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Sample records for cloud particle microphysics

  1. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, S.; Zubler, E. M.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-01-01

    An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented in the regional weather forecast and climate model COSMO. The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snow flakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snow flakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. However, the processes not only impact the total aerosol number and mass, but also the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble accumulation mode and generating coarse mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases the cloud droplet number concentration with possible implications for the ice

  2. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, S.; Zubler, E. M.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-08-01

    An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented into COSMO-Model, the regional weather forecast and climate model of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO). The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed us to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snowflakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snowflakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. Thereby, the processes impact the total aerosol number and mass and additionally alter the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble Aitken and accumulation mode and generating coarse-mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases

  3. Microphysics of Pyrocumulonimbus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The intense heat from forest fires can generate explosive deep convective cloud systems that inject pollutants to high altitudes. Both satellite and high-altitude aircraft measurements have documented cases in which these pyrocumulonimbus clouds inject large amounts of smoke well into the stratosphere (Fromm and Servranckx 2003; Jost et al. 2004). This smoke can remain in the stratosphere, be transported large distances, and affect lower stratospheric chemistry. In addition recent in situ measurements in pyrocumulus updrafts have shown that the high concentrations of smoke particles have significant impacts on cloud microphysical properties. Very high droplet number densities result in delayed precipitation and may enhance lightning (Andrew et al. 2004). Presumably, the smoke particles will also lead to changes in the properties of anvil cirrus produces by the deep convection, with resulting influences on cloud radiative forcing. In situ sampling near the tops of mature pyrocumulonimbus is difficult due to the high altitude and violence of the storms. In this study, we use large eddy simulations (LES) with size-resolved microphysics to elucidate physical processes in pyrocumulonimbus clouds.

  4. Retrievals of Aerosol and Cloud Particle Microphysics Using Polarization and Depolarization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The recent availability of theoretical techniques for computing single and multiple scattering of light by realistic polydispersions of spherical and nonspherical particles and the strong dependence of the Stokes scattering matrix on particle size, shape, and refractive index make polarization and depolarization measurements a powerful particle characterization tool. In this presentation I will describe recent applications of photopolarimetric and lidar depolarization measurements to remote sensing characterization of tropospheric aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), and contrails. The talk will include (1) a short theoretical overview of the effects of particle microphysics on particle single-scattering characteristics; (2) the use of multi-angle multi-spectral photopolarimetry to retrieve the optical thickness, size distribution, refractive index, and number concentration of tropospheric aerosols over the ocean surface; and (3) the application of the T-matrix method to constraining the PSC and contrail particle microphysics using multi-spectral measurements of lidar backscatter and depolarization.

  5. Retrieval of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Microphysical Properties from Lidar Measurements: Dependence on Particle Shape Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Yang, P.; McGee, T. J.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A retrieval algorithm has been developed for the microphysical analysis of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) optical data obtained using lidar instrumentation. The parameterization scheme of the PSC microphysical properties allows for coexistence of up to three different particle types with size-dependent shapes. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method has been used to calculate optical properties of particles with maximum dimensions equal to or less than 2 mu m and with shapes that can be considered more representative of PSCs on the scale of individual crystals than the commonly assumed spheroids. Specifically. these are irregular and hexagonal crystals. Selection of the optical parameters that are input to the inversion algorithm is based on a potential data set such as that gathered by two of the lidars on board the NASA DC-8 during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 0 p (SAGE) Ozone Loss Validation experiment (SOLVE) campaign in winter 1999/2000: the Airborne Raman Ozone and Temperature Lidar (AROTEL) and the NASA Langley Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). The 0 microphysical retrieval algorithm has been applied to study how particle shape assumptions affect the inversion of lidar data measured in leewave PSCs. The model simulations show that under the assumption of spheroidal particle shapes, PSC surface and volume density are systematically smaller than the FDTD-based values by, respectively, approximately 10-30% and approximately 5-23%.

  6. Simulation of particle size distributions in Polar Mesospheric Clouds from Microphysical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, G. E.; Merkel, A.; Bardeen, C.; Rusch, D. W.; Lumpe, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    The size distribution of ice particles is perhaps the most important observable aspect of microphysical processes in Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) formation and evolution. A conventional technique to derive such information is from optical observation of scattering, either passive solar scattering from photometric or spectrometric techniques, or active backscattering by lidar. We present simulated size distributions from two state-of-the-art models using CARMA sectional microphysics: WACCM/CARMA, in which CARMA is interactively coupled with WACCM3 (Bardeen et al, 2009), and stand-alone CARMA forced by WACCM3 meteorology (Merkel et al, this meeting). Both models provide well-resolved size distributions of ice particles as a function of height, location and time for realistic high-latitude summertime conditions. In this paper we present calculations of the UV scattered brightness at multiple scattering angles as viewed by the AIM Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) satellite experiment. These simulations are then considered discretely-sampled “data” for the scattering phase function, which are inverted using a technique (Lumpe et al, this meeting) to retrieve particle size information. We employ a T-matrix scattering code which applies to a wide range of non-sphericity of the ice particles, using the conventional idealized prolate/oblate spheroidal shape. This end-to-end test of the relatively new scattering phase function technique provides insight into both the retrieval accuracy and the information content in passive remote sensing of PMC.

  7. Retrieval of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Microphysical Properties From Lidar Measurements: Dependence on Particle Shape Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, Susanne; Reichardt, Jens; Yang, Ping; McGee, Thomas J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of particle sizes and number densities of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) is highly important, because they are critical parameters for the modeling of the ozone chemistry of the stratosphere. In situ measurements of PSC particles are rare. the main instrument for the accumulation of PSC data are lidar systems. Therefore the derivation of some microphysical properties of PSCS from the optical parameters measured by lidars would be highly beneficial for ozone research. Inversion of lidar data obtained in the presence of PSCs formed from crystalline particles type 11 and the various nitric acid tri Ydrrate (NAT) types cannot be easily accomplished, because a suitable scattering theory for small faceted crystals has not been readily available tip to now. As a consequence, the T-matrix method is commonly used for the interpretation of these PSC lidar data. Here the assumption is made that the optical properties of an ensemble of spheroids resemble those of crystalline PSCs, and microphysical properties of the PSC are inferred from the optical signatures of the PSC at two or more wavelengths. The problem with the T-matrix approach is that the assumption of spheroidal instead of faceted particles can lead to dramatically wrong results: Usually cloud particle properties are deduced from analysis of lidar profiles of backscatter ratio and depolarization ratio. The particle contribution to the backscatter ratio is given by the product of the particle number density and the backscattering cross section. The latter is proportional to the value of the particle's scattering phase function at 180 degrees scattering angle. At 180 degrees however, the phase functions of rough, faceted crystals and of spheroids with same maximum dimension differ by a factor of 6. From this it follows that for a PSC consisting of faceted crystals, the particle number density is underestimated by roughly the same factor if spheroidal particles are unrealistically assumed. We are currently

  8. Correlations among the Optical Properties of Cirrus-Cloud Particles: Microphysical Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Hess, M.; McGee, T. J.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Cirrus measurements obtained with a ground-based polarization Raman lidar at 67.9 deg N in January 1997 reveal a strong positive correlation between the particle optical properties, specifically depolarization ratio delta(sub par) and extinction- to-backscatter (lidar) ratio S, for delta(sub par) less than approximately 40%, and an anti-correlation for delta(sub par) greater than approximately 40%. Over the length of the measurements the particle properties vary systematically. Initially, delta (sub par) approximately equals 60% and S approximately equals 10sr are observed. Then, with decreasing delta(sub par), S first increases to approximately 27sr (delta(sub par) approximately equals 40%) before decreasing to values around 10sr again (delta(sub par) approximately equals 20%). The analysis of lidar humidity and radiosonde temperature data shows that the measured optical properties stem from scattering by dry solid ice particles, while scattering by supercooled droplets, or by wetted or subliming ice particles can be excluded. For the microphysical interpretation of the lidar measurements, ray-tracing computations of particle scattering properties have been used. The comparison with the theoretical data suggests that the observed cirrus data can be interpreted in terms of size, shape, and, under the assumption that the lidar measurements of consecutive cloud segments can be mapped on the temporal development of a single cloud parcel moving along its trajectory, growth of the cirrus particles: Near the cloud top in the early stage of cirrus development, light scattering by nearly isometric particles that have the optical characteristics of hexagonal columns (short, column-like particles) is dominant. Over time the ice particles grow, and as the cloud base height extends to lower altitudes characterized by warmer temperatures they become morphologically diverse. For large S and depolarization values of approximately 40%, the scattering contributions of column- and

  9. Retrieving fall streaks signatures in radar data to study microphysical changes of particle populations within a mixed phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfitzenmaier, Lukas; Dufournet, Yann; Unal, Christine; Russchenberg, Herman

    2016-04-01

    Within mixed-phase clouds the interaction of ice crystals with super-cooled liquid water leads to an enhanced growth of the ice particles. The growth of ice particles from mixed-phase interactions is an important process for precipitation formation in the mid-latitudes. However, such a process is still not clearly understood, nowerdays. To understand the ice particle growth within these clouds the microphysical changes of a single particle population falling through the cloud have to be analysed. Using the 3 beam configuration of the Transportable Atmospheric Radar (TARA) we retrieve the full 3-D Doppler velocity vector. This retrieved dynamical information is used to retrieve the path of a single particle population through the measured cloud system - the so called fall streak - so that microphysical changes along those path can be studied. A way to study changes in ice particle microphysics is to analyse radar Doppler spectra. Microphysical changes along the path of a population of ice particles through a mixed-phase cloud can be correlated to changes in the retrieved radar spectrograms. The instrumental synergy setup during the ACCEPT campaign (Analysis of the Composition of Clouds with Extended Polarization Techniques campaign), fall 2014, Cabauw the Netherlands, allows to detect liquid water layers within mixed-phase clouds. Therefore, identified changes within the retrieved spectrograms can be linked to the presence of super-cooled liquid layers. In this work we will explain the backtracking methodology and its use for the interpretation of velocity spectra. The application of this new methodology for ice particle growth process studies within mixed-phase clouds will be discussed.

  10. Impacts of aerosol particles on the microphysical and radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds over the southeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Anderson, J. R.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R. C.; Wood, R.; Saide, P.; Spak, S.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2013-03-01

    there. Thus, larger scale forcings that impact cloud macrophysical properties, as well as enhanced aerosol particles, are important in determining cloud droplet size and cloud albedo. Differences in the size distribution of droplet residual particles and ambient aerosol particles were observed. By progressively excluding small droplets from the CVI sample, we were able to show that the larger drops, some of which may initiate drizzle, contain the largest aerosol particles. Geometric mean diameters of droplet residual particles were larger than those of the below-cloud and above cloud distributions. However, a wide range of particle sizes can act as droplet nuclei in these stratocumulus clouds. A detailed LES microphysical model was used to show that this can occur without invoking differences in chemical composition of cloud-nucleating particles.

  11. Microphysics of Exoplanet Clouds and Hazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Benneke, Björn; Knutson, Heather; Yung, Yuk

    2016-01-01

    Clouds and hazes are ubiquitous in the atmospheres of exoplanets. However, as most of these planets have temperatures between 600 and 2000 K, their clouds and hazes are likely composed of exotic condensates such as silicates, metals, and salts. We currently lack a satisfactory understanding of the microphysical processes that govern the distribution of these clouds and hazes, thus creating a gulf between the cloud properties retrieved from observations and the cloud composition predictions from condensation equilibrium models. In this work we present a 1D microphysical cloud model that calculates, from first principles, the rates of condensation, evaporation, coagulation, and vertical transport of chemically mixed cloud and haze particles in warm and hot exoplanet atmospheres. The model outputs the equilibrium number density of cloud particles with altitude, the particle size distribution, and the chemical makeup of the cloud particles as a function of altitude and particle mass. The model aims to (1) explain the observed variability in "cloudiness" of individual exoplanets, (2) assess whether the proposed cloud materials are capable of forming the observed particle distributions, and (3) examine the role clouds have in the transport of (cloud-forming) heavy elements in exoplanet atmospheres.

  12. Microphysics of Exoplanet Clouds and Hazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Benneke, Björn; Knutson, Heather A.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2015-11-01

    Clouds and hazes are ubiquitous in the atmospheres of exoplanets. However, as most of these planets have temperatures between 600 and 2000 K, their clouds and hazes are likely composed of exotic condensates such as silicates, metals, and salts. We currently lack a satisfactory understanding of the microphysical processes that govern the distribution of these clouds and hazes, thus creating a gulf between the cloud properties retrieved from observations and the cloud composition predictions from condensation equilibrium models. In this work we present a 1D microphysical cloud model that calculates, from first principles, the rates of condensation, evaporation, coagulation, and vertical transport of chemically mixed cloud and haze particles in warm and hot exoplanet atmospheres. The model outputs the equilibrium number density of cloud particles with altitude, the particle size distribution, and the chemical makeup of the cloud particles as a function of altitude and particle mass. The model aims to (1) explain the observed variability in “cloudiness” of individual exoplanets, (2) assess whether the proposed cloud materials are capable of forming the observed particle distributions, and (3) examine the role clouds have in the transport of (cloud-forming) heavy elements in exoplanet atmospheres.

  13. Microphysics of Exoplanet Clouds and Hazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Benneke, Björn; Knutson, Heather; Yung, Yuk

    2015-12-01

    Clouds and hazes are ubiquitous in the atmospheres of exoplanets. However, as most of these planets have temperatures between 600 and 2000 K, their clouds and hazes are likely composed of exotic condensates such as silicates, metals, and salts. We currently lack a satisfactory understanding of the microphysical processes that govern the distribution of these clouds and hazes, thus creating a gulf between the cloud properties retrieved from observations and the cloud composition predictions from condensation equilibrium models. In this work we present a 1D microphysical cloud model that calculates, from first principles, the rates of condensation, evaporation, coagulation, and vertical transport of chemically mixed cloud and haze particles in warm and hot exoplanet atmospheres. The model outputs the equilibrium number density of cloud particles with altitude, the particle size distribution, and the chemical makeup of the cloud particles as a function of altitude and particle mass. The model aims to (1) explain the observed variability in “cloudiness” of individual exoplanets, (2) assess whether the proposed cloud materials are capable of forming the observed particle distributions, and (3) examine the role clouds have in the transport of (cloud-forming) heavy elements in exoplanet atmospheres.

  14. Impacts of aerosol particles on the microphysical and radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds over the Southeast Pacific ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Anderson, J. R.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R. C.; Wood, R.; Saide, P.; Spak, S.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2012-08-01

    distribution of droplet residual particles and ambient aerosol particles were observed. By progressively excluding small droplets from the CVI sample, we were able to show that the larger drops, which initiate drizzle, contain the largest aerosol particles. Geometric mean diameters of droplet residual particles were larger than those of the below-cloud and above cloud distributions. However, a wide range of particle sizes can act as droplet nuclei in these stratocumulus clouds. A detailed LES microphysical model was used to show that this can occur without invoking differences in chemical composition of cloud-nucleating particles.

  15. Cloud Microphysics and Absorption Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Vertical distributions of particle size and habit were developed from in-situ data collected from three midlatitude cirrus field campaigns (FIRE-1, FIRE-2, and ARM IOP). These new midlatitude microphysical models were used to develop new cirrus scattering models at a number of wavelengths appropriate for use with the MODIS imager (Nasiri et al. 2002). This was the first successful collaborative effort between all the investigators on this proposal. Recent efforts have extended the midlatitude cirrus cloud analyses to tropical cirrus, using in-situ data collected during the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Kwajalein field campaign in 1999. We note that there are critical aspects to the work: a) Improvement in computing the scattering and radiative properties of ice crystals; b) Requirement for copious amounts of cirrus in-situ data, presented in terms of both particle size and habit distributions; c) Development of cirrus microphysical and optical models for various satellite, aircraft, and ground-based instruments based on the theoretical calculations and in-situ measurements; d) Application to satellite data.

  16. Analysis of Cirrus Cloud Microphysical Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poellot, Michael R.; Grainger, Cedric A.

    1999-01-01

    The First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Regional Experiment (FIRE) program has the goal of improving our capabilities to understand, model and detect the properties of climatically-important clouds. This is being undertaken through a three-pronged effort of modeling, long-term observations and short-term intensive field studies. Through examination of satellite and other data it is apparent that stratus and cirrus cloud types have the greatest impact on climate due to their radiative effects and ubiquitous nature. As a result, the FIRE program has developed two paths of investigation, each having its own subset of research objectives and measurement programs. The work conducted under this grant was directed toward furthering our understanding of cirrus cloud systems. While it is known that cirrus are climatically important, the magnitude and even sign of the impact is unclear. Cirrus clouds affect the transfer of radiation according to their physical depth and location in the atmosphere and their microphysical composition. However, significant uncertainties still exist in how cirrus clouds form and how they are maintained, what their physical properties are and how they can be parameterized in numerical models. Better remote sensing techniques for monitoring cirrus cloud systems and improved modeling of radiative transfer through ice particles are also needed. A critical element in resolving these issues is a better understanding of cirrus cloud microphysical properties and how they vary. The focus of the research to be conducted under this grant was th data collected in situ by the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft. The goals of this research were to add to the body of knowledge of cirrus cloud microphysics, particularly at the small end of the size spectrum; and analyze the spatial variation of cirrus clouds.

  17. Chemistry and microphysics of polar stratospheric clouds and cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Zondlo, M A; Hudson, P K; Prenni, A J; Tolbert, M A

    2000-01-01

    Ice particles found within polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and upper tropospheric cirrus clouds can dramatically impact the chemistry and climate of the Earth's atmosphere. The formation of PSCs and the subsequent chemical reactions that occur on their surfaces are key components of the massive ozone hole observed each spring over Antarctica. Cirrus clouds also provide surfaces for heterogeneous reactions and significantly modify the Earth's climate by changing the visible and infrared radiation fluxes. Although the role of ice particles in climate and chemistry is well recognized, the exact mechanisms of cloud formation are still unknown, and thus it is difficult to predict how anthropogenic activities will change cloud abundances in the future. This article focuses on the nucleation, chemistry, and microphysical properties of ice particles composing PSCs and cirrus clouds. A general overview of the current state of research is presented along with some unresolved issues facing scientists in the future.

  18. Cloud Processed CCN Affect Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R., Jr.; Tabor, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the bimodality/monomodality of CCN spectra (Hudson et al. 2015) exert opposite effects on cloud microphysics in two aircraft field projects. The figure shows two examples, droplet concentration, Nc, and drizzle liquid water content, Ld, against classification of CCN spectral modality. Low ratings go to balanced separated bimodal spectra, high ratings go to single mode spectra, strictly monomodal 8. Intermediate ratings go merged modes, e.g., one mode a shoulder of another. Bimodality is caused by mass or hygroscopicity increases that go only to CCN that made activated cloud droplets. In the Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) small cumuli with lower Nc, greater droplet mean diameters, MD, effective radii, re, spectral widths, σ, cloud liquid water contents, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal (lower modal ratings) below cloud CCN spectra whereas clouds with higher Nc, smaller MD, re, σ, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN (higher modal ratings). In polluted stratus clouds of the MArine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) clouds that had greater Nc, and smaller MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal CCN spectra whereas clouds with lower Nc, and greater MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN. These relationships are opposite because the dominant ICE-T cloud processing was coalescence whereas chemical transformations (e.g., SO2 to SO4) were dominant in MASE. Coalescence reduces Nc and thus also CCN concentrations (NCCN) when droplets evaporate. In subsequent clouds the reduced competition increases MD and σ, which further enhance coalescence and drizzle. Chemical transformations do not change Nc but added sulfate enhances droplet and CCN solubility. Thus, lower critical supersaturation (S) CCN can produce more cloud droplets in subsequent cloud cycles, especially for the low W and effective S of stratus. The increased competition reduces MD, re, and σ, which inhibit coalescence and thus reduce drizzle

  19. Cloud Microphysical Characteristics over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Wang, D.; Zhai, G.

    2012-04-01

    A survey of the existing literature on in-situ measurements of cloud-precipitation microphysical properties was undertaken. Then, a database was established to contain microphysical properties for raindrop, cloud droplet, fog, ice nuclei (IN), snow crystal, as well as the relationship between radar reflectivity (Z) and rainfall rate (R). The time span of the in-situ probe measurements ranges from 1960 to 2008 over East Asia and from 1940 to 2008 in the other regions (which is defined as those include the Americas, Europe, and Australia). From the datasets, dividing the data coverage into East Asia and the other regions, several parameters are presented, including mean concentration of hydrometeor particles, liquid water content (LWC), as well as functional fit parameters of particles size distributions. The main properties of hydrometeor particles were presented, and the functional fitted parameters of particle size distributions over East Asia have been compared with those over the other regions. Note that the all measurements taken in other regions do not mean that all cloud systems in the other regions are similar. Our main method of the present study is to put all measurement results taken in different regions over the world together. If the cloud systems over East Asia have their own characteristics, it will be grouped together. Thus, the difference between East Asia and other regions is readily discernible. The results show that there are differences, sometimes even large differences, between East Asia and the other regions in terms of these cloud-precipitation microphysical characteristics. More specific conclusions are as follows: (1) Both exponential- and gamma-size distributions are used to fit RSD of rains originating from stratiform clouds. Average intercept N0 of exponential-size distribution over East Asia is one order of magnitude smaller than that over the other regions, and average slope λ is slight smaller. As for gamma-size distributions, the

  20. Evidence of Mineral Dust Altering Cloud Microphysics and Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Qilong; Li, Rui; Lin, Bing; Joseph, Everette; Wang, Shuyu; Hu, Yongxiang; Morris, Vernon; Chang, F.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-platform and multi-sensor observations are employed to investigate the impact of mineral dust on cloud microphysical and precipitation processes in mesoscale convective systems. It is clearly evident that for a given convection strength,small hydrometeors were more prevalent in the stratiform rain regions with dust than in those regions that were dust free. Evidence of abundant cloud ice particles in the dust sector, particularly at altitudes where heterogeneous nucleation process of mineral dust prevails, further supports the observed changes of precipitation. The consequences of the microphysical effects of the dust aerosols were to shift the precipitation size spectrum from heavy precipitation to light precipitation and ultimately suppressing precipitation.

  1. Cloud microphysics - Analysis of the clouds of Earth, Venus, Mars, and Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    The probable microphysics of a cloud is deduced by a described method which requires information on cloud particle mean size, composition, number density, and atmospheric structure, but does not require any additional information. The analysis is applied to the sulfuric acid clouds of Venus, the water ice and dust clouds of Mars, and the ammonia-water and ammonia ice clouds of Jupiter. The Venus cloud layer is found to have some resemblance to smog and haze layers on earth. The water ice clouds on Mars resemble tenuous nonprecipitating cirrus clouds on earth. Precipitation, vertical distribution of gases, and vertical transport of heat in the clouds on Jupiter are considered.

  2. Cloud Susceptibilities to Ice Nuclei: Microphysical Effects and Dynamical Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukert, Marco; Hoose, Corinna

    2015-04-01

    The impact of aerosols on cloud properties is currently not well established. This is largely attributed to the interdependencies of aerosols and cloud microphysical processes, among which primary ice formation contributes to considerable uncertainties. Although it is known that in a large range of thermodynamic conditions aerosol particles are required to initiate ice formation, identifying and characterizing the effect of specific ice nuclei is among current scientific efforts. Here we attempt to quantify the change of cloud properties with varying aerosol background concentrations. We adapt the concept of susceptibilities for mixed-phase and ice clouds, defining the susceptibility as the derivation of a macrophysical quantity with respect to ice nucleating aerosol concentrations. A focus of our study is the use of different model approaches in order to identify the distinct contributions of both cloud microphysics and cloud-dynamical feedbacks to the overall susceptibility. The classical method is the direct comparison of two independent model runs, where the whole range of microphysical and cloud-dynamical feedbacks contributes to different cloud properties in a perturbed simulation. Our alternative method relies on a single simulation which incorporates multiple executions of the microphysical scheme within the same time step, each "perturbed microphysics" scheme with varying aerosol concentrations and an additional set of cloud particle tracers. Since in the latter case the model dynamics are held constant and only microphysical feedbacks contribute to the properties of perturbed clouds, we can distinguish between the pure microphysical effect and the dynamical enhancement or suppression. For a persistent Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud layer which is expected to be particularly sensitive to feedback cycles, we show an enhancement of the cloud susceptibility to ice nucleating particles by dynamics of around 50%, but a decay of the enhancement with time

  3. Are Climate Models Sensitive to the Microphysics of Clouds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, R. C.

    2001-12-01

    Parameterization transplant experiments with general circulation models (GCMs) demonstrate that details of cloud-radiation interactions can have large potential effects on the simulated climate. However, in order to determine which aspects of sub-grid physics are important and which parameterizations are most realistic, detailed comparisons with observations are essential. One useful diagnostic tool for making such comparisons is the single-column model (SCM), which consists of one isolated column of an atmospheric GCM. When an SCM is forced with observed horizontal advection terms, the parameterizations within the SCM produce time-dependent vertical profiles of fields which can be compared directly with measurements. In the case of cloud microphysical schemes, these fields include cloud altitude, cloud amount, liquid and ice content, particle size spectra, and radiative fluxes at the surface and the top of the atmosphere. Comparisons with data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program show conclusively that prognostic cloud algorithms with detailed microphysics are far more realistic than simpler diagnostic approaches. These results also demonstrate the critical need for more and better in situ observations of cloud microphysical variables.

  4. Microphysical Timescales in Clouds and their Application in Cloud-Resolving Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Xiping; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    Independent prognostic variables in cloud-resolving modeling are chosen on the basis of the analysis of microphysical timescales in clouds versus a time step for numerical integration. Two of them are the moist entropy and the total mixing ratio of airborne water with no contributions from precipitating particles. As a result, temperature can be diagnosed easily from those prognostic variables, and cloud microphysics be separated (or modularized) from moist thermodynamics. Numerical comparison experiments show that those prognostic variables can work well while a large time step (e.g., 10 s) is used for numerical integration.

  5. Ice cloud microphysical properties in tropical Pacific regions derived from CloudSat and CALIPSO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Naoya; Hayasaka, Tadahiro; Okamoto, Hajime

    2017-02-01

    We revealed the difference in tropical ice cloud microphysical properties between the western Pacific (WP) and the eastern Pacific (EP), based on satellite retrievals. Vertical profile of effective particle radius of ice cloud (re) was estimated from active sensors on board CloudSat and CALIPSO satellites. In this study, we focused only on ice cloud which is defined as clouds with the cloud top temperature lower than 0°C. To investigate the relationship between cloud optical properties and cloud vertical structures, these ice clouds were classified into five types based on cloud optical thickness values. Compared the vertical profile of re in WP with that in the EP, re around the freezing level within convective cloud in EP slightly larger than that in WP. This analysis also shows that re of optically thick cloud is larger than that of optically thin cloud. The difference in re may be caused by differences in moisture convergence, upward motion, aerosols.

  6. Aerosol and Cloud Microphysical Characteristics of Rifts and Gradients in Maritime Stratocumulus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharon, Tarah M.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Minnis, Patrick; Khaiyer, Mandana M.; Van Reken, Timothy; Seinfeld, John; Flagan, Rick

    2008-01-01

    A cloud rift is characterized as a large-scale, persistent area of broken, low reflectivity stratocumulus clouds usually surrounded by a solid deck of stratocumulus. A rift observed off the coast of Monterey Bay, California on 16 July 1999 was studied to compare the aerosol and cloud microphysical properties in the rift with those of the surrounding solid stratus deck. Variables measured from an instrumented aircraft included temperature, water vapor, and cloud liquid water. These measurements characterized the thermodynamic properties of the solid deck and rift areas. Microphysical measurements made included aerosol, cloud drop and drizzle drop concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The microphysical characteristics in a solid stratus deck differ substantially from those of a broken, cellular rift where cloud droplet concentrations are a factor of 2 lower than those in the solid cloud. Further, CCN concentrations were found to be about 3 times greater in the solid cloud area compared with those in the rift and aerosol concentrations showed a similar difference as well. Although drizzle was observed near cloud top in parts of the solid stratus cloud, the largest drizzle rates were associated with the broken clouds within the rift area. In addition to marked differences in particle concentrations, evidence of a mesoscale circulation near the solid cloud rift boundary is presented. This mesoscale circulation provides a mechanism for maintaining a rift, but further study is required to understand the initiation of a rift and the conditions that may cause it to fill.

  7. Microphysical Characteristics of Tropical Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grainger, Cedric A.; Anderson, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the analysis of data collected by the University of North Dakota Citation II measurement platform during three TRMM Field measurement campaigns. The Citation II made cloud measurements during TEFLUN B in Florida, the LBA program in Brazil, and KWAJEX in Kwajalein. The work performed can be divided into two parts. The first part consisted of reformatting the Citation data into a form more easily used to compare to the satellite information. The second part consisted of examination of the cloud data in order to characterize the properties of the tropical clouds. The reformatting of the Citation data was quite labor intensive and, due to the fact that the aircraft was involved in three of the field campaigns, it required a substantial number of person-hours to complete. Much of the analysis done on the second part was done in conjunction with the thesis work of Nicholas Anderson, then a graduate student at the University of North Dakota.

  8. Depolarization Lidar Determination Of Cloud-Base Microphysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D. P.; Klein Baltink, H.; Henzing, J. S.; de Roode, S.; Siebesma, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    The links between multiple-scattering induced depolarization and cloud microphysical properties (e.g. cloud particle number density, effective radius, water content) have long been recognised. Previous efforts to use depolarization information in a quantitative manner to retrieve cloud microphysical cloud properties have also been undertaken but with limited scope and, arguably, success. In this work we present a retrieval procedure applicable to liquid stratus clouds with (quasi-)linear LWC profiles and (quasi-)constant number density profiles in the cloud-base region. This set of assumptions allows us to employ a fast and robust inversion procedure based on a lookup-table approach applied to extensive lidar Monte-Carlo multiple-scattering calculations. An example validation case is presented where the results of the inversion procedure are compared with simultaneous cloud radar observations. In non-drizzling conditions it was found, in general, that the lidar- only inversion results can be used to predict the radar reflectivity within the radar calibration uncertainty (2-3 dBZ). Results of a comparison between ground-based aerosol number concentration and lidar-derived cloud base number considerations are also presented. The observed relationship between the two quantities is seen to be consistent with the results of previous studies based on aircraft-based in situ measurements.

  9. Microphysics and Southern Ocean Cloud Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Daniel T.

    Global climate models (GCMs) change their cloud properties in the Southern Ocean (SO) with warming in a qualitatively consistent fashion. Cloud albedo increases in the mid-latitudes and cloud fraction decreases in the subtropics. This creates a distinctive 'dipole' structure in the SW cloud feedback. However, the shape of the dipole varies from model to model. In this thesis we discuss the microphysical mechanisms underlying the SW cloud feedback over the mid-latitude SO. We will focus on the negative lobe of the dipole. The negative SW cloud feedback in the mid-latitudes is created by transitions from ice to liquid in models. If ice transitions to liquid in mixed-phase clouds the cloud albedo increases because ice crystals are larger than liquid droplets and therefore more reflective for a constant mass of water. Decreases in precipitation efficiency further enhance this effect by decreasing sinks of cloud water. This transition is dependent on the mixed-phase cloud parameterization. Parameterizations vary wildly between models and GCMs disagree by up to 35 K on the temperature where ice and liquid are equally prevalent. This results in a wide spread in the model predictions of the increase in liquid water path (LWP, where the path is the vertically integrated mass of water) with warming that drives the negative optical depth cloud feedback. It is found that this disagreement also results in a wide array of climate mean-states as models that create liquid at lower temperatures have a higher mean-state LWP, lower ice water path (IWP), and higher condensed (ice and liquid) water path (CWP). This presents a problem in climate models. GCMs need to have a reasonable planetary albedo in their climate mean-state. We show evidence that GCMs have tuned cloud fraction to compensate for the variation in mid-latitude cloud albedo driven by the mixed-phase cloud parameterization. This tuning results in mid-latitude clouds that are both too few and too bright as well as a

  10. Cloud microphysical relationships in California marine stratus

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.G.; Svensson, G.

    1995-12-01

    Cloud microphysical measurements off the southern California coast are presented and compared with in situ airborne measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. Large-scale variations in cloud droplet concentrations were due to CCN variations, some medium-scale variations may be a result of the conversion of droplets to drops by coalescence, while small-scale variations were due to different proportions of the CCN spectra being activated because of variations in updraft velocity at cloud base. This latter internal mixing process produces an inverse relationship between droplet concentration and mean size and an increase in droplet spectral width with mean droplet size. Drizzle drop concentrations are strongly associated with lower droplet concentrations, larger droplets, and greater droplet spectral width. 29 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. The Influence of Microphysical Cloud Parameterization on Microwave Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail M.; Gasiewski, Albin J.; Wang, James R.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The microphysical parameterization of clouds and rain-cells plays a central role in atmospheric forward radiative transfer models used in calculating passive microwave brightness temperatures. The absorption and scattering properties of a hydrometeor-laden atmosphere are governed by particle phase, size distribution, aggregate density., shape, and dielectric constant. This study identifies the sensitivity of brightness temperatures with respect to the microphysical cloud parameterization. Cloud parameterizations for wideband (6-410 GHz observations of baseline brightness temperatures were studied for four evolutionary stages of an oceanic convective storm using a five-phase hydrometeor model in a planar-stratified scattering-based radiative transfer model. Five other microphysical cloud parameterizations were compared to the baseline calculations to evaluate brightness temperature sensitivity to gross changes in the hydrometeor size distributions and the ice-air-water ratios in the frozen or partly frozen phase. The comparison shows that, enlarging the rain drop size or adding water to the partly Frozen hydrometeor mix warms brightness temperatures by up to .55 K at 6 GHz. The cooling signature caused by ice scattering intensifies with increasing ice concentrations and at higher frequencies. An additional comparison to measured Convection and Moisture LA Experiment (CAMEX 3) brightness temperatures shows that in general all but, two parameterizations produce calculated T(sub B)'s that fall within the observed clear-air minima and maxima. The exceptions are for parameterizations that, enhance the scattering characteristics of frozen hydrometeors.

  12. Meteorological and aerosol effects on marine cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Corrigan, C. E.; Roberts, G. C.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Bertram, A. K.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Lin, J. J.; Nenes, A.; Wang, Z.; Wonaschütz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K. J.; Jonsson, H.; Toom, D.; Macdonald, A. M.; Leaitch, W. R.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation, cloud droplet distributions, and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets studies provided measurements in six case studies of cloud thermodynamic properties, initial particle number distribution and composition, and cloud drop distribution. In this study, we use simulations from a chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce observed cloud droplet distributions of the case studies. Four cases had subadiabatic lapse rates, resulting in fewer activated droplets, lower liquid water content, and higher cloud base height than an adiabatic lapse rate. A weighted ensemble of simulations that reflect measured variation in updraft velocity and cloud base height was used to reproduce observed droplet distributions. Simulations show that organic hygroscopicity in internally mixed cases causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (CR) (<0.01), except for cargo ship and smoke plumes, which increased CR by 0.02 and 0.07, respectively, owing to their high organic mass fraction. Organic hygroscopicity had larger effects on droplet concentrations for cases with higher aerosol concentrations near the critical diameter (namely, polluted cases with a modal peak near 0.1 µm). Differences in simulated droplet spectral widths (k) caused larger differences in CR than organic hygroscopicity in cases with organic mass fractions of 60% or less for the cases shown. Finally, simulations from a numerical parameterization of cloud droplet activation suitable for general circulation models compared well with the ACP model, except under high organic mass fraction.

  13. Cloud Microphysics by Thermal Wave Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Bowdle, D. A.; Reischel, M.

    1985-01-01

    This experiments series is the first application of a low-gravity experimental technique to the study of cloud microphysics. The low-gravity environment is provided by the parabolic maneuver of NASA's KC-135 aircraft. The primary objective is to compare experimental observations of cloud droplet growth and evaporation in a convection free environment with a numerical model of the process. Beyond that, the work also involves the development and testing of low-gravity research techniques. In particular, passive methods of thermal control have been devised and used effectively. The study to date has shown that the method is particularly suitable for looking at interactions between adjoining portions of the cloud drop field and interactions of the drop field with a solid interface. After final analysis of the data, it is expected the results will shed light on the development of cloud droplet size spectra in natural clouds as well as the performance of certain types of cloud physics instrumentation, particularly continuous flow diffusion chambers and loud condensation nuclei counters.

  14. Meteorological and Aerosol effects on Marine Cloud Microphysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Roberts, G.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Wang, Z.; Lee, A.; Abbatt, J.; Lin, J.; Nenes, A.; Wonaschuetz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K.; Jonsson, H.; Albrecht, B. A.; Desiree, T. S.; Macdonald, A. M.; Seinfeld, J.; Zhao, R.

