0001). CDI rates increased with higher income levels and were higher for hospitalizations paid by private insurance versus those paid by Medicaid or classified as self-pay or free care (P < 0.0001). Among patients admitted from skilled nursing facilities, where racial bias in health care access is less, racial differences in CDI rates disappeared (P = 1.0). Infected patients did not show racial differences in rates of complicated CDI or death (P = 1.0). Although white patients had greater CDI rates than nonwhite patients, racial differences in CDI rates disappeared in a population for which health care access was presumed to be less racially biased. This provides evidence that apparent racial differences in CDI risks may represent health care access disparities, rather than genotypic differences. CDI represents a deviation from the paradigm that increased health care access is associated with less morbidity. PMID:26248363

  2. Clostridium difficile infection, a descriptive analysis of solid organ transplant recipients at a single center.

    PubMed

    Tsapepas, Demetra S; Martin, Spencer T; Miao, Jennifer; Shah, Shreya A; Scheffert, Jenna; Fester, Keith; Ma, Karlene; Lat, Asma; Egan, Ron; McKeen, Jaclyn T

    2015-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterial enteric pathogen, which causes clinical disease among solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. This large, single-center, retrospective study describes incidence, demographics, and impact of C. difficile infection (CDI) among adult SOT recipients, cardiac (n=5), lung (n=14), liver (n=9), renal (n=26), and multiorgan (n=9) patients transplanted and diagnosed with CDI (geneB PCR) between 9/2009 and 12/2012. The overall incidence of CDI in our population during the 40-month period of study was 4%. CDI incidence among cardiac, lung, liver, and renal transplant recipients was 1.9%, 7%, 2.7%, and 3.2%, respectively (P=0.03 between organ-types). Median time from transplant to CDI for all was 51 (14-249) days, with liver recipients having the shortest time to infection, median 36 (15-101) days, and lung recipients having a longer time to infection, median 136 (29-611) days. Antibiotic exposure within 3 months of CDI was evident in 45 of the 63 (71%) patients in this study, 80%, 79%, 100%, 58%, and 67% of cardiac, lung, liver, renal, and multiorgan transplant recipients, respectively. Most patients (83%) were hospitalized within the 3 months preceding CDI. Recipients were followed for a median time of 23 (16-31) months; at the time of last follow-up, 83% of allografts were functioning, and 86% of patients were alive. One death and 1 graft failure were causally related to CDI. CDI had an overall incidence of 4%; clinicians should have heightened awareness for CDI, especially among patients receiving antibiotics, with increased monitoring and aggressive management of CDI.

  3. Contribution of Adenosine A2B Receptors in Clostridium difficile Intoxication and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuesheng; Calabrese, Gina M.; Freire, Rosemayre S.; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; van Opstal, Edward; Figler, Robert A.; Linden, Joel; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB) induce a pronounced systemic and intestinal inflammatory response. A2B adenosine receptors (A2BARs) are the predominant adenosine receptors in the intestinal epithelium. We investigated whether A2BARs are upregulated in human intestinal cells by TcdA or TcdB and whether blockade of A2BARs can ameliorate C. difficile TcdA-induced enteritis and alter the outcome of C. difficile infection (CDI). Adenosine receptor subtype (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) mRNAs were assayed in HCT-8 cells. Ileal loops from wild-type rabbits and mice and A2BAR−/− mice were treated with TcdA, with or without the selective A2BAR antagonist ATL692 or PSB1115. A murine model of CDI was used to determine the effect of A2BAR deletion or blockade with the orally available agent ATL801, on clinical outcome, histopathology and intestinal interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression from infection. TcdA and TcdB upregulated A2BAR gene expression in HCT-8 cells. ATL692 decreased TcdA-induced secretion and epithelial injury in rabbit ileum. Deletion of A2BARs reduced secretion and histopathology in TcdA-challenged mouse ileum. Deletion or blockade of A2BARs reduced histopathology, IL-6 expression, weight loss, diarrhea, and mortality in C. difficile-infected mice. A2BARs mediate C. difficile toxin-induced enteritis and disease. Inhibition of A2BAR activation may be a potential strategy to limit morbidity and mortality from CDI. PMID:23045479

  4. Impacts of infection with different toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains on faecal microbiota in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Jia, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Yiwen; Luo, Yueqiu; Yuan, Li; Wang, Yuezhu; Zhao, Chunna; Guo, Shu; Li, Lanjuan; Xu, Xiwei; Xiang, Charlie

    2014-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that altered intestinal microbial composition and function result in an increased risk of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD); however, the specific changes of intestinal microbiota in children suffering from CDAD and their associations with C. difficile strain toxigenicity are poorly understood. High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that reduced faecal bacterial diversity and dramatic shifts of microbial composition were found in children with CDAD. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased significantly in patients with CDAD, which indicated that dysbiosis of faecal microbiota was closely associated with CDAD. C. difficile infection resulted in an increase in lactate-producing phylotypes, with a corresponding decrease in butyrate-producing bacteria. The decrease in butyrate and lactate buildup impaired intestinal colonisation resistance, which increased the susceptibility to C. difficile colonisation. Strains of C. difficile which were positive for both toxin A and toxin B reduced faecal bacterial diversity to a greater degree than strains that were only toxin B-positive, and were associated with unusually abundant Enterococcus, which implies that the C. difficile toxins have different impacts on the faecal microbiota of children. Greater understanding of the relationships between disruption of the normal faecal microbiota and colonisation with C. difficile that produces different toxins might lead to improved treatment.

  5. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation: Expanding Horizons for Clostridium difficile Infections and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Borody, Thomas J; Peattie, Debra; Mitchell, Scott W

    2015-01-01

    Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) methodology has been progressively refined over the past several years. The procedure has an extensive track record of success curing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) with remarkably few adverse effects. It achieves similar levels of success whether the CDI occurs in the young or elderly, previously normal or profoundly ill patients, or those with CDI in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). While using FMT to treat CDI, however, we learned that using the procedure in other gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, such as IBD without CDI, generally fails to effect cure. To improve results in treating other non-CDI diseases, innovatively designed Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) will be required to address questions about mechanisms operating within particular diseases. Availability of orally deliverable FMT products, such as capsules containing lyophilised fecal microbiota, will simplify CDI treatment and open the door to convenient, prolonged FMT delivery to the GI tract and will likely deliver improved results in both CDI and non-CDI diseases. PMID:27025624

  6. Fidaxomicin Versus Vancomycin for Clostridium difficile Infection: Meta-analysis of Pivotal Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Derrick W.; Walker, A. Sarah; Kean, Yin; Weiss, Karl; Cornely, Oliver A.; Miller, Mark A.; Esposito, Roberto; Louie, Thomas J.; Stoesser, Nicole E.; Young, Bernadette C.; Angus, Brian J.; Gorbach, Sherwood L.; Peto, Timothy E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Two recently completed phase 3 trials (003 and 004) showed fidaxomicin to be noninferior to vancomycin for curing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and superior for reducing CDI recurrences. In both studies, adults with active CDI were randomized to receive blinded fidaxomicin 200 mg twice daily or vancomycin 125 mg 4 times a day for 10 days. Post hoc exploratory intent-to-treat (ITT) time-to-event analyses were undertaken on the combined study 003 and 004 data, using fixed-effects meta-analysis and Cox regression models. ITT analysis of the combined 003/004 data for 1164 patients showed that fidaxomicin reduced persistent diarrhea, recurrence, or death by 40% (95% confidence interval [CI], 26%–51%; P < .0001) compared with vancomycin through day 40. A 37% (95% CI, 2%–60%; P = .037) reduction in persistent diarrhea or death was evident through day 12 (heterogeneity P = .50 vs 13–40 days), driven by 7 (1.2%) fidaxomicin versus 17 (2.9%) vancomycin deaths at <12 days. Low albumin level, low eosinophil count, and CDI treatment preenrollment were risk factors for persistent diarrhea or death at 12 days, and CDI in the previous 3 months was a risk factor for recurrence (all P < .01). Fidaxomicin has the potential to substantially improve outcomes from CDI. PMID:22752871

  7. Hyperimmune Bovine Colostrum as a Novel Therapy to Combat Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sponseller, Jerlyn K.; Steele, Jennifer A.; Schmidt, Diane J.; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Beamer, Gillian; Sun, Xingmin; Tzipori, Saul

    2015-01-01

    Background. Clostridium difficile is a primary cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea that typically develops when gut microbiota is altered. Conventional treatment for C. difficile infection (CDI) is additional antimicrobial administration, which further disrupts normal intestinal microbiota, often resulting in poor treatment outcomes. Methods. A pregnant dairy cow was repeatedly immunized with recombinant mutants of toxins A and B produced by C. difficile, and the resultant hyperimmune bovine colostrum (HBC) was evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in gnotobiotic piglets with diarrhea due to CDI. Control piglets received nonimmune colostrum. To determine the impact of HBC on gut microbiota, 1 of 2 groups of piglets transplanted with normal human gut microbiota was treated with HBC. Results. Nonimmune colostrum–treated piglets developed moderate to severe diarrhea and colitis. In contrast, HBC-treated piglets had mild or no diarrhea and mild or no colitis. Lyophilization had no detectable impact on HBC efficacy. HBC had no discernible effect on the composition of normal human gut microbiota in the porcine intestinal tract. Conclusions. HBC provides an oral, cost-effective, and safe alternative to antibiotic therapy for CDI. By preserving intestinal microbiota, HBC may be more efficacious than antibiotics. Additional studies are warranted to establish HBC as a viable immunotherapeutic agent for human use against CDI. PMID:25381448

  8. Doxycycline and Tigecycline: Two Friendly Drugs with a Low Association with Clostridium Difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yuan-Pin; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Liu, Hsiao-Chieh; Wu, Yi-Hui; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is known to be associated with prior exposure to many classes of antibiotics. Standard therapy for CDI (i.e., metronidazole and vancomycin) is associated with high recurrence rates. Although tetracycline derivatives such as tetracycline, doxycycline or tigecycline are not the standard therapeutic choices for CDI, they may serve as an alternative or a component of combination therapy. Previous tetracycline or doxycycline usage had been shown to have less association with CDI development. Tigecycline, a broad-spectrum glycylcycline with potency against many gram-positive or gram-negative pathogens, had been successfully used to treat severe or refractory CDI. The in vitro susceptibility of C. difficile clinical isolates to tigecycline in many studies showed low minimal inhibitory concentrations. Tigecycline can suppress in vitro toxin production in both historical and hypervirulent C. difficile strains and reduce spore production in a dose-dependent manner. Tetracycline compounds such as doxycycline, minocycline, and tigecycline possess anti-inflammatory properties that are independent of their antibiotic activity and may contribute to their therapeutic effect for CDI. Although clinical data are limited, doxycycline is less likely to induce CDI, and tigecycline can be considered one of the therapeutic choices for severe or refractory CDI. PMID:27025622

  9. Cadazolid: A new hope in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Kali, Arunava; Charles, Marie Victor Pravin; Srirangaraj, Srirangaraj

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a potential life-threatening consequence of antibiotic therapy. Although the risk increases with duration of treatment, it can also occur after a short treatment course. In addition to broad-spectrum antibiotics, anti-neoplastic agents, proton pump inhibitors, H(2) blockers, and several other drugs have been reported to induce intestinal dysbiosis, which is central to the pathogenesis of CDI. There is an increase in incidence and mortality attributed to CDI globally. Moreover, the epidemiology of C. difficile-associated diseases has changed significantly with an increasing occurrence of community-acquired CDI. Metronidazole and oral vancomycin are the first-line antibiotics used to treat CDI. However, metronidazole has limited effectiveness in severe cases and vancomycin use is associated with increasing risk of vancomycin resistance among Enterococcus spp. Cadazolid, a novel oxazolidinone antibiotic, has recently shown potent antimicrobial activity against C. difficile and has a lower propensity to induce resistance. The implications of its use in treating CDI have been reviewed based on current evidence.

  10. Probiotics in Clostridium difficile infection: reviewing the need for a multistrain probiotic.

    PubMed

    Hell, M; Bernhofer, C; Stalzer, P; Kern, J M; Claassen, E

    2013-03-01

    In the past two years an enormous amount of molecular, genetic, metabolomic and mechanistic data on the host-bacterium interaction, a healthy gut microbiota and a possible role for probiotics in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been accumulated. Also, new hypervirulent strains of C. difficile have emerged. Yet, clinical trials in CDI have been less promising than in antibiotic associated diarrhoea in general, with more meta-analysis than primary papers on CDI-clinical-trials. The fact that C. difficile is a spore former, producing at least three different toxins has not yet been incorporated in the rational design of probiotics for (recurrent) CDI. Here we postulate that the plethora of effects of C. difficile and the vast amount of data on the role of commensal gut residents and probiotics point towards a multistrain mixture of probiotics to reduce CDI, but also to limit (nosocomial) transmission and/or endogenous reinfection. On the basis of a retrospective chart review of a series of ten CDI patients where recurrence was expected, all patients on adjunctive probiotic therapy with multistrain cocktail (Ecologic®AAD/OMNiBiOTiC® 10) showed complete clinical resolution. This result, and recent success in faecal transplants in CDI treatment, are supportive for the rational design of multistrain probiotics for CDI.

  11. Evidence-based review of probiotics for antibiotic-associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Lynne V

    2009-12-01

    Probiotics are living microbes taken to confer a health benefit on the host. Although probiotics have a long history of use in Europe and Asia and have been on the U.S. market for over 14 years, there is still confusion about how to effectively use them. The use of probiotics for the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) has been tested in randomized controlled clinical trials. This paper will review the evidence supporting probiotic therapy for these two diseases and also review the advantages and disadvantages of probiotics. The advantages of probiotic therapy include multiple mechanisms of action against pathogens, the ability to interact with the host's natural defense systems, survival to the target organ and a good risk to benefit ratio. Disadvantages of probiotics include lack of standardization for clinical trial designs, variations in regulatory standards, poor quality control for some products and infrequent serious adverse reactions. Overall, probiotics offer a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment for AAD and CDI.

  12. Accuracy of ICD-9 coding for Clostridium difficile infections: a retrospective cohort.

    PubMed

    Scheurer, D B; Hicks, L S; Cook, E F; Schnipper, J L

    2007-08-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. diff) is a major nosocomial problem. Epidemiological surveillance of the disease can be accomplished by microbiological or administrative data. Microbiological tracking is problematic since it does not always translate into clinical disease, and it is not always available. Tracking by administrative data is attractive, but ICD-9 code accuracy for C. diff is unknown. By using a large administrative database of hospitalized patients with C. diff (by ICD-9 code or cytotoxic assay), this study found that the sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values of ICD-9 coding were 71%, 99%, 87%, and 96% respectively (using micro data as the gold standard). When only using symptomatic patients the sensitivity increased to 82% and when only using symptomatic patients whose test results were available at discharge, the sensitivity increased to 88%. C. diff ICD-9 codes closely approximate true C. diff infection, especially in symptomatic patients whose test results are available at the time of discharge, and can therefore be used as a reasonable alternative to microbiological data for tracking purposes.

  13. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels are not Associated with Adverse Outcomes in Clostridium Difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Micic, Dejan; Rao, Krishna; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; Walk, Seth T.; Chenoweth, Elizabeth; Jain, Ruchika; Trivedi, Itishree; Santhosh, Kavitha; Young, Vincent B.; Aronoff, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a significant source of healthcare-associated morbidity and mortality. This study investigated whether serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with adverse outcomes from CDI. Patients with CDI were prospectively enrolled. Charts were reviewed and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured. The primary outcome was a composite definition of severe disease: fever (temperature >38°C), acute organ dysfunction, or serum white blood cell count >15,000 cells/µL within 24-48 hours of diagnosis; lack of response to therapy by day 5; and intensive care unit admission; colectomy; or death within 30 days. Sixty-seven patients were included in the final analysis. Mean (±SD) serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was 26.1 (±18.54) ng/mL. Severe disease, which occurred in 26 (39%) participants, was not associated with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [odds ratio (OR) 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96-1.04]. In the adjusted model for severe disease only serum albumin (OR 0.12; 95%CI 0.02-0.64) and diagnosis by detection of stool toxin (OR 5.87; 95%CI 1.09-31.7) remained independent predictors. We conclude that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is not associated with the development of severe disease in patients with CDI. PMID:26500740

  14. Standardised surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection in European acute care hospitals: a pilot study, 2013.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Sofie M; Kinross, Pete; Gastmeier, Petra; Behnke, Michael; Kola, Axel; Delmée, Michel; Pavelkovich, Anastasia; Mentula, Silja; Barbut, Frédéric; Hajdu, Agnes; Ingebretsen, André; Pituch, Hanna; Macovei, Ioana S; Jovanović, Milica; Wiuff, Camilla; Schmid, Daniela; Olsen, Katharina Ep; Wilcox, Mark H; Suetens, Carl; Kuijper, Ed J

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains poorly controlled in many European countries, of which several have not yet implemented national CDI surveillance. In 2013, experts from the European CDI Surveillance Network project and from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control developed a protocol with three options of CDI surveillance for acute care hospitals: a 'minimal' option (aggregated hospital data), a 'light' option (including patient data for CDI cases) and an 'enhanced' option (including microbiological data on the first 10 CDI episodes per hospital). A total of 37 hospitals in 14 European countries tested these options for a three-month period (between 13 May and 1 November 2013). All 37 hospitals successfully completed the minimal surveillance option (for 1,152 patients). Clinical data were submitted for 94% (1,078/1,152) of the patients in the light option; information on CDI origin and outcome was complete for 94% (1,016/1,078) and 98% (294/300) of the patients in the light and enhanced options, respectively. The workload of the options was 1.1, 2.0 and 3.0 person-days per 10,000 hospital discharges, respectively. Enhanced surveillance was tested and was successful in 32 of the hospitals, showing that C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 was predominant (30% (79/267)). This study showed that standardised multicountry surveillance, with the option of integrating clinical and molecular data, is a feasible strategy for monitoring CDI in Europe. PMID:27472820

  15. Insight into alteration of gut microbiota in Clostridium difficile infection and asymptomatic C. difficile colonization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihua; Dong, Danfeng; Jiang, Cen; Li, Zhen; Wang, Xuefeng; Peng, Yibing

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is well recognized as the common pathogen of nosocomial diarrhea, meanwhile, asymptomatic colonization with C. difficile in part of the population has also drawn public attention. Although gut microbiota is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of C. difficile infection (CDI), whether there is any alteration of gut microbial composition in asymptomatic C. difficile carriers hasn't been clearly described. The purpose of this study was to explore the differences in gut microbiome among CDI patients, asymptomatic C. difficile carriers and healthy individuals. We performed fecal microbiota analysis on the samples of eight CDI patients, eight asymptomatic C. difficile carriers and nine healthy subjects using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers showed reduced microbial richness and diversity compared with healthy subjects, accompanied with a paucity of phylum Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes as well as an overabundance of Proteobacteria. Some normally commensal bacteria, especially butyrate producers, were significantly depleted in CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers. Furthermore, the differences observed in microbial community structure between CDI patients and asymptomatic carriers suggested that the gut microbiota may be a potential factor of disease state for CDI. Our study demonstrates the characterization and diversity of gut microbiota in CDI and asymptomatic C. difficile colonization, which will provide new ideas for surveillance of the disease state and development of microbiota-targeted agents for CDI prevention and treatment.

  16. Gastrointestinal dysbiosis and the use of fecal microbial transplantation in Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, L Patrick; Beck, Paul L; MacDonald, Justin A

    2015-01-01

    The impact of antibiotics on the human gut microbiota is a significant concern. Antibiotic-associated diarrhea has been on the rise for the past few decades with the increasing usage of antibiotics. Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) have become one of the most prominent types of infectious diarrheal disease, with dramatically increased incidence in both the hospital and community setting worldwide. Studies show that variability in the innate host response may in part impact upon CDI severity in patients. That being said, CDI is a disease that shows the most prominent links to alterations to the gut microbiota, in both cause and treatment. With recurrence rates still relatively high, it is important to explore alternative therapies to CDI. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) and other types of bacteriotherapy have become exciting avenues of treatment for CDI. Recent clinical trials have generated excitement for the use of FMT as a therapeutic option for CDI; however, the exact components of the human gut microbiota needed for protection against CDI have remained elusive. Additional investigations on the effects of antibiotics on the human gut microbiota and subsequent CDI will help reduce the socioeconomic burden of CDI and potentially lead to new therapeutic modalities. PMID:26600975

  17. Outcomes of Clostridium difficile infection in recipients of solid abdominal organ transplants.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jennifer L; Enser, James J; McKown, Trevor; Leverson, Glen E; Pirsch, John D; Hess, Timothy M; Safdar, Nasia

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge of outcomes of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients is limited. To evaluate this population, we undertook a retrospective cohort study of all recipients of kidney and liver transplants diagnosed with CDI at a single center over 14 yr. Data pertaining to all episodes of CDI were collected. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression was performed to determine independent predictors of clinical cure. Overall, 170 patients developed 215 episodes of CDI. Among these patients, 162 episodes (75%) were cured, and in 103 episodes (48%), patients were cured within 14 d. In a multivariate analysis, lack of clinical cure at 14 d was predicted by recurrent episode (0.21, 95% CI 0.06-0.72, p = 0.0128), treatment with vancomycin (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.1-0.74, p = 0.011), vasopressor support (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.07-0.76, p = 0.0161), and CDI before the year 2004 (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.2-0.98, p = 0.0446). The latter three factors are likely markers for severity of illness. In this cohort, 13 patients (8%) died during hospitalization, and 49 patients (29%) died within one yr. No deaths were attributed to CDI. Recurrent episode was a major predictor of treatment failure, suggesting that research into development of therapeutic options for recurrent disease is needed.

  18. Fecal bacteriotherapy for relapsing Clostridium difficile infection in a child: a proposed treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Russell, George; Kaplan, Jess; Ferraro, Maryjane; Michelow, Ian C

    2010-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a potentially serious emerging infectious disease. The incidences of CDI in childhood and CDI cases complicated by relapses have increased by 50% or more in North America during the past 2 decades. We report here the case of a 2-year-old child with relapsing CDI caused by the epidemic strain BI/NAP1/O27 that was refractory to Saccharomyces boulardii and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG probiotics and to intensive therapy with traditional (metronidazole, vancomycin) and experimental (rifaximin, nitazoxanide) antibiotics despite its apparent antimicrobial-susceptible phenotype. After excluding other infectious causes of diarrhea and inflammatory bowel disease, we designed a protocol to safely administer fecal bacteriotherapy via a temporary nasogastric tube. We demonstrated for the first time that fecal transplantation is practical and effective for treating relapsing CDI in a young child. We recommend that this strategy be reserved for complicated cases of CDI that fail conventional therapy until randomized studies can confirm the safety and effectiveness of fecal bacteriotherapy in children.

  19. Clostridium difficile Infection Seasonality: Patterns across Hemispheres and Continents – A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Furuya-Kanamori, Luis; McKenzie, Samantha J.; Yakob, Laith; Clark, Justin; Paterson, David L.; Riley, Thomas V.; Clements, Archie C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies have demonstrated seasonal variability in rates of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Synthesising all available information on seasonality is a necessary step in identifying large-scale epidemiological patterns and elucidating underlying causes. Methods Three medical and life sciences publication databases were searched from inception to October 2014 for longitudinal epidemiological studies written in English, Spanish or Portuguese that reported the incidence of CDI. The monthly frequency of CDI were extracted, standardized and weighted according to the number of follow-up months. Cross correlation coefficients (XCORR) were calculated to examine the correlation and lag between the year-month frequencies of reported CDI across hemispheres and continents. Results The search identified 13, 5 and 2 studies from North America, Europe, and Oceania, respectively that met the inclusion criteria. CDI had a similar seasonal pattern in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere characterized by a peak in spring and lower frequencies of CDI in summer/autumn with a lag of 8 months (XCORR = 0.60) between hemispheres. There was no difference between the seasonal patterns across European and North American countries. Conclusion CDI demonstrates a distinct seasonal pattern that is consistent across North America, Europe and Oceania. Further studies are required to identify the driving factors of the observed seasonality. PMID:25775463

  20. Gut microbiota composition and Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized elderly individuals: a metagenomic study

    PubMed Central

    Milani, Christian; Ticinesi, Andrea; Gerritsen, Jacoline; Nouvenne, Antonio; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Turroni, Francesca; Duranti, Sabrina; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Ferrario, Chiara; Maggio, Marcello; Lauretani, Fulvio; De Vos, Willem; van Sinderen, Douwe; Meschi, Tiziana; Ventura, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota composition of elderly hospitalized patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) exposed to previous antibiotic treatment is still poorly investigated. The aim of this study was to compare the microbiota composition by means of 16S rRNA microbial profiling among three groups of hospitalized elderly patients (age ≥ 65) under standard diet including 25 CDI-positive (CDI group), 29 CDI-negative exposed to antibiotic treatment (AB+ group) and 30 CDI-negative subjects not on antibiotic treatment (AB− group). The functional properties of the gut microbiomes of CDI-positive vs CDI-negative subjects were also assessed by shotgun metagenomics. A significantly lower microbial diversity was detected in CDI samples, whose microbiomes clustered separately from CDI-negative specimens. CDI was associated with a significant under-representation of gut commensals with putative protective functionalities, including Bacteroides, Alistipes, Lachnospira and Barnesiella, and over-representation of opportunistic pathogens. These findings were confirmed by functional shotgun metagenomics analyses, including an in-depth profiling of the Peptostreptococcaceae family. In CDI-negative patients, antibiotic treatment was associated with significant depletion of few commensals like Alistipes, but not with a reduction in species richness. A better understanding of the correlations between CDI and the microbiota in high-risk elderly subjects may contribute to identify therapeutic targets for CDI. PMID:27166072

  1. Enhanced surveillance of Clostridium difficile infection occurring outside hospital, England, 2011 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Fawley, Warren N; Davies, Kerrie A; Morris, Trefor; Parnell, Peter; Howe, Robin; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-07-21

    There are limited national epidemiological data for community-associated (CA)-Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs). Between March 2011 and March 2013, laboratories in England submitted to the Clostridium difficile Ribotyping Network (CDRN) up to 10 diarrhoeal faecal samples from successive patients with CA-CDI, defined here as C. difficile toxin-positive diarrhoea commencing outside hospital (or less than 48 hours after hospital admission), including those cases associated with community-based residential care, with no discharge from hospital within the previous 12 weeks. Patient demographics and C. difficile PCR ribotypes were compared for CA-CDIs in our study and presumed healthcare-associated (HA) CDIs via CDRN. Ribotype diversity indices, ranking and relative prevalences were very similar in CA- vs HA-CDIs, although ribotypes 002 (p ≤ 0.0001),020 (p = 0.009) and 056 (p < 0.0001) predominated in CA-CDIs; ribotype 027 (p = 0.01) predominated in HA-CDIs. Epidemic ribotypes 027 and 078 predominated in institutional residents with CDI (including care/nursing homes) compared with people with CDI living at home. Ribotype diversity decreased with increasing age in HA-CDIs, but not in CA-CDIs. Ribotype 078 CA-CDIs were significantly more common in elderly people (3.4% (6/174) vs 8.7% (45/519) in those aged < 65 and ≥ 65 years, respectively; p = 0.019). No antibiotics were prescribed in the previous four weeks in about twofold more CA-CDI vs HAs (38.6% (129/334) vs 20.3% (1,226/6,028); p < 0.0001). We found very similar ribotype distributions in CA- and HA-CDIs, although a few ribotypes significantly predominated in one setting. These national data emphasise the close interplay between, and likely common reservoirs for, CDIs, particularly when epidemic strains are not dominant. PMID:27487436

  2. Identification of toxigenic Clostridium difficile by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, N; Ou, C Y; Kato, H; Bartley, S L; Brown, V K; Dowell, V R; Ueno, K

    1991-01-01

    Toxigenic strains of Clostridium difficile are causative agents of pseudomembranous colitis and antimicrobial agent-associated diarrhea and colitis. The toxigenicity is routinely assayed by using highly sensitive cell cultures. We used a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to differentiate toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains of C. difficile. Two sets of oligonucleotide primer pairs derived from nonrepeating sequences of the toxin A gene were used to amplify 546- and 252-bp DNA fragments. A primer pair derived from repeating sequences of the toxin A gene was used to amplify a 1,266-bp DNA product. Amplified products were visualized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by ethidium bromide staining. All 35 cytotoxic strains of C. difficile tested generated the expected amplified DNA. In contrast, none of the 26 noncytotoxic strains tested gave positive results. Although the toxins of C. difficile have been demonstrated to cross-react serologically with the toxins of Clostridium sordellii, we did not detect any amplified DNA in two cytotoxic strains or seven noncytotoxic strains of C. sordellii. PCR was negative in all 30 strains of 20 other Clostridium species. Southern hybridization of HindIII-digested genomic DNA by use of subgenomic probes showed a single hybridization band in toxigenic strains but not in nontoxigenic strains. PCR appears to be a sensitive and specific assay for the rapid identification of toxigenic C. difficile. Nontoxigenic C. difficile appeared to lack the C. difficile toxin A gene. Images PMID:1993763

  3. Characterization of temperate phages infecting Clostridium difficile isolates of human and animal origins.

    PubMed

    Sekulovic, Ognjen; Garneau, Julian R; Néron, Audrey; Fortier, Louis-Charles

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive pathogen infecting humans and animals. Recent studies suggest that animals could represent potential reservoirs of C. difficile that could then transfer to humans. Temperate phages contribute to the evolution of most bacteria, for example, by promoting the transduction of virulence, fitness, and antibiotic resistance genes. In C. difficile, little is known about their role, mainly because suitable propagating hosts and conditions are lacking. Here we report the isolation, propagation, and preliminary characterization of nine temperate phages from animal and human C. difficile isolates. Prophages were induced by UV light from 58 C. difficile isolates of animal and human origins. Using soft agar overlays with 27 different C. difficile test strains, we isolated and further propagated nine temperate phages: two from horse isolates (ΦCD481-1 and ΦCD481-2), three from dog isolates (ΦCD505, ΦCD506, and ΦCD508), and four from human isolates (ΦCD24-2, ΦCD111, ΦCD146, and ΦCD526). Two phages are members of the Siphoviridae family (ΦCD111 and ΦCD146), while the others are Myoviridae phages. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and restriction enzyme analyses showed that all of the phages had unique double-stranded DNA genomes of 30 to 60 kb. Phages induced from human C. difficile isolates, especially the members of the Siphoviridae family, had a broader host range than phages from animal C. difficile isolates. Nevertheless, most of the phages could infect both human and animal strains. Phage transduction of antibiotic resistance was recently reported in C. difficile. Our findings therefore call for further investigation of the potential risk of transduction between animal and human C. difficile isolates.

  4. Clostridium difficile infection diagnosis in a paediatric population: comparison of methodologies.

    PubMed

    Hart, J; Putsathit, P; Knight, D R; Sammels, L; Riley, T V; Keil, A

    2014-09-01

    The increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in paediatric hospitalised populations, combined with the emergence of hypervirulent strains, community-acquired CDI and the need for prompt treatment and infection control, makes the rapid, accurate diagnosis of CDI crucial. We validated commonly used C. difficile diagnostic tests in a paediatric hospital population. From October 2011 to January 2012, 150 consecutive stools were collected from 75 patients at a tertiary paediatric hospital in Perth, Western Australia. Stools were tested using: C. Diff Quik Chek Complete, Illumigene C. difficile, GeneOhm Cdiff, cycloserine cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA) culture, and cell culture cytotoxin neutralisation assay (CCNA). The reference standard was growth on CCFA or Cdiff Chromagar and PCR on isolates to detect tcdA, tcdB, cdtA, and cdtB. Isolates were PCR ribotyped. The prevalence of CDI was high (43 % of patients). Quik Chek Complete glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) demonstrated a low negative predictive value (NPV) (93 %). Both CCNA and Quik Chek Complete toxin A/B had poor sensitivity (33 % and 29 % respectively). Molecular methods both had 89 % sensitivity. Algorithms using GDH + Illumigene or GeneOhm reduced the sensitivity to 85 % and 83 % respectively. Ribotype UK014/20 predominated. GDH NPV and GeneOhm and Illumigene sensitivities were reduced compared with adult studies. Quik Chek Complete and CCNA cannot reliably detect toxigenic CDI. A GDH first algorithm showed reduced sensitivity. In a high prevalence paediatric population, molecular methods alone are recommended over the use of GDH algorithm or culture and CCNA, as they demonstrate the best test performance characteristics.

  5. Risk Factors for Recurrence, Complications and Mortality in Clostridium difficile Infection: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Abou Chakra, Claire Nour; Pepin, Jacques; Sirard, Stephanie; Valiquette, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can lead to complications, recurrence, and death. Numerous studies have assessed risk factors for these unfavourable outcomes, but systematic reviews or meta-analyses published so far were limited in scope or in quality. Methods A systematic review was completed according to PRISMA guidelines. An electronic search in five databases was performed. Studies published until October 2013 were included if risk factors for at least one CDI outcome were assessed with multivariate analyses. Results 68 studies were included: 24 assessed risk factors for recurrence, 18 for complicated CDI, 8 for treatment failure, and 30 for mortality. Most studies accounted for mortality in the definition of complicated CDI. Important variables were inconsistently reported, such as previous episodes and use of antibiotics. Substantial heterogeneity and methodological limitations were noted, mainly in the sample size, the definition of the outcomes and periods of follow-up, precluding a meta-analysis. Older age, use of antibiotics after diagnosis, use of proton pump inhibitors, and strain type were the most frequent risk factors for recurrence. Older age, leucocytosis, renal failure and co-morbidities were frequent risk factors for complicated CDI. When considered alone, mortality was associated with age, co-morbidities, hypo-albuminemia, leucocytosis, acute renal failure, and infection with ribotype 027. Conclusion Laboratory parameters currently used in European and American guidelines to define patients at risk of a complicated CDI are adequate. Strategies for the management of CDI should be tailored according to the age of the patient, biological markers of severity, and underlying co-morbidities. PMID:24897375

  6. Environmental Contamination in Households of Patients with Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bobr, Aleh; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Johnston, Brian D.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Khoruts, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (R-CDI) is common and difficult to treat, potentially necessitating fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). Although C. difficile spores persist in the hospital environment and cause infection, little is known about their potential presence or importance in the household environment. Households of R-CDI subjects in the peri-FMT period and of geographically matched and age-matched controls were analyzed for the presence of C. difficile. Household environmental surfaces and fecal samples from humans and pets in the household were examined. Households of post-FMT subjects were also examined (environmental surfaces only). Participants were surveyed regarding their personal history and household cleaning habits. Species identity and molecular characteristics of presumptive C. difficile isolates from environmental and fecal samples were determined by using the Pro kit (Remel, USA), Gram staining, PCR, toxinotyping, tcdC gene sequencing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Environmental cultures detected C. difficile on ≥1 surface in 8/8 (100%) peri-FMT households, versus 3/8 (38%) post-FMT households and 3/8 (38%) control households (P = 0.025). The most common C. difficile-positive sites were the vacuum (11/27; 41%), toilet (8/30; 27%), and bathroom sink (5/29; 17%). C. difficile was detected in 3/36 (8%) fecal samples (two R-CDI subjects and one household member). Nine (90%) of 10 households with multiple C. difficile-positive samples had a single genotype present each. In conclusion, C. difficile was found in the household environment of R-CDI patients, but whether it was found as a cause or consequence of R-CDI is unknown. If household contamination leads to R-CDI, effective decontamination may be protective. PMID:26921425

  7. High resolution melt analysis to track infections due to ribotype 027 Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Grando, Danilla; Said, Mohamed M; Mayall, Barrie C; Gurtler, Volker

    2012-05-01

    The increased prevalence of hypervirulent ribotype 027 Clostridium difficile requires rapid identification of isolates in order to implement timely infection control strategies. High resolution melt (HRM) analysis of PCR products can identify strain variation amongst genera of bacteria. The intergenic (16S-23S rDNA) spacer region contains sequence regions conserved within genera and other sequence region variables between species within genera. We wished to investigate whether HRM analysis of PCR ribotyping products could identify ribotype 027 C. difficile. Ribotyping was performed on 93 clinical isolates and five control strains and band patterns were analysed using GelCompar II (Applied Maths, USA). Real-time PCR using ribotyping primers was performed and normalised melt curves were generated. The HRM data was then imported into ScreenClust software (QIAGEN) to generate principal component analysis graphs depicting clustered relationships of strains. Ribotyping produced clear PCR bands for 88/98 isolates tested. Dendrograms generated by GelCompar showed a diversity of ribotype patterns amongst these 88 isolates with 18 groups identified with 70% homology. One clinical isolate showed 100% homology with the control 027 strains. ScreenClust analysis of the same 88 HRM results showed clustering of isolates, with 027 strains identifiable as a unique cluster. HRM analysis correctly identified the control 027 stains and the clinical isolate shown to be 027. HRM combined with ScreenClust analysis of real-time PCR products of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region successfully identified ribotype 027 strains. For infection control purposes this was achieved within 2-3 h of colony isolation.

  8. Environmental Contamination in Households of Patients with Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Megan K; Bobr, Aleh; Kuskowski, Michael A; Johnston, Brian D; Sadowsky, Michael J; Khoruts, Alexander; Johnson, James R

    2016-05-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (R-CDI) is common and difficult to treat, potentially necessitating fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). Although C. difficilespores persist in the hospital environment and cause infection, little is known about their potential presence or importance in the household environment. Households of R-CDI subjects in the peri-FMT period and of geographically matched and age-matched controls were analyzed for the presence ofC. difficile Household environmental surfaces and fecal samples from humans and pets in the household were examined. Households of post-FMT subjects were also examined (environmental surfaces only). Participants were surveyed regarding their personal history and household cleaning habits. Species identity and molecular characteristics of presumptive C. difficile isolates from environmental and fecal samples were determined by using the Pro kit (Remel, USA), Gram staining, PCR, toxinotyping, tcdC gene sequencing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Environmental cultures detected C. difficile on ≥1 surface in 8/8 (100%) peri-FMT households, versus 3/8 (38%) post-FMT households and 3/8 (38%) control households (P= 0.025). The most common C. difficile-positive sites were the vacuum (11/27; 41%), toilet (8/30; 27%), and bathroom sink (5/29; 17%).C. difficile was detected in 3/36 (8%) fecal samples (two R-CDI subjects and one household member). Nine (90%) of 10 households with multiple C. difficile-positive samples had a single genotype present each. In conclusion,C. difficile was found in the household environment of R-CDI patients, but whether it was found as a cause or consequence of R-CDI is unknown. If household contamination leads to R-CDI, effective decontamination may be protective. PMID:26921425

  9. Fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Webb, B J; Brunner, A; Ford, C D; Gazdik, M A; Petersen, F B; Hoda, D

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a consequence of intestinal dysbiosis and is particularly common following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective method of treating CDI by correcting intestinal dysbiosis by passive transfer of healthy donor microflora. FMT has not been widely used in immunocompromised patients, including HSCT recipients, owing to concern for donor-derived infection. Here, we describe initial results of an FMT program for CDI at a US HSCT center. Seven HSCT recipients underwent FMT between February 2015 and February 2016. Mean time post HSCT was 635 days (25-75 interquartile range [IQR] 38-791). Five of the patients (71.4%) were on immunosuppressive therapy at FMT; 4 had required long-term suppressive oral vancomycin therapy because of immediate recurrence after antibiotic cessation. Stool donors underwent comprehensive health and behavioral screening and laboratory testing of serum and stool for 32 potential pathogens. FMT was administered via the naso-jejunal route in 6 of the 7 patients. Mean follow-up was 265 days (IQR 51-288). Minor post-FMT adverse effects included self-limited bloating and urgency. One patient was suspected of having post-FMT small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. No serious adverse events were noted and all-cause mortality was 0%. Six of 7 (85.7%) patients had no recurrence; 1 patient recurred at day 156 post FMT after taking an oral antibiotic and required repeat FMT, after which no recurrence has occurred. Diarrhea was improved in all patients and 1 patient with gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease was able to taper off systemic immunosuppression after FMT. With careful donor selection and laboratory screening, FMT appears to be a safe and effective therapy for CDI in HSCT patients and may confer additional benefits. Larger studies are necessary to confirm safety and efficacy and explore other possible effects.

  10. Current application and future perspectives of molecular typing methods to study Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Knetsch, C W; Lawley, T D; Hensgens, M P; Corver, J; Wilcox, M W; Kuijper, E J

    2013-01-01

    Molecular typing is an essential tool to monitor Clostridium difficile infections and outbreaks within healthcare facilities. Molecular typing also plays a key role in defining the regional and global changes in circulating C. difficile types. The patterns of C. difficile types circulating within Europe (and globally) remain poorly understood, although international efforts are under way to understand the spatial and temporal patterns of C. difficile types. A complete picture is essential to properly investigate type-specific risk factors for C. difficile infections (CDI) and track long-range transmission. Currently, conventional agarose gel-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotyping is the most common typing method used in Europe to type C. difficile. Although this method has proved to be useful to study epidemiology on local, national and European level, efforts are made to replace it with capillary electrophoresis PCR ribotyping to increase pattern recognition, reproducibility and interpretation. However, this method lacks sufficient discriminatory power to study outbreaks and therefore multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) has been developed to study transmission between humans, animals and food. Sequence-based methods are increasingly being used for C. difficile fingerprinting/typing because of their ability to discriminate between highly related strains, the ease of data interpretation and transferability of data. The first studies using whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism typing of healthcare-associated C. difficile within a clinically relevant timeframe are very promising and, although limited to select facilities because of complex data interpretation and high costs, these approaches will likely become commonly used over the coming years. PMID:23369393

  11. Environmental Contamination in Households of Patients with Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Megan K; Bobr, Aleh; Kuskowski, Michael A; Johnston, Brian D; Sadowsky, Michael J; Khoruts, Alexander; Johnson, James R

    2016-05-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (R-CDI) is common and difficult to treat, potentially necessitating fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). Although C. difficilespores persist in the hospital environment and cause infection, little is known about their potential presence or importance in the household environment. Households of R-CDI subjects in the peri-FMT period and of geographically matched and age-matched controls were analyzed for the presence ofC. difficile Household environmental surfaces and fecal samples from humans and pets in the household were examined. Households of post-FMT subjects were also examined (environmental surfaces only). Participants were surveyed regarding their personal history and household cleaning habits. Species identity and molecular characteristics of presumptive C. difficile isolates from environmental and fecal samples were determined by using the Pro kit (Remel, USA), Gram staining, PCR, toxinotyping, tcdC gene sequencing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Environmental cultures detected C. difficile on ≥1 surface in 8/8 (100%) peri-FMT households, versus 3/8 (38%) post-FMT households and 3/8 (38%) control households (P= 0.025). The most common C. difficile-positive sites were the vacuum (11/27; 41%), toilet (8/30; 27%), and bathroom sink (5/29; 17%).C. difficile was detected in 3/36 (8%) fecal samples (two R-CDI subjects and one household member). Nine (90%) of 10 households with multiple C. difficile-positive samples had a single genotype present each. In conclusion,C. difficile was found in the household environment of R-CDI patients, but whether it was found as a cause or consequence of R-CDI is unknown. If household contamination leads to R-CDI, effective decontamination may be protective.

  12. Association Between Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Practices and Community-Associated Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dantes, Raymund; Mu, Yi; Hicks, Lauri A.; Cohen, Jessica; Bamberg, Wendy; Beldavs, Zintars G.; Dumyati, Ghinwa; Farley, Monica M.; Holzbauer, Stacy; Meek, James; Phipps, Erin; Wilson, Lucy; Winston, Lisa G.; McDonald, L. Clifford; Lessa, Fernanda C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Antibiotic use predisposes patients to Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), and approximately 32% of these infections are community-associated (CA) CDI. The population-level impact of antibiotic use on adult CA-CDI rates is not well described. Methods. We used 2011 active population- and laboratory-based surveillance data from 9 US geographic locations to identify adult CA-CDI cases, defined as C difficile-positive stool specimens (by toxin or molecular assay) collected from outpatients or from patients ≤3 days after hospital admission. All patients were surveillance area residents and aged ≥20 years with no positive test ≤8 weeks prior and no overnight stay in a healthcare facility ≤12 weeks prior. Outpatient oral antibiotic prescriptions dispensed in 2010 were obtained from the IMS Health Xponent database. Regression models examined the association between outpatient antibiotic prescribing and adult CA-CDI rates. Methods. Healthcare providers prescribed 5.2 million courses of antibiotics among adults in the surveillance population in 2010, for an average of 0.73 per person. Across surveillance sites, antibiotic prescription rates (0.50–0.88 prescriptions per capita) and unadjusted CA-CDI rates (40.7–139.3 cases per 100 000 persons) varied. In regression modeling, reducing antibiotic prescribing rates by 10% among persons ≥20 years old was associated with a 17% (95% confidence interval, 6.0%–26.3%; P = .032) decrease in CA-CDI rates after adjusting for age, gender, race, and type of diagnostic assay. Reductions in prescribing penicillins and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were associated with the greatest decreases in CA-CDI rates. Conclusions and Relevance. Community-associated CDI prevention should include reducing unnecessary outpatient antibiotic use. A modest reduction of 10% in outpatient antibiotic prescribing can have a disproportionate impact on reducing CA-CDI rates. PMID:26509182

  13. Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection: A Systematic Survey of Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lytvyn, Lyubov; Mertz, Dominik; Sadeghirad, Behnam; Alaklobi, Faisal; Selva, Anna; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Johnston, Bradley C

    2016-08-01

    BACKGROUND Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of hospital-acquired infectious diarrhea. OBJECTIVE To analyze the methodological quality, content, and supporting evidence among clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) on CDI prevention. DESIGN AND SETTING We searched medical databases and gray literature for CPGs on CDI prevention published January 2004-January 2015. Three reviewers independently screened articles and rated CPG quality using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) instrument, composed of 23 items, rated 1-7, within 6 domains. We reported each domain score as a percentage of its maximum possible score and standardized range. We summarized recommendations, extracted their supporting articles, and rated individually the level of evidence using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. RESULTS Of 2,578 articles screened, 5 guidelines met inclusion criteria. Median AGREE II scores and interquartile ranges were: clarity of presentation, 75.9% (75.9%-79.6%); scope and purpose, 74.1% (68.5%-85.2%); editorial independence, 63.9% (47.2%-66.7%); applicability, 43.1% (19.4%-55.6%); stakeholder involvement, 40.7% (38.9%-44.4%); and rigor of development, 18.1% (17.4%-35.4%). CPGs addressed several common strategies for CDI prevention, including antibiotic stewardship, hypochlorite solutions, probiotic prophylaxis, and bundle strategies. Recommendations were often not consistent with evidence, and most were based on low-level studies. CONCLUSION CPGs did not adhere well to AGREE II reporting standards. Furthermore, there was limited transparency in moving from evidence to recommendations. CDI prevention CPGs need to better adhere to AGREE-II and be transparent in moving from evidence to recommendations, and recommendations need to be consistent with available evidence. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:901-908. PMID:27267201

  14. Performance management of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitals - The carrot or stick approach?

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Fidelma; Riordan, Mary O

    2016-02-01

    Public and political pressure for healthcare quality indicator monitoring, specifically healthcare-associated infection (HAI) has intensified the debate regarding the merits of public reporting and target setting as policy approaches. This paper reviews the evidence for these approaches with a focus on HAI, including Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Healthcare key performance indicators (KPIs) and associated targets have been used widely with little evaluation. While targets are associated with some HAI reductions including CDI, as their control is multi-factorial, it is likely that reductions are due to numerous, concurrent control measures. Targets may help tackle organizational-wide issues that require high level management engagement and have contributed to the increased access and influence of infection control teams. HAI public reporting has also gained traction and is mandatory in many countries despite little scientific evaluation. CDI is one of the KPIs used but there is little consensus as to the best KPI for public reporting. Countries without public reporting have also seen improvements. Using indicator-based strategies rather than evidence-based ones risk improving the KPI but not necessarily quality of care. 'Bottom-up' approaches focussing on quality improvement and innovation generated by front line staff are seen as a lever for sustainable change. Positive deviance, where the resourcefulness and problem solving abilities of staff is harnessed, enables 'bottom-up' changes with process and outcome improvements. As implementation of best practice in healthcare is dependent on behavioural and cultural change, it is most likely that a combination of 'top-down' and 'bottom-up' approaches are required for sustainable improvement. This combined approach was used to improve staff influenza vaccination rates. Regulation may initially direct the spot-light onto infection control needs but true sustainable HAI reduction will only be fostered with

  15. Interleukin-22 and CD160 play additive roles in the host mucosal response to Clostridium difficile infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sadighi Akha, Amir A; McDermott, Andrew J; Theriot, Casey M; Carlson, Paul E; Frank, Charles R; McDonald, Roderick A; Falkowski, Nicole R; Bergin, Ingrid L; Young, Vincent B; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work has shown the significant up-regulation of Il22 and increased phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) as part of the mucosal inflammatory response to Clostridium difficile infection in mice. Others have shown that phosphorylation of STAT3 at mucosal surfaces includes interleukin-22 (IL-22) and CD160-mediated components. The current study sought to determine the potential role(s) of IL-22 and/or CD160 in the mucosal response to C. difficile infection. Clostridium difficile-infected mice treated with anti-IL-22, anti-CD160 or a combination of the two showed significantly reduced STAT3 phosphorylation in comparison to C. difficile-infected mice that had not received either antibody. In addition, C. difficile-infected mice treated with anti-IL-22/CD160 induced a smaller set of genes, and at significantly lower levels than the untreated C. difficile-infected mice. The affected genes included pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and anti-microbial peptides. Furthermore, histopathological and flow cytometric assessments both showed a significantly reduced influx of neutrophils in C. difficile-infected mice treated with anti-IL-22/CD160. These data demonstrate that IL-22 and CD160 are together responsible for a significant fraction of the colonic STAT3 phosphorylation in C. difficile infection. They also underscore the additive effects of IL-22 and CD160 in mediating both the pro-inflammatory and pro-survival aspects of the host mucosal response in this infection. PMID:25327211

  16. Non-inferiority of pulsed xenon UV light versus bleach for reducing environmental Clostridium difficile contamination on high-touch surfaces in Clostridium difficile infection isolation rooms.

    PubMed

    Ghantoji, Shashank S; Stibich, Mark; Stachowiak, Julie; Cantu, Sherry; Adachi, Javier A; Raad, Issam I; Chemaly, Roy F

    2015-02-01

    The standard for Clostridium difficile surface decontamination is bleach solution at a concentration of 10 % of sodium hypochlorite. Pulsed xenon UV light (PX-UV) is a means of quickly producing germicidal UV that has been shown to be effective in reducing environmental contamination by C. difficile spores. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether PX-UV was equivalent to bleach for decontamination of surfaces in C. difficile infection isolation rooms. High-touch surfaces in rooms previously occupied by C. difficile infected patients were sampled after discharge but before and after cleaning using either bleach or non-bleach cleaning followed by 15 min of PX-UV treatment. A total of 298 samples were collected by using a moistened wipe specifically designed for the removal of spores. Prior to disinfection, the mean contamination level was 2.39 c.f.u. for bleach rooms and 22.97 for UV rooms. After disinfection, the mean level of contamination for bleach was 0.71 c.f.u. (P = 0.1380), and 1.19 c.f.u. (P = 0.0017) for PX-UV disinfected rooms. The difference in final contamination levels between the two cleaning protocols was not significantly different (P = 0.9838). PX-UV disinfection appears to be at least equivalent to bleach in the ability to decrease environmental contamination with C. difficile spores. Larger studies are needed to validate this conclusion.

  17. Non-inferiority of pulsed xenon UV light versus bleach for reducing environmental Clostridium difficile contamination on high-touch surfaces in Clostridium difficile infection isolation rooms

    PubMed Central

    Ghantoji, Shashank S.; Stibich, Mark; Stachowiak, Julie; Cantu, Sherry; Adachi, Javier A.; Raad, Issam I.