    2015-12-01

    Both meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation and consequently their droplet distributions and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (EPEACE) and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets (SOLEDAD) studies provide detailed measurements in 6 case studies of both cloud thermodynamic properties and initial particle number distribution and composition, as well as the resulting cloud drop distribution and composition. This study uses simulations of a detailed chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce the observed cloud droplet distribution and composition. Four of the cases examined had a sub-adiabatic lapse rate, which was shown to have fewer droplets due to decreased maximum supersaturation, lower LWC and higher cloud base height, consistent with previous findings. These detailed case studies provided measured thermodynamics and microphysics that constrained the simulated droplet size distribution sufficiently to match the droplet number within 6% and the size within 19% for 4 of the 6 cases, demonstrating "closure" or consistency of the measured composition with the measured CCN spectra and the inferred and modeled supersaturation. The contribution of organic components to droplet formation shows small effects on the droplet number and size in the 4 marine cases that had background aerosol conditions with varying amounts of coastal, ship or other non-biogenic sources. In contrast, the organic fraction and hygroscopicity increased the droplet number and size in the cases with generated smoke and cargo ship plumes that were freshly emitted and not yet internally mixed with the background particles. The simulation results show organic hygroscopicity causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (<0.7%) with the exception of the cargo ship plume and smoke plume which increased absolute cloud reflectivity fraction by 0

  15. Reformulating Aerosol Thermodynamics and Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling aerosol composition and cloud microphysics is rather complex due to the required thermodynamics, even if chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium is assumed. We show, however, that for deliquescent atmospheric aerosols thermodynamics can be considerably simplified, if we reformulate chemical equilibrium to include water purely based on thermodynamic principles. In chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium, the relative humidity (RH) fixes the molality of atmospheric aerosols. Although this fact is in theory well known, it has hardly been utilized in aerosol modeling nor has been the fact that for the same reason also the aerosol activity (including activity coefficients) and water content are fixed (by RH) for a given aerosol concentration and type. The only model that successfully utilizes this fact is the computationally very efficient EQuilibrium Simplified thermodynamic gas/Aerosol partitioning Model, EQSAM (Metzger et al., 2002a), EQSAM2 (Metzger et al., 2006). In both versions the entire gas/liquid/solid aerosol equilibrium partitioning is solved analytically and hence non-iteratively a substantial advantage in aerosol composition modeling. Here we briefly present the theoretical framework of EQSAM2, which differs from EQSAM in a way that the calculation of the water activity of saturated binary or mixed inorganic/organic salt solutions of multi-component aerosols has been generalized by including the Kelvin-term, thus allowing for any solute activity above the deliquescence relative humidity, including supersaturation. With application of our new concept to a numerical whether prediction (NWP) model, we demonstrate its wide implications for the computation of various aerosol and cloud properties, as our new concept allows to consistently and efficiently link the modeling of aerosol thermodynamics and cloud microphysics through the aerosol water mass, which therefore deserves special attention in atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, NWP and climate

  16. The microphysical properties of small ice particles measured during MACPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; Schnaiter, M.; Heymsfield, A.; Bansemer, A.; Hirst, E.

    2012-12-01

    During the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) field campaign, the Small Ice Detector version 3 (SID-3) and the NCAR Video Ice Particle Sampler (VIPS) probes were operated onboard the NASA WB-57 aircraft to measure the microphysical properties of small ice particles in midlatitude cirrus clouds. The VIPS was optimized to measure the particle size distribution and projected area properties of ice particles between 20 and 200 microns and measurements agreed well with other microphysical probes. SID-3 measures the forward light scattering pattern from ice particles in the 1 to 100 micron size range. Forward scattering patterns can be used to characterize ice particle shape as well as surface roughness. Scattering patterns appear to be 'speckled' when particles have surface roughness and/or are polycrystalline. Scattering patterns can be used to identify quasi-spherical ice particles as well as particles which are sublimating. Sublimating crystals, spherical ice particles, and particles with surface roughness were all observed by SID-3 during MACPEX. Observed particle properties will be correlated to concurrent atmospheric observations. Measurements from the controlled environment of the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) cloud chamber will be related to atmospheric particle measurements.

  17. Black carbon mixing state impacts on cloud microphysical properties: effects of aerosol plume and environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Ping Pui; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew

    2016-05-27

    Black carbon (BC) is usually mixed with other aerosol species within individual aerosol particles. This mixture, along with the particles' size and morphology, determines the particles' optical and cloud condensation nuclei properties, and hence black carbon's climate impacts. In this study the particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC was used to quantify the importance of black carbon mixing state for predicting cloud microphysical quantities. Based on a set of about 100 cloud parcel simulations a process level analysis framework was developed to attribute the response in cloud microphysical properties to changes in the underlying aerosol population ("plume effect") and the cloud parcel cooling rate ("parcel effect"). It shows that the response of cloud droplet number concentration to changes in BC emissions depends on the BC mixing state. When the aerosol population contains mainly aged BC particles an increase in BC emission results in increasing cloud droplet number concentrations ("additive effect"). In contrast, when the aerosol population contains mainly fresh BC particles they act as sinks for condensable gaseous species, resulting in a decrease in cloud droplet number concentration as BC emissions are increased ("competition effect"). Additionally, we quantified the error in cloud microphysical quantities when neglecting the information on BC mixing state, which is often done in aerosol models. The errors ranged from -12% to +45% for the cloud droplet number fraction, from 0% to +1022% for the nucleation-scavenged black carbon (BC) mass fraction, from -12% to +4% for the effective radius, and from -30% to +60% for the relative dispersion.

  18. Factors controlling cloud microphysics, precipitation rate, and brightness temperature of tropical convective and stratiform clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashino, T.; Casella, D.; Mugnai, A.; Sano, P.; Smith, E. A.; Tripoli, G.

    2008-12-01

    This paper discusses factors controlling cloud microphysics, precipitation rate and brightness temperature of tropical convective and stratiform clouds. Tropical convective and stratiform clouds are important in radiative forcing of climates and distribution of precipitation over the ocean. The possible effects of climate change on these clouds are still not well understood. Recent studies show that the higher CCN concentration in a convective cloud can lead to more vigorous updrafts and a higher evaporation/precipitation ratio. The stronger updraft often means stronger downdraft and gust fronts, which can trigger convection nearby. This implies that increases in CCN concentration can result in an increase in area coverage and persistence of tropical cirrus and stratiform clouds. The increased cloudiness would then be expected to lower sensible and latent heat flux from the ocean by lowering sea surface temperature, affecting the future development of convective clouds. The sea surface temperature may also change in a local area due to change of ocean circulation in climate change scenarios. Satellite remote sensing is a powerful tool to study tropical and global precipitation distribution. Many physically-based passive-microwave (MW) satellite precipitation algorithms make use of cloud radiation databases (CRDs), which typically consist of microphysical profiles from cloud resolving model (CRMs) and simulated MW brightness temperature (Tb). Thus, it is important to validate Tb simulated by a CRM against the observed Tb. Also, it is important to study how any changes in the tropical clouds due to aerosols and sea surface temperature translate into the precipitation and brightness temperature. The case study chosen is KWAJEX campaign that took place from 23 July to 14 September 1999. Authors have developed microphysical physical framework (Advanced Microphysics Prediction System) to predict ice particle properties explicitly in a CRM (University of Wisconsin

  19. Re-formulation and Validation of Cloud Microphysics Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Georgakakos, K. P.

    2007-12-01

    The research focuses on improving quantitative precipitation forecasts by removing significant uncertainties in current cloud microphysics schemes embedded in models such as WRF and MM5 and cloud-resolving models such as GCE. Reformulation of several production terms in these microphysics schemes was found necessary. When estimating four graupel production terms involved in the accretion between rain, snow and graupel, current microphysics schemes assumes that all raindrops and snow particles are falling at their appropriate mass-weighted mean terminal velocities and thus analytic solutions are able to be found for these production terms. Initial analysis and tests showed that these approximate analytic solutions give significant and systematic overestimates of these terms, and, thus, become one of major error sources of the graupel overproduction and associated extreme radar reflectivity in simulations. These results are corroborated by several reports. For example, the analytic solution overestimates the graupel production by collisions between raindrops and snow by up to 230%. The structure of "pure" snow (not rimed) and "pure graupel" (completely rimed) in current microphysics schemes excludes intermediate forms between "pure" snow and "pure" graupel and thus becomes a significant reason of graupel overproduction in hydrometeor simulations. In addition, the generation of the same density graupel by both the freezing of supercooled water and the riming of snow may cause underestimation of graupel production by freezing. A parameterization scheme of the riming degree of snow is proposed and then a dynamic fallspeed-diameter relationship and density- diameter relationship of rimed snow is assigned to graupel based on the diagnosed riming degree. To test if these new treatments can improve quantitative precipitation forecast, the Hurricane Katrina and a severe winter snowfall event in the Sierra Nevada Range are selected as case studies. A series of control

  20. Impacts of cloud microphysics on trade wind cumulus: which cloud microphysics processes contribute to the diversity in a large eddy simulation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yousuke; Nishizawa, Seiya; Yashiro, Hisashi; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Kajikawa, Yoshiyuki; Tomita, Hirofumi

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the impact of several cloud microphysical schemes on the trade wind cumulus in the large eddy simulation model. To highlight the differences due to the cloud microphysical component, we developed a fully compressible large eddy simulation model, which excluded the implicit scheme and approximations as much as possible. The three microphysical schemes, the one-moment bulk, two-moment bulk, and spectral bin schemes were used for sensitivity experiments in which the other components were fixed. Our new large eddy simulation model using a spectral bin scheme successfully reproduced trade wind cumuli, and reliable model performance was confirmed. Results of the sensitivity experiments indicated that precipitation simulated by the one-moment bulk scheme started earlier, and its total amount was larger than that of the other models. By contrast, precipitation simulated by the two-moment scheme started late, and its total amount was small. These results support those of a previous study. The analyses revealed that the expression of two processes, (1) the generation of cloud particles and (2) the conversion from small droplets to raindrops, were crucial to the results. The fast conversion from cloud to rain and the large amount of newly generated cloud particles at the cloud base led to evaporative cooling and subsequent stabilization in the sub-cloud layer. The latent heat released at higher layers by the condensation of cloud particles resulted in the development of the boundary layer top height.

  1. A Comparison between Airborne and Mountaintop Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, R.; Lowenthal, D. H.; Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I.; Avallone, L. M.; Mace, G. G.; Wang, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Complex terrain has a large impact on cloud dynamics and microphysics. Several studies have examined the microphysical details of orographically-enhanced clouds from either an aircraft or from a mountain top location. However, further research is needed to characterize the relationships between mountain top and airborne microphysical properties. During the winter of 2011, an airborne study, the Colorado Airborne Mixed-Phase Cloud Study (CAMPS), and a ground-based field campaign, the Storm Peak Lab (SPL) Cloud Property Validation Experiment (StormVEx) were conducted in the Park Range of the Colorado Rockies. The CAMPS study utilized the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) to provide airborne cloud microphysical and meteorological data on 29 flights totaling 98 flight hours over the Park Range from December 15, 2010 to February 28, 2011. The UWKA was equipped with instruments that measured both cloud droplet and ice crystal size distributions, liquid water content, total water content (vapor, liquid, and ice), and 3-dimensional wind speed and direction. The Wyoming Cloud Radar and Lidar were also deployed during the campaign. These measurements are used to characterize cloud structure upwind and above the Park Range. StormVEx measured cloud droplet, ice crystal, and aerosol size distributions at SPL, located on the west summit of Mt. Werner at 3220m MSL. The observations from SPL are used to determine mountain top cloud microphysical properties at elevations lower than the UWKA was able to sample in-situ. Comparisons showed that cloud microphysics aloft and at the surface were consistent with respect to snow growth processes while small crystal concentrations were routinely higher at the surface, suggesting ice nucleation near cloud base. The effects of aerosol concentrations and upwind stability on mountain top and downwind microphysics are considered.

  2. Cloud Microphysics Budget in the Tropical Deep Convective Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiao-Fan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Cloud microphysics budgets in the tropical deep convective regime are analyzed based on a 2-D cloud resolving simulation. The model is forced by the large-scale vertical velocity and zonal wind and large-scale horizontal advections derived from TOGA COARE for a 20-day period. The role of cloud microphysics is first examined by analyzing mass-weighted mean heat budget and column-integrated moisture budget. Hourly budgets show that local changes of mass-weighted mean temperature and column-integrated moisture are mainly determined by the residuals between vertical thermal advection and latent heat of condensation and between vertical moisture advection and condensation respectively. Thus, atmospheric thermodynamics depends on how cloud microphysical processes are parameterized. Cloud microphysics budgets are then analyzed for raining conditions. For cloud-vapor exchange between cloud system and its embedded environment, rainfall and evaporation of raindrop are compensated by the condensation and deposition of supersaturated vapor. Inside the cloud system, the condensation of supersaturated vapor balances conversion from cloud water to raindrop, snow, and graupel through collection and accretion processes. The deposition of supersaturated vapor balances conversion from cloud ice to snow through conversion and riming processes. The conversion and riming of cloud ice and the accretion of cloud water balance conversion from snow to graupel through accretion process. Finally, the collection of cloud water and the melting of graupel increase raindrop to compensate the loss of raindrop due to rainfall and the evaporation of raindrop.

  3. Evaluation of Microphysics Parameterization for Convective Clouds in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Zhang, G. J.; Li, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    A physically-based two-moment microphysics parameterization scheme for convective clouds is implemented in the NCAR CAM5 to improve the representation of convective clouds and their interaction with large-scale clouds and aerosols. The explicit treatment of mass mixing ratio and number concentration of cloud and precipitation particles enables the scheme to account for the impact of aerosols on convection. The scheme is linked to aerosols through cloud droplet activation and ice nucleation processes, and to stratiform cloud parameterization through convective detrainment of cloud liquid/ice water content (LWC/IWC) and droplet/crystal number concentration (DNC/CNC). A 5-yr simulation with the new convective microphysics scheme shows that both cloud LWC/IWC and DNC/CNC are in good agreement with observations, indicating the scheme describes microphysical processes in convection well. Moreover, the microphysics scheme is able to represent the aerosol effects on convective clouds such as the suppression of warm rain formation and enhancement of freezing when aerosol loading is increased. With more realistic simulations of convective cloud microphysical properties and their detrainment, the mid- and low-level cloud fraction is increased significantly over the ITCZ/SPCZ and subtropical oceans, making it much closer to the observations. Correspondingly the serious negative bias in cloud liquid water path over subtropical oceans observed in the standard CAM5 is reduced markedly. The large-scale precipitation is increased and precipitation distribution is improved as well. The longstanding precipitation bias in the western Pacific is significantly alleviated due to microphysics-thermodynamics-circulation feedbacks.

  4. Microphysical effects determine macrophysical response for aerosol impacts on deep convective clouds.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, L Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation, energy, and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Aerosol particles can influence DCCs by altering cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Previous studies reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but few were concerned with the whole life cycle of DCC. By conducting multiple monthlong cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macrophysical and microphysical properties of summer convective clouds and precipitation in the tropics and midlatitudes, this study provides a comprehensive view of how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height, and radiative forcing. We found that although the widely accepted theory of DCC invigoration due to aerosol's thermodynamic effect (additional latent heat release from freezing of greater amount of cloud water) may work during the growing stage, it is microphysical effect influenced by aerosols that drives the dramatic increase in cloud cover, cloud top height, and cloud thickness at the mature and dissipation stages by inducing larger amounts of smaller but longer-lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs, even when thermodynamic invigoration of convection is absent. The thermodynamic invigoration effect contributes up to ~27% of total increase in cloud cover. The overall aerosol indirect effect is an atmospheric radiative warming (3-5 W m(-2)) and a surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m(-2)). The modeling findings are confirmed by the analyses of ample measurements made at three sites of distinctly different environments.

  5. Cloud microphysical background for the Israel-4 cloud seeding experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freud, Eyal; Koussevitzky, Hagai; Goren, Tom; Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The modest amount of rainfall in Israel occurs in winter storms that bring convective clouds from the Mediterranean Sea when the cold post frontal air interacts with its relatively warm surface. These clouds were seeded in the Israel-1 and Israel-2 cloud glaciogenic seeding experiments, which have shown statistically significant positive effect of added rainfall of at least 13% in northern Israel, whereas the Israel-3 experiment showed no added rainfall in the south. This was followed by operational seeding in the north since 1975. The lack of physical evidence for the causes of the positive effects in the north caused a lack of confidence in the statistical results and led to the Israel-4 randomized seeding experiment in northern Israel. This experiment started in the winter of 2013/14. The main difference from the previous experiments is the focus on the orographic clouds in the catchment of the Sea of Galilee. The decision to commence the experiment was partially based on evidence supporting the existence of seeding potential, which is reported here. Aircraft and satellite microphysical and dynamic measurements of the clouds document the critical roles of aerosols, especially sea spray, on cloud microstructure and precipitation forming processes. It was found that the convective clouds over sea and coastal areas are naturally seeded hygroscopically by sea spray and develop precipitation efficiently. The diminution of the large sea spray aerosols farther inland along with the increase in aerosol concentrations causes the clouds to develop precipitation more slowly. The short time available for the precipitation forming processes in super-cooled orographic clouds over the Golan Heights farthest inland represents the best glaciogenic seeding potential.

  6. Simulation of the Upper Clouds and Hazes of Venus Using a Microphysical Cloud Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGouldrick, K.

    2012-12-01

    Several different microphysical and chemical models of the clouds of Venus have been developed in attempts to reproduce the in situ observations of the Venus clouds made by Pioneer Venus, Venera, and Vega descent probes (Turco et al., 1983 (Icarus 53:18-25), James et al, 1997 (Icarus 129:147-171), Imamura and Hashimoto, 2001 (J. Atm. Sci. 58:3597-3612), and McGouldrick and Toon, 2007 (Icarus 191:1-24)). The model of McGouldrick and Toon has successfully reproduced observations within the condensational middle and lower cloud decks of Venus (between about 48 and 57 km altitude, experiencing conditions similar to Earth's troposphere) and it now being extended to also simulate the microphysics occurring in the upper cloud deck (between altitudes of about 57 km and 70 km, experiencing conditions similar to Earth's stratosphere). In the upper clouds, aerosols composed of a solution of sulfuric acid in water are generated from the reservoir of available water vapor and sulfuric acid vapor that is photochemically produced. The manner of particle creation (e.g., activation of cloud condensation nuclei, or homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation) is still incompletely understood, and the atmospheric environment has been measured to be not inconsistent with frozen aerosol particles (either sulfuric acid monohydrate or water ice). The material phase, viscosity, and surface tension of the aerosols (which are strongly dependent up on the local temperature and water vapor concentration) can affect the coagulation efficiencies of the aerosol, leading to variations in the size distributions, and other microphysical and radiative properties. Here, I present recent work exploring the effects of nucleation rates and coalescence efficiencies on the simulated Venus upper clouds.

  7. Alterations of Cloud Microphysics Due to Cloud Processed CCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Tabor, S. S.; Noble, S. R., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution CCN spectra have revealed bimodality (Hudson et al. 2015) similar to aerosol size spectra (e.g., Hoppel et al. 1985). Bimodality is caused by chemical and physical cloud processes that increase mass or hygroscopicity of only CCN that produced activated cloud droplets. Bimodality is categorized by relative CCN concentrations (NCCN) within the two modes, Nu-Np; i.e., NCCN within the higher critical supersaturation, Sc, mode that did not undergo cloud processing minus NCCN within the lower Sc mode that was cloud processed. Lower, especially negative, Nu-Np designates greater processing. The table shows regressions between Nu-Np and characteristics of clouds nearest the CCN measurements. ICE-T MASE parameter R SL R SL Nc 0.17 93.24 -0.26 98.65 MD -0.31 99.69 0.33 99.78 σ -0.27 99.04 0.48 100.00 Ld -0.31 99.61 0.38 99.96 Table. Correlation coefficients, R, and one-tailed significance levels in percent, SL, for Nu-Np with microphysics of the clouds closest to each CCN measurement, 75 ICE-T and 74 MASE cases. Nc is cloud droplet concentration, MD is cloud droplet mean diameter, σ is standard deviation of cloud droplet spectra, Ldis drizzle drop LWC. Two aircraft field campaigns, Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) and Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) show opposite R signs because coalescence dominated cloud processing in low altitude ICE-T cumuli whereas chemical transformations predominated in MASE low altitude polluted stratus. Coalescence reduces Nc and NCCN, which thus increases MD, and σ, which promote Ld. Chemical transformations, e.g., SO2 to SO4, increase CCN hygroscopicity, thus reducing Sc, but not affecting Nc or NCCN. Lower Sc CCN are capable of producing greater Nc in subsequent cloud cycles, which leads to lower MD and σ which reduce Ld (figure). These observations are consistent with cloud droplet growth models for the higher vertical wind (W) of cumuli and lower W of stratus. Coalescence thus reduces the indirect

  8. Microphysical properties of low-level clouds and fogs in a mountain area of South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jin-Yim; Lee, Chulkyu; Jung, Hyun-Sook; Nam, Jae-Chul

    2013-05-01

    Measurements of microphysical properties in low-level clouds and fogs were carried out at Daegwallyeong in the northeastern mountainous region of South Korea. The microphysical characteristics are presented through analyzing the number concentration, mean diameter, liquid water contents and size distribution of cloud particles sampled with the groundbased Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP). The aim of this study is to analyze the influence of the proposed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) type on the size and the number of cloud droplets. Observational cases are classified 5 sectors according to backward air mass trajectories from the NOAA/ARL HYSPLIT model. Clean maritime cloud is characterized by sector 1 trajectories and clean continental cloud is by sector 2. Contaminated maritime cloud is by sector 3 and contaminated continental cloud is by sector 4. Sector 5 trajectories are undefined air masses. On average, the droplet number concentrations in marine clouds were lower than for continental clouds, while the mean diameters and liquid water contents for marine clouds were larger than for continental clouds. Our observed values of microphysical properties are similar to the reported values from previous studies.

  9. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol and Cloud Microphysical Properties in Mixed-Phase Clouds Under Varying Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comstock, J. M.; Fan, J.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Hubbe, J. M.; Schmid, B.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud microphysical properties impact the interaction of clouds and radiation in the atmosphere, and can influence atmospheric circulations through changes in cloud phase. Characterizing the conditions that control phase changes and the microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds is important for improving understanding of physical processes that influence cloud phase. We characterize the aerosol and cloud microphysical properties in relation to the atmospheric dynamic and thermodynamic conditions observed in mixed-phase clouds during several aircraft-based field experiments. The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Gulfstream-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and cloud properties in warm and cold clouds during several recent field experiments. We analyze in-situ observations from the CalWater and TCAP field campaigns to examine the variability of cloud properties (phase, hydrometeor size, ice and liquid water content, particle habit) with changes in aerosol, vertical velocity, and temperature. These measurements indicate that in addition to aerosol concentration, vertical velocity strength has important influence on cloud phase in mixed-phase cloud regimes.

  10. Microphysical Effects Determine Macrophysical Response for Aerosol Impacts on Deep Convective Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation and energy and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Anthropogenic and natural aerosol particles can influence DCCs through changes in cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Modeling studies have reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but none has fully quantified aerosol impacts on convection life cycle and radiative forcing. By conducting multiple month-long cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macro- and micro-physical properties of summer convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, this study provides the first comprehensive look at how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height (CTH), and radiative forcing. Observations validate these simulation results. We find that microphysical aerosol effects contribute predominantly to increased cloud cover and CTH by inducing larger amount of smaller but longer lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs with dynamical aerosol effects contributing at most ~ 1/4 of the total increase of cloud cover. The overall effect is a radiative warming in the atmosphere (3 to 5 W m-2) with strong surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m-2). Herein we clearly identified mechanisms more important than and additional to the invigoration effects hypothesized previously that explain the consistent signatures of increased cloud tops area and height by aerosols in DCCs revealed by observations.

  11. Microphysical properties of the Shuttle exhaust cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.; Anderson, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    A data base describing the properties of the exhaust cloud produced by the launch of the STS has been developed based on data from a series of ground and aircraft based measurements made during the launches of STS 2, 3, and 4. Aircraft observations were performed during the STS-3 launch with a NOAA WP-3D Orion hurricane research aircraft which contained instrumentation for cloud condensation nucleus and ice nucleus counting, Aitken particle counting, and pH determination. Ground observations were conducted at 50 different sites, as well as in the direct exhaust from the solid rocket booster flame trench at all three launches. The data is analyzed in order to determine any possible adverse impacts of the exhaust products on human health and/or the environment. Analyses of the exhaust cloud measurements indicate that in the case of the ground cloud where plenty of large water drops are present and considerable scavenging and fallout of aerosol takes place, possible adverse impacts of the remaining aerosols (CCN and IN) on natural precipitation processes which may occur in the launch area hours after the launch are remote. However, it is determined that under certain atmospheric conditions there could be short term adverse effects on visibility.

  12. Observations of cloud microphysics and ice formation during COPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. W.; Choularton, T. W.; Blyth, A. M.; Liu, Z.; Bower, K. N.; Crosier, J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Williams, P. I.; Dorsey, J. R.; Flynn, M. J.; Bennett, L. J.; Huang, Y.; French, J.; Korolev, A.; Brown, P. R. A.

    2016-01-01

    We present microphysical observations of cumulus clouds measured over the southwest peninsula of the UK during the COnvective Precipitation Experiment (COPE) in August 2013, which are framed into a wider context using ground-based and airborne radar measurements. Two lines of cumulus clouds formed in the early afternoon along convergence lines aligned with the peninsula. The lines became longer and broader during the afternoon due to new cell formation and stratiform regions forming downwind of the convective cells. Ice concentrations up to 350 L-1, well in excess of the expected ice nuclei (IN) concentrations, were measured in the mature stratiform regions, suggesting that secondary ice production was active. Detailed sampling focused on an isolated liquid cloud that glaciated as it matured to merge with a band of cloud downwind. In the initial cell, drizzle concentrations increased from ˜ 0.5 to ˜ 20 L-1 in around 20 min. Ice concentrations developed up to a few per litre, which is around the level expected of primary IN. The ice images were most consistent with freezing drizzle, rather than smaller cloud drops or interstitial IN forming the first ice. As new cells emerged in and around the cloud, ice concentrations up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than the predicted IN concentrations developed, and the cloud glaciated over a period of 12-15 min. Almost all of the first ice particles to be observed were frozen drops, while vapour-grown ice crystals were dominant in the latter stages. Our observations are consistent with the production of large numbers of small secondary ice crystals/fragments, by a mechanism such as Hallett-Mossop or droplets shattering upon freezing. Some of the small ice froze drizzle drops on contact, while others grew more slowly by vapour deposition. Graupel and columns were seen in cloud penetrations up to the -12 °C level, though many ice particles were mixed habit due to riming and growth by vapour deposition at multiple temperatures

  13. High Resolution Cloud Microphysics and Radiation Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-16

    characteristics of mid level altocumulus clouds and upper level visible and subvisual cirrus clouds The MPL lidar provided information about the temporal...balloon, lidar, and radar study of cirrus and altocumulus clouds to further investigate the presence of multi- cloud and nearly cloud -free layers...data set of the clouds and thermodynanuc structure to build a mesoscale and LF.S test-bed for cirrus and altocumulus cloud layers. The project was

  14. MAD-VenLA: a microphysical modal representation of clouds for the IPSL Venus GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbon, Sabrina; Määttänen, Anni; Burgalat, Jérémie; Montmessin, Franck; Stolzenbach, Aurélien; Bekki, Slimane

    2016-10-01

    Venus is enshrouded by 20km-thick clouds, which are composed of sulfuric acid-water solution droplets. Clouds play a crucial role on the climate of the planet. Our goal is to study the formation and evolution of Venusian clouds with microphysical models. The goal of this work is to develop the first full 3D microphysical model of Venus coupled with the IPSL Venus GCM and the photochemical model included (Lebonnois et al. 2010, Stolzenbach et al. 2016).Two particle size distribution representations are generally used in cloud modeling: sectional and modal. The term 'sectional' means that the continuous particle size distribution is divided into a discrete set of size intervals called bins. In the modal approach, the particle size distribution is approximated by a continuous parametric function, typically a log-normal, and prognostic variables are distribution or distribution-integrated parameters (Seigneur et al. 1986, Burgalat et al. 2014). These two representations need to be compared to choose the optimal trade-off between precision and computational efficiency. At high radius resolution, sectional models are computationally too demanding to be integrated in GCMs. That is why, in other GCMs, such as the IPSL Titan GCM, the modal scheme is used (Burgalat et al. 2014).The Venus Liquid Aerosol cloud model (VenLA) and the Modal Dynamics of Venusian Liquid Aerosol cloud model (MAD-VenLA) are respectively the sectional and the modal model discussed here and used for defining the microphysical cloud module to be integrated in the IPSL Venus GCM. We will compare the two models with the key microphysical processes in 0D setting: homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, condensation/evaporation and coagulation. Then, MAD-VenLA will be coupled with the IPSL VGCM. The first results of the complete VGCM with microphysics coupled with chemistry will be presented.

  15. Microphysics of KCl and ZnS Clouds on GJ 1214 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Benneke, Björn

    2016-10-01

    Clouds are ubiquitous in the atmospheres of exoplanets. However, as most of these planets have temperatures between 600 and 2000 K, their clouds are likely composed of exotic condensates such as salts, sulfides, silicates, and metals. Treatment of these clouds in current exoplanet atmosphere models do not consider the microphysical processes that govern their formation, evolution, and distribution, such as nucleation and condensation/evaporation, thus creating a gulf between the cloud properties retrieved from observations and the cloud composition predictions from condensation equilibrium models. In this work, we apply a 1D microphysical cloud model to GJ 1214 b and investigate the properties of potassium chloride (KCl) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) clouds as a function of atmospheric metallicity, the intensity of vertical mixing, and the mode of nucleation. Our cloud model has been widely applied to planets in our own Solar System, and as such our work bridges a gap between planetary science and exoplanets. Using model background atmospheres calculated by the SCARLET code, we find that (1) the cloud distribution is not significantly affected by metallicity unless [Fe/H] > 2, (2) higher intensities of vertical mixing leads to more extended cloud decks, more cloud particles at all altitudes, and smaller mean particle radii, (3) the high surface energy of solid ZnS prevents the homogeneous nucleation of pure ZnS cloud particles, such that KCl clouds dominate; solid ZnS can only manifest by nucleating onto pre-existing surfaces (heterogeneous nucleation), such as KCl cloud particles, resulting in mixed clouds, and (4) formation of KCl clouds results in a KCl vapor abundance above the cloud deck ~5 orders of magnitude less than that calculated from equilibrium chemistry. We also examine the transmission spectra that would result from these different cases. Extension of this model to other planets and condensates will shed light on the observed continuum in the "cloudiness

  16. A low-cost digital holographic imager for calibration and validation of cloud microphysics remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Thomas E.; Hamilton, Murray W.; Reid, Iain M.

    2016-10-01

    Clouds cover approximately 70% of the Earth's surface and therefore play a crucial rule in governing both the climate system and the hydrological cycle. The microphysical properties of clouds such as the cloud particle size distribution, shape distribution and spatial homogeneity contribute significantly to the net radiative effect of clouds and these properties must therefore be measured and understood to determine the exact contribution of clouds to the climate system. Significant discrepancies are observed between meteorological models and observations, particularly in polar regions that are most sensitive to changes in climate, suggesting a lack of understanding of these complex microphysical processes. Remote sensing techniques such as polarimetric LIDAR and radar allow microphysical cloud measurements with high temporal and spatial resolution however these instruments must be calibrated and validated by direct in situ measurements. To this end a low cost, light weight holographic imaging device has been developed and experimentally tested that is suitable for deployment on a weather balloon or tower structure to significantly increase the availability of in situ microphysics retrievals.

  17. The Microphysics of Antarctic Clouds - Part two Modelling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Listowski, Constantino; Lachlan-Cope, Tom

    2016-04-01

    We compare different cloud microphysical schemes implemented in the Weather Research & Forecasting model (WRF, v3.5.1) to investigate their ability to simulate clouds over the Antarctic Peninsula. We also discuss first results obtained over the Weddell Sea. Comparisons are made to cloud in-situ measurements performed with the British Antarctic Survey's instrumented Twin Otter aircraft. We discuss the performance of the microphysical scheme currently used by the operational model Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS), which uses the Polar version of WRF, by contrasting its results with the ones of more sophisticated WRF schemes. We also evaluate the reliability of Ice Nuclei and Cloud Condensation Nuclei parameterizations used by the schemes, which are almost exclusively based on mid-latitudes measurements.

  18. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2014-05-19

    , 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops

  19. Retrieval of radiative and microphysical properties of clouds from multispectral infrared measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Saito, Masanori; Tokoro, Yuka; Putri, Nurfiena Sagita; Sekiguchi, Miho

    2016-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of the macroscopic, microphysical, and optical properties of clouds are useful for studying spatial and temporal variations of clouds at various scales and constraining cloud physical processes in climate and weather prediction models. Instead of using separate independent algorithms for different cloud properties, a unified, optimal estimation-based cloud retrieval algorithm is developed and applied to moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations using ten thermal infrared bands. The model considers sensor configurations, background surface and atmospheric profile, and microphysical and optical models of ice and liquid cloud particles and radiative transfer in a plane-parallel, multilayered atmosphere. Measurement and model errors are thoroughly quantified from direct comparisons of clear-sky observations over the ocean with model calculations. Performance tests by retrieval simulations show that ice cloud properties are retrieved with high accuracy when cloud optical thickness (COT) is between 0.1 and 10. Cloud-top pressure is inferred with uncertainty lower than 10 % when COT is larger than 0.3. Applying the method to a tropical cloud system and comparing the results with the MODIS Collection 6 cloud product shows good agreement for ice cloud optical thickness when COT is less than about 5. Cloud-top height agrees well with estimates obtained by the CO2 slicing method used in the MODIS product. The present algorithm can detect optically thin parts at the edges of high clouds well in comparison with the MODIS product, in which these parts are recognized as low clouds by the infrared window method. The cloud thermodynamic phase in the present algorithm is constrained by cloud-top temperature, which tends not to produce results with an ice cloud that is too warm and liquid cloud that is too cold.

  20. Microphysical effects determine macrophysical response for aerosol impacts on deep convective clouds

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, L. Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-01-01

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation, energy, and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Aerosol particles can influence DCCs by altering cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Previous studies reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but few were concerned with the whole life cycle of DCC. By conducting multiple monthlong cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macrophysical and microphysical properties of summer convective clouds and precipitation in the tropics and midlatitudes, this study provides a comprehensive view of how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height, and radiative forcing. We found that although the widely accepted theory of DCC invigoration due to aerosol’s thermodynamic effect (additional latent heat release from freezing of greater amount of cloud water) may work during the growing stage, it is microphysical effect influenced by aerosols that drives the dramatic increase in cloud cover, cloud top height, and cloud thickness at the mature and dissipation stages by inducing larger amounts of smaller but longer-lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs, even when thermodynamic invigoration of convection is absent. The thermodynamic invigoration effect contributes up to ∼27% of total increase in cloud cover. The overall aerosol indirect effect is an atmospheric radiative warming (3–5 W⋅m−2) and a surface cooling (−5 to −8 W⋅m−2). The modeling findings are confirmed by the analyses of ample measurements made at three sites of distinctly different environments. PMID:24218569

  1. The Microbase Value-Added Product: A Baseline Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M; Johnson, K; Jensen, M

    2011-05-31

    This report describes the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility baseline cloud microphysical properties (MICROBASE) value-added product (VAP). MICROBASE uses a combination of millimeter-wavelength cloud radar, microwave radiometer, and radiosonde observations to estimate the vertical profiles of the primary microphysical parameters of clouds including the liquid/ice water content and liquid/ice cloud particle effective radius. MICROBASE is a baseline algorithm designed to apply to most conditions and locations using a single set of parameterizations and a simple determination of water phase based on temperature. This document provides the user of this product with guidelines to assist in determining the accuracy of the product under certain conditions. Quality control flags are designed to identify outliers and indicate instances where the retrieval assumptions may not be met. The overall methodology is described in this report through a detailed description of the input variables, algorithms, and output products.

  2. Evaluation of Cloud Microphysics in JMA-NHM Simulations Using Bin or Bulk Microphysical Schemes through Comparison with Cloud Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iguchi, Takamichi; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Khain, Alexander P.; Saito, Kazuo; Takemura, Toshihiko; Okamoto, Hajime; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2012-01-01

    Numerical weather prediction (NWP) simulations using the Japan Meteorological Agency NonhydrostaticModel (JMA-NHM) are conducted for three precipitation events observed by shipborne or spaceborneW-band cloud radars. Spectral bin and single-moment bulk cloud microphysics schemes are employed separatelyfor an intercomparative study. A radar product simulator that is compatible with both microphysicsschemes is developed to enable a direct comparison between simulation and observation with respect to theequivalent radar reflectivity factor Ze, Doppler velocity (DV), and path-integrated attenuation (PIA). Ingeneral, the bin model simulation shows better agreement with the observed data than the bulk modelsimulation. The correction of the terminal fall velocities of snowflakes using those of hail further improves theresult of the bin model simulation. The results indicate that there are substantial uncertainties in the masssizeand sizeterminal fall velocity relations of snowflakes or in the calculation of terminal fall velocity of snowaloft. For the bulk microphysics, the overestimation of Ze is observed as a result of a significant predominanceof snow over cloud ice due to substantial deposition growth directly to snow. The DV comparison shows thata correction for the fall velocity of hydrometeors considering a change of particle size should be introducedeven in single-moment bulk cloud microphysics.

  3. Relationship between Ice Cloud Microphysics and Supersaturation from Spaceborne Cloud Radar, Lidar and Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Okamoto, H.; Sato, K.; Ishimoto, H.