    2015-01-01

    The standard for Clostridium difficile surface decontamination is bleach solution at a concentration of 10 % of sodium hypochlorite. Pulsed xenon UV light (PX-UV) is a means of quickly producing germicidal UV that has been shown to be effective in reducing environmental contamination by C. difficile spores. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether PX-UV was equivalent to bleach for decontamination of surfaces in C. difficile infection isolation rooms. High-touch surfaces in rooms previously occupied by C. difficile infected patients were sampled after discharge but before and after cleaning using either bleach or non-bleach cleaning followed by 15 min of PX-UV treatment. A total of 298 samples were collected by using a moistened wipe specifically designed for the removal of spores. Prior to disinfection, the mean contamination level was 2.39 c.f.u. for bleach rooms and 22.97 for UV rooms. After disinfection, the mean level of contamination for bleach was 0.71 c.f.u. (P = 0.1380), and 1.19 c.f.u. (P = 0.0017) for PX-UV disinfected rooms. The difference in final contamination levels between the two cleaning protocols was not significantly different (P = 0.9838). PX-UV disinfection appears to be at least equivalent to bleach in the ability to decrease environmental contamination with C. difficile spores. Larger studies are needed to validate this conclusion. PMID:25627208

  18. Antimicrobial Resistance and Reduced Susceptibility in Clostridium difficile: Potential Consequences for Induction, Treatment, and Recurrence of C. difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Simon D.; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains a substantial burden on healthcare systems and is likely to remain so given our reliance on antimicrobial therapies to treat bacterial infections, especially in an aging population in whom multiple co-morbidities are common. Antimicrobial agents are a key component in the aetiology of CDI, both in the establishment of the infection and also in its treatment. The purpose of this review is to summarise the role of antimicrobial agents in primary and recurrent CDI; assessing why certain antimicrobial classes may predispose to the induction of CDI according to a balance between antimicrobial activity against the gut microflora and C. difficile. Considering these aspects of CDI is important in both the prevention of the infection and in the development of new antimicrobial treatments. PMID:27025625

  19. Fidaxomicin: A novel agent for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhanel, George G; Walkty, Andrew J; Karlowsky, James A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Due to the limitations of existing treatment options for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), new therapies are needed. OBJECTIVE: To review the available data on fidaxomicin regarding chemistry, mechanisms of action and resistance, in vitro activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, efficacy and safety in clinical trials, and place in therapy. METHODS: A search of PubMed using the terms “fidaxomicin”, “OPT-80”, “PAR-101”, “OP-1118”, “difimicin”, “tiacumicin” and “lipiarmycin” was performed. All English-language articles from January 1983 to November 2014 were reviewed, as well as bibliographies of all articles. RESULTS: Fidaxomicin is the first macrocyclic lactone antibiotic with activity versus C difficile. It inhibits RNA polymerase, therefore, preventing transcription. Fidaxomicin (and its active metabolite OP-1118) is bactericidal against C difficile and exhibits a prolonged postantibiotic effect (approximately 10 h). Other than for C difficile, fidaxomicin demonstrated only moderate inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria and was a poor inhibitor of normal colonic flora, including anaerobes and enteric Gram-negative bacilli. After oral administration (200 mg two times per day for 10 days), fidaxomicin achieved low serum concentration levels but high fecal concentration levels (mean approximately 1400 μg/g stool). Phase 3 clinical trials involving adults with CDI demonstrated that 200 mg fidaxomicin twice daily for 10 days was noninferior to 125 mg oral vancomycin four times daily for 10 days in regard to clinical response at the end of therapy. Fidaxomicin was, however, reported to be superior to oral vancomycin in reducing recurrent CDI and achieving a sustained clinical response (assessed at day 28) for patients infected with non-BI/NAP1/027 strains. CONCLUSION: Fidaxomicin was noninferior to oral vancomycin with regard to clinical response at the end of CDI therapy. Fidaxomicin has been

  20. Association between Clostridium difficile infection and antimicrobial usage in a large group of English hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Joao B; Farragher, Tracey M; Tully, Mary P; Cooke, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to determine the association between the reduction in the number of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) cases reported by the English National Health Service (NHS) hospitals and concurrent antimicrobial use. Methods A retrospective ecological study for January 2005 to December 2008 was conducted using data from 26 of the 29 NHS trusts (i.e. a trust manages one or more hospitals) located in the North West Strategic Health Authority of England. Antimicrobial use data, for patients of all ages, were provided by IMS Health, and CDI case data for patients aged ≥65 years were provided by the Health Protection Agency. Antimicrobial use was converted into defined daily doses (DDDs). The overall association between antimicrobial use and CDI for the trusts was investigated using multilevel models. Results Our study shows a positive significant association between the CDI cases and the use of the following antimicrobials: ‘third-generation cephalosporins’ [11.62 CDI cases per 1000 DDDs; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.92–17.31]; ‘fluoroquinolones’ (4.79 CDI cases per 1000 DDDs; 95% CI, 2.83–6.74); and ‘second-generation cephalosporins’ (4.25 CDI cases per 1000 DDDs; 95% CI, 1.66–6.83). The strength of this association was not significantly different (95% CI) among the antimicrobial groups. Conclusions This study shows that the reduction in the number of CDI cases reported by the English NHS hospitals is associated with concurrent reductions in antimicrobial use. This means that the number of CDI cases over time decreased in a similar fashion to the usage of various antimicrobials. PMID:24868578

  1. Outcomes of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized leukemia patients: a nationwide analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ruihong; Greenberg, Alan; Stone, Christian D

    2015-07-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased among hospitalized patients and is a common complication of leukemia. We investigated the risks for and outcomes of CDI in hospitalized leukemia patients. METHODS Adults with a primary diagnosis of leukemia were extracted from the United States Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, 2005-2011. The primary outcomes of interest were CDI incidence, CDI-associated mortality, length of stay (LOS), and charges. In a secondary analysis, we sought to identify independent risk factors for CDI in leukemia patients. Logistic regression was used to derive odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS A total of 1,243,107 leukemia hospitalizations were identified. Overall CDI incidence was 3.4% and increased from 3.0% to 3.5% during the 7-year study period. Leukemia patients had 2.6-fold higher risk for CDI than non-leukemia patients, adjusted for LOS. CDI was associated with a 20% increase in mortality of leukemia patients, as well as 2.6 times prolonged LOS and higher hospital charges. Multivariate analysis revealed that age >65 years (OR, 1.13), male gender (OR, 1.14), prolonged LOS, admission to teaching hospital (OR, 1.16), complications of sepsis (OR, 1.83), neutropenia (OR, 1.35), renal failure (OR, 1.18), and bone marrow or stem cell transplantation (OR, 1.27) were significantly associated with CDI occurrence. CONCLUSIONS Hospitalized leukemia patients have greater than twice the risk of CDI than non-leukemia patients. The incidence of CDI in this population increased 16.7% from 2005 to 2011. Development of CDI in leukemia patients was associated with increased mortality, longer LOS, and higher hospital charges.

  2. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Six Strategies to Treat Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lapointe-Shaw, Lauren; Tran, Kim L.; Coyte, Peter C.; Hancock-Howard, Rebecca L.; Powis, Jeff; Poutanen, Susan M.; Hota, Susy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of six treatment strategies for patients diagnosed with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Canada: 1. oral metronidazole; 2. oral vancomycin; 3.oral fidaxomicin; 4. fecal transplantation by enema; 5. fecal transplantation by nasogastric tube; and 6. fecal transplantation by colonoscopy. Perspective Public insurer for all hospital and physician services. Setting Ontario, Canada. Methods A decision analytic model was used to model costs and lifetime health effects of each strategy for a typical patient experiencing up to three recurrences, over 18 weeks. Recurrence data and utilities were obtained from published sources. Cost data was obtained from published sources and hospitals in Toronto, Canada. The willingness-to-pay threshold was $50,000/QALY gained. Results Fecal transplantation by colonoscopy dominated all other strategies in the base case, as it was less costly and more effective than all alternatives. After accounting for uncertainty in all model parameters, there was an 87% probability that fecal transplantation by colonoscopy was the most beneficial strategy. If colonoscopy was not available, fecal transplantation by enema was cost-effective at $1,708 per QALY gained, compared to metronidazole. In addition, fecal transplantation by enema was the preferred strategy if the probability of recurrence following this strategy was below 8.7%. If fecal transplantation by any means was unavailable, fidaxomicin was cost-effective at an additional cost of $25,968 per QALY gained, compared to metronidazole. Conclusion Fecal transplantation by colonoscopy (or enema, if colonoscopy is unavailable) is cost-effective for treating recurrent CDI in Canada. Where fecal transplantation is not available, fidaxomicin is also cost-effective. PMID:26901316

  3. Impact of clinical awareness and diagnostic tests on the underdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, L; Reigadas, E; Marín, M; Martín, A; Catalán, P; Bouza, E

    2015-08-01

    A multicenter study of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) performed during 2008 in Spain revealed that two of every three episodes went undiagnosed or were misdiagnosed owing to nonsensitive diagnostic tests or lack of clinical suspicion and request. Since then, efforts have been made to improve the diagnostic tests used by laboratories and to increase the awareness of this disease among both clinicians and microbiologists. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of these efforts by assessing the current magnitude of underdiagnosis of CDI in Spain using two point-prevalence studies performed on one day each in January and July of 2013. A total of 111 Spanish laboratories selected all unformed stool specimens received for microbiological diagnosis on these days, and toxigenic culture was performed at a central reference laboratory. Toxigenic isolates were characterized both pheno- and genotypically. The reference laboratory detected 103 episodes of CDI in patients aged 2 years or more. Half (50.5 %) of the episodes were not diagnosed in the participating laboratories, owing to insensitive diagnostic tests (15.5 %) or the lack of clinical suspicion and request (35.0 %). The main ribotypes were 014, 078/126, 001/072, and 106. Ribotype 027 caused 2.9 % of all cases. Despite all the interventions undertaken, CDI remains a highly neglected disease because of the lack of sensitive diagnostic tests in some institutions and, especially, the absence of clinical suspicion, mainly in patients with community-associated CDI. Toxigenic C. difficile should be routinely sought in unformed stools sent for microbiological diagnosis, regardless of their origin.

  4. Minimal systemic and high faecal exposure to cadazolid in patients with severe Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Gehin, Martine; Desnica, Boško; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2015-11-01

    Cadazolid is under development as an oral treatment for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), which is the most common infectious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Low systemic cadazolid exposures were previously reported in healthy subjects following both single and multiple oral dosing. The main objective of this study was to investigate systemic cadazolid exposure in patients with severe CDI with potential disrupted lining of the gastrointestinal tract. A single 3000 mg oral dose of cadazolid was administered to six patients with microbiologically-confirmed severe CDI. Plasma and faeces were collected up to 144 h post-dose for determination of cadazolid concentrations. Safety assessments were conducted over the 144-h investigational period. Cadazolid was well tolerated in patients with severe CDI, with no reported drug-related adverse events. Cadazolid systemic exposure following a single 3000 mg oral dose was very low, with a peak plasma concentration (C(max)) of 2.64 ng/mL and an area under the concentration-time curve (AUC(0-144)) of 125 ng×h/mL. The median peak daily faecal cadazolid concentration was 5675 times the C. difficile MIC(90) of 0.25 mg/L. In subjects with severe CDI, cadazolid systemic exposure was very low following a single high oral dose. Cadazolid plasma concentrations were similar in magnitude to those previously reported for healthy subjects, whereas total systemic exposure was ca. 5-6 times higher, but was still low. Peak daily faecal cadazolid concentrations were 5675 times the 0.25 mg/L C. difficile MIC(90), and on Day 4 five of the six patients presented a daily faecal cadazolid concentration ≥1651 times the MIC(90) [ClinicalTrial.gov ID: NCT02053181].

  5. Potential of lactoferrin to prevent antibiotic-induced Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Chilton, C. H.; Crowther, G. S.; Śpiewak, K.; Brindell, M.; Singh, G.; Wilcox, M. H.; Monaghan, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a global healthcare problem. Recent evidence suggests that the availability of iron may be important for C. difficile growth. This study evaluated the comparative effects of iron-depleted (1% Fe3+ saturated) bovine apo-lactoferrin (apo-bLf) and iron-saturated (85% Fe3+ saturated) bovine holo-lactoferrin (holo-bLf) in a human in vitro gut model that simulates CDI. Methods Two parallel triple-stage chemostat gut models were inoculated with pooled human faeces and spiked with C. difficile spores (strain 027 210, PCR ribotype 027). Holo- or apo-bLf was instilled (5 mg/mL, once daily) for 35 days. After 7 days, clindamycin was instilled (33.9 mg/L, four times daily) to induce simulated CDI. Indigenous microflora populations, C. difficile total counts and spores, cytotoxin titres, short chain fatty acid concentrations, biometal concentrations, lactoferrin concentration and iron content of lactoferrin were monitored daily. Results In the apo-bLf model, germination of C. difficile spores occurred 6 days post instillation of clindamycin, followed by rapid vegetative cell proliferation and detectable toxin production. By contrast, in the holo-bLf model, only a modest vegetative cell population was observed until 16 days post antibiotic administration. Notably, no toxin was detected in this model. In separate batch culture experiments, holo-bLf prevented C. difficile vegetative cell growth and toxin production, whereas apo-bLf and iron alone did not. Conclusions Holo-bLf, but not apo-bLf, delayed C. difficile growth and prevented toxin production in a human gut model of CDI. This inhibitory effect may be iron independent. These observations suggest that bLf in its iron-saturated state could be used as a novel preventative or treatment strategy for CDI. PMID:26759363

  6. Economic Evaluation of Laboratory Testing Strategies for Hospital-Associated Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Robilotti, Elizabeth; Peterson, Lance R.; Banaei, Niaz; Dowdy, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of infectious diarrhea in health care settings, and for patients presumed to have CDI, their isolation while awaiting laboratory results is costly. Newer rapid tests for CDI may reduce this burden, but the economic consequences of different testing algorithms remain unexplored. We used decision analysis from the hospital perspective to compare multiple CDI testing algorithms for adult inpatients with suspected CDI, assuming patient management according to laboratory results. CDI testing strategies included combinations of on-demand PCR (odPCR), batch PCR, lateral-flow diagnostics, plate-reader enzyme immunoassay, and direct tissue culture cytotoxicity. In the reference scenario, algorithms incorporating rapid testing were cost-effective relative to nonrapid algorithms. For every 10,000 symptomatic adults, relative to a strategy of treating nobody, lateral-flow glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)/odPCR generated 831 true-positive results and cost $1,600 per additional true-positive case treated. Stand-alone odPCR was more effective and more expensive, identifying 174 additional true-positive cases at $6,900 per additional case treated. All other testing strategies were dominated by (i.e., more costly and less effective than) stand-alone odPCR or odPCR preceded by lateral-flow screening. A cost-benefit analysis (including estimated costs of missed cases) favored stand-alone odPCR in most settings but favored odPCR preceded by lateral-flow testing if a missed CDI case resulted in less than $5,000 of extended hospital stay costs and <2 transmissions, if lateral-flow GDH diagnostic sensitivity was >93%, or if the symptomatic carrier proportion among the toxigenic culture-positive cases was >80%. These results can aid guideline developers and laboratory directors who are considering rapid testing algorithms for diagnosing CDI. PMID:24478478

  7. Elevated Fecal Calprotectin Associates with Adverse Outcomes from Clostridium difficile Infection in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Krishna; Santhosh, Kavitha; Mogle, Jill A.; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Young, Vincent B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) causes a mild to moderate colitis in most patients, but some, especially older adults, develop severe, adverse outcomes. Biomarkers predicting outcomes are needed to optimize treatments. This study tested whether fecal calprotectin associated with a composite primary outcome of complicated CDI (intensive care unit admission, colectomy, or death due to CDI within 30 days of diagnosis) and/or 8-week recurrence. Methods Stool was collected in Cary-Blair media at the time of diagnosis from inpatients of age >60 years that tested positive for C. difficile (enzyme immunoassay [EIA] for toxin A/B or polymerase chain reaction for the tcdB gene). Fecal calprotectin was measured and normalized to solid stool weight. Analysis was performed using logistic regression. Variables were selected for the final model using likelihood ratio tests. Results Fifty patients were included with a mean age 72.8 (± 7.5), and 13 (26%) developed the primary outcome. Clinical variables such as age, gender, and comorbid disease did not associate with complicated CDI/recurrence, nor did traditional biomarkers such as serum albumin or white blood cell count. A high normalized fecal calprotectin (>2000 µg/g) associated with the primary outcome in the final model after adjustment for gender and detectable fecal toxin(s) by EIA (OR 24.9, 95% CI 2.4–257.9, P=.007) with a specificity of 91.9%. Conclusion This study provides evidence that fecal calprotectin level associates with complications from CDI in older adults. Further studies are required to validate these findings in larger cohorts and incorporate them into clinical prediction algorithms. PMID:27206404

  8. Impact of clinical symptoms on interpretation of diagnostic assays for Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Dubberke, Erik R; Han, Zhuolin; Bobo, Linda; Hink, Tiffany; Lawrence, Brenda; Copper, Susan; Hoppe-Bauer, Joan; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Dunne, William Michael

    2011-08-01

    Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile colonization is common in hospitalized patients. Existing C. difficile assay comparisons lack data on severity of diarrhea or patient outcomes, limiting the ability to interpret their results in regard to the diagnosis of C. difficile infection (CDI). The objective of this study was to measure how including patient presentation with the C. difficile assay result impacted assay performance to diagnose CDI. Stool specimens from 150 patients that met inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected. Nine methods to detect C. difficile in stool were evaluated. All patients were interviewed prospectively to assess diarrhea severity. We then assessed how different reference standards, with and without the inclusion of patient presentation, impact the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the assays to diagnose CDI. There were minimal changes in sensitivity; however, specificity was significantly lower for the assays Tox A/B II, C. diff Chek-60, BD GeneOhm Cdiff, Xpert C. difficile, and Illumigene C. difficile and for toxigenic culture (P was <0.01 for all except Tox A/B II from fresh stool, for which the P value was 0.016) when the reference standard was recovery of toxigenic C. difficile from stool plus the presence of clinically significant diarrhea compared to when the reference standard was having at least four assays positive while ignoring diarrhea severity. There were 15 patients whose assay result was reported as negative but subsequently found to be positive by at least four assays in the comparison. None suffered from any CDI-related adverse events. In conclusion, clinical presentation is important when interpreting C. difficile diagnostic assays.

  9. Epidemiology and Outcomes of Community Acquired Clostridium difficile Infections in Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Courtney E; Ayturk, M Didem; Flahive, Julie M; Emhoff, Timothy A; Anderson, Frederick A; Santry, Heena P

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence of community-acquired Clostridium difficile (CACD) is increasing in the US. Many CACD infections occur in the elderly who are predisposed to poor outcomes. We aimed to describe the epidemiology and outcomes of CACD in a nationally representative sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Study Design We queried a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries (2009–2011 Part A inpatient and Part D prescription drug claims, N=864,604) for any hospital admission with a primary ICD-9 diagnosis code for C. difficile (008.45). We examined patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, pre-admission exposure to oral antibiotics, prior treatment with oral vancomycin or metronidazole, inpatient outcomes (colectomy, ICU stay, length of stay, mortality), and subsequent admissions for C. difficile. Results A total of 1566 (0.18%) patients were admitted with CACD. Of these, 889(56.8%) received oral antibiotics within 90 days of admission. Few were being treated with oral metronidazole (N=123, 7.8%) or vancomycin (N=13, 0.8%) at the time of admission. While 223(14%) patients required ICU admission, few (N=15, 1%) underwent colectomy. Hospital mortality was 9%. Median length of stay (LOS) among survivors was 5 days (IQR 3–8). One- fifth of survivors were re-admitted with C. difficile with a median follow up time of 393 days (IQR 129–769). Conclusions Nearly half of Medicare beneficiaries admitted with CACD have no recent antibiotic exposure. High mortality and re-admission rates suggest that the burden of C. difficile on patients and the healthcare system will increase as the US population ages. Additional efforts at primary prevention and eradication may be warranted. PMID:24755188

  10. Clostridium difficile Infection in Hospitalized Liver Transplant Patients: A Nationwide Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Ahmad, Shahryar; Kumar, Nilay; Kumar, Gagan; Saeian, Kia

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is increasing among hospitalized patients. Liver transplant patients are at higher risk for acquiring CDI. Small, single-center studies, but no nation-wide analyses, have assessed this association. Methods We used the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project- Nationwide Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS) from years 2004–2008 for this retrospective cross sectional study. Patients with any discharge diagnosis of liver transplant comprised the study population and were identified using ICD-9-CM codes. Those with a discharge diagnosis of CDI were considered cases. Our primary outcomes were prevalence of CDI and effect of CDI on inpatient mortality. Our secondary outcomes included length of stay and hospitalization charges. Regression analysis was used to derive odds ratios adjusted for potential confounders. Results There were 193,714 discharges with a diagnosis of liver transplant from 2004–2008. Prevalence of CDI was 2.7% in liver transplant population compared to 0.9% in non liver transplant population (p <0.001). Most of the liver transplant patients were in the 50–64 age group. Liver transplant patients were at higher odds of developing CDI (OR 2.88, 95% CI 2.68–3.10). Increasing age, increasing comorbidity, IBD and NG tube placement were also independent risk factors for CDI. CDI in liver transplant was associated with a higher mortality, 5.5% as compared to 2.3% in liver transplant only population (adjusted OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.3–2.2). Conclusions Liver transplant patients have a higher prevalence of CDI as compared to non liver transplant patients (2.7% vs. 0.9%).CDI was an independent risk factor for mortality in liver transplant population. PMID:22505356

  11. Cost-effectiveness analysis of treatment strategies for initial Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Varier, R U; Biltaji, E; Smith, K J; Roberts, M S; Jensen, M K; LaFleur, J; Nelson, R E

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is costly. Current guidelines recommend metronidazole as first-line therapy and vancomycin as an alternative. Recurrence is common. Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective therapy for recurrent CDI (RCDI). This study explores the cost-effectiveness of FMT, vancomycin and metronidazole for initial CDI. We constructed a decision-analytic computer simulation using inputs from published literature to compare FMT with a 10-14-day course of oral metronidazole or vancomycin for initial CDI. Parameters included cure rates (baseline value (range)) for metronidazole (80% (65-85%)), vancomycin (90% (88-92%)) and FMT(91% (83-100%)). Direct costs of metronidazole, vancomycin and FMT, adjusted to 2011 dollars, were $57 ($43-72), $1347 ($1195-1499) and $1086 ($815-1358), respectively. Our effectiveness measure was quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted from the third-party payer perspective. Analysis using baseline values showed that FMT($1669, 0.242 QALYs) dominated (i.e. was less costly and more effective) vancomycin ($1890, 0.241 QALYs). FMT was more costly and more effective than metronidazole ($1167, 0.238 QALYs), yielding an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $124 964/QALY. One-way sensitivity analyses showed that metronidazole dominated both strategies if its probability of cure were >90%; FMT dominated if it cost <$584. In a probabilistic sensitivity analysis at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100 000/QALY, metronidazole was favoured in 55% of model iterations; FMT was favoured in 38%. Metronidazole, as the first-line treatment for CDIs, is less costly. FMT and vancomycin are more effective. However, FMT is less likely to be economically favourable, and vancomycin is unlikely to be favourable as first-line therapy when compared with FMT.

  12. Persistence of Clostridium difficile RT 237 infection in a Western Australian piggery.

    PubMed

    Moono, Peter; Putsathit, Papanin; Knight, Daniel R; Squire, Michele M; Hampson, David J; Foster, Niki F; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is commonly associated with healthcare-related infections in humans, and is an emerging pathogen in food animal species. There is potential for transmission of C. difficile from animals or animal products to humans. This study aimed to determine if C. difficile RT 237 had persisted in a Western Australian piggery or if there had been a temporal change in C. difficile diversity. C. difficile carriage in litters with and without diarrhea was investigated, as was the acquisition of C. difficile over time using cohort surveys. Rectal swabs were obtained from piglets aged 1-10 days to determine prevalence of C. difficile carriage and samples were obtained from 20 piglets on days 1, 7, 13, 20, and 42 of life to determine duration of shedding. Isolation of C. difficile from feces was achieved by selective enrichment culture. All isolates were characterized by standard molecular typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on selected isolates (n = 29). Diarrheic piglets were more likely to shed C. difficile than the non-diseased (p = 0.0124, χ2). In the cohort study, C. difficile was isolated from 40% samples on day 1, 50% on day 7, 20% on day 13, and 0% on days 20 and 42. All isolates were RT 237 and no antimicrobial resistance was detected. The decline of shedding of C. difficile to zero has public health implications because slaughter age pigs have a low likelihood of spreading C. difficile to consumers via pig meat.

  13. Incorrect diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection in a university hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mori, Nobuaki; Yoshizawa, Sadako; Saga, Tomoo; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Murakami, Hinako; Iwata, Morihiro; Collins, Deirdre A; Riley, Thomas V; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Physicians often fail to suspect Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and many microbiology laboratories use suboptimal diagnostic techniques. To estimate the extent of and reasons for incorrect diagnosis of CDI in Japan, we investigated toxigenic C. difficile isolated from all stool culture samples and clinical course. Over a 12-month period in 2010, all stool culture samples (n = 975) submitted from inpatients in a university hospital in Japan were cultured for C. difficile and routine microbiological testing was conducted. In total, 177 C. difficile isolates were recovered, and 127 isolates were toxigenic. Among the toxin-A-positive/toxin-B-positive isolates, 12 were also positive for the binary toxin gene. However, clinically important ribotypes, such as 027 and 078, were not identified. A total of 58 (45.7%) cases with toxigenic C. difficile had unformed stool, and the incidence CDI was 1.6 cases per 10,000 patient-days. Of these 58 cases, 40 were not diagnosed in routine testing due to a lack of clinical suspicion (24.1%, 14/58) or a negative C. difficile toxin assay result (44.8%, 26/58). A stool toxin assay was performed in 54 patients (78.2%, 54/69) who did not have unformed stool. The present study demonstrated that a significant number of CDI cases in Japan might be overlooked or misdiagnosed in clinical practice due to a lack of clinical suspicion and limitations of microbiological testing for CDI in Japan. Providing education to promote awareness of CDI among physicians is important to improve the accuracy of diagnosis in Japan.

  14. Age-Stratified Treatment Response Rates in Hospitalized Patients with Clostridium difficile Infection Treated with Metronidazole

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Vy P.; Luce, Andrea M.; Ruppelt, Sara C.; Wei, Wenjing; Aitken, Samuel L.; Musick, William L.; Roux, Ryan K.

    2015-01-01

    Consensus on the optimal treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is rapidly changing. Treatment with metronidazole has been associated with increased clinical failure rates; however, the reasons for this are unclear. The purpose of this study was to assess age-related treatment response rates in hospitalized patients with CDI treated with metronidazole. This was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study of hospitalized patients with CDI. Patients were assessed for refractory CDI, defined as persistent diarrhea after 7 days of metronidazole therapy, and stratified by age and clinical characteristics. A total of 242 individuals, aged 60 ± 18 years (Charlson comorbidity index, 3.8 ± 2.4; Horn's index, 1.7 ± 1.0) were included. One hundred twenty-eight patients (53%) had severe CDI. Seventy patients (29%) had refractory CDI, a percentage that increased from 22% to 28% and to 37% for patients aged less than 50 years, for patients from 50 to 70 years, and for patients aged >70 years, respectively (P = 0.05). In multivariate analysis, Horn's index (odds ratio [OR], 2.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.50 to 2.77; P < 0.001), severe CDI (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.15 to 4.41; P = 0.018), and continued use of antibiotics (OR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.30 to 5.39; P = 0.0072) were identified as significant predictors of refractory CDI. Age was not identified as an independent risk factor for refractory CDI. Therefore, hospitalized elderly patients with CDI treated with metronidazole had increased refractory CDI rates likely due to increased underlying severity of illness, severity of CDI, and concomitant antibiotic use. These results may help identify patients that may benefit from alternative C. difficile treatments other than metronidazole. PMID:26195522

  15. Minimal systemic and high faecal exposure to cadazolid in patients with severe Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Gehin, Martine; Desnica, Boško; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2015-11-01

    Cadazolid is under development as an oral treatment for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), which is the most common infectious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Low systemic cadazolid exposures were previously reported in healthy subjects following both single and multiple oral dosing. The main objective of this study was to investigate systemic cadazolid exposure in patients with severe CDI with potential disrupted lining of the gastrointestinal tract. A single 3000 mg oral dose of cadazolid was administered to six patients with microbiologically-confirmed severe CDI. Plasma and faeces were collected up to 144 h post-dose for determination of cadazolid concentrations. Safety assessments were conducted over the 144-h investigational period. Cadazolid was well tolerated in patients with severe CDI, with no reported drug-related adverse events. Cadazolid systemic exposure following a single 3000 mg oral dose was very low, with a peak plasma concentration (C(max)) of 2.64 ng/mL and an area under the concentration-time curve (AUC(0-144)) of 125 ng×h/mL. The median peak daily faecal cadazolid concentration was 5675 times the C. difficile MIC(90) of 0.25 mg/L. In subjects with severe CDI, cadazolid systemic exposure was very low following a single high oral dose. Cadazolid plasma concentrations were similar in magnitude to those previously reported for healthy subjects, whereas total systemic exposure was ca. 5-6 times higher, but was still low. Peak daily faecal cadazolid concentrations were 5675 times the 0.25 mg/L C. difficile MIC(90), and on Day 4 five of the six patients presented a daily faecal cadazolid concentration ≥1651 times the MIC(90) [ClinicalTrial.gov ID: NCT02053181]. PMID:26419191

  16. Impact of vancomycin faecal concentrations on clinical and microbiological outcomes in Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Thabit, Abrar K; Nicolau, David P

    2015-08-01

    To assess the impact of faecal vancomycin concentrations on clinical and microbiological outcomes in patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and whether these concentrations vary with stool consistency and frequency, faecal concentrations of vancomycin were measured in stools collected at various times from patients initiated on 125mg every 6h (q6h) for 10 days. Stool consistency and frequency were determined over the course of therapy. Clinical and microbiological outcomes were assessed during therapy, at the end of therapy (EOT) and during a 19-38-day follow-up visit. Faecal vancomycin concentrations in 55 stool samples from 15 patients ranged from 175-6299μg/g at Days 3-5 of therapy (midpoint), 17-5277μg/g at EOT and 0-70μg/g at follow-up. Clinical cure or failure at EOT and at follow-up was not dependent on vancomycin concentrations measured at the midpoint (P=0.72) or at EOT (P=0.76). Likewise, concentrations at EOT and at follow-up did not predict colonisation at follow-up (P=0.85 and 0.71, respectively). Faecal vancomycin concentrations during the course of therapy (Days 3-5) did not differ with either stool consistency or frequency (P=0.94 and 0.16, respectively). However, after completion of therapy, patients with more frequent stools showed higher concentrations than patients with less frequent stools (P=0.04). Oral vancomycin 125mg q6h led to faecal concentrations that did not predict clinical outcomes of CDI in terms of cure or gut colonisation and did not vary with stool consistency and frequency.

  17. Clinical and economic benefits of fidaxomicin compared to vancomycin for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Jason C; Reilly, Joseph P; Navalkele, Bhagyashri; Downham, Gemma; Haynes, Kevin; Trivedi, Manish

    2015-11-01

    We studied the clinical and economic impact of a protocol encouraging the use of fidaxomicin as a first-line drug for treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients hospitalized during a 2-year period. This study evaluated patients who received oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for the treatment of CDI during a 2-year period. All included patients were eligible for administration of fidaxomicin via a protocol that encouraged its use for selected patients. The primary clinical endpoint was 90-day readmission with a diagnosis of CDI. Hospital charges and insurance reimbursements for readmissions were calculated along with the cost of CDI therapy to estimate the financial impact of the choice of therapy. Recurrences were seen in 10/49 (20.4%) fidaxomicin patients and 19/46 (41.3%) vancomycin patients (P = 0.027). In a multivariate analysis that included determinations of severity of CDI, serum creatinine increases, and concomitant antibiotic use, only fidaxomicin was significantly associated with decreased recurrence (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12 to 0.93). The total lengths of stay of readmitted patients were 183 days for vancomycin and 87 days for fidaxomicin, with costs of $454,800 and $196,200, respectively. Readmissions for CDI were reimbursed on the basis of the severity of CDI, totaling $151,136 for vancomycin and $107,176 for fidaxomicin. Fidaxomicin drug costs totaled $62,112, and vancomycin drug costs were $6,646. We calculated that the hospital lost an average of $3,286 per fidaxomicin-treated patient and $6,333 per vancomycin-treated patient, thus saving $3,047 per patient with fidaxomicin. Fidaxomicin use for CDI treatment prevented readmission and decreased hospital costs compared to use of oral vancomycin.

  18. Impact of clinical awareness and diagnostic tests on the underdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, L; Reigadas, E; Marín, M; Martín, A; Catalán, P; Bouza, E

    2015-08-01

    A multicenter study of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) performed during 2008 in Spain revealed that two of every three episodes went undiagnosed or were misdiagnosed owing to nonsensitive diagnostic tests or lack of clinical suspicion and request. Since then, efforts have been made to improve the diagnostic tests used by laboratories and to increase the awareness of this disease among both clinicians and microbiologists. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of these efforts by assessing the current magnitude of underdiagnosis of CDI in Spain using two point-prevalence studies performed on one day each in January and July of 2013. A total of 111 Spanish laboratories selected all unformed stool specimens received for microbiological diagnosis on these days, and toxigenic culture was performed at a central reference laboratory. Toxigenic isolates were characterized both pheno- and genotypically. The reference laboratory detected 103 episodes of CDI in patients aged 2 years or more. Half (50.5 %) of the episodes were not diagnosed in the participating laboratories, owing to insensitive diagnostic tests (15.5 %) or the lack of clinical suspicion and request (35.0 %). The main ribotypes were 014, 078/126, 001/072, and 106. Ribotype 027 caused 2.9 % of all cases. Despite all the interventions undertaken, CDI remains a highly neglected disease because of the lack of sensitive diagnostic tests in some institutions and, especially, the absence of clinical suspicion, mainly in patients with community-associated CDI. Toxigenic C. difficile should be routinely sought in unformed stools sent for microbiological diagnosis, regardless of their origin. PMID:25904126

  19. The effect of polydextrose and probiotic lactobacilli in a Clostridium difficile–infected human colonic model

    PubMed Central

    Forssten, Sofia D.; Röytiö, Henna; Hibberd, Ashley A.; Ouwehand, Arthur C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is a natural resident of the intestinal microbiota; however, it becomes harmful when the normal intestinal microbiota is disrupted, and overgrowth and toxin production occurs. The toxins can cause bloating and diarrhoea, which may cause severe disease and have the potential to cause outbreaks in hospitals and other healthcare settings. Normally, antibiotic agents are used for treatment, although for some of the patients, these treatments provide only a temporary relief with a recurrence of C. difficile–associated diarrhoea. Objective The effects of polydextrose (PDX), Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, and L. paracasei Lpc-37 on the growth of C. difficile were investigated in an in vitro model of infected human large intestine. Design The semi-continuous colonic model is composed of four connected vessels inoculated with human faecal microbes and spiked with pathogenic C. difficile (DSM 1296). PDX in two concentrations (2 and 4%), NCFM, and Lpc-37 were fed to the system during the 2-day simulation, and the growth of C. difficile and several other microbial groups were monitored using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and 16S rDNA sequencing. Results The microbial community structure of the simulation samples was closely grouped according to treatment, and the largest shifts in the microbial composition were seen with PDX. The microbial diversity decreased significantly with 4% PDX, and the OTU containing C. difficile was significantly (p<0.01) decreased when compared to control and lactobacilli treatments. The mean numbers of C. difficile also decreased as detected by qPCR, although the reduction did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions The treatments influenced the colonic microbiota, and a trend for reduced numbers of C. difficile as well as alterations of several microbial groups could be detected. This suggests that PDX may be able to modulate the composition and/or function of the colonic microbiota in

  20. Detection of nosocomial Clostridium difficile infections with toxigenic strains despite negative toxin A and B testing on stool samples.

    PubMed

    Stahlmann, J; Schönberg, M; Herrmann, M; von Müller, L

    2014-09-01

    A two-step diagnostic algorithm is recommended to detect Clostridium difficile infections; however, samples are regularly found that are glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) positive but stool toxin negative. In the present single-centre prospective study we focused on these 'difficult-to-interpret' samples and characterized them by anaerobic culture, toxigenic culture, slpA sequence typing and multiplex PCR (GenoType CDiff). The majority of stool toxin A and B-negative samples have been caused by toxigenic strains including ribotype 027. The multiplex PCR was faster and more sensitive compared with culture and allowed preliminary identification of hypervirulent strains in stool samples on the same day.

  1. Fecal Microbiota Therapy for Clostridium difficile Infection: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Fecal microbiota therapy is increasingly being used to treat patients with Clostridium difficile infection. This health technology assessment primarily evaluated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of fecal microbiota therapy compared with the usual treatment (antibiotic therapy). Methods We performed a literature search using Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, CRD Health Technology Assessment Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and NHS Economic Evaluation Database. For the economic review, we applied economic filters to these search results. We also searched the websites of agencies for other health technology assessments. We conducted a meta-analysis to analyze effectiveness. The quality of the body of evidence for each outcome was examined according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. Using a step-wise, structural methodology, we determined the overall quality to be high, moderate, low, or very low. We used a survey to examine physicians’ perception of patients’ lived experience, and a modified grounded theory method to analyze information from the survey. Results For the review of clinical effectiveness, 16 of 1,173 citations met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis of two randomized controlled trials found that fecal microbiota therapy significantly improved diarrhea associated with recurrent C. difficile infection versus treatment with vancomycin (relative risk 3.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.85–5.68) (GRADE: moderate). While fecal microbiota therapy is not associated with a significant decrease in mortality compared with antibiotic therapy (relative risk 0.69, 95% CI 0.14–3.39) (GRADE: low), it is associated with a significant increase in adverse events (e.g., short-term diarrhea, relative risk 30.76, 95% CI 4.46–212.44; abdominal cramping, relative risk 14

  2. A Tetraspecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Antibody Modifies Disease Outcome in Three Animal Models of Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Diane J; Beamer, Gillian; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Steele, Jennifer A; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Wang, Yaunkai; Debatis, Michele; Sun, Xingmin; Kashentseva, Elena A; Dmitriev, Igor P; Curiel, David T; Shoemaker, Charles B; Tzipori, Saul

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), a leading cause of nosocomial infection, is a serious disease in North America, Europe, and Asia. CDI varies greatly from asymptomatic carriage to life-threatening diarrhea, toxic megacolon, and toxemia. The incidence of community-acquired infection has increased due to the emergence of hypervirulent antibiotic-resistant strains. These new strains contribute to the frequent occurrence of disease relapse, complicating treatment, increasing hospital stays, and increasing morbidity and mortality among patients. Therefore, it is critical to develop new therapeutic approaches that bypass the development of antimicrobial resistance and avoid disruption of gut microflora. Here, we describe the construction of a single heteromultimeric VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA) that targets the two primary virulence factors of Clostridium difficile, toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). Designated VNA2-Tcd, this agent has subnanomolar toxin neutralization potencies for both C. difficile toxins in cell assays. When given systemically by parenteral administration, VNA2-Tcd protected against CDI in gnotobiotic piglets and mice and to a lesser extent in hamsters. Protection from CDI was also observed in gnotobiotic piglets treated by gene therapy with an adenovirus that promoted the expression of VNA2-Tcd. PMID:27413067

  3. A Tetraspecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Antibody Modifies Disease Outcome in Three Animal Models of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Beamer, Gillian; Tremblay, Jacqueline M.; Steele, Jennifer A.; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Wang, Yaunkai; Debatis, Michele; Sun, Xingmin; Kashentseva, Elena A.; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Curiel, David T.; Shoemaker, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), a leading cause of nosocomial infection, is a serious disease in North America, Europe, and Asia. CDI varies greatly from asymptomatic carriage to life-threatening diarrhea, toxic megacolon, and toxemia. The incidence of community-acquired infection has increased due to the emergence of hypervirulent antibiotic-resistant strains. These new strains contribute to the frequent occurrence of disease relapse, complicating treatment, increasing hospital stays, and increasing morbidity and mortality among patients. Therefore, it is critical to develop new therapeutic approaches that bypass the development of antimicrobial resistance and avoid disruption of gut microflora. Here, we describe the construction of a single heteromultimeric VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA) that targets the two primary virulence factors of Clostridium difficile, toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). Designated VNA2-Tcd, this agent has subnanomolar toxin neutralization potencies for both C. difficile toxins in cell assays. When given systemically by parenteral administration, VNA2-Tcd protected against CDI in gnotobiotic piglets and mice and to a lesser extent in hamsters. Protection from CDI was also observed in gnotobiotic piglets treated by gene therapy with an adenovirus that promoted the expression of VNA2-Tcd. PMID:27413067

  4. An exploratory study to evaluate Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction ribotypes and infection outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Thabit, Abrar K; Nicolau, David P

    2016-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection ranges from mild to severe prolonged diarrhea with systemic symptoms. Previous studies have assessed the correlation of some disease severity parameters to C. difficile ribotypes. However, certain clinical parameters of interest have not yet been evaluated. Aim We conducted an exploratory study to evaluate the correlation of C. difficile ribotypes to parameters not assessed previously, notably days to diarrhea resolution (in terms of days to formed stools and days to less than three stools per day), length of hospital stay, 30-day recurrence rates, and 30-day readmission rates. Additional severity parameters evaluated include leukocytosis, serum creatinine, fever, and nausea/vomiting. Methods Polymerase chain reaction ribotyping was performed on C. difficile isolates from baseline stool samples of 29 patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted to assess the parameters of interest. Results The most common ribotypes were 027 (38%), 014/020 (21%), and 106/174 (21%). Numerically, 027 ribotype patients required more days to less than three stools per day versus 014/020 and 106/174 ribotype patients (P=0.2). The three ribotypes were similar regarding time to formed stools, duration of hospitalization, and 30-day readmission rate (P=0.2, 0.6, and 0.8, respectively). Recurrence within 30 days occurred in two patients with 027 and two patients with 014/020 (P=0.6). Leukocytosis and fever were more prominent with 027 than with 014/020 and 106/174 (P=0.04 for both parameters), although the degree of nausea/vomiting did not differ between the three groups (P=0.3). A serum creatinine level ≥1.5 times the premorbid level was seen in only three patients, each infected with a different ribotype. Conclusion Although these data provide a baseline assessment of outcomes to aid in the design of future studies, the diversity of C. difficile ribotypes within the population must be considered, and additional work with other ribotypes

  5. Clinical and economic burden of Clostridium difficile infection in Europe: a systematic review of healthcare-facility-acquired infection.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, P N; Nathwani, D; Wilcox, M H; Stephens, J; Shelbaya, A; Haider, S

    2012-05-01

    PubMed, EMBASE and conference abstracts were reviewed systematically to determine the clinical and economic burden associated with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) acquired and treated in European healthcare facilities. Inclusion criteria were: published in the English language between 2000 and 2010, and study population of at least 20 patients with documented CDI acquired/treated in European healthcare facilities. Data collection was completed by three unblinded reviewers using the Cochrane Handbook and PRISMA statement. The primary outcomes were mortality, recurrence, length of hospital stay (LOS) and cost related to CDI. In total, 1138 primary articles and conference abstracts were identified, and this was narrowed to 39 and 30 studies, respectively. Data were available from 14 countries, with 47% of studies from UK institutions. CDI mortality at 30 days ranged from 2% (France) to 42% (UK). Mortality rates more than doubled from 1999 to 2004, and continued to rise until 2007 when reductions were noted in the UK. Recurrent CDI varied from 1% (France) to 36% (Ireland); however, recurrence definitions varied between studies. Median LOS ranged from eight days (Belgium) to 27 days (UK). The incremental cost of CDI was £4577 in Ireland and £8843 in Germany, after standardization to 2010 prices. Country-specific estimates, weighted by sample size, ranged from 2.8% to 29.8% for 30-day mortality and from 16 to 37 days for LOS. CDI burden in Europe was most commonly described using 30-day mortality, recurrence, LOS and cost data. The continued spread of CDI and resultant healthcare burden underscores the need for judicious use of antibiotics. PMID:22498638

  6. Understanding the Current State of Infection Prevention to Prevent Clostridium difficile Infection: A Human Factors and Systems Engineering Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yanke, Eric; Zellmer, Caroline; Van Hoof, Sarah; Moriarty, Helene; Carayon, Pascale; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-01-01

    Background Achieving and sustaining high levels of healthcare worker (HCW) compliance with contact isolation precautions is challenging. The aim of this study was to determine HCW work system barriers to, and facilitators of, adherence to contact isolation for patients with suspected or confirmed Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) using a human factors and systems engineering approach. Methods Prospective cohort study from September 2013 to November 2013 at a large academic medical center (hospital A) and an affiliated Veterans Administration (VA) hospital (hospital B). A human factors engineering (HFE) model for patient safety – the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) model – was used to guide work system analysis and direct observation data collection. 288 observations were conducted. HCWs and visitors were assessed for compliance with all components of contact isolation precautions (hand hygiene, gowning, and gloving) before and after patient contact. Time required to complete contact isolation precautions was measured and adequacy of contact isolation supplies was assessed. Results Full compliance with contact isolation precautions was low at both hospitals: hospital A, 7%; hospital B, 22%. Lack of appropriate hand hygiene prior to room entry (Compliance: hospital A, 18%; hospital B, 29%) was the most common reason for lack of full compliance. More time was required for full compliance as compared to compliance with no components of contact isolation precautions before patient room entry, inside patient room, and after patient room exit (59.9 sec vs. 3.2 sec; P < .001; 507.3 sec vs. 149.7 sec; P = .006; 15.2 sec vs. 1.3 sec; P < .001). Compliance was lower when contact isolation supplies were inadequate (4% vs. 16%; P = .005). Conclusions Adherence to contact isolation precautions for CDI is a complex, time-consuming process. HFE analysis indicates multiple work system components serve as barriers and facilitators to full compliance

  7. Mathematical Modeling of the Transmission Dynamics of Clostridium difficile Infection and Colonization in Healthcare Settings: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Guillaume; Guertin, Marie-Hélène; Laprise, Jean-François; Drolet, Mélanie; Brisson, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background We conducted a systematic review of mathematical models of transmission dynamic of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in healthcare settings, to provide an overview of existing models and their assessment of different CDI control strategies. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science up to February 3, 2016 for transmission-dynamic models of Clostridium difficile in healthcare settings. The models were compared based on their natural history representation of Clostridium difficile, which could include health states (S-E-A-I-R-D: Susceptible-Exposed-Asymptomatic-Infectious-Resistant-Deceased) and the possibility to include healthcare workers and visitors (vectors of transmission). Effectiveness of interventions was compared using the relative reduction (compared to no intervention or current practice) in outcomes such as incidence of colonization, CDI, CDI recurrence, CDI mortality, and length of stay. Results Nine studies describing six different models met the inclusion criteria. Over time, the models have generally increased in complexity in terms of natural history and transmission dynamics and number/complexity of interventions/bundles of interventions examined. The models were categorized into four groups with respect to their natural history representation: S-A-I-R, S-E-A-I, S-A-I, and S-E-A-I-R-D. Seven studies examined the impact of CDI control strategies. Interventions aimed at controlling the transmission, lowering CDI vulnerability and reducing the risk of recurrence/mortality were predicted to reduce CDI incidence by 3–49%, 5–43% and 5–29%, respectively. Bundles of interventions were predicted to reduce CDI incidence by 14–84%. Conclusions Although CDI is a major public health problem, there are very few published transmission-dynamic models of Clostridium difficile. Published models vary substantially in the interventions examined, the outcome measures used and the representation of the natural history of Clostridium

  8. Flooding and Health Care Visits for Clostridium Difficile Infection: A Case-Crossover Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Floods can contaminate potable water and other resources, thus increasing the potential for fecal-oral transmission of pathogens. Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that can spread by water and cause acute gastrointestinal illness. It often affects older adults who are hospital...

  9. Relapse versus reinfection: recurrent Clostridium difficile infection following treatment with fidaxomicin or vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Iris; Johnson, Stuart; Sambol, Susan P; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Gerding, Dale N

    2012-08-01

    Our study sought to compare the strain types of Clostridium difficile causing initial and recurrent episodes of C. difficile infection (CDI) in adult patients with a first episode of CDI or 1 prior episode of CDI within the previous 90 days. Strains originated from patients who had been entered into two phase 3 randomized clinical trials of fidaxomicin versus vancomycin. Isolates of C. difficile from the initial and recurrent episodes within 28 (± 2) days of cure of CDI were compared using restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) typing. Paired isolates were available from 90 of 194 (46%) patients with recurrent CDI. Patients with isolates available were significantly younger (P = .008) and more likely to be from Canadian sites (P = .0001), compared with patients without isolates. In 75 of 90 subjects (83.3%), the identical REA type strain was identified at recurrence and the initial episode (putative relapse). Early recurrences (0-14 days after treatment completion) were relapses in 86.7% and a new strain (reinfection) in 13.3%. Later recurrences (15-31 days after treatment) were relapses in 76.7% and reinfections in 23.3%. Mean time (± standard deviation) to recurrence was 12.2 (± 6.4) days for relapses and 14.7 (± 6.8) days for reinfections (P = .177). The most common BI/NAP1/027 group and the previous US epidemic REA group J/NAP2/001 had a significantly higher combined rate of recurrence with the same strain (relapse), compared with the other REA groups (39 of 42 [93%] vs 36 of 48 [75%], respectively; P = .023). We found a higher than historic rate of recurrent CDI caused by the same isolate as the original episode, a finding that may be related to the relatively short observation period in this study and the high frequency of isolation of epidemic strains, such as groups BI and J, for which relapse rates may be higher than for other REA groups. Caution in generalizing these observations is required, because the patients studied were younger and more likely

  10. Deciphering Adaptation Strategies of the Epidemic Clostridium difficile 027 Strain during Infection through In Vivo Transcriptional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kansau, Imad; Barketi-Klai, Amira; Monot, Marc; Hoys, Sandra; Dupuy, Bruno; Janoir, Claire; Collignon, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is responsible for a wide spectrum of infection from asymptomatic carriage to severe, relapsing colitis. Since 2003, C. difficile infections have increased with a higher morbidity and mortality due to the emergence of epidemic and hypervirulent C. difficile strains such as those of the epidemic lineage 027/BI/NAP1. To decipher the hypervirulence and epidemicity of 027 strains, we analyzed gene expression profiles of the R20291 027 strain using a monoxenic mouse model during the first 38h of infection. A total of 741 genes were differentially expressed during the course of infection. They are mainly distributed in functional categories involved in host adaptation. Several genes of PTS and ABC transporters were significantly regulated during the infection, underlying the ability of strain R20291 to adapt its metabolism according to nutrient availability in the digestive tract. In this animal model, despite the early sporulation process, sporulation efficiency seems to indicate that growth of R20291 vegetative cells versus spores were favored during infection. The bacterial mechanisms associated to adaptability and flexibility within the gut environment, in addition to the virulence factor expression and antibiotic resistance, should contribute to the epidemicity and hypervirulence of the C. difficile 027 strains. PMID:27351947

  11. A case of imported Clostridium difficile PCR-ribotype 027 infection within the Czech Republic which has a high prevalence of C. difficile ribotype 176.

    PubMed

    Krutova, Marcela; Nyc, Otakar; Kuijper, Ed J; Geigerova, Lenka; Matejkova, Jana; Bergerova, Tamara; Arvand, Mardjan

    2014-12-01

    The first case of Clostridium difficile RT027 infection in the Czech Republic (CZ) was identified. The patient had been hospitalised in Germany prior to moving to CZ. Multiple-Locus Variable number tandem repeat Analysis revealed a genetic relatedness between the patient's isolate and RT027 isolate collected in the German hospital.

  12. Intravenous Tigecycline Facilitates Cure of Severe Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI) After Failure of Standard Therapy: A Case Report and Literature Review of Tigecycline Use in CDI

    PubMed Central

    Navalkele, Bhagyashri D.; Lerner, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Standard treatment for severe Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is oral vancomycin with metronidazole. After failure of this standard regimen, treatment becomes challenging. A young woman treated for septic shock developed CDI. Standard treatment failed and she was ineligible for fecal transplant. Addition of tigecycline to her regimen resulted in cure. PMID:27419166

  13. Use of Bacillus subtilis PXN21 spores for suppression of Clostridium difficile infection symptoms in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Colenutt, Claire; Cutting, Simon M

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is the primary cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in healthcare centres of the developed world. Only a few antibiotics are available for treatment, and relapses are common in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy. New approaches are required to reduce reliance on antibiotics, the use of which represents a primary risk factor for development of C. difficile infections. Supplementation of the gut flora with probiotics represents a key area for producing more successful treatment options for C. difficile infection (CDI). In this study, spores of B. subtilis have been evaluated as a potential probiotic treatment against CDI. Using a murine model of infection, we demonstrate that oral administration of B. subtilis spores can attenuate the symptoms of infection. We further show that (1) suppression of symptoms was better if spores were administered post infection, and (2) germination of the spore to a vegetative cell may be an integral part of how CDI is suppressed. The results of this study highlight the potential of this bacterium as a probiotic treatment for CDI.

  14. Long-Term Follow-Up of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Treatment of Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection in a Dual Solid Organ Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Mohammad; Khehra, Raman; Strahotin, Cristina; Mitre, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most frequent causes of healthcare-associated infections, and its rates are also increasing in the community. Mounting evidence suggests that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) may be effective; however, as there is paucity of data regarding the use of FMT in patients with solid organ transplants, we present a case of successful FMT in a patient with dual solid organ transplant.

  15. Outcome of relapsing Clostridium difficile infections do not correlate with virulence-, spore- and vegetative cell-associated phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Garrido, Ángela; Miranda-Cárdenas, Camila; Castro-Córdova, Pablo; Olguín-Araneda, Valeria; Cofré-Araneda, Glenda; Hernández-Rocha, Cristian; Carman, Robert; Ibáñez, Patricio; Fawley, Warren N; Wilcox, Mark H; Gil, Fernando; Calderón, Iván L; Fuentes, Juan A; Guzmán-Durán, Ana María; Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    One of the main clinical challenges of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) is the high rate of relapse episodes. The main determinants involved in relapse of CDI include the presence of antibiotic-resistant C. difficile spores in the colonic environment and a permanent state of dysbiosis of the microbiota caused by antibiotic therapy. A possible scenario is that phenotypes related to the persistence of C. difficile spores might contribute to relapsing infections. In this study, 8 C. difficile isolates recovered from 4 cases with relapsing infection, and 9 isolates recovered from single infection cases were analyzed for PCR ribotyping and the presence of tcdA, tcdB and cdtAB genes. Factors associated to spore persistence, sporulation, spore adherence and biofilm formation and sporulation during biofilm formation were characterized. We also evaluated motility and cytotoxicity. However, we observed no significant difference in the analyzed phenotypes among the different clinical outcomes, most likely due to the high variability observed among strains within clinical backgrounds in each phenotype and the small sample size. It is noteworthy that C. difficile spores adhered to similar extents to undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells. By contrast, spores of all clinical isolates tested had increased germination efficiency in presence of taurocholate, while decreased sporulation rate during biofilm development in the presence of glucose. In conclusion, these results show that, at least in this cohort of patients, the described phenotypes are not detrimental in the clinical outcome of the disease.