    2014-12-01

    We examined the relationship between ice cloud microphysics retrieved from cloud radar on CloudSat and CALIOP on CALIPSO and super saturation inferred from AIRS on AQUA. Ice microphysics such as ice water content (IWC) and effective radius was estimated by CloudSat and CALIPSO data. Unique features of the algorithm is that it has been designed to use depolarization ratio from CALIOP addition to radar reflectivity factor from CloudSat and attenuated backscattering coefficient from CALIOP in order to take into account the variation of ice particle shapes and their orientations [Okamoto et al., 2010]. Water vapor density and temperature were retrieved with much finer resolution by the application of Ishimoto's algorithm [2009] compared with standard AIRS products where horizontal resolution is 45km. The algorithm allows retrievals of water vapor density and temperature every 13.5km in horizontal direction with 1km in vertical. The retrievals are carried out when there is no cloud with its cloud top pressure <200hPa. That is, it is possible to report water vapor information above low-level clouds. Then we sampled the amount of water vapor and temperature estimated from AIRS data to match the CloudSat and CALIPSO foot-print and the data were interpolated to have the same space and time resolution of the merged data sets of CloudSat and CALIPSO, i.e., 1.1km and 240m for horizontal and vertical resolutions. In the new AIRS products, ice super saturation often reached 150% while standard AIRS products showed less frequent super saturation. The ECMWF results generally showed smaller fraction of ice super saturation compared with the new AIRS products. In order to quantitatively compare the water vapor amount and retrieved IWC, we estimated the excess of water amount respect to ice saturation by using ice super saturation. The occurrences of ice clouds inferred from CloudSat and CALIOP agreed with the occurrences of ice-supersaturation reported in the new AIRS products. The

  4. Microphysical Consequences of the Spatial Distribution of Ice Nucleation in Mixed-Phase Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fan; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2014-07-28

    Mixed-phase stratiform clouds can persist even with steady ice precipitation fluxes, and the origin and microphysical properties of the ice crystals are of interest. Vapor deposition growth and sedimentation of ice particles along with a uniform volume source of ice nucleation, leads to a power law relation between ice water content wi and ice number concentration ni with exponent 2.5. The result is independent of assumptions about the vertical velocity structure of the cloud and is therefore more general than the related expression of Yang et al. [2013]. The sensitivity of the wi-ni relationship to the spatial distribution of ice nucleation is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking and ice growth with cloud-volume, cloud-top, and cloud-base sources of ice particles through a time-dependent cloud field. Based on observed wi and ni from ISDAC, a lower bound of 0.006 m^3/s is obtained for the ice crystal formation rate.

  5. Impact of volcanic ash plume aerosol on cloud microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martucci, G.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Ceburnis, D.; Berresheim, H.; Varghese, S.; Martin, D.; Flanagan, R.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2012-03-01

    This study focuses on the dispersion of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash plume over the west of Ireland, at the Mace Head Supersite, and its influence on cloud formation and microphysics during one significant event spanning May 16th and May 17th, 2010. Ground-based remote sensing of cloud microphysics was performed using a K a-band Doppler cloud RADAR, a LIDAR-ceilometer and a multi-channel microwave-radiometer combined with the synergistic analysis scheme SYRSOC ( Synergistic Remote Sensing Of Cloud). For this case study of volcanic aerosol interaction with clouds, cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), liquid water content (LWC), and droplet effective radius ( reff) and the relative dispersion were retrieved. A unique cloud type formed over Mace Head characterized by layer-averaged maximum, mean and standard deviation values of the CDNC, reff and LWC: Nmax = 948 cm -3, N¯=297cm, σ=250cm, reff max = 35.5 μm, r¯=4.8μm, σ=4.4μm, LWC=0.23gm, LWC¯=0.055gm, σ=0.054gm, respectively. The high CDNC, for marine clean air, were associated with large accumulation mode diameter (395 nm) and a hygroscopic growth factor consistent with sulphuric acid aerosol, despite being almost exclusively internally mixed in submicron sizes. Additionally, the Condensation Nuclei (CN, d > 10 nm) to Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) ratio, CCN:CN ˜1 at the moderately low supersaturation of 0.25%. This case study illustrates the influence of volcanic aerosols on cloud formation and microphysics and shows that volcanic aerosol can be an efficient CCN.

  6. Cloud microphysics and surface properties in climate

    SciTech Connect

    Stamnes, K.

    1995-09-01

    Cloud optical thickness is determined from ground-based measurements of broadband incoming solar irradiance using a radiation model in which the cloud optical depth is adjusted until computed irradiance agrees with the measured value. From spectral measurements it would be feasible to determine both optical thickness and mean drop size, which apart from cloud structure and morphology, are the most important climatic parameters of clouds. A radiative convective model is used to study the sensitivity of climate to cloud liquid water amount and cloud drop size. This is illustrated in Figure 21.1 which shows that for medium thick clouds a 10 % increase in drop size yields a surface warming of 1.5{degrees}C, which is the same as that due to a doubling of carbon dioxide. For thick clouds, a 5% decrease in drop size is sufficient to offset the warming due to doubling of carbon dioxide. A radiative transfer model for the coupled atmosphere/sea ice/ocean system is used to study the partitioning of radiative energy between the three strata, and the potential for testing such a model in terms of planned experiments in the Arctic is discussed.

  7. Satellite Determination of Stratus Cloud Microphysical Properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuidema, Paquita; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    1995-06-01

    Satellite measurements of liquid water path from SSM/I, broadband albedo from ERBE, and cloud characteristics from ISCCP are used to study stratus regions. An average cloud liquid water path of 0.120 ± 0.032 kg m2 is derived by dividing the average liquid water path for stratus areas by the fractional area coverage of cloud in the region. The diurnal range in this average cloud liquid water path is about 25%. Stratus cloud liquid water is positively correlated with cloud amount and is negatively correlated with low cloud-top temperature.Cloud liquid water path (LWP) and cloud albedo measurements are used to derive an effective droplet radius using the plane-parallel cloud albedo model of Slingo. The 2.5;dg by 2.5;dg grid boxes are first screened for completely overcast scenes in an attempt to justify the plane-parallel assumption. The mean effective droplet radius for this sample is 10.1 ± 4.4 m. This serves as an upper bound since small-scale LWP variability is estimated to affect the average albedo by up to 0.07, corresponding to an overestimate in the derived droplet size of up to almost 6 m. The authors find larger droplet sizes in the evening than in the morning, along with smaller LWPs and lower albedos. No correlation is seen between effective radius and liquid water path, reinforcing the independence of these two parameters. Small droplet sizes are only derived in conjunction with high albedos, but this may simply reflect the effect of LWP inhomogeneity on the albedo and hence the derived droplet size. Individual case studies both support the validity of the methodology given high spatial homogeneity and yet demonstrate the common occurrence of nonhomogeneous conditions within stratus regions.

  8. Satellite determination of stratus cloud microphysical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zuidema, P.; Hartmann, D.L.

    1995-06-01

    Satellite measurements of liquid water path from SSM/I, broadband albedo from ERBE, and cloud characteristics from ISCCP are used to study stratus regions. An average cloud liquid water path of 0.120{+-}0.032 kg m{sup {minus}2} is derived by dividing the average liquid water path for stratus areas by the fractional area coverage of cloud in the region. The diurnal range in this average cloud liquid water path is about 25%. Stratus cloud liquid water is positively correlated with cloud amount and is negatively correlated with low cloud-top temperature. Cloud liquid water path (LWP) and cloud albedo measurements are used to derive an effective droplet radius using the plane-parallel cloud albedo model of Slingo. The 2.5{degrees} by 2.5{degrees} grid boxes are first screened for completely overcast scenes in an attempt to justify the plane-parallel assumption. The mean effective droplet radius for this sample is 10.1{+-}4.4{mu}m. This serves as an upper bound since small-scale LWP variability is estimated to affect the average albedo by up to 0.07, corresponding to an overestimate in the derived droplet size of up to almost 6{mu}m. The authors find larger droplet sizes in the evening than in the morning, along with smaller LWP`s and lower albedos. No correlation is seen between effective radius and liquid water path, reinforcing the independence of these two parameters. Small droplet sizes are only derived in conjunction with high albedos, but this may simply reflect the effect of LWP inhomogeneity on the albedo and hence the derived droplet size. Individual case studies both support the validity of the methodology given high spatial homogeneity and yet demonstrate the common occurrence of nonhomogeneous conditions within stratus regions. 63 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. A Cloud Microphysics Model for the Gas Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palotai, Csaba J.; Le Beau, Raymond P.; Shankar, Ramanakumar; Flom, Abigail; Lashley, Jacob; McCabe, Tyler

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have significantly increased the quality and the number of observed meteorological features on the jovian planets, revealing banded cloud structures and discrete features. Our current understanding of the formation and decay of those clouds also defines the conceptual modes about the underlying atmospheric dynamics. The full interpretation of the new observational data set and the related theories requires modeling these features in a general circulation model (GCM). Here, we present details of our bulk cloud microphysics model that was designed to simulate clouds in the Explicit Planetary Hybrid-Isentropic Coordinate (EPIC) GCM for the jovian planets. The cloud module includes hydrological cycles for each condensable species that consist of interactive vapor, cloud and precipitation phases and it also accounts for latent heating and cooling throughout the transfer processes (Palotai and Dowling, 2008. Icarus, 194, 303-326). Previously, the self-organizing clouds in our simulations successfully reproduced the vertical and horizontal ammonia cloud structure in the vicinity of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and Oval BA (Palotai et al. 2014, Icarus, 232, 141-156). In our recent work, we extended this model to include water clouds on Jupiter and Saturn, ammonia clouds on Saturn, and methane clouds on Uranus and Neptune. Details of our cloud parameterization scheme, our initial results and their comparison with observations will be shown. The latest version of EPIC model is available as open source software from NASA's PDS Atmospheres Node.

  10. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mace, Gerald

    2008-01-15

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  11. Constraints on PSC Particle Microphysics Derived From Lidar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Li; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2001-01-01

    Based on extensive T-matrix computations of light scattering by polydispersions of randomly oriented, rotationally symmetric nonspherical particles, we analyze existing lidar observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and derive several constraints on PSC particle microphysical properties. We show that sharp-edged nonspherical particles (finite circular cylinders) exhibit less variability of lidar backscattering characteristics with particle size and aspect ratio than particles with smooth surfaces (spheroids). For PSC particles significantly smaller than the wavelength, the backscatter color index Alpha and the depolarization color index Beta are essentially shape-independent. Observations for type Ia PSCs can be reproduced by spheroids with aspect ratios larger than 1.2, oblate cylinders with diameter-to-length ratios greater than 1.6, and prolate cylinders with length-to-diameter ratios greater than 1.4. The effective equal-volume-sphere radius for type la PSCs is about 0.8 microns or larger. Type Ib PSCs are likely to be composed of spheres or nearly spherical particles with effective radii smaller than 0.8 microns. Observations for type II PSCs are consistent with large ice crystals (effective radius greater than 1 micron modeled as cylinders or prolate spheroids.

  12. An Aircraft And Radar Based Analysis Of Cloud And Precipitation Microphysics In Mid-Latitude Continental Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Kumjian, M.; Bansemer, A.; Giangrande, S. E.; Ryzhkov, A.; Toto, T.

    2014-12-01

    An observational analysis of precipitation microphysics was conducted using data obtained during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) that took place around the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Lamont, Oklahoma from April 22- June 6, 2011. MC3E was a collaborative campaign led by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission and the U.S. Department of Energy ARM program. MC3E provided a unique opportunity to compare in-situ data from aircraft based microphysical probes with data from polarimetric radars in the radar bright band region or melting layer. One of the primary objectives of this study was to understand how riming and aggregation affect polarimetric signatures. In depth case study analysis of cloud and precipitation microphysics was performed for two specific cases, April 27th, 2011 (A27) and May 20th, 2011 (M20). Both these cases provided coincident aircraft and radar data in extensive stratiform cloud regions. Measurements from the University of North Dakota (UND) Citation aircraft and polarimetric data from the ARM CSAPR data reveal interesting details of cloud scale processes. Observations based on data from cloud probes (2DC, CIP and HVPS) along with in-situ observations of environmental variables provide remarkable details of particle growth and cloud dynamics for both case studies. For the A27 case study, UND aircraft measurements from two successive spiral profiles through the stratiform cloud region showed a transition from a riming dominated region to an aggregation dominated region. This is supported by polarimetric data from the C-Band ARM Precipitation Radar (CSAPR ). An extensive region of trailing stratiform precipitation was sampled in the M20 case study, where the aggregation, melting, and evaporation processes were measured in detail with the in-situ microphysical instruments. Latest findings from MC3E based on this combined aircraft

  13. A comparison of cloud microphysical quantities with forecasts from cloud prediction models

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M.; Jensen, M.; Hogan, R.; O’Connor, E.; Huang, D.

    2010-03-15

    Numerical weather prediction models (ECMWF, NCEP) are evaluated using ARM observational data collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Cloud forecasts generated by the models are compared with cloud microphysical quantities, retrieved using a variety of parameterizations. Information gained from this comparison will be utilized during the FASTER project, as models are evaluated for their ability to reproduce fast physical processes detected in the observations. Here the model performance is quantified against the observations through a statistical analysis. Observations from remote sensing instruments (radar, lidar, radiometer and radiosonde) are used to derive the cloud microphysical quantities: ice water content, liquid water content, ice effective radius and liquid effective radius. Unfortunately, discrepancies in the derived quantities arise when different retrieval schemes are applied to the observations. The uncertainty inherent in retrieving the microphysical quantities using various retrievals is estimated from the range of output microphysical values. ARM microphysical retrieval schemes (Microbase, Mace) are examined along with the CloudNet retrieval processing of data from the ARM sites for this purpose. Through the interfacing of CloudNet and “ARM” processing schemes an ARMNET product is produced and employed as accepted observations in the assessment of cloud model predictions.

  14. Microphysical properties of the November 26 cirrus cloud retrieved by Doppler radar/IR radiometer technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matrosov, Sergey Y.; Kropfli, Robert A.; Orr, Brad W.; Snider, Jack B.

    1993-01-01

    Gaining information about cirrus cloud microphysics requires development of remote sensing techniques. In an earlier paper. Matrosov et al. (1992) proposed a method to estimate ice water path (IWP) (i.e., vertically integrated ice mass content IMC) and characteristic particle size averaged through the cloud from combined groundbased measurements of radar reflectivities and IR brightness temperatures of the downwelling thermal radiation in the transparency region of 10-12 mu m. For some applications, the vertically averaged characteristic particle sizes and IWP could be the appropriate information to use. However, vertical profiles of cloud microphysical parameters can provide a better understanding of cloud structure and development. Here we describe a further development of the previous method by Matrosov et al. (1992) for retrieving vertical profiles of cirrus particle sizes and IMC rather than their vertically averaged values. In addition to measurements of radar reflectivities, the measurements of Doppler velocities are used in the new method. This provides us with two vertical profiles of measurements to infer two vertical profiles of unknowns, i.e., particle characteristic sizes and IMC. Simultaneous measurements of the IR brightness temperatures are still needed to resolve an ambiguity in particle size-fall velocity relationships.

  15. Microphysical relationships of clouds observed during March 2000 Cloud IOP at SGP Site and important implications

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C.; Liu, Y.

    2010-03-15

    Cloud droplet size distributions ---- hence the key microphysical quantities of climate importance (e.g., the total droplet concentration, liquid water content, relative dispersion, mean-volume radius, radar reflectivity, and effective radius) are determined by different physical mechanisms such as pre-cloud aerosols, cloud updraft and turbulent entrainment-mixing processes. Therefore, the relationships among these microphysical properties are expected to behave differently in response to aerosols, cloud updrafts and turbulent entrainment-mixing processes. Identifying and quantifying the influences on these microphysical relationships of the various mechanisms is critical for accurately representing cloud microphysics in climate models and for reducing the uncertainty in estimates of aerosol indirect effects. This study first examines the characteristics of the relationships between relative dispersion, droplet concentration, liquid water content, mean-volume radius, effective radius and radar reflectivity calculated from in-situ measurements of cloud droplet size distributions collected during the March 2000 Cloud IOP at the SGP site. The relationships are further analyzed to dissect the effects from different mechanisms/factors (aerosols, updraft, and different turbulent entrainment-mixing processes). Potential applications to improve radar retrievals of cloud properties will be explored as well.

  16. Evaluation of Retrieval Algorithms for Ice Microphysics Using CALIPSO/CloudSat and Earthcare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hajime; Sato, Kaori; Hagihara, Yuichiro; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Borovoi, Anatoli; Konoshonkin, Alexander; Kustova, Natalia

    2016-06-01

    We developed lidar-radar algorithms that can be applied to Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar and CloudSat data to retrieve ice microphysics. The algorithms were the extended version of previously reported algorithm [1] and can treat both of nadir pointing of CALIPSO lidar period and 3°-off-nadir pointing one. We used the scattering data bank produced by the physical optics methods [2] and created lidar look-up tables of quasi-horizontally oriented ice plates (Q2D-plate) for nadir- and off-nadir lidar pointing periods. Then LUTs were implemented in the ice retrieval algorithms. We performed several sensitivity studies to evaluate uncertainties in the retrieved ice microphysics due to ice particle orientation and shape. It was found that the implementation of orientation of horizontally oriented ice plate model in the algorithm drastically improved the retrieval results in both for nadir- and off-nadir lidar pointing periods. Differences in the retrieved microphysics between only randomly oriented ice model (3D-ice) and mixture of 3D-ice and Q2Dplate model were large especially in off-nadir period, e.g., 100% in effective radius and one order in ice water content, respectively. And differences in the retrieved ice microphysics among different mixture models were smaller than about 50% for effective radius in nadir period.

  17. Investigation of warm-cloud microphysics using a multi-component cloud model: Interactive effects of the aerosol spectrum. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zahn, S.G.

    1993-12-01

    Clouds, especially low, warm, boundary-layer clouds, play an important role in regulating the earth's climate due to their significant contribution to the global albedo. The radiative effects of individual clouds are controlled largely by cloud microstructure, which is itself sensitive to the concentration and spectral distribution of the atmospheric aerosol. Increases in aerosol particle concentrations from anthropogenic activity could result in increased cloud albedo and global cloudiness, increasing the amount of reflected solar radiation. However, the effects of increased aerosol particle concentrations could be offset by the presence of giant or ultragiant aerosol particles. A one-dimensional, multi-component microphysical cloud model has been used to demonstrate the effects of aerosol particle spectral variations on the microstructure of warm clouds. Simulations performed with this model demonstrate that the introduction of increased concentrations of giant aerosol particles has a destabilizing effect on the cloud microstructure. Also, it is shown that warm-cloud microphysical processes modify the aerosol particle spectrum, favoring the generation of the largest sized particles via the collision-coalescence process. These simulations provide further evidence that the effect of aerosol particles on cloud microstructure must be addressed when considering global climate forecasts.

  18. Cloud microphysical properties of convective clouds sampled during the Convective Precipitation Experiment (COPE) experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R.; French, J.; Leon, D.; Plummer, D. M.; Lasher-Trapp, S.; Blyth, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The COnvective Precipitation Experiment (COPE), occurring in the southwest UK during Summer 2013, was motivated to improve quantitative precipitation forecasting, in part, with the aim to increase understanding of the warm and cold precipitation processes that can produce heavy convective rainfall in the southwest UK. In particular, we examine the creation of graupel embryos, the Hallett-Mossop process, and the effect of entrainment on these processes. To characterize the evolution of cloud microphysical properties of maturing thunderstorms, the University of Wyoming King Air sampled the tops of fresh turrets between -15 and 0. Data sampled by the Cloud Droplet Probe, Cloud Imaging grayscale Probe (CIP-Grey) and 2D Precipitation Probe during four missions are examined. Here we characterize the variability of the cloud liquid and ice particle size distributions and liquid water contents (LWC) inside updraft cores, as a function of temperature, T, and vertical velocity, w. On one of the days, the number concentration of particles with maximum dimension D > 300 μm, N>300, was less than 1 L-1, with very few ice hydrometeors observed. However, on the other missions, N>300 ranged from 1 L-1 to 250 L-1. The CIP-Grey detected liquid drops at T > -5 and a mixture of graupel and rimed columns at T < -5 for these missions, consistent with the warm rain process providing the frozen drops necessary to form graupel embryos that initiate secondary production. In general, LWC relative to adiabatic decreased from 0.75 to 0.2 with height and was lowest when N>300 > 1 L-1, consistent with precipitation growth by collision-coalescence and accretion. Finally, ice precipitation was primarily present at w < 7 m s-1 and greatest when w < 3 m s-1, suggesting that w influences the number of ice particles generated in the updraft cores sampled during COPE-MED.

  19. The global atmospheric electric circuit and its effects on cloud microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    2008-06-01

    This review is an overview of progress in understanding the theory and observation of the global atmospheric electric circuit, with the focus on its dc aspects, and its short and long term variability. The effects of the downward ionosphere-earth current density, Jz, on cloud microphysics, with its variability as an explanation for small observed changes in weather and climate, will also be reviewed. The global circuit shows responses to external as well as internal forcing. External forcing arises from changes in the distribution of conductivity due to changes in the cosmic ray flux and other energetic space particle fluxes, and at high magnetic latitudes from solar wind electric fields. Internal forcing arises from changes in the generators and changes in volcanic and anthropogenic aerosols in the troposphere and stratosphere. All these result in spatial and temporal variation in Jz. Variations in Jz affect the production of space charge in layer clouds, with the charges being transferred to droplets and aerosol particles. New observations and new analyses are consistent with non-negligible effects of the charges on the microphysics of such clouds. Observed effects are small, but of high statistical significance for cloud cover and precipitation changes, with resulting atmospheric temperature, pressure and dynamics changes. These effects are detectable on the day-to-day timescale for repeated Jz changes of order 10%, and are thus second order electrical effects. The implicit first order effects have not, as yet, been incorporated into basic cloud and aerosol physics. Long term (multidecadal through millennial) global circuit changes, due to solar activity modulating the galactic cosmic ray flux, are an order of magnitude greater at high latitudes and in the stratosphere, as can be inferred from geological cosmogenic isotope records. Proxies for climate change in the same stratified depositories show strong correlations of climate with the inferred global circuit

  20. Impact of nucleation schemes on cirrus cloud formation in a GCM with sectional microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardeen, C.; Gettelman, A.; Jensen, E. J.; Heymsfield, A.; Delanoe, J.; Deng, M.

    2012-12-01

    We have implemented a sectional microphysics scheme for ice clouds based upon the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), which allows for a size resolved treatment of ice particle nucleation, condensational growth, coagulation, sedimentation and detrainment. Detrained and in situ formed ice particles are tracked separately in the model allowing for different microphysical assumptions and separate analysis. Cloud ice from CAM5/CARMA simulations compare better with satellite observations than those with the standard CAM5 two-moment microphysics. CAM5/CARMA has a prognostic treatment for snow, which results in improved ice mass and representation of a melting layer that is absent in CAM5. Here we explore the sensitivity of the simulations to different nucleation schemes including: homogeneous freezing based on Koop et al. (2000), homogeneous freezing based upon Aerosols Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber measurement (Möhler et al., 2010), heterogeneous nucleation with dust aerosols, and heterogeous nucleation with glassy aerosols (Murray et al. 2010). The initial size for detrained ice particles in CAM5/CARMA is temperature dependent based upon a fits to observations from Heymsfield et al. (2010). We explore the sensitivity of the model to different choices for these fits. Results from these simulations are compared to retrievals of water vapor from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), ice cloud properties from CloudSat-CALIPSO observations (Delanoë and Hogan, 2010; Deng et al. 2010) and to aircraft observations from several field campaigns including: the Costa Rica Aura Validation Experiment (CR-AVE), the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4), the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) and the Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX).

  1. Soot microphysical effects on liquid clouds, a multi-model investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Easter, R. C.; Ferrachat, S.; Ghan, S. J.; Hoose, C.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevâg, A.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Liu, X.; Lohmann, U.; Menon, S.; Quaas, J.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Takemura, T.; Yan, N.

    2010-10-01

    We use global models to explore the microphysical effects of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds. Although absorption of solar radiation by soot warms the atmosphere, soot may cause climate cooling due to its contribution to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and therefore cloud brightness. Six global models conducted three soot experiments; four of the models had detailed aerosol microphysical schemes. The average cloud radiative response to biofuel soot (black and organic carbon), including both indirect and semi-direct effects, is -0.11 Wm-2, comparable in size but opposite in sign to the respective direct effect. In a more idealized fossil fuel black carbon experiment, some models calculated a~positive cloud response because soot provides a deposition sink for sulfuric and nitric acids and secondary organics, decreasing nucleation and evolution of viable CCN. Biofuel soot particles were also typically assumed to be larger and more hygroscopic than for fossil fuel soot and therefore caused more negative forcing, as also found in previous studies. Diesel soot (black and organic carbon) experiments had relatively smaller cloud impacts with five of the models <±0.06 Wm-2 from clouds. The results are subject to the caveats that variability among models, and regional and interrannual variability for each model, are large. This comparison together with previously published results stresses the need to further constrain aerosol microphysical schemes. The non-linearities resulting from the competition of opposing effects on the CCN population make it difficult to extrapolate from idealized experiments to likely impacts of realistic potential emission changes.

  2. Soot microphysical effects on liquid clouds, a multi-model investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Easter, R. C.; Ferrachat, S.; Ghan, S. J.; Hoose, C.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Liu, X.; Lohmann, U.; Menon, S.; Quaas, J.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Takemura, T.; Yan, N.

    2011-02-01

    We use global models to explore the microphysical effects of carbonaceous aerosols on liquid clouds. Although absorption of solar radiation by soot warms the atmosphere, soot may cause climate cooling due to its contribution to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and therefore cloud brightness. Six global models conducted three soot experiments; four of the models had detailed aerosol microphysical schemes. The average cloud radiative response to biofuel soot (black and organic carbon), including both indirect and semi-direct effects, is -0.11 Wm-2, comparable in size but opposite in sign to the respective direct effect. In a more idealized fossil fuel black carbon experiment, some models calculated a positive cloud response because soot provides a deposition sink for sulfuric and nitric acids and secondary organics, decreasing nucleation and evolution of viable CCN. Biofuel soot particles were also typically assumed to be larger and more hygroscopic than for fossil fuel soot and therefore caused more negative forcing, as also found in previous studies. Diesel soot (black and organic carbon) experiments had relatively smaller cloud impacts with five of the models <±0.06 Wm-2 from clouds. The results are subject to the caveats that variability among models, and regional and interrannual variability for each model, are large. This comparison together with previously published results stresses the need to further constrain aerosol microphysical schemes. The non-linearities resulting from the competition of opposing effects on the CCN population make it difficult to extrapolate from idealized experiments to likely impacts of realistic potential emission changes.

  3. Soot microphysical effects on liquid clouds, a multi-model investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, D; Balkanski, Y; Bauer, S; Easter, Richard C; Ferrachat, S; Ghan, Steven J; Hoose, C; Iversen, T; Kirkevag, A; Kristjansson, J E; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, U; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, J; Schulz, M; Seland, O; Takemura, T; Yan, N

    2011-02-10

    We use global models to explore the microphysical effects of carbonaceous aerosols on liquid clouds. Although absorption of solar radiation by soot warms the atmosphere, soot may cause climate cooling due to its contribution to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and therefore cloud brightness. Six global models conducted three soot experiments; four of the models had detailed aerosol microphysical schemes. The average cloud radiative response to biofuel soot (black and organic carbon), including both indirect and semi-direct effects, is -0.11Wm-2, comparable in size but opposite in sign to the respective direct effect. In a more idealized fossil fuel black carbon experiment, some models calculated a positive cloud response because soot provides a deposition sink for sulfuric and nitric acids and secondary organics, decreasing nucleation and evolution of viable CCN. Biofuel soot particles were also typically assumed to be larger and more hygroscopic than for fossil fuel soot and therefore caused more negative forcing, as also found in previous studies. Diesel soot (black and organic carbon) experiments had relatively smaller cloud impacts with five Correspondence to: D. Koch (dorothy.koch@science.doe.gov) of the models <±0.06Wm-2 from clouds. The results are subject to the caveats that variability among models, and regional and interrannual variability for each model, are large. This comparison together with previously published results stresses the need to further constrain aerosol microphysical schemes. The non-linearities resulting from the competition of opposing effects on the CCN population make it difficult to extrapolate from idealized experimen

  4. An Intercomparison of Microphysical Retrieval Algorithms for Upper-Tropospheric Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; d'Entremont, Robert; DeSlover, Daniel; Mace, Gerald G.; Matrosov, S. Y.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Minnis, Patrick; Mitchell, David; Sassen, Kenneth; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.; Wang, Zhien

    2007-02-01

    The large horizontal extent, location in the cold upper troposphere, and ice composition make cirrus clouds important modulators of the earth’s radiation budget and climate. Cirrus cloud microphysical properties are difficult to measure and model because they are inhomogeneous in nature and their ice crystal size distribution and habit are not well characterized. Accurate retrievals of cloud properties are crucial for improving the representation of cloud scale processes in large-scale models and for accurately predicting the earth’s future climate. A number of passive and active remote sensing retrievals exist for estimating the microphysical properties of upper tropospheric clouds. We believe significant progress has been made in the evolution of these retrieval algorithms in the last decade; however, there is room for improvement. Members of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) Cloud Properties Working Group are involved in an intercomparison of optical depth (tau), ice water path, and characteristic particle size in ice clouds retrieved using ground-based instruments. The goals of this intercomparison are to evaluate the accuracy of state-of-the-art algorithms, quantify the uncertainties, and make recommendations for improvement. Currently, there is significant scatter in the algorithms for difficult clouds with very small optical depths (tau<0.3) and thick ice clouds (tau>1). The good news is that for thin cirrus (0.3cloud properties with aircraft and satellite measurements, and perform a radiative closure experiment to begin gauging the accuracy of these retrieval algorithms.

  5. UV Raman lidar measurements of relative humidity for the characterization of cirrus cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.; Lin, R.-F.; Maestri, T.; Rizzi, R.; Masiello, G.

    2009-11-01

    Raman lidar measurements performed in Potenza by the Raman lidar system BASIL in the presence of cirrus clouds are discussed. Measurements were performed on 6 September 2004 in the frame of the Italian phase of the EAQUATE Experiment. The major feature of BASIL is represented by its capability to perform high-resolution and accurate measurements of atmospheric temperature and water vapour, and consequently relative humidity, both in daytime and night-time, based on the application of the rotational and vibrational Raman lidar techniques in the UV. BASIL is also capable to provide measurements of the particle backscatter and extinction coefficient, and consequently lidar ratio (at the time of these measurements, only at one wavelength), which are fundamental to infer geometrical and microphysical properties of clouds. A case study is discussed in order to assess the capability of Raman lidars to measure humidity in presence of cirrus clouds, both below and inside the cloud. While air inside the cloud layers is observed to be always under-saturated with respect to water, both ice super-saturation and under-saturation conditions are found inside these clouds. Upper tropospheric moistening is observed below the lower cloud layer. The synergic use of the data derived from the ground based Raman Lidar and of spectral radiances measured by the NAST-I Airborne Spectrometer allows the determination of the temporal evolution of the atmospheric cooling/heating rates due to the presence of the cirrus cloud. Lidar measurements beneath the cirrus cloud layer have been interpreted using a 1-D cirrus cloud model with explicit microphysics. The 1-D simulations indicate that sedimentation-moistening has contributed significantly to the moist anomaly, but other mechanisms are also contributing. This result supports the hypothesis that the observed mid-tropospheric humidification is a real feature which is strongly influenced by the sublimation of precipitating ice crystals. Results

  6. UV Raman lidar measurements of relative humidity for the characterization of cirrus cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.; Lin, R.-F.; Maestri, T.; Rizzi, R.; Masiello, G.

    2009-07-01

    Raman lidar measurements performed in Potenza by the Raman lidar system BASIL in the presence of cirrus clouds are discussed. Measurements were performed on 6 September 2004 in the frame of Italian phase of the EAQUATE Experiment. The major feature of BASIL is represented by its capability to perform high-resolution and accurate measurements of atmospheric temperature and water vapour, and consequently relative humidity, both in daytime and night-time, based on the application of the rotational and vibrational Raman lidar techniques in the UV. BASIL is also capable to provide measurements of the particle backscatter and extinction coefficient, and consequently lidar ratio (at the time of these measurements only at one wavelength), which are fundamental to infer geometrical and microphysical properties of clouds. A case study is discussed in order to assess the capability of Raman lidars to measure humidity in presence of cirrus clouds, both below and inside the cloud. While air inside the cloud layers is observed to be always under-saturated with respect to water, both ice super-saturation and under-saturation conditions are found inside these clouds. Upper tropospheric moistening is observed below the lower cloud layer. The synergic use of the data derived from the ground based Raman Lidar and of spectral radiances measured by the NAST-I Airborne Spectrometer allows to determine the temporal evolution of the atmospheric cooling/heating rates due to the presence of the cirrus cloud anvil. Lidar measurements beneath the cirrus cloud layer have been interpreted using a 1-D cirrus cloud model with explicit microphysics. The 1-D simulations indicates that sedimentation-moistening has contributed significantly to the moist anomaly, but other mechanisms are also contributing. This result supports the hypothesis that the observed mid-tropospheric humidification is a real feature which is strongly influenced by the sublimation of precipitating ice crystals. Results

  7. Airborne observations of the microphysical structure of two contrasting cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, S. J.; Choularton, T. W.; Lloyd, G.; Crosier, J.; Bower, K. N.; Gallagher, M.; Abel, S. J.; Cotton, R. J.; Brown, P. R. A.; Fugal, J. P.; Schlenczek, O.; Borrmann, S.; Pickering, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    We present detailed airborne in situ measurements of cloud microphysics in two midlatitude cirrus clouds, collected as part of the Cirrus Coupled Cloud-Radiation Experiment. A new habit recognition algorithm for sorting cloud particle images using a neural network is introduced. Both flights observed clouds that were related to frontal systems, but one was actively developing while the other dissipated as it was sampled. The two clouds showed distinct differences in particle number, habit, and size. However, a number of common features were observed in the 2-D stereo data set, including a distinct bimodal size distribution within the higher-temperature regions of the clouds. This may result from a combination of local heterogeneous nucleation and large particles sedimenting from aloft. Both clouds had small ice crystals (<100 µm) present at all levels However, this small ice mode is not present in observations from a holographic probe. This raises the possibility that the small ice observed by optical array probes may at least be in part an instrument artifact due to the counting of out-of-focus large particles as small ice. The concentrations of ice crystals were a factor 10 higher in the actively growing cloud with the stronger updrafts, with a mean concentration of 261 L-1 compared to 29 L-1 in the decaying case. Particles larger than 700 µm were largely absent from the decaying cirrus case. A comparison with ice-nucleating particle parameterizations suggests that for the developing case the ice concentrations at the lowest temperatures are best explained by homogenous nucleation.

  8. Exploring the Effects of Cloud Vertical Structure on Cloud Microphysical Retrievals based on Polarized Reflectances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. J.; Zhang, Z.; Platnick, S. E.; Ackerman, A. S.; Cornet, C.; Baum, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    A polarized cloud reflectance simulator was developed by coupling an LES cloud model with a polarized radiative transfer model to assess the capabilities of polarimetric cloud retrievals. With future remote sensing campaigns like NASA's Aerosols/Clouds/Ecosystems (ACE) planning to feature advanced polarimetric instruments it is important for the cloud remote sensing community to understand the retrievable information available and the related systematic/methodical limitations. The cloud retrieval simulator we have developed allows us to probe these important questions in a realistically relevant test bed. Our simulator utilizes a polarized adding-doubling radiative transfer model and an LES cloud field from a DHARMA simulation (Ackerman et al. 2004) with cloud properties based on the stratocumulus clouds observed during the DYCOMS-II field campaign. In this study we will focus on how the vertical structure of cloud microphysics can influence polarized cloud effective radius retrievals. Numerous previous studies have explored how retrievals based on total reflectance are affected by cloud vertical structure (Platnick 2000, Chang and Li 2002) but no such studies about the effects of vertical structure on polarized retrievals exist. Unlike the total cloud reflectance, which is predominantly multiply scattered light, the polarized reflectance is primarily the result of singly scattered photons. Thus the polarized reflectance is sensitive to only the uppermost region of the cloud (tau~<1) where photons can scatter once and still escape before being scattered again. This means that retrievals based on polarized reflectance have the potential to reveal behaviors specific to the cloud top. For example cloud top entrainment of dry air, a major influencer on the microphysical development of cloud droplets, can be potentially studied with polarimetric retrievals.

  9. Studies of Radiation and Microphysics in Cirrus and Marine Stratocumulus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Two tasks were completed during this period. In the first, we examined the polarization of millimeter-wavelength radar beams scattered by ice crystals. Because of their non-spherical shape and size, ice crystals depolarize the incident polarized radar beam. In principle, this depolarization can be used to identify ice from liquid water, as well as provide some information on size. However, the amount of de-polarization is small, producing only a weak signal at the receiver. Our task was to determine the magnitude of such a signal and decide if our radar would be capable of measuring it under typical cirrus conditions. The theoretical study was carried out by Henrietta Lemke, a visiting graduate student from Germany. She had prior experience using a discrete dipole code to compute scattering depolarization. Dr. Kultegin Aydin of the Penn State Electrical Engineering Department, who is also expert in this area, consulted with us on this project at no cost to the project. Our conclusion was that the depolarization signal is too weak to be usefully measured by our system. Therefore we proceeded no further in this study. The second task involved the study of the effect of stratus microphysics on surface cloud forcing. Manajit Sengupta, a graduate student, and the project PI jointly carried out this task. The study used data culled from over a year of continuous radar and radiometer observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Oklahoma. The study compared solar radiation calculations made using constant microphysics with calculations made using a retrieved mean particle size. The results showed that on average the constant microphysics produced the correct forcing when compared with the observed forcing. We conclude, therefore, that there is little impetus on radiation grounds alone to include explicit microphysics in climate models. The question of pollutant particle emission impacts on microphysics remains to be resolved. A manuscript is in

  10. A Microphysics Guide to Cirrus Clouds - Part I: Cirrus Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Martina; Rolf, Christian; Anna, Luebke; Armin, Afchine; Nicole, Spelten; Anja, Costa; Jessica, Meyer; Martin, Zöger; Jessica, Smith; Robert, Herman; Bernhard, Buchholz; Volker, Ebert; Darrel, Baumgardner; Stephan, Borrmann; Marcus, Klingebiel; Linnea, Avallone

    2016-04-01

    The microphysical and radiative properties of cirrus clouds continue to be beyond understanding and thus still represent one of the largest uncertainties in the prediction of the Earth's climate (IPCC, 2013). Our study provides a guide to cirrus microphysics, which is compiled from an extensive set of model simulations, covering the broad range of atmospheric conditions for cirrus formation and evolution (Krämer et al., 2015, ACPD). The model results are portrayed in the same parameter space as field measurements, i.e. in the Ice Water Content-Temperature (IWC-T) parameter space. We validate this cirrus analysis approach by evaluating cirrus data sets from seventeen aircraft campaigns, conducted in the last fifteen years, spending about 94 h in cirrus over Europe, Australia, Brazil as well as Southern and Northern America. Altogether, the approach of this study is to track cirrus IWC development with temperature by means of model simulations, compare with observations and then assign, to a certain degree, cirrus microphysics to the observations. Indeed, the field observations show characteristics expected from the simulated cirrus guide. For example, high/low IWCs are found together with high/low ice crystal concentrations. An important finding from our study is the classification of two types of cirrus with differing formation mechanisms and microphysical properties: the first cirrus type is rather thin with lower IWCs and forms directly as ice (in-situ origin cirrus). The second type consists predominantly of thick cirrus originating from mixed phase clouds (i.e. via freezing of liquid droplets - liquid origin cirrus), which are completely glaciated while lifting to the cirrus formation temperature region (< 235 K). In the European field campaigns, in-situ origin cirrus occur frequently at slow updrafts in low and high pressure systems, but also in conjunction with faster updrafts. Also, liquid origin cirrus mostly related to warm conveyor belts are found. In

  11. Retrieving microphysical properties and air motion of cirrus clouds based on the doppler moments method using cloud radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Lingzhi; Liu, Liping; Deng, Min; Zhou, Xiuji

    2012-05-01

    Radar parameters including radar reflectivity, Doppler velocity, and Doppler spectrum width were obtained from Doppler spectrum moments. The Doppler spectrum moment is the convolution of both the particle spectrum and the mean air vertical motion. Unlike strong precipitation, the motion of particles in cirrus clouds is quite close to the air motion around them. In this study, a method of Doppler moments was developed and used to retrieve cirrus cloud microphysical properties such as the mean air vertical velocity, mass-weighted diameter, effective particle size, and ice content. Ice content values were retrieved using both the Doppler spectrum method and classic Z-IWC (radar reflectivity-ice water content) relationships; however, the former is a more reasonable method.

  12. Interactions of radiation, microphysics, and turbulence in the evolution of cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yu

    2000-12-01

    A two-dimensional cirrus cloud model has been developed to investigate the interaction and feedback of radiation, ice microphysics, and turbulence-scale turbulence, and their influence on the evolution of cirrus clouds. The new features of the model include a detailed ice microphysical module for the prediction of ice crystal size distributions, a radiation scheme which interacts with the ice crystal size distribution via ice water content (IWC) and a mean effective ice crystal size, the effects of radiation on the diffusional growth of ice crystals, and a second-order closure for turbulence. Simulation results show that initial cloud formation occurs through ice nucleation associated with dynamic and thermodynamic forcings. Radiative processes enhance both the growth of ice crystals at the cloud top by radiative cooling and the sublimation of ice crystals in the lower region by radiative heating. In addition, the radiation effect on individual ice crystals through diffusional growth is shown to be significant. Turbulence begins to play a substantial role in cloud evolution during the maintenance and dissipation period of the cirrus cloud life cycle. The inclusion of turbulence tends to generate more intermediate-to-large ice crystals, especially in the middle and lower parts of the cloud. A three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer model has also been developed to simulate the transfer of solar and thermal infrared radiation in inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. The model utilizes a diffusion approximation approach for application to inhomogeneous media employing Cartesian coordinates. The extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor are parameterized in terms of the ice water content and mean effective ice crystal size. We employ the correlated k- distribution method for incorporation of gaseous absorption in multiple scattering atmospheres. Delta- function adjustment is used to account for the strong forward diffraction nature of the phase

  13. A study of cloud microphysics and precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau by radar observations and cloud-resolving model simulations: Cloud Microphysics over Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Wenhua; Sui, Chung-Hsiung; Fan, Jiwen; Hu, Zhiqun; Zhong, Lingzhi

    2016-11-27

    Cloud microphysical properties and precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) are unique because of the high terrains, clean atmosphere, and sufficient water vapor. With dual-polarization precipitation radar and cloud radar measurements during the Third Tibetan Plateau Atmospheric Scientific Experiment (TIPEX-III), the simulated microphysics and precipitation by the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) with the Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences (CAMS) microphysics and other microphysical schemes are investigated through a typical plateau rainfall event on 22 July 2014. Results show that the WRF-CAMS simulation reasonably reproduces the spatial distribution of 24-h accumulated precipitation, but has limitations in simulating time evolution of precipitation rates. The model-calculated polarimetric radar variables have biases as well, suggesting bias in modeled hydrometeor types. The raindrop sizes in convective region are larger than those in stratiform region indicated by the small intercept of raindrop size distribution in the former. The sensitivity experiments show that precipitation processes are sensitive to the changes of warm rain processes in condensation and nucleated droplet size (but less sensitive to evaporation process). Increasing droplet condensation produces the best area-averaged rain rate during weak convection period compared with the observation, suggesting a considerable bias in thermodynamics in the baseline simulation. Increasing the initial cloud droplet size causes the rain rate reduced by half, an opposite effect to that of increasing droplet condensation.

  14. A New Two-Moment Bulk Stratiform Cloud Microphysics Scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model, Version 3 (CAM3). Part II: Single-Column and Global Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gettelman, A.; Morrison, H.; Ghan, Steven J.

    2008-08-11

    The global performance of a new 2-moment cloud microphysics scheme for a General Circulation Model (GCM) is presented and evaluated relative to observations. The scheme produces reasonable representations of cloud particle size and number concentration when compared to observations, and represents expected and observed spatial variations in cloud microphysical quantities. The scheme has smaller particles and higher number concentrations over land than the standard bulk microphysics in the GCM, and is able to balance the radiation budget of the planet with 60% the liquid water of the standard scheme, in better agreement with observations. The new scheme treats both the mixing ratio and number concentration of rain and snow, and is therefore able to differentiate the two key regimes, consisting of drizzle in shallow warm clouds and larger rain drops in deeper cloud systems. The modeled rain and snow size distributions are consistent with observations.

  15. Aerosol Impacts on Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Stratocumulus Clouds in the Southeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R.; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2011-12-01

    particle sizes, down to at least 55 nm in size, act as droplet nuclei in these stratocumulus clouds. A detailed LES microphysical model was used to show this can occur without invoking differences in chemical composition. Aerosol number concentration in the >0.05 and >0.1 μm size ranges was correlated with droplet number concentration, and anti-correlated with droplet effective radius, and the effect is statistically significant. The impact of aerosol pollutants was to increase droplet number and decrease droplet size within a region extending about 1000 km offshore. Cloud droplets were more numerous and smaller near shore, and there was less drizzle. However, MODIS satellite measurements were used to show that despite the smaller droplets near shore, cloud albedo is not higher near shore than offshore. This is due to the generally thinner clouds and lower liquid water path near shore.

  16. Continuous Profiles of Cloud Microphysical Properties for the Fixed Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M; Jensen, K

    2006-06-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program defined a specific metric for the third quarter of Fiscal Year 2006 to produce and refine a one-year continuous time series of cloud microphysical properties based on cloud radar measurements for each of the fixed ARM sites. To accomplish this metric, we used a combination of recently developed algorithms that interpret radar reflectivity profiles, lidar backscatter profiles, and microwave brightness temperatures into the context of the underlying cloud microphysical structure.

  17. Two-moment Bulk Stratiform Cloud Microphysics in the Grid-point Atmospheric Model of IAP LASG (GAMIL)

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Bin; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Minghuai

    2013-05-01

    A two-moment bulk stratiform microphysics scheme, including recently developed physically-based droplet activation/ice nucleation parameterizations has been implemented into the Grid-point Atmospheric Model of IAP LASG (GAMIL) as an effort to enhance the model capability for studying aerosol indirect effects. Unlike the previous one-moment cloud microphysics scheme, the new scheme produces reasonable representation of cloud particle size and number concentration. This scheme captures the observed spatial variations in cloud droplet number concentrations. Simulated ice crystal number concentrations in cirrus clouds qualitatively agree with in-situ observations. The longwave and shortwave cloud forcing are in better agreement with observations. Sensitivity tests show that the column cloud droplet number concentrations calculated from two different droplet activation parameterizations are similar. However, ice crystal number concentration in mixed-phased clouds is sensitive to different heterogeneous freezing formulations. The simulation with high ice crystal number concentration in mixed-phase clouds has less liquid water path and weaker cloud forcing. Furthermore, ice crystal number concentration in cirrus clouds is sensitive to different ice nucleation parameterizations. Sensitivity tests also suggest that impact of pre-existing ice crystals on homogeneous freezing in old clouds should be taken into account.

  18. The Microphysics of Antarctic Clouds - Part one Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachlan-Cope, Tom; Listowski, Constantino; O'Shea, Sebastian; Bower, Keith

    2016-04-01

    During the Antarctic summer of 2010 and 2011 in-situ measurements of clouds were made over the Antarctic Peninsula and in 2015 similar measurements were made over the eastern Weddell Sea using the British Antarctic Surveys instrumented Twin Otter aircraft. This paper contrasts the clouds found on either side of the Antarctic Peninsula with the clouds over the eastern Weddell Sea, paying particular attention to the total number of ice and water particles found in the clouds. The differences found between the clouds are considered in relation to the sources of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei that are expected to be active in the different cases. In particular it was found that the number of ice nuclei was very low over the Weddell Sea when compared to other regions.

  19. Retrievals of ice cloud microphysical properties of deep convective systems using radar measurements: Convective Cloud Microphysical Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Jingjing; Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Wang, Jingyu; Homeyer, Cameron R.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Fan, Jiwen

    2016-09-23

    This study presents new algorithms for retrieving ice cloud microphysical properties (ice water content (IWC) and median mass diameter (Dm)) for the stratiform and thick anvil regions of Deep Convective Systems (DCSs) using Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) reflectivity and recently developed empirical relationships from aircraft in situ measurements during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). A classic DCS case on 20 May 2011 is used to compare the retrieved IWC profiles with other retrieval and cloud-resolving model simulations. The mean values of each retrieved and simulated IWC fall within one standard derivation of the other two. The statistical results from six selected cases during MC3E show that the aircraft in situ derived IWC and Dm are 0.47 ± 0.29 g m-3 and 2.02 ± 1.3 mm, while the mean values of retrievals have a positive bias of 0.16 g m-3 (34%) and a negative bias of 0.39 mm (19%). To validate the newly developed retrieval algorithms from this study, IWC and Dm are performed with other DCS cases during Bow Echo and Mesoscale Convective Vortex Experiment (BAMEX) field campaign using composite gridded NEXRAD reflectivity and compared with in situ IWC and Dm from aircraft. A total of 64 1-min collocated aircraft and radar samples are available for comparisons, and the averages of radar retrieved and aircraft in situ measured IWCs are 1.22 g m-3 and 1.26 g m-3 with a correlation of 0.5, and their averaged Dm values are 2.15 and 1.80 mm. These comparisons have shown that the retrieval algorithms 45 developed during MC3E can retrieve similar ice cloud microphysical properties of DCS to aircraft in situ measurements during BAMEX with median errors of ~40% and ~25% for IWC and Dm retrievals, respectively. This is indicating our retrieval algorithms are suitable for other midlatitude continental DCS ice clouds, especially at stratiform rain and thick anvil regions. In addition, based on the averaged IWC and Dm values during MC3E and

  20. A new single-moment microphysics scheme for cloud-resolving models using observed dependence of ice concentration on temperature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairoutdinov, M.

    2015-12-01

    The representation of microphysics, especially ice microphysics, remains one of the major uncertainties in cloud-resolving models (CRMs). Most of the cloud schemes use the so-called bulk microphysics approach, in which a few moments of such distributions are used as the prognostic variables. The System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) is the CRM that employs two such schemes. The single-moment scheme, which uses only mass for each of the water phases, and the two-moment scheme, which adds the particle concentration for each of the hydrometeor category. Of the two, the single-moment scheme is much more computationally efficient as it uses only two prognostic microphysics variables compared to ten variables used by the two-moment scheme. The efficiency comes from a rather considerable oversimplification of the microphysical processes. For instance, only a sum of the liquid and icy cloud water is predicted with the temperature used to diagnose the mixing ratios of different hydrometeors. The main motivation for using such simplified microphysics has been computational efficiency, especially in the applications of SAM as the super-parameterization in global climate models. Recently, we have extended the single-moment microphysics by adding only one additional prognostic variable, which has, nevertheless, allowed us to separate the cloud ice from liquid water. We made use of some of the recent observations of ice microphysics collected at various parts of the world to parameterize several aspects of ice microphysics that have not been explicitly represented before in our sing-moment scheme. For example, we use the observed broad dependence of ice concentration on temperature to diagnose the ice concentration in addition to prognostic mass. Also, there is no artificial separation between the pristine ice and snow, often used by bulk models. Instead we prescribed the ice size spectrum as the gamma distribution, with the distribution shape parameter controlled by the

  1. Multi-year analysis of ice microphysics derived from CloudSat and CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, H.; Sato, K.; Hagihara, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We conducted multi-year analys of ice microphysics using CloudSat and CALIPSO data. Inter-annual variability, land-ocean differences and seasonal changes of ice microphysical properties were reported for the observation periods from 2006 to 2009. CALIPSO changed the laser tilt angle from 0.3 degrees to 3 degrees off nadir direction on November 2007 and the zonal mean properties of backscattering coefficient and depolarization ratio were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, for low altitude after November 2007. This could be explained by the different backscattering behavior of horizontally oriented ice crystals for the different laser tilt angles. On the other hand, inter-annual variability of zonal mean properties of reflectivity factor observed by CloudSat showed the very similar characteristics during the four years. In addition, the lidar observables were similar when the monthly mean properties were compared for different years before November 2007 and also the same was true for the comparisons after November 2007. These analyses of observables suggested that the inter-annual variability of zonal mean properties of ice microphysics could be considered to be similar. Application of the radar-lidar algorithm showed that the change of the laser tilt angle introduced the large gap between the ice microphysical properties before and after November 2007, if the proper treatment of the oriented ice crystals were not conducted in the retrievals. Global analysis of cloud particle types showed that the frequent occurrence of oriented ice crystals were identified in the temperature range between -10 to -20 degrees C. It is also noted that the significant overestimation of ice water content and significant underestimation of ice effective radius were found if the scattering properties of the horizontally oriented ice particles were not considered. Therefore it is highly demanded that the realistic ice orientation model is implemented in the look up tables

  2. Effect Of Black Carbon Radiative Heating On Cloud Microphysics Over Indo-Gangetic Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    Airborne black carbon (BC), the most significant particulate absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, is an important contributor to both global and regional-scale climate forcing (Tripathi et al., 2005). In context of cloud microphysics, freshly emitted pure BC particles are hydrophobic (i.e., bad cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)). However, exposure in the atmosphere may transform BC to a hydrophilic state if these particles are coated with additional materials, such as sulfate and organic carbon (OC). In a recent study, Conant et al. (2002) has examined the effect of radiative heating of BC on the critical supersaturation spectrum of internally mixed aerosols. Two main uncertainties introduced in this work are due to lack of knowledge of actual state of mixing and realistic distributions of different aerosol species. Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) in the northern India is one of the most polluted regions in the world. The cloud microphysical processes in IGB are very complex and it requires an in depth investigation for understanding of the aerosol-cloud interaction in the region (Tripathi, et al., 2007). In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the effect of radiative heating due to BC particles coated with hydrophilic materials on cloud microphysics over IGB. For this purpose, we have used (a) a two-layer radiative parameter model based on Mie theory (Toon and Ackerman, 1981) to calculate the particle (monodisperse) absorption cross section; (b) a three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer model, the spherical harmonics discrete ordinate method (SHDOM) (Evans,1998), which assumes a tropical continental atmosphere, to simulate the 3D spectral actinic flux over the study region; and (c) Extended Köhler theory (Conant et al., 2002) to simulate the effect the BC radiative heating on cloud droplet activation. The solar wavelength spectrum used ranges from 0.2 to 5 micrometer. Following the in situ measurements and modeling studies on mixing state (Dey

  3. Impact of cloud microphysics on the CSU GCM atmospheric moisture budget

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, L.D.; Randall, D.A.

    1993-12-31

    In this article, we present the first maps of the global distribution of the cloud liquid and ice water contents of the atmosphere. It is shown that the cloud microphysics package produces realistic distributions of both moisture variables. We axe presently adapting the present model so that long-term simulations with the CSU GCM may be made. In the near future, we plan to couple the cloud liquid and ice water contents prognosed by the cloud microphysics package with the cloud fraction and cloud optical properties.

  4. Indian Summer Monsoon Drought 2009: Role of Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Anupam; Taraphdar, Sourav; Halder, Madhuparna; Pokhrel, S.; Chaudhari, H. S.; Salunke, K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Rao, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Cloud dynamics played a fundamental role in defining Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall during drought in 2009. The anomalously negative precipitation was consistent with cloud properties. Although, aerosols inhibited the growth of cloud effective radius in the background of sparse water vapor, their role is secondary. The primary role, however, is played by the interactive feedback between cloud microphysics and dynamics owing to reduced efficient cloud droplet growth, lesser latent heating release and shortage of water content. Cloud microphysical processes were instrumental for the occurrence of ISM drought 2009.

  5. Ground based in situ measurements of arctic cloud microphysical and optical properties at Mount Zeppelin (Ny-Alesund Svalbard)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, Gwennolé; Jourdan, Olivier; Olofson, Frans; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Gourbeyre, Christophe; Febvre, Guy; Dupuy, Régis; Bernard, Christophe; Tunved, Peter; Ancellet, Gérard; Law, Kathy; Wobrock, Wolfram; Shcherbakov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    The high sensitivity of the polar regions to climate perturbation, due to complex feedback mechanisms existing in this region, was shown by many studies (Solomon et al., 2007; Verlinde et al., 2007; IPCC, 2007). In particular, climate simulations suggest that cloud feedback plays an important role in the arctic warming (Vavrus 2004; Hassol, 2005). Moreover, the high seasonal variability of arctic aerosol properties (Engwall et al., 2008; Tunveld et al., 2013) is expected to significantly impact the cloud properties during the winter-summer transition. Field measurements are needed for improved understanding and representation of cloud-aerosol interactions in climate models. Within the CLIMSLIP project (CLimate IMpacts of Short-LIved Pollutants and methane in the arctic), a two months (March-April 2012) ground-based cloud measurement campaign was performed at Mt Zeppelin station, Ny-Alesund, Svalbard. The experimental set-up comprised a wide variety of instruments. A CPI (Cloud Particle Imager) was used for the microphysical and morphological characterization of ice particles. Measurements of sized-resolved liquid cloud parameters were performed by the FSSP-100 (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe). The Nevzorov Probe measured the bulk properties (LWC and IWC) of clouds. The Polar Nephelometer (PN) was used to assess the single scattering properties of an ensemble of cloud particles. This cloud instrumentation combined with the aerosol properties (size distribution and total concentration) continuously measured at the station allowed us to study the variability of the microphysical and optical properties of low level Mixed Phase Clouds (MPC) as well as the aerosol-cloud interaction in the Arctic. Typical properties of MPC, snow precipitation and blowing snow will be presented. First results suggest that liquid water is ubiquitous in arctic low level clouds. Precipitations are characterized by large (typically 1 mm sized) stellar and pristine shape particles

  6. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David D.

    2003-06-01

    A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance observations. The theoretical basis is that the absorption coefficient of ice is stronger than that of liquid water from 10-13 mm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16-25 um. However, due to strong absorption in the rotational water vapor absorption band, the 16-25 um spectral region becomes opaque for significant water vapor burdens (i.e., for precipitable water vapor amounts over approximately 1 cm). The Arctic is characterized by its dry and cold atmosphere, as well as a preponderance of mixed-phase clouds, and thus this approach is applicable to Arctic clouds. Since this approach uses infrared observations, cloud properties are retrieved at night and during the long polar wintertime period. The analysis of the cloud properties retrieved during a 7 month period during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment demonstrates many interesting features. These results show a dependence of the optical depth on cloud phase, differences in the mode radius of the water droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the clouds being thinner in winter and becoming more optically thick in the late spring, and a seasonal trend in the effective size of the water droplets in liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds that is most likely related to aerosol concentration.

  7. Observed microphysical changes in Arctic mixed-phase clouds when transitioning from sea ice to open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Gillian; Jones, Hazel M.; Choularton, Thomas W.; Crosier, Jonathan; Bower, Keith N.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Davies, Rhiannon S.; Renfrew, Ian A.; Elvidge, Andrew D.; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Marenco, Franco; Brown, Philip R. A.; Ricketts, Hugo M. A.; Connolly, Paul J.; Lloyd, Gary; Williams, Paul I.; Allan, James D.; Taylor, Jonathan W.; Liu, Dantong; Flynn, Michael J.

    2016-11-01

    In situ airborne observations of cloud microphysics, aerosol properties, and thermodynamic structure over the transition from sea ice to ocean are presented from the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling And Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) campaign. A case study from 23 March 2013 provides a unique view of the cloud microphysical changes over this transition under cold-air outbreak conditions. Cloud base lifted and cloud depth increased over the transition from sea ice to ocean. Mean droplet number concentrations, Ndrop, also increased from 110 ± 36 cm-3 over the sea ice to 145 ± 54 cm-3 over the marginal ice zone (MIZ). Downstream over the ocean, Ndrop decreased to 63 ± 30 cm-3. This reduction was attributed to enhanced collision-coalescence of droplets within the deep ocean cloud layer. The liquid water content increased almost four fold over the transition and this, in conjunction with the deeper cloud layer, allowed rimed snowflakes to develop and precipitate out of cloud base downstream over the ocean. The ice properties of the cloud remained approximately constant over the transition. Observed ice crystal number concentrations averaged approximately 0.5-1.5 L-1, suggesting only primary ice nucleation was active; however, there was evidence of crystal fragmentation at cloud base over the ocean. Little variation in aerosol particle number concentrations was observed between the different surface conditions; however, some variability with altitude was observed, with notably greater concentrations measured at higher altitudes ( > 800 m) over the sea ice. Near-surface boundary layer temperatures increased by 13 °C from sea ice to ocean, with corresponding increases in surface heat fluxes and turbulent kinetic energy. These significant thermodynamic changes were concluded to be the primary driver of the microphysical evolution of the cloud. This study represents the first investigation, using in situ airborne observations, of cloud microphysical changes with

  8. Studyng the Influence of Aerosols in the Evolution of Cloud Microphysics Procesess Associated with Tropical Cyclone Earl Using Airborne Measurements from the NASA Grip Field Campaing 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Cruz, Y.; Heymsfield, A.; Jenkins, G. S.; Bansemer, A.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud microphysics processes are strongly related to tropical cyclones evolution. Although there have been three decades of research dedicated to understand the role of cloud microphysics in tropical cyclogenesis, there are still questions unanswered. With the intention of fulfill the gaps and to better understand the processes involves in tropical storms formation the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field campaign was conducted during the months of August and September of 2010. In-situ microphysical measurements, including particle size distributions, shapes, liquid/ice water content and supercooled liquid water were obtained from the DC-8 aircraft. A total of 139 hrs of flying science modules were performed including sampling of four named storms (Earl, Gaston, Karl and Matthew). One tropical cyclone, Earl, was one of the major hurricanes of the season reaching a category 4 in the Saffir-Simpson scale. Earl emerged from the West Africa on August 22 as an easterly wave, moved westward and became a tropical storm on August 25 before undergoing rapid intensification. This project seeks to explore the lifecycle of hurricane Earl including the genesis and rapid intensification from a microphysics perspective; to develop a better understanding of the relationship between dust from the Saharan Air Layer and cloud microphysics evolution and to develop a better understanding of how cloud microphysics processes interacts and serve as precursor for thermodynamics processes. An overview of the microphysics measurements as well as preliminary results will be presented.

  9. An Automated System for Measuring Microphysical and Radiative Cloud Characteristics from a Tethered Balloon

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Paul Lawson

    2004-03-15

    OAK-B135 The rate of climate change in polar regions is now felt to be a harbinger of possible global warming. Long-lived, relatively thin stratus clouds play a predominant role in transmitting solar radiation and trapping long wave radiation emitted from open water and melt ponds. In situ measurements of microphysical and radiative properties of Arctic and Antarctic stratus clouds are needed to validate retrievals from remote measurements and simulations using numerical models. While research aircraft can collect comprehensive microphysical and radiative data in clouds, the duration of these aircraft is relatively short (up to about 12 hours). During the course of the Phase II research, a tethered balloon system was developed that supports miniaturized meteorological, microphysical and radiation sensors that can collect data in stratus clouds for days at a time. The tethered balloon system uses a 43 cubic meter balloon to loft a 17 kg sensor package to altitudes u p to 2 km. Power is supplied to the instrument package via two copper conductors in the custom tether. Meteorological, microphysical and radiation data are recorded by the sensor package. Meteorological measurements include pressure, temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction. Radiation measurements are made using a 4-pi radiometer that measures actinic flux at 500 and 800 nm. Position is recorded using a GPS receiver. Microphysical data are obtained using a miniaturized version of an airborne cloud particle imager (CPI). The miniaturized CPI measures the size distribution of water drops and ice crystals from 9 microns to 1.4 mm. Data are recorded onboard the sensor package and also telemetered via a 802.11b wireless communications link. Command signals can also be sent to the computer in the sensor package via the wireless link. In the event of a broken tether, a GMRS radio link to the balloon package is used to heat a wire that burns 15 cm opening in the top of the balloon. The balloon and

  10. METHANE-NITROGEN BINARY NUCLEATION: A NEW MICROPHYSICAL MECHANISM FOR CLOUD FORMATION IN TITAN'S ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, I-Chun; Chen, Jen-Ping; Liang, Mao-Chang

    2012-03-01

    It is known that clouds are present in the troposphere of Titan; however, their formation mechanism, particle size, and chemical composition remain poorly understood. In this study, a two-component (CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}) bin-microphysics model is developed and applied to simulate cloud formation in the troposphere of Titan. A new process, binary nucleation of particles from CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} gases, is considered. The model is validated and calibrated by recent laboratory experiments that synthesize particle formation in Titan-like environments. Our model simulations show that cloud layers can be formed at about 20 km with a particle size ranging from one to several hundred {mu}m and number concentration 10{sup -2} to over 100 cm{sup -3} depending on the strength of the vertical updraft. The particles are formed by binary nucleation and grow via the condensation of both CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} gases, with their N{sub 2} mole fraction varying from <10% in the nucleation stage to >30% in the condensation growth stage. The locally occurring CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} binary nucleation mechanism is strong and could potentially be more important than the falling condensation nuclei mechanism assumed in many current models.

  11. Cirrus cloud model parameterizations: Incorporating realistic ice particle generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Dodd, G. C.; Starr, David OC.

    1990-01-01

    Recent cirrus cloud modeling studies have involved the application of a time-dependent, two dimensional Eulerian model, with generalized cloud microphysical parameterizations drawn from experimental findings. For computing the ice versus vapor phase changes, the ice mass content is linked to the maintenance of a relative humidity with respect to ice (RHI) of 105 percent; ice growth occurs both with regard to the introduction of new particles and the growth of existing particles. In a simplified cloud model designed to investigate the basic role of various physical processes in the growth and maintenance of cirrus clouds, these parametric relations are justifiable. In comparison, the one dimensional cloud microphysical model recently applied to evaluating the nucleation and growth of ice crystals in cirrus clouds explicitly treated populations of haze and cloud droplets, and ice crystals. Although these two modeling approaches are clearly incompatible, the goal of the present numerical study is to develop a parametric treatment of new ice particle generation, on the basis of detailed microphysical model findings, for incorporation into improved cirrus growth models. For example, the relation between temperature and the relative humidity required to generate ice crystals from ammonium sulfate haze droplets, whose probability of freezing through the homogeneous nucleation mode are a combined function of time and droplet molality, volume, and temperature. As an example of this approach, the results of cloud microphysical simulations are presented showing the rather narrow domain in the temperature/humidity field where new ice crystals can be generated. The microphysical simulations point out the need for detailed CCN studies at cirrus altitudes and haze droplet measurements within cirrus clouds, but also suggest that a relatively simple treatment of ice particle generation, which includes cloud chemistry, can be incorporated into cirrus cloud growth.

  12. Comparison of LES model produced and in-situ measured stratocumulus cloud microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, K.; Yeom, J. M.; Yum, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models are known to be a valuable tool that can be used to study microphysical, dynamical and radiative properties and their complex interactions in stratocumulus clouds since they can generate stratocumulus clouds realistically. These model generated properties were often compared with observations usually focusing on macroscopic features such as cloud depth and LWP. In this study we try to examine how good LES models are in re-producing cloud microphysical characteristics of stratocumulus clouds. After all if microphysics is not right, macroscopic, dynamic and radiative characteristics represented by the model cannot be fully trusted. The observation data are obtained from the G-1 aircraft measurements of marine stratocumulus clouds over the southeast Pacific near the coast of Chile during the Variability of the American Monsoon Systems Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx). Two LES models are used to simulate these clouds: one is CIMMS (Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies) LES and the other is WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting Model) LES. Both models are run in 3-D setting and employ bin microphysics to be appropriate for detailed cloud microphysics calculation. Comparison between observation and LES models could reveal intrinsic problems of the LES models in representing entrainment and mixing processes. The difference between the two LES models may reveal the intrinsic differences between the two models in representing large eddies and microphysical processes. Some preliminary results indicate that the CIMMS LES model tends to produce cloud microphysical relationships that are expected to occur when homogeneous mixing is dominant. More detail will be presented at the conference.

  13. Case study on microphysical properties of boundary layer mixed-phase cloud observed at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard: Observed cloud microphysics and calculated optical properties on 9 June 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Akihiro; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Shiobara, Masataka; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Cloud radiation interactions are important in the global climate system. However, an understanding of mixed-phase boundary layer clouds in the Arctic remains poor. During May-June 2011, ground-based in situ measurements were made at Zeppelin Station, operated by the Norwegian Polar Institute (altitude 474 m) in Ny-Ålesund (78.9°N, 11.9°E), Svalbard. The instruments used comprised a Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (CAPS), and a Cloud Particle Microscope imager. The CAPS incorporated a Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer and Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP). During the observation period, clouds associated with cyclonic disturbances and those associated with outbreaks of westerly cold air masses from the sea were observed. Atmospheric temperature during all measurements ranged from 0 to -5 °C. In every case, columns were the major type of ice particle measured by the CAPS-CIP. Cloud microphysical properties were observed continuously on 9 June 2011. Size spectra, liquid/ice water content, and particle effective size changed depending on progress stages. Based on the observed microphysics, optical properties were calculated and investigated. Optical properties were determined mainly by those of liquid water particles, even during periods when the relative contribution of ice particles to total water content was at the maximum. It was confirmed that the wavelength region of 1.6 and 2.2 μm can be used in remote sensing. This study shows that it is possible to measure detailed changes of cloud properties in the Arctic region by using instruments installed at a ground-based mountain station.

  14. A Cloud-Resolving Modeling Intercomparison Study on Properties of Cloud Microphysics, Convection, and Precipitation for a Squall Line Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Han, B.; Morrison, H.; Varble, A.; Mansell, E.; Milbrandt, J.; Wang, Y.; Lin, Y.; Dong, X.; Giangrande, S. E.; Jensen, M. P.; Collis, S. M.; North, K.; Kollias, P.

    2015-12-01

    The large spread in CRM model simulations of deep convection and aerosol effects on deep convective clouds (DCCs) makes it difficult (1) to further our understanding of deep convection and (2) to define "benchmarks" and recommendations for their use in parameterization developments. Past model intercomparison studies used different models with different complexities of dynamic-microphysics interactions, making it hard to isolate the causes of differences between simulations. In this intercomparison study, we employed a much more constrained approach - with the same model and same experiment setups for simulations with different cloud microphysics schemes (one-moment, two-moment, and bin models). Both the piggybacking and interactive approaches are employed to explore the major microphysical processes that control the model differences and the significance of their feedback to dynamics through latent heating/cooling and cold pool characteristics. Real-case simulations are conducted for the squall line case 20 May 2011 from the MC3E field campaign. Results from the piggybacking approach show substantially different responses of the microphysics schemes to the same dynamical fields. Although the interactive microphysics-dynamics simulations buffer some differences compared with those from the piggyback runs, large differences still exist and are mainly contributed by ice microphysical processes parameterizations. The presentation will include in-depth analyses of the major microphysical processes for the squall line case, the significance of the feedback of the processes to dynamics, and how those results differ in different cloud microphysics schemes.

  15. Recent Ice Ages on Mars: The role of radiatively active clouds and cloud microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeleine, J.-B.; Head, J. W.; Forget, F.; Navarro, T.; Millour, E.; Spiga, A.; Colaïtis, A.; Määttänen, A.; Montmessin, F.; Dickson, J. L.

    2014-07-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) have been successfully employed to explain the origin of many glacial deposits on Mars. However, the latitude-dependent mantle (LDM), a dust-ice mantling deposit that is thought to represent a recent "Ice Age," remains poorly explained by GCMs. We reexamine this question by considering the effect of radiatively active water-ice clouds (RACs) and cloud microphysics. We find that when obliquity is set to 35°, as often occurred in the past 2 million years, warming of the atmosphere and polar caps by clouds modifies the water cycle and leads to the formation of a several centimeter-thick ice mantle poleward of 30° in each hemisphere during winter. This mantle can be preserved over the summer if increased atmospheric dust content obscures the surface and provides dust nuclei to low-altitude clouds. We outline a scenario for its deposition and preservation that compares favorably with the characteristics of the LDM.

  16. Studying the influence of temperature and pressure on microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds using airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreea, Boscornea; Sabina, Stefan; Sorin-Nicolae, Vajaiac; Mihai, Cimpuieru

    2015-04-01

    One cloud type for which the formation and evolution process is not well-understood is the mixed-phase type. In general mixed-phase clouds consist of liquid droplets and ice crystals. The temperature interval within both liquid droplets and ice crystals can potentially coexist is limited to 0 °C and - 40 °C. Mixed-phase clouds account for 20% to 30% of the global cloud coverage. The need to understand the microphysical characteristics of mixed-phase clouds to improve numerical forecast modeling and radiative transfer calculation is of major interest in the atmospheric community. In the past, studies of cloud phase composition have been significantly limited by a lack of aircraft instruments capable of discriminating between the ice and liquid phase for a wide range of particle sizes. Presently, in situ airborne measurements provide the most accurate information about cloud microphysical characteristics. This information can be used for verification of both numerical models and cloud remote-sensing techniques. The knowledge of the temperature and pressure variation during the airborne measurements is crucial in order to understand their influence on the cloud dynamics and also their role in the cloud formation processes like accretion and coalescence. Therefore, in this paper is presented a comprehensive study of cloud microphysical properties in mixed-phase clouds in focus of the influence of temperature and pressure variation on both, cloud dynamics and the cloud formation processes, using measurements performed with the ATMOSLAB - Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Atmospheric Research in property of the National Institute for Aerospace Research "Elie Carafoli" (INCAS). The airborne laboratory equipped for special research missions is based on a Hawker Beechcraft - King Air C90 GTx aircraft and is equipped with a sensors system CAPS - Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (30 bins, 0.51-50 µm) and a HAWKEYE cloud probe. The analyzed data in this

  17. Applying super-droplets as a compact representation of warm-rain microphysics for aerosol-cloud-aerosol interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabas, S.; Jaruga, A.; Pawlowska, H.; Grabowski, W. W.

    2012-12-01

    Clouds may influence aerosol characteristics of their environment. The relevant processes include wet deposition (rainout or washout) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) recycling through evaporation of cloud droplets and drizzle drops. Recycled CCN physicochemical properties may be altered if the evaporated droplets go through collisional growth or irreversible chemical reactions (e.g. SO2 oxidation). The key challenge of representing these processes in a numerical cloud model stems from the need to track properties of activated CCN throughout the cloud lifecycle. Lack of such "memory" characterises the so-called bulk, multi-moment as well as bin representations of cloud microphysics. In this study we apply the particle-based scheme of Shima et al. 2009. Each modelled particle (aka super-droplet) is a numerical proxy for a multiplicity of real-world CCN, cloud, drizzle or rain particles of the same size, nucleus type,and position. Tracking cloud nucleus properties is an inherent feature of the particle-based frameworks, making them suitable for studying aerosol-cloud-aerosol interactions. The super-droplet scheme is furthermore characterized by linear scalability in the number of computational particles, and no numerical diffusion in the condensational and in the Monte-Carlo type collisional growth schemes. The presentation will focus on processing of aerosol by a drizzling stratocumulus deck. The simulations are carried out using a 2D kinematic framework and a VOCALS experiment inspired set-up (see http://www.rap.ucar.edu/~gthompsn/workshop2012/case1/).