  16. Loss of Microbiota-Mediated Colonization Resistance to Clostridium difficile Infection With Oral Vancomycin Compared With Metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brittany B; Buffie, Charlie G; Carter, Rebecca A; Leiner, Ingrid; Toussaint, Nora C; Miller, Liza C; Gobourne, Asia; Ling, Lilan; Pamer, Eric G

    2015-11-15

    Antibiotic administration disrupts the intestinal microbiota, increasing susceptibility to pathogens such as Clostridium difficile. Metronidazole or oral vancomycin can cure C. difficile infection, and administration of these agents to prevent C. difficile infection in high-risk patients, although not sanctioned by Infectious Disease Society of America guidelines, has been considered. The relative impacts of metronidazole and vancomycin on the intestinal microbiota and colonization resistance are unknown. We investigated the effect of brief treatment with metronidazole and/or oral vancomycin on susceptibility to C. difficile, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli infection in mice. Although metronidazole resulted in transient loss of colonization resistance, oral vancomycin markedly disrupted the microbiota, leading to prolonged loss of colonization resistance to C. difficile infection and dense colonization by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, K. pneumoniae, and E. coli. Our results demonstrate that vancomycin, and to a lesser extent metronidazole, are associated with marked intestinal microbiota destruction and greater risk of colonization by nosocomial pathogens.

  17. An Integrated Metabolomic and Microbiome Analysis Identified Specific Gut Microbiota Associated with Fecal Cholesterol and Coprostanol in Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Antharam, Vijay C; McEwen, Daniel C; Garrett, Timothy J; Dossey, Aaron T; Li, Eric C; Kozlov, Andrew N; Mesbah, Zhubene; Wang, Gary P

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is characterized by dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota and a profound derangement in the fecal metabolome. However, the contribution of specific gut microbes to fecal metabolites in C. difficile-associated gut microbiome remains poorly understood. Using gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and 16S rRNA deep sequencing, we analyzed the metabolome and microbiome of fecal samples obtained longitudinally from subjects with Clostridium difficile infection (n = 7) and healthy controls (n = 6). From 155 fecal metabolites, we identified two sterol metabolites at >95% match to cholesterol and coprostanol that significantly discriminated C. difficile-associated gut microbiome from healthy microbiota. By correlating the levels of cholesterol and coprostanol in fecal extracts with 2,395 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined by 16S rRNA sequencing, we identified 63 OTUs associated with high levels of coprostanol and 2 OTUs correlated with low coprostanol levels. Using indicator species analysis (ISA), 31 of the 63 coprostanol-associated bacteria correlated with health, and two Veillonella species were associated with low coprostanol levels that correlated strongly with CDI. These 65 bacterial taxa could be clustered into 12 sub-communities, with each community containing a consortium of organisms that co-occurred with one another. Our studies identified 63 human gut microbes associated with cholesterol-reducing activities. Given the importance of gut bacteria in reducing and eliminating cholesterol from the GI tract, these results support the recent finding that gut microbiome may play an important role in host lipid metabolism. PMID:26871580

  18. An Integrated Metabolomic and Microbiome Analysis Identified Specific Gut Microbiota Associated with Fecal Cholesterol and Coprostanol in Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Antharam, Vijay C.; McEwen, Daniel C.; Garrett, Timothy J.; Dossey, Aaron T.; Li, Eric C.; Kozlov, Andrew N.; Mesbah, Zhubene; Wang, Gary P.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is characterized by dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota and a profound derangement in the fecal metabolome. However, the contribution of specific gut microbes to fecal metabolites in C. difficile-associated gut microbiome remains poorly understood. Using gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and 16S rRNA deep sequencing, we analyzed the metabolome and microbiome of fecal samples obtained longitudinally from subjects with Clostridium difficile infection (n = 7) and healthy controls (n = 6). From 155 fecal metabolites, we identified two sterol metabolites at >95% match to cholesterol and coprostanol that significantly discriminated C. difficile-associated gut microbiome from healthy microbiota. By correlating the levels of cholesterol and coprostanol in fecal extracts with 2,395 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined by 16S rRNA sequencing, we identified 63 OTUs associated with high levels of coprostanol and 2 OTUs correlated with low coprostanol levels. Using indicator species analysis (ISA), 31 of the 63 coprostanol-associated bacteria correlated with health, and two Veillonella species were associated with low coprostanol levels that correlated strongly with CDI. These 65 bacterial taxa could be clustered into 12 sub-communities, with each community containing a consortium of organisms that co-occurred with one another. Our studies identified 63 human gut microbes associated with cholesterol-reducing activities. Given the importance of gut bacteria in reducing and eliminating cholesterol from the GI tract, these results support the recent finding that gut microbiome may play an important role in host lipid metabolism. PMID:26871580

  19. An Integrated Metabolomic and Microbiome Analysis Identified Specific Gut Microbiota Associated with Fecal Cholesterol and Coprostanol in Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Antharam, Vijay C; McEwen, Daniel C; Garrett, Timothy J; Dossey, Aaron T; Li, Eric C; Kozlov, Andrew N; Mesbah, Zhubene; Wang, Gary P

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is characterized by dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota and a profound derangement in the fecal metabolome. However, the contribution of specific gut microbes to fecal metabolites in C. difficile-associated gut microbiome remains poorly understood. Using gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and 16S rRNA deep sequencing, we analyzed the metabolome and microbiome of fecal samples obtained longitudinally from subjects with Clostridium difficile infection (n = 7) and healthy controls (n = 6). From 155 fecal metabolites, we identified two sterol metabolites at >95% match to cholesterol and coprostanol that significantly discriminated C. difficile-associated gut microbiome from healthy microbiota. By correlating the levels of cholesterol and coprostanol in fecal extracts with 2,395 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) determined by 16S rRNA sequencing, we identified 63 OTUs associated with high levels of coprostanol and 2 OTUs correlated with low coprostanol levels. Using indicator species analysis (ISA), 31 of the 63 coprostanol-associated bacteria correlated with health, and two Veillonella species were associated with low coprostanol levels that correlated strongly with CDI. These 65 bacterial taxa could be clustered into 12 sub-communities, with each community containing a consortium of organisms that co-occurred with one another. Our studies identified 63 human gut microbes associated with cholesterol-reducing activities. Given the importance of gut bacteria in reducing and eliminating cholesterol from the GI tract, these results support the recent finding that gut microbiome may play an important role in host lipid metabolism.

  20. [Type-A aortic dissection without chest pain in a patient with Clostridium fallax infection].

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Giulio; Nardi, Carmela; Mecozzi, Gianclaudio; Caravelli, Paolo; Grandjean, Jan G; Mariani, Mario

    2003-03-01

    We describe the case of a 64-year-old patient admitted to our hospital because of syncope and suspicion of cardiac tamponade. At admission he had temporary alteration of conscience with clinical evidence of sepsis without chest pain. There was a mild pericardial effusion in absence of clinical and echocardiographic signs of cardiac tamponade. About 36 hours later we found evidence of an aortic dissection and in the blood culture an isolation of Clostridium fallax that we consider the probable cause of this lesion. PMID:12784761

  1. Prevention of hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection in the New York metropolitan region using a collaborative intervention model.

    PubMed

    Koll, Brian S; Ruiz, Rafael E; Calfee, David P; Jalon, Hillary S; Stricof, Rachel L; Adams, Audrey; Smith, Barbara A; Shin, Gina; Gase, Kathleen; Woods, Maria K; Sirtalan, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    The incidence, severity, and associated costs of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) have dramatically increased in hospitals over the past decade, indicating an urgent need for strategies to prevent transmission of C. difficile. This article describes a multifaceted collaborative approach to reduce hospital-onset CDI rates in 35 acute care hospitals in the New York metropolitan region. Hospitals participated in a comprehensive CDI reduction intervention and formed interdisciplinary teams to coordinate their efforts. Standardized clinical infection prevention and environmental cleaning protocols were implemented and monitored using checklists. Monthly data reports were provided to hospitals for facility-specific performance evaluation and comparison to aggregate data from all participants. Hospitals also participated in monthly teleconferences to review data and highlight successes, challenges, and strategies to reduce CDI. Incidence of hospital-onset CDI per 10,000 patient days was the primary outcome measure. Additionally, the incidence of nonhospital-associated, community-onset, hospital-associated, and recurrent CDIs were measured. The use of a collaborative model to implement a multifaceted infection prevention strategy was temporally associated with a significant reduction in hospital-onset CDI rates in participating New York metropolitan regional hospitals.

  2. Laboratory and Clinical features of EIA Toxin-positive and EIA Toxin-negative Community-acquired Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hiren; Randhawa, Jeewanjot; Nanavati, Sushant; Marton, L Randy; Baddoura, Walid J; DeBari, Vincent A

    2015-01-01

    Studies have described the clinical course of patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) with positive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for toxins A and B. Limited information is available for the patients with negative EIA but positive for the toxin B gene (TcdB) by the PCR. The aim of our study is to determine if there are any differences that exist among the clinical and laboratory parameters in the patients tested to be positive by EIA for toxin and those who were negative. This is a retrospective cohort study conducted in a 700-bed teaching hospital. We reviewed charts of the patients with presumptive CDI between January 2006 and July 2013. We divided these patients into two groups, EIA-positive and EIA-negative, based on result of EIA for toxins A and B and the requirement for a positive PCR analysis of the TcdB gene. The EIA-positive group had significantly higher white blood cell counts (p<0.001), with a significantly greater percentage of bands (p<0.0001). Albumin and total protein both exhibit significantly (p<0.0001, both comparisons) lower values in the EIA-positive group. Among clinical findings, the EIA-positive group had significantly longer length of hospital stay (p=0.010). These data suggest that an infection with an EIA-negative strain of C. difficile presents laboratory markers closer to those of healthy subjects and clinical features suggesting considerably less severe than infection with EIA-positive C. difficile.

  3. Clostridium difficile Infection: An Emerging Cause of Death in the Twenty-First Century.

    PubMed

    Abdullatif, Viytta N; Noymer, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Enterocolitis due to Clostridium difficile is major emerging cause of death in the U.S. Between 1999 and 2012, C. diff. deaths rose by a staggering almost ten-fold amount, to 7,739 from 793. This article has three goals. First, we present a demographic description of C. diff. mortality in the U.S. since 1999. Second, we test a hypothesis that the increase in C. diff. deaths is due to population aging. We find that the emergence of this cause of death follows a proportional hazard pattern above age 40. Thus, population aging is not the only factor responsible for the increase in C. diff. deaths. This, combined with a contributory cause of death analysis, points towards health care-based strategies to combat C. diff. Third, we demonstrate a simple weighted least squares technique for estimating Gompertz models that gives parameter estimates that are closer to full maximum likelihood than conventional approaches.

  4. Microbial composition analysis of Clostridium difficile infections in an ulcerative colitis patient treated with multiple fecal microbiota transplantations.

    PubMed

    Brace, Chantalle; Gloor, Gregory B; Ropeleski, Mark; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Petrof, Elaine O

    2014-09-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a promising therapy for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). However, questions remain regarding efficacy and safety in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, as well as longitudinal stability of donor stool composition. This report describes an IBD patient with two CDIs 18 months apart, each successfully treated with FMT with no IBD flares or complications. Microbiome composition analysis of patient samples during each infection revealed low-diversity microbiota patterns similar to those previously described in non-IBD patients with CDI and active IBD alone. Samples taken after each transplant demonstrated quick remodeling towards the donor's sample composition coinciding with symptom resolution. Of note, samples taken from the same donor 18 months apart reflected marked differences in microbiota abundances, suggesting that the use of single donors in FMT programs offers little benefit in ensuring predictability of donor stool composition over time. This report describes similar microbial composition patterns during CDI in IBD patients to those described previously in non-IBD patients, and supports FMT as safe and effective treatment for recurring CDI in this patient population.

  5. Long-term microbiota and virome in a Zürich patient after fecal transplantation against Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Broecker, Felix; Klumpp, Jochen; Moelling, Karin

    2016-05-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an emerging therapeutic option for Clostridium difficile infections that are refractory to conventional treatment. FMT introduces fecal microbes into the patient's intestine that prevent the recurrence of C. difficile, leading to rapid expansion of bacteria characteristic of healthy microbiota. However, the long-term effects of FMT remain largely unknown. The C. difficile patient described in this paper revealed protracted microbiota adaptation processes from 6 to 42 months post-FMT. Ultimately, bacterial communities were donor similar, suggesting sustainable stool engraftment. Since little is known about the consequences of transmitted viruses during C. difficile infection, we also interrogated virome changes. Our approach allowed identification of about 10 phage types per sample that represented larger viral communities, and phages were found to be equally abundant in the cured patient and donor. The healthy microbiota appears to be characterized by low phage abundance. Although viruses were likely transferred, the patient established a virome distinct from the donor. Surprisingly, the patient had sequences of algal giant viruses (chloroviruses) that have not previously been reported for the human gut. Chloroviruses have not been associated with intestinal disease, but their presence in the oropharynx may influence cognitive abilities. The findings suggest that the virome is an important indicator of health or disease. A better understanding of the role of viruses in the gut ecosystem may uncover novel microbiota-modulating therapeutic strategies. PMID:27286042

  6. Clostridium difficile ribotypes 001, 017, and 027 are associated with lethal C. difficile infection in Hesse, Germany.

    PubMed

    Arvand, M; Hauri, A M; Zaiss, N H; Witte, W; Bettge-Weller, G

    2009-01-01

    From January 2008 to April 2009, 72 cases of severe Clostridium difficile infection were reported from 18 different districts in the state of Hesse, Germany. A total of 41 C. difficile isolates from 41 patients were subjected to PCR ribotyping. PCR ribotype (RT) 027 was the most prevalent strain accounting for 24 of 41 (59%) of typed isolates, followed by RT 001 (eight isolates, 20%), RT 017 and 042 (two isolates each), and RT 003, 066, 078, 081, and RKI-034 (one isolate each). Eighteen patients had died within 30 days after admission. C. difficile was reported as underlying cause of or contributing to death in 14 patients, indicating a case fatality rate of 19%. The patients with lethal outcome attributable to C. difficile were 59-89 years-old (median 78 years). Ribotyping results were available for seven isolates associated with lethal outcome, which were identified as RT 027 in three and as RT 001 and 017 in two cases each. Our data suggest that C. difficile RT 027 is prevalent in some hospitals in Hesse and that, in addition to the possibly more virulent RT 027, other toxigenic C. difficile strains like RT 001 and 017 are associated with lethal C. difficile infections in this region. PMID:19941785

  7. The correlation between Clostridium-difficile infection and human gut concentrations of Bacteroidetes phylum and clostridial species.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, E; Amir, I; Zafran, M; Gophna, U; Samra, Z; Pitlik, S; Bishara, J

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to assess differences in bacterial intensities of Bacteroidetes phylum and different clostridial species in the human intestines with respect to C. difficile infection. Patients with a stool assay for C. difficile toxin were identified via the microbiology laboratory in our institute. Bacterial populations were quantified from stool samples of four groups of patients: Group I-patients with C. difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD); Group II-asymptomatic C. difficile carriers; Group III-patients with non-C. difficile diarrhea; Group IV-patients with no diarrhea and negative stool samples for the C. difficile toxin (control group). Stool was examined for three genes-C. difficile toxin A gene, 16S rRNA gene from Clostridium thermocellum representing other clostridial species, and 16S rRNA gene from Bacteroides fragilis representing the Bacteroidetes phylum. Fifty-nine patients underwent analysis of the stool (CDAD group 14, carriers group 14, non-C. difficile diarrhea group 16, control group 15). C. difficile concentration was highest in the CDAD group, followed by the carriers group. Higher concentrations of both clostridial species and Bacteriodetes were observed in the control and non-C. difficile diarrhea groups compared to the CDAD and carriers groups. We demonstrated an inverse association between infection with C. difficile and the abundance of Bacteroidetes phylum and other clostridial species in human intestines. Studies with larger samples and broader diagnostic procedures are needed in order to better explore and understand this association.

  8. Clostridium difficile infection after adult autologous stem cell transplantation: A multicenter study of epidemiology and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Dufresne, Simon F.; Hanna, David B.; Labbé, Annie-Claude; Treadway, Suzanne B.; Neofytos, Dionissios; Bélanger, Sylvie; Huff, Carol Ann; Laverdière, Michel; Marr, Kieren A.

    2013-01-01

    We sought to describe the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) among adult recipients of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto HSCT) within the first year after HSCT in centers with variable epidemiology of hyper-toxigenic strains. A multicenter, retrospective nested case-control study was conducted among 873 auto HSCT recipients at Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH, Baltimore, MD) and Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont (HMR, Montreal, Canada) between 1/2003-12/2008. Despite center differences in the prevalence of NAP-1 strains over the time period (21-43% JHH; 80-84% HMR), the 1-year incidence of CDI was similar (6.2% JHH; 5.7% HMR). The median time to infection was 11 days (interquartile range [IQR] 1 to 27). In case control analysis, the following were predictors for CDI: grade 2 or higher mucositis (odds ratio [OR]: 3.00, P=0.02) and receipt of a 4th generation cephalosporin (OR: 2.76, P=0.04). Mucositis was the strongest predictor of risk for CDI in multivariate analysis (adjusted OR [AOR]: 2.77; P=0.03). CDI is a common and early complication of auto HSCT. Treatment-related gastrointestinal mucosal damage, in addition to the potentially modifiable risk of antimicrobial exposure, influence risk for CDI early post-auto HSCT. PMID:23916741

  9. Infection with Toxin A-Negative, Toxin B-Negative, Binary Toxin-Positive Clostridium difficile in a Young Patient with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Androga, Grace O.; Hart, Julie; Foster, Niki F.; Charles, Adrian; Forbes, David

    2015-01-01

    Large clostridial toxin-negative, binary toxin-positive (A− B− CDT+) strains of Clostridium difficile are almost never associated with clinically significant C. difficile infection (CDI), possibly because such strains are not detected by most diagnostic methods. We report the isolation of an A− B− CDT+ ribotype 033 (RT033) strain of C. difficile from a young patient with ulcerative colitis and severe diarrhea. PMID:26354812

  10. Infection with Toxin A-Negative, Toxin B-Negative, Binary Toxin-Positive Clostridium difficile in a Young Patient with Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Androga, Grace O; Hart, Julie; Foster, Niki F; Charles, Adrian; Forbes, David; Riley, Thomas V

    2015-11-01

    Large clostridial toxin-negative, binary toxin-positive (A(-) B(-) CDT(+)) strains of Clostridium difficile are almost never associated with clinically significant C. difficile infection (CDI), possibly because such strains are not detected by most diagnostic methods. We report the isolation of an A(-) B(-) CDT(+) ribotype 033 (RT033) strain of C. difficile from a young patient with ulcerative colitis and severe diarrhea.

  11. Epidemiological and pathobiological profiles of Clostridium perfringens infections: review of consecutive series of 33 cases over a 13-year period

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Yuji; Dobashi, Yoh; Sakai, Toshiyasu; Monma, Chie; Miyatani, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is well known as the causative agent of several forms of enteric disease, precise epidemiological and pathobiological aspects are still unknown. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the culture results of samples collected in our hospital from 2001 through 2013. In addition, for the detection and toxinogenic typing of C. perfringens, polymerase-chain-reaction amplification (PCR)-based rapid analysis was performed in 6 cases using DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded tissues. Results: A total of 35 samples from 33 cases were positive for C. perfringens, representing an incidence of 0.017% (35/205, 114). Among 33 patients, 21 patients manifested sepsis and 7 patients had bacteremia. One of the septic cases was complicated by fatal intravascular hemolysis and thus, the prevalence was estimated at 3.0% among C. perfringens infections (1/33). The direct causative disease or state for C. perfringens infection was identified in 18 patients: surgery or intervention for cancers, 8 patients; chemotherapy for cancer, 2 patients; surgery or intervention for non-neoplastic disease, 6 patients; liver cirrhosis, 3 patients, etc. PCR-based toxinogenic typing of C. perfringens detected the alpha-toxin gene only in tissue from a patient who died of massive hemolysis; none of the toxin genes could be amplified in the other 5 cases examined. Conclusions: The prevalence of overt C. perfringens infection is low, but upon detection, infected patients should be carefully monitored for fatal acute hemolysis caused by type A C. perfringens. Furthermore, PCR-based rapid detection of C. perfringens and toxinogenic typing by archival pathological material is applicable as a diagnostic tool. PMID:25755747

  12. The utility of repeat enzyme immunoassay testing for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Garimella, P S; Agarwal, R; Katz, A

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, the prevalence of healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile (C. diff) disease has increased. While multiple tests are available for the diagnosis of C. diff infection, enzyme immunoassay (EIA) testing for toxin is the most used. Repeat EIA testing, although of limited utility, is common in medical practice. To assess the utility of repeat EIA testing to diagnose C. diff infections. Systematic literature review. Eligible studies performed >1 EIA test for C. diff toxin and were published in English. Electronic searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE were performed and bibliographies of review articles and conference abstracts were hand searched. Of 805 citations identified, 32 were reviewed in detail and nine were included in the final review. All studies except one were retrospective chart reviews. Seven studies had data on number of participants (32,526), and the overall reporting of test setting and patient characteristics was poor. The prevalence of C. diff infection ranged from 9.1% to 18.5%. The yield of the first EIA test ranged from 8.4% to 16.6%, dropping to 1.5-4.7% with a second test. The utility of repeat testing was evident in outbreak settings, where the yield of repeat testing was 5%. Repeat C. diff testing for hospitalized patients has low clinical utility and may be considered in outbreak settings or when the pre-test probability of disease is high. Future studies should aim to identify patients with a likelihood of disease and determine the utility of repeat testing compared with empiric treatment.

  13. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in hemato-oncological patients: A case control study in 144 patients

    PubMed Central

    Fuereder, Thorsten; Koni, Danjel; Gleiss, Andreas; Kundi, Michael; Makristathis, Athanasios; Zielinski, Christoph; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hemato-oncologic patients is conflicting. We studied risk factors for CDI in a large, well-characterized cohort of hemato-oncological patients. 144 hemato-oncological patients were identified in this retrospective, single center study with a microbiologically confirmed CDI-associated diarrhea. Patients were compared with 144 age and sex matched hemato-oncologic patients with CDI negative diarrhea. Risk factors such as prior antimicrobial therapy, type of disease, chemotherapy and survival were evaluated. CDI-positive patients received more frequently any antimicrobial agent and antimicrobial combination therapy than CDI-negative patients (79% vs. 67%; OR = 2.26, p = 0.038 and OR = 2.62, p = 0.003, respectively). CDI positive patients were treated more frequently with antimicrobial agents active against C. difficile than CDI negative ones (25% vs. 13%; OR = 2.2, p = 0.039). The interval between last chemotherapy and onset of diarrhea was significantly shorter in patients without CDI (median, 17 days vs 36 days; p < 0.001). Our study demonstrates that chemotherapy is not a significant risk factor for CDI but for early onset CDI negative diarrhea. The predominant modifiable risk factor for CDI is in hemato-oncological patients antimicrobial treatment. These findings should be taken into account in the daily clinical practice to avoid CDI associated complications and excess health care costs. PMID:27510591

  14. Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes 001 and 176 - the common denominator of C. difficile infection epidemiology in the Czech Republic, 2014.

    PubMed

    Krutova, Marcela; Matejkova, Jana; Kuijper, Ed J; Drevinek, Pavel; Nyc, Otakar

    2016-07-21

    In 2014, 18 hospitals in the Czech Republic participated in a survey of the incidence of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in the country. The mean CDI incidence was 6.1 (standard deviation (SD):7.2) cases per 10,000 patient bed-days and 37.8 cases (SD: 41.4) per 10,000 admissions. The mean CDI testing frequency was 39.5 tests (SD: 25.4) per 10,000 patient bed-days and 255.8 tests (SD: 164.0) per 10,000 admissions. A total of 774 C. difficile isolates were investigated, of which 225 (29%) belonged to PCR ribotype 176, and 184 isolates (24%) belonged to PCR ribotype 001. Multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) revealed 27 clonal complexes formed by 84% (190/225) of PCR ribotype 176 isolates, and 14 clonal complexes formed by 77% (141/184) of PCR ribotype 001 isolates. Clonal clusters of PCR ribotypes 176 and 001 were observed in 11 and 7 hospitals, respectively. Our data demonstrate the spread of two C. difficile PCR ribotypes within 18 hospitals in the Czech Republic, stressing the importance of standardising CDI testing protocols and implementing mandatory CDI surveillance in the country. PMID:27484171

  15. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in hemato-oncological patients: A case control study in 144 patients.

    PubMed

    Fuereder, Thorsten; Koni, Danjel; Gleiss, Andreas; Kundi, Michael; Makristathis, Athanasios; Zielinski, Christoph; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hemato-oncologic patients is conflicting. We studied risk factors for CDI in a large, well-characterized cohort of hemato-oncological patients. 144 hemato-oncological patients were identified in this retrospective, single center study with a microbiologically confirmed CDI-associated diarrhea. Patients were compared with 144 age and sex matched hemato-oncologic patients with CDI negative diarrhea. Risk factors such as prior antimicrobial therapy, type of disease, chemotherapy and survival were evaluated. CDI-positive patients received more frequently any antimicrobial agent and antimicrobial combination therapy than CDI-negative patients (79% vs. 67%; OR = 2.26, p = 0.038 and OR = 2.62, p = 0.003, respectively). CDI positive patients were treated more frequently with antimicrobial agents active against C. difficile than CDI negative ones (25% vs. 13%; OR = 2.2, p = 0.039). The interval between last chemotherapy and onset of diarrhea was significantly shorter in patients without CDI (median, 17 days vs 36 days; p < 0.001). Our study demonstrates that chemotherapy is not a significant risk factor for CDI but for early onset CDI negative diarrhea. The predominant modifiable risk factor for CDI is in hemato-oncological patients antimicrobial treatment. These findings should be taken into account in the daily clinical practice to avoid CDI associated complications and excess health care costs. PMID:27510591

  16. Nation-wide prospective surveillance of Clostridium difficile infections in hospitals in Belgium, July 2007-June 2008.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M L; Mertens, K; Ramboer, I; Delmée, M; Suetens, C

    2009-01-01

    We report here baseline data from the first year of compulsory surveillance of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in hospitals in Belgium. Between 1 July 2007 and 30 June 2008, 2,704 CDI were reported: 12% were recurrent and 66% were hospital-associated (half of which occurred 15 days or more after admission). CDI was considered the cause of death (direct or indirect) for 10% of the episodes. The median incidence of CDI was 1.5 per 1,000 admissions and 1.9 per 10,000 hospital-days for all cases, and 0.9 per 1,000 admissions, and 1.1 per 10,000 hospital-days for hospital-associated cases. Further investigation of risk stratification by average length of stay in the reporting hospitals is warranted as a way to improve the comparability of indicators across hospitals and surveillance systems. In spite of methodological issues, the surveillance of CDI in Belgian hospitals has been able to produce robust baseline data that should allow monitoring of trends at hospital and national level, and provide a basis for international comparisons. Remaining challenges are to define and monitor targets for the control of CDI, and to improve the individual feed-back of data at hospital level. PMID:19371509

  17. Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes 001 and 176 - the common denominator of C. difficile infection epidemiology in the Czech Republic, 2014.

    PubMed

    Krutova, Marcela; Matejkova, Jana; Kuijper, Ed J; Drevinek, Pavel; Nyc, Otakar

    2016-07-21

    In 2014, 18 hospitals in the Czech Republic participated in a survey of the incidence of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in the country. The mean CDI incidence was 6.1 (standard deviation (SD):7.2) cases per 10,000 patient bed-days and 37.8 cases (SD: 41.4) per 10,000 admissions. The mean CDI testing frequency was 39.5 tests (SD: 25.4) per 10,000 patient bed-days and 255.8 tests (SD: 164.0) per 10,000 admissions. A total of 774 C. difficile isolates were investigated, of which 225 (29%) belonged to PCR ribotype 176, and 184 isolates (24%) belonged to PCR ribotype 001. Multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) revealed 27 clonal complexes formed by 84% (190/225) of PCR ribotype 176 isolates, and 14 clonal complexes formed by 77% (141/184) of PCR ribotype 001 isolates. Clonal clusters of PCR ribotypes 176 and 001 were observed in 11 and 7 hospitals, respectively. Our data demonstrate the spread of two C. difficile PCR ribotypes within 18 hospitals in the Czech Republic, stressing the importance of standardising CDI testing protocols and implementing mandatory CDI surveillance in the country.

  18. Diarrhoea in general practice: when should a Clostridium difficile infection be considered? Results of a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hensgens, M P M; Dekkers, O M; Demeulemeester, A; Buiting, A G M; Bloembergen, P; van Benthem, B H B; Le Cessie, S; Kuijper, E J

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) are frequent in hospitals, but also seem to increase in the community. Here, we aim to determine the incidence of CDI in general practice and to evaluate current testing algorithms for CDI. Three Dutch laboratories tested all unformed faeces (12,714) for C. difficile when diagnostic testing (for any enteric pathogen) was requested by a general practitioner (GP). Additionally, a nested case-control study was initiated, including 152 CDI patients and 304 age and sex-matched controls. Patients were compared using weighted multivariable logistic regression. One hundred and ninety-four samples (1.5%) were positive for C. difficile (incidence 0.67/10,000 patient years). This incidence was comparable to that of Salmonella spp. Compared with diarrhoeal controls, CDI was associated with more severe complaints, underlying diseases, antibiotic use and prior hospitalization. In our study, GPs requested a test for C. difficile in 7% of the stool samples, thereby detecting 40% of all CDIs. Dutch national recommendations advise testing for C. difficile when prior antibiotic use or hospitalization is present (18% of samples). If these recommendations were followed, 61% of all CDIs would have been detected. In conclusion, C. difficile is relatively frequent in general practice. Currently, testing for C. difficile is rare and only 40% of CDI in general practice is detected. Following recommendations that are based on traditional risk factors for CDI, would improve detection of CDI.

  19. The roles of host and pathogen factors and the innate immune response in the pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xingmin; Hirota, Simon A

    2015-02-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is the most common cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the etiologic agent of pseudomembranous colitis. The clinical manifestation of C. difficile infection (CDI) is highly variable, from asymptomatic carriage, to mild self-limiting diarrhea, to the more severe pseudomembranous colitis. Furthermore, in extreme cases, colonic inflammation and tissue damage can lead to toxic megacolon, a condition requiring surgical intervention. C. difficile expresses two key virulence factors; the exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which are glucosyltransferases that target host-cell monomeric GTPases. In addition, some hypervirulent strains produce a third toxin, binary toxin or C. difficile transferase (CDT), which may contribute to the pathogenesis of CDI. More recently, other factors such as surface layer proteins (SLPs) and flagellin have also been linked to the inflammatory responses observed in CDI. Although the adaptive immune response can influence the severity of CDI, the innate immune responses to C. difficile and its toxins play crucial roles in CDI onset, progression, and overall prognosis. Despite this, the innate immune responses in CDI have drawn relatively little attention from clinical researchers. Targeting these responses may prove useful clinically as adjuvant therapies, especially in refractory and/or recurrent CDI. This review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of how C. difficile and its toxins modulate innate immune responses that contribute to CDI pathogenesis.

  20. Efficacy of fecal microbiota transplantation in 2 children with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection and its impact on their growth and gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Walia, Ritu; Garg, Shashank; Song, Yang; Girotra, Mohit; Cuffari, Carmen; Fricke, Wolfgang Florian; Dutta, Sudhir K

    2014-11-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is recognized as an alternative therapeutic modality for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI); however, data on its efficacy in children are lacking, including its effect on their growth and fecal microbiota. We report on 2 young children (<3 years old) who failed available therapeutics for RCDI, but responded remarkably well to FMT. Besides resolution of clinical features of C difficile infection (CDI), FMT administration led to marked improvement in their growth, along with increased microbiota diversity, especially proportion of Bacteroides. Our 2 cases illustrate the efficacy of FMT in children with RCDI and its positive effect on their growth and gut microbiota.

  1. Diversity of Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes in Europe: results from the European, multicentre, prospective, biannual, point-prevalence study of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalised patients with diarrhoea (EUCLID), 2012 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kerrie A; Ashwin, Helen; Longshaw, Christopher M; Burns, David A; Davis, Georgina L; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the major cause of infective diarrhoea in healthcare environments. As part of the European, multicentre, prospective, biannual, point-prevalence study of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalised patients with diarrhoea (EUCLID), the largest C. difficile epidemiological study of its type, PCR ribotype distribution of C. difficile isolates in Europe was investigated. PCR ribotyping was performed on 1,196 C. difficile isolates from diarrhoeal samples sent to the European coordinating laboratory in 2012-13 and 2013 (from two sampling days) by 482 participating hospitals from 19 European countries. A total of 125 ribotypes were identified, of which ribotypes 027 (19%, n =222), 001/072 (11%, n = 134) and 014/020 (10%, n = 119) were the most prevalent. Distinct regional patterns of ribotype distribution were noted. Of 596 isolates from patients with toxin-positive stools (CDI cases), ribotype 027 accounted for 22% (32/144) of infections in cases aged from 18 to less than 65 years, but the prevalence decreased in those aged ≥ 65 years (14% (59/412)) and further decreased in those aged ≥ 81 years (9% (18/195)). The prevalence of ribotype 027 and 176, but not other epidemic strains, was inversely proportional to overall ribotype diversity (R(2) = 0.717). This study highlights an increased diversity of C. difficile ribotypes across Europe compared with previous studies, with considerable intercountry variation in ribotype distribution. Continuous surveillance programmes are necessary to monitor the changing epidemiology of C. difficile.

  2. Diversity of Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes in Europe: results from the European, multicentre, prospective, biannual, point-prevalence study of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalised patients with diarrhoea (EUCLID), 2012 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kerrie A; Ashwin, Helen; Longshaw, Christopher M; Burns, David A; Davis, Georgina L; Wilcox, Mark H

    2016-07-21

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the major cause of infective diarrhoea in healthcare environments. As part of the European, multicentre, prospective, biannual, point-prevalence study of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalised patients with diarrhoea (EUCLID), the largest C. difficile epidemiological study of its type, PCR ribotype distribution of C. difficile isolates in Europe was investigated. PCR ribotyping was performed on 1,196 C. difficile isolates from diarrhoeal samples sent to the European coordinating laboratory in 2012-13 and 2013 (from two sampling days) by 482 participating hospitals from 19 European countries. A total of 125 ribotypes were identified, of which ribotypes 027 (19%, n =222), 001/072 (11%, n = 134) and 014/020 (10%, n = 119) were the most prevalent. Distinct regional patterns of ribotype distribution were noted. Of 596 isolates from patients with toxin-positive stools (CDI cases), ribotype 027 accounted for 22% (32/144) of infections in cases aged from 18 to less than 65 years, but the prevalence decreased in those aged ≥ 65 years (14% (59/412)) and further decreased in those aged ≥ 81 years (9% (18/195)). The prevalence of ribotype 027 and 176, but not other epidemic strains, was inversely proportional to overall ribotype diversity (R(2) = 0.717). This study highlights an increased diversity of C. difficile ribotypes across Europe compared with previous studies, with considerable intercountry variation in ribotype distribution. Continuous surveillance programmes are necessary to monitor the changing epidemiology of C. difficile. PMID:27470194

  3. Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolates from a Phase 2 clinical trial of cadazolid and vancomycin in C. difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Gerding, D. N.; Hecht, D. W.; Louie, T.; Nord, C. E.; Talbot, G. H.; Cornely, O. A.; Buitrago, M.; Best, E.; Sambol, S.; Osmolski, J. R.; Kracker, H.; Locher, H. H.; Charef, P.; Wilcox, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibilities of Clostridium difficile isolates to cadazolid, a novel antibiotic for the treatment of C. difficile infection. Methods Ribotyping and susceptibilities were determined for C. difficile isolates from a multicentre, double-blind, Phase 2 study of oral cadazolid in patients with C. difficile infection (NCT01222702, ClinicalTrials.gov; EudraCT 2010-020941-29, European Clinical Trials Database). Patients were randomized to receive 250, 500 or 1000 mg of cadazolid twice daily or 125 mg of vancomycin four times daily, for 10 days. MICs of cadazolid, vancomycin, fidaxomicin, linezolid and moxifloxacin were determined at baseline for all patients and post-baseline for patients with clinical failure or recurrence, using the agar dilution method. Results Seventy-eight of 84 patients had an evaluable toxigenic C. difficile isolate at baseline. The most frequent PCR ribotype was 027 (15.4%). Cadazolid MICs for baseline isolates (including epidemic strain 027) ranged from 0.06 to 0.25 mg/L. Baseline cadazolid MICs were similar to those of fidaxomicin and lower than those of vancomycin, linezolid and moxifloxacin. For each clinical outcome group (clinical cure, clinical failure, sustained clinical response and clinical failure or recurrence), the baseline cadazolid MIC range was 0.06–0.25 mg/L. Mean (min–max) cadazolid faecal concentration (μg/g) on day 5 was 884 (101–2710), 1706 (204–4230) and 3226 (1481–12 600) for the doses 250, 500 and 1000 mg, respectively. Conclusions For all cadazolid doses, the faecal concentration was in excess of several thousand-fold the MIC90 for C. difficile. The MIC of cadazolid for all C. difficile isolates, including epidemic strains, was low and in the same narrow range regardless of treatment outcome. PMID:26433782

  4. Multicenter, Randomized Clinical Trial To Compare the Safety and Efficacy of LFF571 and Vancomycin for Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mullane, Kathleen; Lee, Christine; Bressler, Adam; Buitrago, Martha; Weiss, Karl; Dabovic, Kristina; Praestgaard, Jens; Leeds, Jennifer A.; Blais, Johanne

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection causes serious diarrheal disease. Although several drugs are available for treatment, including vancomycin, recurrences remain a problem. LFF571 is a semisynthetic thiopeptide with potency against C. difficile in vitro. In this phase 2 exploratory study, we compared the safety and efficacy (based on a noninferiority analysis) of LFF571 to those of vancomycin used in adults with primary episodes or first recurrences of moderate C. difficile infection. Patients were randomized to receive 200 mg of LFF571 or 125 mg of vancomycin four times daily for 10 days. The primary endpoint was the proportion of clinical cures at the end of therapy in the per-protocol population. Secondary endpoints included clinical cures at the end of therapy in the modified intent-to-treat (mITT) population, the time to diarrhea resolution, and the recurrence rate. Seventy-two patients were randomized, with 46 assigned to receive LFF571. Based on the protocol-specified definition, the rate of clinical cure for LFF571 (90.6%) was noninferior to that of vancomycin (78.3%). The 30-day sustained cure rates for LFF571 and vancomycin were 56.7% and 65.0%, respectively, in the per-protocol population and 58.7% and 60.0%, respectively, in the modified intent-to-treat population. Using toxin-confirmed cases only, the recurrence rates were lower for LFF571 (19% versus 25% for vancomycin in the per-protocol population). LFF571 was generally safe and well tolerated. The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was higher for LFF571 (76.1% versus 69.2% for vancomycin), although more AEs in the vancomycin group were suspected to be related to the study drug (38.5% versus 32.6% for LFF571). One patient receiving LFF571 discontinued the study due to an AE. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01232595.) PMID:25534727

  5. Burden of Nursing Home-Onset Clostridium difficile Infection in the United States: Estimates of Incidence and Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Jennifer C.; Mu, Yi; Dumyati, Ghinwa K.; Farley, Monica M.; Winston, Lisa G.; Johnston, Helen L.; Meek, James I.; Perlmutter, Rebecca; Holzbauer, Stacy M.; Beldavs, Zintars G.; Phipps, Erin C.; Dunn, John R.; Cohen, Jessica A.; Avillan, Johannetsy; Stone, Nimalie D.; Gerding, Dale N.; McDonald, L. Clifford; Lessa, Fernanda C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Approximately 4 million Americans receive nursing home (NH) care annually. Nursing home residents commonly have risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), including advanced age and antibiotic exposures. We estimated national incidence of NH-onset (NHO) CDI and patient outcomes. Methods. We identified NHO-CDI cases from population-based surveillance of 10 geographic areas in the United States. Cases were defined by C difficile-positive stool collected in an NH (or from NH residents in outpatient settings or ≤3 days after hospital admission) without a positive stool in the prior 8 weeks. Medical records were reviewed on a sample of cases. Incidence was estimated using regression models accounting for age and laboratory testing method; sampling weights were applied to estimate hospitalizations, recurrences, and deaths. Results. A total of 3503 NHO-CDI cases were identified. Among 262 sampled cases, median age was 82 years, 76% received antibiotics in the 12 weeks prior to the C difficile-positive specimen, and 57% were discharged from a hospital in the month before specimen collection. After adjusting for age and testing method, the 2012 national estimate for NHO-CDI incidence was 112 800 cases (95% confidence interval [CI], 93 400–131 800); 31 400 (28%) were hospitalized within 7 days after a positive specimen (95% CI, 25 500–37 300), 20 900 (19%) recurred within 14–60 days (95% CI, 14 600–27 100), and 8700 (8%) died within 30 days (95% CI, 6600–10 700). Conclusions. Nursing home onset CDI is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Strategies focused on infection prevention in NHs and appropriate antibiotic use in both NHs and acute care settings may decrease the burden of NHO CDI. PMID:26798767

  6. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases: update of the treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Debast, S B; Bauer, M P; Kuijper, E J

    2014-03-01

    In 2009 the first European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infection (ESCMID) treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was published. The guideline has been applied widely in clinical practice. In this document an update and review on the comparative effectiveness of the currently available treatment modalities of CDI is given, thereby providing evidence-based recommendations on this issue. A computerized literature search was carried out to investigate randomized and non-randomized trials investigating the effect of an intervention on the clinical outcome of CDI. The Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to grade the strength of our recommendations and the quality of the evidence. The ESCMID and an international team of experts from 11 European countries supported the process. To improve clinical guidance in the treatment of CDI, recommendations are specified for various patient groups, e.g. initial non-severe disease, severe CDI, first recurrence or risk for recurrent disease, multiple recurrences and treatment of CDI when oral administration is not possible. Treatment options that are reviewed include: antibiotics, toxin-binding resins and polymers, immunotherapy, probiotics, and faecal or bacterial intestinal transplantation. Except for very mild CDI that is clearly induced by antibiotic usage antibiotic treatment is advised. The main antibiotics that are recommended are metronidazole, vancomycin and fidaxomicin. Faecal transplantation is strongly recommended for multiple recurrent CDI. In case of perforation of the colon and/or systemic inflammation and deteriorating clinical condition despite antibiotic therapy, total abdominal colectomy or diverting loop ileostomy combined with colonic lavage is recommended.

  7. A comparison between National Healthcare Safety Network laboratory-identified event reporting versus traditional surveillance for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Durkin, Michael J; Baker, Arthur W; Dicks, Kristen V; Lewis, Sarah S; Chen, Luke F; Anderson, Deverick J; Sexton, Daniel J; Moehring, Rebekah W

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Hospitals in the National Healthcare Safety Network began reporting laboratory-identified (LabID) Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) events in January 2013. Our study quantified the differences between the LabID and traditional surveillance methods. DESIGN Cohort study. SETTING A cohort of 29 community hospitals in the southeastern United States. METHODS A period of 6 months (January 1, 2013, to June 30, 2013) of prospectively collected data using both LabID and traditional surveillance definitions were analyzed. CDI events with mismatched surveillance categories between LabID and traditional definitions were identified and characterized further. Hospital-onset CDI (HO-CDI) rates for the entire cohort of hospitals were calculated using each method, then hospital-specific HO-CDI rates and standardized infection ratios (SIRs) were calculated. Hospital rankings based on each CDI surveillance measure were compared. RESULTS A total of 1,252 incident LabID CDI events were identified during 708,551 patient-days; 286 (23%) mismatched CDI events were detected. The overall HO-CDI rate was 6.0 vs 4.4 per 10,000 patient-days for LabID and traditional surveillance, respectively (P<.001); of 29 hospitals, 25 (86%) detected a higher CDI rate using LabID compared with the traditional method. Hospital rank in the cohort differed greatly between surveillance measures. A rank change of at least 5 places occurred in 9 of 28 hospitals (32%) between LabID and traditional CDI surveillance methods, and for SIR. CONCLUSIONS LabID surveillance resulted in a higher hospital-onset CDI incidence rate than did traditional surveillance. Hospital-specific rankings varied based on the HO-CDI surveillance measure used. A clear understanding of differences in CDI surveillance measures is important when interpreting national and local CDI data.

  8. Multicenter, randomized clinical trial to compare the safety and efficacy of LFF571 and vancomycin for Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Mullane, Kathleen; Lee, Christine; Bressler, Adam; Buitrago, Martha; Weiss, Karl; Dabovic, Kristina; Praestgaard, Jens; Leeds, Jennifer A; Blais, Johanne; Pertel, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium difficile infection causes serious diarrheal disease. Although several drugs are available for treatment, including vancomycin, recurrences remain a problem. LFF571 is a semisynthetic thiopeptide with potency against C. difficile in vitro. In this phase 2 exploratory study, we compared the safety and efficacy (based on a noninferiority analysis) of LFF571 to those of vancomycin used in adults with primary episodes or first recurrences of moderate C. difficile infection. Patients were randomized to receive 200 mg of LFF571 or 125 mg of vancomycin four times daily for 10 days. The primary endpoint was the proportion of clinical cures at the end of therapy in the per-protocol population. Secondary endpoints included clinical cures at the end of therapy in the modified intent-to-treat (mITT) population, the time to diarrhea resolution, and the recurrence rate. Seventy-two patients were randomized, with 46 assigned to receive LFF571. Based on the protocol-specified definition, the rate of clinical cure for LFF571 (90.6%) was noninferior to that of vancomycin (78.3%). The 30-day sustained cure rates for LFF571 and vancomycin were 56.7% and 65.0%, respectively, in the per-protocol population and 58.7% and 60.0%, respectively, in the modified intent-to-treat population. Using toxin-confirmed cases only, the recurrence rates were lower for LFF571 (19% versus 25% for vancomycin in the per-protocol population). LFF571 was generally safe and well tolerated. The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was higher for LFF571 (76.1% versus 69.2% for vancomycin), although more AEs in the vancomycin group were suspected to be related to the study drug (38.5% versus 32.6% for LFF571). One patient receiving LFF571 discontinued the study due to an AE. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01232595.).

  9. Septicemia in Neutropenic Patients Infected with Clostridium tertium Resistant to Cefepime and Other Expanded-Spectrum Cephalosporins

    PubMed Central

    Steyaert, Sophia; Peleman, Renaat; Vaneechoutte, Mario; De Baere, Thierry; Claeys, Geert; Verschraegen, Gerda

    1999-01-01

    Clostridium tertium was isolated from two immunocompromised patients with septicemia, fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms. The strains were resistant to ceftazidime, cefepime, and clindamycin; intermediately resistant to penicillin; and susceptible to metronidazole, quinolones, and vancomycin. PMID:10523601

  10. In vitro susceptibility of Clostridium difficile isolates from patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea or colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dzink, J; Bartlett, J G

    1980-01-01

    In vitro susceptibility tests were performed on 84 strains of Clostridium difficile to 11 antimicrobial agents. All isolates were from the stools of patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea or colitis in which there was a cytopathic toxin that was neutralized by Clostridium sordellii antitoxin. Over 95% of the strains were susceptible to vancomycin, penicillin G, ampicillin, and metronidazole at concentrations of 4 microgram/ml. Susceptibility to clindamycin was variable; 60% of the strains were susceptible at 1 microgram/ml, and 9% were resistant at 128 microgram/ml. Studies of individual isolates showed that a major portion of the strains were relatively susceptible to the antimicrobial agent implicated in causing the disease. PMID:7396460

  11. The flagellin FliC of Clostridium difficile is responsible for pleiotropic gene regulation during in vivo infection.

    PubMed

    Barketi-Klai, Amira; Monot, Marc; Hoys, Sandra; Lambert-Bordes, Sylvie; Kuehne, Sarah A; Minton, Nigel; Collignon, Anne; Dupuy, Bruno; Kansau, Imad

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the main agent responsible for hospital acquired antibiotic associated diarrhoea. In recent years, epidemic strains have emerged causing more severe infections. Whilst C. difficile has two major virulence factors, toxins TcdA and TcdB, it is generally accepted that other virulence components of the bacterium contribute to disease. Previously, it has been suggested that flagella expression from pathogenic bacteria might be implicated in virulence. In a recent study, we observed an increased mortality in a gnotobiotic mouse model when animals were colonized with an isogenic fliC mutant constructed in the PCR-ribotype 027 (B1/NAP1) strain R20291, while animals survived when colonized by the parental strain or after colonization by other high-toxin-producing C. difficile strains. To understand the reasons for this increased virulence, we compared the global gene expression profiles between the fliC-R20291 mutant and its parental strain using an in vitro and in vivo transcriptomic approach. The latter made use of the gnotobiotic mouse model. Interestingly, in the fliC mutant, we observed considerable up-regulation of genes involved in mobility, membrane transport systems (PTS, ABC transporters), carbon metabolism, known virulence factors and sporulation. A smaller but significant up-regulation of genes involved in cell growth, fermentation, metabolism, stress and antibiotic resistance was also apparent. All of these genes may be associated with the increased virulence of the fliC-R20921 mutant. We confirmed that the fliC mutation is solely responsible for the observed changes in gene expression in the mutant strain since expression profiles were restored to that of the wild-type strain in the fliC-complemented strain. Thus, the absence of FliC is directly or indirectly involved in the high mortality observed in the fliC mutant infected animals. Therefore, we provide the first evidence that when the major structural component of the flagellum is

  12. Effect of Clostridium perfringens infection and antibiotic administration on microbiota in the small intestine of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Fasina, Yewande O; Newman, Molli M; Stough, Joshua M; Liles, Mark R

    2016-02-01

    The etiological agent of necrotic enteritis (NE) is Clostridium perfringens (CP), which is an economically significant problem for broiler chicken producers worldwide. Traditional use of in-feed antibiotic growth promoters to control NE disease have resulted in the emergence of antibiotic resistance in CP strains. Identification of probiotic bacteria strains as an alternative to antibiotics for the control of intestinal CP colonization is crucial. Two experiments were conducted to determine changes in intestinal bacterial assemblages in response to CP infection and in-feed bacitracin methylene disalicylate (BMD) in broiler chickens. In each experiment conducted in battery-cage or floor-pen housing, chicks were randomly assigned to the following treatment groups: 1) BMD-supplemented diet with no CP challenge (CM), 2) BMD-free control diet with no CP challenge (CX), 3) BMD-supplemented diet with CP challenge (PCM), or 4) BMD-free control diet with CP challenge (PCX). The establishment of CP infection was confirmed, with the treatment groups exposed to CP having a 1.5- to 2-fold higher CP levels (P < 0.05) compared to the non-exposed groups. Next-generation sequencing of PCR amplified 16S rRNA genes, was used to perform intestinal bacterial diversity analyses pre-challenge, and at 1, 7, and 21 d post-challenge. The results indicated that the intestinal bacterial assemblage was dominated by members of the phylum Firmicutes in all treatments before and after CP challenge, especially the Lactobacillaceae and Clostridiales families. In addition, we observed post-challenge emergence of members of the Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcaceae in the non-medicated PCX treatment, and emergence of the Enterococcaceae in the medicated PCM treatment. This study highlights the bacterial interactions that could be important in suppressing or eliminating CP infection within the chicken intestine. Future studies should explore the potential to use commensal strains of unknown

  13. Clostridium difficile Infections in Medical Intensive Care Units of a Medical Center in Southern Taiwan: Variable Seasonality and Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2016-01-01

    Critical patients are susceptible to Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs), which cause significant morbidity and mortality in the hospital. In Taiwan, the epidemiology of CDI in intensive care units (ICUs) is not well understood. This study was aimed to describe the incidence and the characteristics of CDI in the ICUs of a medical center in southern Taiwan. Adult patients with diarrhea but without colostomy/colectomy or laxative use were enrolled. Stool samples were collected with or without 5 ml alcohol and were plated on cycloserine-cefoxitin-fructose agar. C. difficile identification was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. There were 1,551 patients admitted to ICUs, 1,488 screened, and 145 with diarrhea. A total of 75 patients were excluded due either to laxative use, a lack of stool samples, or refusal. Overall, 70 patients were included, and 14 (20%) were diagnosed with CDI, with an incidence of 8.8 cases per 10,000 patient-days. The incidence of CDI was found to be highest in March 2013 and lowest in the last quarter of 2013. The cases were categorized as the following: 5 severe, complicated, 5 severe, and 4 mild or moderate diseases. Among the 14 cases of CDI, the median patient age was 74 (range: 47–94) years, and the median time from admission to diarrhea onset was 16.5 (4–53) days. Eight cases received antimicrobial treatment (primarily metronidazole), and the time to diarrheal resolution was 11.5 days. Though 6 cases were left untreated, no patients died of CDI. The in-hospital mortality of CDI cases was 50%, similar to that of patients without CDI (46.4%; P = 1.0). We concluded that the overall incidence of CDI in our medical ICUs was low and there were variable seasonal incidences and disease severities of CDI. PMID:27509051

  14. Clostridium difficile infection following systemic antibiotic administration in randomised controlled trials: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Trigkidis, Kyriakos K; Boukouvala, Eleni; Falagas, Matthew E

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotics have been the most important risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). However, only data from non-randomised studies have been reviewed. We sought to evaluate the risk for development of CDI associated with the major antibiotic classes by analysing data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The PubMed, Cochrane and Scopus databases were searched and the references of selected RCTs were also hand-searched. Eligible studies should have compared only one antibiotic versus another administered systemically. Inclusion of studies comparing combinations of antibiotics was allowed only if the second antibiotic was the same or from the same class or if it was administered in a subset of the enrolled patients who were equally distributed in the two arms. Only a minority of the selected RCTs (79/1332; 5.9%) reported CDI episodes. Carbapenems were associated with more CDI episodes than fluoroquinolones [risk ratio (RR) = 2.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32-4.49] and cephalosporins (RR = 2.24, 95% CI 1.46-3.42), but not penicillins (RR = 2.53, 95% CI 0.87-7.41). Cephalosporins were associated with more CDIs than penicillins (RR = 2.36, 95% CI 1.32-4.23) and fluoroquinolones (RR = 2.84, 95% CI 1.60-5.06). There was no difference in CDI frequency between fluoroquinolones and penicillins (RR = 1.34, 95% CI 0.55-3.25). Finally, clindamycin was associated with more CDI episodes than cephalosporins and penicillins (RR = 3.92, 95% CI 1.15-13.43). In conclusion, data from RCTs showed that clindamycin and carbapenems were associated with more CDIs than other antibiotics. PMID:27216385

  15. Amixicile, a novel inhibitor of pyruvate: ferredoxin oxidoreductase, shows efficacy against Clostridium difficile in a mouse infection model.

    PubMed

    Warren, Cirle A; van Opstal, Edward; Ballard, T Eric; Kennedy, Andrew; Wang, Xia; Riggins, Mary; Olekhnovich, Igor; Warthan, Michelle; Kolling, Glynis L; Guerrant, Richard L; Macdonald, Timothy L; Hoffman, Paul S

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a serious diarrheal disease that often develops following prior antibiotic usage. One of the major problems with current therapies (oral vancomycin and metronidazole) is the high rate of recurrence. Nitazoxanide (NTZ), an inhibitor of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) in anaerobic bacteria, parasites, Helicobacter pylori, and Campylobacter jejuni, also shows clinical efficacy against CDI. From a library of ∼250 analogues of NTZ, we identified leads with increased potency for PFOR. MIC screens indicated in vitro activity in the 0.05- to 2-μg/ml range against C. difficile. To improve solubility, we replaced the 2-acetoxy group with propylamine, producing amixicile, a soluble (10 mg/ml), nontoxic (cell-based assay) lead that produced no adverse effects in mice by oral or intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes at 200 mg/kg of body weight/day. In initial efficacy testing in mice treated (20 mg/kg/day, 5 days each) 1 day after receiving a lethal inoculum of C. difficile, amixicile showed slightly less protection than did vancomycin by day 5. However, in an optimized CDI model, amixicile showed equivalence to vancomycin and fidaxomicin at day 5 and there was significantly greater survival produced by amixicile than by the other drugs on day 12. All three drugs were comparable by measures of weight loss/gain and severity of disease. Recurrence of CDI was common for mice treated with vancomycin or fidaxomicin but not for mice receiving amixicile or NTZ. These results suggest that gut repopulation with beneficial (non-PFOR) bacteria, considered essential for protection against CDI, rebounds much sooner with amixicile therapy than with vancomycin or fidaxomicin. If the mouse model is indeed predictive of human CDI disease, then amixicile, a novel PFOR inhibitor, appears to be a very promising new candidate for treatment of CDI. PMID:22585229

  16. Do admissions and discharges to long-term care facilities influence hospital burden of Clostridium difficile infection?

    PubMed Central

    Ricciardi, R.; Nelson, J.; Griffith, J.L.; Concannon, T.W.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Substantial geographical clustering of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) outbreaks in hospitals in the USA have previously been demonstrated. Aim To test the hypothesis that hospital burden of CDI is associated with admission from and discharge to long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Methods Hospital discharge data from 19 states in the USA were used to identify all patients discharged with a diagnosis of CDI from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2004. For every hospital, the proportion of discharges with a diagnosis of CDI was calculated, and those above the 90th percentile were classified as ‘high CDI’ hospitals. We tested the association between this measure of hospital burden of CDI and the rates of admission from and discharges to LTCFs. We adjusted for other hospital level characteristics, case-complexity and local population characteristics. Findings We identified 38,372,951 discharges during the three-year study period. Of all discharges, 274,311 (0.71%) had a primary or secondary diagnosis of CDI. Hospitals had a mean CDI burden of 7.8 cases per 1000 discharges. High CDI hospitals (N = 610; 10.0%) had a mean CDI burden of 34.8 cases per 1000 discharges. Compared to other hospitals, high CDI hospitals were more likely to have a high proportion of admissions from or discharges to LTCFs. This association persisted after adjustments for other hospital characteristics, case-complexity, and area population characteristics. Conclusion A high rate of admission from or discharge to LTCFs is associated with an increased hospital burden of CDI. PMID:22137065

  17. Low sensitivity of fecal toxin A/B enzyme immunoassay for diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Erb, S; Frei, R; Strandén, A M; Dangel, M; Tschudin-Sutter, S; Widmer, A F

    2015-11-01

    The optimal approach in laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is still not well defined. Toxigenic culture (TC) or alternatively fecal toxin assay by cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay are considered to be the reference standard, but these methods are time-consuming and labor intensive. In many medical centers, diagnosis of CDI is therefore still based on fecal toxin A/B enzyme immunoassay (EIA) directly from stool alone, balancing cost and speed against limited diagnostic sensitivity. The aim of the study was to assess in which patient population the additional workload of TC is justified. All consecutive stool specimens submitted for diagnosis of suspected CDI between 2004 and 2011 at a tertiary-care center were examined by toxin EIA and TC. Clinical data of patients with established diagnosis of CDI were collected in a standardized case-report form. From 12,481 stool specimens submitted to the microbiologic laboratory, 480 (3.8%) fulfilled CDI criteria; 274 (57.1%) were diagnosed by toxin EIA; and an additional 206 (42.9%) were diagnosed by TC when toxin EIA was negative. Independent predictors for negative toxin EIA but positive TC were high-dose corticosteroids (odds ratio (OR) 2.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.50-5.90, p 0.002), leukocytopenia <1000/μL (OR 2.52, 95% CI 1.22-5.23, p 0.013) and nonsevere CDI (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.39-3.50, p 0.001). There was no difference in outcomes such as in-hospital mortality and recurrence between both groups. In conclusion, negative toxin EIA does not rule out CDI in immunocompromised patients in the setting of relevant clinical symptoms. Methods with improved sensitivity such as TC or PCR should be used, particularly in this patient population.

  18. Prevalence and impact of Clostridium difficile infection in elderly residents of long-term care facilities, 2011: A nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Joyce, Nina; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M; Zervou, Fainareti N; Besdine, Richard W; Mor, Vincent; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-08-01

    The elderly population is particularly vulnerable to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), but the epidemiology of CDI in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) is unknown.We performed a retrospective cohort study and used US 2011 LTCF resident data from the Minimum Data Set 3.0 linked to Medicare claims. We extracted CDI cases based on International Classification of Diseases-9 coding, and compared residents with the diagnosis of CDI to those who did not have a CDI diagnosis during their LTCF stay. We estimated CDI prevalence rates and calculated 3-month mortality rates.The study population consisted of 2,190,613 admissions (median age 82 years; interquartile range 76-88; female to male ratio 2:1; >80% whites), 45,500 of whom had a CDI diagnosis. The nationwide CDI prevalence rate was 1.85 per 100 LTCF admissions (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83-1.87). The CDI rate was lower in the South (1.54%; 95% CI 1.51-1.57) and higher in the Northeast (2.29%; 95% CI 2.25-2.33). Older age, white race, presence of a feeding tube, unhealed pressure ulcers, end-stage renal disease, cirrhosis, bowel incontinence, prior tracheostomy, chemotherapy, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were independently related to "high risk" for CDI. Residents with a CDI diagnosis were more likely to be admitted to an acute care hospital (40% vs 31%, P < 0.001) and less likely to be discharged to the community (46% vs 54%, P < 0.001) than those not reported with CDI during stay. Importantly, CDI was associated with higher mortality (24.7% vs 18.1%, P = 0.001).CDI is common among the elderly residents of LTCFs and is associated with significant increase in 3-month mortality. The prevalence is higher in the Northeast and risk stratification can be used in CDI prevention policies. PMID:27495022

  19. The discovery of a novel antibiotic for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections: a story of an effective academic–industrial partnership

    PubMed Central

    Mann, John; Taylor, Peter W.; Dorgan, Colin R.; Johnson, Peter D.; Wilson, Francis X.; Vickers, Richard; Dale, Aaron G

    2015-01-01

    Academic drug discovery is playing an increasingly important role in the identification of new therapies for a wide range of diseases. There is no one model that guarantees success. We describe here a drug discovery story where chance, the ability to capitalise on chance, and the assembling of a range of expertise, have all played important roles in the discovery and subsequent development of an antibiotic chemotype based on the bis-benzimidazole scaffold, with potency against a number of current therapeutically challenging diseases. One compound in this class, SMT19969, has recently entered Phase 2 human clinical trials for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections. PMID:26949507

  20. Australasian Society of Infectious Diseases updated guidelines for the management of Clostridium difficile infection in adults and children in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Trubiano, J A; Cheng, A C; Korman, T M; Roder, C; Campbell, A; May, M L A; Blyth, C C; Ferguson, J K; Blackmore, T K; Riley, T V; Athan, E

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) continues to rise, whilst treatment remains problematic due to recurrent, refractory and potentially severe nature of disease. The treatment of C. difficile is a challenge for community and hospital-based clinicians. With the advent of an expanding therapeutic arsenal against C. difficile since the last published Australasian guidelines, an update on CDI treatment recommendations for Australasian clinicians was required. On behalf of the Australasian Society of Infectious Diseases, we present the updated guidelines for the management of CDI in adults and children.

  1. The Monoclonal Antitoxin Antibodies (Actoxumab–Bezlotoxumab) Treatment Facilitates Normalization of the Gut Microbiota of Mice with Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Džunková, Mária; D'Auria, Giuseppe; Xu, Hua; Huang, Jun; Duan, Yinghua; Moya, Andrés; Kelly, Ciarán P.; Chen, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics have significant and long-lasting impacts on the intestinal microbiota and consequently reduce colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Standard therapy using antibiotics is associated with a high rate of disease recurrence, highlighting the need for novel treatment strategies that target toxins, the major virulence factors, rather than the organism itself. Human monoclonal antibodies MK-3415A (actoxumab–bezlotoxumab) to C. difficile toxin A and toxin B, as an emerging non-antibiotic approach, significantly reduced the recurrence of CDI in animal models and human clinical trials. Although the main mechanism of protection is through direct neutralization of the toxins, the impact of MK-3415A on gut microbiota and its restoration has not been examined. Using a CDI murine model, we compared the bacterial diversity of the gut microbiome of mice under different treatments including MK-3415A, vancomycin, or vancomycin combined with MK-3415A, sampled longitudinally. Here, we showed that C. difficile infection resulted in the prevalence of Enterobacter species. Sixty percent of mice in the vehicle group died after 2 days and their microbiome was almost exclusively formed by Enterobacter. MK-3415A treatment resulted in lower Enterobacter levels and restoration of Blautia, Akkermansia, and Lactobacillus which were the core components of the original microbiota. Vancomycin treatment led to significantly lower survival rate than the combo treatment of MK-3415A and vancomycin. Vancomycin treatment decreased bacterial diversity with predominant Enterobacter and Akkermansia, while Staphylococcus expanded after vancomycin treatment was terminated. In contrast, mice treated by vancomycin combined with MK-3415A also experienced decreased bacterial diversity during vancomycin treatment. However, these animals were able to recover their initial Blautia and Lactobacillus proportions, even though episodes of Staphylococcus overgrowth were

  2. Hyperimmune bovine colostrum for treatment of GI infections: a review and update on Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Steele, Jennifer; Sponseller, Jerlyn; Schmidt, Diane; Cohen, Ocean; Tzipori, Saul

    2013-07-01

    Hyperimmune bovine colostrum (HBC), produced by vaccination of a cow during gestation, is rich in targeted immunoglobulins, and can be used to treat a variety of diseases. The published history of HBC use for treating gastrointestinal infections in humans has developed over the past several decades and demonstrates the promise of this type of therapeutic for GI infectious disease. HBC, or purified derivative products, have been used successfully for treatment or prevention of cryptosporidiosis, shigellosis, rotavirus, enterotoxigenic E. coli, and C. difficile infection (CDI). Given the positive results of previous studies using HBC for treatment of CDI, we have produced HBC with antibodies against the two most important virulence factors of C. difficile, TcdA and TcdB, using a novel recombinant vaccine. Our preliminary results demonstrate efficacy of the HBC product for treatment of CDI in the gnotobiotic piglet model, and warrant more thorough investigation. HBC may provide an effective treatment alternative to antibiotics, which can spare the normal gut microflora, and reduce rates of recurrence and antibiotic resistance. PMID:23435084

  3. Comparison of pediatric and adult antibiotic-associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infections

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Lynne Vernice; Ozen, Metehan; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Goh, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and Clostridum difficile infections (CDI) have been well studied for adult cases, but not as well in the pediatric population. Whether the disease process or response to treatments differs between pediatric and adult patients is an important clinical concern when following global guidelines based largely on adult patients. A systematic review of the literature using databases PubMed (June 3, 1978-2015) was conducted to compare AAD and CDI in pediatric and adult populations and determine significant differences and similarities that might impact clinical decisions. In general, pediatric AAD and CDI have a more rapid onset of symptoms, a shorter duration of disease and fewer CDI complications (required surgeries and extended hospitalizations) than in adults. Children experience more community-associated CDI and are associated with smaller outbreaks than adult cases of CDI. The ribotype NAP1/027/BI is more common in adults than children. Children and adults share some similar risk factors, but adults have more complex risk factor profiles associated with more co-morbidities, types of disruptive factors and a wider range of exposures to C. difficile in the healthcare environment. The treatment of pediatric and adult AAD is similar (discontinuing or switching the inciting antibiotic), but other treatment strategies for AAD have not been established. Pediatric CDI responds better to metronidazole, while adult CDI responds better to vancomycin. Recurrent CDI is not commonly reported for children. Prevention for both pediatric and adult AAD and CDI relies upon integrated infection control programs, antibiotic stewardship and may include the use of adjunctive probiotics. Clinical presentation of pediatric AAD and CDI are different than adult AAD and CDI symptoms. These differences should be taken into account when rating severity of disease and prescribing antibiotics. PMID:27003987

  4. Multicenter, Double-Blind, Randomized, Phase 2 Study Evaluating the Novel Antibiotic Cadazolid in Patients with Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Carl Erik; Talbot, George H.; Wilcox, Mark; Gerding, Dale N.; Buitrago, Martha; Kracker, Hilke; Charef, Pascal; Cornely, Oliver A.

    2015-01-01

    Cadazolid, a novel fluoroquinolone-oxazolidinone antibiotic, exhibits potent in vitro activity against Clostridium difficile, including the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, active reference group, phase 2 study evaluated the efficacy and safety of oral cadazolid in treatment of adult patients with C. difficile infection (CDI). Eligible patients with first occurrence/first recurrence of CDI were randomized 1:1:1:1 to 250, 500, or 1,000 mg cadazolid twice daily (BID) or oral 125 mg vancomycin four times daily (QID) for 10 days. The primary endpoint was clinical cure at test of cure (48 ± 24 h after the end of treatment; modified intent-to-treat population), defined as resolution of diarrhea with no further CDI treatment required. Secondary endpoints included recurrence rate, sustained clinical response (clinical cure without recurrence), and time to diarrhea resolution. Of 84 patients enrolled, 20, 22, 20, and 22 received 250, 500, or 1,000 mg cadazolid BID or 125 mg vancomycin QID, respectively. The primary endpoint was achieved in 76.5% (80% confidence interval [CI], 58.4, 89.3), 80.0% (63.9, 91.0), 68.4% (51.1, 82.5), and 68.2% (52.3, 81.3) of patients, respectively. There was no evidence of a cadazolid dosage-dependent response. Each dosage of cadazolid resulted in a lower recurrence rate than with vancomycin (18.2 to 25.0% versus 50%). Consequently, higher sustained clinical response rates were observed with cadazolid (46.7 to 60.0%) than with vancomycin (33.3%). The times to diarrhea resolution were similar for cadazolid and vancomycin. Cadazolid was well tolerated, with no safety signal observed. The results of this phase 2 study support further clinical development of cadazolid. (This study has been registered in the United States at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01222702 and in Europe with the European Medicines Agency under registration no. EUDRA-CT 2010-020941-29.) PMID:26248357

  5. Multicenter, Double-Blind, Randomized, Phase 2 Study Evaluating the Novel Antibiotic Cadazolid in Patients with Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Louie, Thomas; Nord, Carl Erik; Talbot, George H; Wilcox, Mark; Gerding, Dale N; Buitrago, Martha; Kracker, Hilke; Charef, Pascal; Cornely, Oliver A

    2015-10-01

    Cadazolid, a novel fluoroquinolone-oxazolidinone antibiotic, exhibits potent in vitro activity against Clostridium difficile, including the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, active reference group, phase 2 study evaluated the efficacy and safety of oral cadazolid in treatment of adult patients with C. difficile infection (CDI). Eligible patients with first occurrence/first recurrence of CDI were randomized 1:1:1:1 to 250, 500, or 1,000 mg cadazolid twice daily (BID) or oral 125 mg vancomycin four times daily (QID) for 10 days. The primary endpoint was clinical cure at test of cure (48 ± 24 h after the end of treatment; modified intent-to-treat population), defined as resolution of diarrhea with no further CDI treatment required. Secondary endpoints included recurrence rate, sustained clinical response (clinical cure without recurrence), and time to diarrhea resolution. Of 84 patients enrolled, 20, 22, 20, and 22 received 250, 500, or 1,000 mg cadazolid BID or 125 mg vancomycin QID, respectively. The primary endpoint was achieved in 76.5% (80% confidence interval [CI], 58.4, 89.3), 80.0% (63.9, 91.0), 68.4% (51.1, 82.5), and 68.2% (52.3, 81.3) of patients, respectively. There was no evidence of a cadazolid dosage-dependent response. Each dosage of cadazolid resulted in a lower recurrence rate than with vancomycin (18.2 to 25.0% versus 50%). Consequently, higher sustained clinical response rates were observed with cadazolid (46.7 to 60.0%) than with vancomycin (33.3%). The times to diarrhea resolution were similar for cadazolid and vancomycin. Cadazolid was well tolerated, with no safety signal observed. The results of this phase 2 study support further clinical development of cadazolid. (This study has been registered in the United States at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01222702 and in Europe with the European Medicines Agency under registration no. EUDRA-CT 2010-020941-29.).

  6. An Economic Analysis of Strategies to Control Clostridium Difficile Transmission and Infection Using an Agent-Based Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Richard E.; Jones, Makoto; Leecaster, Molly; Samore, Matthew H.; Ray, William; Huttner, Angela; Huttner, Benedikt; Khader, Karim; Stevens, Vanessa W.; Gerding, Dale; Schweizer, Marin L.; Rubin, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Background A number of strategies exist to reduce Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) transmission. We conducted an economic evaluation of “bundling” these strategies together. Methods We constructed an agent-based computer simulation of nosocomial C. difficile transmission and infection in a hospital setting. This model included the following components: interactions between patients and health care workers; room contamination via C. difficile shedding; C. difficile hand carriage and removal via hand hygiene; patient acquisition of C. difficile via contact with contaminated rooms or health care workers; and patient antimicrobial use. Six interventions were introduced alone and "bundled" together: (a) aggressive C. difficile testing; (b) empiric isolation and treatment of symptomatic patients; (c) improved adherence to hand hygiene and (d) contact precautions; (e) improved use of soap and water for hand hygiene; and (f) improved environmental cleaning. Our analysis compared these interventions using values representing 3 different scenarios: (1) base-case (BASE) values that reflect typical hospital practice, (2) intervention (INT) values that represent implementation of hospital-wide efforts to reduce C. diff transmission, and (3) optimal (OPT) values representing the highest expected results from strong adherence to the interventions. Cost parameters for each intervention were obtained from published literature. We performed our analyses assuming low, normal, and high C. difficile importation prevalence and transmissibility of C. difficile. Results INT levels of the “bundled” intervention were cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/quality-adjusted life-year in all importation prevalence and transmissibility scenarios. OPT levels of intervention were cost-effective for normal and high importation prevalence and transmissibility scenarios. When analyzed separately, hand hygiene compliance, environmental decontamination, and empiric

  7. Prevalence and impact of Clostridium difficile infection in elderly residents of long-term care facilities, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, Panayiotis D.; Joyce, Nina; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M.; Zervou, Fainareti N.; Besdine, Richard W.; Mor, Vincent; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The elderly population is particularly vulnerable to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), but the epidemiology of CDI in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) is unknown. We performed a retrospective cohort study and used US 2011 LTCF resident data from the Minimum Data Set 3.0 linked to Medicare claims. We extracted CDI cases based on International Classification of Diseases-9 coding, and compared residents with the diagnosis of CDI to those who did not have a CDI diagnosis during their LTCF stay. We estimated CDI prevalence rates and calculated 3-month mortality rates. The study population consisted of 2,190,613 admissions (median age 82 years; interquartile range 76–88; female to male ratio 2:1; >80% whites), 45,500 of whom had a CDI diagnosis. The nationwide CDI prevalence rate was 1.85 per 100 LTCF admissions (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83–1.87). The CDI rate was lower in the South (1.54%; 95% CI 1.51–1.57) and higher in the Northeast (2.29%; 95% CI 2.25–2.33). Older age, white race, presence of a feeding tube, unhealed pressure ulcers, end-stage renal disease, cirrhosis, bowel incontinence, prior tracheostomy, chemotherapy, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were independently related to “high risk” for CDI. Residents with a CDI diagnosis were more likely to be admitted to an acute care hospital (40% vs 31%, P < 0.001) and less likely to be discharged to the community (46% vs 54%, P < 0.001) than those not reported with CDI during stay. Importantly, CDI was associated with higher mortality (24.7% vs 18.1%, P = 0.001). CDI is common among the elderly residents of LTCFs and is associated with significant increase in 3-month mortality. The prevalence is higher in the Northeast and risk stratification can be used in CDI prevention policies. PMID:27495022

  8. Evaluation of a rapid membrane enzyme immunoassay for the simultaneous detection of glutamate dehydrogenase and toxin for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heejung; Kim, Wan Hee; Kim, Myungsook; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kyungwon

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the new C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE (CD COMPLETE; TechLab, USA), which is a rapid membrane enzyme immunoassay that uses a combination of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) antigen and toxin A and B detection. A total of 608 consecutive loose stool specimens collected from the patients with suspected Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) from August to December 2012 were subjected to the CD COMPLETE and VIDAS Clostridium difficile A & B (VIDAS CDAB; bioMérieux, France). Their performances were compared with a toxigenic culture as a reference. Stool specimens that were culture-negative and CD COMPLETE- or VIDAS CDAB-positive were analyzed by using an enrichment procedure. In comparison to the toxigenic cultures, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPV), and negative predictive values (NPV) were 63.6%, 98.0%, 76.1%, and 96.4%, respectively, for the CD COMPLETE-toxin and 75.5%, 97.4%, 72.5%, and 97.8%, respectively, for the VIDAS CDAB. In comparison to the enriched C. difficile cultures, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for the CD COMPLETE-GDH were 91.0%, 92.4%, 70.5%, and 98.1%, respectively. The CD COMPLETE is a reliable method for the diagnosis of CDI and provides greater sensitivity than toxin enzyme immunoassay alone. Furthermore, the CD COMPLETE-GDH has advantages over direct culture in detecting C. difficile.

  9. Clostridium difficile Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... for someone who may have C. diff. Use chlorine bleach-based products to disinfect surfaces or items ... may be soiled with stool with detergent and chlorine bleach. If you are visiting someone in a ...

  10. The non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile CD37 protects mice against infection with a BI/NAP1/027 type of C. difficile strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keshan; Zhao, Song; Wang, Yuankai; Zhu, Xuejun; Shen, Hong; Chen, Yugen; Sun, Xingmin

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile CD37, a clinical isolate from the USA, does not produce toxin A, B or binary toxin. The aim of this study was to determine whether strain CD37 can protect mice against infection from a challenge with a toxigenic C. difficile strain. Three groups of mice (n = 10) were pretreated with a antibiotics cocktail for 5 days, switched to sterile water for 2 days, and given one dose of clindamycin (10 mg/kg) one day (day-1) before challenge (day 0) with a toxigenic C. difficile strain. Group 1 (CD37 + UK6) was given 10(7)C. difficile CD37 vegetative cells by gavage twice a day on days -1 and -2, followed by challenge with 10(6) spores of the toxigenic C. difficile UK6 (BI/NAPI/027) on day 0; Group 2 (UK6) was infected with 10(6)C. difficile UK6 spores on day 0; Group 3 (CD37) was challenged with 10(6) CD37 vegetative cells on day 0. Our data show that pre-inoculation of strain CD37 provided mice significant protection (survival, p < 0.001 between groups CD37 + UK6 and UK6) against subsequent infection with the strain UK6, while mice infected with CD37 only did not develop any symptoms of C. difficile infection (CDI). Our results highlight the potential use of CD37 as a therapeutic strain for the prevention of primary and recurrent CDI in humans.

  11. Clostridium difficile infections among adults and children in Mwanza/Tanzania: is it an underappreciated pathogen among immunocompromised patients in sub-Saharan Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Seugendo, M.; Mshana, S.E.; Hokororo, A.; Okamo, B.; Mirambo, M.M.; von Müller, L.; Gunka, K.; Zimmermann, O.; Groß, U.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known regarding the epidemiology Clostridium difficile in developing countries. Fresh stool samples from patients with diarrhoea were cultured anaerobically. C. difficile was detected in nine (6.4%) of 141 (95% confidence interval 4.2–13.1), of which seven (77.8%) were from children. HIV infection, prolonged hospitalization and antibiotic use were independent factors associated with the occurrence of C. difficile in the gastrointestinal tract. Two of the toxigenic isolates were typed as ribotype 045, and the other two had unknown ribotype. All C. difficile isolates were susceptible to metronidazole, moxifloxacin and clarithromycin, while three isolates were resistant to clarithromycin. C. difficile may be an important pathogen causing diarrhoea in sub-Saharan Africa among immunocompromised patients. PMID:26649183

  12. Identification of patients at high risk for Clostridium difficile infection: development and validation of a risk prediction model in hospitalized patients treated with antibiotics.

    PubMed

    van Werkhoven, C H; van der Tempel, J; Jajou, R; Thijsen, S F T; Diepersloot, R J A; Bonten, M J M; Postma, D F; Oosterheert, J J

    2015-08-01

    To develop and validate a prediction model for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hospitalized patients treated with systemic antibiotics, we performed a case-cohort study in a tertiary (derivation) and secondary care hospital (validation). Cases had a positive Clostridium test and were treated with systemic antibiotics before suspicion of CDI. Controls were randomly selected from hospitalized patients treated with systemic antibiotics. Potential predictors were selected from the literature. Logistic regression was used to derive the model. Discrimination and calibration of the model were tested in internal and external validation. A total of 180 cases and 330 controls were included for derivation. Age >65 years, recent hospitalization, CDI history, malignancy, chronic renal failure, use of immunosuppressants, receipt of antibiotics before admission, nonsurgical admission, admission to the intensive care unit, gastric tube feeding, treatment with cephalosporins and presence of an underlying infection were independent predictors of CDI. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the model in the derivation cohort was 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.80-0.87), and was reduced to 0.81 after internal validation. In external validation, consisting of 97 cases and 417 controls, the model area under the curve was 0.81 (95% confidence interval 0.77-0.85) and model calibration was adequate (Brier score 0.004). A simplified risk score was derived. Using a cutoff of 7 points, the positive predictive value, sensitivity and specificity were 1.0%, 72% and 73%, respectively. In conclusion, a risk prediction model was developed and validated, with good discrimination and calibration, that can be used to target preventive interventions in patients with increased risk of CDI.

  13. Pilin Vaccination Stimulates Weak Antibody Responses and Provides No Protection in a C57Bl/6 Murine Model of Acute Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Maldarelli, Grace A; Matz, Hanover; Gao, Si; Chen, Kevin; Hamza, Therwa; Yfantis, Harris G; Feng, Hanping; Donnenberg, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomial infections in the United States, adding billions of dollars per year to health care costs. A vaccine targeted against the bacterium would be extremely beneficial in decreasing the morbidity and mortality caused by C. difficile-associated disease; a vaccine directed against a colonization factor would hinder the spread of the bacterium as well as prevent disease. Type IV pili (T4Ps) are extracellular appendages composed of protein monomers called pilins. They are involved in adhesion and colonization in a wide variety of bacteria and archaea, and are putative colonization factors in C. difficile. We hypothesized that vaccinating mice with pilins would lead to generation of anti-pilin antibodies, and would protect against C. difficile challenge. We found that immunizing C57Bl/6 mice with various pilins, whether combined or as individual proteins, led to low anti-pilin antibody titers and no protection upon C. difficile challenge. Passive transfer of anti-pilin antibodies led to high serum anti-pilin IgG titers, but to undetectable fecal anti-pilin IgG titers and did not protect against challenge. The low antibody titers observed in these experiments may be due to the particular strain of mice used. Further experiments, possibly with a different animal model of C. difficile infection, are needed to determine if an anti-T4P vaccine would be protective against C. difficile infection. PMID:27375958

  14. Evaluation of three enzyme immunoassays and a loop-mediated isothermal amplification test for the laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Bruins, M J; Verbeek, E; Wallinga, J A; Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, L E S; Kuijper, E J; Bloembergen, P

    2012-11-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) consists of the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile, and/or its toxins A or B in stool preferably in a two-step algorithm. In a prospective study, we compared the performance of three toxin enzyme immunoassays (EIAs)-ImmunoCard Toxins A & B, Premier Toxins A & B and C. diff Quik Chek Complete, which combines a toxins test and a glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) antigen EIA in one device -and the loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay Illumigene C. difficile. In total 986 stool samples were analyzed. Compared with toxigenic culture as the gold standard, sensitivities, specificities, PPV and NPV values of the toxin EIAs were 41.1-54.8 %, 98.9-100 %, 75.0-100 % and 95.5-96.5 % respectively, of the Illumigene assay 93.3 %, 99.7 %, 95.8 % and 99.5 %. Illumigene assays performed significantly better for non-014/020 PCR-ribotypes than for C. difficile isolates belonging to 014/020. Discrepant analysis of three culture-negative, but Illumigene-positive samples, revealed the presence of toxin genes using real-time PCRs. In addition to the GDH EIA (NPV of 99.8 %), the performance of Illumigene allows this test to be introduced as a first screening test for CDI- or as a confirmation test for GDH -positive samples, although the initial invalid Illumigene result of 4.4 % is a point of concern.

  15. Agent-based model of Fecal Microbial Transplant effect on Bile Acid Metabolism on suppressing Clostridium difficile infection: an example of agent-based modeling of intestinal bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Xavier; An, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Agent-based modeling is a computational modeling method that represents system-level behavior as arising from multiple interactions between the multiple components that make up a system. Biological systems are thus readily described using agent-based models (ABMs), as multi-cellular organisms can be viewed as populations of interacting cells, and microbial systems manifest as colonies of individual microbes. Intersections between these two domains underlie an increasing number of pathophysiological processes, and the intestinal tract represents one of the most significant locations for these inter-domain interactions, so much so that it can be considered an internal ecology of varying robustness and function. Intestinal infections represent significant disturbances of this internal ecology, and one of the most clinically relevant intestinal infections is Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). CDI is precipitated by the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, involves the depletion of commensal microbiota, and alterations in bile acid composition in the intestinal lumen. We present an example ABM of CDI (the Clostridium difficile Infection ABM, or CDIABM) to examine fundamental dynamics of the pathogenesis of CDI and its response to treatment with anti-CDI antibiotics and a newer treatment therapy, Fecal Microbial Transplant (FMT). The CDIABM focuses on one specific mechanism of potential CDI suppression: commensal modulation of bile acid composition. Even given its abstraction, the CDIABM reproduces essential dynamics of CDI and its response to therapy, and identifies a paradoxical zone of behavior that provides insight into the role of intestinal nutritional status and the efficacy of anti-CDI therapies. It is hoped that this use case example of the CDIABM can demonstrate the usefulness of both agent-based modeling and the application of abstract functional representation as the biomedical community seeks to address the challenges of increasingly complex diseases with

  16. Transient Fecal Shedding and Limited Animal-to-Animal Transmission of Clostridium difficile by Naturally Infected Finishing Feedlot Cattle ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Palacios, Alexander; Pickworth, Carrie; Loerch, Steve; LeJeune, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    To longitudinally assess fecal shedding and animal-to-animal transmission of Clostridium difficile among finishing feedlot cattle as a risk for beef carcass contamination, we tested 186 ± 12 steers (mean ± standard deviation; 1,369 samples) in an experimental feedlot facility during the finishing period and at harvest. Clostridium difficile was isolated from 12.9% of steers on arrival (24/186; 0 to 33% among five suppliers). Shedding decreased to undetectable levels a week later (0%; P < 0.001), and remained low (<3.6%) until immediately prior to shipment for harvest (1.2%). Antimicrobial use did not increase fecal shedding, despite treatment of 53% of animals for signs of respiratory disease. Animals shedding C. difficile on arrival, however, had 4.6 times higher odds of receiving antimicrobials for respiratory signs than nonshedders (95% confidence interval for the odds ratio, 1.4 to 14.8; P = 0.01). Neither the toxin genes nor toxin A or B was detected in most (39/42) isolates based on two complementary multiplex PCRs and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay testing, respectively. Two linezolid- and clindamycin-resistant PCR ribotype 078 (tcdA+/tcdB+/cdtB+/39-bp-type deletion in tcdC) isolates were identified from two steers (at arrival and week 20), but these ribotypes did not become endemic. The other toxigenic isolate (tcdA+/tcdB+/cdtB+/classic tcdC; PCR ribotype 078-like) was identified in the cecum of one steer at harvest. Spatio-temporal analysis indicated transient shedding with no evidence of animal-to-animal transmission. The association between C. difficile shedding upon arrival and the subsequent need for antimicrobials for respiratory disease might indicate common predisposing factors. The isolation of toxigenic C. difficile from bovine intestines at harvest highlights the potential for food contamination in meat processing plants. PMID:21441320

  17. Seasonal variations in Clostridium difficile infections are associated with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus activity independently of antibiotic prescriptions: a time series analysis in Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gilca, Rodica; Fortin, Elise; Frenette, Charles; Longtin, Yves; Gourdeau, Marie

    2012-02-01

    Seasonal variations in Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), with a higher incidence occurring during winter months, have been reported. Although winter epidemics of respiratory viruses may be temporally associated with an increase in CDAD morbidity, we hypothesized that this association is mainly due to increased antibiotic use for respiratory infections. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the two most frequent respiratory viruses (influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus [RSV]) and antibiotics prescribed for respiratory infections (fluoroquinolones and macrolides) on the CDAD incidence in hospitals in the province of Québec, Canada. A multivariable Box-Jenkins transfer function model was built to relate monthly CDAD incidence to the monthly percentage of positive tests for influenza virus and RSV and monthly fluoroquinolone and macrolide prescriptions over a 4-year period (January 2005 to December 2008). Analysis showed that temporal variations in CDAD incidence followed temporal variations for influenza virus (P = 0.043), RSV (P = 0.004), and macrolide prescription (P = 0.05) time series with an average delay of 1 month and fluoroquinolone prescription time series with an average delay of 2 months (P = 0.01). We conclude that influenza virus and RSV circulation is independently associated with CDAD incidence after controlling for fluoroquinolone and macrolide use. This association was observed at an aggregated level and may be indicative of other phenomena occurring during wintertime.

  18. Preclinical studies of amixicile, a systemic therapeutic developed for treatment of Clostridium difficile infections that also shows efficacy against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Paul S; Bruce, Alexandra M; Olekhnovich, Igor; Warren, Cirle A; Burgess, Stacey L; Hontecillas, Raquel; Viladomiu, Monica; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guerrant, Richard L; Macdonald, Timothy L

    2014-08-01

    Amixicile shows efficacy in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in a mouse model, with no recurrence of CDI. Since amixicile selectively inhibits the action of a B vitamin (thiamine pyrophosphate) cofactor of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), it may both escape mutation-based drug resistance and spare beneficial probiotic gut bacteria that do not express this enzyme. Amixicile is a water-soluble derivative of nitazoxanide (NTZ), an antiparasitic therapeutic that also shows efficacy against CDI in humans. In comparative studies, amixicile showed no toxicity to hepatocytes at 200 μM (NTZ was toxic above 10 μM); was not metabolized by human, dog, or rat liver microsomes; showed equivalence or superiority to NTZ in cytochrome P450 assays; and did not activate efflux pumps (breast cancer resistance protein, P glycoprotein). A maximum dose (300 mg/kg) of amixicile given by the oral or intraperitoneal route was well tolerated by mice and rats. Plasma exposure (rats) based on the area under the plasma concentration-time curve was 79.3 h · μg/ml (30 mg/kg dose) to 328 h · μg/ml (100 mg/kg dose), the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 20 μg/ml, the time to the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 0.5 to 1 h, and the half-life was 5.6 h. Amixicile did not concentrate in mouse feces or adversely affect gut populations of Bacteroides species, Firmicutes, segmented filamentous bacteria, or Lactobacillus species. Systemic bioavailability was demonstrated through eradication of Helicobacter pylori in a mouse infection model. In summary, the efficacy of amixicile in treating CDI and other infections, together with low toxicity, an absence of mutation-based drug resistance, and excellent drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic metrics, suggests a potential for broad application in the treatment of infections caused by PFOR-expressing microbial pathogens in addition to CDI. PMID:24890599

  19. Utilizing Rapid Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis Typing To Aid Control of Hospital-Acquired Clostridium difficile Infection: a Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor, Susan; Marriott, Claire; Parsons, Helen; Waddington, Claire; Gossain, Savita; Szczepura, Ala; Stallard, Nigel; Hawkey, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The early identification of outbreaks is crucial for the control of Clostridium difficile infection. This study aimed to determine if the number of hospital-acquired C. difficile infections could be reduced by rapidly typing C. difficile strains using multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) compared to typing using PCR ribotyping. A total of 16 hospitals were recruited to the study, and all periods of increased incidence (PIIs) of C. difficile infection were identified. The hospitals were randomized into two study arms, the test and the control, with all isolates typed in the test using MLVA and in the control using PCR ribotyping. Following a PII, each hospital received a structured questionnaire regarding control measures implemented or stopped prior to or following the typing results. During the study period, there were a total of 1,682 hospital-apportioned C. difficile toxin-positive cases, with 868 in the control and 814 in the test, with modeling demonstrating no differences between the two arms. A total of 245 PIIs occurred, involving 785 patients. There was a significant difference in the mean turnaround time between the ribotyping and MLVA typing (13.6 and 5.3 days, respectively [P < 0.001]). The discriminatory ability of MLVA was greater than ribotyping, with 85 outbreaks being confirmed by ribotyping and 62 by MLVA. In the test arm, 40.6% of respondents strongly agreed that the typing result had aided their management of clusters, as opposed to 9.9% in the control. The study demonstrated the utility of rapidly typing C. difficile strains, demonstrating that it aided the management of clusters, enabling effective targeting of infection control resources. PMID:22837319

  20. Defining the Roles of TcdA and TcdB in Localized Gastrointestinal Disease, Systemic Organ Damage, and the Host Response during Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Glen P.; Chakravorty, Anjana; Pham Nguyen, Tu Anh; Mileto, Steven; Schreiber, Fernanda; Li, Lucy; Howarth, Pauline; Clare, Simon; Cunningham, Bliss; Sambol, Susan P.; Cheknis, Adam; Figueroa, Iris; Johnson, Stuart; Gerding, Dale; Rood, Julian I.; Dougan, Gordon; Lawley, Trevor D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, a significant animal pathogen, and a worldwide public health burden. Most disease-causing strains secrete two exotoxins, TcdA and TcdB, which are considered to be the primary virulence factors. Understanding the role that these toxins play in disease is essential for the rational design of urgently needed new therapeutics. However, their relative contributions to disease remain contentious. Using three different animal models, we show that TcdA+ TcdB− mutants are attenuated in virulence in comparison to the wild-type (TcdA+ TcdB+) strain, whereas TcdA− TcdB+ mutants are fully virulent. We also show for the first time that TcdB alone is associated with both severe localized intestinal damage and systemic organ damage, suggesting that this toxin might be responsible for the onset of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), a poorly characterized but often fatal complication of C. difficile infection (CDI). Finally, we show that TcdB is the primary factor responsible for inducing the in vivo host innate immune and inflammatory responses. Surprisingly, the animal infection model used was found to profoundly influence disease outcomes, a finding which has important ramifications for the validation of new therapeutics and future disease pathogenesis studies. Overall, our results show unequivocally that TcdB is the major virulence factor of C. difficile and provide new insights into the host response to C. difficile during infection. The results also highlight the critical nature of using appropriate and, when possible, multiple animal infection models when studying bacterial virulence mechanisms. PMID:26037121

  1. Preclinical Studies of Amixicile, a Systemic Therapeutic Developed for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infections That Also Shows Efficacy against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Alexandra M.; Olekhnovich, Igor; Warren, Cirle A.; Burgess, Stacey L.; Hontecillas, Raquel; Viladomiu, Monica; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guerrant, Richard L.; Macdonald, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Amixicile shows efficacy in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in a mouse model, with no recurrence of CDI. Since amixicile selectively inhibits the action of a B vitamin (thiamine pyrophosphate) cofactor of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), it may both escape mutation-based drug resistance and spare beneficial probiotic gut bacteria that do not express this enzyme. Amixicile is a water-soluble derivative of nitazoxanide (NTZ), an antiparasitic therapeutic that also shows efficacy against CDI in humans. In comparative studies, amixicile showed no toxicity to hepatocytes at 200 μM (NTZ was toxic above 10 μM); was not metabolized by human, dog, or rat liver microsomes; showed equivalence or superiority to NTZ in cytochrome P450 assays; and did not activate efflux pumps (breast cancer resistance protein, P glycoprotein). A maximum dose (300 mg/kg) of amixicile given by the oral or intraperitoneal route was well tolerated by mice and rats. Plasma exposure (rats) based on the area under the plasma concentration-time curve was 79.3 h · μg/ml (30 mg/kg dose) to 328 h · μg/ml (100 mg/kg dose), the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 20 μg/ml, the time to the maximum concentration of the drug in serum was 0.5 to 1 h, and the half-life was 5.6 h. Amixicile did not concentrate in mouse feces or adversely affect gut populations of Bacteroides species, Firmicutes, segmented filamentous bacteria, or Lactobacillus species. Systemic bioavailability was demonstrated through eradication of Helicobacter pylori in a mouse infection model. In summary, the efficacy of amixicile in treating CDI and other infections, together with low toxicity, an absence of mutation-based drug resistance, and excellent drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic metrics, suggests a potential for broad application in the treatment of infections caused by PFOR-expressing microbial pathogens in addition to CDI. PMID:24890599

  2. [Clostridium perfringens].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Haruki; Inui, Ayano; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Fujisawa, Tomoo

    2012-08-01

    In Japan, Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is the top 5th or 6th pathogen of foodborne illnesses. Annually between 2006 and 2010, there were between 20 and 40 reported outbreaks of foodborne illnesses caused by C. perfringens. C. perfringens is found in soil and dust, in the intestinal tract humans and animals, on the surface of vegetable products. C. perfringens produces an enterotoxin that causes diarrhea and abdominal pain. Inappropriate food handing practice (inadequate heating, cooling and reheating) can lead to an outbreak. In general, clinical symptoms are mild and short duration. The diagnosis of C. perfringens food poisoning is based on either quantitative cultures of implicated foods or enterotoxin-positive stool specimens. Antibiotics are not indicated.

  3. Clostridium difficile Ribotype 027: Relationship to Age, Detectability of Toxins A or B in Stool With Rapid Testing, Severe Infection, and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Krishna; Micic, Dejan; Natarajan, Mukil; Winters, Spencer; Kiel, Mark J.; Walk, Seth T.; Santhosh, Kavitha; Mogle, Jill A.; Galecki, Andrzej T.; LeBar, William; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Young, Vincent B.; Aronoff, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can cause severe disease and death, especially in older adults. A better understanding of risk factors for adverse outcomes is needed. This study tests the hypotheses that infection with specific ribotypes and presence of stool toxins independently associate with severity and constructs predictive models of adverse outcomes. Methods. Cases of non-recurrent CDI were prospectively included after positive stool tests for toxins A and/or B by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) or tcdB by polymerase chain reaction. Outcomes included severe CDI (intensive care unit admission, colectomy, or death attributable to CDI within 30 days of diagnosis) and 30-day all-cause mortality. Adjusted models were developed to test hypotheses and predict outcomes. Results. In total, 1144 cases were included. The toxin EIA was positive in 37.2% and 35.6% of patients were of age >65 years. One of the 137 unique ribotypes was ribotype 027 (16.2%). Detectable stool toxin did not associate with outcomes. Adjusting for covariates, including age, Ribotype 027 was a significant predictor of severe CDI (90 cases; odds ratio [OR], 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–2.89; P = .037) and mortality (89 cases; OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.19–3.43; P = .009). Concurrent antibiotic use associated with both outcomes. Both multivariable predictive models had excellent performance (area under the curve >0.8). Conclusions. Detection of stool toxin A and/or B by EIA does not predict severe CDI or mortality. Infection with ribotype 027 independently predicts severe CDI and mortality. Use of concurrent antibiotics is a potentially modifiable risk factor for severe CDI. PMID:25828993

  4. Investigations of the Mode of Action and Resistance Development of Cadazolid, a New Antibiotic for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Caspers, Patrick; Bruyère, Thierry; Schroeder, Susanne; Pfaff, Philippe; Knezevic, Andreja; Keck, Wolfgang; Ritz, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Cadazolid is a new oxazolidinone-type antibiotic currently in clinical development for the treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. Here, we report investigations on the mode of action and the propensity for spontaneous resistance development in C. difficile strains. Macromolecular labeling experiments indicated that cadazolid acts as a potent inhibitor of protein synthesis, while inhibition of DNA synthesis was also observed, albeit only at substantially higher concentrations of the drug. Strong inhibition of protein synthesis was also obtained in strains resistant to linezolid, in agreement with low MICs against such strains. Inhibition of protein synthesis was confirmed in coupled transcription/translation assays using extracts from different C. difficile strains, including strains resistant to linezolid, while inhibitory effects in DNA topoisomerase assays were weak or not detectable under the assay conditions. Spontaneous resistance frequencies of cadazolid were low in all strains tested (generally <10−10 at 2× to 4× the MIC), and in multiple-passage experiments (up to 13 passages) MICs did not significantly increase. Furthermore, no cross-resistance was observed, as cadazolid retained potent activity against strains resistant or nonsusceptible to linezolid, fluoroquinolones, and the new antibiotic fidaxomicin. In conclusion, the data presented here indicate that cadazolid acts primarily by inhibition of protein synthesis, with weak inhibition of DNA synthesis as a potential second mode of action, and suggest a low potential for spontaneous resistance development. PMID:24277035

  5. In vitro and in vivo antibacterial evaluation of cadazolid, a new antibiotic for treatment of Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Locher, Hans H; Seiler, Peter; Chen, Xinhua; Schroeder, Susanne; Pfaff, Philippe; Enderlin, Michel; Klenk, Axel; Fournier, Elvire; Hubschwerlen, Christian; Ritz, Daniel; Kelly, Ciaran P; Keck, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of health care-associated diarrhea with significant morbidity and mortality, and new options for the treatment of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) are needed. Cadazolid is a new oxazolidinone-type antibiotic that is currently in clinical development for treatment of CDAD. Here, we report the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial evaluation of cadazolid against C. difficile. Cadazolid showed potent in vitro activity against C. difficile with a MIC range of 0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml, including strains resistant to linezolid and fluoroquinolones. In time-kill kinetics experiments, cadazolid showed a bactericidal effect against C. difficile isolates, with >99.9% killing in 24 h, and was more bactericidal than vancomycin. In contrast to metronidazole and vancomycin, cadazolid strongly inhibited de novo toxin A and B formation in stationary-phase cultures of toxigenic C. difficile. Cadazolid also inhibited C. difficile spore formation substantially at growth-inhibitory concentrations. In the hamster and mouse models for CDAD, cadazolid was active, conferring full protection from diarrhea and death with a potency similar to that of vancomycin. These findings support further investigations of cadazolid for the treatment of CDAD.

  6. In Vitro and In Vivo Antibacterial Evaluation of Cadazolid, a New Antibiotic for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Peter; Chen, Xinhua; Schroeder, Susanne; Pfaff, Philippe; Enderlin, Michel; Klenk, Axel; Fournier, Elvire; Hubschwerlen, Christian; Ritz, Daniel; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Keck, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of health care-associated diarrhea with significant morbidity and mortality, and new options for the treatment of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) are needed. Cadazolid is a new oxazolidinone-type antibiotic that is currently in clinical development for treatment of CDAD. Here, we report the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial evaluation of cadazolid against C. difficile. Cadazolid showed potent in vitro activity against C. difficile with a MIC range of 0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml, including strains resistant to linezolid and fluoroquinolones. In time-kill kinetics experiments, cadazolid showed a bactericidal effect against C. difficile isolates, with >99.9% killing in 24 h, and was more bactericidal than vancomycin. In contrast to metronidazole and vancomycin, cadazolid strongly inhibited de novo toxin A and B formation in stationary-phase cultures of toxigenic C. difficile. Cadazolid also inhibited C. difficile spore formation substantially at growth-inhibitory concentrations. In the hamster and mouse models for CDAD, cadazolid was active, conferring full protection from diarrhea and death with a potency similar to that of vancomycin. These findings support further investigations of cadazolid for the treatment of CDAD. PMID:24277020

  7. Investigations of the mode of action and resistance development of cadazolid, a new antibiotic for treatment of Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Locher, Hans H; Caspers, Patrick; Bruyère, Thierry; Schroeder, Susanne; Pfaff, Philippe; Knezevic, Andreja; Keck, Wolfgang; Ritz, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Cadazolid is a new oxazolidinone-type antibiotic currently in clinical development for the treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. Here, we report investigations on the mode of action and the propensity for spontaneous resistance development in C. difficile strains. Macromolecular labeling experiments indicated that cadazolid acts as a potent inhibitor of protein synthesis, while inhibition of DNA synthesis was also observed, albeit only at substantially higher concentrations of the drug. Strong inhibition of protein synthesis was also obtained in strains resistant to linezolid, in agreement with low MICs against such strains. Inhibition of protein synthesis was confirmed in coupled transcription/translation assays using extracts from different C. difficile strains, including strains resistant to linezolid, while inhibitory effects in DNA topoisomerase assays were weak or not detectable under the assay conditions. Spontaneous resistance frequencies of cadazolid were low in all strains tested (generally <10(-10) at 2× to 4× the MIC), and in multiple-passage experiments (up to 13 passages) MICs did not significantly increase. Furthermore, no cross-resistance was observed, as cadazolid retained potent activity against strains resistant or nonsusceptible to linezolid, fluoroquinolones, and the new antibiotic fidaxomicin. In conclusion, the data presented here indicate that cadazolid acts primarily by inhibition of protein synthesis, with weak inhibition of DNA synthesis as a potential second mode of action, and suggest a low potential for spontaneous resistance development.

  8. Fluoroquinolone and Macrolide Exposure Predict Clostridium difficile Infection with the Highly Fluoroquinolone- and Macrolide-Resistant Epidemic C. difficile Strain BI/NAP1/027.

    PubMed

    Wieczorkiewicz, Jeffrey T; Lopansri, Bert K; Cheknis, Adam; Osmolski, James R; Hecht, David W; Gerding, Dale N; Johnson, Stuart

    2015-11-02

    Antibiotics have been shown to influence the risk of infection with specific Clostridium difficile strains as well as the risk of C. difficile infection (CDI). We performed a retrospective case-control study of patients infected with the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain in a U.S. hospital following recognition of increased CDI severity and culture of stools positive by C. difficile toxin immunoassay. Between 2005 and 2007, 72% (103/143) of patients with first-episode CDIs were infected with the BI strain by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) typing. Most patients received multiple antibiotics within 6 weeks of CDI onset (median of 3 antibiotic classes). By multivariate analysis, fluoroquinolone and macrolide exposure was more frequent among BI cases than among non-BI-infected controls (odds ratio [OR] for fluoroquinolones, 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 7.5; (P < 0.001; OR for macrolides, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 24.0; P = 0.04)). In contrast, clindamycin use was less frequent among the BI cases than among the controls (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.4; P = 0.001). High-level resistance to moxifloxacin and azithromycin was more frequent among BI strains (moxifloxacin, 49/102 [48%] BI versus 0/40 non-BI, P = 0.0001; azithromycin, 100/102 [98%] BI versus 22/40 [55%] non-BI, P = 0.0001). High-level resistance to clindamycin was more frequent among non-BI strains (22/40 [55%] non-BI versus 7/102 [7%] BI, P = 0.0001). Fluoroquinolone use, macrolide use, and C. difficile resistance to these antibiotic classes were associated with infection by the epidemic BI strain of C. difficile in a U.S. hospital during a time when CDI rates were increasing nationally due to the highly fluoroquinolone-resistant BI/NAP1/027 strain.