  18. Next generation aerosol-cloud microphysics for advanced high-resolution climate predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Bennartz, Ralf; Hamilton, Kevin P; Phillips, Vaughan T.J.; Wang, Yuqing; Brenguier, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-14

    The three top-level project goals are: -We proposed to develop, test, and run a new, physically based, scale-independent microphysical scheme for those cloud processes that most strongly affect greenhouse gas scenarios, i.e. warm cloud microphysics. In particular, we propsed to address cloud droplet activation, autoconversion, and accretion. -The new, unified scheme was proposed to be derived and tested using the University of Hawaii's IPRC Regional Atmospheric Model (iRAM). -The impact of the new parameterizations on climate change scenarios will be studied. In particular, the sensitivity of cloud response to climate forcing from increased greenhouse gas concentrations will be assessed.

  19. Microphysical and Dynamical Influences on Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, J.; Baker, M.; Hegg, D.

    2005-03-18

    Cirrus cloud inhomogeneity occurs at scales greater than the cirrus radiative smoothing scale ({approx}100 m), but less than typical global climate model (GCM) resolutions ({approx}300 km). Therefore, calculating cirrus radiative impacts in GCMs requires an optical depth distribution parameterization. Radiative transfer calculations are sensitive to optical depth distribution assumptions (Fu et al. 2000; Carlin et al. 2002). Using raman lidar observations, we quantify cirrus timescales and optical depth distributions at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, OK (USA). We demonstrate the sensitivity of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) calculations to assumed optical depth distributions and to the temporal resolution of optical depth measurements. Recent work has highlighted the importance of dynamics and nucleation for cirrus evolution (Haag and Karcher 2004; Karcher and Strom 2003). We need to understand the main controls on cirrus optical depth distributions to incorporate cirrus variability into model radiative transfer calculations. With an explicit ice microphysics parcel model, we aim to understand the influence of ice nucleation mechanism and imposed dynamics on cirrus optical depth distributions.

  20. Radiative and microphysical properties of cirrus cloud inferred from the MODIS infrared split-window measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, H.; Yamada, S.; Katagiri, S.; Yang, P.; Okamoto, H.

    2013-12-01

    An optimal estimation-based algorithm is developed for retrieval of radiative and microphysical properties of cirrus cloud from the measurements made by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) at three infrared (IR) split-window bands with center wavelengths at 8.5, 11 and 12 μm. Prior information of cloud top and underlying surface temperatures are from the MODIS operational products. A fast forward model is based on semi-analytical equations for the brightness temperature assuming a single-layer homogeneous ice cloud with prescribed particle habit and size distributions. Modeling errors in the brightness temperature from the present approximate treatment of radiative transfer are insignificant, but relatively more substantial errors occur due to the uncertainties in model parameters including surface emissivity, precipitable water, and cloud bottom temperature. The total measurement-model errors are well correlated for the three bands, which is considered properly in the optimal estimation framework. Retrieval errors of cloud optical thickness and effective particle radius are mainly from uncertainties in a priori cloud top and surface temperatures and model parameters. The three-band IR method is suitable for retrieving optical thickness and effective particle radius for opaque and moderately thick cirrus clouds (with cloud optical thicknesses within a range of 0.5-6). The efficient retrieval algorithm enables global-scale remote sensing at a 1-km2 resolution. A tropical region case study demonstrates advantages of the method; particularly, the ability to be applied to more pixels in optically-thin cirrus in comparison with a solar-reflection based method, and the ability of the optimal estimation framework to produce useful diagnostics of retrieval uncertainties and the retrieval cost that denote the quantitative consistency between measurement and model calculation with several assumptions. The IR retrieval shows smaller optical thickness

  1. Numerical Analysis Using WRF-SBM for the Cloud Microphysical Structures in the C3VP Field Campaign: Impacts of Supercooled Droplets and Resultant Riming on Snow Microphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iguchi, Takamichi; Matsui, Toshihisa; Shi, Jainn J.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Khain, Alexander P.; Hao, Arthur; Cifelli, Robert; Heymsfield, Andrew; Tokay, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Two distinct snowfall events are observed over the region near the Great Lakes during 19-23 January 2007 under the intensive measurement campaign of the Canadian CloudSat/CALIPSO validation project (C3VP). These events are numerically investigated using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with a spectral bin microphysics (WRF-SBM) scheme that allows a smooth calculation of riming process by predicting the rimed mass fraction on snow aggregates. The fundamental structures of the observed two snowfall systems are distinctly characterized by a localized intense lake-effect snowstorm in one case and a widely distributed moderate snowfall by the synoptic-scale system in another case. Furthermore, the observed microphysical structures are distinguished by differences in bulk density of solid-phase particles, which are probably linked to the presence or absence of supercooled droplets. The WRF-SBM coupled with Goddard Satellite Data Simulator Unit (G-SDSU) has successfully simulated these distinctive structures in the three-dimensional weather prediction run with a horizontal resolution of 1 km. In particular, riming on snow aggregates by supercooled droplets is considered to be of importance in reproducing the specialized microphysical structures in the case studies. Additional sensitivity tests for the lake-effect snowstorm case are conducted utilizing different planetary boundary layer (PBL) models or the same SBM but without the riming process. The PBL process has a large impact on determining the cloud microphysical structure of the lake-effect snowstorm as well as the surface precipitation pattern, whereas the riming process has little influence on the surface precipitation because of the small height of the system.

  2. Microphysical Properties of Warm Clouds During The Aircraft Take-Off and Landing Over Bucharest, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, Sabina; Nicolae Vajaiac, Sorin; Boscornea, Andreea

    2016-06-01

    This paper is focused on airborne measurements of microphysical parameters into warm clouds when the aircraft penetrates the cloud, both during take-off and landing. The experiment was conducted during the aircraft flight between Bucharest and Craiova, in the southern part of Romania. The duration of the experimental flight was 2 hours and 35 minutes in October 7th, 2014, but the present study is dealing solely with the analysis of cloud microphysical properties at the beginning of the experiment (during the aircraft take-off) and at the end, when it got finalized by the aircraft landing procedure. The processing and interpretation of the measurements showed the differences between microphysical parameters, emphasizing that the type of cloud over Bucharest changed, as it was expected. In addition, the results showed that it is important to take into account both the synoptic context and the cloud perturbation due to the velocity of the aircraft, in such cases.

  3. Radiative and microphysical properties of Arctic stratus clouds from multiangle downwelling infrared radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathke, Carsten; Neshyba, Steven; Shupe, Matthew D.; Rowe, Penny; Rivers, Aaron

    2002-12-01

    The information content of multiangle downwelling infrared radiance spectra of stratus clouds is investigated. As an example, 76 sets of spectra were measured at angles of 0, 15, 30 and 45° from zenith, using an interferometer based at the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) drifting ice camp. Exploiting the angular variation of radiance in infrared microwindows, a "geometric" algorithm is used to determine cloud temperature and optical depth without auxiliary information. For comparison, a spectral method allows us to infer cloud microphysical properties for each angle; each multiangle set therefore constitutes a microphysical characterization of horizontal inhomogeneity of the cloudy scene. We show that cloud temperatures determined with both approaches agree with temperatures obtained from lidar/radiosonde data. The multiangle radiance observations can also be used to calculate the longwave flux reaching the surface. We find that up to 14 W m-2 of the overcast fluxes can be attributed to horizontal variations in cloud microphysical properties.

  4. Development of Two-Moment Cloud Microphysics for Liquid and Ice Within the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model (GEOS-5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, Donifan; Molod, Andrea M.; Bacmeister, Julio; Nenes, Athanasios; Gettelman, Andrew; Morrison, Hugh; Phillips, Vaughan,; Eichmann, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the development of a two-moment cloud microphysics scheme within the version 5 of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5). The scheme includes the implementation of a comprehensive stratiform microphysics module, a new cloud coverage scheme that allows ice supersaturation and a new microphysics module embedded within the moist convection parameterization of GEOS-5. Comprehensive physically-based descriptions of ice nucleation, including homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing, and liquid droplet activation are implemented to describe the formation of cloud particles in stratiform clouds and convective cumulus. The effect of preexisting ice crystals on the formation of cirrus clouds is also accounted for. A new parameterization of the subgrid scale vertical velocity distribution accounting for turbulence and gravity wave motion is developed. The implementation of the new microphysics significantly improves the representation of liquid water and ice in GEOS-5. Evaluation of the model shows agreement of the simulated droplet and ice crystal effective and volumetric radius with satellite retrievals and in situ observations. The simulated global distribution of supersaturation is also in agreement with observations. It was found that when using the new microphysics the fraction of condensate that remains as liquid follows a sigmoidal increase with temperature which differs from the linear increase assumed in most models and is in better agreement with available observations. The performance of the new microphysics in reproducing the observed total cloud fraction, longwave and shortwave cloud forcing, and total precipitation is similar to the operational version of GEOS-5 and in agreement with satellite retrievals. However the new microphysics tends to underestimate the coverage of persistent low level stratocumulus. Sensitivity studies showed that the simulated cloud properties are robust to moderate variation in cloud microphysical parameters

  5. Cloud Macro- and Microphysical Properties Derived from GOES over the ARM SGP Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, P.; Smith, W. L., Jr.; Young, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    Cloud macrophysical properties like fractional coverage and height Z(sub c) and microphysical parameters such as cloud liquid water path (LWP), effective droplet radius r(sub e), and cloud phase, are key factors affecting both the radiation budget and the hydrological cycle. Satellite data have been used to complement surface observations from Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) by providing additional spatial coverage and top-of-atmosphere boundary conditions of these key parameters. Since 1994, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) has been used for deriving at each half-hour over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) domain: cloud amounts, altitudes, temperatures, and optical depths as well as broadband shortwave (SW) albedo and outgoing longwave radiation at the top of the atmosphere. A new operational algorithm has been implemented to increase the number of value-added products to include cloud particle phase and effective size (r(sub e) or effective ice diameter D(sub e)) as well as LWP and ice water path. Similar analyses have been performed on the data from the Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite as part of the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System project. This larger suite of cloud properties will enhance our knowledge of cloud processes and further constrain the mesoscale and single column models using ARM data as a validation/initialization resource. This paper presents the results of applying this new algorithm to GOES-8 data taken during 1998 and 2000. The global VIRS results are compared to the GOES SGP results to provide appropriate context and to test consistency.

  6. Parameterization of the Vertical Variability of Tropical Cirrus Cloud Microphysical and Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, Hermann E.

    2004-01-01

    Cloud Integrating Nephelometers (CIN) were flown on the U. North Dakota Citation aircraft and the NASA WB-57 aircraft for the purpose of measuring in-situ the optical extinction coefficient and the asymmetry parameter (g) at a wavelength of 635 nm of primarily ice particles encountered during the NASA CRYSTAL-FACE study of large cumulus clouds (Cu) and their anvils found in the southern Florida region. The probes performance was largely successful and produced archived data for vertical profiles of extinction, asymmetry parameter, and effective radius (Re), the latter being obtained by combining CIN and CVI (total water; Oregon State U.) measurements. Composites of the CIN and CVI data describing the average microphysical and optical behavior of the Cu and their anvils showed the following: The extinction increases with height as a result of the size of the particles also decreasing with height as shown by the Re measurements; near the top of anvils the size of the primary ice particles is about 10-um radius; and the value of g does not vary significantly with height and has a mean value of about 0.73 consistent with the idea that ambient ice crystals are primarily of complex shape and reflect solar radiation more efficiently than particles of pristine crystal shape. Other observations include: The g measurements were found to be an indicator of the phase of the cloud permitting identification of the clouds with water droplets, rain, and ice; visual ranges as small as several tens of meters were occasionally found in "extinction cores" that coincided with strong updraft cores; and comparison of the cloud probes on the Citation showed significant disagreement.

  7. A Hierarchical Modeling Study of the Interactions Among Turbulence, Cloud Microphysics, and Radiative Transfer in the Evolution of Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Judith; Khvorostyanov, V. I.

    2005-01-01

    This project used a hierarchy of cloud resolving models to address the following science issues of relevance to CRYSTAL-FACE: What ice crystal nucleation mechanisms are active in the different types of cirrus clouds in the Florida area and how do these different nucleation processes influence the evolution of the cloud system and the upper tropospheric humidity? How does the feedback between supersaturation and nucleation impact the evolution of the cloud? What is the relative importance of the large-scale vertical motion and the turbulent motions in the evolution of the crystal size spectra? How does the size spectra impact the life-cycle of the cloud, stratospheric dehydration, and cloud radiative forcing? What is the nature of the turbulence and waves in the upper troposphere generated by precipitating deep convective cloud systems? How do cirrus microphysical and optical properties vary with the small-scale dynamics? How do turbulence and waves in the upper troposphere influence the cross-tropopause mixing and stratospheric and upper tropospheric humidity? The models used in this study were: 2-D hydrostatic model with explicit microphysics that can account for 30 size bins for both the droplet and crystal size spectra. Notably, a new ice crystal nucleation scheme has been incorporated into the model. Parcel model with explicit microphysics, for developing and evaluating microphysical parameterizations. Single column model for testing bulk microphysics parameterizations

  8. Ice Cloud Optical and Microphysical Properties from the CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, A.; Pelon, J.; Dubuisson, P.; Yang, P.; Vaughan, M.; Avery, M. A.; Winker, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    We will present cirrus cloud optical and microphysical properties as retrieved from the operational analysis of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) data in synergy with the CALIOP lidar co-located observations collected in the framework of the CALIPSO mission. The IIR data provides nighttime and daytime independent retrievals of optical depth and effective diameter, from which the cloud layer ice water path is inferred. The technique takes advantage of the vertical information provided by CALIOP to select suitable scenes and compute effective emissivity and optical depth. Effective diameters are retrieved through microphysical indices defined as the ratio of the effective infrared optical depths in the two pairs of channels 10.6-12.05 μm and 8.65-12.05 μm, and are related to the ice crystal effective diameter and shape through pre-computed Look-Up Tables. Sources of uncertainty are discussed and possible biases are assessed through internal consistency checks. Comparisons of IIR and CALIOP cirrus optical depths show the very good sensitivity of the IIR retrievals, down to 0.05 visible optical depth. It is shown that particle effective diameter and cloud layer ice water path of single-layered cirrus clouds can be retrieved over ocean, land, as well as over low opaque clouds, for thin to dense clouds of visible optical depth ranging between 0.1 and 6 and of ice water path found typically between 1 and 150 g.m-2. Taking advantage of the cloud boundaries simultaneously derived by CALIOP, IIR power law relationships between mean ice water content (IWC, in g.m-3) and mean extinction coefficient (α, in m-1) are established for cloud temperatures between 190 and 233 K. An average global power law relationship IWC = 75. α1.23 is obtained, which compares well with parameterizations derived from in-situ observations at mid-latitude and in the tropics. However, the IWCs reported in our study are lower by about 40% than those derived from the power law relationship used

  9. Evaluating Microphysics in Cloud-Resolving Models using TRMM and Ground-based Precipitation Radar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, S. K.; Zulauf, M. A.; Li, Y.; Zipser, E. J.

    2005-05-01

    Global satellite datasets such as those produced by ISCCP, ERBE, and CERES provide strong observational constraints on cloud radiative properties. Such observations have been widely used for model evaluation, tuning, and improvement. Cloud radiative properties depend primarily on small, non-precipitating cloud droplets and ice crystals, yet the dynamical, microphysical and radiative processes which produce these small particles often involve large, precipitating hydrometeors. There now exists a global dataset of tropical cloud system precipitation feature (PF) properties, collected by TRMM and produced by Steve Nesbitt, that provides additional observational constraints on cloud system properties. We are using the TRMM PF dataset to evaluate the precipitation microphysics of two simulations of deep, precipitating, convective cloud systems: one is a 29-day summertime, continental case (ARM Summer 1997 SCM IOP, at the Southern Great Plains site); the second is a tropical maritime case: the Kwajalein MCS of 11-12 August 1999 (part of a 52-day simulation). Both simulations employed the same bulk, three-ice category microphysical parameterization (Krueger et al. 1995). The ARM simulation was executed using the UCLA/Utah 2D CRM, while the KWAJEX simulation was produced using the 3D CSU CRM (SAM). The KWAJEX simulation described above is compared with both the actual radar data and the TRMM statistics. For the Kwajalein MCS of 11 to 12 August 1999, there are research radar data available for the lifetime of the system. This particular MCS was large in size and rained heavily, but it was weak to average in measures of convective intensity, against the 5-year TRMM sample of 108. For the Kwajalein MCS simulation, the 20 dBZ contour is at 15.7 km and the 40 dBZ contour at 14.5 km! Of all 108 MCSs observed by TRMM, the highest value for the 40 dBZ contour is 8 km. Clearly, the high reflectivity cores are off scale compared with observed cloud systems in this area. A similar

  10. Understanding the Covariance of Microphysics, Thermodynamics, and Dynamics in Mixed Phase Clouds using Airborne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comstock, J. M.; Fan, J.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Kluzek, C.; Schmid, B.

    2013-12-01

    The physical processes responsible for cloud initiation and lifecycle are complex and involve the interaction between the microphysics, thermodynamics, and dynamics of the atmosphere. Representation of these processes in models requires understanding of the covariance of important parameters at scales that are difficult to resolve in models. We utilize aircraft based measurements in mixed phase clouds to examine the relationship of ice phase partitioning and microphysics with thermodynamic properties and vertical motion. Results are compiled from observational data obtained in convective mixed phase clouds during the Calwater and Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) field campaigns conducted using the Department of Energy Gulfstream-1 aircraft. Our results provide a basis for building statistical relationships between microphysical, thermodynamic, and dynamic properties in clouds that are useful for model development and evaluation.

  11. Measuring CCN to Characterize Warm Cloud Microphysics Over The Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Hudson, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) are embryos for cloud droplets and are suspected to play a vital role in the production of initial collision drops that explain the classical problem of warm rain initiation. They may also be instrumental in modifying the droplet spectra to promote warm rain initiation. Although the giant nuclei hypothesis seems to be the simplest solution to the problem of warm rain initiation, modeling studies by Johnson 1982 and Ochs and Semonin 1978, suggest that the importance of UGN for precipitation formation diminishes when the CCN concentrations are low as in clear maritime air. Measurement of CCN is essential to verify all hypotheses that investigate precipitation processes. Thus, a detailed analysis of the complete CCN spectra in relation to other cloud parameters is crucial for understanding warm rain initiation. During the RICO field project, aerosol measurements were made by the two DRI instantaneous CCN spectrometers to analyze their distribution and properties. Use of two instruments ensured redundancy and enabled in-flight calibrations without interrupting ambient measurements. These measurements include more than 180 flight hours from 19 flights over a two month period in the western Atlantic near the northeastern corner of the Antilles (Antigua and Barbuda) in December and January (2004-05). During 17 of these flights there were two hours of subcloud measurements at constant altitudes, which enabled evaluation of aerosol characteristics since they allowed long observation times in clear air with very few cloud penetrations. Average and standard deviations of the total particle (CN) and cumulative CCN concentrations during the low altitude horizontal legs showed major variations in the total concentrations and standard deviations. This implies that even in clean maritime air there is some significant day-to-day variability in concentrations, which seems to be related either to wind velocity or to cloudiness. Higher concentrations at

  12. What are the Microphysical Properties of Clouds in an Atmosphere without Human-Induced Pollution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feichter, J.; O'Donnell, D.

    2009-04-01

    The composition of the atmosphere without any man-made emissions is controlled by biogenic and volcanic emissions and wind-driven particle emissions from the pedosphere and the ocean. Biogenic sources include phytoplankton, emission of volatile organic carbon (VOC) compounds by plants and reduced sulfur emissions from vegetation and soils. Besides mineral dust and biomass burning emissions, organics formed from biogenic VOC was likely the dominating aerosol over continents. The different chemical composition of present-day and past climate aerosol loading might affect the subset of aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei and subsequently the microphysical properties of clouds. We will present some exploratory model simulations contrasting the climate system in the absence of human-induced aerosol and VOC emissions with that in the presence of such emissions. In particular, cloud properties will be simulated for present-day emissions and contrasted to a scenario where anthropogenic emissions are switched off. The atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 used for this study includes the aerosol model HAM and has been extended by an emission model and a module for secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The updated model treats SOA formed from the anthropogenic precursors toluene, xylene and benzene and from the biogenic precursors isoprene and monoterpenes. SOA-specific modelled processes are precursor emissions, gas-phase formation of SOA and gas-aerosol phase partitioning of SOA. Aerosol microphysical and sink processes (dry and wet removal) are treated with minor modifications to the existing model. The VOC emissions from plants are calculated dependent on surface temperature and photosynthetically active radiation flux.

  13. Study of the microphysical properties in stratus clouds on the Romanian Black Sea coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscornea, Andreea; Stefan, Sabina; Sorin Vajaiac, Nicolae

    2016-04-01

    Stratocumulus clouds play a critical role in the Earth's climate system due to their spatial and temporal large extent. For this reason, this study aims to highlight the significant differences of microphysical properties of maritime and continental stratus clouds and By using the ATMOSLAB research aircraft were examined aerosol and microphysical properties, as well as the thermodynamics of the marine boundary layer in and around the Black Sea (between Mangalia, N: 43 48' 34,6'', E: 28̊ 35' 25,12'' and Navodari City N: 44̊ 19' 02'', E: 28̊ 36' 55,24''). More than 10 h measurements obtained by a Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer and the HAWKEYE included aerosol, CCN, cloud droplet and drizzle drop concentrations, air temperatures, liquid water content, real time cloud droplet and ice crystals images and marine aerosol measurements above the sea surface. The over 15 flight legs in clouds (minimum altitude 250 m and maximum altitude 4000 m) and the 4 flight legs performed directly above the sea surface (altitude 120 m) from the three flight 30 October 2015 and 23 November 2015 conducted to results that provide evidence of indirect aerosol effects associated with natural variability in the cloud and aerosol characteristics. For a complete understanding of the large-scale context processes maintaining and dissipating the continental and marine stratocumulus clouds information from a Sun Photometer (Eforie, N: 44̊ 04' 30'', E: 28̊ 37' 55'', altitude 40 m) and satellite data were used. The interpretation performed on the in situ (into cloud and below cloud) measured data have shown, as it was expected, differences between microphysical parameters for maritime and continental clouds and their dependence on aerosol concentrations. These presented results of in situ measurements of clouds above the Romanian Black Sea Coast are the first reported, so that more data is needed for an enhanced understanding of the maritime/continental microphysical contrasts in

  14. Dominant cloud microphysical processes of a torrential rainfall event in Sichuan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongjie; Cui, Xiaopeng

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution numerical simulation data of a rainstorm triggering debris flow in Sichuan Province of China simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model were used to study the dominant cloud microphysical processes of the torrential rainfall. The results showed that: (1) In the strong precipitation period, particle sizes of all hydrometeors increased, and mean-mass diameters of graupel increased the most significantly, as compared with those in the weak precipitation period; (2) The terminal velocity of raindrops was the strongest among all hydrometeors, followed by graupel's, which was much smaller than that of raindrops. Differences between various hydrometeors' terminal velocities in the strong precipitation period were larger than those in the weak precipitation period, which favored relative motion, collection interaction and transformation between the particles. Absolute terminal velocity values of raindrops and graupel were significantly greater than those of air upward velocity, and the stronger the precipitation was, the greater the differences between them were; (3) The orders of magnitudes of the various hydrometeors' sources and sinks in the strong precipitation period were larger than those in the weak precipitation period, causing a difference in the intensity of precipitation. Water vapor, cloud water, raindrops, graupel and their exchange processes played a major role in the production of the torrential rainfall, and there were two main processes via which raindrops were generated: abundant water vapor condensed into cloud water and, on the one hand, accretion of cloud water by rain water formed rain water, while on the other hand, accretion of cloud water by graupel formed graupel, and then the melting of graupel formed rain water.

  15. Uncertainties in synthetic Meteosat SEVIRI infrared brightness temperatures in the presence of cirrus clouds and implications for evaluation of cloud microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senf, Fabian; Deneke, Hartwig

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic brightness temperatures of five infrared Meteosat SEVIRI channels are investigated for their sensitivities on cirrus radiative properties. The operational SynSat scheme of the regional German weather prediction model COSMO-DE is contrasted to a revised scheme with a special emphasis on consistency between the model-internal ice-microphysics and infrared radiation in convective situations. In particular, the formulation of generalized effective diameters of ice, snow and graupel as well as subgrid-scale cloud cover has been improved. Based on the applied modifications, we first show that changed assumptions on the cirrus radiative properties can lead to 10 K warmer brightness temperatures. Second, we demonstrate that prescribed relative changes of 20% in cloud cover and particle size induce maximum changes of around 4 to 5 K. The maximum sensitivity appears for semi-transparent cirrus having brightness temperatures around 240 and 260 K and total frozen water path around 30 gm- 2 for viewing geometries over Central Europe. We further consider the known COSMO-DE cold bias to discuss the problem of inconsistencies in model-internal and external formulations of cloud microphysical and radiative properties. We demonstrate that between 35% and 70% of the cold bias can be attributed to the radiative representation of cirrus clouds. We additionally discuss the use of window-channel brightness temperature differences for evaluation of model microphysics and hypothesize that the amount of COSMO-DE ice is overestimated in convective situations.

  16. Probing the impact of different aerosol sources on cloud microphysics and precipitation through in-situ measurements of chemical mixing state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.; Suski, K.; Cazorla, A.; Cahill, J. F.; Creamean, J.; Collins, D. B.; Heymsfield, A.; Roberts, G. C.; DeMott, P. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; Rosenfeld, D.; Comstock, J. M.; Tomlinson, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol particles play a crucial role in affecting cloud processes by serving as cloud nuclei. However, our understanding of which particles actually form cloud and ice nuclei limits our ability to treat aerosols properly in climate models. In recent years, it has become possible to measure the chemical composition of individual cloud nuclei within the clouds using on-line mass spectrometry. In-situ high time resolution chemistry can now be compared with cloud physics measurements to directly probe the impact of aerosol chemistry on cloud microphysics. This presentation will describe results from two recent field campaigns, CalWater in northern California and ICE-T in the western Caribbean region. Ground-based and aircraft measurements will be presented of aerosol mixing state, cloud microphysics, and meteorology. Results from single particle mass spectrometry will show the sources of the cloud seeds, including dust, biomass burning, sea spray, and biological particles. Details will be provided on how we are now able to probe the sources and cycling of atmospheric aerosols by measuring individual aerosols, cloud nuclei, and precipitation chemistry. The important role of dust, both Asian and African, and bioparticles in forming ice nuclei will be discussed. Finally, a summary will be provided discussing how these new in-situ measurements are being used to advance our understanding of complex atmospheric processes, and improve our understanding of aerosol impacts on climate.

  17. Determining Best Estimates and Uncertainties in Cloud Microphysical Parameters from ARM Field Data: Implications for Models, Retrieval Schemes and Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg

    2015-12-28

    We proposed to analyze in-situ cloud data collected during ARM/ASR field campaigns to create databases of cloud microphysical properties and their uncertainties as needed for the development of improved cloud parameterizations for models and remote sensing retrievals, and for evaluation of model simulations and retrievals. In particular, we proposed to analyze data collected over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) during the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), the Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) Experiment and the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign, over the North Slope of Alaska during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), and over the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) during The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), to meet the following 3 objectives; derive statistical databases of single ice particle properties (aspect ratio AR, dominant habit, mass, projected area) and distributions of ice crystals (size distributions SDs, mass-dimension m-D, area-dimension A-D relations, mass-weighted fall speeds, single-scattering properties, total concentrations N, ice mass contents IWC), complete with uncertainty estimates; assess processes by which aerosols modulate cloud properties in arctic stratus and mid-latitude cumuli, and quantify aerosol’s influence in context of varying meteorological and surface conditions; and determine how ice cloud microphysical, single-scattering and fall-out properties and contributions of small ice crystals to such properties vary according to location, environment, surface, meteorological and aerosol conditions, and develop parameterizations of such effects.In this report we describe the accomplishments that we made on all 3 research objectives.

  18. Implementation of an Aerosol-Cloud Microphysics-Radiation Coupling into the NASA Unified WRF: Simulation Results for the 6-7 August 2006 AMMA Special Observing Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, J. J.; Matsui, T.; Tao, W.-K.; Tan, Q.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Chin, M.; Pickering, K.; Guy, N.; Lang, S.; Kemp, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols affect the Earth's radiation balance directly and cloud microphysical processes indirectly via the activation of cloud condensation and ice nuclei. These two effects have often been considered separately and independently, hence the need to assess their combined impact given the differing nature of their effects on convective clouds. To study both effects, an aerosol-microphysics-radiation coupling, including Goddard microphysics and radiation schemes, was implemented into the NASA Unified Weather Research and Forecasting model (NU-WRF). Fully coupled NU-WRF simulations were conducted for a mesoscale convective system (MCS) that passed through the Niamey, Niger area on 6-7 August 2006 during an African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) special observing period. The results suggest that rainfall is reduced when aerosol indirect effects are included, regardless of the aerosol direct effect. Daily mean radiation heating profiles in the area traversed by the MCS showed the aerosol (mainly mineral dust) direct effect had the largest impact near cloud tops just above 200 hectopascals where short-wave heating increased by about 0.8 Kelvin per day; the weakest long-wave cooling was at around 250 hectopascals. It was also found that more condensation and ice nuclei as a result of higher aerosol/dust concentrations led to increased amounts of all cloud hydrometeors because of the microphysical indirect effect, and the radiation direct effect acts to reduce precipitating cloud particles (rain, snow and graupel) in the middle and lower cloud layers while increasing the non-precipitating particles (ice) in the cirrus anvil. However, when the aerosol direct effect was activated, regardless of the indirect effect, the onset of MCS precipitation was delayed about 2 hours, in conjunction with the delay in the activation of cloud condensation and ice nuclei. Overall, for this particular environment, model set-up and physics configuration, the effect of aerosol

  19. Global climate modeling of the Martian water cycle with improved microphysics and radiatively active water ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, T.; Madeleine, J.-B.; Forget, F.; Spiga, A.; Millour, E.; Montmessin, F.; Määttänen, A.

    2014-07-01

    Water ice clouds play a key role in the radiative transfer of the Martian atmosphere, impacting its thermal structure, its circulation, and, in turn, the water cycle. Recent studies including the radiative effects of clouds in global climate models (GCMs) have found that the corresponding feedbacks amplify the model defaults. In particular, it prevents models with simple microphysics from reproducing even the basic characteristics of the water cycle. Within that context, we propose a new implementation of the water cycle in GCMs, including a detailed cloud microphysics taking into account nucleation on dust particles, ice particle growth, and scavenging of dust particles due to the condensation of ice. We implement these new methods in the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique GCM and find satisfying agreement with the Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations of both water vapor and cloud opacities, with a significant improvement when compared to GCMs taking into account radiative effects of water ice clouds without this implementation. However, a lack of water vapor in the tropics after Ls = 180° is persistent in simulations compared to observations, as a consequence of aphelion cloud radiative effects strengthening the Hadley cell. Our improvements also allow us to explore questions raised by recent observations of the Martian atmosphere. Supersaturation above the hygropause is predicted in line with Spectroscopy for Investigation of Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars observations. The model also suggests for the first time that the scavenging of dust by water ice clouds alone fails to fully account for the detached dust layers observed by the Mars Climate Sounder.

  20. Electric Fields, Cloud Microphysics, and Reflectivity in Anvils of Florida Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, J. E.; Bateman, M. G.; Christian, H. J.; Defer, E.; Grainger, C. A.; Hall, W. D.; Krider, E. P.; Lewis, S. A.; Mach, D. M.; Merceret, F. J.; Willett, J. C.; Willis, P. T.

    2007-01-01

    A coordinated aircraft - radar project that investigated the electric fields, cloud microphysics and radar reflectivity of thunderstorm anvils near Kennedy Space Center is described. Measurements from two cases illustrate the extensive nature of the microphysics and electric field observations. As the aircraft flew from the edges of anvils into the interior, electric fields very frequently increased abruptly from approximately 1 to more than 10 kV m(exp -1) even though the particle concentration and radar reflectivity increased smoothly. The abrupt increase in field usually occurred when the aircraft entered regions with a reflectivity of 10 to 15 dBZ. It is suggested that the abrupt increase in electric field may be because the charge advection from the storm core did not occur across the entire breadth of the anvil and was not constant in time. Screening layers were not detected near the edges of the anvils. Some long-lived anvils showed subsequent enhancement of electric field and reflectivity and growth of particles, which if localized, might be a factor in explaining the abrupt change of field in some cases. Comparisons of electric field magnitude with particle concentration or reflectivity for a combined data set that included all anvil measurements showed a threshold behavior. When the average reflectivity, such as in a 3-km cube, was less than approximately 5 dBZ, the electric field magnitude was les than kV m(exp -1). Based on these findings, the Volume Averaged Height Integrated Radar Reflectivity (VAHIRR) is now being used by NASA, the Air Force and Federal Aviation Administration in new Lightning Launch Commit Criteria as a diagnostic for high electric fields in anvils.

  1. Electric Fields, Cloud Microphysics, and Reflectivity in Anvils of Florida Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, J. E.; Bateman, M. G.; Christian, H. J.; Grainger, C. A.; Hall, W. D.; Krider, E. P.; Lewis, S. A.; Mach, D. M.; Merceret, F. J.; Willett, J. C.; Willis, P. T.

    2006-01-01

    A coordinated aircraft - radar project that investigated the electric fields, cloud microphysics and radar reflectivity of thunderstorm anvils near Kennedy Space Center is described. Measurements from two cases illustrate the extensive nature of the microphysics and electric field observations. As the aircraft flew from the edges of anvils into the interior, electric fields very frequently increased abruptly from approx.1 to >10 kV/m even though the particle concentrations and radar reflectivity increased smoothly. The abrupt increase in field usually occurred when the aircraft entered regions with a reflectivity of 10 to 15 dBZ. It is suggested that the abrupt increase in electric field may be because the charge advection from the storm core did not occur across the entire breadth of the anvil and was not constant in time. Screening layers were not detected near the edges of the anvils. Some long-lived anvils showed subsequent enhancement of electric field and reflectivity and growth of particles, which if localized, might be a factor in explaining the abrupt change of field in some cases. Comparisons of electric field magnitude with particle concentration or reflectivity for a combined data set that included all anvil measurements showed a threshold behavior. When the average reflectivity, such as in a 3-km cube, was less than approximately 5 dBZ, the electric field magnitude was <3 kV/m. Based on these findings, the Volume Averaged Height Integrated Radar Reflectivity (VAHIRR) is now being used by NASA, the Air Force and Federal Aviation Administration in new Lightning Launch Commit Criteria as a diagnostic for high electric fields in anvils.

  2. Impact of Cloud Model Microphysics on Passive Microwave Retrievals of Cloud Properties. Part I: Model Comparison Using EOF Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggerstaff, Michael I.; Seo, Eun-Kyoung; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.; Kim, Kwang-Yul

    2006-07-01

    The impact of model microphysics on the relationships among hydrometeor profiles, latent heating, and derived satellite microwave brightness temperatures TB have been examined using a nonhydrostatic, adaptive-grid cloud model to simulate a mesoscale convective system over water. Two microphysical schemes (each employing three-ice bulk parameterizations) were tested for two different assumptions in the number of ice crystals assumed to be activated at 0°C to produce simulations with differing amounts of supercooled cloud water. The model output was examined using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, which provided a quantitative framework in which to compare the simulations. Differences in the structure of the vertical anomaly patterns were related to physical processes and attributed to different approaches in cloud microphysical parameterizations in the two schemes. Correlations between the first EOF coefficients of cloud properties and TB at frequencies associated with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) showed additional differences between the two parameterization schemes that affected the relationship between hydrometeors and TB. Classified in terms of TB, the microphysical schemes produced significantly different mean vertical profiles of cloud water, cloud ice, snow, vertical velocity, and latent heating. The impact of supercooled cloud water on the 85-GHz TB led to a 15% variation in mean convective rain mass at the surface. The variability in mean profiles produced by the four simulations indicates that the retrievals of cloud properties, especially latent heating, based on TMI frequencies are dependent on the particular microphysical parameterizations used to construct the retrieval database.

  3. The effect of cloud microphysics on climate sensitivity. Progress report, July 15, 1990--July 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Stamnes, K.

    1992-12-31

    Clouds play an important role in the climate system through radiative energy redistribution. The cloud radiative properties change if the cloud droplet size spectrum changes. This research shows that the climate is very sensitive to cloud water path and equivalent radius. To explore this issue, an accurate parameterization of cloud radiative properties for the purpose of climate modeling has been developed. A one-dimensional radiative convective model with a comprehensive radiative transfer scheme using the new parameterization of cloud radiative properties has also been developed to investigate the climate sensitivity to changes in cloud microphysics. By looking at clouds with different size distributions, we find that for clouds with the same cloud water amount and equivalent radius, the cloud radiative properties are essentially the same. Thus cloud radiative properties depend primarily on equivalent radius and are independent of the details of the size distribution. Our parameterization allows these two parameters to change independently. A sensitivity study has been performed, to consider cloud droplet size. First, we looked at cloud radiative forcing. The results show that the cloud radiative forcing is indeed very sensitive to the changes in cloud equivalent radius. Secondly, we have looked at the response of equilibrium temperature to changes in cloud equivalent radius. This sensitivity study suggests that in climate models, an interactive cloud parameterization is needed, in which cloud water amount and equivalent radius are predicted independently.