  9. Fluoroquinolone and Macrolide Exposure Predict Clostridium difficile Infection with the Highly Fluoroquinolone- and Macrolide-Resistant Epidemic C. difficile Strain BI/NAP1/027

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorkiewicz, Jeffrey T.; Lopansri, Bert K.; Cheknis, Adam; Osmolski, James R.; Hecht, David W.; Gerding, Dale N.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics have been shown to influence the risk of infection with specific Clostridium difficile strains as well as the risk of C. difficile infection (CDI). We performed a retrospective case-control study of patients infected with the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain in a U.S. hospital following recognition of increased CDI severity and culture of stools positive by C. difficile toxin immunoassay. Between 2005 and 2007, 72% (103/143) of patients with first-episode CDIs were infected with the BI strain by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) typing. Most patients received multiple antibiotics within 6 weeks of CDI onset (median of 3 antibiotic classes). By multivariate analysis, fluoroquinolone and macrolide exposure was more frequent among BI cases than among non-BI-infected controls (odds ratio [OR] for fluoroquinolones, 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 7.5; (P < 0.001; OR for macrolides, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 24.0; P = 0.04)). In contrast, clindamycin use was less frequent among the BI cases than among the controls (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.4; P = 0.001). High-level resistance to moxifloxacin and azithromycin was more frequent among BI strains (moxifloxacin, 49/102 [48%] BI versus 0/40 non-BI, P = 0.0001; azithromycin, 100/102 [98%] BI versus 22/40 [55%] non-BI, P = 0.0001). High-level resistance to clindamycin was more frequent among non-BI strains (22/40 [55%] non-BI versus 7/102 [7%] BI, P = 0.0001). Fluoroquinolone use, macrolide use, and C. difficile resistance to these antibiotic classes were associated with infection by the epidemic BI strain of C. difficile in a U.S. hospital during a time when CDI rates were increasing nationally due to the highly fluoroquinolone-resistant BI/NAP1/027 strain. PMID:26525793

  10. In vitro activity of cadazolid against Clostridium difficile strains isolated from primary and recurrent infections in Stockholm, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Lozano, Helena Martinez; Weintraub, Andrej; Nord, Carl Erik

    2013-04-01

    One hundred thirty-three Clostridium difficile strains were collected from 71 patients and analyzed for the presence of C. difficile toxin B by the cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay, genes for toxin A, toxin B, binary toxin and TcdC deletion by PCR. All strains were also PCR-ribotyped and analyzed for sporulation frequency. The MICs of the isolates were determined against cadazolid and seven other antimicrobial agents by the agar dilution method. All isolates were positive for toxin B by the cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay. One hundred fourteen isolates were positive for toxin A and B and 16 isolates were positive for toxin A, toxin B and binary toxin by PCR. Three isolates were negative for toxin A but positive for toxin B. Thirty-three different ribotypes were identified. No strain of ribotype 027 was found. No differences in sporulation were noticed between the primary and recurrent isolates. All 133 isolates were sensitive to cadazolid (0.064-0.5 mg/l), fidaxomicin (0.008-0.125 mg/l), metronidazole (0.125-2 mg/l), vancomycin (0.125-1 mg/l) and tigecycline (0.032-0.25 mg/l). Three isolates were resistant to linezolid (8 mg/l), 15 isolates were resistant to moxifloxacin (8-32 mg/l) and 103 isolates were resistant to clindamycin (8-256 mg/l). No association between toxins A, B and binary toxin, ribotypes or the sporulation and the sensitivity to cadazolid could be found. Cadazolid has a potent in vitro activity against C. difficile.

  11. Gastrointestinal localization of metronidazole by a lactobacilli-inspired tetramic acid motif improves treatment outcomes in the hamster model of Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Philip T.; Wu, Xiaoqian; Yang, Lei; Scarborough, Jerrod S.; Singh, Aman P.; Alam, Zahidul A.; Lee, Richard E.; Hurdle, Julian G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Metronidazole, a mainstay treatment for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), is often ineffective for severe CDI. Whilst this is thought to arise from suboptimal levels of metronidazole in the colon due to rapid absorption, empirical validation is lacking. In contrast, reutericyclin, an antibacterial tetramic acid from Lactobacillus reuteri, concentrates in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we modified metronidazole with reutericyclin's tetramic acid motif to obtain non-absorbed compounds, enabling assessment of the impact of pharmacokinetics on treatment outcomes. Methods A series of metronidazole-bearing tetramic acid substituents were synthesized and evaluated in terms of anti-C. difficile activities, gastric permeability, in vivo pharmacokinetics, efficacy in the hamster model of CDI and mode of action. Results Most compounds were absorbed less than metronidazole in cell-based Caco-2 permeability assays. In hamsters, lead compounds compartmentalized in the colon rather than the bloodstream with negligible levels detected in the blood, in direct contrast with metronidazole, which was rapidly absorbed into the blood and was undetectable in caecum. Accordingly, four leads were more efficacious (P < 0.05) than metronidazole in C. difficile-infected animals. Improved efficacy was not due to an alternative mode of action, as the leads retained the mode of action of metronidazole. Conclusions This study provides the clearest empirical evidence that the high absorption of metronidazole lowers treatment outcomes for CDI and suggests a role for the tetramic acid motif for colon-specific drug delivery. This approach also has the potential to lower systemic toxicity and drug interactions of nitroheterocyclic drugs for treating gastrointestine-specific diseases. PMID:26286574

  12. An in vitro culture model to study the dynamics of colonic microbiota in Syrian golden hamsters and their susceptibility to infection with Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Miezeiewski, Matthew; Schnaufer, Todd; Muravsky, Michele; Wang, Su; Caro-Aguilar, Ivette; Secore, Susan; Thiriot, David S; Hsu, Charlie; Rogers, Irene; DeSantis, Todd; Kuczynski, Justin; Probst, Alexander J; Chehoud, Christel; Steger, Rachel; Warrington, Janet; Bodmer, Jean-Luc; Heinrichs, Jon H

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are caused by colonization and growth of toxigenic strains of C. difficile in individuals whose intestinal microbiota has been perturbed, in most cases following antimicrobial therapy. Determination of the protective commensal gut community members could inform the development of treatments for CDI. Here, we utilized the lethal enterocolitis model in Syrian golden hamsters to analyze the microbiota disruption and recovery along a 20-day period following a single dose of clindamycin on day 0, inducing in vivo susceptibility to C. difficile infection. To determine susceptibility in vitro, spores of strain VPI 10463 were cultured with and without soluble hamster fecal filtrates and growth was quantified by quantitative PCR and toxin immunoassay. Fecal microbial population changes over time were tracked by 16S ribosomal RNA gene analysis via V4 sequencing and the PhyloChip assay. C. difficile culture growth and toxin production were inhibited by the presence of fecal extracts from untreated hamsters but not extracts collected 5 days post-administration of clindamycin. In vitro inhibition was re-established by day 15, which correlated with resistance of animals to lethal challenge. A substantial fecal microbiota shift in hamsters treated with antibiotics was observed, marked by significant changes across multiple phyla including Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria. An incomplete return towards the baseline microbiome occurred by day 15 correlating with the inhibition of C. difficile growth in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that soluble factors produced by the gut microbiota may be responsible for the suppression of C. difficile growth and toxin production. PMID:25036923

  13. Hospital-based Clostridium difficile infection surveillance reveals high proportions of PCR ribotypes 027 and 176 in different areas of Poland, 2011 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Pituch, Hanna; Obuch-Woszczatyński, Piotr; Lachowicz, Dominika; Wultańska, Dorota; Karpiński, Paweł; Młynarczyk, Grażyna; van Dorp, Sofie M; Kuijper, Ed J

    2015-01-01

    As part of the European Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) surveillance Network (ECDIS-Net), which aims to build capacity for CDI surveillance in Europe, we constructed a new network of hospital-based laboratories in Poland. We performed a survey in 13 randomly selected hospital-laboratories in different sites of the country to determine their annual CDI incidence rates from 2011 to 2013. Information on C. difficile laboratory diagnostic testing and indications for testing was also collected. Moreover, for 2012 and 2013 respectively, participating hospital-laboratories sent all consecutive isolates from CDI patients between February and March to the Anaerobe Laboratory in Warsaw for further molecular characterisation, including the detection of toxin-encoding genes and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-ribotyping. Within the network, the mean annual hospital CDI incidence rates were 6.1, 8.6 and 9.6 CDI per 10,000 patient-days in 2011, 2012, and 2013 respectively. Six of the 13 laboratories tested specimens only on the request of a physician, five tested samples of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea or samples from patients who developed diarrhoea more than two days after admission (nosocomial diarrhoea), while two tested all submitted diarrhoeal faecal samples. Most laboratories (9/13) used tests to detect glutamate dehydrogenase and toxin A/B either separately or in combination. In the two periods of molecular surveillance, a total of 166 strains were characterised. Of these, 159 were toxigenic and the majority belonged to two PCR-ribotypes: 027 (n=99; 62%) and the closely related ribotype 176 (n=22; 14%). The annual frequency of PCR-ribotype 027 was not significantly different during the surveillance periods (62.9% in 2012; 61.8% in 2013). Our results indicate that CDIs caused by PCR-ribotype 027 predominate in Polish hospitals participating in the surveillance, with the closely related 176 ribotype being the second most common agent of infection.

  14. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nathaniel A; Ben Ami, Ronen; Guzner-Gur, Hanan; Santo, Moshe E; Halpern, Zamir; Maharshak, Nitsan

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is a problem most hospital-based physicians will face in their career. This review aims to refresh current knowledge with regard to Clostridium difficile infection and bring physicians up to date with the latest developments in the growing field of fecal microbiota transplantation, the benefits it offers, and the promise this and other developments hold for the future.

  15. Evaluating the Use of the Case Mix Index for Risk Adjustment of Healthcare-Associated Infection Data: An Illustration using Clostridium difficile Infection Data from the National Healthcare Safety Network.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Nicola D; Edwards, Jonathan R; Dudeck, Margaret A; Fridkin, Scott K; Magill, Shelley S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Case mix index (CMI) has been used as a facility-level indicator of patient disease severity. We sought to evaluate the potential for CMI to be used for risk adjustment of National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) healthcare-associated infection (HAI) data. METHODS NHSN facility-wide laboratory-identified Clostridium difficile infection event data from 2012 were merged with the fiscal year 2012 Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) Impact file by CMS certification number (CCN) to obtain a CMI value for hospitals reporting to NHSN. Negative binomial regression was used to evaluate whether CMI was significantly associated with healthcare facility-onset (HO) CDI in univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS Among 1,468 acute care hospitals reporting CDI data to NHSN in 2012, 1,429 matched by CCN to a CMI value in the Impact file. CMI (median, 1.49; interquartile range, 1.36-1.66) was a significant predictor of HO CDI in univariate analysis (P<.0001). After controlling for community onset CDI prevalence rate, medical school affiliation, hospital size, and CDI test type use, CMI remained highly significant (P<.0001), with an increase of 0.1 point in CMI associated with a 3.4% increase in the HO CDI incidence rate. CONCLUSIONS CMI was a significant predictor of NHSN HO CDI incidence. Additional work to explore the feasibility of using CMI for risk adjustment of NHSN data is necessary. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;37(1):19-25. PMID:26486597

  16. Clostridium difficile colitis.

    PubMed

    Trnka, Y M; Lamont, J T

    1984-01-01

    Clostridium difficile has become one of the commonest pathogens of the lower intestinal tract. This organism appears unique in that infection almost always occurs during or after antibiotic therapy, suggesting that some component of the normal microflora prevents colonization by C. difficile. Once it has overgrown in the colon, C. difficile releases several toxins which cause tissue damage and diarrhea. Infection can range from a simple self-limited diarrheal illness to fulminant colitis with perforation and megacolon. Assay of stool filtrates reveals the presence of cytotoxin in nearly all patients with antibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis, and in approximately one third to one half of those with less severe infections. Effective therapy is available in the form of oral vancomycin, although the expense of this antibiotic has led to the use of oral metronidazole or bacitracin, which appear to be equally efficacious and considerably cheaper. Although we have learned a great deal about C. difficile in the past decade, a number of fascinating puzzles remain. We know very little about the immune response to this organism or its toxin, or whether a vaccine might someday be feasible. Similarly, we have very little insight into what effects antibodies exert on the normal colonic flora and how these effects allow C. difficile infection in a small percentage of patients. Studies of this pathogen will undoubtedly lead to a fuller understanding of the enormously complex and still mysterious microbial ferment which lives within our gastrointestinal tract. PMID:6369936

  17. Clearance of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus Concomitant With Administration of a Microbiota-Based Drug Targeted at Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dubberke, Erik R.; Mullane, Kathleen M.; Gerding, Dale N.; Lee, Christine H.; Louie, Thomas J.; Guthertz, Harriet; Jones, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Background. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) is a major healthcare-associated pathogen and a well known complication among transplant and immunocompromised patients. We report on stool VRE clearance in a post hoc analysis of the Phase 2 PUNCH CD study assessing a microbiota-based drug for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Methods. A total of 34 patients enrolled in the PUNCH CD study received 1 or 2 doses of RBX2660 (microbiota suspension). Patients were requested to voluntarily submit stool samples at baseline and at 7, 30, and 60 days and 6 months after the last administration of RBX2660. Stool samples were tested for VRE using bile esculin azide agar with 6 µg/mL vancomycin and Gram staining. Vancomycin resistance was confirmed by Etest. Results. VRE status (at least 1 test result) was available for 30 patients. All stool samples for 19 patients (63.3%, mean age 61.7 years, 68% female) tested VRE negative. Eleven patients (36.7%, mean age 75.5 years, 64% female) were VRE positive at the first test (baseline or 7-day follow-up). Of these patients, 72.7%, n = 8 converted to negative as of the last available follow-up (30 or 60 days or 6 months). Of the other 3: 1 died (follow-up data not available); 1 patient remained positive at all follow-ups; 1 patient retested positive at 6 months with negative tests during the interim. Conclusions. Although based on a small sample size, this secondary analysis demonstrated the possibility of successfully converting a high percentage of VRE-positive patients to negative in a recurrent CDI population with RBX2660. PMID:27703995

  18. Deciphering meta-analytic results: a mini-review of probiotics for the prevention of paediatric antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    McFarland, L V

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analyses are used to evaluate pooled effects of a wide variety of investigational agents, but the interpretation of the results into clinical practices may be difficult. This mini-review offers a three-step process to enable healthcare providers to decipher pooled meta-analysis estimates into results that are useful for therapeutic decisions. As an example of how meta-analyses should be interpreted, a recent meta-analysis of probiotics for the prevention of paediatric antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (AAD) and the prevention of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) will be used. First, the pooled results of this meta-analysis indicates a significant protective efficacy for AAD is found when the 16 different types of probiotics are combined (pooled relative risk (RR) = 0.43, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.33-0.56) and also a significant reduction of paediatric CDI (pooled RR=0.34, 95%CI=0.16-0.74) was found pooling four different types of probiotics. Secondly, because the efficacy of probiotics is strain-specific, it is necessary to do a sensitivity analysis, restricting the meta-analysis to one specific strain. Two strains, Saccharomyces boulardii lyo and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG showed significant efficacy for paediatric AAD when pooled (pooled RR for S. boulardii = 0.43, 95%CI=0.21-0.86 and pooled RR for L. rhamnosus GG = 0.44, 95%CI=0.20-0.95). Thirdly, if studies within probiotic types have different results, it is prudent to examine these studies individually to determine the reasons why non-significant differences in efficacy were found. By drilling down through these three analytic layers, physicians will be confident in recommending the correct probiotic strain to their patients.

  19. Fecal Microbiota Transplant for Relapsing Clostridium difficile Infection Using a Frozen Inoculum From Unrelated Donors: A Randomized, Open-Label, Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Youngster, Ilan; Sauk, Jenny; Pindar, Christina; Wilson, Robin G.; Kaplan, Jess L.; Smith, Mark B.; Alm, Eric J.; Gevers, Dirk; Russell, George H.; Hohmann, Elizabeth L.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) with poor response to standard antimicrobial therapy is a growing medical concern. We aimed to investigate the outcomes of fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) for relapsing CDI using a frozen suspension from unrelated donors, comparing colonoscopic and nasogastric tube (NGT) administration. Methods. Healthy volunteer donors were screened and a frozen fecal suspension was generated. Patients with relapsing/refractory CDI were randomized to receive an infusion of donor stools by colonoscopy or NGT. The primary endpoint was clinical resolution of diarrhea without relapse after 8 weeks. The secondary endpoint was self-reported health score using standardized questionnaires. Results. A total of 20 patients were enrolled, 10 in each treatment arm. Patients had a median of 4 (range, 2–16) relapses prior to study enrollment, with 5 (range, 3–15) antibiotic treatment failures. Resolution of diarrhea was achieved in 14 patients (70%) after a single FMT (8 of 10 in the colonoscopy group and 6 of 10 in the NGT group). Five patients were retreated, with 4 obtaining cure, resulting in an overall cure rate of 90%. Daily number of bowel movements changed from a median of 7 (interquartile range [IQR], 5–10) the day prior to FMT to 2 (IQR, 1–2) after the infusion. Self-ranked health score improved significantly, from a median of 4 (IQR, 2–6) before transplant to 8 (IQR, 5–9) after transplant. No serious or unexpected adverse events occurred. Conclusions. In our initial feasibility study, FMT using a frozen inoculum from unrelated donors is effective in treating relapsing CDI. NGT administration appears to be as effective as colonoscopic administration. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01704937. PMID:24762631

  20. Multimorbidity in elderly hospitalised patients and risk of Clostridium difficile infection: a retrospective study with the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS)

    PubMed Central

    Ticinesi, Andrea; Nouvenne, Antonio; Folesani, Giuseppina; Prati, Beatrice; Morelli, Ilaria; Guida, Loredana; Turroni, Francesca; Ventura, Marco; Lauretani, Fulvio; Maggio, Marcello; Meschi, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the role of chronic comorbidities, considered together in a literature-validated index (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale, CIRS), and antibiotic or proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) treatments as risk factors for hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in elderly multimorbid hospitalised patients. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Subacute hospital geriatric care ward in Italy. Participants 505 (238 male (M), 268 female (F)) elderly (age ≥65) multimorbid patients. Main outcome measures The relationship between CDI and CIRS Comorbidity Score, number of comorbidities, antibiotic, antifungal and PPI treatments, and length of hospital stay was assessed through age-adjusted and sex-adjusted and multivariate logistic regression models. The CIRS Comorbidity Score was handled after categorisation in quartiles. Results Mean age was 80.7±11.3 years. 43 patients (22 M, 21 F) developed CDI. The prevalence of CDI increased among quartiles of CIRS Comorbidity Score (3.9% first quartile vs 11.1% fourth quartile, age-adjusted and sex-adjusted p=0.03). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, patients in the highest quartile of CIRS Comorbidity Score (≥17) carried a significantly higher risk of CDI (OR 5.07, 95% CI 1.28 to 20.14, p=0.02) than patients in the lowest quartile (<9). The only other variable significantly associated with CDI was antibiotic therapy (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.21 to 5.66, p=0.01). PPI treatment was not associated with CDI. Conclusions Multimorbidity, measured through CIRS Comorbidity Score, is independently associated with the risk of CDI in a population of elderly patients with prolonged hospital stay. PMID:26503394

  1. Hydrogen peroxide vapor room disinfection and hand hygiene improvements reduce Clostridium difficile infection, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Horn, Kim; Otter, Jonathan A

    2015-12-01

    We report a statistically significant reduction in Clostridium difficile infection (from 1.38 to 0.90 cases per 1,000 patient days), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (from 0.21 to 0.01 cases per 1,000 patient days), and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing gram-negative bacteria (from 0.16 to 0.01 cases per 1,000 patient days) associated with the introduction of hydrogen peroxide vapor for terminal decontamination of patient rooms and improvements in hand hygiene compliance.

  2. A Mixture of Functionally Oligoclonal Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies That Neutralize Clostridium difficile TcdA and TcdB with High Levels of In Vitro Potency Shows In Vivo Protection in a Hamster Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Nicola L.; Compson, Joanne E.; MacKenzie, Brendon; O'Dowd, Victoria L.; Oxbrow, Amanda K. F.; Heads, James T.; Turner, Alison; Sarkar, Kaushik; Dugdale, Sarah L.; Jairaj, Mark; Christodoulou, Louis; Knight, David E. O.; Cross, Amanda S.; Hervé, Karine J. M.; Tyson, Kerry L.; Hailu, Hanna; Doyle, Carl B.; Ellis, Mark; Kriek, Marco; Cox, Matthew; Page, Matthew J. T.; Moore, Adrian R.; Lightwood, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are a major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in hospital and care facility patients. In spite of the availability of effective antibiotic treatments, C. difficile infection (CDI) is still a major cause of patient suffering, death, and substantial health care costs. Clostridium difficile exerts its major pathological effects through the actions of two protein exotoxins, TcdA and TcdB, which bind to and disrupt gut tissue. Antibiotics target the infecting bacteria but not the exotoxins. Administering neutralizing antibodies against TcdA and TcdB to patients receiving antibiotic treatment might modulate the effects of the exotoxins directly. We have developed a mixture of three humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which neutralize TcdA and TcdB to address three clinical needs: reduction of the severity and duration of diarrhea, reduction of death rates, and reduction of the rate of recurrence. The UCB MAb mixture showed higher potency in a variety of in vitro binding and neutralization assays (∼10-fold improvements), higher levels of protection in a hamster model of CDI (82% versus 18% at 28 days), and higher valencies of toxin binding (12 versus 2 for TcdA and 3 versus 2 for TcdB) than other agents in clinical development. Comparisons of the MAb properties also offered some insight into the potential relative importance of TcdA and TcdB in the disease process. PMID:23324518

  3. Difficult case of Cronkhite-Canada syndrome with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, Clostridium difficile infection and polymyalgia rheumatica.

    PubMed

    Traussnigg, Stefan; Dolak, Werner; Trauner, Michael; Kazemi-Shirazi, Lili

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with heavy diarrhoea, nausea and weight loss accompanied by alopecia and dystrophic fingernails and toenails. The preceding diagnosis of an inflammatory bowel disease, a common pitfall, was excluded by endoscopic work up. Instead, Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS), a rare polyposis condition, was identified as the reason for this almost pathognomonic combination of diagnostic findings including various polyps throughout the entire intestine and ectodermal abnormalities. This case exemplifies common risks and complications in terms of gastrointestinal malabsorption, infections and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), including its treatment as well as a hereto unreported association with polymyalgia rheumatica. In CCS, long-term immunosuppressive therapy and close endoscopic cancer screening of the patient is essential. The treatment of vitamin deficiency and recurring SIBO helps to reduce symptoms. PMID:26818813

  4. Healthcare-associated infections studies project: an American Journal of Infection Control and National Healthcare Safety Network data quality collaboration-LabID Clostridium Difficile event 2013.

    PubMed

    Hebden, Joan N; Anttila, Angela; Allen-Bridson, Kathy; Morrell, Gloria C; Wright, Marc-Oliver; Horan, Teresa

    2013-10-01

    This is the first in a series of case studies that will be published in American Journal of Infection Control following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance definition update of 2013. These cases reflect some of the complex patient scenarios infection professionals encounter during daily surveillance of health care-associated infections using NHSN definitions. Answers to the questions posed and immediate feedback in the form of answers and explanations are available at: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/AJIC-NHSN-LbId2013. All individual participant answers will remain confidential, although it is the authors' hope to share a summary of the findings at a later date. Cases, answers, and explanations have been reviewed and approved by NHSN staff. Active participation is encouraged and recommended. Review/reference Chapter 12-Multidrug-resistant organism &C difficile infection module protocol, of the NHSN Patient Safety Component Manual (http://www.cdc.gov/nhsn/PDFs/pscManual/12pscMDRO_CDADcurrent.pdf), for information you may need to answer the case study questions.

  5. Multi-institution case–control and cohort study of risk factors for the development and mortality of Clostridium difficile infections in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Mori, Nobuaki; Bito, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) morbidity and mortality in Japan. Design Multimethod investigation including a case–control study and cohort study. Setting 47 participating facilities of the National Hospital Organization (NHO). Participants 1026 patients with CDI and 878 patients in the control group over the age of 18 years admitted to the subject NHO facilities from November 2010 to October 2011. Main outcome measures In a case–control study, we identify risk factors for CDI development. Next, in a cohort study, we identify risk factors for all-cause mortality within 30 days following CDI onset. Results A total of 1026 cases of CDI meeting the definitions of this investigation were identified, encompassing 878 patients at 42 of the 47 subject facilities. In the case–control study, we identified, compared with no antibiotics use, use of first-generation and second-generation cephem antibiotics (OR 1.44; 95% CI 1.10 to 1.87), use of third-generation and fourth-generation cephem antibiotics (OR 1.86; 95% CI 1.48 to 2.33) and use of carbapenem antibiotics (OR 1.87; 95% CI 1.44 to 2.42) the risk factors for CDI development. However, use of penicillin was not identified as a risk factor. In the cohort study, sufficient data for analysis was available for 924 CDI cases; 102 of them (11.0%) resulted in death within 30 days of CDI onset. Compared with no anti-CDI drug use, use of vancomycin was associated with reduced risk of mortality (OR 0.43; 95% CI 0.25 to 0.75) whereas metronidazole was not. Conclusions The findings mirror those of previous studies from Europe and North America, identifying the administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics as a risk factor for CDI development. The use of vancomycin is associated with a decreased risk of mortality. PMID:25186155

  6. Autism and Clostridium tetani.

    PubMed

    Bolte, E R

    1998-08-01

    Autism is a severe developmental disability believed to have multiple etiologies. This paper outlines the possibility of a subacute, chronic tetanus infection of the intestinal tract as the underlying cause for symptoms of autism observed in some individuals. A significant percentage of individuals with autism have a history of extensive antibiotic use. Oral antibiotics significantly disrupt protective intestinal microbiota, creating a favorable environment for colonization by opportunistic pathogens. Clostridium tetani is an ubiquitous anaerobic bacillus that produces a potent neurotoxin. Intestinal colonization by C. tetani, and subsequent neurotoxin release, have been demonstrated in laboratory animals which were fed vegetative cells. The vagus nerve is capable of transporting tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) and provides a route of ascent from the intestinal tract to the CNS. This route bypasses TeNT's normal preferential binding sites in the spinal cord, and therefore the symptoms of a typical tetanus infection are not evident. Once in the brain, TeNT disrupts the release of neurotransmitters by the proteolytic cleavage of synaptobrevin, a synaptic vesicle membrane protein. This inhibition of neurotransmitter release would explain a wide variety of behavioral deficits apparent in autism. Lab animals injected in the brain with TeNT have exhibited many of these behaviors. Some children with autism have also shown a significant reduction in stereotyped behaviors when treated with antimicrobials effective against intestinal clostridia. When viewed as sequelae to a subacute, chronic tetanus infection, many of the puzzling abnormalities of autism have a logical basis. A review of atypical tetanus cases, and strategies to test the validity of this paper's hypothesis, are included. PMID:9881820

  7. Persistent and Recurrent Clostridium difficile Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Shola A.; Stahl, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea. It has become a significant dilemma in the treatment of patients, and causes increasing morbidity that, in extreme cases, may result in death. Persistent and recurrent disease hamper attempts at eradication of this infection. Escalating levels of treatment and novel therapeutics are being utilized and developed to treat CDI. Further trials are warranted to definitively determine what protocols can be used to treat persistent and recurrent disease. PMID:26034401

  8. A chimeric protein comprising the glucosyltransferase and cysteine proteinase domains of toxin B and the receptor binding domain of toxin A induces protective immunity against Clostridium difficile infection in mice and hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan-Kai; Yan, Ya-Xian; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Ju, Xianghong; Zhao, Song; Zhang, Keshan; Tzipori, Saul; Sun, Xingmin

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the major cause of hospital-acquired infectious diarrhea and colitis in developed countries. The pathogenicity of C. difficile is mainly mediated by the release of 2 large potent exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), both of which require neutralization to prevent disease occurrence. We have generated a novel chimeric protein, designated mTcd138, comprised of the glucosyltransferase and cysteine proteinase domains of TcdB and the receptor binding domain of TcdA and expressed it in Bacillus megaterium. To ensure that mTcd138 is atoxic, 2 point mutations were introduced to the glucosyltransferase domain of TcdB, which essentially eliminates toxicity of mTcd138. Parenteral immunizations of mice and hamsters with mTcd138 induced protective antibodies to both toxins and provided protection against infection with the hyper-virulent C. difficile strain UK6. PMID:26036797

  9. A chimeric protein comprising the glucosyltransferase and cysteine proteinase domains of toxin B and the receptor binding domain of toxin A induces protective immunity against Clostridium difficile infection in mice and hamsters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Kai; Yan, Ya-Xian; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Ju, Xianghong; Zhao, Song; Zhang, Keshan; Tzipori, Saul; Sun, Xingmin

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the major cause of hospital-acquired infectious diarrhea and colitis in developed countries. The pathogenicity of C. difficile is mainly mediated by the release of 2 large potent exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), both of which require neutralization to prevent disease occurrence. We have generated a novel chimeric protein, designated mTcd138, comprised of the glucosyltransferase and cysteine proteinase domains of TcdB and the receptor binding domain of TcdA and expressed it in Bacillus megaterium. To ensure that mTcd138 is atoxic, 2 point mutations were introduced to the glucosyltransferase domain of TcdB, which essentially eliminates toxicity of mTcd138. Parenteral immunizations of mice and hamsters with mTcd138 induced protective antibodies to both toxins and provided protection against infection with the hyper-virulent C. difficile strain UK6.

  10. Clostridium difficile colitis: pathogenesis and host defence.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; McKenney, Peter T; Pamer, Eric G

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of intestinal infection and diarrhoea in individuals following antibiotic treatment. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that induce spore formation and germination and have determined the roles of C. difficile toxins in disease pathogenesis. Exciting progress has also been made in defining the role of the microbiome, specific commensal bacterial species and host immunity in defence against infection with C. difficile. This Review will summarize the recent discoveries and developments in our understanding of C. difficile infection and pathogenesis. PMID:27573580

  11. Environmental interventions to control Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Loo, Vivian G

    2015-03-01

    The control of Clostridium difficile infection is paramount. C difficile spores are difficult to eradicate and can survive on surfaces for prolonged periods of time. Hand washing with either plain or antimicrobial soap is effective in removing C difficile spores from hands. Patients should be placed in private rooms and under contact precautions to prevent transmission to other patients. Regular hospital germicides are not sporicidal and hypochlorite solutions are required for surface disinfection. In outbreak situations, a multifaceted approach is required. PMID:25573675

  12. Detection by in vitro amplification of the alpha-toxin (phospholipase C) gene from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Fach, P; Guillou, J P

    1993-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with thermostable DNA polymerase from Thermus aquaticus is described for the specific amplification of the phospholipase C (alpha-toxin) gene of Clostridium perfringens. A set of primers selected for their high specificity could detect Cl. perfringens in stools with a detection limit of approximately 5 x 10(2) bacteria, after bi-amplification. A modified PCR without thermal steps was performed to rapidly amplify, with a yield of 60%, the DNA template. With this PCR method Cl. perfringens alpha-toxin gene could be detected within 2 h. The PCR method detected alpha-toxin positive Cl. perfringens but did not react with phospholipase C-producing Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Cl. sordellii and Cl. bifermentans. The amplified PCR products were screened through ethidium bromide agarose gel electrophoresis or, in only 1 h, with the PhastSystem (Pharmacia). This PCR satisfies the criteria of specificity, sensitivity and rapidity required for a useful tool in epidemiology and for the diagnosis of the pathogen Cl. perfringens as it may be used directly on stool samples.

  13. Identification of toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains by using a toxin A gene-specific probe.

    PubMed Central

    Wren, B W; Clayton, C L; Castledine, N B; Tabaqchali, S

    1990-01-01

    A 4.5-kilobase PstI fragment encoding part of the toxin A gene was isolated and used as a DNA probe in colony hybridization studies with 58 toxigenic and 17 nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile strains. All 58 toxigenic strains showed positive hybridization, in contrast to the 17 nontoxigenic strains. Southern blot analysis with the toxin A gene probe showed hybridization to a single fragment of equal intensities for HindIII-digested genomic DNAs isolated from C. difficile strains of wide-ranging toxin production. The positive hybridization signals were due to fragments of heterogeneous lengths (9 to 13 kilobases) for toxigenic strains of different types but were absent for the nontoxigenic strains. These results suggest the presence of a single copy of the toxin A gene on the genome of C. difficile strains, and the wide variation of toxin expression is not a reflection of gene copy number. The lack of toxin activity for nontoxigenic strains can be explained by the absence of at least part of the toxin A gene. The toxin A gene probe was tested against clostridial strains from 18 other species, of which only toxigenic C. sordellii strains showed positive hybridization. The specificity of the toxin A gene probe for toxigenic strains may lead to improved methods for the specific identification of toxigenic C. difficile strains from clinical specimens. Images PMID:2118549

  14. [Morphological changes in human embryonic lung fibroblasts caused by cytotoxins of various Clostridium species].

    PubMed

    Schallehn, G; Wolff, M H

    1988-01-01

    A total of 243 strains of 35 Clostridium species were tested for cytotoxin production in cooked meat medium or liver broth within 48-72 h at 37 degrees C, using human embryonal lung fibroblasts in tissue-culture as indicator cells. Cytotoxin could be detected in the culture-filtrates of all toxigenic strains of C. chauvoei, C. difficile, C. histolyticum, C. novyi types A and B, C. septicum and C. tetani, but not in the atoxigenic ones. The cytotoxin of C. novyi correlated with alpha-toxin in the culture filtrate. All strains of C. perfringens and C. novyi D tested were not cytotoxic for lung fibroblasts despite their pathogenicity for guinea-pigs. Further cytotoxigenic strains were found among C. hastiforme, C. limosum, C. oceanicum, C. putrificum, C. ramosum, C. sordellii, C. sporogenes, and C. subterminale. The morphological changes in lung fibroblasts caused by the culture filtrates were characteristic and species-specific and corresponded with pathogenicity for guinea-pigs and/or mice. No cytotoxin was produced by C. absonum, C. barati, C. bifermentans, C. botulinum (atoxic), C. butyricum, C. cadaveris, C. carnis, C. clostridioforme, C. cochlearium, C. glycolicum, C. innocuum, C. malenominatum, C. mangenotii, C. paraputrificum, C. putrefaciens, C. rectum, C. tertium, and C. tyrobutyricum.

  15. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program on Reducing the Incidence Rate of Healthcare-Associated Clostridium difficile Infection: A Non-Randomized, Stepped Wedge, Single-Site, Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence rate of healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infection (HA-CDI) is estimated at 1 in 100 patients. Antibiotic exposure is the most consistently reported risk factor for HA-CDI. Strategies to reduce the risk of HA-CDI have focused on reducing antibiotic utilization. Prospective audit and feedback is a commonly used antimicrobial stewardship intervention (ASi). The impact of this ASi on risk of HA-CDI is equivocal. This study examines the effectiveness of a prospective audit and feedback ASi on reducing the risk of HA-CDI. Methods Single-site, 339 bed community-hospital in Barrie, Ontario, Canada. Primary outcome is HA-CDI incidence rate. Daily prospective and audit ASi is the exposure variable. ASi implemented across 6 wards in a non-randomized, stepped wedge design. Criteria for ASi; any intravenous antibiotic use for ≥ 48 hrs, any oral fluoroquinolone or oral second generation cephalosporin use for ≥ 48 hrs, or any antimicrobial use for ≥ 5 days. HA-CDI cases and model covariates were aggregated by ward, year and month starting September 2008 and ending February 2016. Multi-level mixed effect negative binomial regression analysis was used to model the primary outcome, with intercept and slope coefficients for ward-level random effects estimated. Other covariates tested for inclusion in the final model were derived from previously published risk factors. Deviance residuals were used to assess the model’s goodness-of-fit. Findings The dataset included 486 observation periods, of which 350 were control periods and 136 were intervention periods. After accounting for all other model covariates, the estimated overall ASi incidence rate ratio (IRR) was 0.48 (95% 0.30, 0.79). The ASi effect was independent of antimicrobial utilization. The ASi did not seem to reduce the risk of Clostridium difficile infection on the surgery wards (IRR 0.87, 95% CI 0.45, 1.69) compared to the medicine wards (IRR 0.42, 95% CI 0.28, 0.63). The ward

  16. Discrimination of clostridium species using a magnetic bead based hybridization assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlow, Susanne; Seise, Barbara; Pollok, Sibyll; Seyboldt, Christian; Weber, Karina; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the causative agent of blackleg, which is an endogenous bacterial infection. Mainly cattle and other ruminants are affected. The symptoms of blackleg are very similar to those of malignant edema, an infection caused by Clostridium septicum. [1, 2] Therefore a reliable differentiation of Clostridium chauvoei from other Clostridium species is required. Traditional microbiological detection methods are time consuming and laborious. Additionally, the unique identification is hindered by the overgrowing tendency of swarming Clostridium septicum colonies when both species are present. [1, 3, 4] Thus, there is a crucial need to improve and simplify the specific detection of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum. Here we present an easy and fast Clostridium species discrimination method combining magnetic beads and fluorescence spectroscopy. Functionalized magnetic particles exhibit plentiful advantages, like their simple manipulation in combination with a large binding capacity of biomolecules. A specific region of the pathogenic DNA is amplified and labelled with biotin by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These PCR products were then immobilized on magnetic beads exploiting the strong biotin-streptavidin interaction. The specific detection of different Clostridium species is achieved by using fluorescence dye labeled probe DNA for the hybridization with the immobilized PCR products. Finally, the samples were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. [5

  17. Clostridium difficile in paediatric populations

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Upton D

    2014-01-01

    An increase in Clostridium difficile infection incidence has been observed among hospitalized children in the United States. The present statement, targeted at clinicians caring for infants and children in community and institutional settings, summarizes the relevant information relating to the role of C difficile in childhood diarrhea and provides recommendations for diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Significant differences between adult and paediatric risk factors and disease are discussed, along with emerging therapies. The relationship between age and disease severity in children with a newly emergent and more fluoroqinolone-resistant strain of C difficile (North American Pulse-field type-1 [NAP1]) remains unknown. The importance of antimicrobial stewardship as a preventive strategy is highlighted. This statement replaces a previous Canadian Paediatric Society position statement on C difficile published in 2000. PMID:24627655

  18. Seasonal Variations in Clostridium difficile Infections Are Associated with Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Activity Independently of Antibiotic Prescriptions: a Time Series Analysis in Québec, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Élise; Frenette, Charles; Longtin, Yves; Gourdeau, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal variations in Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), with a higher incidence occurring during winter months, have been reported. Although winter epidemics of respiratory viruses may be temporally associated with an increase in CDAD morbidity, we hypothesized that this association is mainly due to increased antibiotic use for respiratory infections. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the two most frequent respiratory viruses (influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus [RSV]) and antibiotics prescribed for respiratory infections (fluoroquinolones and macrolides) on the CDAD incidence in hospitals in the province of Québec, Canada. A multivariable Box-Jenkins transfer function model was built to relate monthly CDAD incidence to the monthly percentage of positive tests for influenza virus and RSV and monthly fluoroquinolone and macrolide prescriptions over a 4-year period (January 2005 to December 2008). Analysis showed that temporal variations in CDAD incidence followed temporal variations for influenza virus (P = 0.043), RSV (P = 0.004), and macrolide prescription (P = 0.05) time series with an average delay of 1 month and fluoroquinolone prescription time series with an average delay of 2 months (P = 0.01). We conclude that influenza virus and RSV circulation is independently associated with CDAD incidence after controlling for fluoroquinolone and macrolide use. This association was observed at an aggregated level and may be indicative of other phenomena occurring during wintertime. PMID:22106208

  19. Bacteriophages of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The specific aims of the book chapter are to: (1) Briefly review the nomenclature of bacteriophages and how these agents are classified. (2) Discuss the problems associated with addition/removal of antibiotics in commercial animal feeds. (3) Provide a brief overview of Clostridium perfringens biolog...

  20. Toxin plasmids of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P; Uzal, Francisco A; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2013-06-01

    In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Isolation of C. difficile Carriers Alone and as Part of a Bundle Approach for the Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI): A Mathematical Model Based on Clinical Study Data

    PubMed Central

    Grigoras, Christos A.; Zervou, Fainareti N.; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M.; Siettos, Constantinos I.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the most common hospital-acquired infection. Besides infected patients, carriers have emerged as a key player in C. difficile epidemiology. In this study, we evaluated the impact of identifying and isolating carriers upon hospital admission on the incidence of CDI incidence and hospital-acquired C. difficile colonization, as a single policy and as part of bundle approaches. We simulated C. difficile transmission using a stochastic mathematical approach, considering the contribution of carriers based on published literature. In the baseline scenario, CDI incidence was 6.18/1,000 admissions (95% CI, 5.72–6.65), simulating reported estimates from U.S. hospital discharges. The acquisition rate of C. difficile carriage was 9.72/1,000 admissions (95% CI, 9.15–10.31). Screening and isolation of colonized patients on admission to the hospital decreased CDI incidence to 4.99/1,000 admissions (95% CI, 4.59–5.42; relative reduction (RR) = 19.1%) and led to 36.2% reduction in the rate of hospital-acquired colonization. Simulating an antimicrobial stewardship program reduced CDI rate to 2.35/1,000 admissions (95% CI, 2.07–2.65). In sensitivity analysis, CDI incidence was less than 2.32/1,000 admissions (RR = 62.4%) in 95% of 1,000 simulations. The combined bundle, focusing on reducing C. difficile transmission from colonized patients and the individual risk of these patients to develop CDI, decreased significantly the incidence of both CDI and hospital-acquired colonization. Implementation of this bundle to current practice is expected to have an important impact in containing CDI. PMID:27258068

  2. Isolation of C. difficile Carriers Alone and as Part of a Bundle Approach for the Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection (CDI): A Mathematical Model Based on Clinical Study Data.

    PubMed

    Grigoras, Christos A; Zervou, Fainareti N; Zacharioudakis, Ioannis M; Siettos, Constantinos I; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the most common hospital-acquired infection. Besides infected patients, carriers have emerged as a key player in C. difficile epidemiology. In this study, we evaluated the impact of identifying and isolating carriers upon hospital admission on the incidence of CDI incidence and hospital-acquired C. difficile colonization, as a single policy and as part of bundle approaches. We simulated C. difficile transmission using a stochastic mathematical approach, considering the contribution of carriers based on published literature. In the baseline scenario, CDI incidence was 6.18/1,000 admissions (95% CI, 5.72-6.65), simulating reported estimates from U.S. hospital discharges. The acquisition rate of C. difficile carriage was 9.72/1,000 admissions (95% CI, 9.15-10.31). Screening and isolation of colonized patients on admission to the hospital decreased CDI incidence to 4.99/1,000 admissions (95% CI, 4.59-5.42; relative reduction (RR) = 19.1%) and led to 36.2% reduction in the rate of hospital-acquired colonization. Simulating an antimicrobial stewardship program reduced CDI rate to 2.35/1,000 admissions (95% CI, 2.07-2.65). In sensitivity analysis, CDI incidence was less than 2.32/1,000 admissions (RR = 62.4%) in 95% of 1,000 simulations. The combined bundle, focusing on reducing C. difficile transmission from colonized patients and the individual risk of these patients to develop CDI, decreased significantly the incidence of both CDI and hospital-acquired colonization. Implementation of this bundle to current practice is expected to have an important impact in containing CDI.

  3. Clostridium difficile infection among immunocompromised patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and detection of moxifloxacin resistance in a ribotype 014 strain.

    PubMed

    Secco, Danielle Angst; Balassiano, Ilana Teruszkin; Boente, Renata Ferreira; Miranda, Karla Rodrigues; Brazier, Jon; Hall, Val; dos Santos-Filho, Joaquim; Lobo, Leandro Araujo; Nouér, Simone Aranha; Domingues, Regina Maria Cavalcanti Pilotto

    2014-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive spore forming anaerobic bacterium, often associated with nosocomial diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. The acquisition of this organism occurs primarily in hospitals through accidental ingestion of spores, and its establishment and proliferation in the colon results from the removal of members of the normal intestinal flora during or after antibiotic therapy. In this study, stool samples from patients admitted to the University Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCCF/UFRJ) were screened for C. difficile toxins with an ELISA test and cultured with standard techniques for C. difficile isolation. A total of 74 stool samples were collected from patients undergoing antibiotic therapy between August 2009 and November 2010, only two (2.7%) were positive in the ELISA test and culture. A third isolate was obtained from a negative ELISA test sample. All cases of CDI were identified in patients with acute lymphoid or myeloid leukemia. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization showed that all strains carried toxins A and B genes, and belonged to PCR-ribotypes 014, 043 and 046. The isolated strains were sensitive to metronidazole and vancomycin, and resistant to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. Resistance to moxifloxacin, was present in the strain from PCR-ribotype 014, that showed an amino acid substitution in gyrB gene (Asp 426 → Asn). This is the first time that this mutation in a PCR-ribotype 014 strain has been described in Brazil.

  4. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Using Upper Gastrointestinal Tract for the Treatment of Refractory or Severe Complicated Clostridium difficile Infection in Elderly Patients in Poor Medical Condition: The First Study in an Asian Country

    PubMed Central

    Gweon, Tae-Geun; Kim, Jinsu; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, Dong-Gun; Lee, In Seok; Cho, Young-Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective treatment option for refractory Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). FMT may be challenging in patients with a low performance status, because of their poor medical condition. The aims of this study were to describe our experience treating patients in poor medical condition with refractory or severe complicated CDI using FMT via the upper GI tract route. Methods. This study was a retrospective review of seven elderly patients with refractory or severe complicated CDI and a poor medical condition who were treated with FMT through the upper GI tract route from May 2012 through August 2013. The outcomes studied included the cure rate of CDI and adverse events. Results. Of these seven patients who received FMT via the upper GI tract route, all patients were cured. During the 11-month follow-up period, CDI recurrence was observed in two patients; rescue FMT was performed in these patients, which led to a full cure. Vomiting was observed in two patients. Conclusions. FMT via the upper gastrointestinal tract route may be effective for the treatment of refractory or severe complicated CDI in patients with a low performance status. Physicians should be aware of adverse events, especially vomiting. PMID:27127501

  5. A Decade of Experience in Primary Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection at a Community Hospital Using the Probiotic Combination Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285, Lactobacillus casei LBC80R, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CLR2 (Bio-K+).

    PubMed

    Maziade, Pierre-Jean; Pereira, Pascale; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2015-05-15

    In August 2003, the 284-bed community hospital Pierre-Le Gardeur (PLGH) in Quebec experienced a major outbreak associated with the Clostridium difficile NAP1/027/BI strain. Augmented standard preventive measures (SPMs) were not able to control this outbreak. It was decided in February 2004 to give to every adult inpatient on antibiotics, without any exclusion, a probiotic (Bio-K+: Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285, Lactobacillus casei LBC80R, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CLR2) within 12 hours of the antibiotic prescription. Augmented SPMs were continued. The use of the probiotic in addition to SPMs was associated with a marked reduction of C. difficile infection (CDI). During the 10 years of observation, 44 835 inpatients received Bio-K+, and the CDI rate at PLGH declined from 18.0 cases per 10,000 patient-days and remained at low mean levels of 2.3 cases per 10,000 patient-days. Additionally, 10-year data collected by the Ministry of Health in Quebec comparing the CDI rate between Quebec hospitals showed that CDI rates at PLGH were consistently and continuously lower compared with those at similar hospitals. Blood cultures were monitored at PLGH for Lactobacillus bacteremia through the 10 years' experience, and no Lactobacillus bacteremias were detected. Despite the limitation of an observational study, we concluded that the probiotic Bio-K+ was safe and effective in decreasing our primary CDI rate.

  6. Toxigenicity of Clostridium histolyticum

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Shoki; Imaizumi, Masaaki

    1966-01-01

    Nishida, Shoki (Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan), and Masaaki Imaizumi. Toxigenicity of Clostridium histolyticum. J. Bacteriol. 91:477–483. 1966.—From 234 soil samples, 21 strains of Clostridium histolyticum of different levels of α-toxigenicity were isolated by a new method specially designed for the isolation of this species. The α-toxigenicity of freshly isolated strains and of stock strains was closely associated with the potentiality for sporulation, growth, and smooth-colony formation. The presence of sugars, particularly xylose and arabinose, was inhibitory for growth. A few controversies on the biological properties of this species seem to be due to disregard for the growth-inhibiting effects of these sugars. PMID:5935337

  7. Small Molecules Take A Big Step Against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Beilhartz, Greg L; Tam, John; Melnyk, Roman A

    2015-12-01

    Effective treatment of Clostridium difficile infections demands a shift away from antibiotics towards toxin-neutralizing agents. Work by Bender et al., using a drug that attenuates toxin action in vivo without affecting bacterial survival, demonstrates the exciting potential of small molecules as a new modality in the fight against C. difficile. PMID:26547239

  8. Isolation of Clostridium difficile from healthy food animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Clostridium difficile-associated disease is increasingly reported and studies indicate that food animals may be sources of human infections. Methods: The presence of C. difficile in 345 swine fecal, 1,325 dairy cattle fecal, and 371 dairy environmental samples were examined. Two isolati...

  9. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Cappella, Michela; Pugliese, Fabrizio; Zucchini, Andrea; Marchetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered. PMID:27190666

  10. Chronic septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in a prosthetic knee joint due to Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Pron, B; Merckx, J; Touzet, P; Ferroni, A; Poyart, C; Berche, P; Gaillard, J L

    1995-07-01

    A case of chronic septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in a prosthetic knee joint due to Clostridium difficile is reported. A knee prosthesis was installed in a 16-year-old boy for surgical treatment of an osteosarcoma of the femur. Later, the patient suffered a traumatic closed fracture of his patella, and a sterile fluid was aspirated. One month later, the joint displayed inflammation. Culture of the articular fluid yielded a nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile strain. Despite several attempts using conservative medical treatment with penicillins and ornidazole, Clostridium difficile strains with the same antibiotic susceptibility pattern were repeatedly isolated from the joint over an eight-month period. The foreign material was then ablated, and finally, the patient's leg was amputated one year after Clostridium difficile was first isolated. The possible sources of contamination in our case and other reported cases of extraintestinal infection due to Clostridium difficile are discussed.

  11. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cappella, Michela; Pugliese, Fabrizio; Zucchini, Andrea; Marchetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered. PMID:27190666

  12. Clostridium difficile Enterocolitis and Reactive Arthritis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Cappella, Michela; Pugliese, Fabrizio; Zucchini, Andrea; Marchetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of Clostridium difficile enterocolitis, especially in children. We review the 6 pediatric cases published in the English and non-English literature and discuss their clinical presentation, outcome, treatment, and pathophysiology. We also report the seventh case of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis in a 6-year-old boy who was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 10 days because of an upper respiratory infection. After the antibiotic course, the child developed at the same time diarrhea with positive stool culture for Clostridium difficile and an asymmetric polyarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and metronidazole completely resolved the pain, joint swelling, and diarrhea. After twelve months of follow-up there has been no recurrence. This report confirms the self-limiting course of Clostridium difficile reactive arthritis. Clostridium difficile testing in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and acute onset of joint pain should be always considered.

  13. Impact on toxin production and cell morphology in Clostridium difficile by ridinilazole (SMT19969), a novel treatment for C. difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Bassères, Eugénie; Endres, Bradley T.; Khaleduzzaman, Mohammed; Miraftabi, Faranak; Alam, M. Jahangir; Vickers, Richard J.; Garey, Kevin W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Ridinilazole (SMT19969) is a narrow-spectrum, non-absorbable antimicrobial with activity against Clostridium difficile undergoing clinical trials. The purpose of this study was to assess the pharmacological activity of ridinilazole and assess the effects on cell morphology. Methods Antibiotic killing curves were performed using the epidemic C. difficile ribotype 027 strain, R20291, using supra-MIC (4× and 40×) and sub-MIC (0.125×, 0.25× and 0.5×) concentrations of ridinilazole. Following exposure, C. difficile cells were collected for cfu counts, toxin A and B production, and morphological changes using scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy. Human intestinal cells (Caco-2) were co-incubated with ridinilazole-treated C. difficile growth medium to determine the effects on host inflammatory response (IL-8). Results Treatment at supra-MIC concentrations (4× and 40× MIC) of ridinilazole resulted in a significant reduction in vegetative cells over 72 h (4 log difference, P < 0.01) compared with controls without inducing spore formation. These results correlated with a 75% decrease in toxin A production (P < 0.05) and a 96% decrease in toxin B production (P < 0.05). At sub-MIC levels (0.5× MIC), toxin A production was reduced by 91% (P < 0.01) and toxin B production was reduced by 100% (P < 0.001), which resulted in a 74% reduction in IL-8 release compared with controls (P < 0.05). Sub-MIC (0.5×)-treated cells formed filamentous structures ∼10-fold longer than control cells. Following fluorescence labelling, the cell septum was not forming in sub-MIC-treated cells, yet the DNA was dividing. Conclusions Ridinilazole had robust killing effects on C. difficile that significantly reduced toxin production and attenuated the inflammatory response. Ridinilazole also elicited significant cell division effects suggesting a potential mechanism of action. PMID:26895772

  14. Inducing and Quantifying Clostridium difficile Spore Formation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Aimee; Fimlaid, Kelly A; Pishdadian, Keyan

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive nosocomial pathogen Clostridium difficile induces sporulation during growth in the gastrointestinal tract. Sporulation is necessary for this obligate anaerobe to form metabolically dormant spores that can resist antibiotic treatment, survive exit from the mammalian host, and transmit C. difficile infections. In this chapter, we describe a method for inducing C. difficile sporulation in vitro. This method can be used to study sporulation and maximize spore purification yields for a number of C. difficile strain backgrounds. We also describe procedures for visualizing spore formation using phase-contrast microscopy and for quantifying the efficiency of sporulation using heat resistance as a measure of functional spore formation. PMID:27507338

  15. The role of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile colitis.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Gerald

    2012-12-01

    Clostridium difficile colitis is the most common gastrointestinal infection, exceeding all other gastrointestinal infections combined. There has been a dramatic increase in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) worldwide during the past decade. Antibiotic therapy is a trigger precipitating antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD), which may lead to CDI. The antibiotic alters the protective, diverse bacteria allowing pathogenic bacteria to cause disease. Probiotics have been effective in reducing AAD and preventing CDI.

  16. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  17. The Role of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) Testing Assay in the Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infections: A High Sensitive Screening Test and an Essential Step in the Proposed Laboratory Diagnosis Workflow for Developing Countries like China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jing-Wei; Xiao, Meng; Kudinha, Timothy; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Lin-Ying; Hou, Xin; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in North America and Europe has increased significantly since the 2000s. However, CDI is not widely recognized in China and other developing countries due to limited laboratory diagnostic capacity and low awareness. Most published studies on laboratory workflows for CDI diagnosis are from developed countries, and thus may not be suitable for most developing countries. Therefore, an alternative strategy for developing countries is needed. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) test and its associated workflow on 416 fecal specimens from suspected CDI cases. The assay exhibited excellent sensitivity (100.0%) and specificity (92.8%), compared to culture based method, and thus could be a good screening marker for C. difficile but not for indication of toxin production. The VIDAS CDAB assay, which can detect toxin A/B directly from fecal specimens, showed good specificity (99.7%) and positive predictive value (97.2%), but low sensitivity (45.0%) and negative predictive value (88.3%), compared with PCR-based toxin gene detection. Therefore, we propose a practical and efficient GDH test based workflow strategy for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI in developing countries like China. By applying this new workflow, the CDI laboratory diagnosis rate was notably improved in our center, yet the increasing cost was kept at a minimum level. Furthermore, to gain some insights into the genetic population structure of C. difficile isolates from our hospital, we performed MLST and PCR toxin gene typing. PMID:26659011

  18. The Role of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) Testing Assay in the Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infections: A High Sensitive Screening Test and an Essential Step in the Proposed Laboratory Diagnosis Workflow for Developing Countries like China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-Wei; Xiao, Meng; Kudinha, Timothy; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Lin-Ying; Hou, Xin; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in North America and Europe has increased significantly since the 2000s. However, CDI is not widely recognized in China and other developing countries due to limited laboratory diagnostic capacity and low awareness. Most published studies on laboratory workflows for CDI diagnosis are from developed countries, and thus may not be suitable for most developing countries. Therefore, an alternative strategy for developing countries is needed. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) test and its associated workflow on 416 fecal specimens from suspected CDI cases. The assay exhibited excellent sensitivity (100.0%) and specificity (92.8%), compared to culture based method, and thus could be a good screening marker for C. difficile but not for indication of toxin production. The VIDAS CDAB assay, which can detect toxin A/B directly from fecal specimens, showed good specificity (99.7%) and positive predictive value (97.2%), but low sensitivity (45.0%) and negative predictive value (88.3%), compared with PCR-based toxin gene detection. Therefore, we propose a practical and efficient GDH test based workflow strategy for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI in developing countries like China. By applying this new workflow, the CDI laboratory diagnosis rate was notably improved in our center, yet the increasing cost was kept at a minimum level. Furthermore, to gain some insights into the genetic population structure of C. difficile isolates from our hospital, we performed MLST and PCR toxin gene typing. PMID:26659011

  19. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Katherine R.; Clokie, Martha R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however, developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarize the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics. Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage–host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution. No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using “whole-phages” are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem-free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen. PMID:24808893

  20. Hand hygiene is crucial to combat Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    Patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) can contaminate the environment with spores that are able to survive for months. A previous room occupant with CDI is a significant risk factor for developing the infection. Room cleaning with commonly used disinfectants will not kill spores. Sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide are effective but correct concentration and contact time are important. Hand hygiene is a crucial element in preventing infection. In the UK, there is a clear recommendation for handwashing, rather than alcohol-based hand rub, when caring for patients with CDI. PMID:25258234

  1. Fatal Spontaneous Clostridium bifermentans Necrotizing Endometritis: A Case Report and Literature Review of the Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Hale, Andrew; Kirby, James E; Albrecht, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium bifermentans is a rare pathogen in humans. A fatal case of fulminant endometritis with toxic shock and capillary leak secondary to C bifermentans infection in a young woman is described, and this is compared to all 13 previously described cases of C bifermentans infection. PMID:27419167

  2. Fatal Spontaneous Clostridium bifermentans Necrotizing Endometritis: A Case Report and Literature Review of the Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Andrew; Kirby, James E.; Albrecht, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium bifermentans is a rare pathogen in humans. A fatal case of fulminant endometritis with toxic shock and capillary leak secondary to C bifermentans infection in a young woman is described, and this is compared to all 13 previously described cases of C bifermentans infection. PMID:27419167

  3. Isolation and characterization of Clostridium difficile associated with beef cattle and commercially produced ground beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection has recently increased in North American and European countries. This pathogen has been isolated from retail pork, turkey, and beef products and reported associated with human illness. This increase in infections has been attributed to the emergence o...

  4. Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs) Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... and 2014 13 percent decrease in hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia (bloodstream infections) between 2011 ... Clostridium difficile infections ( C. difficile ), and hospital-onset ... Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia (bloodstream infections). To read ...

  5. Isolating and Purifying Clostridium difficile Spores.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Adrianne N; McBride, Shonna M

    2016-01-01

    The ability for the obligate anaerobe, Clostridium difficile to form a metabolically dormant spore is critical for the survival of this organism outside of the host. This spore form is resistant to a myriad of environmental stresses, including heat, desiccation, and exposure to disinfectants and antimicrobials. These intrinsic properties of spores allow C. difficile to survive long-term in an oxygenated environment, to be easily transmitted from host-to-host, and to persist within the host following antibiotic treatment. Because of the importance of the spore form to the C. difficile life cycle and treatment and prevention of C. difficile infection (CDI), the isolation and purification of spores are necessary to study the mechanisms of sporulation and germination, investigate spore properties and resistances, and for use in animal models of CDI. Here we provide basic protocols, in vitro growth conditions, and additional considerations for purifying C. difficile spores for a variety of downstream applications. PMID:27507337

  6. Clostridium perfringens type A-E toxin plasmids.

    PubMed

    Freedman, John C; Theoret, James R; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Uzal, Francisco A; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell.

  7. [Clostridium difficile infecion--diagnostics, prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Piekarska, Marta; Wandałowicz, Alicja D; Miigoć, Henryka

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of an antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Frequency of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) increased in the last decade. This study presents current preventive measure i.e. hand washing, disposable gloves. Additionally, the article presents diagnostic methods: detection glutamine dehydrogenase (GDH), toxins A and B, cytotoxicity neutralization test, polymerase chain reaction methods (PCR) i.e. nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) and stool culture. Moreover available methods of treatment were presented depending on severity of CDI e.i. metronidazole, vancomycin, fidaxomicin, rifaximin. Furthermore, the review provides information about alternative methods of treatment in view of new hypervirulent strains of C. difficile and increasing resistance to commonly used antibiotics, including: fuscid acid, bacitracin, probiotics, non-toxigenic strains, immunoglobulins, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, toxins binders and fecal transplant. PMID:24868904

  8. Clostridium perfringens in Animal Disease: A Review of Current Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Niilo, L.

    1980-01-01

    The diseases caused by various types of Clostridium perfringens are critically reviewed in the light of current knowledge. Particular emphasis is placed on information concerning these diseases in Canadian livestock. There are two etiologically clearly-defined acute C. perfringens diseases recognized in Canada: hemorrhagic enteritis of the new born calf, caused by C. perfringens type C, and enterotoxemia of sheep, caused by type D. Clostridium perfringens type A may play a role as a secondary pathological agent in various disease conditions, such as necrotic enteritis of chickens. It may also cause wound infections and may provide a source for human food poisoning outbreaks. There appears to be a considerable lack of knowledge regarding the distribution of C. perfringens types, their pathogenesis, diagnosis and the incidence of diseases caused by this organism. PMID:6253040

  9. Nosocomial outbreak of Clostridium difficile diarrhea in a pediatric service.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, A; Merckx, J; Ancelle, T; Pron, B; Abachin, E; Barbut, F; Larzul, J; Rigault, P; Berche, P; Gaillard, J L

    1997-12-01

    An outbreak of nosocomial diarrhea that occurred in a pediatric orthopedic service between 1 December 1993 and 15 April 1994 is reported. A total of 37 patients (mean age, 9.6 years; range, 2 months-19.3 years) were involved in the outbreak, including six patients with bacteriologically documented Clostridium difficile infection. A multivariate analysis identified lincomycin treatment for at least three days as the only significant risk factor. Stool samples from four asymptomatic patients were also positive for Clostridium difficile and its cytotoxins. Isolates from all patients belonged to serogroup C, were highly resistant to lincomycin, and exhibited the same restriction pattern by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The outbreak ended after treatment with lincomycin was discontinued and hygiene control measures were implemented. PMID:9495676

  10. Clostridium difficile spore biology: sporulation, germination, and spore structural proteins

    PubMed Central

    Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Shen, Aimee; Sorg, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, spore-forming obligate anaerobe and a major nosocomial pathogen of world-wide concern. Due to its strict anaerobic requirements, the infectious and transmissible morphotype is the dormant spore. In susceptible patients, C. difficile spores germinate in the colon to form the vegetative cells that initiate Clostridium difficile infections (CDI). During CDI, C. difficile induces a sporulation pathway that produces more spores; these spores are responsible for the persistence of C. difficile in patients and horizontal transmission between hospitalized patients. While important to the C. difficile lifecycle, the C. difficile spore proteome is poorly conserved when compared to members of the Bacillus genus. Further, recent studies have revealed significant differences between C. difficile and B. subtilis at the level of sporulation, germination and spore coat and exosporium morphogenesis. In this review, the regulation of the sporulation and germination pathways and the morphogenesis of the spore coat and exosporium will be discussed. PMID:24814671

  11. Electrotransformation of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Tyurin, Michael V; Desai, Sunil G; Lynd, Lee R

    2004-02-01

    Electrotransformation of several strains of Clostridium thermocellum was achieved using plasmid pIKm1 with selection based on resistance to erythromycin and lincomycin. A custom-built pulse generator was used to apply a square 10-ms pulse to an electrotransformation cuvette consisting of a modified centrifuge tube. Transformation was verified by recovery of the shuttle plasmid pIKm1 from presumptive transformants of C. thermocellum with subsequent PCR specific to the mls gene on the plasmid, as well as by retransformation of Escherichia coli. Optimization carried out with strain DSM 1313 increased transformation efficiencies from <1 to (2.2 +/- 0.5) x 10(5) transformants per micro g of plasmid DNA. Factors conducive to achieving high transformation efficiencies included optimized periods of incubation both before and after electric pulse application, chilling during cell collection and washing, subculture in the presence of isoniacin prior to electric pulse application, a custom-built cuvette embedded in an ice block during pulse application, use of a high (25-kV/cm) field strength, and induction of the mls gene before plating the cells on selective medium. The protocol and preferred conditions developed for strain DSM 1313 resulted in transformation efficiencies of (5.0 +/- 1.8) x 10(4) transformants per micro g of plasmid DNA for strain ATCC 27405 and approximately 1 x 10(3) transformants per micro g of plasmid DNA for strains DSM 4150 and 7072. Cell viability under optimal conditions was approximately 50% of that of controls not exposed to an electrical pulse. Dam methylation had a beneficial but modest (7-fold for strain ATCC 27405; 40-fold for strain DSM 1313) effect on transformation efficiency. The effect of isoniacin was also strain specific. The results reported here provide for the first time a gene transfer method functional in C. thermocellum that is suitable for molecular manipulations involving either the introduction of genes associated with foreign

  12. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis.

    PubMed

    Essenmacher, Alex C; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  13. A case of reactive arthritis due to Clostridium difficile colitis

    PubMed Central

    Essenmacher, Alex C.; Khurram, Nazish; Bismack, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an acute, aseptic, inflammatory arthropathy following an infectious process but removed from the site of primary infection. It is often attributed to genitourinary and enteric pathogens, such as Chlamydia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Yersinia, in susceptible individuals. An uncommon and less recognized cause of this disease is preceding colonic infection with Clostridium difficile, an organism associated with pseudomembranous colitis and diarrhea in hospitalized patients and those recently exposed to antibiotics. Recognition of this association may be complicated by non-specific presentation of diarrhea, the interval between gastrointestinal and arthritic symptoms, and the wide differential in mono- and oligoarthritis. We present the case of a 61-year-old, hospitalized patient recently treated for C. difficile colitis who developed sudden, non-traumatic, right knee pain and swelling. Physical examination and radiographs disclosed joint effusion, and sterile aspiration produced cloudy fluid with predominant neutrophils and no growth on cultures. Diagnostic accuracy is enhanced by contemporaneous laboratory investigations excluding other entities such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis and other infections that typically precede reactive arthritis. Contribution of Clostridium infection to reactive arthritis is an obscure association frequently difficult to prove, but this organism is warranted inclusion in the differential of reactive arthritis. PMID:26908381

  14. Electrophoretic study of Clostridium species.

    PubMed Central

    Cato, E P; Hash, D E; Holdeman, L V; Moore, W E

    1982-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of soluble cellular proteins (without sodium dodecyl sulfate) of 70 Clostridium species indicated that the procedure was readily applicable to the differentiation of species in the genus. The protein patterns correlated well with the available DNA homology data and with most accepted differential tests. Results indicated that several earlier names for species were synonyms of those of accepted species and that two accepted species may be synonymous. Images PMID:6175658

  15. [Toxins of Clostridium perfringens as a natural and bioterroristic threats].

    PubMed

    Omernik, Andrzej; Płusa, Tadeusz

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is absolutely anaerobic rod-shaped, sporeforming bacterium. The morbidity is connected with producing toxins. Depending on the type of toxin produced Clostridium perfringens can be divided into five serotypes:A-E. Under natural conditions, this bacterium is responsible for local outbreaks of food poisoning associated with eating contaminated food which which was improperly heat treated. Some countries with lower economic level are endemic foci of necrotizing enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens. The bacterium is also a major cause of gas gangrene. It is a disease, associated with wound infection, with potentially fatal prognosis in the case of treatment's delays. In the absence of early radical surgery, antibiotic therapy and (if available) hyperbaric treatment leads to the spread of toxins in the body causing shock, coma and death. Due to the force of produced toxins is a pathogen that poses a substrate for the production of biological weapons. It could potentially be used to induce outbreaks of food poisoning and by missiles contamination by spore lead to increased morbidity of gas gangrene in injured soldiers. C. perfringens types B and D produce epsilon toxin considered to be the third most powerful bacterial toxin. Because of the ability to disperse the toxin as an aerosol and a lack of methods of treatment and prevention of poisoning possible factors it is a potential tool for bioterrorism It is advisable to continue research into vaccines and treatments for poisoning toxins of C. perfringens. PMID:26449576

  16. [Toxins of Clostridium perfringens as a natural and bioterroristic threats].

    PubMed

    Omernik, Andrzej; Płusa, Tadeusz

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is absolutely anaerobic rod-shaped, sporeforming bacterium. The morbidity is connected with producing toxins. Depending on the type of toxin produced Clostridium perfringens can be divided into five serotypes:A-E. Under natural conditions, this bacterium is responsible for local outbreaks of food poisoning associated with eating contaminated food which which was improperly heat treated. Some countries with lower economic level are endemic foci of necrotizing enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens. The bacterium is also a major cause of gas gangrene. It is a disease, associated with wound infection, with potentially fatal prognosis in the case of treatment's delays. In the absence of early radical surgery, antibiotic therapy and (if available) hyperbaric treatment leads to the spread of toxins in the body causing shock, coma and death. Due to the force of produced toxins is a pathogen that poses a substrate for the production of biological weapons. It could potentially be used to induce outbreaks of food poisoning and by missiles contamination by spore lead to increased morbidity of gas gangrene in injured soldiers. C. perfringens types B and D produce epsilon toxin considered to be the third most powerful bacterial toxin. Because of the ability to disperse the toxin as an aerosol and a lack of methods of treatment and prevention of poisoning possible factors it is a potential tool for bioterrorism It is advisable to continue research into vaccines and treatments for poisoning toxins of C. perfringens.

  17. Gut check: Clostridium difficile testing and treatment in the molecular testing era.

    PubMed

    Buckel, Whitney R; Avdic, Edina; Carroll, Karen C; Gunaseelan, Vidhya; Hadhazy, Eric; Cosgrove, Sara E

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the impact of nursing education and stewardship interventions on Clostridium difficile testing and treatment appropriateness. Diarrhea documentation increased for those with positive tests (45% to 70%); pretreatment laxative use decreased (50% to 19%). Appropriate treatment increased for severe infection (57% to 93%), but all asymptomatically colonized patients were treated. PMID:25633006

  18. Prevalence and genotypic characteristics of Clostridium difficle in a closed and integrated human and swine population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, increases in cases of community-acquired Clostridium difficile have led researchers to explore additional sources of infection. The objective of this study was to compare C. difficile isolated from a closed population of both humans and swine to investigate possible food safety and occupa...

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium difficile Belonging to Ribotype 018 and Sequence Type 17

    PubMed Central

    Riccobono, E.; Di Pilato, V.; Della Malva, N.; Meini, S.; Ciraolo, F.; Torricelli, F.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, belonging to ribotype 018 (RT018), is one of the most prevalent genotypes circulating in hospital settings in Italy. Here, we report the draft genome of C. difficile CD8-15 belonging to RT018, isolated from a patient with fatal C. difficile-associated infection. PMID:27587821

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium difficile Belonging to Ribotype 018 and Sequence Type 17.

    PubMed

    Riccobono, E; Di Pilato, V; Della Malva, N; Meini, S; Ciraolo, F; Torricelli, F; Rossolini, G M

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, belonging to ribotype 018 (RT018), is one of the most prevalent genotypes circulating in hospital settings in Italy. Here, we report the draft genome of C. difficile CD8-15 belonging to RT018, isolated from a patient with fatal C. difficile-associated infection. PMID:27587821

  1. A prediction model for Clostridium difficile recurrence

    PubMed Central

    LaBarbera, Francis D.; Nikiforov, Ivan; Parvathenani, Arvin; Pramil, Varsha; Gorrepati, Subhash

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a growing problem in the community and hospital setting. Its incidence has been on the rise over the past two decades, and it is quickly becoming a major concern for the health care system. High rate of recurrence is one of the major hurdles in the successful treatment of C. difficile infection. There have been few studies that have looked at patterns of recurrence. The studies currently available have shown a number of risk factors associated with C. difficile recurrence (CDR); however, there is little consensus on the impact of most of the identified risk factors. Methods Our study was a retrospective chart review of 198 patients diagnosed with CDI via Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) from January 2009 to Jun 2013. In our study, we decided to use a machine learning algorithm called the Random Forest (RF) to analyze all of the factors proposed to be associated with CDR. This model is capable of making predictions based on a large number of variables, and has outperformed numerous other models and statistical methods. Results We came up with a model that was able to accurately predict the CDR with a sensitivity of 83.3%, specificity of 63.1%, and area under curve of 82.6%. Like other similar studies that have used the RF model, we also had very impressive results. Conclusions We hope that in the future, machine learning algorithms, such as the RF, will see a wider application. PMID:25656667

  2. Action of nitroheterocyclic drugs against Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Adhikari, Sudip; Hurdle, Julian G.

    2014-01-01

    The nitroheterocyclic classes of drugs have a long history of use in treating anaerobic infections, as exemplified by metronidazole as a first-line treatment for mild-to-moderate Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Since direct comparisons of the three major classes of nitroheterocyclic drugs (i.e. nitroimidazole, nitazoxanide and nitrofurans) and nitrosating agents against C. difficile are under-examined, in this study their actions against C. difficile were compared. Results show that whilst transient resistance occurs to metronidazole and nitazoxanide, stable resistance arises to nitrofurans upon serial passage. All compounds killed C. difficile at high concentrations in addition to the host defence nitrosating agent S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). This suggests that GSNO killing of C. difficile contributes to its efficacy in murine CDI. Although nitric oxide production could not be detected for the nitroheterocyclic drugs, the cellular response to metronidazole and nitrofurans has some overlap with the response to GSNO, causing significant upregulation of the hybrid-cluster protein Hcp that responds to nitrosative stress. These findings provide new insights into the action of nitroheterocyclic drugs against C. difficile. PMID:25129314

  3. Clinical impact of Clostridium difficile colonization.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yuan-Pin; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Liu, Hsiao-Chieh; Wu, Yi-Hui; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile can cause antibiotic-associated diarrhea in hospitalized patients. Asymptomatic colonization by C. difficile is common during the neonatal period and early infancy, ranging from 21% to 48%, and in childhood. The colonization rate of C. difficile in adult hospitalized patients shows geographic variation, ranging from 4.4% to 23.2%. Asymptomatic carriage in neonates caused no further disease in many studies, whereas adult patients colonized with toxigenic C. difficile were prone to the subsequent development of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). However, the carriage of nontoxigenic C. difficile strains appears to prevent CDAD in hamsters and humans. Risk factors for C. difficile colonization include recent hospitalization, exposure to antimicrobial agents or gastric acid-suppressing drugs (such as proton-pump inhibitors and H2 blockers), a history of CDAD or cytomegalovirus infection, the presence of an underlying illness, receipt of immunosuppressants, the presence of antibodies against toxin B, and Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms. Asymptomatic C. difficile carriers are associated with significant skin and environmental contamination, similar to those with CDAD, and contact isolation and hand-washing practices should therefore be employed as infection control policies for the prevention of C. difficile spread. Treating patients with asymptomatic C. difficile colonization with metronidazole or vancomycin is not suggested by the currently available evidence. In conclusion, asymptomatic C. difficile colonization may lead to skin and environmental contamination by C. difficile, but more attention should be paid to the clinical impact of those with C. difficile colonization.

  4. Clostridium perfringens type A enteritis in blue and yellow macaw (Ara ararauna).

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Marta Brito; Torres, Luciana Neves; Mesquita, Ramon Gomes; Ampuero, Fernanda; Cunha, Marcos Paulo Vieira; Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana Porfida; Ferreira, Antonio José Piantino; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Moreno, Andrea Micke; Knöbl, Terezinha

    2014-12-01

    This study describes an outbreak of necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens type A in captive macaws (Ara ararauna). Two psittacine birds presented a history of prostration and died 18 hr after manifestation of clinical signs. The necropsy findings and histopathologic lesions were indicative of necrotic enteritis. Microbiologic assays resulted in the growth of large gram-positive bacilli that were identified as C. perfringens. PCR was used to identify clostridium toxinotypes and confirmed the identification of isolated strains as C pefringens type A, positive to gene codifying beta 2 toxin. The infection source and predisposing factors could not be ascertained.

  5. Clostridium septicum gas gangrene in the orbit: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fejes, I; Dégi, R; Végh, M

    2013-02-01

    Our report presents a case of Clostridium septicum gas gangrene in an unusual, orbital localization. The predisposing factors are typical: colon tumour and lymphatic malignancy. Most probably bacteria from the intestinal flora entered the bloodstream through the compromised intestinal wall and settled in the orbit resulting in the development of an abscess containing gas. At the site of the gas gangrene, an indolent B cell lymphoma was present. After surgery and antibiotic treatment, the patient healed from the C. septicum infection; but subsequently died as a consequence of the tumour.

  6. First Australian isolation of epidemic Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027.

    PubMed

    Riley, Thomas V; Thean, Sarah; Hool, Graham; Golledge, Clayton L

    2009-06-15

    We report the first isolation in Australia of a hypervirulent epidemic strain of Clostridium difficile, PCR ribotype 027. It was isolated from a 43-year-old woman with a permanent ileostomy, who appears to have been infected while travelling in the United States. The isolate was positive for toxin A, toxin B and binary toxin, and resistant to fluoroquinolone antimicrobials, and had characteristic deletions in the tcdC gene. All diagnostic laboratories and health care facilities in Australia should now be on high alert for this organism. PMID:19527210

  7. Type IV pili promote early biofilm formation by Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Maldarelli, Grace A; Piepenbrink, Kurt H; Scott, Alison J; Freiberg, Jeffrey A; Song, Yang; Achermann, Yvonne; Ernst, Robert K; Shirtliff, Mark E; Sundberg, Eric J; Donnenberg, Michael S; von Rosenvinge, Erik C

    2016-08-01

    Increasing morbidity and mortality from Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) present an enormous challenge to healthcare systems. Clostridium difficile express type IV pili (T4P), but their function remains unclear. Many chronic and recurrent bacterial infections result from biofilms, surface-associated bacterial communities embedded in an extracellular matrix. CDI may be biofilm mediated; T4P are important for biofilm formation in a number of organisms. We evaluate the role of T4P in C. difficile biofilm formation using RNA sequencing, mutagenesis and complementation of the gene encoding the major pilin pilA1, and microscopy. RNA sequencing demonstrates that, in comparison to other growth phenotypes, C. difficile growing in a biofilm has a distinct RNA expression profile, with significant differences in T4P gene expression. Microscopy of T4P-expressing and T4P-deficient strains suggests that T4P play an important role in early biofilm formation. A non-piliated pilA1 mutant forms an initial biofilm of significantly reduced mass and thickness in comparison to the wild type. Complementation of the pilA1 mutant strain leads to formation of a biofilm which resembles the wild-type biofilm. These findings suggest that T4P play an important role in early biofilm formation. Novel strategies for confronting biofilm infections are emerging; our data suggest that similar strategies should be investigated in CDI. PMID:27369898

  8. Clostridium botulinum type E occurs and grows in the alga Cladophora glomerata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, M.N.; Whitman, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, massive avian die-offs from Clostridium botulinum type E infection have occurred in the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) area of Lake Michigan. These outbreaks have been coincidental with massive blooms of the green algae Cladophora, mostly Cladophora glomerata. We tested the hypothesis that Clostridium botulinum type E can grow under suitable conditions in these algal mats. In a lab mesocosm study, Cladophora from four outbreak-impacted beaches from SLBE were compared with four unimpacted beaches in the Milwaukee–Racine area for bontE gene of Clostridium botulinum. Frequency of the bontE gene was higher after incubation (25 °C for up to 6 weeks) of Cladophora from impacted vs. the unimpacted area. Since no type E gene was detected initially in Cladophora from any of the eight locations, we infer that the increased occurrence of type E gene arose from spore germination or vegetative Clostridium growth within the existing algal mats of SLBE. Moreover, we found that the congener Clostridium perfringens readily grows in mesocosms containing Cladophora.

  9. Quantitative real-time PCR assay for Clostridium septicum in poultry gangrenous dermatitis associated samples.

    PubMed

    Neumann, A P; Dunham, S M; Rehberger, T G; Siragusa, G R

    2010-08-01

    Clostridium septicum is a spore-forming anaerobe frequently implicated in cases of gangrenous dermatitis (GD) and other spontaneously occurring myonecrotic infections of poultry. Although C. septicum is readily cultured from diseased tissues it can be difficult to enumerate due to its tendency to swarm over the surface of agar plates. In this study a quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed in order to more accurately measure the levels of C. septicum in healthy as well as GD associated poultry samples. The assay was specifically designed to target the C. septicum alpha toxin gene, csa, which is, to our knowledge, carried by all strains of C. septicum and has been shown to be essential for virulence. Genomic DNAs from a diverse collection of bacterial species, including closely related Clostridium chauvoei, Clostridium carnis, Clostridium tertium as well as several strains of Clostridium perfringens, all failed to produce a positive reaction. An approximate reproducible limit of detection in spiked extracts of at least 10(3) cfu/g of C. septicum was observed for a variety of different sample types. C. septicum levels in broiler chicken field samples estimated from the results of qPCR were statistically correlated to culture based enumerations obtained from those same tissues.

  10. Infection.

    PubMed

    Miclau, Theodore; Schmidt, Andrew H; Wenke, Joseph C; Webb, Lawrence X; Harro, Janette M; Prabhakara, Ranjani; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2010-09-01

    Musculoskeletal infection is a clinical problem with significant direct healthcare costs. The prevalence of infection after closed, elective surgery is frequently estimated to be less than 2%, but in severe injuries, posttraumatic infection rates have been reported as 10% or greater. Although clinical infections are found outside the realm of medical devices, it is clear that the enormous increase of infections associated with the use of implants presents a major challenge worldwide. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal infections.

  11. Clostridium difficile Is an Autotrophic Bacterial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Köpke, Michael; Straub, Melanie; Dürre, Peter

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection showed a dramatic increase in incidence and virulence in the Northern hemisphere. This incessantly challenging disease is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea and became life-threatening especially among elderly people. It is generally assumed that all human bacterial pathogens are heterotrophic organisms, being either saccharolytic or proteolytic. So far, this has not been questioned as colonization of the human gut gives access to an environment, rich in organic nutrients. Here, we present data that C. difficile (both clinical and rumen isolates) is also able to grow on CO2+H2 as sole carbon and energy source, thus representing the first identified autotrophic bacterial pathogen. Comparison of several different strains revealed high conservation of genes for autotrophic growth and showed that the ability to use gas mixtures for growth decreases or is lost upon prolonged culturing under heterotrophic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of C. difficile (heterotrophic growth on various substrates as well as autotrophy) could allow the organism in the gut to avoid competition by niche differentiation and contribute to its survival when stressed or in unfavorable conditions that cause death to other bacteria. This may be an important trait for the pathogenicity of C. difficile. PMID:23626782

  12. Characterization of Functional Prophages in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Sekulović, Ognjen; Fortier, Louis-Charles

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are present in almost, if not all ecosystems. Some of these bacterial viruses are present as latent "prophages," either integrated within the chromosome of their host, or as episomal DNAs. Since prophages are ubiquitous throughout the bacterial world, there has been a sustained interest in trying to understand their contribution to the biology of their host. Clostridium difficile is no exception to that rule and with the recent release of hundreds of bacterial genome sequences, there has been a growing interest in trying to identify and classify these prophages. Besides their identification in bacterial genomes, there is also growing interest in determining the functionality of C. difficile prophages, i.e., their capacity to escape their host and reinfect a different strain, thereby promoting genomic evolution and horizontal transfer of genes through transduction, for example of antibiotic resistance genes. There is also some interest in using therapeutic phages to fight C. difficile infections.The objective of this chapter is to share with the broader C. difficile research community the expertise we developed in the study of C. difficile temperate phages. In this chapter, we describe a general "pipeline" comprising a series of experiments that we use in our lab to identify, induce, isolate, propagate, and characterize prophages. Our aim is to provide readers with the necessary basic tools to start studying C. difficile phages. PMID:27507339

  13. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Nicole M; Rutherford, Stacey A; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A; Lisher, John P; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P; Spiller, Benjamin W; Melnyk, Roman A; Lacy, D Borden

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon(1,2). The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host(3,4). The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics. PMID:27571750

  14. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon1,2. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host3,4. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics. PMID:27571750

  15. Secretome analysis of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Boetzkes, Alexander; Felkel, Katharina Wiebke; Zeiser, Johannes; Jochim, Nelli; Just, Ingo; Pich, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Clostridium difficile causes infections ranging from mild C. difficile-associated diarrhea to severe pseudomembranous colitis. Since 2003 new hypervirulent C. difficile strains (PCR ribotype 027) emerged characterized by a dramatically increased mortality. The secretomes of the three C. difficile strains CDR20291, CD196, and CD630 were analyzed and compared. Proteins were separated and analyzed by means of SDS--PAGE and LC-MS. MS data were analyzed using Mascot and proteins were checked for export signals with SecretomeP and SignalP. LC-MS analysis revealed 158 different proteins in the supernatant of C. difficile. Most of the identified proteins originate from the cytoplasm. Thirty-two proteins in CDR20291, 36 in CD196 and 26 in CD630 were identified to be secreted by C. difficile strains. Those were mainly S-layer proteins, substrate-binding proteins of ABC-transporters, cell wall hydrolases, pilin and unknown hypothetical proteins. Toxin A and toxin B were identified after growth in brain heart infusion medium using immunological techniques. The ADP-ribosyltransferase-binding component protein, which is a part of the binary toxin CDT, was only identified in the hypervirulent ribotype 027 strains. Further proteins that are secreted specifically by hypervirulent strains were identified. PMID:22398929

  16. Clostridium difficile in the Long-Term Care Facility: Prevention and Management

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Robin L. P.; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2014-01-01

    Residents of long-term care facilities are at high risk for Clostridium difficile infection due to frequent antibiotic exposure in a population already rendered vulnerable to infection due to advanced age, multiple comorbid conditions and communal living conditions. Moreover, asymptomatic carriage of toxigenic C. difficile and recurrent infections are prevalent in this population. Here, we discuss epidemiology and management of C. difficile infection among residents of long-term care facilities. Also, recognizing that both the population and culture differs significantly from that of hospitals, we also address prevention strategies specific to LTCFs. PMID:25685657

  17. Effective Sequestration of Clostridium difficile Protein Toxins by Calcium Aluminosilicate.

    PubMed

    Sturino, Joseph M; Pokusaeva, Karina; Carpenter, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the etiologic agent responsible for C. difficile infection. Toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB) are nearly indispensable virulence factors for Clostridium difficile pathogenesis. Given the toxin-centric mechanism by which C. difficile pathogenesis occurs, the selective sequestration with neutralization of TcdA and TcdB by nonantibiotic agents represents a novel mode of action to prevent or treat C. difficile-associated disease. In this preclinical study, we used quantitative enzyme immunoassays to determine the extent by which a novel drug, calcium aluminosilicate uniform particle size nonswelling M-1 (CAS UPSN M-1), is capable of sequestering TcdA and TcdB in vitro. The following major findings were derived from the present study. First, we show that CAS UPSN M-1 efficiently sequestered both TcdA and TcdB to undetectable levels. Second, we show that CAS UPSN M-1's affinity for TcdA is greater than its affinity for TcdB. Last, we show that CAS UPSN M-1 exhibited limited binding affinity for nontarget proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that ingestion of calcium aluminosilicate might protect gastrointestinal tissues from antibiotic- or chemotherapy-induced C. difficile infection by neutralizing the cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of luminal TcdA and TcdB.

  18. Clostridium difficile and C. difficile Toxin Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... C diff antigen; GDH Formal name: Clostridium difficile Culture; C. difficile Toxin, A and B; C. difficile Cytotoxin Assay; Glutamate Dehydrogenase Test Related tests: Stool Culture ; O&P At a Glance Test Sample The ...

  19. Clostridium acetobutylicum protoplast formation and regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Allcock, E.R.; Reid, S.J.; Jones, D.T.; Woods, D.R.

    1982-03-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum is already used for the industrial production of acetone and butanol from molasses. Further advantages include its ability to utilize pentose sugars and produce a carboxymethyl cellulase and a cellobiase. The development of genetic transfer systems enabling the use of genetic manipulation techniques would greatly enhance the potential of the fermentation system. Techniques and media for the production and regeneration of stable Clostridium acetobutylicum protoplasts are described. (Refs. 12).

  20. Predisposing factors and prevention of Clostridium perfringens-associated enteritis.

    PubMed

    Allaart, Janneke G; van Asten, Alphons J A M; Gröne, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is one of the major causes of intestinal disease in humans and animals. Its pathogenicity is contributed to by the production of a variety of toxins. In addition, predisposing environmental factors are important for the induction of C. perfringens-associated enteritis as shown by infection models. Environmental contamination, gastric and intestinal pH, intestinal microflora, nutrition, concurrent infections, and medical interventions may influence the intestinal colonization, growth, and toxin production by C. perfringens. Prevention of C. perfringens-associated enteritis may be mediated by the use of feed additives like probiotics, prebiotics, organic acids, essential oils, bacteriophages, lysozymes, bacteriocins, and antimicrobial peptides. Here we summarize and discuss published data on the influence of different environmental predisposing factors and preventive measures. Further research should focus on feed composition and feed additives in order to prevent C. perfringens-associated enteritis.

  1. Clostridium septicum: An Unusual Link to a Lower Gastrointestinal Bleed

    PubMed Central

    Jessamy, Kegan; Ojevwe, Fidelis O.; Ubagharaji, Ezinnaya; Sharma, Anuj; Anozie, Obiajulu; Gilman, Christy Ann; Rawlins, Sekou

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium septicum is a highly virulent pathogen which is associated with colorectal malignancy, hematological malignancy, immunosuppression, diabetes mellitus and cyclical neutropenia. Presentation may include disseminated clostridial infection in the form of septicemia, gas gangrene, and mycotic aortic aneurysms. We report the case of a 62-year-old female presenting with necrotizing fasciitis of her left thigh and subsequently developing rectal bleeding. While she was being treated with empiric antibiotics, her blood culture was found to be positive for C. septicum. We would like to highlight the importance of early colorectal cancer screening in minimizing the occurrence of undetected tumors which provide an optimal growth environment for C. septicum, leading to localized and/or remote infection. PMID:27721737

  2. Physiology and Sporulation in Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Dürre, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Clostridia are Gram-positive, anaerobic, endospore-forming bacteria, incapable of dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Comprising approximately 180 species, the genus Clostridium is one of the largest bacterial genera. Physiology is mostly devoted to acid production. Numerous pathways are known, such as the homoacetate fermentation by acetogens, the propionate fermentation by Clostridium propionicum, and the butyrate/butanol fermentation by C. acetobutylicum, a well-known solvent producer. Clostridia degrade sugars, alcohols, amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, and polymers such as starch and cellulose. Energy conservation can be performed by substrate-level phosphorylation as well as by the generation of ion gradients. Endospore formation resembles the mechanism elucidated in Bacillus. Morphology, contents, and properties of spores are very similar to bacilli endospores. Sporulating clostridia usually form swollen mother cells and accumulate the storage substance granulose. However, clostridial sporulation differs by not employing the so-called phosphorelay. Initiation starts by direct phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A. The cascade of sporulation-specific sigma factors is again identical to what is known from Bacillus. The onset of sporulation is coupled in some species to either solvent (acetone, butanol) or toxin (e.g., C. perfringens enterotoxin) formation. The germination of spores is often induced by various amino acids, often in combination with phosphate and sodium ions. In medical applications, C. butyricum spores are used as a C. difficile prophylaxis and as treatment against diarrhea. Recombinant spores are currently under investigation and testing as antitumor agents, because they germinate only in hypoxic tissues (i.e., tumor tissue), allowing precise targeting and direct killing of tumor cells. PMID:26104199

  3. Clostridium difficile Spore-Macrophage Interactions: Spore Survival

    PubMed Central

    Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Cofre-Araneda, Glenda; Brito-Silva, Christian; Pizarro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Sarker, Mahfuzur R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the main cause of nosocomial infections including antibiotic associated diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. During the course of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), C. difficile undergoes sporulation and releases spores to the colonic environment. The elevated relapse rates of CDI suggest that C. difficile spores has a mechanism(s) to efficiently persist in the host colonic environment. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we provide evidence that C. difficile spores are well suited to survive the host’s innate immune system. Electron microscopy results show that C. difficile spores are recognized by discrete patchy regions on the surface of macrophage Raw 264.7 cells, and phagocytosis was actin polymerization dependent. Fluorescence microscopy results show that >80% of Raw 264.7 cells had at least one C. difficile spore adhered, and that ∼60% of C. difficile spores were phagocytosed by Raw 264.7 cells. Strikingly, presence of complement decreased Raw 264.7 cells’ ability to phagocytose C. difficile spores. Due to the ability of C. difficile spores to remain dormant inside Raw 264.7 cells, they were able to survive up to 72 h of macrophage infection. Interestingly, transmission electron micrographs showed interactions between the surface proteins of C. difficile spores and the phagosome membrane of Raw 264.7 cells. In addition, infection of Raw 264.7 cells with C. difficile spores for 48 h produced significant Raw 264.7 cell death as demonstrated by trypan blue assay, and nuclei staining by ethidium homodimer-1. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that despite efficient recognition and phagocytosis of C. difficile spores by Raw 264.7 cells, spores remain dormant and are able to survive and produce cytotoxic effects on Raw 264.7 cells. PMID:22952726

  4. Infection.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Gaurav; Nagornaya, Natalya; Post, M Judith D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is useful in the diagnosis and management of infections of the central nervous system. Typically, imaging findings at the outset of the disease are subtle and nonspecific, but they often evolve to more definite imaging patterns in a few days, with less rapidity than for stroke but faster than for neoplastic lesions. This timing is similar to that of noninfectious inflammatory brain disease, such as multiple sclerosis. Fortunately, imaging patterns help to distinguish the two kinds of processes. Other than for sarcoidosis, the meninges are seldom involved in noninfectious inflammation; in contrast, many infectious processes involve the meninges, which then enhance with contrast on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, brain infection causes a vast array of imaging patterns. Although CT is useful when hemorrhage or calcification is suspected or bony detail needs to be determined, MRI is the imaging modality of choice in the investigation of intracranial infections. Imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging help in accurately depicting the location and characterizing pyogenic infections and are particularly useful in differentiating bacterial infections from other etiologies. Susceptibility-weighted imaging is extremely useful for the detection of hemorrhage. Although MR spectroscopy findings can frequently be nonspecific, certain conditions such as bacterial abscesses show a relatively specific spectral pattern and are useful in diagnosing and constituting immediate therapy. In this chapter we review first the imaging patterns associated with involvement of various brain structures, such as the epidural and subdural spaces, the meninges, the brain parenchyma, and the ventricles. Involvement of these regions is illustrated with bacterial infections. Next we illustrate the patterns associated with viral and prion diseases, followed by mycobacterial and fungal infections, to conclude with a review of imaging findings

  5. Impact of toxigenic Clostridium difficile polymerase chain reaction testing on the clinical microbiology laboratory and inpatient epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Napierala, Maureen; Munson, Erik; Skonieczny, Patrice; Rodriguez, Sonia; Riederer, Nancy; Land, Gayle; Luzinski, Mary; Block, Denise; Hryciuk, Jeanne E

    2013-08-01

    Conversion from Clostridium difficile toxin A/B EIA to tcdB polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of C. difficile infection (CDI) resulted in significant decreases in laboratory testing volume and largely unchanged C. difficile toxin detection rates. Decreases in healthcare-associated CDI rates (P ≤ 0.05) reflected a clinical practice benefit of this conversion.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium difficile Strain IT1118, an Epidemic Isolate Belonging to the Emerging PCR Ribotype 018

    PubMed Central

    Wasels, François; Barbanti, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 018 has emerged in Italy, South Korea, and Japan, causing severe infections and outbreaks. In this study, we sequenced the genome of IT1118, an Italian clinical isolate, to clarify the molecular features contributing to the success of this epidemic type. PMID:27445391

  7. Comparison of antimicrobial susceptibility among Clostridium difficile isolated from an integrated human and swine population in Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium difficile can be a major problem in hospitals because the bacterium primarily affects individuals with an altered gut flora, which largely occurs through prolonged antibiotic use. Proposed sources of increased community-acquired infections are food animals and retail meats. The objecti...

  8. Clostridium difficile from food and surface samples in a Belgian nursing home: an unlikely source of contamination.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, C; Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Avesani, V; Van Broeck, J; Brach, P; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the contamination of foods and surfaces with Clostridium difficile in a single nursing home. C. difficile PCR-ribotype 078 was found in one food sample and in none of the tested surfaces. These results indicate that food and surfaces are an unlikely source of C. difficile infection in this setting.

  9. Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile Colonisation and Onward Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, David W.; Griffiths, David; Vaughan, Alison; Golubchik, Tanya; Acharya, Milind; O’Connor, Lily; Crook, Derrick W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Combined genotyping/whole genome sequencing and epidemiological data suggest that in endemic settings only a minority of Clostridium difficile infection, CDI, is acquired from other cases. Asymptomatic patients are a potential source for many unexplained cases. Methods We prospectively screened a cohort of medical inpatients in a UK teaching hospital for asymptomatic C. difficile carriage using stool culture. Electronic and questionnaire data were used to determine risk factors for asymptomatic carriage by logistic regression. Carriage isolates were compared with all hospital/community CDI cases from the same geographic region, from 12 months before the study to 3 months after, using whole genome sequencing and hospital admission data, assessing particularly for evidence of onward transmission from asymptomatic cases. Results Of 227 participants recruited, 132 provided ≥1 stool samples for testing. 18 participants were culture-positive for C. difficile, 14/132(11%) on their first sample. Independent risk factors for asymptomatic carriage were patient reported loose/frequent stool (but not meeting CDI criteria of ≥3 unformed stools in 24 hours), previous overnight hospital stay within 6 months, and steroid/immunosuppressant medication in the last 6 months (all p≤0.02). Surprisingly antibiotic exposure in the last 6 months was independently associated with decreased risk of carriage (p = 0.005). The same risk factors were identified excluding participants reporting frequent/loose stool. 13/18(72%) asymptomatically colonised patients carried toxigenic strains from common disease-causing lineages found in cases. Several plausible transmission events to asymptomatic carriers were identified, but in this relatively small study no clear evidence of onward transmission from an asymptomatic case was seen. Conclusions Transmission events from any one asymptomatic carrier are likely to be relatively rare, but as asymptomatic carriage is common, it may

  10. Acquisition of Clostridium difficile by piglets.

    PubMed

    Hopman, N E M; Keessen, E C; Harmanus, C; Sanders, I M J G; van Leengoed, L A M G; Kuijper, E J; Lipman, L J A

    2011-04-21

    Clostridium difficile is recognized as an important cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in humans especially in association with administration of antibiotics. In pigs, C. difficile can cause neonatal enteritis and can be isolated from faeces from both diseased and healthy animals. The presented prospective study describes how soon C. difficile can be isolated from newborn piglets after normal parturition and how C. difficile spreads within a pig farm. Six sows, their farrowing crates and their litters at one farm were sampled until C. difficile was found in all piglets. Within 48 h after birth, all 71 piglets became positive for C. difficile (two piglets were already positive within 1h post partum), all sows became positive within 113 h after parturition and the farrowing crates were found intermittently positive. C. difficile could also be detected in air samples and in samples of teats of the sows. All isolates belonged to PCR ribotype 078. Twenty-one C. difficile ribotype 078 isolates, found at the farm, were further analyzed by MLVA (multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis) and belonged to one clonal complex, except one isolate. To be sure that piglets were not born already infected with C. difficile ribotype 078, 38 caesarean derived piglets were sampled immediately after surgery. All piglets tested negative at delivery and stayed negative for C. difficile ribotype 078 during the 21 days in which they were kept in sterile incubators. This study shows that C. difficile ribotype 078 spreads easily between sows, piglets and the environment. Vertical transmission of C. difficile ribotype 078 was not found and is very unlikely to occur.

  11. Fournier's gangrene caused by Actinomyces funkei, Fusobacterium gonidiaformans and Clostridium hathewayi.

    PubMed

    Tena, Daniel; Losa, Cristina; Medina-Pascual, María José; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio

    2014-06-01

    We report the first case of Fournier's gangrene caused by three unusual anaerobic organisms: Actinomyces funkei, Fusobacterium gonidiaformans and Clostridium hathewayi. The infection occurred in a 73-year-old man without typical risk factors for the development of Fournier's gangrene. Clinical outcome was good after prolonged antibiotic treatment and extensive debridement of the perineum. The case suggests that A. funkei, F. gonidiaformans and C. hathewayi should be considered as potential pathogens of Fournier's gangrene. Human infections caused by these organisms are very rare but can be underestimated because correct identification is very difficult, especially in polymicrobial infections such as Fournier's gangrene.

  12. Fatal case of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in an adult due to a rare serogroup O91 Entero hemorrhagic Escherichia coli associated with a Clostridium difficile infection. More than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Guillard, Thomas; Limelette, Anne; Le Magrex-Debar, Elisabeth; Wynckel, Alain; Gouali, Malika; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Guyot-Colosio, Charlotte; de Champs, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic-uremic syndrome due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, belonging to serogroup O91 has rarely been described. We report here a case of post-diarrheal HUS due to EHEC O91 in an elderly patient for whom diagnosis was delayed given a previously diagnosed C. difficile infection. This case highlights the usefulness of Shiga-toxin detection.

  13. Carbon Monoxide Oxidation by Clostridium thermoaceticum and Clostridium formicoaceticum

    PubMed Central

    Diekert, Gabriele B.; Thauer, Rudolf K.

    1978-01-01

    Cultures of Clostridium formicoaceticum and C. thermoaceticum growing on fructose and glucose, respectively, were shown to rapidly oxidize CO to CO2. Rates up to 0.4 μmol min−1 mg of wet cells−1 were observed. Carbon monoxide oxidation by cell suspensions was found (i) to be dependent on pyruvate, (ii) to be inhibited by alkyl halides and arsenate, and (iii) to stimulate CO2 reduction to acetate. Cell extracts catalyzed the oxidation of carbon monoxide with methyl viologen at specific rates up to 10 μmol min−1 mg of protein−1 (35°C, pH 7.2). Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and ferredoxin from C. pasteurianum were ineffective as electron acceptors. The catalytic mechanism of carbon monoxide oxidation was “ping-pong,” indicating that the enzyme catalyzing carbon monoxide oxidation can be present in an oxidized and a reduced form. The oxidized form was shown to react reversibly with cyanide, and the reduced form was shown to react reversibly with alkyl halides: cyanide inactivated the enzyme only in the absence of carbon monoxide, and alkyl halides inactivated it only in the presence of carbon monoxide. Extracts inactivated by alkyl halides were reactivated by photolysis. The findings are interpreted to indicate that carbon monoxide oxidation in the two bacteria is catalyzed by a corrinoid enzyme and that in vivo the reaction is coupled with the reduction of CO2 to acetate. Cultures of C. acidi-urici and C. cylindrosporum growing on hypoxanthine were found not to oxidize CO, indicating that clostridia mediating a corrinoid-independent total synthesis of acetate from CO2 do not possess a CO-oxidizing system. PMID:711675

  14. Dentists, antibiotics and Clostridium difficile-associated disease.

    PubMed

    Beacher, N; Sweeney, M P; Bagg, J

    2015-09-25

    Dentists prescribe significant volumes of antimicrobial drugs within primary care settings. There is good evidence that many of the prescriptions are not justified by current clinical guidance and that that there is considerable misuse of these drugs in dentistry. One of the risks associated with antibiotic administration is Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD), an entity of which many healthcare workers, including dentists, have little knowledge or understanding. This review seeks to identify the extent and nature of the problem and provides an up to date summary of current views on CDAD, with particular reference to community acquired disease. As for all healthcare workers, scrupulous attention to standard infection control procedures and reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing are essential to reduce the risks of CDAD, prevent emergence of further resistant strains of microorganisms and maintain the value of the arsenal of antibiotics currently available to us.

  15. Clostridium difficile in a children's hospital: assessment of environmental contamination.

    PubMed

    Warrack, Simone; Duster, Megan; Van Hoof, Sarah; Schmitz, Michelle; Safdar, Nasia

    2014-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most frequent infectious cause of health care-associated diarrhea. Three cases of CDI, in children age 2, 3, and 14 years, occurred in the hematology/oncology ward of our children's hospital over 48 hours. We aimed to assess environmental contamination with C difficile in the shared areas of this unit, and to determine whether person-to-person transmission occurred. C difficile was recovered from 5 of 18 samples (28%). We compared C difficile isolated from each patient and the environment using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and found that none of the patient strains matched any of the others, and that none matched any strains recovered from the environment, suggesting that person-to-person transmission had not occurred. We found that C difficile was prevalent in the environment throughout shared areas of the children's hospital unit. Molecular typing to identify mechanisms of transmission is useful for devising appropriate interventions.

  16. [Diarrhea associated with Clostridium difficile in the elderly: new perspectives].

    PubMed

    Pareja-Sierra, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Infection due to Clostridium difficile is currently the main cause of hospital acquired gastrointestinal disease. Its prevalence in the elderly population is higher due to there being many associated risk factors in this age group, such as comorbidity, frequent exposure to the healthcare or residential home setting, immunosenescence, greater consumption of antibiotics, and antiacids. The diagnostic techniques have notably improved in the last few years, which could also account for an increase in its diagnosis. The new expert consensus recommendations propose stratifying the clinical situation of the patient in order to choose the treatment option. Therapeutic options have recently been included in the new Clinical Guidelines, such as flidaxomicin or fecal transplants, with encouraging results, particularly for the control of frequent recurrences.

  17. Interactions Between the Gastrointestinal Microbiome and Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Casey M; Young, Vincent B

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics have significant and long-lasting effects on the intestinal microbiota and consequently reduce colonization resistance against pathogens, including Clostridium difficile. By altering the community structure of the gut microbiome, antibiotics alter the intestinal metabolome, which includes both host- and microbe-derived metabolites. The mechanisms by which antibiotics reduce colonization resistance against C. difficile are unknown yet important for development of preventative and therapeutic approaches against this pathogen. This review focuses on how antibiotics alter the structure of the gut microbiota and how this alters microbial metabolism in the intestine. Interactions between gut microbial products and C. difficile spore germination, growth, and toxin production are discussed. New bacterial therapies to restore changes in bacteria-driven intestinal metabolism following antibiotics will have important applications for treatment and prevention of C. difficile infection.