  4. Understanding the Relationships Between Lightning, Cloud Microphysics, and Airborne Radar-derived Storm Structure During Hurricane Karl (2010)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Brad; Fuelberg, Henry; Blakeslee, Richard; Mach, Douglas; Heymsfield, Andrew; Bansemer, Aaron; Durden, Stephen L.; Tanelli, Simone; Heymsfield, Gerald; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn

    2013-01-01

    This study explores relationships between lightning, cloud microphysics, and tropical cyclone (TC) storm structure in Hurricane Karl (16 September 2010) using data collected by the NASA DC-8 and Global Hawk (GH) aircraft during NASA's Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment. The research capitalizes on the unique opportunity provided by GRIP to synthesize multiple datasets from two aircraft and analyze the microphysical and kinematic properties of an electrified TC. Five coordinated flight legs through Karl by the DC-8 and GH are investigated, focusing on the inner-core region (within 50km of the storm center) where the lightning was concentrated and the aircraft were well coordinated. GRIP datasets are used to compare properties of electrified and nonelectrified inner-core regions that are related to the noninductive charging mechanism, which is widely accepted to explain the observed electric fields within thunderstorms. Three common characteristics of Karl's electrified regions are identified: 1) strong updrafts of 10-20ms21, 2) deep mixed-phase layers indicated by reflectivities.30 dBZ extending several kilometers above the freezing level, and 3) microphysical environments consisting of graupel, very small ice particles, and the inferred presence of supercooled water. These characteristics describe an environment favorable for in situ noninductive charging and, hence, TC electrification. The electrified regions in Karl's inner core are attributable to a microphysical environment that was conducive to electrification because of occasional, strong convective updrafts in the eyewall.

  5. Cloud Microphysics in Hurricane Outflows: Observations in 'Bonnie' (1998) at 12 km Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Hallett, J.; Strawa, A. W.; Ferry, G. V.; Bui, T. P.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The water balance of a hurricane is controlled by boundary layer inflow, near vertical motion in the eyewall causing coalescence precipitation at above and residual ice precipitation at below freezing temperatures, and cirrus outflow at below -40 C aloft. In this paper we address the question of efficiency of water removal by this cirrus outflow which is important for the release of latent heat at high altitudes and its role in the dynamic flow at that level. During NASA's 1998 Convection and Moisture Experiment campaign we acquired microphysical outflow data in order to (1) determine the release and redistribution of latent heat near the top of hurricanes, (2) aid in TRMM algorithm development for remote sensing of precipitation, and (3) determine the optical/radiative characteristics of hurricane outflow. The data were acquired with Particle Measuring Systems two dimensional imaging spectrometers. On 23 August and again during the hurricane's landfall on 26 August, 1998, the NASA DC-8 aircraft penetrated hurricane 'Bonnie' four times each near 200 hPa pressure altitude. The eye crossing times were determined by (1) zero counts of cloud particles, (2) approximately 5 C increases in static and potential temperatures, and (3) minima in speeds and changes of direction of horizontal winds. The vertical winds showed shear between -6 m per second and +4 m per second and tangential winds approached 30 m per second in the eyewall. The particle volumes in the eyewall (determined by the pixels the particles shadowed in the direction of flight [x-direction] and normally to it by the number of diodes that they shadowed [y-direction]) ranged between 0.5 and 5.0 cubic centimeters per cubic meter. With a particle density near 0.2 g per cubic centimeter (determined from in situ melting and evaporation on a surface collector), the 1.0 g per meter corresponding mass of cloud ice ranged between 0.27 and 2.7 g per kilograms yielding horizontal fluxes between 8.1 and 81 g per square

  6. A study of cloud microphysics and precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau by radar observations and cloud-resolving model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wenhua; Sui, Chung-Hsiung; Fan, Jiwen; Hu, Zhiqun; Zhong, Lingzhi

    2016-11-01

    Cloud microphysical properties and precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau are unique because of the high terrains, clean atmosphere, and sufficient water vapor. With dual-polarization precipitation radar and cloud radar measurements during the Third Tibetan Plateau Atmospheric Scientific Experiment, the simulated microphysics and precipitation by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with the Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences (CAMS) microphysics and other microphysical schemes are investigated through a typical plateau rainfall event on 22 July 2014. Results show that the WRF-CAMS simulation reasonably reproduces the spatial distribution of 24 h accumulated precipitation but has limitations in simulating time evolution of precipitation rates. The model-calculated polarimetric radar variables have biases as well, suggesting bias in modeled hydrometeor types. The raindrop sizes in convective region are larger than those in stratiform region indicated by the small intercept of raindrop size distribution in the former. In addition, the warm rain processes generate heavier precipitation than the cold rain processes do over the rainfall centers during weak convection period. The sensitivity of precipitation to perturbing the warm rain microphysical processes show that doubling droplet condensation increases precipitation significantly and produces the best area-averaged rain rate, suggesting biases in thermodynamics in the baseline simulation. Halving raindrop evaporation results in an increase in weak rainfall areas along with a warmer subcloud layer. Increasing the initial cloud droplet size causes the rain rate reduced by half, an opposite effect to that of increasing droplet condensation.

  7. Factors influencing the microphysics and radiative properties of liquid-dominated Arctic clouds: insight from observations of aerosol and clouds during ISDAC

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Strapp, J. Walter; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; McFarquhar, Greg; Shantz, Nicole C.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2011-11-04

    Aircraft measurements during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 are used to investigate aerosol indirect effects in Arctic clouds. Two aerosol-cloud regimes are considered in this analysis: single-layer stratocumulus cloud with below-cloud aerosol concentrations (N{sub a}) below 300 cm{sup -3} on April 8 and April 26-27 (clean cases); and inhomogeneous layered cloud with N{sub a} > 500 cm{sup -3} below cloud base on April 19-20, concurrent with a biomass burning episode (polluted cases). Vertical profiles through cloud in each regime are used to determine average cloud microphysical and optical properties. Positive correlations between the cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and cloud optical depth ({tau}) are observed for both clean and polluted cases, which are characteristic of optically-thin, non-precipitating clouds. Average Re values for each case are {approx} 6.2 {mu}m, despite significantly higher droplet number concentrations (Nd) in the polluted cases. The apparent independence of Re and Nd simplifies the description of indirect effects, such that {tau} and the cloud albedo (A) can be described by relatively simple functions of the cloud liquid water path. Adiabatic cloud parcel model simulations show that the marked differences in Na between the regimes account largely for differences in droplet activation, but that the properties of precursor aerosol also play a role, particularly for polluted cases where competition for vapour amongst the more numerous particles limits activation to larger and/or more hygroscopic particles. The similarity of Re for clean and polluted cases is attributed to compensating droplet growth processes for different initial droplet size distributions.

  8. Parametric studies of contrail ice particle formation in jet regime using microphysical parcel modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, H.-W.; Miake-Lye, R. C.

    2010-04-01

    Condensation trails (contrails) formed from water vapor emissions behind aircraft engines are the most uncertain components of the aviation impacts on climate change. To gain improved knowledge of contrail and contrail-induced cirrus cloud formation, understanding of contrail ice particle formation immediately after aircraft engines is needed. Despite many efforts spent in modeling the microphysics of ice crystal formation in jet regime (with a plume age <5 s), systematic understanding of parametric effects of variables affecting contrail ice particle formation is still limited. In this work, we apply a microphysical parcel modeling approach to study contrail ice particle formation in near-field aircraft plumes up to 1000 m downstream of an aircraft engine in the soot-rich regime (soot number emission index >1×1015 (kg-fuel)-1) at cruise. The effects of dilution history, ion-mediated nucleation, ambient relative humidity, fuel sulfur contents, and initial soot emissions were investigated. Our simulation results suggest that ice particles are mainly formed by water condensation on emitted soot particles. The growth of ice coated soot particles is driven by water vapor emissions in the first 1000 m and by ambient relative humidity afterwards. The presence of chemi-ions does not significantly contribute to the formation of ice particles in the soot-rich regime, and the effect of fuel sulfur contents is small over the range typical of standard jet fuels. The initial properties of soot emissions play the most critical role, and our calculations suggest that higher number concentration and smaller size of contrail particle nuclei may be able to effectively suppress the formation of contrail ice particles. Further modeling and experimental studies are needed to verify if our findings can provide a possible approach for contrail mitigation.

  9. Retrieval of cloud microphysical parameters from INSAT-3D: a feasibility study using radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinya, John; Bipasha, Paul S.

    2016-05-01

    Clouds strongly modulate the Earths energy balance and its atmosphere through their interaction with the solar and terrestrial radiation. They interact with radiation in various ways like scattering, emission and absorption. By observing these changes in radiation at different wavelength, cloud properties can be estimated. Cloud properties are of utmost importance in studying different weather and climate phenomena. At present, no satellite provides cloud microphysical parameters over the Indian region with high temporal resolution. INSAT-3D imager observations in 6 spectral channels from geostationary platform offer opportunity to study continuous cloud properties over Indian region. Visible (0.65 μm) and shortwave-infrared (1.67 μm) channel radiances can be used to retrieve cloud microphysical parameters such as cloud optical thickness (COT) and cloud effective radius (CER). In this paper, we have carried out a feasibility study with the objective of cloud microphysics retrieval. For this, an inter-comparison of 15 globally available radiative transfer models (RTM) were carried out with the aim of generating a Look-up- Table (LUT). SBDART model was chosen for the simulations. The sensitivity of each spectral channel to different cloud properties was investigated. The inputs to the RT model were configured over our study region (50°S - 50°N and 20°E - 130°E) and a large number of simulations were carried out using random input vectors to generate the LUT. The determination of cloud optical thickness and cloud effective radius from spectral reflectance measurements constitutes the inverse problem and is typically solved by comparing the measured reflectances with entries in LUT and searching for the combination of COT and CER that gives the best fit. The products are available on the website www.mosdac.gov.in

  10. Cirrus Clouds Optical, Microphysical and Radiative Properties Observed During Crystal-Face Experiment: I. A Radar-Lidar Retrieval System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitrescu, C.; Haynes, J. M.; Stephens, G. L.; Heymsfield, G. M.; McGill, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    A method of retrieving cloud microphysical properties using combined observations from both cloud radar and lidar is introduced. This retrieval makes use of an improvement to the traditional optimal estimation retrieval method, whereby a series of corrections are applied to the state vector during the search for an iterative solution. This allows faster convergence to a solution and is less processor intensive. The method is first applied to a synthetic cloud t o demonstrate its validity, and it is shown that the retrieval reliably reproduces vertical profiles of ice water content. The retrieval method is then applied to radar and lidar observations from the CRYSTAL-FACE experiment, and vertical profiles of ice crystal diameter, number concentration, and ice water content are retrieved for a cirrus cloud layers observed one day of that experiment. The validity of the relationship between visible extinction coefficient and radar reflectivity was examined. While synthetic tests showed such a functional relationship, the measured data only partially supported such a conclusion. This is due to errors in the forward model (as explained above) as well as errors in the data sets, including possible mismatch between lidar and radar profiles or errors in the optical depth. Empirical relationships between number concentrations and mean particle diameter were also examined. The results indicate that a distinct and robust relationship exists between these retrieved quantities and it is argued that such a relationship is more than an artifact of the retrieval process offering insight into the nature of the microphysical processes taking place in cirrus.

  11. Compute unified device architecture (CUDA)-based parallelization of WRF Kessler cloud microphysics scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Wang, Jun; Allen Huang, H.-L.; Goldberg, Mitchell D.

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, graphics processing units (GPUs) have emerged as a low-cost, low-power and a very high performance alternative to conventional central processing units (CPUs). The latest GPUs offer a speedup of two-to-three orders of magnitude over CPU for various science and engineering applications. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is the latest-generation numerical weather prediction model. It has been designed to serve both operational forecasting and atmospheric research needs. It proves useful for a broad spectrum of applications for domain scales ranging from meters to hundreds of kilometers. WRF computes an approximate solution to the differential equations which govern the air motion of the whole atmosphere. Kessler microphysics module in WRF is a simple warm cloud scheme that includes water vapor, cloud water and rain. Microphysics processes which are modeled are rain production, fall and evaporation. The accretion and auto-conversion of cloud water processes are also included along with the production of cloud water from condensation. In this paper, we develop an efficient WRF Kessler microphysics scheme which runs on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) using the NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). The GPU-based implementation of Kessler microphysics scheme achieves a significant speedup of 70× over its CPU based single-threaded counterpart. When a 4 GPU system is used, we achieve an overall speedup of 132× as compared to the single thread CPU version.

  12. Deriving Arctic Cloud Microphysics at Barrow, Alaska. Algorithms, Results, and Radiative Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.; Zwink, Alexander; Thieman, Mandana M.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Shippert, Timothy

    2015-07-01

    Cloud phase and microphysical properties control the radiative effects of clouds in the climate system and are therefore crucial to characterize in a variety of conditions and locations. An Arctic-specific, ground-based, multi-sensor cloud retrieval system is described here and applied to two years of observations from Barrow, Alaska. Over these two years, clouds occurred 75% of the time, with cloud ice and liquid each occurring nearly 60% of the time. Liquid water occurred at least 25% of the time even in the winter, and existed up to heights of 8 km. The vertically integrated mass of liquid was typically larger than that of ice. While it is generally difficult to evaluate the overall uncertainty of a comprehensive cloud retrieval system of this type, radiative flux closure analyses were performed where flux calculations using the derived microphysical properties were compared to measurements at the surface and top-of-atmosphere. Radiative closure biases were generally smaller for cloudy scenes relative to clear skies, while the variability of flux closure results was only moderately larger than under clear skies. The best closure at the surface was obtained for liquid-containing clouds. Radiative closure results were compared to those based on a similar, yet simpler, cloud retrieval system. These comparisons demonstrated the importance of accurate cloud phase classification, and specifically the identification of liquid water, for determining radiative fluxes. Enhanced retrievals of liquid water path for thin clouds were also shown to improve radiative flux calculations.

  13. Microphysical Simulations of Polar Stratospheric Clouds Compared with Calipso and MLS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.; Toon, O. B.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lambert, A.; Brakebusch, M.

    2014-12-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) form in the lower stratosphere during the polar night due to the cold temperature inside the polar vortex. PSCs are important to understand because they are responsible for the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole and the ozone depletion over the Arctic. In this work, we explore the formation and evolution of STS particles (Super-cooled Ternary Solution) and NAT (Nitric-acid Trihydrate) particles using the SD-WACCM/CARMA model. SD-WACCM/CARMA couples the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model using Specific Dynamics with the microphysics model (CARMA). The 2010-2011 Arctic winter has been simulated because the Arctic vortex remained cold enough for PSCs from December until the end of March (Manney et al., 2011). The unusual length of this cold period and the presence of PSCs caused strong ozone depletion. This model simulates the growth and evaporation of the STS particles instead of considering them as being in equilibrium as other models do (Carslaw et al., 1995). This work also explores the homogeneous nucleation of NAT particles and derives a scheme for NAT formation based on the observed denitrification during the winter 2010-2011. The simulated microphysical features (particle volumes, size distributions, etc.) of both STS (Supercooled Ternary Solutions) and NAT particles show a consistent comparison with historical observations. The modeled evolution of PSCs and gas phase ozone related chemicals inside the vortex such as HCl and ClONO2 are compared with the observations from MLS, MIPAS and CALIPSO over this winter. The denitrification history indicate the surface nucleation rate from Tabazadeh et al. (2002) removes too much HNO3 over the winter. With a small modification of the free energy term of the equation, the denitification and the PSC backscattering features are much closer to the observations. H2O, HCl, O3 and ClONO2 are very close to MLS and MIPAS observations inside the vortex. The model underestimates ozone

  14. Retrieve Optically Thick Ice Cloud Microphysical Properties by Using Airborne Dual-Wavelength Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm to retrieve optically thick ice cloud microphysical property profiles is developed by using the GSFC 9.6 GHz ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP) and the 94 GHz Cloud Radar System (CRS) measurements aboard the high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. In situ size distribution and total water content data from the CRYSTAL-FACE field campaign are used for the algorithm development. To reduce uncertainty in calculated radar reflectivity factors (Ze) at these wavelengths, coincident radar measurements and size distribution data are used to guide the selection of mass-length relationships and to deal with the density and non-spherical effects of ice crystals on the Ze calculations. The algorithm is able to retrieve microphysical property profiles of optically thick ice clouds, such as, deep convective and anvil clouds, which are very challenging for single frequency radar and lidar. Examples of retrieved microphysical properties for a deep convective clouds are presented, which show that EDOP and CRS measurements provide rich information to study cloud structure and evolution. Good agreement between IWPs derived from an independent submillimeter-wave radiometer, CoSSIR, and dual-wavelength radar measurements indicates accuracy of the IWC retrieved from the two-frequency radar algorithm.

  15. Sensitivity Study of Cloud Cover and Ozone Modeling to Microphysics Parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wałaszek, Kinga; Kryza, Maciej; Szymanowski, Mariusz; Werner, Małgorzata; Ojrzyńska, Hanna

    2017-02-01

    Cloud cover is a significant meteorological parameter influencing the amount of solar radiation reaching the ground surface, and therefore affecting the formation of photochemical pollutants, most of all tropospheric ozone (O3). Because cloud amount and type in meteorological models are resolved by microphysics schemes, adjusting this parameterization is a major factor determining the accuracy of the results. However, verification of cloud cover simulations based on surface data is difficult and yields significant errors. Current meteorological satellite programs provide many high-resolution cloud products, which can be used to verify numerical models. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) has been applied for the area of Poland for an episode of June 17th-July 4th, 2008, when high ground-level ozone concentrations were observed. Four simulations were performed, each with a different microphysics parameterization: Purdue Lin, Eta Ferrier, WRF Single-Moment 6-class, and Morrison Double-Moment scheme. The results were then evaluated based on cloud mask satellite images derived from SEVIRI data. Meteorological variables and O3 concentrations were also evaluated. The results show that the simulation using Morrison Double-Moment microphysics provides the most and Purdue Lin the least accurate information on cloud cover and surface meteorological variables for the selected high ozone episode. Those two configurations were used for WRF-Chem runs, which showed significantly higher O3 concentrations and better model-measurements agreement of the latter.

  16. Sensitivity of Cloud Microphysics to Choice of Physics Parameterizations : a Crm Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, C.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2013-12-01

    Weather Research and Forecasting regional meteorological model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is being used widely to study direct and indirect effect of aerosols. The results of a numerical study on the impacts of aerosols on meteorology and microphysics depend on the accuracy with which the model parameterizes any weather conditions. This study investigates the sensitivity of simulated hydrometeors at 3 km resolution over Northern India, to different types of microphysics parameterizations, such as ETA microphysics (only warm rain processes are parameterized), LIN microphysics (single moment including ice processes) and Morrison microphysics (double moment including ice processes) and planetary boundary layer parameterizations (Yonsei and MYJ). WRF's ability to simulate the vertical and horizontal distribution of hydrometeors using cloud resolving mode is evaluated using in-situ aircraft measurements of hydrometeors during CAIPEEX campaign and cloud products from MODIS satellite. The results suggest that the model underestimates the mass concentration of hydrometeors, but can reasonably simulate the distribution of hydrometeors at most places, except a few places where the hydrometeors are modeled simulated at higher altitude than observed. Ongoing work includes aerosol impact on these simulated hydrometeors distribution.

  17. The Influence of Thermodynamic Phase on the Retrieval of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysical and Optical Properties in the Visible and Near Infrared Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Joonsuk; Yang, Ping; Dessler, Andrew E.; Baum, Bryan A.; Platnick, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Cloud microphysical and optical properties are inferred from the bidirectional reflectances simulated for a single-layered cloud consisting of an external mixture of ice particles and liquid droplets. The reflectances are calculated with a rigorous discrete ordinates radiative transfer model and are functions of the cloud effective particle size, the cloud optical thickness, and the values of the ice fraction in the cloud (i.e., the ratio of ice water content to total water content). In the present light scattering and radiative transfer simulations, the ice fraction is assumed to be vertically homogeneous; the habit (shape) percentage as a function of ice particle size is consistent with that used for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) operational (Collection 4 and earlier) cloud products; and the surface is assumed to be Lambertian with an albedo of 0.03. Furthermore, error analyses pertaining to the inference of the effective particle sizes and optical thicknesses of mixed-phase clouds are performed. Errors are calculated with respect to the assumption of a cloud containing solely liquid or ice phase particles. The analyses suggest that the effective particle size inferred for a mixed-phase cloud can be underestimated (or overestimated) if pure liquid phase (or pure ice phase) is assumed for the cloud, whereas the corresponding cloud optical thickness can be overestimated (or underestimated).

  18. Ten Years of Cloud Optical and Microphysical Retrievals from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven; King, Michael D.; Wind, Galina; Hubanks, Paul; Arnold, G. Thomas; Amarasinghe, Nandana

    2010-01-01

    The MODIS cloud optical properties algorithm (MOD06/MYD06 for Terra and Aqua MODIS, respectively) has undergone extensive improvements and enhancements since the launch of Terra. These changes have included: improvements in the cloud thermodynamic phase algorithm; substantial changes in the ice cloud light scattering look up tables (LUTs); a clear-sky restoral algorithm for flagging heavy aerosol and sunglint; greatly improved spectral surface albedo maps, including the spectral albedo of snow by ecosystem; inclusion of pixel-level uncertainty estimates for cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and water path derived for three error sources that includes the sensitivity of the retrievals to solar and viewing geometries. To improve overall retrieval quality, we have also implemented cloud edge removal and partly cloudy detection (using MOD35 cloud mask 250m tests), added a supplementary cloud optical thickness and effective radius algorithm over snow and sea ice surfaces and over the ocean, which enables comparison with the "standard" 2.1 11m effective radius retrieval, and added a multi-layer cloud detection algorithm. We will discuss the status of the MOD06 algorithm and show examples of pixellevel (Level-2) cloud retrievals for selected data granules, as well as gridded (Level-3) statistics, notably monthly means and histograms (lD and 2D, with the latter giving correlations between cloud optical thickness and effective radius, and other cloud product pairs).

  19. Parameterizations of the Vertical Variability of Tropical Cirrus Cloud Microphysical and Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twohy, Cynthia; Heymsfield, Andrew; Gerber, Hermann

    2005-01-01

    Our multi-investigator effort was targeted at the following areas of interest to CRYSTAL-FACE: (1) the water budgets of anvils, (2) parameterizations of the particle size distributions and related microphysical and optical properties (3) characterizations of the primary ice particle habits, (4) the relationship of the optical properties to the microphysics and particle habits, and (5) investigation of the ice-nuclei types and mechanisms in anvil cirrus. Dr. Twohy's effort focused on (l), (2), and (5), with the measurement and analysis of ice water content and cirrus residual nuclei using the counterflow virtual impactor (CVI).

  20. Microphysical Characteristics of Clouds During the TRMM Field Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stith, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    Further analysis of the TRMM field campaign data was conducted to examine the growth of precipitation in updraft regions of the TRMM field campaign tropical clouds and to extend the earlier results to cover the whole TRMM data set collected by the University of North Dakota (UND). The results have been submitted for publication. In this paper, composite vertical profiles of liquid water, small particle concentration, and updraft/downdraft magnitudes were presented from each of the campaigns. They exhibited similar peak values for the two TRMM regions of LBA and Kwajalein. Updrafts were found to be favored locations for precipitation embryos in the form of liquid or frozen drizzle-sized droplets. Although liquid water concentrations decreased to undetectable levels between -5 and -18 C in most glaciating updrafts, occasional traces of liquid water were found in updrafts at colder temperatures, probably due to the persistence of liquid drizzle droplets. The updraft magnitudes where the traces of liquid water were observed at cold temperatures do not appear to be stronger than updrafts without liquid water at similar temperatures, however.

  1. An investigation of the effect of sulfate on cloud microphysics using a chemistry/transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H.D.; Green, R.; Schwartz, S.E.; Benkovitz, C.M.

    2001-01-14

    Here the authors have used the output of a chemistry/transport model to identify a situation in which sulfate aerosol from industrial sources may be expected to exert a strong influence on cloud microphysical and radiative properties in an oceanic area that is well displaced from source regions. Pertinent cloud microphysical properties (optical depth and cloud drop radius) are inferred from radiance data obtained from satellite remote sensing. Comparison of these quantities in situations where the model indicates the presence or absence of industrial sulfate has allowed identification of the expected signature of one aerosol indirect effect--an increase in droplet number concentration and concomitant decrease in droplet radii, on a synoptic scale. Although the information obtained on changes in cloud optical depth is too meager to draw conclusions regarding radiative forcing, there is no doubt that the cloud microphysical properties are influenced by the incursion of continental sulfate aerosol in a way that is consistent with that expected by the Twomey indirect forcing mechanism.

  2. Use of microphysical relationships to discern growth/decay mechanisms of cloud droplets with focus on Z-LWC relationships.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Y.; Daum, P.H.; Yum, S.S.; Wang, J.

    2008-05-01

    Cloud droplet size distributions hence the key microphysical quantities (e.g., radar reflectivity, droplet concentration, liquid water content, relative dispersion, and mean-volume radius) are determined by different physical mechanisms, including pre-cloud aerosols as CCNs, cloud updraft, and various turbulent entrainment-mixing processes. Therefore, different relationships among these microphysical properties are expected in response to these various mechanisms. The effect of turbulent entrainment-mixing processes is particularly vexing, with different entrainment-mixing processes likely leading to different microphysical relationships. Cloud radar has been widely used to infer the cloud liquid water content (L) from the measurement of radar reflectivity (Z) using a Z-L relationship. Existing Z-L expressions have been often obtained empirically, and differ substantially (Khain et al. 2008). The discrepancy among Z-L relations, which has been hindering the application of cloud radar in measuring cloud properties, likely stems from the different relationships between the relevant microphysical properties caused by different physical processes. This study first analyzes the Z-L relationship theoretically, and identify the key microphysical properties that affect this relationship, and then address the effects of various processes on the Z-L relationship by discerning the characteristics of the relationships between the relative dispersion, droplet concentration, liquid water content, and mean-volume radius calculated from in-situ measurements of cloud droplet size distributions. Effort is also made to further relate the microphysical relationships to physical processes such as turbulent entrainment-mixing.

  3. A numerical study of aerosol effects on the dynamics and microphysics of a deep convective cloud in a continental environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhiqiang; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Yin, Yan; Davies, Stewart

    2006-03-01

    The effects of aerosols on a deep convective cloud in a midlatitude continental environment are studied using an axisymmetric cloud model with a sectional treatment of aerosol and hydrometeor microphysical processes. Simulations are conducted using observations from the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiments (CCOPE). The isolated cloud occurred in an environment with low wind shear and with relatively dry air in the midtroposphere and upper troposphere. By varying the concentration of aerosol particles in the accumulation mode within realistic limits for a continental environment, the simulated cloud exhibited different properties. The overall impact as the aerosol concentration increased is that (1) the cloud development was inhibited; (2) the precipitation was suppressed; (3) the maximum values of liquid water content decreased, but the maximum values of droplet number concentration increased before the dissipating stage; (4) a clear tendency was found for ice crystals to be larger and less numerous in the anvil cloud; and (5) there was a significant reduction of the inflow in the lower 2 km of the atmosphere. In the relatively dry environment in the midtroposphere, the latent heat changes associated with the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen mechanism played an important role in the upper part of the cloud at altitudes below the homogeneous freezing level. In particular, immersion freezing and latent heat release were much more rapid in the base simulation than in the increased aerosol simulation. Less latent heat release and insufficient inflow together impeded the development of the cloud with the higher aerosol loading. Our simulations suggest that continental clouds existing below the homogeneous freezing level could show an opposite response of cloud top height and anvil crystal concentrations to changes in aerosol to what has previously been reported for clouds ascending to higher levels.

  4. MLS and CALIOP Cloud Ice Measurements in the Upper Troposphere: A Constraint from Microwave on Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Lambert, Alyn; Read, William G.; Eriksson, Patrick; Gong, Jie

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the consistency and microphysics assumptions among satellite ice water content (IWC) retrievals in the upper troposphere with collocated A-Train radiances from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and lidar backscatters from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). For the cases in which IWC values are small (less than 10mg m(exp-23)), the cloud ice retrievals are constrained by both MLS 240- and 640- GHz radiances and CALIOP 532-nm backscatter beta(532). From the observed relationships between MLS cloud-induced radiance T(sub cir) and the CALIOP backscatter integrated gamma532 along the MLS line of sight, an empirical linear relation between cloud ice and the lidar backscatter is found: IWC/beta532=0.58+/-0.11. This lidar cloud ice relation is required to satisfy the cloud ice emission signals simultaneously observed at microwave frequencies, in which ice permittivity is relatively well known. This empirical relationship also produces IWC values that agree well with the CALIOP, version 3.0, retrieval at values, less than 10mg m(exp-3). Because the microphysics assumption is critical in satellite cloud ice retrievals, the agreement found in the IWC-beta532 relationships increase fidelity of the assumptions used by the lidar and microwave techniques for upper-tropospheric clouds.

  5. Laboratory study of microphysical and scattering properties of corona-producing cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, E; Vochezer, P; Möhler, O; Schnaiter, M

    2014-11-01

    Corona-producing cirrus clouds were generated and measured under chamber conditions at the AIDA cloud chamber in Karlsruhe. We were able to measure the scattering properties as well as microphysical properties of these clouds under well-defined laboratory conditions in contrast with previous studies of corona-producing clouds, where the measurements were conducted by means of lidar and in situ aircraft measurements. Our results are in agreement with those of previous studies, confirming that corona-producing cirrus clouds consist of a narrow distribution of small (median Dp=19-32  μm) and compact ice crystals. We showed that the ice crystals in these clouds are most likely formed in homogeneous freezing processes. As a result of the homogeneous freezing process, the ice crystals grow uniformly in size; furthermore, the majority of the ice crystals have rough surface features.

  6. Aerosol Impacts on Clouds and Precipitation in Eastern China: Results from Bin and Bulk Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Zhanqing; Morrison, H.; Chen, Hongbin; Zhou, Yuquan; Qian, Yun; Wang, Yuan

    2012-01-19

    Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with a 3 spectral-bin microphysics ('SBM') and measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation 4 Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility field campaign in China (AMF-China), the authors 5 examine aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in the typical cloud regimes of the warm and cold 6 seasons in Southeast China: deep convective clouds (DCC) and stratus clouds (SC), 7 respectively. Comparisons with a two-moment bulk microphysics ('Bulk') are performed 8 to gain insights for improving bulk schemes in estimating AIE in weather and climate 9 simulations. For the first time, measurements of aerosol and cloud properties acquired in 10 China are used to evaluate model simulations to better understand AIE in China. It is 11 found that changes in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration significantly 12 change the timing of storms, the spatial and temporal distributions of precipitation, the 13 frequency distribution of precipitation rate, as well as cloud base and top heights for the 14 DCC, but not for the SC. CCN increase cloud droplet number (Nc) and mass 15 concentrations, decrease raindrop number concentration (Nr), and delay the onset of 16 precipitation. It is indicated much higher Nc and the opposite CCN effects on convection 17 and heavy rain with Bulk compared to SBM stem from the fixed CCN prescribed in Bulk. 18 CCN have a significant effect on ice microphysical properties with SBM but not Bulk 19 and different condensation/deposition freezing parameterizations employed could be the 20 main reason. This study provided insights to further improve the bulk scheme to better 21 account for aerosol-cloud interactions in regional and global climate simulations, which 22 will be the focus for a follow-on paper.

  7. Aerosol impacts on radiative and microphysical properties of clouds and precipitation formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh-Choobari, O.; Gharaylou, M.

    2017-03-01

    Through modifying the number concentration and size of cloud droplets, aerosols have intricate impacts on radiative and microphysical properties of clouds, which together influence precipitation processes. Aerosol-cloud interactions for a mid-latitude convective cloud system are investigated using a two-moment aerosol-aware bulk microphysical scheme implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Three sensitivity experiments with initial identical dynamic and thermodynamic conditions, but different cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations were conducted. Increased aerosol number concentration has resulted in more numerous cloud droplets of overall smaller sizes, through which the optical properties of clouds have been changed. While the shortwave cloud forcing is significantly increased in more polluted experiments, changes in the aerosol number concentration have negligible impacts on the longwave cloud forcing. For the first time, it is found that polluted clouds have higher cloud base heights, the feature that is caused by more surface cooling due to a higher shortwave cloud forcing, as well as a drier boundary layer in the polluted experiment compared to the clean. The polluted experiment was also associated with a higher liquid water content (LWC), caused by an increase in the number of condensation of water vapor due to higher concentration of hygroscopic aerosols acting as condensation nuclei. The domain-averaged accumulated precipitation is little changed under both polluted and clean atmosphere. Nevertheless, changes in the rate of precipitation are identified, such that under polluted atmosphere light rain is reduced, while both moderate and heavy rain are intensified, confirming the fact that if an ample influx of water vapor exists, an increment of hygroscopic aerosols can increase the amount of precipitation.

  8. Particle cloud mixing in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H.; Facca, L.; Tangirala, V.; Berlad, A. L.

    1989-01-01

    Quasi-steady flame propagation through clouds of combustible particles requires quasi-steady transport properties and quasi-steady particle number density. Microgravity conditions may be employed to help achieve the conditions of quiescent, uniform clouds needed for such combustion studies. Joint experimental and theoretical NASA-UCSD studies were concerned with the use of acoustic, electrostatic, and other methods of dispersion of fuel particulates. Results of these studies are presented for particle clouds in long cylindrical tubes.

  9. Microphysical characterization of winter cloud systems during a research flight campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-González, Sergio; Sánchez, José Luis; Valero, Francisco; Gascón, Estíbaliz; Merino, Andrés; Hermida, Lucía; López, Laura; Marcos, José Luis; García-Ortega, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    The lack of accuracy in the knowledge of cloud microphysics leads to aviation risks, which have caused numerous crashes, mainly owing to aircraft icing (e.g., an EMB-120 crashed in Detroit, Michigan in 1997, and an ATR-72 crashed near Roselawn, Indiana in 1994). Further, this lack is a source of uncertainty in numerical weather forecasting models, since commonly used parameterizations often overestimate ice water content and underestimate supercooled liquid water. This makes the collection of data on cloud microphysical characteristics very useful toward improving the forecasting of icing conditions. Ten research flights were conducted during the winters of 2011/12 and 2012/13. Their goal was to determine dominant microphysical conditions of winter cloud systems traversing the Guadarrama Mountains in the central Iberian Peninsula. The aircraft was a C-212-200, equipped with a Cloud, Aerosol, and Precipitation Spectrometer (CAPS) under the left wing. Data of temperature and Liquid Water Content (LWC), registered by the CAPS probe, were used in the study. Furthermore, we thoroughly analyzed images taken by a Cloud Imaging Probe Grayscale (CIP-GS), capable of measuring hydrometeors between 25 and 1,550 µm in size, and representing them in a 2D image. The various types of hydrometeors observed during these flights are described, along with microphysical processes inferred from the CIP-GS images. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS S. Fernández-González acknowledges grant support from the FPU program (AP 2010-2093). This study was also supported by grants from GRANIMETRO (CGL2010-15930) and MICROMETEO (IPT-310000-2010-22). The authors thank INTA for the research flights.

  10. The Dependence on Grid Resolution of Numerically Simulated Convective Cloud Systems Using Ice Microphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Ferrier, Bradley S.

    1999-01-01

    Mesoscale research and forecast models are increasingly being used at horizontal resolutions of 1-8 km to simulate a variety of precipitating systems. When the model is used to simulate convective systems, it is uncertain to what extent the dynamics and microphysics of convective updrafts can be resolved with grids larger than 1 km. In this study, two- and three-dimensional versions of the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model are used to determine the impact of horizontal grid resolution on the behavior of the simulated storms and on the characteristics of the cloud microphysical fields. It will be shown that as resolution decreases from about 1 km to greater than 3 km, there is a fairly rapid degradation of the storm structure in the form of reduced convective mass fluxes, updraft tilts, and cloud microphysics. A high-resolution simulation of hurricane outer rainbands using the MM5 mesoscale model shows also that there can be a substantial modification of the key microphysical processes that contribute to rainfall as a result of reducing the horizontal resolution.

  11. Observed microphysical changes in Arctic mixed-phase clouds when transitioning from sea-ice to open ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Gillian; Jones, Hazel M.; Crosier, Jonathan; Bower, Keith N.; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Taylor, Jonathan W.; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James D.; Williams, Paul I.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Choularton, Thomas W.