  18. The Regulatory Networks That Control Clostridium difficile Toxin Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Peltier, Johann; Dupuy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic clostridia cause many human and animal diseases, which typically arise as a consequence of the production of potent exotoxins. Among the enterotoxic clostridia, Clostridium difficile is the main causative agent of nosocomial intestinal infections in adults with a compromised gut microbiota caused by antibiotic treatment. The symptoms of C. difficile infection are essentially caused by the production of two exotoxins: TcdA and TcdB. Moreover, for severe forms of disease, the spectrum of diseases caused by C. difficile has also been correlated to the levels of toxins that are produced during host infection. This observation strengthened the idea that the regulation of toxin synthesis is an important part of C. difficile pathogenesis. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the regulators and sigma factors that have been reported to control toxin gene expression in response to several environmental signals and stresses, including the availability of certain carbon sources and amino acids, or to signaling molecules, such as the autoinducing peptides of quorum sensing systems. The overlapping regulation of key metabolic pathways and toxin synthesis strongly suggests that toxin production is a complex response that is triggered by bacteria in response to particular states of nutrient availability during infection. PMID:27187475

  19. The Regulatory Networks That Control Clostridium difficile Toxin Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Peltier, Johann; Dupuy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic clostridia cause many human and animal diseases, which typically arise as a consequence of the production of potent exotoxins. Among the enterotoxic clostridia, Clostridium difficile is the main causative agent of nosocomial intestinal infections in adults with a compromised gut microbiota caused by antibiotic treatment. The symptoms of C. difficile infection are essentially caused by the production of two exotoxins: TcdA and TcdB. Moreover, for severe forms of disease, the spectrum of diseases caused by C. difficile has also been correlated to the levels of toxins that are produced during host infection. This observation strengthened the idea that the regulation of toxin synthesis is an important part of C. difficile pathogenesis. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the regulators and sigma factors that have been reported to control toxin gene expression in response to several environmental signals and stresses, including the availability of certain carbon sources and amino acids, or to signaling molecules, such as the autoinducing peptides of quorum sensing systems. The overlapping regulation of key metabolic pathways and toxin synthesis strongly suggests that toxin production is a complex response that is triggered by bacteria in response to particular states of nutrient availability during infection. PMID:27187475

  20. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins.

  1. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R.; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  2. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  3. Xylose fermentation with Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, A.; Wilke, C.R.; Blanch, H.W.

    1982-12-01

    In this study, the fermentation of xylose to ethanol with a thermophilic, strictly anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum, was examined. The focus of this investigation was on the physiological parameters which most strongly affect the economic feasibility of using this bacterium for industrial ethanol production. In rich medium (containing economically impractical concentrations of yeast extract) yields as high as 0.43 gm ethanol/gm xylose and growth rates of 0.4 to 0.5 hr/sup -1/ were observed. The predominant by-products of the fermentation were acetate and lactate. Nutritional studies indicated that the cost of the growth medium could be dramatically reduced by replacing most of the yeast extract used with nicotinic acid and vitamin B/sup 12/. Ethanol was found to be very inhibitory to growth and ethanol formation. To overcome the problem of inhibition, cells were gradually adapted to high concentrations (up to 4.2%) of ethanol. However, the ethanol yield of adapted cells was typically 30 to 40% less than the yield of non-adapted cells. Environmental parameters such as pH and by-product concentrations had only a slight effect on the ethanol yield produced by tolerant cells. A mutant, selected from an adapted strain, was found to produce 60% less lactate than its parent. This low-lactate producing mutant had a slightly improved ethanol yield. The results obtained with the tolerant, low-lactate producing mutant were used in the design of an industrial-scale fermentation process. An economic evaluation of the process indicates that ethanol production with this bacterium is currently uneconomical.

  4. Phylogenetic positions of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, P; Capaul, S E; Nicolet, J; Frey, J

    1996-10-01

    The sequences of the 16S rRNA genes (rrs genes) of Clostridium chauvoei, the causative agent of blackleg in cattle, and the phenotypically related organism Clostridium septicum were determined. After amplification of 1,507-bp PCR fragments from the corresponding rrs genes, the sequences were determined in a single round of sequencing by using conserved region primers. A sequence similarity analysis of the sequences revealed the close phylogenetic relationship of C. chauvoei and C. septicum in Clostridium cluster I (M. D. Collins, P. A. Lawson, A. Willems, J. J. Cordoba, J. Fernandez-Garayzabal, P. Garcia, J. Cai, H. Hippe, and J. A. E. Farrow, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 44:812-826, 1994), which includes Clostridium carnis, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tetani. We found that 99.3% of the nucleotides in the genes of C. chauvoei and C. septicum are identical.

  5. Acute Hemolysis with Renal Failure due to Clostridium Bacteremia in a Patient with AML

    PubMed Central

    Medrano-Juarez, R. M.; Sotello, D.; D'Cuhna, L.; Payne, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of acute hemolytic anemia, renal failure, and Clostridium perfringens bacteremia in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. The high fatality of C. perfringens bacteremia requires that clinicians recognize and rapidly treat patients at risk for this infection. Although other hemolytic processes are in the differential diagnosis of these events, the presence of high fever, chills, and rapidly positive blood cultures may help narrow the diagnosis. Most cases of C. perfringens bacteremia have a concomitant coinfection, which makes broad spectrum empiric therapy essential. There is a high mortality rate of C. perfringens infections associated with leukemia. PMID:27774325

  6. Coculture Production of Butanol by Clostridium Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, S. L.; Foutch, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Production of butanol by anaerobic fermentation of sugars enhanced by use of two Clostridium species, one of which feeds on metabolic product of other. Renewed interest in fermentation process for making butanol stimulated by potential use of butanol as surfactant in enhanced oil recovery. Butanol also used as fuel or as chemical feedstock and currently produced synthetically from petroleum.

  7. Isolation of Clostridium tetani from anaerobic empyema.

    PubMed

    Mayall, B C; Snashall, E A; Peel, M M

    1998-11-01

    We report the isolation of Clostridium tetani (along with Fusobacterium mortiferum) from empyema pus. The patient, a 68 year old retired farmer from rural NSW, had recently undergone cholecystectomy, had heart failure and developed an empyema. He improved after drainage of the empyema and penicillin therapy, but died suddenly during convalescence.

  8. Clostridium jejuense sp. nov., isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyunyoung; Yi, Hana; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Muramatsu, Mizuho; Kamagata, Yoichi; Chun, Jongsik

    2004-09-01

    A strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, endospore-forming bacterium, designated strain HY-35-12T, was isolated from a soil sample in Jeju, Korea. Cells of this isolate were Gram-positive, motile rods that formed oval to spherical terminal spores. Strain HY-35-12T grew optimally at 30 degrees C, pH 7.0 and 0-0.5 % (w/v) NaCl. The isolate produced pyruvate, lactate, acetate, formate and hydrogen as fermentation end products from glucose. The G + C content of DNA of the isolate was 41 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the organism formed a monophyletic clade with Clostridium xylanovorans and Clostridium aminovalericum in cluster XIVa of the genus Clostridium. The closest phylogenetic neighbour was C. xylanovorans, with 96.65 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Several physiological and chemotaxonomic properties were identified that enable strain HY-35-12T to be distinguished from phylogenetically related clostridia. On the basis of polyphasic characteristics, it is proposed that strain HY-35-12T (= IMSNU 40003T = KCTC 5026T = DSM 15929T) represents a novel species, Clostridium jejuense sp. nov.

  9. Clostridium difficile in poultry and poultry meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence and severity of disease associated with toxigenic Clostridium difficile have increased in hospitals in North America from the emergence of newer, more virulent strains. Toxigenic C. difficile has been isolated from food animals and retail meat with potential implications of transfer t...

  10. 76 FR 6624 - Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ..., Inc., for the requested indication of treatment of adults with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), also known as Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), and prevention of recurrences. FDA... meetings. Notice of this meeting is given under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. app. 2)....

  11. Fecal microbiota transplant by push enteroscopy to treat diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Ganc, Arnaldo José; Ganc, Ricardo Leite; Reimão, Sílvia Mansur; Frisoli, Alberto; Pasternak, Jacyr

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium difficile is the major etiological agent of pseudomembranous colitis and is found in up to 20% of adult inpatients. The recommended treatment is antibiotic therapy with metronidazole and/or vancomycin. However, the recurrence rate may reach up to 25% and it increases in each episode. The newest alternative to treat diarrhea due to recurrent Clostridium difficile is fecal microbiota transplantation. The procedure was performed in 12 patients, with a 6-month follow-up on 10 of them. Of the ten cases, bacterial recurrence was diagnosed in only one patient, after a course of antibiotic to treat urinary tract infection, without presenting with diarrhea. The particularity of our study, besides being an unprecedented event in South America, is the way to perform the infusion of fecal microbiota by enteroscopy. PMID:26154556

  12. Fecal microbiota transplant by push enteroscopy to treat diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Ganc, Arnaldo José; Ganc, Ricardo Leite; Reimão, Sílvia Mansur; Frisoli Junior, Alberto; Pasternak, Jacyr

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the major etiological agent of pseudomembranous colitis and is found in up to 20% of adult inpatients. The recommended treatment is antibiotic therapy with metronidazole and/or vancomycin. However, the recurrence rate may reach up to 25% and it increases in each episode. The newest alternative to treat diarrhea due to recurrent Clostridium difficile is fecal microbiota transplantation. The procedure was performed in 12 patients, with a 6-month follow-up on 10 of them. Of the ten cases, bacterial recurrence was diagnosed in only one patient, after a course of antibiotic to treat urinary tract infection, without presenting with diarrhea. The particularity of our study, besides being an unprecedented event in South America, is the way to perform the infusion of fecal microbiota by enteroscopy.

  13. A novel regulator controls Clostridium difficile sporulation, motility and toxin production.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Adrianne N; Tamayo, Rita; McBride, Shonna M

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic pathogen that forms spores which promote survival in the environment and transmission to new hosts. The regulatory pathways by which C. difficile initiates spore formation are poorly understood. We identified two factors with limited similarity to the Rap sporulation proteins of other spore-forming bacteria. In this study, we show that disruption of the gene CD3668 reduces sporulation and increases toxin production and motility. This mutant was more virulent and exhibited increased toxin gene expression in the hamster model of infection. Based on these phenotypes, we have renamed this locus rstA, for regulator of sporulation and toxins. Our data demonstrate that RstA is a bifunctional protein that upregulates sporulation through an unidentified pathway and represses motility and toxin production by influencing sigD transcription. Conserved RstA orthologs are present in other pathogenic and industrial Clostridium species and may represent a key regulatory protein controlling clostridial sporulation. PMID:26915493

  14. The Burden of Clostridium difficile after Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Javier Z; Skovrlj, Branko; Rothenberg, Edward S; Lu, Young; McAnany, Steven; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective database analysis. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate incidence, comorbidities, and impact on health care resources of Clostridium difficile infection after cervical spine surgery. Methods A total of 1,602,130 cervical spine surgeries from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2002 to 2011 were included. Patients were included for study based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedural codes for cervical spine surgery for degenerative spine diagnoses. Baseline patient characteristics were determined. Multivariable analyses assessed factors associated with increased incidence of C. difficile and risk of mortality. Results Incidence of C. difficile infection in postoperative cervical spine surgery hospitalizations is 0.08%, significantly increased since 2002 (p < 0.0001). The odds of postoperative C. difficile infection were significantly increased in patients with comorbidities such as congestive heart failure, renal failure, and perivascular disease. Circumferential cervical fusion (odds ratio [OR] = 2.93, p < 0.0001) increased the likelihood of developing C. difficile infection after degenerative cervical spine surgery. C. difficile infection after cervical spine surgery results in extended length of stay (p < 0.0001) and increased hospital costs (p < 0.0001). Mortality rate in patients who develop C. difficile after cervical spine surgery is nearly 8% versus 0.19% otherwise (p < 0.0001). Moreover, multivariate analysis revealed C. difficile to be a significant predictor of inpatient mortality (OR = 3.99, p < 0.0001). Conclusions C. difficile increases the risk of in-hospital mortality and costs approximately $6,830,695 per year to manage in patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery. Patients with comorbidities such as renal failure or congestive heart failure have increased probability of developing infection

  15. The Burden of Clostridium difficile after Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Javier Z; Skovrlj, Branko; Rothenberg, Edward S; Lu, Young; McAnany, Steven; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective database analysis. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate incidence, comorbidities, and impact on health care resources of Clostridium difficile infection after cervical spine surgery. Methods A total of 1,602,130 cervical spine surgeries from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2002 to 2011 were included. Patients were included for study based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedural codes for cervical spine surgery for degenerative spine diagnoses. Baseline patient characteristics were determined. Multivariable analyses assessed factors associated with increased incidence of C. difficile and risk of mortality. Results Incidence of C. difficile infection in postoperative cervical spine surgery hospitalizations is 0.08%, significantly increased since 2002 (p < 0.0001). The odds of postoperative C. difficile infection were significantly increased in patients with comorbidities such as congestive heart failure, renal failure, and perivascular disease. Circumferential cervical fusion (odds ratio [OR] = 2.93, p < 0.0001) increased the likelihood of developing C. difficile infection after degenerative cervical spine surgery. C. difficile infection after cervical spine surgery results in extended length of stay (p < 0.0001) and increased hospital costs (p < 0.0001). Mortality rate in patients who develop C. difficile after cervical spine surgery is nearly 8% versus 0.19% otherwise (p < 0.0001). Moreover, multivariate analysis revealed C. difficile to be a significant predictor of inpatient mortality (OR = 3.99, p < 0.0001). Conclusions C. difficile increases the risk of in-hospital mortality and costs approximately $6,830,695 per year to manage in patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery. Patients with comorbidities such as renal failure or congestive heart failure have increased probability of developing infection

  16. Precision microbiome restoration of bile acid-mediated resistance to Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Buffie, Charlie G.; Bucci, Vanni; Stein, Richard R.; McKenney, Peter T.; Ling, Lilan; Gobourne, Asia; No, Daniel; Liu, Hui; Kinnebrew, Melissa; Viale, Agnes; Littmann, Eric; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Jenq, Robert R.; Taur, Ying; Sander, Chris; Cross, Justin; Toussaint, Nora C.; Xavier, Joao B.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of mammals are colonized by hundreds of microbial species that contribute to health, including colonization resistance against intestinal pathogens1. Many antibiotics destroy intestinal microbial communities and increase susceptibility to intestinal pathogens2. Among these, Clostridium difficile, a major cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhea, greatly increases morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients3. Which intestinal bacteria provide resistance to C. difficile infection and their in vivo inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. By treating mice with different antibiotics that result in distinct microbiota changes and lead to varied susceptibility to C. difficile, we correlated loss of specific bacterial taxa with development of infection. Mathematical modeling augmented by microbiota analyses of hospitalized patients identified resistance-associated bacteria common to mice and humans. Using these platforms, we determined that Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium, is associated with resistance to C. difficile infection and, upon administration, enhances resistance to infection in a secondary bile acid-dependent fashion. Using a workflow involving mouse models, clinical studies, metagenomic analyses and mathematical modeling, we identified a probiotic candidate that corrects a clinically relevant microbiome deficiency. These findings have implications for rational design of targeted antimicrobials as well as microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for individuals at risk for C. difficile infection. PMID:25337874

  17. Precision microbiome reconstitution restores bile acid mediated resistance to Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Buffie, Charlie G; Bucci, Vanni; Stein, Richard R; McKenney, Peter T; Ling, Lilan; Gobourne, Asia; No, Daniel; Liu, Hui; Kinnebrew, Melissa; Viale, Agnes; Littmann, Eric; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Jenq, Robert R; Taur, Ying; Sander, Chris; Cross, Justin R; Toussaint, Nora C; Xavier, Joao B; Pamer, Eric G

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of mammals are colonized by hundreds of microbial species that contribute to health, including colonization resistance against intestinal pathogens. Many antibiotics destroy intestinal microbial communities and increase susceptibility to intestinal pathogens. Among these, Clostridium difficile, a major cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhoea, greatly increases morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Which intestinal bacteria provide resistance to C. difficile infection and their in vivo inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. Here we correlate loss of specific bacterial taxa with development of infection, by treating mice with different antibiotics that result in distinct microbiota changes and lead to varied susceptibility to C. difficile. Mathematical modelling augmented by analyses of the microbiota of hospitalized patients identifies resistance-associated bacteria common to mice and humans. Using these platforms, we determine that Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium, is associated with resistance to C. difficile infection and, upon administration, enhances resistance to infection in a secondary bile acid dependent fashion. Using a workflow involving mouse models, clinical studies, metagenomic analyses, and mathematical modelling, we identify a probiotic candidate that corrects a clinically relevant microbiome deficiency. These findings have implications for the rational design of targeted antimicrobials as well as microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for individuals at risk of C. difficile infection.

  18. Precision microbiome reconstitution restores bile acid mediated resistance to Clostridium difficile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffie, Charlie G.; Bucci, Vanni; Stein, Richard R.; McKenney, Peter T.; Ling, Lilan; Gobourne, Asia; No, Daniel; Liu, Hui; Kinnebrew, Melissa; Viale, Agnes; Littmann, Eric; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Jenq, Robert R.; Taur, Ying; Sander, Chris; Cross, Justin R.; Toussaint, Nora C.; Xavier, Joao B.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of mammals are colonized by hundreds of microbial species that contribute to health, including colonization resistance against intestinal pathogens. Many antibiotics destroy intestinal microbial communities and increase susceptibility to intestinal pathogens. Among these, Clostridium difficile, a major cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhoea, greatly increases morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Which intestinal bacteria provide resistance to C. difficile infection and their in vivo inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. Here we correlate loss of specific bacterial taxa with development of infection, by treating mice with different antibiotics that result in distinct microbiota changes and lead to varied susceptibility to C. difficile. Mathematical modelling augmented by analyses of the microbiota of hospitalized patients identifies resistance-associated bacteria common to mice and humans. Using these platforms, we determine that Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium, is associated with resistance to C. difficile infection and, upon administration, enhances resistance to infection in a secondary bile acid dependent fashion. Using a workflow involving mouse models, clinical studies, metagenomic analyses, and mathematical modelling, we identify a probiotic candidate that corrects a clinically relevant microbiome deficiency. These findings have implications for the rational design of targeted antimicrobials as well as microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for individuals at risk of C. difficile infection.

  19. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Clostridium difficile Carriage

    PubMed Central

    Alasmari, Faisal; Seiler, Sondra M.; Hink, Tiffany; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Dubberke, Erik R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) incidence has increased dramatically over the last decade. Recent studies suggest that asymptomatic carriers may be an important reservoir of C. difficile in healthcare settings. We sought to identify the prevalence and risk factors for asymptomatic C. difficile carriage on admission to the hospital. Methods. Patients admitted to Barnes-Jewish Hospital without diarrhea were enrolled from June 2010 through October 2011. Demographic information and healthcare and medication exposures 90 days prior to admission were collected. Stool specimens or rectal swabs were collected within 48 hours of admission and stored at −30°C until cultured. Clostridium difficile isolates were typed and compared with isolates from patients with CDI. Results. A stool/swab specimen was obtained for 259 enrolled subjects on admission. Two hundred four (79%) were not colonized, 40 (15%) had toxigenic C. difficile (TCD), and 15 (6%) had nontoxigenic C. difficile. There were no differences between TCD-colonized and -uncolonized subjects for age (mean, 56 vs 58 years; P = .46), comorbidities, admission from another healthcare facility (33% vs 24%; P = .23), or recent hospitalization (50% vs 50%; P = .43). There were no differences in antimicrobial exposures in the 90 days prior to admission (55% vs 56%; P = .91). Asymptomatic carriers were colonized with strains similar to strains from patients with CDI, but the relative proportions were different. Conclusions. There was a high prevalence of TCD colonization on admission. In contrast to past studies, TCD colonization was not associated with recent antimicrobial or healthcare exposures. Additional investigation is needed to determine the role of asymptomatic TCD carriers on hospital-onset CDI incidence. PMID:24755858

  20. Genomic diversity of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Janezic, Sandra; Rupnik, Maja

    2015-05-01

    Approaches to exploring Clostridium difficile genomic diversity have ranged from molecular typing methods to use of comparative genome microarrays and whole genome sequence comparisons. The C. difficile population structure is clonal and distributed into six clades, which correlate well with MLST STs (multilocus sequence types) and PCR ribotypes. However, toxigenic strains and strains with increased virulence are distributed throughout several clades. Here we summarize studies on C. difficile genomic diversity, with emphasis on phylogenetic aspects, epidemiological aspect and variability of some virulence factors.

  1. Diarylacylhydrazones: Clostridium-Selective Antibacterials with Activity Against Stationary-Phase Cells

    PubMed Central

    Casadei, Gabriele; Bremner, John B.; Lewis, Kim; Kelso, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Current antibiotics for treating Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), i.e. metronidazole, vancomycin and more recently fidaxomicin, are mostly effective but treatment failure and disease relapse remain as significant clinical problems. The shortcomings of these agents are attributed to their low selectivity for C. difficile over normal gut microflora and their ineffectiveness against C. difficile spores. This paper reports that certain diarylacylhydrazones identified during a high-throughput screening/counter-screening campaign show selective activity against two Clostridium species (C. difficile and C. perfringens) over common gut commensals. Representative examples are shown to possess activity similar to vancomycin against clinical C. difficile strains and to kill stationary-phase C. difficile cells, which are responsible for spore production. Structure-activity relationships with additional synthesised analogues suggested a protonophoric mechanism may play a role in the observed activity/selectivity and this was supported by the well-known protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) showing selective anti-Clostridium effects and activity similar to diarylacylhydrazones against stationary-phase C. difficile cells. Two diarylacylhydrazones were shown to be non-toxic towards human FaDu and Hep G2 cells indicating that further studies with the class are warranted towards new drugs for CDI. PMID:24360560

  2. Loss of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus Fecal Dominance in an Organ Transplant Patient With Clostridium difficile Colitis After Fecal Microbiota Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Stripling, Joshua; Kumar, Ranjit; Baddley, John W.; Nellore, Anoma; Dixon, Paula; Howard, Donna; Ptacek, Travis; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Tallaj, Jose A.; Benjamin, William H.; Morrow, Casey D.; Rodriguez, J. Martin

    2015-01-01

    We report the use of fecal microbiota transplantation in a single heart-kidney transplant recipient with recurrent Clostridium difficile, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) fecal dominance, and recurrent VRE infections. Fecal microbiota transplantation resulted in the reconstruction of a diverse microbiota with (1) reduced relative abundance of C difficile and VRE and (2) positive clinical outcome. PMID:26180828

  3. Loss of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus Fecal Dominance in an Organ Transplant Patient With Clostridium difficile Colitis After Fecal Microbiota Transplant.

    PubMed

    Stripling, Joshua; Kumar, Ranjit; Baddley, John W; Nellore, Anoma; Dixon, Paula; Howard, Donna; Ptacek, Travis; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Tallaj, Jose A; Benjamin, William H; Morrow, Casey D; Rodriguez, J Martin

    2015-04-01

    We report the use of fecal microbiota transplantation in a single heart-kidney transplant recipient with recurrent Clostridium difficile, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) fecal dominance, and recurrent VRE infections. Fecal microbiota transplantation resulted in the reconstruction of a diverse microbiota with (1) reduced relative abundance of C difficile and VRE and (2) positive clinical outcome.

  4. Development of Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) for Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Hayley; Kohoutova, Darina; Mosse, Charles A.; Yahioglu, Gokhan; Stamati, Ioanna; Deonarain, Mahendra; Battah, Sinan; Ready, Derren; Allan, Elaine; Mullany, Peter; Lovat, Laurence B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudo membranous colitis in the developed world. The aim of this study was to explore whether Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) could be used as a novel approach to treating C. difficile infections. Methods PACT utilises the ability of light-activated photosensitisers (PS) to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as free radical species and singlet oxygen, which are lethal to cells. We screened thirteen PS against C. difficile planktonic cells, biofilm and germinating spores in vitro, and cytotoxicity of effective compounds was tested on the colorectal adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29. Results Three PS were able to kill 99.9% of bacteria in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, both in the planktonic state and in a biofilm, after exposure to red laser light (0.2 J/cm2) without harming model colon cells. The applicability of PACT to eradicate C. difficile germinative spores indirectly was also shown, by first inducing germination with the bile salt taurocholate, followed by PACT. Conclusion This innovative and simple approach offers the prospect of a new antimicrobial therapy using light to treat C. difficile infection of the colon. PMID:26313448

  5. How to eradicate Clostridium difficile from the environment.

    PubMed

    Barbut, F

    2015-04-01

    During the last decade, Clostridium difficile has emerged as a major cause of healthcare-associated diarrhoea and death. Transmission of this spore-forming bacterium is thought to occur via the hands of healthcare providers or via the contaminated environment. Therefore, enhanced environmental cleaning/disinfection of the rooms housing C. difficile-infected patients is warranted. Guidelines from various scientific bodies have been published. They recommend performing environmental decontamination of rooms of patients with C. difficile infection (CDI) using hypochlorite (diluted 1/10) or a sporicidal product. Compliance with cleaning and disinfection is a critical point and is often suboptimal. Novel 'no-touch' methods for room disinfection have recently been introduced. Ultraviolet (UV) light or hydrogen peroxide systems are most widely used. In-vitro studies suggest that hydrogen peroxide vapour (from 30% hydrogen peroxide) methods achieve a >6 log10 reduction in C. difficile spores placed on carriers, and that aerosolized hydrogen peroxide systems (from 5% to 6% hydrogen peroxide) achieve ∼4 log10 reduction, whereas UV-based methods achieve ∼2 log10 reduction. Very few studies have assessed the impact of these devices on the transmission of C. difficile. Major limitations of these devices include the fact that they can only be used after the patient's discharge, because patients and staff must be removed from the room. The new no-touch methods for room disinfection supplement, but do not replace, daily cleaning. PMID:25638358

  6. Expression and delivery of an endolysin to combat Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Teresa; Horn, Nikki; Wegmann, Udo; Dugo, Giacomo; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J

    2014-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a cause for increasing concern due to its responsibility for severe infections both in humans and animals, especially poultry. To find new control strategies to treat C. perfringens infection, we investigated the activity and delivery of a bacteriophage endolysin. We identified a new endolysin, designated CP25L, which shows similarity to an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase domain and is distinct from other C. perfringens endolysins whose activity has been demonstrated in vitro. The cp25l gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product demonstrated lytic activity against all 25 C. perfringens strains tested. The probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785 was engineered to deliver the endolysin to the gastrointestinal tract. The integration of the nisRK two-component regulatory system from the Lactococcus lactis nisin A biosynthesis operon into the chromosome of L. johnsonii allowed constitutive expression of the endolysin under the control of the nisA promoter (P nisA ), while the use of a signal peptide (SLPmod) led to successful secretion of the active endolysin to the surrounding media. The high specificity and activity of the endolysin suggest that it may be developed as an effective tool to enhance the control of C. perfringens by L. johnsonii in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23942878

  7. Reprofiled anthelmintics abate hypervirulent stationary-phase Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Gooyit, Major; Janda, Kim D

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged use of broad-spectrum antibiotics disrupts the indigenous gut microbiota, which consequently enables toxigenic Clostridium difficile species to proliferate and cause infection. The burden of C. difficile infections was exacerbated with the outbreak of hypervirulent strains that produce copious amounts of enterotoxins and spores. In recent past, membrane-active agents have generated a surge of interest due to their bactericidal property with a low propensity for resistance. In this study, we capitalized on the antimicrobial property and low oral bioavailability of salicylanilide anthelmintics (closantel, rafoxanide, niclosamide, oxyclozanide) to target the gut pathogen. By broth microdilution techniques, we determined the MIC values of the anthelmintics against 16 C. difficile isolates of defined PCR-ribotype. The anthelmintics broadly inhibited C. difficile growth in vitro via a membrane depolarization mechanism. Interestingly, the salicylanilides were bactericidal against logarithmic- and stationary-phase cultures of the BI/NAP1/027 strain 4118. The salicylanilides were poorly active against select gut commensals (Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus species), and were non-hemolytic and non-toxic to mammalian cell lines HepG2 and HEK 293T/17 within the range of their in vitro MICs and MBCs. The salicylanilide anthelmintics exhibit desirable properties for repositioning as anti-C. difficile agents. PMID:27633064

  8. How to eradicate Clostridium difficile from the environment.

    PubMed

    Barbut, F

    2015-04-01

    During the last decade, Clostridium difficile has emerged as a major cause of healthcare-associated diarrhoea and death. Transmission of this spore-forming bacterium is thought to occur via the hands of healthcare providers or via the contaminated environment. Therefore, enhanced environmental cleaning/disinfection of the rooms housing C. difficile-infected patients is warranted. Guidelines from various scientific bodies have been published. They recommend performing environmental decontamination of rooms of patients with C. difficile infection (CDI) using hypochlorite (diluted 1/10) or a sporicidal product. Compliance with cleaning and disinfection is a critical point and is often suboptimal. Novel 'no-touch' methods for room disinfection have recently been introduced. Ultraviolet (UV) light or hydrogen peroxide systems are most widely used. In-vitro studies suggest that hydrogen peroxide vapour (from 30% hydrogen peroxide) methods achieve a >6 log10 reduction in C. difficile spores placed on carriers, and that aerosolized hydrogen peroxide systems (from 5% to 6% hydrogen peroxide) achieve ∼4 log10 reduction, whereas UV-based methods achieve ∼2 log10 reduction. Very few studies have assessed the impact of these devices on the transmission of C. difficile. Major limitations of these devices include the fact that they can only be used after the patient's discharge, because patients and staff must be removed from the room. The new no-touch methods for room disinfection supplement, but do not replace, daily cleaning.

  9. Case of Clostridium perfringens bacteremia after routine colonoscopy and polypectomy.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Anjali N; Riera, Diana; Hickey, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    Bacteremia is an uncommon complication after polypectomy and colonoscopy. We report one of the first cases of Clostridium perfringens bacteremia after polypectomy. Our patient was a four years old boy with congenital polyposis, who underwent colonoscopy and polypectomy without complication. Approximately 12h later he developed a fever and tachycardia with no other clinical symptoms. His blood cultures grew out penicillin susceptible C. perfringens and Enterococcus faecalis. He responded to antibiotic therapy and remained clinically asymptomatic for the duration of his course. There are a few reports of bacteremia after routine polypectomy, but no reported cases of C. perfringens bacteremia in the pediatric population. Clostridial sp. bacteremia can be fatal with devastating consequences if appropriate antibiotics and/or surgical debridement are delayed. Polymicrobial infection, as illustrated in our patient, is also common and can be a poor prognostic risk factor. Therefore, for patients with a history of polypectomy and new onset fever, anaerobic infections should be considered and empiric antibiotic therapy should include coverage for these organisms. PMID:19324098

  10. Reprofiled anthelmintics abate hypervirulent stationary-phase Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Gooyit, Major; Janda, Kim D

    2016-09-16

    Prolonged use of broad-spectrum antibiotics disrupts the indigenous gut microbiota, which consequently enables toxigenic Clostridium difficile species to proliferate and cause infection. The burden of C. difficile infections was exacerbated with the outbreak of hypervirulent strains that produce copious amounts of enterotoxins and spores. In recent past, membrane-active agents have generated a surge of interest due to their bactericidal property with a low propensity for resistance. In this study, we capitalized on the antimicrobial property and low oral bioavailability of salicylanilide anthelmintics (closantel, rafoxanide, niclosamide, oxyclozanide) to target the gut pathogen. By broth microdilution techniques, we determined the MIC values of the anthelmintics against 16 C. difficile isolates of defined PCR-ribotype. The anthelmintics broadly inhibited C. difficile growth in vitro via a membrane depolarization mechanism. Interestingly, the salicylanilides were bactericidal against logarithmic- and stationary-phase cultures of the BI/NAP1/027 strain 4118. The salicylanilides were poorly active against select gut commensals (Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus species), and were non-hemolytic and non-toxic to mammalian cell lines HepG2 and HEK 293T/17 within the range of their in vitro MICs and MBCs. The salicylanilide anthelmintics exhibit desirable properties for repositioning as anti-C. difficile agents.

  11. Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotype 018, a Successful Epidemic Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Alberto; Bianchini, Valentina; Biancardi, Anna; Cichero, Paola; Mazzotti, Maria; Nizzero, Paola; Moro, Matteo; Ossi, Cristina; Scarpellini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) became a public health problem for the global spreading of the so-called hypervirulent PCR ribotypes (RTs) 027 and 078, associated with increases in the transmission and severity of the disease. However, especially in Europe, several RTs are prevalent, and the concept of hypervirulence is currently debated. We investigated the toxin and resistance profiles and the genetic relatedness of 312 C. difficile strains isolated in a large Italian teaching hospital during a 5-year period. We evaluated the role of CDI-related antibiotic consumption and infection control practices on the RT predominance in association with their molecular features and transmission capacity. Excluding secondary cases due to nosocomial transmission, RT018 was the predominant genotype (42.4%) followed by RT078 (13.6%), while RT027 accounted for 0.8% of the strains. RT078 was most frequently isolated from patients in intensive care units. Its prevalence significantly increased over time, but its transmission capacity was very low. In contrast, RT018 was highly transmissible and accounted for 95.7% of the secondary cases. Patients with the RT018 genotype were significantly older than those with RT078 and other RTs, indicating an association between epidemic RT and age. We provide here the first epidemiological evidence to consider RT018 as a successful epidemic genotype that deserves more attention in clinical practice. PMID:26041894

  12. Reprofiled anthelmintics abate hypervirulent stationary-phase Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Gooyit, Major; Janda, Kim D.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged use of broad-spectrum antibiotics disrupts the indigenous gut microbiota, which consequently enables toxigenic Clostridium difficile species to proliferate and cause infection. The burden of C. difficile infections was exacerbated with the outbreak of hypervirulent strains that produce copious amounts of enterotoxins and spores. In recent past, membrane-active agents have generated a surge of interest due to their bactericidal property with a low propensity for resistance. In this study, we capitalized on the antimicrobial property and low oral bioavailability of salicylanilide anthelmintics (closantel, rafoxanide, niclosamide, oxyclozanide) to target the gut pathogen. By broth microdilution techniques, we determined the MIC values of the anthelmintics against 16 C. difficile isolates of defined PCR-ribotype. The anthelmintics broadly inhibited C. difficile growth in vitro via a membrane depolarization mechanism. Interestingly, the salicylanilides were bactericidal against logarithmic- and stationary-phase cultures of the BI/NAP1/027 strain 4118. The salicylanilides were poorly active against select gut commensals (Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus species), and were non-hemolytic and non-toxic to mammalian cell lines HepG2 and HEK 293T/17 within the range of their in vitro MICs and MBCs. The salicylanilide anthelmintics exhibit desirable properties for repositioning as anti-C. difficile agents. PMID:27633064

  13. Fate of ingested Clostridium difficile spores in mice.

    PubMed

    Howerton, Amber; Patra, Manomita; Abel-Santos, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, a major nosocomial complication. The infective form of C. difficile is the spore, a dormant and resistant structure that forms under stress. Although spore germination is the first committed step in CDI onset, the temporal and spatial distribution of ingested C. difficile spores is not clearly understood. We recently reported that CamSA, a synthetic bile salt analog, inhibits C. difficile spore germination in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we took advantage of the anti-germination activity of bile salts to determine the fate of ingested C. difficile spores. We tested four different bile salts for efficacy in preventing CDI. Since CamSA was the only anti-germinant tested able to prevent signs of CDI, we characterized CamSa's in vitro stability, distribution, and cytotoxicity. We report that CamSA is stable to simulated gastrointestinal (GI) environments, but will be degraded by members of the natural microbiota found in a healthy gut. Our data suggest that CamSA will not be systemically available, but instead will be localized to the GI tract. Since in vitro pharmacological parameters were acceptable, CamSA was used to probe the mouse model of CDI. By varying the timing of CamSA dosage, we estimated that C. difficile spores germinated and established infection less than 10 hours after ingestion. We also showed that ingested C. difficile spores rapidly transited through the GI tract and accumulated in the colon and cecum of CamSA-treated mice. From there, C. difficile spores were slowly shed over a 96-hour period. To our knowledge, this is the first report of using molecular probes to obtain disease progression information for C. difficile infection. PMID:24023628

  14. Method for the typing of Clostridium difficile based on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tabaqchali, S.; O'Farrell, S.; Holland, D.; Silman, R.

    1986-01-01

    A typing method for Clostridium difficile based on the incorporation of (/sup 35/S)methionine into cellular proteins, their separation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and their visualization by autoradiography is described. On analysis of the radiolabeled-protein profiles, nine distinct groups were observed (A to E and W to Z). The method, which is simple, reproducible, and readily expandable, has been applied in epidemiological studies to demonstrate cross-infection and hospital acquisition of C. difficile.

  15. The pathology of enterotoxemia by Clostridium perfringens type C in calves.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Jorge P; Anderson, Mark; Blanchard, Patricia; Mete, Asli; Uzal, Francisco A

    2013-05-01

    The pathology of Clostridium perfringens type C infection has been described with detail only in foals and piglets. The current report describes the diagnostic workup and detailed pathology of 3 cases of C. perfringens type C infection in calves. A 2-day-old Jersey calf and fresh and fixed tissues from a 4-week-old Angus calf and from a 1-week-old Jersey calf were received at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System with a history of digestive disease and death. The gross changes in the gastrointestinal tract of 1 calf consisted of multifocal subserosal hemorrhages of the rumen, diffuse congestion and multifocal hemorrhages of the small intestinal mucosa, and dilated cecum with bloody liquid contents. In a second calf, a large segment of small intestine was hemorrhagic. The small intestine of the third calf was dilated and filled with abundant yellow fluid content. Microscopically, all 3 calves had diffuse coagulation necrosis of the intestinal mucosa. Clostridium perfringens type A was isolated from the intestinal content of 2 calves. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Bovine rotavirus was positive on colonic content of 1 calf. Small numbers of cryptosporidia were seen in smears of colonic content of 2 calves, and Salmonella sp. group E was detected in the small intestinal content of another calf. Clostridium perfringens beta toxin was detected in the intestinal content of the 3 animals. A diagnosis of C. perfringens type C infection was confirmed based on pathological findings and detection of beta toxin in the intestinal content of the 3 animals. PMID:23592750

  16. Clostridium difficile ribotype 078 cultured from post-surgical non-healing wound in a patient carrying ribotype 014 in the intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Nyc, Otakar; Krutova, Marcela; Kriz, Jiri; Matejkova, Jana; Bebrova, Eliska; Hysperska, Veronika; Kuijper, Ed J

    2015-11-01

    Extra-intestinal infections caused by Clostridium difficile are rare. The risk of extra-intestinal infections associated with C. difficile may be particularly relevant in environments contaminated with C. difficile spores. This paper describes the case of a non-diarrheic patient colonized with C. difficile ribotype 014 in the intestinal tract who developed a post-surgical wound infection by C. difficile ribotype 078. The infection responded to metronidazole administered first intravenously and then orally. This case indicates that C. difficile may not only be related to diarrheic diseases, but also to infections of non-healing wounds, especially in situations when C. difficile is the only isolated pathogen.

  17. Clostridium perfringens: A review of enteric diseases in dogs, cats and wild animals.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus that is commonly part of the microbiota of humans and animals. It is considered a common enteric pathogen, but the pathogenesis and the predisposing factors of the disease commonly differ between host species. Thus, specific research is necessary to understand the role of this pathogen, how to diagnose it, and which control measures are applicable. The aim of this paper is to review the current knowledge of C. perfringens infections in dogs, cats and wild animals.

  18. Clostridium perfringens: a flesh-eating bacterium living in your garden.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Ann

    2010-10-01

    Gas gangrene is a painful, rapidly developing and potentially fatal infection despite antibiotic treatment. During the First World War thousands of soldiers died from this disease. Dr Alexis Carrel pioneered a controversial method of irrigating wounds with Dakin's solution to destroy Clostridium perfringens, a bacterium found in heavily fertilised soils that causes gas gangrene. Although this method is no longer used due to the discovery of antibiotics, many of his other ideas, such as scientifically determining the type and number of bacteria and delaying the closure of a wound until the bacteria had been eradicated, are still used today. PMID:21049805

  19. Physical and genetic map of the Clostridium saccharobutylicum (formerly Clostridium acetobutylicum) NCP 262 chromosome.

    PubMed

    Keis, S; Sullivan, J T; Jones, D T

    2001-07-01

    A physical and genetic map of the Clostridium saccharobutylicum NCP 262 chromosome was constructed. The order of macrorestriction fragments was determined by analysing fragments generated after single and double digestion with the restriction enzymes BssHII, I-CeuI, Sse8387I, RsrII and SfiI and separation by PFGE. The I-CeuI backbone of C. saccharobutylicum was constructed by indirect end-labelling with rrs- and 3' rrl-specific probes located on either side of the I-CeuI site in the rrn operon, and reciprocal separation of BssHII and I-CeuI digestion products by two-dimensional PFGE. The positions of BssHII fragments on the physical map were determined using a library of linking clones containing BssHII cleavage sites. The size of the circular genome was estimated to be 5.3 Mb with a mean resolution of approximately 140 kb. The chromosome of C. saccharobutylicum contains 12 rrn operons, located on 46% of the chromosome, which are transcribed divergently from the deduced origin of replication. The genetic map was constructed by determining the location of 28 genes involved in house-keeping, heat-shock response, sporulation, electron transfer and acid- and solvent-formation. Comparison of the C. saccharobutylicum genetic map with those of the spore-forming bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium beijerinckii indicated C. saccharobutylicum to be most similar to the latter two Clostridium species, with the order of the genes within the gyrAB and recA loci being conserved.

  20. Clinical Utility of Laboratory Detection of Clostridium difficile Strain BI/NAP1/027

    PubMed Central

    Gerding, Dale N.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile strain BI/NAP1/027 is associated with increased C. difficile infection (CDI) rates and severity, and the efficacy of some CDI therapies may be strain dependent. Although cultured C. difficile isolates can be reliably subtyped by various methods, the long turnaround times, high cost, and limited availability of strain typing preclude their routine use. Nucleic acid amplification tests identify BI/NAP1/027 rapidly from stool, but the emergence of closely related strains compromises test specificity. Although detection of epidemiologically significant pathogens is generally useful for infection control programs, specific data supporting use of rapid detection of BI/NAP1/027 as an infection control tool are still awaited. PMID:26511742

  1. Clinical Utility of Laboratory Detection of Clostridium difficile Strain BI/NAP1/027.

    PubMed

    Kociolek, Larry K; Gerding, Dale N

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile strain BI/NAP1/027 is associated with increased C. difficile infection (CDI) rates and severity, and the efficacy of some CDI therapies may be strain dependent. Although cultured C. difficile isolates can be reliably subtyped by various methods, the long turnaround times, high cost, and limited availability of strain typing preclude their routine use. Nucleic acid amplification tests identify BI/NAP1/027 rapidly from stool, but the emergence of closely related strains compromises test specificity. Although detection of epidemiologically significant pathogens is generally useful for infection control programs, specific data supporting use of rapid detection of BI/NAP1/027 as an infection control tool are still awaited. PMID:26511742

  2. Clostridium difficile Drug Pipeline: Challenges in Discovery and Development of New Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade Clostridium difficile has become a bacterial pathogen of global significance. Epidemic strains have spread throughout hospitals, while community acquired infections and other sources ensure a constant inoculation of spores into hospitals. In response to the increasing medical burden, a new C. difficile antibiotic, fidaxomicin, was approved in 2011 for the treatment of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. Rudimentary fecal transplants are also being trialed as effective treatments. Despite these advances, therapies that are more effective against C. difficile spores and less damaging to the resident gastrointestinal microbiome and that reduce recurrent disease are still desperately needed. However, bringing a new treatment for C. difficile infection to market involves particular challenges. This review covers the current drug discovery pipeline, including both small molecule and biologic therapies, and highlights the challenges associated with in vitro and in vivo models of C. difficile infection for drug screening and lead optimization. PMID:25760275

  3. Nanomechanical analysis of Clostridium tyrobutyricum spores.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, N; Bassi, D; Cappa, F; Cocconcelli, P S; Parmigiani, F; Ferrini, G

    2010-12-01

    In this work we report on the measurement of the Young modulus of the external surface of Clostridium tyrobutyricum spores in air with an atomic force microscope. The Young modulus can be reliably measured despite the strong tip-spore adhesion forces and the need to immobilize the spores due to their slipping on most substrates. Moreover, we investigate the disturbing factors and consider some practical aspects that influence the measurements of elastic properties of biological objects with the atomic force microscopy indentation techniques.

  4. An Update on Clostridium difficile Toxinotyping

    PubMed Central

    Janezic, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Toxinotyping is a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based method for differentiation of Clostridium difficile strains according to the changes in the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc), a region coding for toxins A and B. Toxinotypes are a heterogenous group of strains that are important in the development of molecular diagnostic tests and vaccines and are a good basis for C. difficile phylogenetic studies. Here we describe an overview of the 34 currently known toxinotypes (I to XXXIV) and some changes in nomenclature. PMID:26511734

  5. Genomic diversity of Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Janezic, Sandra; Rupnik, Maja

    2015-05-01

    Approaches to exploring Clostridium difficile genomic diversity have ranged from molecular typing methods to use of comparative genome microarrays and whole genome sequence comparisons. The C. difficile population structure is clonal and distributed into six clades, which correlate well with MLST STs (multilocus sequence types) and PCR ribotypes. However, toxigenic strains and strains with increased virulence are distributed throughout several clades. Here we summarize studies on C. difficile genomic diversity, with emphasis on phylogenetic aspects, epidemiological aspect and variability of some virulence factors. PMID:25700631

  6. Annotation of the Clostridium Acetobutylicum Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, M. J.

    2004-06-09

    The genome sequence of the solvent producing bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC824, has been determined by the shotgun approach. The genome consists of a 3.94 Mb chromosome and a 192 kb megaplasmid that contains the majority of genes responsible for solvent production. Comparison of C. acetobutylicum to Bacillus subtilis reveals significant local conservation of gene order, which has not been seen in comparisons of other genomes with similar, or, in some cases, closer, phylogenetic proximity. This conservation allows the prediction of many previously undetected operons in both bacteria.

  7. Biochemical properties of Clostridium bifermentans spores.

    PubMed Central

    Hausenbauer, J M; Waites, W M; Setlow, P

    1977-01-01

    As previously found for spores of Bacillus species, dormant spores of Clostridium bifermentans contained essentially no adenosine triphosphate, a high level of adenosine monophosphate, a high level of 3-phosphoglyceric acid, and much transfer ribonucleic acid lacking a 3'-terminal adenosine monophosphate residue. As in spores of Bacillus species, germination of C. bifermentans spores was accompanied by utilization of the 3-phosphoglyceric acid, a large increase in the adenosine triphosphate level, and the disappearance of defective transfer ribonucleic acid. In contrast to spores of Bacillus species, dormant spores of C. bifermentans contained little free amino acid. PMID:402349

  8. Regulation of Toxin Production in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens is widely distributed in nature, especially in soil and the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals. C. perfringens causes gas gangrene and food poisoning, and it produces extracellular enzymes and toxins that are thought to act synergistically and contribute to its pathogenesis. A complicated regulatory network of toxin genes has been reported that includes a two-component system for regulatory RNA and cell-cell communication. It is necessary to clarify the global regulatory system of these genes in order to understand and treat the virulence of C. perfringens. We summarize the existing knowledge about the regulatory mechanisms here. PMID:27399773

  9. Clostridium perfringens Type E Virulence Traits Involved in Gut Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Leandro M.; Carrasco, Juan M. Díaz; Redondo, Enzo A.; Delgado, Fernando; Miyakawa, Mariano E. Fernández

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type E disease in ruminants has been characterized by hemorrhagic enteritis or sudden death. Although type E isolates are defined by the production of alpha and iota toxin, little is known about the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type E infections. Thus far, the role of iota toxin as a virulence factor is unknown. In this report, iota toxin showed positive effects on adherence and colonization of C. perfringens type E while having negative effect on the adherence of type A cells. In-vitro and in-vivo models suggest that toxinotype E would be particularly adapted to exploit the changes induced by iota toxin in the surface of epithelial cells. In addition, type E strains produce metabolites that affected the growth of potential intra-specific competitors. These results suggest that the alteration of the enterocyte morphology induced by iota toxin concomitantly with the specific increase of type E cell adhesion and the strong intra-specific growth inhibition of other strains could be competitive traits inherent to type E isolates that improve its fitness within the bovine gut environment. PMID:25799452

  10. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Clostridium difficile spore proteins.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Chandrabali; Eugenis, Ioannis; Edwards, Adrianne N; Sun, Xingmin; McBride, Shonna M; Ho, David D

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming, anaerobic, Gram-positive organism that is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated infectious diarrhea, commonly known as C. difficile infection (CDI). C. difficile spores play an important role in the pathogenesis of CDI. Spore proteins, especially those that are surface-bound may play an essential role in the germination, colonization and persistence of C. difficile in the human gut. In our current study, we report the identification of two surface-bound spore proteins, CdeC and CdeM that may be utilized as immunization candidates against C. difficile. These spore proteins are immunogenic in mice and are able to protect mice against challenge with C. difficile UK1, a clinically-relevant 027/B1/NAP1 strain. These spore proteins are also able to afford high levels of protection against challenge with C. difficile 630Δerm in golden Syrian hamsters. This unprecedented study shows the vaccination potential of C. difficile spore exosporium proteins. PMID:26688279

  11. Cost-effectiveness in Clostridium difficile treatment decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Nuijten, Mark JC; Keller, Josbert J; Visser, Caroline E; Redekop, Ken; Claassen, Eric; Speelman, Peter; Pronk, Marja H

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To develop a framework for the clinical and health economic assessment for management of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). METHODS: CDI has vast economic consequences emphasizing the need for innovative and cost effective solutions, which were aim of this study. A guidance model was developed for coverage decisions and guideline development in CDI. The model included pharmacotherapy with oral metronidazole or oral vancomycin, which is the mainstay for pharmacological treatment of CDI and is recommended by most treatment guidelines. RESULTS: A design for a patient-based cost-effectiveness model was developed, which can be used to estimate the cost-effectiveness of current and future treatment strategies in CDI. Patient-based outcomes were extrapolated to the population by including factors like, e.g., person-to-person transmission, isolation precautions and closing and cleaning wards of hospitals. CONCLUSION: The proposed framework for a population-based CDI model may be used for clinical and health economic assessments of CDI guidelines and coverage decisions for emerging treatments for CDI. PMID:26601096

  12. Diversity and Evolution in the Genome of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Daniel R.; Elliott, Briony; Chang, Barbara J.; Perkins, Timothy T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of antimicrobial and health care-associated diarrhea in humans, presenting a significant burden to global health care systems. In the last 2 decades, PCR- and sequence-based techniques, particularly whole-genome sequencing (WGS), have significantly furthered our knowledge of the genetic diversity, evolution, epidemiology, and pathogenicity of this once enigmatic pathogen. C. difficile is taxonomically distinct from many other well-known clostridia, with a diverse population structure comprising hundreds of strain types spread across at least 6 phylogenetic clades. The C. difficile species is defined by a large diverse pangenome with extreme levels of evolutionary plasticity that has been shaped over long time periods by gene flux and recombination, often between divergent lineages. These evolutionary events are in response to environmental and anthropogenic activities and have led to the rapid emergence and worldwide dissemination of virulent clonal lineages. Moreover, genome analysis of large clinically relevant data sets has improved our understanding of CDI outbreaks, transmission, and recurrence. The epidemiology of CDI has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, and CDI may have a foodborne or zoonotic etiology. The WGS era promises to continue to redefine our view of this significant pathogen. PMID:26085550

  13. Clostridium difficile in Crete, Greece: epidemiology, microbiology and clinical disease.

    PubMed

    Samonis, G; Vardakas, K Z; Tansarli, G S; Dimopoulou, D; Papadimitriou, G; Kofteridis, D P; Maraki, S; Karanika, M; Falagas, M E

    2016-01-01

    We studied the epidemiology and microbiology of Clostridium difficile and the characteristics of patients with C. difficile infection (CDI) in Crete in three groups of hospitalized patients with diarrhoea: group 1 [positive culture and positive toxin by enzyme immunoassay (EIA)]; group 2 (positive culture, negative toxin); group 3 (negative culture, negative toxin). Patients in group 1 were designated as those with definitive CDI (20 patients for whom data was available) and matched with cases in group 2 (40 patients) and group 3 (40 patients). C. difficile grew from 6% (263/4379) of stool specimens; 14·4% of these had positive EIA, of which 3% were resistant to metronidazole. Three isolates had decreased vancomycin susceptibility. Patients in groups 1 and 2 received more antibiotics (P = 0·03) and had more infectious episodes (P = 0·03) than patients in group 3 prior to diarrhoea. Antibiotic administration for C. difficile did not differ between groups 1 and 2. Mortality was similar in all three groups (10%, 12·5% and 5%, P = 0·49). CDI frequency was low in the University Hospital of Crete and isolates were susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin.

  14. Discovery of Selective Inhibitors of the Clostridium difficile Dehydroquinate Dehydratase

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Wayne F.; Caffrey, Michael; Lavie, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    A vibrant and healthy gut flora is essential for preventing the proliferation of Clostridium difficile, a pathogenic bacterium that causes severe gastrointestinal symptoms. In fact, most C. difficile infections (CDIs) occur after broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment, which, by eradicating the commensal gut bacteria, allows its spores to proliferate. Hence, a C. difficile specific antibiotic that spares the gut flora would be highly beneficial in treating CDI. Towards this goal, we set out to discover small molecule inhibitors of the C. difficile enzyme dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD). DHQD is the 3rd of seven enzymes that compose the shikimate pathway, a metabolic pathway absent in humans, and is present in bacteria as two phylogenetically and mechanistically distinct types. Using a high-throughput screen we identified three compounds that inhibited the type I C. difficile DHQD but not the type II DHQD from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a highly represented commensal gut bacterial species. Kinetic analysis revealed that the compounds inhibit the C. difficile enzyme with Ki values ranging from 10 to 20 µM. Unexpectedly, kinetic and biophysical studies demonstrate that inhibitors also exhibit selectivity between type I DHQDs, inhibiting the C. difficile but not the highly homologous Salmonella enterica DHQD. Therefore, the three identified compounds seem to be promising lead compounds for the development of C. difficile specific antibiotics. PMID:24586713

  15. Quantifying Transmission of Clostridium difficile within and outside Healthcare Settings

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Margaret A.; Dubberke, Erik R.; Galvani, Alison P.; Townsend, Jeffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    To quantify the effect of hospital and community-based transmission and control measures on Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), we constructed a transmission model within and between hospital, community, and long-term care-facility settings. By parameterizing the model from national databases and calibrating it to C. difficile prevalence and CDI incidence, we found that hospitalized patients with CDI transmit C. difficile at a rate 15 (95% CI 7.2–32) times that of asymptomatic patients. Long-term care facility residents transmit at a rate of 27% (95% CI 13%–51%) that of hospitalized patients, and persons in the community at a rate of 0.1% (95% CI 0.062%–0.2%) that of hospitalized patients. Despite lower transmission rates for asymptomatic carriers and community sources, these transmission routes have a substantial effect on hospital-onset CDI because of the larger reservoir of hospitalized carriers and persons in the community. Asymptomatic carriers and community sources should be accounted for when designing and evaluating control interventions. PMID:26982504

  16. Diversity and Evolution in the Genome of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Knight, Daniel R; Elliott, Briony; Chang, Barbara J; Perkins, Timothy T; Riley, Thomas V

    2015-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of antimicrobial and health care-associated diarrhea in humans, presenting a significant burden to global health care systems. In the last 2 decades, PCR- and sequence-based techniques, particularly whole-genome sequencing (WGS), have significantly furthered our knowledge of the genetic diversity, evolution, epidemiology, and pathogenicity of this once enigmatic pathogen. C. difficile is taxonomically distinct from many other well-known clostridia, with a diverse population structure comprising hundreds of strain types spread across at least 6 phylogenetic clades. The C. difficile species is defined by a large diverse pangenome with extreme levels of evolutionary plasticity that has been shaped over long time periods by gene flux and recombination, often between divergent lineages. These evolutionary events are in response to environmental and anthropogenic activities and have led to the rapid emergence and worldwide dissemination of virulent clonal lineages. Moreover, genome analysis of large clinically relevant data sets has improved our understanding of CDI outbreaks, transmission, and recurrence. The epidemiology of CDI has changed dramatically over the last 15 years, and CDI may have a foodborne or zoonotic etiology. The WGS era promises to continue to redefine our view of this significant pathogen. PMID:26085550

  17. MLST analysis reveals a highly conserved core genome among poultry isolates of Clostridium septicum.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Anthony P; Rehberger, Thomas G

    2009-06-01

    Clostridium septicum is a highly virulent, anaerobic bacterium capable of establishing necrotizing tissue infections and forming heat resistant endospores. Disease is primarily facilitated by secretion of numerous toxic products including a lethal pore-forming cytolysin. Spontaneously occurring clostridial myonecrosis involving C. septicum has recently reemerged as a concern for many poultry producers. However, despite its increasing prevalence, the epidemiology of infection and population structure of C. septicum remains largely unknown. In this study a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) approach was utilized to examine evolutionary relationships within a diverse collection of C. septicum isolates recovered from poultry flocks experiencing episodes of gangrenous dermatitis. The 109 isolates examined represented 42 turkey flocks and 24 different flocks of broiler chickens as well as C. septicum type strain, ATCC 12464. Isolates were recovered predominantly from gangrenous lesions although isolates from livers, gastrointestinal tracts, spleens and blood were included. The loci analyzed were csa, the major lethal toxin produced by C. septicum, and the housekeeping genes gyrA, groEL, dnaK, recA, tpi, ddl, colA and glpK. These loci were included in part because of their previous use in MLST analysis of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile. Results indicated a high level of conservation present within these housekeeping gene fragments when compared to what has been previously reported for the aforementioned clostridia. Of the 5352 bp of sequence data examined for each isolate, 99.7% (5335/5352) was absolutely conserved among the 109 isolates. Only one of the ten unique sequence types, or allelic profiles, identified among the isolates was recovered from both turkeys and broiler chickens suggesting some host species preference. Phylogenetic analyses identified two unique clusters, or clonal complexes, among these poultry isolates which may have important

  18. Necrotizing soft tissue infections

    PubMed Central

    Urschel, J.

    1999-01-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections are a group of highly lethal infections that typically occur after trauma or surgery. Many individual infectious entities have been described, but they all have similar pathophysiologies, clinical features, and treatment approaches. The essentials of successful treatment include early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement, antibiotics, and supportive intensive treatment unit care. The two commonest pitfalls in management are failure of early diagnosis and inadequate surgical debridement. These life-threatening infections are often mistaken for cellulitis or innocent wound infections, and this is responsible for diagnostic delay. Tissue gas is not a universal finding in necrotizing soft tissue infections. This misconception also contributes to diagnostic errors. Incision and drainage is an inappropriate surgical strategy for necrotizing soft tissue infections; excisional debridement is needed. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may be useful, but it is not as important as aggressive surgical therapy. Despite advances in antibiotic therapy and intensive treatment unit medicine, the mortality of necrotizing soft tissue infections is still high. This article emphasizes common treatment principles for all of these infections, and reviews some of the more important individual necrotizing soft tissue infectious entities.


Keywords: fasciitis; gas gangrene; clostridium infections; streptococcal infections; necrosis; debridement; surgical infections; soft tissue infections PMID:10621873

  19. Secretion of clostridium cellulase by E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Ida Kuo

    1998-01-01

    A gene, encoding an endocellulase from a newly isolated mesophilic Clostridium strain IY-2 which can digest bamboo fibers, cellulose, rice straw, and sawdust, was isolated by shotgun cloning in an E. coli expression plasmid pLC2833. E. coli positive clones were selected based on their ability to hydrolyze milled bamboo fibers and cellulose present in agar plates. One clone contained a 2.8 kb DNA fragment that was responsible for cellulase activity. Western blot analyses indicated that the positive clone produced a secreted cellulase with a mass of about 58,000 daltons that was identical in size to the subunit of one of the three major Clostridium cellulases. The products of cellulose digestion by this cloned cellulase were cellotetraose and soluble higher polymers. The cloned DNA contained signal sequences capable of directing the secretion of heterologous proteins from an E. coli host. The invention describes a bioprocess for the treatment of cellulosic plant materials to produce cellular growth substrates and fermentation end products suitable for production of liquid fuels, solvents, and acids.

  20. Lack of enhanced effect of a chlorine dioxide-based cleaning regimen on environmental contamination with Clostridium difficile spores.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, S D; Patel, A; Tucker, D; French, G L

    2012-09-01

    Spores of Clostridium difficile may play a significant role in transmission of disease within the healthcare environment and are resistant to a variety of detergents and cleaning fluids. A range of environmental cleaning agents has recently become available, many of which claim to be sporicidal. We investigated the effect of changing to a chlorine dioxide-based cleaning regimen on C. difficile environmental contamination and patient infection rates. The prevalence of environmental contamination was unaffected with a rate of 8% (9/120) before and 8% (17/212) following the change. Rates of patient infection were also unchanged during these periods.

  1. Clinico-pathological findings of Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxaemia in goats and its hemolytic activity in different erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ali Nasir, A.; Younus, M.; Rashid, A.; Abdul Khaliq, S.; Khan, E.; Shah, S. H.; Aslam, A.; Ghumman, M. A.; Joiya, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted to study the effects of experimental Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxaemia in teddy goats. Clinical signs started to appear after 30 min of experimental infection like anorexia, diarrhea, dehydration, frothing and dyspnea. Gross lesions consisted of severe congestion in tissues of varying intensity with enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes while histological examination revealed edema of lungs, kidney, and lymph nodes and to some extent in brain along with hemorrhages in lungs and intestines. Clostridium perfringens type D carrying alpha and epsilon toxin genes were amplified with amplicon size about 247 bp and 665 bp, respectively. Human erythrocytes showed the highest hemolysis, 68%, followed by mice, 57%, against culture supernatants. The percentage of hemolysis was significantly higher at 37°C as compared to 25°C except for rabbit and dog. PMID:27175159

  2. Comparison of Three Commercial Methods for Rapid Detection of Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B from Fecal Specimens▿

    PubMed Central

    Alcalá, L.; Sánchez-Cambronero, L.; Catalán, M. P.; Sánchez-Somolinos, M.; Peláez, M. T.; Marín, M.; Bouza, E.

    2008-01-01

    Three rapid enzyme immunoassays (X/pect Clostridium difficile Toxin A/B test, Wampole Tox A/B Quik Chek, and ImmunoCard Toxins A&B) were compared for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection. Of the 367 stool specimens tested, 102 (27.8%) were positive for toxigenic C. difficile when a combination of direct cytotoxicity assay and cytotoxic culture was used as the gold standard. Sensitivity/specificity values were 49.0%/95.8%, 54.9%/95.5%, and 66.7%/95.1%, respectively. The median times to test five stool specimens were 28, 30, and 24 min, respectively. The ImmunoCard test was the quickest and most sensitive test of the three enzyme immunoassays evaluated. PMID:18784313

  3. Efficacy of decontaminants and disinfectants against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Prerna; Poxton, Ian R

    2011-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is a common nosocomial pathogen transmitted mainly via its spores. These spores can remain viable on contaminated surfaces for several months and are resistant to most commonly used cleaning agents. Thus, effective decontamination of the environment is essential in preventing the transmission of C. difficile in health-care establishments. However, this emphasis on decontamination must also be extended to laboratories due to risk of exposure of staff to potentially virulent strains. Though few cases of laboratory-acquired infection have been reported, the threat of infection by C. difficile in the laboratory is real. Our aim was to test the efficacy of four disinfectants, Actichlor, MicroSol 3+, TriGene Advance and Virkon, and one laboratory decontaminant, Decon 90, against vegetative cells and spores of C. difficile. Five strains were selected for the study: the three most commonly encountered epidemic strains in Scotland, PCR ribotypes 106, 001 and 027, and control strains 630 and VPI 10463. MICs were determined by agar dilution and broth microdilution. All the agents tested inhibited the growth of vegetative cells of the selected strains at concentrations below the recommended working concentrations. Additionally, their effect on spores was determined by exposing the spores of these strains to different concentrations of the agents for different periods of time. For some of the agents, an exposure of 10 min was required for sporicidal activity. Further, only Actichlor was able to bring about a 3 log(10) reduction in spore numbers under clean and dirty conditions. It was also the only agent that decontaminated different hard, non-porous surfaces artificially contaminated with C. difficile spores. However, this too required an exposure time of more than 2 min and up to 10 min. In conclusion, only the chlorine-releasing agent Actichlor was found to be suitable for the elimination of C. difficile spores from the environment, making it the agent

  4. Spore formation and toxin production in Clostridium difficile biofilms.

    PubMed

    Semenyuk, Ekaterina G; Laning, Michelle L; Foley, Jennifer; Johnston, Pehga F; Knight, Katherine L; Gerding, Dale N; Driks, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The ability to grow as a biofilm can facilitate survival of bacteria in the environment and promote infection. To better characterize biofilm formation in the pathogen Clostridium difficile, we established a colony biofilm culture method for this organism on a polycarbonate filter, and analyzed the matrix and the cells in biofilms from a variety of clinical isolates over several days of biofilm culture. We found that biofilms readily formed in all strains analyzed, and that spores were abundant within about 6 days. We also found that extracellular DNA (eDNA), polysaccharide and protein was readily detected in the matrix of all strains, including the major toxins A and/or B, in toxigenic strains. All the strains we analyzed formed spores. Apart from strains 630 and VPI10463, which sporulated in the biofilm at relatively low frequencies, the frequencies of biofilm sporulation varied between 46 and 65%, suggesting that variations in sporulation levels among strains is unlikely to be a major factor in variation in the severity of disease. Spores in biofilms also had reduced germination efficiency compared to spores obtained by a conventional sporulation protocol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that in 3 day-old biofilms, the outermost structure of the spore is a lightly staining coat. However, after 6 days, material that resembles cell debris in the matrix surrounds the spore, and darkly staining granules are closely associated with the spores surface. In 14 day-old biofilms, relatively few spores are surrounded by the apparent cell debris, and the surface-associated granules are present at higher density at the coat surface. Finally, we showed that biofilm cells possess 100-fold greater resistance to the antibiotic metronidazole then do cells cultured in liquid media. Taken together, our data suggest that C. difficile cells and spores in biofilms have specialized properties that may facilitate infection.

  5. In vivo lysogenization of a Clostridium difficile bacteriophage ΦCD119

    PubMed Central

    Govind, Revathi; Fralick, Joe A.; Rolfe, Rial D.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a nosocomial pathogen identified as the cause of antibiotic associated diarrhea and colitis. In this study, we have documented the lysogeny of a C. difficile bacteriophage in hamsters during C. difficile infection. The lysogens isolated from the hamsters were toxin typed and their phage integration site was confirmed by PCR. Through toxin ELISA it was found that the toxin production in the in vivo isolated lysogens was affected due to ΦCD119 lysogenization as in the case of in vitro isolated ΦCD119 lysogens. Together our findings indicate that a baceriophage can lysogenize its C. difficile host even during the infection process and highlights the importance of lysogeny of C. difficile phages as an evolutionary adaptation for survival. PMID:21664468

  6. Glucosylation Drives the Innate Inflammatory Response to Clostridium difficile Toxin A.

    PubMed

    Cowardin, Carrie A; Jackman, Brianna M; Noor, Zannatun; Burgess, Stacey L; Feig, Andrew L; Petri, William A

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major, life-threatening hospital-acquired pathogen that causes mild to severe colitis in infected individuals. The tissue destruction and inflammation which characterize C. difficile infection (CDI) are primarily due to the Rho-glucosylating toxins A and B. These toxins cause epithelial cell death and induce robust inflammatory signaling by activating the transcription factor NF-κB, leading to chemokine and cytokine secretion. The toxins also activate the inflammasome complex, which leads to secretion of the pyrogenic cytokine IL-1β. In this study, we utilized glucosylation-deficient toxin A to show that activation of the inflammasome by this toxin is dependent on Rho glucosylation, confirming similar findings reported for toxin B. We also demonstrated that tissue destruction and in vivo inflammatory cytokine production are critically dependent on the enzymatic activity of toxin A, suggesting that inhibiting toxin glucosyltransferase activity may be effective in combating this refractory disease.

  7. Alteration of the intestinal microbiome: fecal microbiota transplant and probiotics for Clostridium difficile and beyond.

    PubMed

    Vindigni, Stephen M; Broussard, Elizabeth K; Surawicz, Christina M

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is increasingly common with a high risk of recurrence despite antibiotic treatment. In cases of recurrent C. difficile infection, fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) is a highly effective treatment option promoting the restoration of normal gut microbiota. Furthermore, preliminary uncontrolled evidence demonstrates possible benefit of FMT in the management of some cases of inflammatory bowel disease and chronic constipation. In addition to presenting an overview of FMT, we discuss the role of probiotics, a more common approach to modifying the intestinal microbiome. Probiotics have been utilized broadly for many disease processes, including gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and allergic disease settings, although with limited and inconsistent results. Multiple potential areas for research are also identified.

  8. Novel Real-Time PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Differentiation of Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum in Clostridial Myonecrosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Halm, Anna; Wagner, Martin; Köfer, Josef; Hein, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence was designed for differentiation of blackleg-causing Clostridium chauvoei and Clostridium septicum, a phylogenetically closely related bacterium responsible for malignant edema. In order to exclude false-negative results, an internal amplification control was included in the assay. A set of three probes, one specific for C. chauvoei, one specific for C. septicum, and one specific for both species, permitted unequivocal detection of C. chauvoei in tests of 32 Clostridium sp. strains and 10 non-Clostridium strains. The assay proved to be sensitive, detecting one genome of C. chauvoei or C. septicum per PCR and 1.79 × 103 C. chauvoei cells/g artificially contaminated muscle tissue. In tests of 11 clinical specimens, the real-time PCR assay yielded the same results as an established conventional PCR method. PMID:20129968

  9. Review of Clostridium difficile-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    McFarland, L V; Stamm, W E

    1986-06-01

    Clostridium difficile has recently become recognized as an important nosocomial pathogen. This review summarizes what is known about the isolation of the organism, the spectrum of clinical disease, virulence factors, treatments, and methods of prevention. Risk factors for C. difficile disease are also discussed. The most important risk factor is the use of certain antibiotics (ampicillin, cephalosporins, and clindamycin). C. difficile is associated with 96% to 100% of cases of pseudomembraneous colitis, 60% to 75% of antibiotic-associated cases of colitis, and 11% to 33% of antibiotic-associated cases of diarrhea. Other risk factors include gastrointestinal manipulations, advanced age, female sex, inflammatory bowel disease, cancer chemotherapy, and renal disorders. Hospital outbreaks of C. difficile disease are examined. Data from nosocomial outbreaks support transmission of C. difficile by contaminated fomites and hand carriage by hospital personnel.

  10. Clostridium difficile: clinical disease and diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, F C; Owens, M; Crocker, I C

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a spectrum of disease ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis. Although the disease was first described in 1893, the etiologic agent was not isolated and identified until 1978. Since clinical and pathological features of C. difficile-associated disease are not easily distinguished from those of other gastrointestinal diseases, including ulcerative colitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, and Crohn's disease, diagnostic methods have relied on either isolation and identification of the microorganism or direct detection of bacterial antigens or toxins in stool specimens. The current review focuses on the sensitivity, specificity, and practical use of several diagnostic tests, including methods for culture of the etiologic agent, cellular cytotoxicity assays, latex agglutination tests, enzyme immunoassay systems, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, fluorescent-antibody assays, and polymerase chain reactions. PMID:8358706

  11. Biotechnological potential of Clostridium butyricum bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Szymanowska-Powałowska, Daria; Orczyk, Dorota; Leja, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    In response to demand from industry for microorganisms with auspicious biotechnological potential, a worldwide interest has developed in bacteria and fungi isolation. Microorganisms of interesting metabolic properties include non-pathogenic bacteria of the genus Clostridium, particularly C. acetobutylicum, C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum. A well-known property of C. butyricum is their ability to produce butyric acid, as well as effectively convert glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (38.2 g/L). A conversion rate of 0.66 mol 1,3-propanediol/mol of glycerol has been obtained. Results of the studies described in the present paper broaden our knowledge of characteristic features of C. butyricum specific isolates in terms of their phylogenetic affiliation, fermentation capacity and antibacterial properties. PMID:25477923

  12. Purification and characterization of Clostridium difficile toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Rolfe, R D; Finegold, S M

    1979-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains are a major cause of antimicrobial-associated ileocecitis in laboratory animals and pseudomembranous colitis in humans. C. difficile ATCC 9689 was cultivated in a synthetic medium to which 3% ultrafiltrated proteose peptone was added. Purification of the toxin from broth filtrate was accomplished through ultrafiltration (100,000 nominal-molecular-weight-limit membrane), precipitation with 75% (NH4)2SO4, and chromatographic separation using Bio-Gel A 5m followed by ion-exchange chromatography on a diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex A-25 column. The purified toxin displayed only one band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and approximately 170 pg was cytopathic for human amnion cells. The isolated toxin was neutralized by Clostridium sordelli antitoxin, heat labile (56 degrees C for 30 min), and inactivated at pH 4 and 9; it had an isoelectric point of 5.0, increased vascular permeability in rabbits, and caused ileocecitis in hamsters when injected intracecally. Treatment of the toxin with trypsin, chymotrypsin, pronase, amylase, or ethylmercurithiosalicylate caused inactivation, whereas lipase had no effect. By gel filtration, its molecular weight was estimated as 530,000. Upon reduction and denaturation, the toxin dissociated into 185,000- and 50,000-molecular-weight components, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Extensive dissociation yielded only the 50,000-molecular-weight component. The toxin appears to be protoplasmic and is released into the surrounding environment upon autolysis of the cells. Attempts to correlate specific enzymatic activity with the toxin have been unsuccessful. These studies will help delineate the role of C. difficile toxin in antimicrobial-associated colitis and diarrhea. Images PMID:478634

  13. Diagnostic testing for Clostridium difficile in Italian microbiological laboratories.

    PubMed

    Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Morandi, Matteo; Moro, Maria Luisa; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2016-02-01

    A laboratory diagnosis survey of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was performed in Italy in 2012-2013. Questionnaires from 278 healthcare settings from 15 regions of Italy were collected and analysed. Eighty seven percent of the laboratories declared to routinely perform CDI diagnosis, 99% of them only after the clinician's request. Among the 216 laboratories providing information on the size of the hospitals in which they were located, 65 had more than 500 beds (large hospitals), while 151 had less than 500 beds (small hospitals). The average percentage of positive tests for C. difficile toxins was 12.2%. Almost half of the laboratories (42%) used immunoenzymatic assay (EIA) for Tox A/B as a stand-alone method, while only 34% used an algorithm for CDI as indicated by the European guidelines. A low percentage of laboratories performed molecular assays or C. difficile culture, 25% and 29%, respectively. Most laboratories (161/278) declared to type C. difficile strains, the majority in collaboration with a reference laboratory. Among the 103 C. difficile clinical isolates collected during the study, 31 different PCR-ribotypes were identified. PCR-ribotype 356/607 (27%) was predominant, followed by 018 (12%). These two PCR-ribotypes show 87.5% of similarity in ribotyping profile. PCR-ribotypes 027 and 078 represented 8% and 4% of the strains, respectively. Four PCR-ribotypes (027, 033, 078 and 126) were positive for the binary toxin CDT. In particular, PCR-ribotype 033 produces only CDT, and it has recently been associated with symptomatic cases. The majority of strains were multidrug resistant. In particular, all strains PCR-ribotypes 356/607 and 018 were resistant to moxifloxacin, rifampicin, erythromycin and clindamycin. The results obtained highlight the need to raise awareness to the microbiological diagnosis of CDI among clinicians and to implement and harmonize diagnostic methods for CDI in Italian laboratories in the perspective of a future national

  14. Clostridium difficile carriage in healthy pregnant women in China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guang-yong; Li, Na; Chen, Yun-Bo; Lv, Tao; Shen, Ping; Gu, Si-Lan; Fang, Yun-Hui; Li, Lan-Juan

    2016-02-01

    Infection with Clostridium difficile has been shown to have particularly poor outcomes for pregnant women, including an increased risk of death. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence, genotypic distribution, and characterization of C. difficile strains isolated from pregnant women without diarrhea in China. As part of this study, 3.7% (37 out of 1009) of samples acquired from pregnant females tested positive for C. difficile. Of these positive samples, 27.0% (10) were toxigenic isolates containing both toxin A and toxin B genes (A+B+), 13.5% (5) of the variant strains contained the toxin B gene (A-B+) only, while the rest were non-toxigenic isolates (59.5%, 22 isolates). Among the non-pregnant women without diarrhea tested, 1.4% (9 of 651) contained toxigenic isolates (all of which were A+B+). Sixteen different sequence types (STs) were isolated during the course of this study. ST-37 (ribotype 017) and ST-54 (ribotype 012) were the most frequent toxigenic types observed in pregnant women. All strains showed susceptibility to the antibiotics metronidazole and vancomycin. The resistance rates of toxigenic C. difficile strains isolated from pregnant females to clindamycin, erythromycin, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and rifampicin were 20%, 46.7%, 13.6%, 46.7% and 13.3%, respectively. There was no significant difference between resistance rates of toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains with respect to their susceptibility to these antibiotics. However, when compared with the same data from non-pregnant women, toxigenic strains from pregnant women showed lower resistance rates to clindamycin (P < 0.05).

  15. Diagnostic trends in Clostridium difficile detection in Finnish microbiology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Könönen, Eija; Rasinperä, Marja; Virolainen, Anni; Mentula, Silja; Lyytikäinen, Outi

    2009-12-01

    Due to increased interest directed to Clostridium difficile-associated infections, a questionnaire survey of laboratory diagnostics of toxin-producing C. difficile was conducted in Finland in June 2006. Different aspects pertaining to C. difficile diagnosis, such as requests and criteria used for testing, methods used for its detection, yearly changes in diagnostics since 1996, and the total number of investigations positive for C. difficile in 2005, were asked in the questionnaire, which was sent to 32 clinical microbiology laboratories, including all hospital-affiliated and the relevant private clinical microbiology laboratories in Finland. The situation was updated by phone and email correspondence in September 2008. In June 2006, 28 (88%) laboratories responded to the questionnaire survey; 24 of them reported routinely testing requested stool specimens for C. difficile. Main laboratory methods included toxin detection (21/24; 88%) and/or anaerobic culture (19/24; 79%). In June 2006, 18 (86%) of the 21 laboratories detecting toxins directly from feces, from the isolate, or both used methods for both toxin A (TcdA) and B (TcdB), whereas only one laboratory did so in 1996. By September 2008, all of the 23 laboratories performing diagnostics for C. difficile used methods for both TcdA and TcdB. In 2006, the number of specimens processed per 100,000 population varied remarkably between different hospital districts. In conclusion, culturing C. difficile is common and there has been a favorable shift in toxin detection practice in Finnish clinical microbiology laboratories. However, the variability in diagnostic activity reported in 2006 creates a challenge for national monitoring of the epidemiology of C. difficile and related diseases.

  16. Intratumoral injection of Clostridium novyi-NT spores induces antitumor responses

    PubMed Central

    Rusk, Anthony W.; Tung, David; Miller, Maria; Roix, Jeffrey; Khanna, Kristen V.; Murthy, Ravi; Benjamin, Robert S.; Helgason, Thorunn; Szvalb, Ariel D.; Bird, Justin E.; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Zhang, Halle H.; Qiao, Yuan; Karim, Baktiar; McDaniel, Jennifer; Elpiner, Amanda; Sahora, Alexandra; Lachowicz, Joshua; Phillips, Brenda; Turner, Avenelle; Klein, Mary K.; Post, Gerald; Diaz, Luis A.; Riggins, Gregory J.; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Bettegowda, Chetan; Huso, David L.; Varterasian, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Species of Clostridium bacteria are notable for their ability to lyse tumor cells growing in hypoxic environments. We show that an attenuated strain of Clostridium novyi (C. novyi-NT) induces a microscopically precise, tumor-localized response in a rat orthotopic brain tumor model after intratumoral injection. It is well known, however, that experimental models often do not reliably predict the responses of human patients to therapeutic agents. We therefore used naturally occurring canine tumors as a translational bridge to human trials. Canine tumors are more like those of humans because they occur in animals with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds, are of host origin, and are due to spontaneous rather than engineered mutations. We found that intratumoral injection of C. novyi-NT spores was well tolerated in companion dogs bearing spontaneous solid tumors, with the most common toxicities being the expected symptoms associated with bacterial infections. Objective responses were observed in 6 of 16 dogs (37.5%), with three complete and three partial responses. On the basis of these encouraging results, we treated a human patient who had an advanced leiomyosarcoma with an intratumoral injection of C. novyi-NT spores. This treatment reduced the tumor within and surrounding the bone. Together, these results show that C. novyi-NT can precisely eradicate neoplastic tissues and suggest that further clinical trials of this agent in selected patients are warranted. PMID:25122639

  17. Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B: Insights into Pathogenic Properties and Extraintestinal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Di Bella, Stefano; Ascenzi, Paolo; Siarakas, Steven; Petrosillo, Nicola; di Masi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has significant clinical impact especially on the elderly and/or immunocompromised patients. The pathogenicity of Clostridium difficile is mainly mediated by two exotoxins: toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB). These toxins primarily disrupt the cytoskeletal structure and the tight junctions of target cells causing cell rounding and ultimately cell death. Detectable C. difficile toxemia is strongly associated with fulminant disease. However, besides the well-known intestinal damage, recent animal and in vitro studies have suggested a more far-reaching role for these toxins activity including cardiac, renal, and neurologic impairment. The creation of C. difficile strains with mutations in the genes encoding toxin A and B indicate that toxin B plays a major role in overall CDI pathogenesis. Novel insights, such as the role of a regulator protein (TcdE) on toxin production and binding interactions between albumin and C. difficile toxins, have recently been discovered and will be described. Our review focuses on the toxin-mediated pathogenic processes of CDI with an emphasis on recent studies. PMID:27153087

  18. Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B: Insights into Pathogenic Properties and Extraintestinal Effects.

    PubMed

    Di Bella, Stefano; Ascenzi, Paolo; Siarakas, Steven; Petrosillo, Nicola; di Masi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has significant clinical impact especially on the elderly and/or immunocompromised patients. The pathogenicity of Clostridium difficile is mainly mediated by two exotoxins: toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB). These toxins primarily disrupt the cytoskeletal structure and the tight junctions of target cells causing cell rounding and ultimately cell death. Detectable C. difficile toxemia is strongly associated with fulminant disease. However, besides the well-known intestinal damage, recent animal and in vitro studies have suggested a more far-reaching role for these toxins activity including cardiac, renal, and neurologic impairment. The creation of C. difficile strains with mutations in the genes encoding toxin A and B indicate that toxin B plays a major role in overall CDI pathogenesis. Novel insights, such as the role of a regulator protein (TcdE) on toxin production and binding interactions between albumin and C. difficile toxins, have recently been discovered and will be described. Our review focuses on the toxin-mediated pathogenic processes of CDI with an emphasis on recent studies. PMID:27153087

  19. The Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Predisposes for the Development of Clostridium perfringens-Induced Necrotic Enteritis in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Antonissen, Gunther; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Timbermont, Leen; Verlinden, Marc; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (P<0.001). DON significantly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance in duodenal segments (P<0.001) and decreased duodenal villus height (P = 0.014) indicating intestinal barrier disruption and intestinal epithelial damage, respectively. This may lead to an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and decreased absorption of dietary proteins. Protein analysis of duodenal content indeed showed that DON contamination resulted in a significant increase in total protein concentration (P = 0.023). Furthermore, DON had no effect on in vitro growth, alpha toxin production and netB toxin transcription of Clostridium perfringens. In conclusion, feed contamination with DON at concentrations below the European maximum guidance level of 5,000 µg/kg feed, is a predisposing factor for the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens. PMID:25268498

  20. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol predisposes for the development of Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Antonissen, Gunther; Van Immerseel, Filip; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Timbermont, Leen; Verlinden, Marc; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (P<0.001). DON significantly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance in duodenal segments (P<0.001) and decreased duodenal villus height (P = 0.014) indicating intestinal barrier disruption and intestinal epithelial damage, respectively. This may lead to an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and decreased absorption of dietary proteins. Protein analysis of duodenal content indeed showed that DON contamination resulted in a significant increase in total protein concentration (P = 0.023). Furthermore, DON had no effect on in vitro growth, alpha toxin production and netB toxin transcription of Clostridium perfringens. In conclusion, feed contamination with DON at concentrations below the European maximum guidance level of 5,000 µg/kg feed, is a predisposing factor for the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens.

  1. Clostridium difficile ribotypes in Austria: a multicenter, hospital-based survey.

    PubMed

    Indra, Alexander; Schmid, Daniela; Huhulescu, Steliana; Simons, Erica; Hell, Markus; Stickler, Karl; Allerberger, Franz

    2015-08-01

    A prospective, noninterventional survey was conducted among Clostridium difficile positive patients identified in the time period of July until October 2012 in 18 hospitals distributed across all nine Austrian provinces. Participating hospitals were asked to send stool samples or isolates from ten successive patients with C.difficile infection to the National Clostridium difficile Reference Laboratory at the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety for PCR-ribotyping and in vitro susceptibility testing. A total of 171 eligible patients were identified, including 73 patients with toxin-positive stool specimens and 98 patients from which C. difficile isolates were provided. Of the 159 patients with known age, 127 (74.3%) were 65 years or older, the median age was 76 years (range: 9-97 years), and the male to female ratio 2.2. Among these patients, 73% had health care-associated and 20% community-acquired C. difficile infection (indeterminable 7%). The all-cause, 30-day mortality was 8.8% (15/171). Stool samples yielded 46 different PCR-ribotypes, of which ribotypes 027 (20%), 014 (15.8%), 053 (10.5%), 078 (5.3%), and 002 (4.7%) were the five most prevalent. Ribotype 027 was found only in the provinces Vienna, Burgenland, and Lower Austria. Severe outcome of C. difficile infection was found to be associated with ribotype 053 (prevalence ratio: 3.04; 95% CI: 1.24, 7.44), not with the so-called hypervirulent ribotypes 027 and 078. All 027 and 053 isolates exhibited in vitro resistance against moxifloxacin. Fluoroquinolone use in the health care setting must be considered as a factor favoring the spread of these fluoroquinolone resistant C. difficile clones.

  2. Clostridium kogasensis sp. nov., a novel member of the genus Clostridium, isolated from soil under a corroded gas pipeline.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yeseul; Kang, Seok-Seong; Paek, Jayoung; Jin, Tae Eun; Song, Hong Seok; Kim, Hongik; Park, Hee-Moon; Chang, Young-Hyo

    2016-06-01

    Two bacterial strains, YHK0403(T) and YHK0508, isolated from soil under a corroded gas pipe line, were revealed as Gram-negative, obligately anaerobic, spore-forming and mesophilic bacteria. The cells were rod-shaped and motile by means of peritrichous flagella. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the isolates were members of the genus Clostridium and were the most closely related to Clostridium scatologenes KCTC 5588(T) (95.8% sequence similarity), followed by Clostridium magnum KCTC 15177(T) (95.8%), Clostridium drakei KCTC 5440(T) (95.7%) and Clostridium tyrobutyricum KCTC 5387(T) (94.9%). The G + C contents of the isolates were 29.6 mol%. Peptidoglycan in the cell wall was of the A1γ type with meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major polar lipid was diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), and other minor lipids were revealed as phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), two unknown glycolipids (GL1 and GL2), an unknown aminoglycolipid (NGL), two unknown aminophospholipids (PN1 and PN2) and four unknown phospholipids (PL1 to PL4). Predominant fatty acids were C16:0 and C16:1cis9 DMA. The major end products from glucose fermentation were identified as butyrate (12.2 mmol) and acetate (9.8 mmol). Collectively, the results from a wide range of phenotypic tests, chemotaxonomic tests, and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two isolates represent novel species of the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium kogasensis sp. nov. (type strain, YHK0403(T) = KCTC 15258(T) = JCM 18719(T)) is proposed. PMID:26899448

  3. Phylogeny of the ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, and Clostridium aminophilum sp. nov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paster, B. J.; Russell, J. B.; Yang, C. M.; Chow, J. M.; Woese, C. R.; Tanner, R.

    1993-01-01

    In previous studies, gram-positive bacteria which grew rapidly with peptides or an amino acid as the sole energy source were isolated from bovine rumina. Three isolates, strains C, FT (T = type strain), and SR, were considered to be ecologically important since they produced up to 20-fold more ammonia than other ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria. On the basis of phenotypic criteria, the taxonomic position of these new isolates was uncertain. In this study, the 16S rRNA sequences of these isolates and related bacteria were determined to establish the phylogenetic positions of the organisms. The sequences of strains C, FT, and SR and reference strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, Clostridium coccoides, Clostridium aminovalericum, Acetomaculum ruminis, Clostridium leptum, Clostridium lituseburense, Clostridium acidiurici, and Clostridium barkeri were determined by using a modified Sanger dideoxy chain termination method. Strain C, a large coccus purported to belong to the genus Peptostreptococcus, was closely related to P. anaerobius, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.6%. Strain SR, a heat-resistant, short, rod-shaped organism, was closely related to C. sticklandii, with a level of sequence similarity of 99.9%. However, strain FT, a heat-resistant, pleomorphic, rod-shaped organism, was only distantly related to some clostridial species and P. anaerobius. On the basis of the sequence data, it was clear that strain FT warranted designation as a separate species. The closest known relative of strain FT was C. coccoides (level of similarity, only 90.6%). Additional strains that are phenotypically similar to strain FT were isolated in this study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  4. [Bacteriologic and serologic diagnosis of enteral infections].

    PubMed

    Ringelmann, R

    1988-09-01

    Infections of the gastrointestinal tract still are numerous, ranging on the second place after infections of the respiratory tract. Some of them show quite severe or prolonged course. In contrast to other infections, especially those of the urinary tract, laboratory diagnostic of enteritis is only scarcely ordered. During the last ten years new methods and knowledge of etiologic germs like Campylobacter, Yersinia, various types of E. coli, Clostridium difficile, Rotavirus, Adenovirus, Giardia, Blastomyces and Cryptosporidia have been accumulated. A better etiologic diagnosis of these infections should enable the clinician to start a more precise and therefore more effective therapy.

  5. Gas gangrene caused by clostridium perfringens involving the liver, spleen, and heart in a man 20 years after an orthotopic liver transplant: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kitterer, Daniel; Braun, Niko; Jehs, Margit C; Schulte, Bernhard; Alscher, M Dominik; Latus, Joerg

    2014-04-01

    Despite advances in immunosuppression and liver transplant in the past, mortality and morbidity caused by infections remain major problems. We present a 71-year-old man who was admitted to our internal intensive care unit with septicemia. Upon admission, he had poorly localized epigastric pain and fever of 2 days ' duration. Twenty years earlier, he had undergone an orthotopic liver transplant. Testing revealed a high C-reactive protein level, elevated liver enzymes, and an acute kidney injury. A computer tomography scan showed 2 circular, non--rim-enhancing, totally emphysematous intrahepatic lesions. Additionally, gas could be seen in the portal veins mainly, as well as in the biliary system, in the right auricle, and the splenic veins. To the best of our knowledge, he showed no malignant lesion or predisposing trauma. Empirically, treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was begun, and the patient was transferred to the operating suite. When surgery began, blood cultures revealed the presence of gram-positive bacilli, which were identified as Clostridium perfringens. Seven hours after the surgery, the patient developed asystole and died. In septic patients presenting with severe hemolysis, Clostridium perfringens infection must be considered in the absence of a malignant lesion or a predisposing trauma; a previous episode of gastroenteritis might be a predisposing trauma by impairing the barrier of the intestinal flora, leading to Clostridium perfringens infection.

  6. Ethanol and acetate production by Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium autoethanogenum using resting cells.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Jacqueline L; Chinn, Mari S; Grunden, Amy M

    2009-04-01

    Combined gasification and fermentation technologies can potentially produce biofuels from renewable biomass. Gasification generates synthesis gas consisting primarily of CO, CO(2), H(2), N(2), with smaller amounts of CH(4), NO(x), O(2), C(2) compounds, ash and tars. Several anaerobic bacteria species can ferment bottled mixtures of pure synthesis gas constituents. However, there are challenges to maintaining culture viability of synthesis gas exposed cells. This study was designed to enhance culture stability and improve ethanol-to-acetate ratios using resting (non-growing) cells in synthesis gas fermentation. Resting cell states were induced in autotrophic Clostridium ljungdahlii cultures with minimal ethanol and acetate production due to low metabolic activity compared to growing cell production levels of 5.2 and 40.1 mM of ethanol and acetate. Clostridium autoethanogenum cultures were not induced into true resting states but did show improvement in total ethanol production (from 5.1 mM in growing cultures to 9.4 in one nitrogen-limited medium) as well as increased shifts in ethanol-to-acetate production ratios.

  7. Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium difficile Detoxify Methylglyoxal by a Novel Mechanism Involving Glycerol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Liyanage, Hemachandra; Kashket, Shelby; Young, Michael; Kashket, Eva R.

    2001-01-01

    In contrast to gram-negative bacteria, little is known about the mechanisms by which gram-positive bacteria degrade the toxic metabolic intermediate methylglyoxal (MG). Clostridium beijerinckii BR54, a Tn1545 insertion mutant of the NCIMB 8052 strain, formed cultures that contained significantly more (free) MG than wild-type cultures. Moreover, BR54 was more sensitive to growth inhibition by added MG than the wild type, suggesting that it has a reduced ability to degrade MG. The single copy of Tn1545 in this strain lies just downstream from gldA, encoding glycerol dehydrogenase. As a result of antisense RNA production, cell extracts of BR54 possess significantly less glycerol dehydrogenase activity than wild-type cell extracts (H. Liyanage, M. Young, and E. R. Kashket, J. Mol. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 2:87–93, 2000). Inactivation of gldA in both C. beijerinckii and Clostridium difficile gave rise to pinpoint colonies that could not be subcultured, indicating that glycerol dehydrogenase performs an essential function in both organisms. We propose that this role is detoxification of MG. To our knowledge, this is the first report of targeted gene disruption in the C. difficile chromosome. PMID:11319074

  8. Routine detection of Clostridium difficile in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Collins, Deirdre A; Riley, Thomas V

    2016-02-01

    Despite increasing infection rates, Clostridium difficile is not currently routinely tested for in all diarrhoeal faecal specimens in Australia. In July 2014, all diarrhoeal specimens submitted to a diagnostic laboratory in Western Australia were surveyed to determine the true prevalence of C. difficile. In total, 1010 diarrhoeal non-duplicate faecal specimens were received during the month. Testing for C. difficile was requested, or the criteria for a C. difficile investigation were met, for 678 specimens which were investigated by PCR for the tcdB gene using the BD MAX platform, followed by toxigenic culture on PCR-positive samples. The remaining 332 specimens, with either no C. difficile test request or the criteria for a C. difficile investigation were not met, were examined by toxigenic culture. All isolates were PCR ribotyped. C. difficile was the most commonly detected diarrhoeal pathogen among all specimens. The overall prevalence of C. difficile in all 1010 specimens was 6.4%; 7.2% in the routinely tested group, and 4.8% in the non-requested group. The proportion of non-requested positive detections among all cases was 24.6%. Community-onset infection was present in 50.8% of all cases. The median age of all CDI cases was 60.0 years and the age range in CDI patients in the routine group was 0.6-96.6 years (median 72.7 years), compared to 0.2-2.3 years (median 0.8 years) in the non-requested group. The most common ribotype (RT) found was RT 014/020 (34.1% in the routine group, 43.8% in the non-requested group), followed by RTs 002, 056, 005 and 018. While the routine testing group and the non-requested group differed markedly in age and patient classification, C. difficile was the most common cause of diarrhoea in hospitals and the community in Western Australia. The significance of finding C. difficile in the community paediatric population requires further study.

  9. Identification of molybdoproteins in Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, S M; Mortenson, L E

    1985-01-01

    Cells of Clostridium pasteurianum whose N source is switched from NH3 to N2 accumulate large amounts of molybdenum beginning 1.5 h before the detection of nitrogenase activity. Anaerobic multiphasic gel electrophoresis and anion-exchange chromatography were used to identify the molybdoproteins and molybdenum-containing components present in N2-fixing cells. In addition to molybdate, six distinct 99Mo-labeled species were detected, i.e., a membrane fragment, the MoFe protein of nitrogenase, formate dehydrogenase, a Mo "binding-storage" protein, a 30-kilodalton molybdoprotein, and a low-molecular-weight molybdenum species. Of these, the MoFe protein, formate dehydrogenase, and the Mo binding-storage protein were present in more than one zone because of complex formation with other proteins, partial denaturation, and variation in the amount of Mo bound to the protein, respectively. In addition to the six proteins, a soluble "free" Mo cofactor in the cytosol was detected by showing that it reconstituted nitrate reductase activity in crude extracts of the Neurospora crassa mutant nit-1. Images PMID:3857223

  10. Parameters affecting solvent production by Clostridium pasteurianum

    SciTech Connect

    Dabrock, B.; Bahl, H.; Gottschalk, G. )

    1992-04-01

    The effect of pH, growth rate, phosphate and iron limitation, carbon monoxide, and carbon source on product formation by Clostridium pasteurianum was determined. Under phosphate limitation, glucose was fermented almost exclusively to acetate and butyrate independently of the pH and growth rate. Iron limitation caused lactate production (38 mol/100 mol) from glucose in batch and continuous culture. At 15% (vol/vol) carbon monoxide in the atmosphere, glucose was fermented to ethanol (24 mol/100 mol), lactate (32 mol/100 mol), and butanol (36 mol/100 mol) in addition to the usual products, acetate (38 mol/100 mol) and butyrate (17 mol/100 mol). During glycerol fermentation, a completely different product pattern was found. In continuous culture under phosphate limitation, acetate and butyrate were produced only in trace amounts, whereas ethanol (30 mol/10 mol), butanol (18 mol/100 mol), and 1,3-propanediol (18 mol/100 mol) were the major products. Under iron limitation, the ratio of these products could be changed in favor of 1,3-propanediol (34 mol/100 mol). In addition, lactate was produced in significant amounts (25 mol/100 mol). The tolerance of C. pasteurianum to glycerol was remarkably high; growth was not inhibited by glycerol concentrations up to 17% (wt/vol). Increasing glycerol concentrations favored the production of 1,3-propanediol.

  11. Regulation of protease production in Clostridium sporogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, C; Macfarlane, G T

    1990-01-01

    The physiological and nutritional factors that regulate protease synthesis in Clostridium sporogenes C25 were studied in batch and continuous cultures. Formation of extracellular proteases occurred at the end of active growth and during the stationary phase in batch cultures. Protease production was inversely related to growth rate in glucose-excess and glucose-limited chemostats over the range D = 0.05 to 0.70 h-1. In pulse experiments, glucose, ammonia, phosphate, and some amino acids (tryptophan, proline, tyrosine, and isoleucine) strongly repressed protease synthesis. This repression was not relieved by addition of 4 mM cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Protease formation was markedly inhibited by 4 mM ATP and ADP, but GTP and GDP had little effect on the process. It is concluded that protease production by C. sporogenes is strongly influenced by the amount of energy available to the cells, with the highest levels of protease synthesis occurring under energy-limiting conditions. PMID:2268158

  12. Elimination of formate production in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Rydzak, Thomas; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-07-11

    We study the ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly degrade cellulose and ferment resulting hydrolysis products into ethanol makes it a promising platform organism for cellulosic biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Currently, however, ethanol yield are far below theoretical maximum due to branched product pathways that divert carbon and electrons towards formate, H2, lactate, acetate, and secreted amino acids. To redirect carbon and electron flux away from formate, pyruvate:formate lyase (pfl) and respective PFL-activating enzyme were deleted. Formate production in the resulting Δpfl strain was eliminated and acetate production decreased by 50% on both complex and defined medium. Growth ratemore » of Δpfl decreased by 2.9-fold on defined medium and diauxic growth was observed on complex medium. Supplementation of defined medium with 2 mM formate restored Δpfl growth rate to 80% of the parent strain. Finally, we discuss the role of pfl in metabolic engineering strategies and C1 metabolism.« less

  13. Clostridium botulinum in cattle and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Miia; Myllykoski, Jan; Sivelä, Seppo; Korkeala, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    The use of plastic-wrapped and nonacidified silage as cattle feed has led to an increasing number of botulism outbreaks due to Clostridium botulinum Groups I-III in dairy cattle. The involvement of Groups I and II organisms in cattle botulism has raised concern of human botulism risk associated with the consumption of dairy products. Multiplication of C. botulinum in silage and in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle with botulism has been reported, thus contamination of the farm environment and raw milk, and further transmission through the dairy chain, are possible. The standard milk pasteurization treatment does not eliminate spores, and the intrinsic factors of many dairy products allow botulinal growth and toxin production. Although rare, several large botulism outbreaks due to both commercial and home-prepared dairy products have been reported. Factors explaining these outbreaks include most importantly temperature abuse, but also unsafe formulation, inadequate fermentation, insufficient thermal processing, post-process contamination, and lack of adequate quality control for adjunct ingredients were involved. The small number of outbreaks is probably explained by a low incidence of spores in milk, the presence of competitive bacteria in pasteurized milk and other dairy products, and growth-inhibitory combinations of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in cultured and processed dairy products.

  14. Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotypes in Calves, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Stämpfli, Henry R.; Duffield, Todd; Peregrine, Andrew S.; Trotz-Williams, Lise A.; Arroyo, Luis G.; Brazier, Jon S.; Weese, J. Scott

    2006-01-01

    We investigated Clostridium difficile in calves and the similarity between bovine and human C. difficile PCR ribotypes by conducting a case-control study of calves from 102 dairy farms in Canada. Fecal samples from 144 calves with diarrhea and 134 control calves were cultured for C. difficile and tested with an ELISA for C. difficile toxins A and B. C. difficile was isolated from 31 of 278 calves: 11 (7.6%) of 144 with diarrhea and 20 (14.9%) of 134 controls (p = 0.009). Toxins were detected in calf feces from 58 (56.8%) of 102 farms, 57 (39.6%) of 144 calves with diarrhea, and 28 (20.9%) of 134 controls (p = 0.0002). PCR ribotyping of 31 isolates showed 8 distinct patterns; 7 have been identified in humans, 2 of which have been associated with outbreaks of severe disease (PCR types 017 and 027). C. difficile may be associated with calf diarrhea, and cattle may be reservoirs of C. difficile for humans. PMID:17283624

  15. Perfringolysin O: The Underrated Clostridium perfringens Toxin?

    PubMed Central

    Verherstraeten, Stefanie; Goossens, Evy; Valgaeren, Bonnie; Pardon, Bart; Timbermont, Leen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Deprez, Piet; Wade, Kristin R.; Tweten, Rodney; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens expresses multiple toxins that promote disease development in both humans and animals. One such toxin is perfringolysin O (PFO, classically referred to as θ toxin), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC). PFO is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that recognizes and binds membranes via cholesterol. Membrane-bound monomers undergo structural changes that culminate in the formation of an oligomerized prepore complex on the membrane surface. The prepore then undergoes conversion into the bilayer-spanning pore measuring approximately 250–300 Å in diameter. PFO is expressed in nearly all identified C. perfringens strains and harbors interesting traits that suggest a potential undefined role for PFO in disease development. Research has demonstrated a role for PFO in gas gangrene progression and bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis, but there is limited data available to determine if PFO also functions in additional disease presentations caused by C. perfringens. This review summarizes the known structural and functional characteristics of PFO, while highlighting recent insights into the potential contributions of PFO to disease pathogenesis. PMID:26008232

  16. Effects of butanol on Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, L K; Ellefson, W L

    1985-01-01

    The internal pH of Clostridium acetobutylicum was determined at various stages during the growth of the organism. Even in the presence of significant quantities of acetic, butyric, and lactic acids, an internal pH of 6.2 was maintained. Experiments using N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide indicated that a functioning H+-ATPase is necessary for internal pH control. Butanol, one of the end products of the fermentation, had numerous harmful effects on C. acetobutylicum. At a concentration high enough to inhibit growth, butanol destroyed the ability of the cell to maintain internal pH, lowered the intracellular level of ATP, and inhibited glucose uptake. Experiments done at two different external pH values suggested that the butanol-mediated decrease in ATP concentration was independent of the drop in internal pH. Glucose uptake was not affected by arsenate, suggesting that uptake was not ATP dependent. The effects of butanol on C. acetobutylicum are complex, inhibiting several interrelated membrane processes. PMID:2868690

  17. Clostridium botulinum in cattle and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Miia; Myllykoski, Jan; Sivelä, Seppo; Korkeala, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    The use of plastic-wrapped and nonacidified silage as cattle feed has led to an increasing number of botulism outbreaks due to Clostridium botulinum Groups I-III in dairy cattle. The involvement of Groups I and II organisms in cattle botulism has raised concern of human botulism risk associated with the consumption of dairy products. Multiplication of C. botulinum in silage and in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle with botulism has been reported, thus contamination of the farm environment and raw milk, and further transmission through the dairy chain, are possible. The standard milk pasteurization treatment does not eliminate spores, and the intrinsic factors of many dairy products allow botulinal growth and toxin production. Although rare, several large botulism outbreaks due to both commercial and home-prepared dairy products have been reported. Factors explaining these outbreaks include most importantly temperature abuse, but also unsafe formulation, inadequate fermentation, insufficient thermal processing, post-process contamination, and lack of adequate quality control for adjunct ingredients were involved. The small number of outbreaks is probably explained by a low incidence of spores in milk, the presence of competitive bacteria in pasteurized milk and other dairy products, and growth-inhibitory combinations of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in cultured and processed dairy products. PMID:20301016

  18. Precipitation of cadium by clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, D.P.; Lundie, L.L. Jr. )

    1993-01-01

    Cadmium is a major anthropogenic pollutant. Because of the long-term toxicity of cadmium in humans and other organisms, the study of the resistance mechanisms of microorganisms to cadmium and the role they may play in removal of the metal from contaminated waters is important. This study evaluates the tolerance of Clostridium thermoaceticum to cadmium and studies the mechanism employed by the organism. C. thermoaceticum tolerates up to at least 2mM cadmium by producing sulfide, which forms an insoluable precipitate with the metal. The mechanism of cadmium precipitation appears to utilize the reduction of sulfate to sulfide or the enzymatic cleaving of the phosphate from glycerophospate to mediate resistance. C. thermaceticum requires a source of energy for CdS formation. The electron microscopic evidence in this study points to an energy-dependent deposition of cadmium at distinct locations in the cell wall. Once the cadmium enters the cell, it is likely that cadmium is detoxified quickly since neither acetogenesis nor growth is affected. 51 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Botulism Due to Clostridium baratii Type F Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Sydney M.; Sturgeon, Joan; Dassey, David E.

    2002-01-01

    Botulism results from consumption of preformed toxin or in vivo toxin elaboration in wounds or intestine. Of U.S. food-borne botulism cases since 1950, the majority were due to toxin A, but a significant number of suspect cases were never confirmed by culture or toxin detection. We report here a possible case of food-borne botulism attributed to toxin F production by a Clostridium baratii organism isolated from food consumed by the patient. The isolation of a toxin-producing Clostridium species other than Clostridium botulinum from food and stool requires deviation from the usual laboratory protocols, which may account for the lack of complete laboratory confirmation of clinically diagnosed cases. PMID:12037104

  20. Promoters and proteins from Clostridium thermocellum and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Wu, J. H. David; Newcomb, Michael

    2012-11-13

    The present invention relates to an inducible and a high expression nucleic acid promoter isolated from Clostridium thermocellum. These promoters are useful for directing expression of a protein or polypeptide encoded by a nucleic acid molecule operably associated with the nucleic acid promoters. The present invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs including the C. thermocellum promoters, and expression vectors and hosts containing such nucleic acid constructs. The present invention also relates to protein isolated from Clostridium thermocellum, including a repressor protein. The present invention also provides methods of using the isolated promoters and proteins from Clostridium thermocellum, including methods for directing inducible in vitro and in vivo expression of a protein or polypeptide in a host, and methods of producing ethanol from a cellulosic biomass.