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic sea-ice is intricately coupled to the atmosphere[1]. The decreasing sea-ice extent with the changing climate raises questions about how Arctic cloud structure will respond. Any effort to answer these questions is hindered by the scarcity of atmospheric observations in this region. Comprehensive cloud and aerosol measurements could allow for an improved understanding of the relationship between surface conditions and cloud structure; knowledge which could be key in validating weather model forecasts. Previous studies[2] have shown via remote sensing that cloudiness increases over the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and ocean with comparison to the sea-ice; however, to our knowledge, detailed in-situ data of this transition have not been previously presented. In 2013, the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling and Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) campaign was carried out in the vicinity of Svalbard, Norway to collect in-situ observations of the Arctic atmosphere and investigate this issue. Fitted with a suite of remote sensing, cloud and aerosol instrumentation, the FAAM BAe-146 aircraft was used during the spring segment of the campaign (Mar-Apr 2013). One case study (23rd Mar 2013) produced excellent coverage of the atmospheric changes when transitioning from sea-ice, through the MIZ, to the open ocean. Clear microphysical changes were observed, with the cloud liquid-water content increasing by almost four times over the transition. Cloud base, depth and droplet number also increased, whilst ice number concentrations decreased slightly. The surface warmed by ~13 K from sea-ice to ocean, with minor differences in aerosol particle number (of sizes corresponding to Cloud Condensation Nuclei or Ice Nucleating Particles) observed, suggesting that the primary driver of these microphysical changes was the increased heat fluxes and induced turbulence from the warm ocean surface as expected. References: [1] Kapsch, M.L., Graversen, R.G. and Tjernström, M. Springtime

  12. The Operational MODIS Cloud Optical and Microphysical Property Product: Overview of the Collection 6 Algorithm and Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven; King, Michael D.; Wind, Galina; Amarasinghe, Nandana; Marchant, Benjamin; Arnold, G. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Operational Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals of cloud optical and microphysical properties (part of the archived products MOD06 and MYD06, for MODIS Terra and Aqua, respectively) are currently being reprocessed along with other MODIS Atmosphere Team products. The latest "Collection 6" processing stream, which is expected to begin production by summer 2012, includes updates to the previous cloud retrieval algorithm along with new capabilities. The 1 km retrievals, based on well-known solar reflectance techniques, include cloud optical thickness, effective particle radius, and water path, as well as thermodynamic phase derived from a combination of solar and infrared tests. Being both global and of high spatial resolution requires an algorithm that is computationally efficient and can perform over all surface types. Collection 6 additions and enhancements include: (i) absolute effective particle radius retrievals derived separately from the 1.6 and 3.7 !-lm bands (instead of differences relative to the standard 2.1 !-lm retrieval), (ii) comprehensive look-up tables for cloud reflectance and emissivity (no asymptotic theory) with a wind-speed interpolated Cox-Munk BRDF for ocean surfaces, (iii) retrievals for both liquid water and ice phases for each pixel, and a subsequent determination of the phase based, in part, on effective radius retrieval outcomes for the two phases, (iv) new ice cloud radiative models using roughened particles with a specified habit, (v) updated spatially-complete global spectral surface albedo maps derived from MODIS Collection 5, (vi) enhanced pixel-level uncertainty calculations incorporating additional radiative error sources including the MODIS L1 B uncertainty index for assessing band and scene-dependent radiometric uncertainties, (v) and use of a new 1 km cloud top pressure/temperature algorithm (also part of MOD06) for atmospheric corrections and low cloud non-unity emissivity temperature adjustments.

  13. Double-moment cloud microphysics scheme for the deep convection parameterization in the GFDL AM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belochitski, A.; Donner, L.

    2014-12-01

    A double-moment cloud microphysical scheme originally developed by Morrision and Gettelman (2008) for the stratiform clouds and later adopted for the deep convection by Song and Zhang (2011) has been implemented in to the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's atmospheric general circulation model AM3. The scheme treats cloud drop, cloud ice, rain, and snow number concentrations and mixing ratios as diagnostic variables and incorporates processes of autoconversion, self-collection, collection between hydrometeor species, sedimentation, ice nucleation, drop activation, homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing, and the Bergeron-Findeisen process. Such detailed representation of microphysical processes makes the scheme suitable for studying the interactions between aerosols and convection, as well as aerosols' indirect effects on clouds and their roles in climate change. The scheme is first tested in the single column version of the GFDL AM3 using forcing data obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurment project's Southern Great Planes site. Scheme's impact on SCM simulations is discussed. As the next step, runs of the full atmospheric GCM incorporating the new parameterization are compared to the unmodified version of GFDL AM3. Global climatological fields and their variability are contrasted with those of the original version of the GCM. Impact on cloud radiative forcing and climate sensitivity is investigated.

  14. MODIS Cloud Microphysics Product (MOD_PR06OD) Data Collection 6 Updates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wind, Gala; Platnick, Steven; King, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The MODIS Cloud Optical and Microphysical Product (MOD_PR060D) for Data Collection 6 has entered full scale production. Aqua reprocessing is almost completed and Terra reprocessing will begin shortly. Unlike previous collections, the CHIMAERA code base allows for simultaneous processing for multiple sensors and the operational CHIMAERA 6.0.76 stream is also available for VIIRS and SEVIRI sensors and for our E-MAS airborne platform.

  15. Rain chemistry and cloud composition and microphysics in a Caribbean tropical montane cloud forest under the influence of African dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Delgado, Elvis; Valle-Diaz, Carlos J.; Baumgardner, Darrel; McDowell, William H.; González, Grizelle; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

    2015-04-01

    It is known that huge amounts of mineral dust travels thousands of kilometers from the Sahara and Sahel regions in Africa over the Atlantic Ocean reaching the Caribbean, northern South America and southern North America; however, not much is understood about how the aging process that takes place during transport changes dust properties, and how the presence of this dust affects cloud's composition and microphysics. This African dust reaches the Caribbean region mostly in the summer time. In order to improve our understanding of the role of long-range transported African dust (LRTAD) in cloud formation processes in a tropical montane cloud forest (TMCF) in the Caribbean region we had field campaigns measuring dust physical and chemical properties in summer 2013, as part of the Puerto Rico African Dust and Cloud Study (PRADACS), and in summer 2014, as a part of the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO) and in collaboration with the Saharan Aerosol Long-Range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE). Measurements were performed at the TMCF of Pico del Este (PE, 1051 masl) and at the nature reserve of Cabezas de San Juan (CSJ, 60 masl). In both stations we monitored meteorological parameters (e.g., temperature, wind speed, wind direction). At CSJ, we measured light absorption and scattering at three wavelengths (467, 528 and 652 nm). At PE we collected cloud and rainwater and monitored cloud microphysical properties (e.g., liquid water content, droplet size distribution, droplet number concentration, effective diameter and median volume diameter). Data from aerosol models, satellites, and back-trajectories were used together with CSJ measurements to classify air masses and samples collected at PE in the presence or absence of dust. Soluble ions, insoluble trace metals, pH and conductivity were measured for cloud and rainwater. Preliminary results for summer 2013 showed that in the presence of LRTAD (1) the average conductivity of cloud water

  16. Interactions between aerosol absorption, thermodynamics, dynamics, and microphysics and their impacts on a multiple-cloud system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoung Soo; Li, Zhanqing; Mok, Jungbin; Ahn, Myoung-Hwan; Kim, Byung-Gon; Choi, Yong-Sang; Jung, Chang-Hoon; Yoo, Hye Lim

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates how the increasing concentration of black carbon aerosols, which act as radiation absorbers as well as agents for the cloud-particle nucleation, affects stability, dynamics and microphysics in a multiple-cloud system using simulations. Simulations show that despite increases in stability due to increasing concentrations of black carbon aerosols, there are increases in the averaged updraft mass fluxes (over the whole simulation domain and period). This is because aerosol-enhanced evaporative cooling intensifies convergence near the surface. This increase in the intensity of convergence induces an increase in the frequency of updrafts with the low range of speeds, leading to the increase in the averaged updraft mass fluxes. The increase in the frequency of updrafts induces that in the number of condensation entities and this leads to more condensation and cloud liquid that acts to be a source of the accretion of cloud liquid by precipitation. Hence, eventually, there is more accretion that offsets suppressed autoconversion, which results in negligible changes in cumulative precipitation as aerosol concentrations increase. The increase in the frequency of updrafts with the low range of speeds alters the cloud-system organization (represented by cloud-depth spatiotemporal distributions and cloud-cell population) by supporting more low-depth clouds. The altered organization in turn alters precipitation spatiotemporal distributions by generating more weak precipitation events. Aerosol-induced reduction in solar radiation that reaches the surface induces more occurrences of small-value surface heat fluxes, which in turn supports the more low-depth clouds and weak precipitation together with the greater occurrence of low-speed updrafts.

  17. Long-term in situ measurements of the cloud-precipitation microphysical properties over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jinfang; Wang, Donghai; Zhai, Guoqing

    2011-10-01

    A database of cloud-precipitation microphysical characteristics is established, using in situ data during 1960-2008. Main features of aerosol, ice nuclei (IN), cloud droplet, fog, ice crystal, snow crystal, and raindrop are presented based on the analyses of the database. In addition, a statistical analysis has been performed. The results show that the overall average aerosol concentration in diameter greater than 0.3 μm is 166.9 cm -3 and the average maximum values of IN concentration can reach 78.9 L -1 at - 20 °C, with an overall average of 22.9 L -1. In addition, cumuliform clouds have higher overall average cloud droplet number concentration (N c) of 907.7 cm -3, and that of stratiform clouds, is 120.9 cm -3; cumuliform clouds (stratiform clouds) have an average liquid water content (LWC) of 0.875 (0.140) g m -3, with a peak value of 2.000 (0.520) g m -3. The gamma size distributions are shown to be suitable for most of the observed spectra in stratiform clouds. Both the exponential and gamma size distributions are applicable to fit the raindrops originating from stratiform clouds. Good agreement is obtained when the gamma size distribution is applied to fit the raindrops originating from both convective and mixing (stratiform and cumuliform) clouds. The exponential size distributions are suitable for both ice crystal and snow crystal fitting.

  18. Unique manifestations of mixed-phase cloud microphysics over Ross Island and the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Ryan C.; Lubin, Dan

    2016-03-01

    Spaceborne radar and lidar observations from the CloudSat and CALIPSO satellites are used to compare seasonal variations in the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds over Ross Island, Antarctica, with two contrasting Arctic atmospheric observatories located in Barrow, Alaska, and Summit, Greenland. At Ross Island, downstream from recurrent intrusions of marine air over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and eastern Ross Ice Shelf, clouds exhibit a tendency toward the greatest geometrical thickness and coldest temperatures in summer, the largest average ice water content, IWC, at low altitude during summer and autumn, the most abundant IWC at cold mixed-phase temperatures (-40°C Clouds over Barrow form and evolve in a contrastingly warm and moist atmosphere and on average contain the largest liquid water content and ice and liquid water effective particle radii, re, year round. In contrast, clouds observed atop the central Greenland Ice Sheet are relatively tenuous, containing the smallest IWC and ice re of all sites.

  19. Microphysical and optical properties of precipitating drizzle and ice particles obtained from alternated lidar and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayet, J.-F.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Jourdan, O.; Shcherbakov, V.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Neuber, R.

    2007-07-01

    During the international ASTAR experiment (Arctic Study of Aerosols, Clouds and Radiation) carried out from Longyearbyen (Spitsbergen) from 10 May to 11 June 2004, the AWI (Alfred Wegener Institute) Polar 2 aircraft was equipped with a unique combination of remote and in situ instruments. The airborne AMALi lidar provided downward backscatter and Depolarisation ratio profiles at 532 nm wavelength. The in situ instrumental setup comprised a Polar Nephelometer, a Cloud Particle Imager (CPI) as well as a Nevzorov and standard PMS probes to measure cloud particle properties in terms of scattering characteristics, particle morphology and size, and in-cloud partitioning of ice/water content. The objective of the paper is to present the results of a case study related to observations with ice crystals precipitating down to supercooled boundary-layer stratocumulus. The flight pattern was predefined in a way that firstly the AMALi lidar probed the cloud tops to guide the in situ measurements into a particular cloud formation. Three kinds of clouds with different microphysical and optical properties have therefore been quasi-simultaneously observed: (i) water droplets stratiform-layer, (ii) drizzle-drops fallstreak and (iii) precipitating ice-crystals from a cirrus cloud above. The signatures of these clouds are clearly evidenced from the in situ measurements and from the lidar profiles in term of backscatter and Depolarisation ratio. Accordingly, typical lidar ratios, i.e., extinction-to-backscatter ratios, are derived from the measured scattering phase function combined with subsequent particle shapes and size distributions. The backscatter profiles can therefore be retrieved under favourable conditions of low optical density. From these profiles extinction values in different cloud types can be obtained and compared with the direct in situ measurements.

  20. Statistical retrieval of thin liquid cloud microphysical properties using ground-based infrared and microwave observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marke, Tobias; Ebell, Kerstin; Löhnert, Ulrich; Turner, David D.

    2016-12-01

    In this article, liquid water cloud microphysical properties are retrieved by a combination of microwave and infrared ground-based observations. Clouds containing liquid water are frequently occurring in most climate regimes and play a significant role in terms of interaction with radiation. Small perturbations in the amount of liquid water contained in the cloud can cause large variations in the radiative fluxes. This effect is enhanced for thin clouds (liquid water path, LWP <100 g/m2), which makes accurate retrieval information of the cloud properties crucial. Due to large relative errors in retrieving low LWP values from observations in the microwave domain and a high sensitivity for infrared methods when the LWP is low, a synergistic retrieval based on a neural network approach is built to estimate both LWP and cloud effective radius (reff). These statistical retrievals can be applied without high computational demand but imply constraints like prior information on cloud phase and cloud layering. The neural network retrievals are able to retrieve LWP and reff for thin clouds with a mean relative error of 9% and 17%, respectively. This is demonstrated using synthetic observations of a microwave radiometer (MWR) and a spectrally highly resolved infrared interferometer. The accuracy and robustness of the synergistic retrievals is confirmed by a low bias in a radiative closure study for the downwelling shortwave flux, even for marginally invalid scenes. Also, broadband infrared radiance observations, in combination with the MWR, have the potential to retrieve LWP with a higher accuracy than a MWR-only retrieval.

  1. Simulation of the effects of aerosol on mixed-phase orographic clouds using the WRF model with a detailed bin microphysics scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hui; Yin, Yan; Jin, Lianji; Chen, Qian; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-08-01

    The Weather Research Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model coupled with a detailed bin microphysics scheme is used to investigate the impact of aerosol particles serving as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei on orographic clouds and precipitation. A mixed-phase orographic cloud developed under two scenarios of aerosol (a typical continental background and a relatively polluted urban condition) and ice nuclei over an idealized mountain is simulated. The results show that, when the initial aerosol condition is changed from the relatively clean case to the polluted scenario, more droplets are activated, leading to a delay in precipitation, but the precipitation amount over the terrain is increased by about 10%. A detailed analysis of the microphysical processes indicates that ice-phase particles play an important role in cloud development, and their contribution to precipitation becomes more important with increasing aerosol particle concentrations. The growth of ice-phase particles through riming and Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen regime is more effective under more polluted conditions, mainly due to the increased number of droplets with a diameter of 10-30 µm. Sensitivity tests also show that a tenfold increase in the concentration of ice crystals formed from ice nucleation leads to about 7% increase in precipitation, and the sensitivity of the precipitation to changes in the concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles is becoming less pronounced when the concentration of ice crystals is also increased.

  2. Theoretical Studies of Microphysics of Marine Boundary-Layer Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.

    2002-01-01

    This project is aimed at better understanding the role that aerosols play in altering the properties of stratus clouds. This interaction, termed the indirect effect of aerosols on climate, is a major subject a of study since the radiative forcing involved may rival that of greenhouse gases, but may be of the opposite sign. Our goal was to create numerical models of the phenomena, test them with data, and thereby gain insight into the physical processes occurring. Below we list the papers that we have produced during this grant. We then discuss these papers.

  3. Unified Very Low Stratus Cloud/Subcloud Microphysics Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    radiation effect in the cloud and is an unknown function of z, Ac = F(z) (22d) (Turb) is the turbulence effect, after Priestley (1953), k2(T - T’) (22e...equations, "horizontal" entrainment or the Priestley (1953) turbulence effect tends to increase the magnitude of dT/dz when dT/dz is negative, but... Priestley . As was done in section 4.3, we allow either entrainment or Priestley turbulence to be activated in equation (35), but not both. If

  4. Sensitivity of a Cloud-Resolving Model to Bulk and Explicit Bin Microphysical Schemes. Part 2; Cloud Microphysics and Storm Dynamics Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaowen; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Khain, Alexander P.; Simpson, Joanne; Johnson, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    Part I of this paper compares two simulations, one using a bulk and the other a detailed bin microphysical scheme, of a long-lasting, continental mesoscale convective system with leading convection and trailing stratiform region. Diagnostic studies and sensitivity tests are carried out in Part II to explain the simulated contrasts in the spatial and temporal variations by the two microphysical schemes and to understand the interactions between cloud microphysics and storm dynamics. It is found that the fixed raindrop size distribution in the bulk scheme artificially enhances rain evaporation rate and produces a stronger near surface cool pool compared with the bin simulation. In the bulk simulation, cool pool circulation dominates the near-surface environmental wind shear in contrast to the near-balance between cool pool and wind shear in the bin simulation. This is the main reason for the contrasting quasi-steady states simulated in Part I. Sensitivity tests also show that large amounts of fast-falling hail produced in the original bulk scheme not only result in a narrow trailing stratiform region but also act to further exacerbate the strong cool pool simulated in the bulk parameterization. An empirical formula for a correction factor, r(q(sub r)) = 0.11q(sub r)(exp -1.27) + 0.98, is developed to correct the overestimation of rain evaporation in the bulk model, where r is the ratio of the rain evaporation rate between the bulk and bin simulations and q(sub r)(g per kilogram) is the rain mixing ratio. This formula offers a practical fix for the simple bulk scheme in rain evaporation parameterization.

  5. Cloud microphysical relationships and their implication on entrainment and mixing mechanism for the stratocumulus clouds measured during the VOCALS project

    SciTech Connect

    Yum, Seong Soo; Wang, Jian; Liu, Yangang; Senum, Gunnar; Springston, Stephen; McGraw, Robert; Yeom, Jae Min

    2015-05-27

    Cloud microphysical data obtained from G-1 aircraft flights over the southeastern pacific during the VOCALS-Rex field campaign were analyzed for evidence of entrainment mixing of dry air from above cloud top. Mixing diagram analysis was made for the horizontal flight data recorded at 1 Hz and 40 Hz. The dominant observed feature, a positive relationship between cloud droplet mean volume (V) and liquid water content (L), suggested occurrence of homogeneous mixing. On the other hand, estimation of the relevant scale parameters (i.e., transition length scale and transition scale number) consistently indicated inhomogeneous mixing. Importantly, the flight altitudes of the measurements were significantly below cloud top. We speculate that mixing of the entrained air near the cloud top may have indeed been inhomogeneous; but due to vertical circulation mixing, the correlation between V and L became positive at the measurement altitudes in mid-level of clouds, because during their descent, cloud droplets evaporate, faster in more diluted cloud parcels, leading to a positive correlation between V and L regardless of the mixing mechanism near the cloud top.

  6. Cloud microphysical relationships and their implication on entrainment and mixing mechanism for the stratocumulus clouds measured during the VOCALS project

    DOE PAGES

    Yum, Seong Soo; Wang, Jian; Liu, Yangang; ...

    2015-05-27

    Cloud microphysical data obtained from G-1 aircraft flights over the southeastern pacific during the VOCALS-Rex field campaign were analyzed for evidence of entrainment mixing of dry air from above cloud top. Mixing diagram analysis was made for the horizontal flight data recorded at 1 Hz and 40 Hz. The dominant observed feature, a positive relationship between cloud droplet mean volume (V) and liquid water content (L), suggested occurrence of homogeneous mixing. On the other hand, estimation of the relevant scale parameters (i.e., transition length scale and transition scale number) consistently indicated inhomogeneous mixing. Importantly, the flight altitudes of the measurementsmore » were significantly below cloud top. We speculate that mixing of the entrained air near the cloud top may have indeed been inhomogeneous; but due to vertical circulation mixing, the correlation between V and L became positive at the measurement altitudes in mid-level of clouds, because during their descent, cloud droplets evaporate, faster in more diluted cloud parcels, leading to a positive correlation between V and L regardless of the mixing mechanism near the cloud top.« less

  7. Impacts of cloud microphysics and radiation on the cloud and precipitation in a simulated Meiyu-frontal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Meiyu frontal system that formed and moved over the Huai River basin of China on 7-8 July 2007 is investigated using weather radar observations, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar and CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar measurements, and brightness temperatures from the MTSAT-1R satellite. These results are used to evaluate cloud-resolving simulations performed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Sensitivity experiments are conducted to explore impacts of cloud microphysics and radiation on the cloud and precipitation structure. At its mature stage, the observed convective system consisted of a west-east oriented leading convective line with stratiform precipitating and non-precipitating cloud regions trailing off to the north and east. While the cloud system extending hundreds kilometers from west to east, the widths of the convective and stratiform raining regions are of 10-20 km and 100-200 km, respectively. During the system's development stage, newer convection occurred on the western edge of the convective line. The convective centers progressed through a period of rapid growth when propagated eastward, with echo tops penetrating to maximum heights of 16-km, then decreasing to height of 13-km, which corresponds to the height of the stratiform precipitating cloud top with which the convective elements merged at the end of their lifetimes. Results from four simulations are analyzed: CONTROL, Lin, Thompson, and noRad. The three sensitivity experiments are identical to CONTROL except that the Lin and Thompson simulations employ the 1-moment microphysics schemes of Lin and Thompson, respectively, rather than the 2-moment microphysics scheme of Morrison as in CONTROL, and the noRad simulation turns off the radiative cooling/warming effect. The CONTROL reasonably reproduces not only the magnitude and spatial distribution of the accumulated surface precipitation, but also the evolution of the leading convective lines and

  8. A Comparison Of Cloud Microphysical Properties Derived Using VIRS 3.7 Micron and 1.6 Micron Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, David F.; Minnis, Patrick; Arduini, Robert F.

    1999-01-01

    One of the main objectives of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project is the retrieval of cloud physical and microphysical properties simultaneously with observations of broadband radiative fluxes. These cloud parameter sare used for three main purposes: 1) to provide data for radiation-cloud climate feedback studies; 2) to provide scene identification data for the construction and application of angular distribution models; and 3) to be used as input to radiative transfer calculations of intra-atmospheric fluxes

  9. Retrievals of Ice Cloud Microphysical Properties of Deep Convective Systems using Radar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, J.; Dong, X.; Xi, B.; Wang, J.; Homeyer, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents innovative algorithms for retrieving ice cloud microphysical properties of Deep Convective Systems (DCSs) using Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) reflectivity and newly derived empirical relationships from aircraft in situ measurements in Wang et al. (2015) during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). With composite gridded NEXRAD radar reflectivity, four-dimensional (space-time) ice cloud microphysical properties of DCSs are retrieved, which is not possible from either in situ sampling at a single altitude or from vertical pointing radar measurements. For this study, aircraft in situ measurements provide the best-estimated ice cloud microphysical properties for validating the radar retrievals. Two statistical comparisons between retrieved and aircraft in situ measured ice microphysical properties are conducted from six selected cases during MC3E. For the temporal-averaged method, the averaged ice water content (IWC) and median mass diameter (Dm) from aircraft in situ measurements are 0.50 g m-3 and 1.51 mm, while the retrievals from radar reflectivity have negative biases of 0.12 g m-3 (24%) and 0.02 mm (1.3%) with correlations of 0.71 and 0.48, respectively. For the spatial-averaged method, the IWC retrievals are closer to the aircraft results (0.51 vs. 0.47 g m-3) with a positive bias of 8.5%, whereas the Dm retrievals are larger than the aircraft results (1.65 mm vs. 1.51 mm) with a positive bias of 9.3%. The retrieved IWCs decrease from ~0.6 g m-3 at 5 km to ~0.15 g m-3 at 13 km, and Dm values decrease from ~2 mm to ~0.7 mm at the same levels. In general, the aircraft in situ measured IWC and Dm values at each level are within one standard derivation of retrieved properties. Good agreements between microphysical properties measured from aircraft and retrieved from radar reflectivity measurements indicate the reasonable accuracy of our retrievals.

  10. Coupling Spectral-bin Cloud Microphysics with the MOSAIC Aerosol Model in WRF-Chem: Methodology and Results for Marine Stratocumulus Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Wenhua; Fan, Jiwen; Easter, Richard C.; Yang, Qing; Zhao, Chun; Ghan, Steven J.

    2016-08-23

    Aerosol-cloud interaction processes can be represented more physically with bin cloud microphysics relative to bulk microphysical parameterizations. However, due to computational power limitations in the past, bin cloud microphysics was often run with very simple aerosol treatments. The purpose of this study is to represent better aerosol-cloud interaction processes in the Chemistry version of Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF-Chem) at convection-permitting scales by coupling spectral-bin cloud microphysics (SBM) with the MOSAIC sectional aerosol model. A flexible interface is built that exchanges cloud and aerosol information between them. The interface contains a new bin aerosol activation approach, which replaces the treatments in the original SBM. It also includes the modified aerosol resuspension and in-cloud wet removal processes with the droplet loss tendencies and precipitation fluxes from SBM. The newly coupled system is evaluated for two marine stratocumulus cases over the Southeast Pacific Ocean with either a simplified aerosol setup or full-chemistry. We compare the aerosol activation process in the newly-coupled SBM-MOSAIC against the SBM simulation without chemistry using a simplified aerosol setup, and the results show consistent activation rates. A longer time simulation reinforces that aerosol resuspension through cloud drop evaporation plays an important role in replenishing aerosols and impacts cloud and precipitation in marine stratocumulus clouds. Evaluation of the coupled SBM-MOSAIC with full-chemistry using aircraft measurements suggests that the new model works realistically for the marine stratocumulus clouds, and improves the simulation of cloud microphysical properties compared to a simulation using MOSAIC coupled with the Morrison two-moment microphysics.

  11. Coupling spectral-bin cloud microphysics with the MOSAIC aerosol model in WRF-Chem: Methodology and results for marine stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wenhua; Fan, Jiwen; Easter, R. C.; Yang, Qing; Zhao, Chun; Ghan, Steven J.

    2016-09-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction processes can be represented more physically with bin cloud microphysics relative to bulk microphysical parameterizations. However, due to computational power limitations in the past, bin cloud microphysics was often run with very simple aerosol treatments. The purpose of this study is to represent better aerosol-cloud interaction processes in the Chemistry version of Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF-Chem) at convection-permitting scales by coupling spectral-bin cloud microphysics (SBM) with the MOSAIC sectional aerosol model. A flexible interface is built that exchanges cloud and aerosol information between them. The interface contains a new bin aerosol activation approach, which replaces the treatments in the original SBM. It also includes the modified aerosol resuspension and in-cloud wet removal processes with the droplet loss tendencies and precipitation fluxes from SBM. The newly coupled system is evaluated for two marine stratocumulus cases over the Southeast Pacific Ocean with either a simplified aerosol setup or full-chemistry. We compare the aerosol activation process in the newly coupled SBM-MOSAIC against the SBM simulation without chemistry using a simplified aerosol setup, and the results show consistent activation rates. A longer time simulation reinforces that aerosol resuspension through cloud drop evaporation plays an important role in replenishing aerosols and impacts cloud and precipitation in marine stratocumulus clouds. Evaluation of the coupled SBM-MOSAIC with full-chemistry using aircraft measurements suggests that the new model works realistically for the marine stratocumulus clouds, and improves the simulation of cloud microphysical properties compared to a simulation using MOSAIC coupled with the Morrison two-moment microphysics.

  12. The origin of midlatitude ice clouds and the resulting influence on their microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luebke, Anna E.; Afchine, Armin; Costa, Anja; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Meyer, Jessica; Rolf, Christian; Spelten, Nicole; Avallone, Linnea M.; Baumgardner, Darrel; Krämer, Martina

    2016-05-01

    The radiative role of ice clouds in the atmosphere is known to be important, but uncertainties remain concerning the magnitude and net effects. However, through measurements of the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds, we can better characterize them, which can ultimately allow for their radiative properties to be more accurately ascertained. Recently, two types of cirrus clouds differing by formation mechanism and microphysical properties have been classified - in situ and liquid origin cirrus. In this study, we present observational evidence to show that two distinct types of cirrus do exist. Airborne, in situ measurements of cloud ice water content (IWC), ice crystal concentration (Nice), and ice crystal size from the 2014 ML-CIRRUS campaign provide cloud samples that have been divided according to their origin type. The key features that set liquid origin cirrus apart from the in situ origin cirrus are higher frequencies of high IWC ( > 100 ppmv), higher Nice values, and larger ice crystals. A vertical distribution of Nice shows that the in situ origin cirrus clouds exhibit a median value of around 0.1 cm-3, while the liquid origin concentrations are slightly, but notably higher. The median sizes of the crystals contributing the most mass are less than 200 µm for in situ origin cirrus, with some of the largest crystals reaching 550 µm in size. The liquid origin cirrus, on the other hand, were observed to have median diameters greater than 200 µm, and crystals that were up to 750 µm. An examination of these characteristics in relation to each other and their relationship to temperature provides strong evidence that these differences arise from the dynamics and conditions in which the ice crystals formed. Additionally, the existence of these two groups in cirrus cloud populations may explain why a bimodal distribution in the IWC-temperature relationship has been observed. We hypothesize that the low IWC mode is the result of in situ origin cirrus and the

  13. Jovian clouds and haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Robert A.; Baines, Kevin H.; Friedson, A. James; Banfield, Don; Ragent, Boris; Taylor, Fred W.

    Tropospheric clouds: thermochemical equilibrium theory and cloud microphysical theory, condensate cloud microphysics, tropospheric cloud and haze distribution - observations, results from the Galileo probe experiments, Galileo NIMS observations and results, Galileo SSE observations and results, recent analyses of ground-based and HST data; Tropospheric clouds and haze: optical and physical properties: partical composition, particle optical properties, size and shape, chromophores; Stratospheric haze: particle distribution, optical properties, size and shape, particle formation.

  14. Microphysical properties of frozen particles inferred from Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI) polarimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.

    2017-02-01

    Scattering differences induced by frozen particle microphysical properties are investigated, using the vertically (V) and horizontally (H) polarized radiances from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI) 89 and 166 GHz channels. It is the first study on frozen particle microphysical properties on a global scale that uses the dual-frequency microwave polarimetric signals.From the ice cloud scenes identified by the 183.3 ± 3 GHz channel brightness temperature (Tb), we find that the scattering by frozen particles is highly polarized, with V-H polarimetric differences (PDs) being positive throughout the tropics and the winter hemisphere mid-latitude jet regions, including PDs from the GMI 89 and 166 GHz TBs, as well as the PD at 640 GHz from the ER-2 Compact Scanning Submillimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSSIR) during the TC4 campaign. Large polarization dominantly occurs mostly near convective outflow regions (i.e., anvils or stratiform precipitation), while the polarization signal is small inside deep convective cores as well as at the remote cirrus region. Neglecting the polarimetric signal would easily result in as large as 30 % error in ice water path retrievals. There is a universal bell curve in the PD-TBV relationship, where the PD amplitude peaks at ˜ 10 K for all three channels in the tropics and increases slightly with latitude (2-4 K). Moreover, the 166 GHz PD tends to increase in the case where a melting layer is beneath the frozen particles aloft in the atmosphere, while 89 GHz PD is less sensitive than 166 GHz to the melting layer. This property creates a unique PD feature for the identification of the melting layer and stratiform rain with passive sensors.Horizontally oriented non-spherical frozen particles are thought to produce the observed PD because of different ice scattering properties in the V and H polarizations. On the other hand, turbulent mixing within deep convective cores inevitably promotes the random

  15. Retrieval of ice cloud microphysical parameters using the CloudSat millimeter-wave radar and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Richard T.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2009-04-01

    A new remote sensing retrieval of ice cloud microphysics has been developed for use with millimeter-wave radar from ground-, air-, or space-based sensors. Developed from an earlier retrieval that used measurements of radar reflectivity factor together with a priori information about the likely cloud targets, the new retrieval includes temperature information as well to assist in determining the correct region of state space, particularly for those size distribution parameters that are less constrained by the radar measurements. These algorithms have served as the ice cloud retrieval algorithms in Releases 3 and 4 of the CloudSat 2B-CWC-RO Standard Data Product. Several comparison studies have been performed on the previous and current retrieval algorithms: some involving tests of the algorithms on simulated radar data (based on actual cloud probe data or cloud resolving models) and others featuring statistical comparisons of the R04 2B-CWC-RO product (current algorithm) to ice cloud mass retrievals by other spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based instruments or alternative algorithms using the same CloudSat radar data. Comparisons involving simulated radar data based on a database of cloud probe data showed generally good performance, with ice water content (IWC) bias errors estimated to be less than 40%. Comparisons to ice water content and ice water path estimates by other instruments are mixed. When the comparison is restricted to different retrieval approaches using the same CloudSat radar measurements, CloudSat R04 results generally agree with alternative IWC retrievals for IWC < 1000 mg m-3 at altitudes below 12 km but differ at higher ice contents and altitudes, either exceeding other retrievals or falling within a spread of retrieval values. Validation and reconciliation of all these approaches will continue to be a topic for further research.

  16. Final Report for "Improved Representations of Cloud Microphysics for Model and Remote Sensing Evaluation using Data Collected during ISDAC, TWP-ICE and RACORO

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg M.

    2003-06-11

    We were funded by ASR to use data collected during ISDAC and TWP-ICE to evaluate models with a variety of temporal and spatial scales, to evaluate ground-based remote sensing retrievals and to develop cloud parameterizations with the end goal of improving the modeling of cloud processes and properties and their impact on atmospheric radiation. In particular, we proposed to: 1) Calculate distributions of microphysical properties observed in arctic stratus during ISDAC for initializing and evaluating LES and GCMs, and for developing parameterizations of effective particle sizes, mean fall velocities, and mean single-scattering properties for such models; 2) Improve representations of particle sizes, fall velocities and scattering properties for tropical and arctic cirrus using TWP-ICE, ISDAC and M-PACE data, and to determine the contributions that small ice crystals, with maximum dimensions D less than 50 μm, make to mass and radiative properties; 3) Study fundamental interactions between clouds and radiation by improving representations of small quasi-spherical particles and their scattering properties. We were additionally funded 1-year by ASR to use RACORO data to develop an integrated product of cloud microphysical properties. We accomplished all of our goals.

  17. Derivation of Physical and Optical Properties of Midlatitude Cirrus Ice Crystals for a Size-Resolved Cloud Microphysics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette masses are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5-2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by approx. 0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from approx. 0:05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.

  18. Comparisons of cirrus cloud microphysical properties between polluted and pristine air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Minghui; Schumann, Ulrich; Minikin, Andreas; Jensen, Jorgen

    2015-04-01

    Cirrus clouds occur in the upper troposphere at altitudes where atmospheric radiative forcing is most sensitive to perturbations of water vapor concentration and water phase. The formation of cirrus clouds influences the distributions of water in both vapor and ice forms. The radiative properties of cirrus depend strongly on particle sizes. Currently it is still unclear how the formation of cirrus clouds and their microphysical properties are influenced by anthropogenic emissions (e.g., industrial emission and biomass burning). If anthropogenic emissions influence cirrus formation in a significant manner, then one should expect a systematic difference in cirrus properties between pristine (clean) air and polluted air. Because of the pollution contrasts between the Southern (SH) and Northern Hemispheres (NH), cirrus properties could have hemispheric differences as well. Therefore, we study high-resolution (~200 m), in-situ observations from two global flight campaigns: 1) the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) global campaign in 2009-2011 funded by the US National Science Foundation (NSF), and 2) the Interhemispheric Differences In Cirrus Properties from Anthropogenic Emissions (INCA) campaign in 2000 funded by the European Union and participating research institutions. To investigate the changes of cirrus clouds by anthropogenic emissions, we compare ice crystal distributions in polluted and pristine air, in terms of their frequency occurrence, number concentration (Nc) and mean diameter (i.e., effective-mean Deff and volume-mean Dc). Total aerosol concentration is used to represent the combined influence of natural and anthropogenic aerosols. In addition, measured carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratio is used to discriminate between polluted and pristine air masses. All analyses are restricted to temperatures ≤ -40°C to exclude mixed-phased clouds. The HIPPO campaign observations were obtained over the North America continent and the central Pacific Ocean

  19. Microphysical Modelling of Polar Stratospheric Clouds During the 1999-2000 Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, Katja; Schoeberl, Mark; Rosenfield, Joan; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of the 1999-2000 Arctic winter has been examined using a microphysical/photochemical model run along diabatic trajectories. A large number of trajectories have been generated, filling the vortex throughout the region of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) formation, and extending from November until the vortex breakup, in order to provide representative sampling of the evolution of PSCs and their effect on stratospheric chemistry. The 1999-2000 winter was particularly cold, allowing extensive PSC formation. Many trajectories have ten-day periods continuously below the Type I PSC threshold; significant periods of Type II PSCs are also indicated. The model has been used to test the extent and severity of denitrification and dehydration predicted using a range of different microphysical schemes. Scenarios in which freezing only occurs below the ice frost point (causing explicit coupling of denitrification and dehydration) have been tested, as well as scenarios with partial freezing at warmer temperatures (in which denitrification can occur independently of dehydration). The sensitivity to parameters such as aerosol freezing rates and heterogeneous freezing have been explored. Several scenarios cause sufficient denitrification to affect chlorine partitioning, and in turn, model-predicted ozone depletion, demonstrating that an improved understanding of the microphysics responsible for denitrification is necessary for understanding ozone loss rates.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Hurricane Bonnie (1998). Part II: Sensitivity to Varying Cloud Microphysical Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Da-Lin

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the effects of various cloud microphysics processes on the hurricane intensity, precipitation, and inner-core structures are examined with a series of 5-day explicit simulations of Hurricane Bonnie (1998), using the results presented in Part I as a control run. It is found that varying cloud microphysics processes produces little sensitivity in hurricane track, except for very weak and shallow storms, but it produces pronounced departures in hurricane intensity and inner-core structures.Specifically, removing ice microphysics produces the weakest (15-hPa underdeepening) and shallowest storm with widespread cloud water but little rainwater in the upper troposphere. Removing graupel from the control run generates a weaker hurricane with a wider area of precipitation and more cloud coverage in the eyewall due to the enhanced horizontal advection of hydrometeors relative to the vertical fallouts (or increased water loading). Turning off the evaporation of cloud water and rainwater leads to the most rapid deepening storm (i.e., 90 hPa in 48 h) with the smallest radius but a wider eyewall and the strongest eyewall updrafts. The second strongest storm, but with the most amount of rainfall, is obtained when the melting effect is ignored. It is found that the cooling due to melting is more pronounced in the eyewall where more frozen hydrometeors, especially graupel, are available, whereas the evaporative cooling occurs more markedly when the storm environment is more unsaturated.It is shown that stronger storms tend to show more compact eyewalls with heavier precipitation and more symmetric structures in the warm-cored eye and in the eyewall. It is also shown that although the eyewall replacement scenarios occur as the simulated storms move into weak-sheared environments, the associated inner-core structural changes, timing, and location differ markedly, depending on the hurricane intensity. That is, the eyewall convection in weak storms tends to diminish

  1. Optical and Microphysical Retrievals of Marine Stratocumulus Clouds off the Coast of Namibia from Satellite and Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    Though the emphasis of the Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative 2000 (SAFARI-2000) dry season campaign was largely on emission sources and transport, the assemblage of aircraft (including the high altitude NASA ER-2 remote sensing platform and the University of Washington CV-580, UK MRF C-130, and South African Weather Bureau JRA in situ aircrafts) provided a unique opportunity for cloud studies. Therefore, as part of the SAFARI initiative, investigations were undertaken to assess regional aerosol-cloud interactions and cloud remote sensing algorithms. In particular, the latter part of the experiment concentrated on marine boundary layer stratocumulus clouds off the southwest coast of Africa. Associated with cold water upwelling along the Benguela current, the Namibian stratocumulus regime has received limited attention but appears to be unique for several reasons. During the dry season, outflow of continental fires and industrial pollution over this area can be extreme. From below, upwelling provides a rich nutrient source for phytoplankton (a source of atmospheric sulfur through DMS production as well as from decay processes). The impact of these natural and anthropogenic sources on the microphysical and optical properties of the stratocumulus is unknown. Continental and Indian Ocean cloud systems of opportunity were also studied during the campaign. SAFARI 2000 aircraft flights off the coast of Namibia were coordinated with NASA Terra Satellite overpasses for synergy with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and other Terra instruments. MODIS was developed by NASA and launched onboard the Terra spacecraft on December 18, 1999 (and Aqua spacecraft on May 4, 2002). Among the remote sensing algorithms developed and applied to this sensor are cloud optical and microphysical properties that include cloud thermodynamic phase, optical thickness, and effective particle radius of both liquid water and ice clouds. The archived products from

  2. Observations of monsoon convective cloud microphysics over India and role of entrainment-mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Sudarsan; Prabha, Thara V.; Grabowski, Wojciech W.

    2016-08-01

    Microphysical characteristics of premonsoon and monsoon deep cumuli over India observed by an instrumented aircraft are contrasted focusing on influences of environmental conditions and entrainment-mixing processes. Differences in the lower tropospheric temperature and moisture profiles lead to contrasting undiluted cloud buoyancy profiles around the cloud base, larger in the premonsoon case. It is argued that this affects the variation of the mean and maximum cloud droplet number concentrations and the droplet radius within the lowest several hundred meters above the cloud base. The conserved-variable thermodynamic diagram analysis suggests that entrained parcels originate from levels close to the observational level. Mixing processes and their impact on the droplet size distribution (DSD) are investigated contrasting 1 Hz and 10 Hz observations. Inhomogeneous-type mixing, likely because of unresolved small-scale structures associated with active turbulent stirring, is noted at cloud edge volumes where dilution is significant and DSDs shift toward smaller sizes with reduced droplet number concentrations due to complete evaporation of smaller droplets and partial evaporation of larger droplets. DSDs within cloud core volumes suggest that the largest droplets are formed in the least diluted volumes where raindrops can form at higher levels; no superadiabatic droplet growth is observed. The typical diluted parcel size is approximately 100-200 m for cloud edge volumes, and it is much smaller, 10-20 m, for cloud core volumes. Time scale analysis indicates the possibility of inhomogeneous type mixing within the diluted cloud edge volumes at spatial scales of a 100 m or more.

  3. Influence of the Entrainment Interface Layer on Cloud Microphysical Properties near Stratocumulus Top

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, P. Y.; Carman, J. K.; Rossiter, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    Entrainment across the stratocumulus-topped boundary layer is a key process governing the cloud properties and evolution. This process is not well-represented even in high-resolution large-eddy simulations, in part due to the sharp gradients in temperature, buoyancy and (usually) humidity that occur at the top of the boundary layer. In summer 2008, the Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST) field campaign conduct extensive measurements in the vicinity of cloud top, including the so-called entrainment interface layer or EIL that separates boundary layer and free tropospheric air. Roughly half of the fifteen flights occurred during the day (near solar noon) while the remaining flights occurred during late evening-to-night when solar input was minimal. A wide diversity of EIL properties has been revealed over the course of the campaign. EIL vertical thickness diagnosed using total water varies from fairly thin (~20 m) to very thick (>100 m). The thickness and intensity of the turbulent layer in this interfacial region also varies substantially, with the top of the significantly turbulent region ranging from 10 m to 50 m above cloud top. Shear in the vicinity of cloud top also varied strongly from day-to-day. While almost all cases exhibited strong jumps in potential temperature, there are a number of cases where the jump in total water was very small-to-none, and one case where total water was higher in the free troposphere by 1.4 g/kg. POST thus demonstrates that the cloud-top interfacial region exhibits a rich and diverse range of properties. This study focuses on how this EIL diversity affects the stratocumulus cloud itself. We build on our study of the EIL dynamic and thermodynamic properties to investigate the influence of the EIL on the microphysical properties of the stratocumulus in the vicinity of cloud top. Entrainment of the overlying warmer and (usually) drier air can strongly impact the amount of liquid water as well as the size and concentration of cloud

  4. HOLIMO II: a digital holographic instrument for ground-based in-situ observations of microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneberger, J.; Fugal, J. P.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2013-05-01

    Measurements of the microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds with high spatial resolution are important to understand the processes inside these clouds. This work describes the design and characterization of the newly developed ground-based field instrument HOLIMO II (HOLographic Imager for Microscopic Objects II). HOLIMO II uses digital in-line holography to in-situ image cloud particles in a well defined sample volume. By an automated algorithm, two-dimensional images of single cloud particles between 6 and 250 μm in diameter are obtained and the size spectrum, the concentration and water content of clouds are calculated. By testing the sizing algorithm with monosized beads a systematic overestimation near the resolution limit was found, which has been used to correct the measurements. Field measurements from the high altitude research station Jungfraujoch, Switzerland, are presented. The measured number size distributions are in good agreement with parallel measurements by a fog monitor (FM-100, DMT, Boulder USA). The field data shows that HOLIMO II is capable of measuring the number size distribution with a high spatial resolution and determines ice crystal shape, thus providing a method of quantifying variations in microphysical properties. A case study over a period of 8 h has been analyzed, exploring the transition from a liquid to a mixed-phase cloud, which is the longest observation of a cloud with a holographic device. During the measurement period, the cloud does not completely glaciate, contradicting earlier assumptions of the dominance of the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process.

  5. HOLIMO II: a digital holographic instrument for ground-based in situ observations of microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneberger, J.; Fugal, J. P.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of the microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds with high spatial resolution are important to understand the processes inside these clouds. This work describes the design and characterization of the newly developed ground-based field instrument HOLIMO II (HOLographic Imager for Microscopic Objects II). HOLIMO II uses digital in-line holography to in situ image cloud particles in a well-defined sample volume. By an automated algorithm, two-dimensional images of single cloud particles between 6 and 250 μm in diameter are obtained and the size spectrum, the concentration and water content of clouds are calculated. By testing the sizing algorithm with monosized beads a systematic overestimation near the resolution limit was found, which has been used to correct the measurements. Field measurements from the high altitude research station Jungfraujoch, Switzerland, are presented. The measured number size distributions are in good agreement with parallel measurements by a fog monitor (FM-100, DMT, Boulder USA). The field data shows that HOLIMO II is capable of measuring the number size distribution with a high spatial resolution and determines ice crystal shape, thus providing a method of quantifying variations in microphysical properties. A case study over a period of 8 h has been analyzed, exploring the transition from a liquid to a mixed-phase cloud, which is the longest observation of a cloud with a holographic device. During the measurement period, the cloud does not completely glaciate, contradicting earlier assumptions of the dominance of the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process.

  6. Formation of Bidisperse Particle Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Er, Jenn Wei; Zhao, Bing; Law, Adrian W. K.; Adams, E. Eric

    2014-11-01

    When a group of dense particles is released instantaneously into water, their motion has been conceptualized as a circulating particle thermal (Ruggerber 2000). However, Wen and Nacamuli (1996) observed the formation of particle clumps characterized by a narrow, fast moving core shedding particles into wakes. They observed the clump formation even for particles in the non-cohesive range as long as the source Rayleigh number was large (Ra > 1E3) or equivalently the source cloud number (Nc) was small (Nc < 3.2E2). This physical phenomenon has been investigated by Zhao et al. (2014) through physical experiments. They proposed the theoretical support for Nc dependence and categorized the formation processes into cloud formation, transitional regime and clump formation. Previous works focused mainly on the behavior of monodisperse particles. The present study further extends the experimental investigation to the formation process of bidisperse particles. Experiments are conducted in a glass tank with a water depth of 90 cm. Finite amounts of sediments with various weight proportions between coarser and finer particles are released from a cylindrical tube. The Nc being tested ranges from 6E-3 to 9.9E-2, which covers all the three formation regimes. The experimental results showed that the introduction of coarse particles promotes cloud formation and reduce the losses of finer particles into the wake. More quantitative descriptions of the effects of source conditions on the formation processes will be presented during the conference.

  7. Cloud-radiative and microphysical impacts from precipitating hydrometeors in South Asian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wanchen

    A sensitivity test was performed to examine the radiative and microphysical feed- back of large hydrometeors (LHR) to both large-scale environment (LSE) and convec- tive systems in South Asian Summer Monsoon by Weather Research and Forecasting Advanced Research Model (WRF-ARW) equipped with Single-moment 6-class Mi- crophysics Scheme (WSM6) and new Goddard radiative transfer model. The cloud processes are fully represented and featured by WSM6. The results show ignoring LHR-radiative feedback can result in an average of SW gain around 20˜30 W/m2 at surface and LW loss around 5˜20 W/m2 at TOA over BoB, which are slightly larger than 3 ˜5 W/m2 estimated by Waliser at. el. (2011) for both surface SW gain and TOA LW loss. The absent of LHR-radiative effects only have slight difference in magnitude of monthly mean state compared to control run, while the exclusion of LHR can have a north shift of convective area which results in a huge bias in the monthly mean state. The results indicate the bias from exclusion of LHR is mainly from instantaneous fallout of LHR instead of neglect of LHR-radiative feedback. This study reveals the importance of LHR in microphysical parameterization. The MD cir- culation and convective structure could be changed substantially due to the absent of LHR. The cloud water and ice in convective systems as well as precipitation are greatly increased due to the absent of LHR, while the downdraft area is largely re- duced because of the incomplete microphysical processes. Overall, the overestimated the intensity, frequency and lifetime of MDs have substantial and profound influences on LSE and monthly mean state, which serves as an upper bound of the bias due to instantaneous fallout of LHR in GCM.

  8. A hierarchy of nonlinear multiparametric models of cloud dynamics and microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spassova, T.; Nikolov, S.

    2005-11-01

    Three one-dimensional models of pure water (warm) cloud, represented by systems of three, four and five nonlinear ordinary differential equations, respectively, are formulated. They are treated as nonlinear dynamical systems. In all of them, the microphysics is parameterized by Kessler's scheme; the vertical dynamics is modeled by means of the equation of convective motion inside the cloud. The steady solutions for all models are sketched in Appendix A. The evolution of the systems' behaviour of the simplest model is studied. Depending on the parameters' values, the attractor is a fixed point or a limit cycle, or the system is structurally unstable. For some specific combinations of parameters, the system demonstrates chaotic behaviour and the transition to chaos is realized through period-doubling bifurcation. The detailed study of the more complex models, proposed here, is a future task.

  9. Cloud microphysical and radiative properties measured by combined lidar, radar, and infrared radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, W.L.; Intrieri, J.M.; Chan, K.P.; Feingold, G.

    1995-04-01

    The goal of our research in the Instrument Development Program (IDP) is to provide experimental descriptions of the bulk, microphysical, and radiative parameters of clouds (especially cirrus) and the relationships between these properties, for use in developing and validating climate models. The strategy of the Atmospheric Lidar Division of our laboratory is to develop remote sensing techniques to simultaneously measure important cloud parameters and to apply these new methods and older ones in case studies and statistical investigations. Our division participated with the University of Utah on technique development during the first three years of IDP including field tests locally and at FIRE II. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program also helped fund demonstration of new technology at the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition EXperiment (ASTEX). Our current research under a new, independent grant comprises four tasks, which are summarized.

  10. Performance of McRAS-AC in the GEOS-5 AGCM: Part 1, Aerosol-Activated Cloud Microphysics, Precipitation, Radiative Effects, and Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Lee, D.; Oreopoulos, L.; Barahona, D.; Nenes, A.; Suarez, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    A revised version of the Microphysics of clouds with Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert and Aerosol-Cloud interaction (McRAS-AC), including, among others, the Barahona and Nenes ice nucleation parameterization, is implemented in the GEOS-5 AGCM. Various fields from a 10-year long integration of the AGCM with McRAS-AC were compared with their counterparts from an integration of the baseline GEOS-5 AGCM, and with satellite data as observations. Generally using McRAS-AC reduced biases in cloud fields and cloud radiative effects are much better over most of the regions of the Earth. Two weaknesses are identified in the McRAS-AC runs, namely, too few cloud particles around 40S-60S, and too high cloud water path during northern hemisphere summer over the Gulf Stream and North Pacific. Sensitivity analyses showed that these biases potentially originated from biases in the aerosol input. The first bias is largely eliminated in a sensitivity test using 50% smaller aerosol particles, while the second bias is much reduced when interactive aerosol chemistry was turned on. The main drawback of McRAS-AC is dearth of low-level marine stratus clouds, probably due to lack of dry-convection, not yet implemented into the cloud scheme. Despite these biases, McRAS-AC does simulate realistic clouds and their optical properties that can improve with better aerosol-input and thereby has the potential to be a valuable tool for climate modeling research because of its aerosol indirect effect simulation capabilities involving prediction of cloud particle number concentration and effective particle size for both convective and stratiform clouds is quite realistic.

  11. FINAL REPORT FOR THE DOE/ARM PROJECT TITLED Representation of the Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Ice Clouds in SCMs and GCMs

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, David L.

    2005-08-08

    The broad goal of this research is to improve climate prediction through better representation of cirrus cloud microphysical and radiative properties in global climate models (GCMs). Clouds still represent the greatest source of uncertainty in climate prediction, and the representation of ice clouds is considerably more challenging than liquid water clouds. While about 40% of cloud condensate may be in the form of ice by some estimates, there have been no credible means of representing the ice particle size distribution and mass removal rates from ice clouds in GCMs. Both factors introduce large uncertainties regarding the global net flux, the latter factor alone producing a change of 10 W/m2 in the global net flux due to plausible changes in effective ice particle fallspeed. In addition, the radiative properties of ice crystals themselves are in question. This research provides GCMs with a credible means of representing the full (bimodal) ice particle size distribution (PSD) in ice clouds, including estimates of the small crystal (D < 65 microns) mode of the PSD. It also provides realistic estimates of mass sedimentation rates from ice clouds, which have a strong impact on their ice contents and radiative properties. This can be done through proper analysis of ice cloud microphysical data from ARM and other field campaigns. In addition, this research tests the ice cloud radiation treatment developed under two previous ARM projects by comparing it against laboratory measurements of ice cloud extinction efficiency and by comparing it with explicit theoretical calculations of ice crystal optical properties. The outcome of this project includes two PSD schemes for ice clouds; one appropriate for mid-latitude cirrus clouds and another for tropical anvil cirrus. Cloud temperature and ice water content (IWC) are the inputs for these PSD schemes, which are based on numerous PSD observations. The temperature dependence of the small crystal mode of the PSD for tropical

  12. Impact of particle shape on the morphology of noctilucent clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliani, J.; Baumgarten, G.; Lübken, F.-J.; Berger, U.

    2015-11-01

    Noctilucent clouds (NLCs) occur during summer in the polar region at altitudes around 83 km. They consist of ice particles with a typical size around 50 nm. The shape of NLC particles is less well known but is important both for interpreting optical measurements and modeling ice cloud characteristics. In this paper, NLC modeling of microphysics and optics is adapted to use cylindrical instead of spherical particle shape. The optical properties of the resulting ice clouds are compared directly to NLC three-color measurements by the Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research (ALOMAR) Rayleigh/Mie/Raman (RMR) lidar between 1998 and 2014. Shape distributions including both needle- and disc-shaped particles are consistent with lidar measurements. The best agreement occurs if disc shapes are 60 % more common than needles, with a mean axis ratio of 2.8. Cylindrical particles cause stronger ice clouds on average than spherical shapes with an increase of backscatter at 532 nm by ≈ 30 % and about 20 % in ice mass density. This difference is less pronounced for bright than for weak ice clouds. Cylindrical shapes also cause NLCs to have larger but a smaller number of ice particles than for spherical shapes.

  13. Cloud properties and bulk microphysical properties of semi-transparent cirrus from IR Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubenrauch, Claudia; Feofilov, Artem; Armante, Raymond; Guignard, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    Satellite observations provide a continuous survey of the atmosphere over the whole globe. IR sounders have been observing our planet since 1979. The spectral resolution has improved from TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounders (TOVS) to the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), and to the InfraRed Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI); resolution within the CO2 absorption band makes these passive sounders most sensitive to semi-transparent cirrus (about 30% of all clouds), day and night. The LMD cloud property retrieval method developed for TOVS, has been adapted to the second generation of IR sounders like AIRS and, recently, IASI. It is based on a weighted χ2 method using different channels within the 15 micron CO2 absorption band. Once the cloud physical properties (cloud pressure and IR emissivity) are retrieved, cirrus bulk microphysical properties (De and IWP) are determined from spectral emissivity differences between 8 and 12 μm. The emissivities are determined using the retrieved cloud pressure and are then compared to those simulated by the radiative transfer model. For IASI, we use the latest version of the radiative transfer model 4A (http://4aop.noveltis.com), which has been coupled with the DISORT algorithm to take into account multiple scattering of ice crystals. The code incorporates single scattering properties of column-like or aggregate-like ice crystals provided by MetOffice (Baran et al. (2001); Baran and Francis (2004)). The synergy of AIRS and two active instruments of the A-Train (lidar and radar of the CALIPSO and CloudSat missions), which provide accurate information on vertical cloud structure, allowed the evaluation of cloud properties retrieved by the weighted χ2 method. We present first results for cloud properties obtained with IASI/ Metop-A and compare them with those of AIRS and other cloud climatologies having participated in the GEWEX cloud assessment. The combination of IASI observations at 9:30 AM and 9:30 PM complement

  14. Liquid and Ice Cloud Microphysics in the CSU General Circulation Model. Part III: Sensitivity to Modeling Assumptions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Laura D.; Randall, David A.

    1996-03-01

    The inclusion of cloud microphysical processes in general circulation models makes it possible to study the multiple interactions among clouds, the hydrological cycle, and radiation. The gaps between the temporal and spatial scales at which such cloud microphysical processes work and those at which general circulation models presently function force climate modelers to crudely parameterize and simplify the various interactions among the different water species (namely, water vapor, cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and snow) and to use adjustable parameters to which large-scale models can be highly sensitive. Accordingly, the authors have investigated the sensitivity of the climate, simulated with the Colorado State University general circulation model, to various aspects of the parameterization of cloud microphysical processes and its interactions with the cumulus convection and radiative transfer parameterizations.The results of 120-day sensitivity experiments corresponding to perpetual January conditions have been compared with those of a control simulation in order to 1 ) determine the importance of advecting cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and snow at the temporal and spatial scale resolutions presently used in the model; 2) study the importance of the formation of extended stratiform anvils at the tops of cumulus towers, 3) analyze the role of mixed-phase clouds in determining the partitioning among cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and snow and, hence, their impacts on the simulated cloud optical properties; 4) evaluate the sensitivity of the atmospheric moisture budget and precipitation rates to a change in the fall velocities of rain and snow; 5) determine the model's sensitivity to the prescribed thresholds of autoconversion of cloud water to rain and cloud ice to snow; and 6) study the impact of the collection of supercooled cloud water by snow, as well as accounting for the cloud optical properties of snow.Results are presented in terms of 30-day mean differences

  15. Improvements in Representations of Cloud Microphysics for BBHRP and Models using Data Collected during M-PACE and TWP-ICE

    SciTech Connect

    Greg M. McFarquhar

    2010-02-22

    In our research we proposed to use data collected during the 2004 Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) and the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) to improve retrievals of ice and mixed-phase clouds, to improve our understanding of how cloud and radiative processes affect cloud life cycles, and to develop and test methods for using ARM data more effectively in model. In particular, we proposed to: 1) use MPACE in-situ data to determine how liquid water fraction and cloud ice and liquid effective radius (r{sub ei} and r{sub ew}) vary with temperature, normalized cloud altitude and other variables for Arctic mixed-phase clouds, and to use these data to evaluate the performance of model parameterization schemes and remote sensing retrieval algorithms; 2) calculate rei and size/shape distributions using TWP-ICE in-situ data, investigate their dependence on cirrus type (oceanic or continental anvils or cirrus not directly traced to convection), and develop and test representations for MICROBASE; 3) conduct fundamental research enhancing our understanding of cloud/radiative interactions, concentrating on effects of small crystals and particle shapes and sizes on radiation; and 4) improve representations of microphysical processes for models (fall-out, effective density, mean scattering properties, rei and rew) and provide them to ARM PIs. In the course of our research, we made substantial progress on all four goals.

  16. Effects of Cloud-Microphysics on Tropical Atmospheric Hydrologic Processes in the GEOS GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Wu, H. T.; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    2004-01-01

    The sensitivity of tropical atmospheric hydrologic processes to cloud-microphysics is investigated using the NASA GEOS GCM. Results show that a faster autoconversion - rate produces more warm rain and less clouds at all levels. Fewer clouds enhances longwave cooling and reduces shortwave heating in the upper troposphere, while more warm rain produces increased condensation heating in the lower troposphere. This vertical heating differential destablizes the tropical atmosphere, producing a positive feedback resulting in more rain over the tropics. The feedback is maintained via a two-cell secondary circulation. The lower cell is capped by horizontal divergence and maximum cloud detrainment near the melting/freezing, with rising motion in the warm rain region connected to descending motion in the cold rain region. The upper cell is found above the freezing/melting level, with longwave-induced subsidence in the warm rain and dry regions, coupled to forced ascent in the deep convection region. The tropical large scale circulation is found to be very sensitive to the radiative-dynamic effects induced by changes in autoconversion rate. Reduced cloud-radiation processes feedback due to a faster autoconversion rate results in intermittent but more energetic eastward propagating Madden and Julian Oscillations (MJO). Conversely,-a slower autconversion rate, with increased cloud radiation produces MJO's with more realistic westward propagating transients, resembling a supercloud cluster structure. Results suggests that warm rain and associated low and mid level clouds, i.e., cumulus congestus, may play a critical role in regulating the time-intervals of deep convections and hence the fundamental time scales of the MJO.

  17. A Mechanistic Understanding of North American Monsoon and Microphysical Properties of Ice Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfani, Ehsan

    A mechanistic understanding of the North American Monsoon (NAM) is suggested by incorporating local- and synoptic-scale processes. The local-scale mechanism describes the effect sea surface temperature (SST) in Gulf of California (GC) and how it contributes to the low-level moisture during the 2004 NAM. Before NAM onset, the strong low-level temperature inversion exists over the GC, but this inversion weakens with increasing GC SST and generally disappears once SSTs exceed 29.5°C, allowing the moist air, trapped in the MBL, to mix with free tropospheric air. This leads to a deep, moist layer that can be transported toward the NAM regions to produce thunderstorms. The synoptic scale mechanism is based on climatologies from 1983 to 2010 and explains that the warmest SSTs moving up the coast contributes to NAM convection and atmospheric heating, and consequently advancing the position of the anticyclone and the region of descent northward. In order to improve microphysical properties of ice clouds, this study develops self-consistent second order polynomial mass- and projected area-dimension (m-D and A-D) expressions that are valid over a much larger size range, compared to traditional power laws. Such expressions can easily be reduced to power laws for the size range of interest, in order to use in cloud and climate models. This was done by combining field measurements of individual ice particle m and D with airborne optical probe measurements of D, A and estimates of m. The resulting m-D and A-D expressions are functions of temperature and cloud type (synoptic vs. anvil), and are in good agreement with m-D power laws developed from recent field studies. These expressions also appear representative for heavily rimed dendrites occurring over the Sierra Nevada Mountains. By using the m-D field measurements of rimed and unrimed particles, and by developing theoretical methods, an approach was suggested for calculating rimed m and A, which has the benefit of accounting

  18. Volcanic particle aggregation in explosive eruption columns. Part I: Parameterization of the microphysics of hydrometeors and ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Textor, C.; Graf, H. F.; Herzog, M.; Oberhuber, J. M.; Rose, William I.; Ernst, G. G. J.

    2006-02-01

    The aggregation of volcanic ash particles within the eruption column of explosive eruptions has been observed at many volcanoes. It influences the residence time of ash in the atmosphere and the radiative properties of the umbrella cloud. However, the information on the processes leading to aggregate formation are still either lacking or very incomplete. We examine the fate of ash particles through numerical experiments with the plume model ATHAM (Active Tracer High resolution Atmospheric Model) in order to determine the conditions that promote ash particle aggregation. In this paper we describe the microphysics and parameterization of ash and hydrometeors. In a companion paper (this issue) we use this information in a series of numerical experiments. The parameterization includes the condensation of water vapor in the rising eruption column. The formation of liquid and solid hydrometeors and the effect of latent heat release on the eruption column dynamics are considered. The interactions of hydrometeors and volcanic ash within the eruption column that lead to aggregate formation are simulated for the first time within a rising eruption column. The microphysical parameterization follows a modal approach. The hydrometeors are described by two size classes, each of which is divided into a liquid and a frozen category. By analogy with the hydrometeor classification, we specify four categories of volcanic ash particles. We imply that volcanic particles are active as condensation nuclei for water and ice formation. Ash can be contained in all categories of hydrometeors, thus forming mixed particles of any composition reaching from mud rain to accretionary lapilli. Collisions are caused by gravitational capture of particles with different fall velocity. Coalescence of hydrometeor-ash aggregates is assumed to be a function of the hydrometeor mass fraction within the mixed particles. The parameterization also includes simplified descriptions of electrostatics and salinity

  19. Impacts of Asian Dust on Cloud Microphysics and Precipitation during an Atmospheric River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Creamean, J. M.; Williams, C. R.; Gaston, C. J.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers constitute a significant source of precipitation in the mid-latitudes of the northern hemisphere over relatively short time periods, but questions remain about the influence of external factors, such as aerosols, on precipitation locally and regionally. During the CalWater Early Start Campaign (Feb-Mar 2009) sampling aerosol measurements (aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry - ATOFMS, aerosol number concentration, CCN concentrations, aerosol size distributions, and PM2.5 mass concentrations) were combined with S-band profiling radar, meteorological, and disdrometer measurements at a remote site in the Central California Sierra Nevada to characterize atmospheric rivers. Aerosol measurements were made of clear air at the site, while rainwater samples were collected. The rainwater samples were then aerosolized and characterized on site using an ATOFMS. S-band radar measured the microphysics of the precipitating cloud and disdrometer measurements characterized the subsequent hydrometeors. During the study an atmospheric river and transported dust interacted, altering cloud properties and shifting the chemical composition of the aerosolized precipitation to markers indicative of transported Asia dust. In contrast, an atmospheric river characterized 8 days earlier was not impacted by Asian dust, leading to different cloud properties and rain water chemical composition. This study examined the impacts of long range transport on precipitation in the Sierras. A greater understanding of the impact of Asian dust on these processes is necessary to properly evaluate long term climate change in the middle latitudes and properly account for transported aerosols in cloud and precipitation models.

  20. Influence of the Kuwait oil fires plume (1991) on the microphysical development of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Yinon; Sagi, Ayelet; Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2003-08-01

    Applications of new retrieval methods to old satellite data allowed us to study the effects of smoke from the Kuwait oil fires in 1991 on clouds and precipitation. The properties of smoke-affected and smoke-free clouds were compared on the background of the dust-laden desert atmosphere. Several effects were observed: (1) clouds typically developed at the top of the smoke plume, probably because of solar heating and induced convection by the strongly absorbing aerosols; (2) large salt particles from the burning mix of oil and brines formed giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) close to the source, which initiated coalescence in the highly polluted clouds; (3) farther away from the smoke source, the giant CCN were deposited, and the extremely high concentrations of medium and small CCN dominated cloud development by strongly suppressing drop coalescence and growth with altitude; and (4) the smaller cloud droplets in the smoke-affected clouds froze at colder temperatures and suppressed both the water and ice precipitation forming processes. These observations imply that over land the smoke particles are not washed out efficiently and can be transported to long distances, extending the observed effects to large areas. The absorption of solar radiation by the smoke induces convection above the smoke plumes and consequently leads to formation of clouds with roots at the top of the smoke layer. This process dominates over the semidirect effect of cloud evaporation due to the smoke-induced enhanced solar heating, at least in the case of the Kuwait fires.

  1. Impact of Cloud Model Microphysics on Passive Microwave Retrievals of Cloud Properties. Part II: Uncertainty in Rain, Hydrometeor Structure, and Latent Heating Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Kyoung; Biggerstaff, Michael I.

    2006-07-01

    The impact of model microphysics on the retrieval of cloud properties based on passive microwave observations was examined using a three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, adaptive-grid cloud model to simulate a mesoscale convective system over ocean. Two microphysical schemes, based on similar bulk two-class liquid and three-class ice parameterizations, were used to simulate storms with differing amounts of supercooled cloud water typical of both the tropical oceanic environment, in which there is little supercooled cloud water, and midlatitude continental environments in which supercooled cloud water is more plentiful. For convective surface-level rain rates, the uncertainty varied between 20% and 60% depending on which combination of passive and active microwave observations was used in the retrieval. The uncertainty in surface rain rate did not depend on the microphysical scheme or the parameter settings except for retrievals over stratiform regions based on 85-GHz brightness temperatures TB alone or 85-GHz TB and radar reflectivity combined. In contrast, systematic differences in the treatment of the production of cloud water, cloud ice, and snow between the parameterization schemes coupled with the low correlation between those properties and the passive microwave TB examined here led to significant differences in the uncertainty in retrievals of those cloud properties and latent heating. The variability in uncertainty of hydrometeor structure and latent heating associated with the different microphysical parameterizations exceeded the inherent variability in TB cloud property relations. This was true at the finescales of the cloud model as well as at scales consistent with satellite footprints in which the inherent variability in TB cloud property relations are reduced by area averaging.

  2. The Effects of Saharan Dust on Cloud Microphysics and its Impacts on the Caribbean Mid-Summer Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comarazamy, D. E.; Gonzalez, J.; Glenn, E.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term atmospheric particle concentration data obtained from all Caribbean locations available in the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) record show an increase in fine mode particle concentration during the summer months, leading to believe that this is evidence of the passing of Saharan Dust through the region. The annual precipitation pattern in the Caribbean basin shows a distinct bimodal behavior, where the first mode is called the Early Rainfall Season (ERS, April-July), and the second mode the Late Rainfall Season (LRS, August-November). The brief, relatively low-precipitation, period in July is usually referred to as the mid-summer drought (MSD). It has been hypothesized that the passing of Saharan Dust across the Caribbean may result in this observed precipitation pattern. A cloud-resolving regional atmospheric model driven with the AERONET observations was used to investigate the possible effects of different AP concentrations on cloud formation and rain development over the Caribbean Island of Puerto Rico. The modeling system was also used to investigate the role of aerosols in originating and controlling the Caribbean MSD. Results indicate that cloud microphysics play an important role in producing the bimodal precipitation pattern, while variations in large-scale atmospheric dynamics (e.g., VWS) help explain variations in the strength of the yearly bimodal events. In recent years the aerosol observing network in Puerto Rico has been enhanced to include AERONET sites upwind of San Juan, PR, and lidar locations downwind of the city, namely at the Arecibo Observatory and the University of Puerto Rico - Mayagüez. This configuration will help discriminate urban aerosols from large-scale transport. To further complement the lidar efforts in the island, a comprehensive surface observation data analysis and planetary boundary layer characterization of the Intra-Americas Region was performed using historical data from COOP stations as archived by the NCDC, 2

  3. Simulation study of the remote sensing of optical and microphysical properties of cirrus clouds from satellite IR measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Zhang, J

    1995-05-20

    Improved ray-optics theory and Mie theory for single scattering and an adding-doubling method for multiple scattering have been used to study the interaction of radiation in NASA's Visible and Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder Satellite (VAS) IR channels and the microphysics of inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. The simulation study shows that crystal shape has remarkable effects on scattering and on the radiative-transfer properties of cirrus clouds in IR spectra. The sensitivity of the brightness temperature, as observed with VAS-IR channels, to the hexagonal columns and plates in cirrus clouds is noticeable. A method that permits one to infer the optical thickness, crystal shape, ice-water content,and emittance of cirrus clouds by using a multi-IR window channel with a scanning observation technique is developed. Detailed error analyses are carried out, and the characteristics of VAS-IR window channels are investigated through the examination of the effects of sea-surface reflection and variations in the temperature and water-vapor profiles on the VAS measurements. It is shown that these effects are large and need to be considered. Some uncertainties that have risen from the theoretical model are studied; they demonstrate that the Mie-scattering theory should not be used to retrieve the microphysical and optical properties of cirrus clouds. A suitable cloud-microphysics model and a suitable scattering model are needed instead.

  4. Study of Midlatitude and Arctic Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Feedbacks Based on LES Model with Explicit Ice and Liquid Phase Microphysics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    validate the CIMMS LES model and to improve our understanding of the interaction between the microphysical, radiative, and thermodynamical processes...modeling part of the research will be based on the CIMMS 3-D LES model of a stratocumulus cloud layer that includes an explicit formulation of aerosol...and cloud drop size resolving microphysics and radiation. The study of mixed phase clouds will use the new version of the CIMMS model which includes

  5. A statistical data analysis and plotting program for cloud microphysics experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis software developed for atmospheric cloud microphysics experiments conducted in the laboratory as well as aboard a KC-135 aircraft is described. A group of four programs was developed and implemented on a Hewlett Packard 1000 series F minicomputer running under HP's RTE-IVB operating system. The programs control and read data from a MEMODYNE Model 3765-8BV cassette recorder, format the data on the Hewlett Packard disk subsystem, and generate statistical data (mean, variance, standard deviation) and voltage and engineering unit plots on a user selected plotting device. The programs are written in HP FORTRAN IV and HP ASSEMBLY Language with the graphics software using the HP 1000 Graphics. The supported plotting devices are the HP 2647A graphics terminal, the HP 9872B four color pen plotter, and the HP 2608A matrix line printer.

  6. Determining the Polar Cosmic Ray Effect on Cloud Microphysics and the Earth's Ozone Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckie, Charlene Radons

    water content and effective radius, or altitude specific studies concerning the stratosphere. Continued results from laboratory studies at the CERN facility may lead to a deeper understanding of cosmic ray, cloud microphysics and ozone relationships in nature.

  7. Microphysical and radiative changes in cirrus clouds by geoengineering the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirisan, A.; Spichtinger, P.; Luo, B. P.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Wernli, H.; Lohmann, U.; Peter, T.

    2013-05-01

    In the absence of tangible progress in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the implementation of solar radiation management has been suggested as measure to stop global warming. Here we investigate the impacts on northern midlatitude cirrus from continuous SO2emissions of 2-10 Mt/a in the tropical stratosphere. Transport of geoengineering aerosols into the troposphere was calculated along trajectories based on ERA Interim reanalyses using ozone concentrations to quantify the degree of mixing of stratospheric and tropospheric air termed "troposphericity". Modeled size distributions of the geoengineered H2SO4-H2O droplets have been fed into a cirrus box model with spectral microphysics. The geoengineering is predicted to cause changes in ice number density by up to 50%, depending on troposphericity and cooling rate. We estimate the resulting cloud radiative effects from a radiation transfer model. Complex interplay between the few large stratospheric and many small tropospheric H2SO4-H2O droplets gives rise to partly counteracting radiative effects: local increases in cloud radiative forcing up to +2 W/m2for low troposphericities and slow cooling rates, and decreases up to -7.5 W/m2for high troposphericities and fast cooling rates. The resulting mean impact on the northern midlatitudes by changes in cirrus is predicted to be low, namely <1% of the intended radiative forcing by the stratospheric aerosols. This suggests that stratospheric sulphate geoengineering is unlikely to have large microphysical effects on the mean cirrus radiative forcing. However, this study disregards feedbacks, such as temperature and humidity changes in the upper troposphere, which must be examined separately.

  8. Tropical Convective Responses to Microphysical and Radiative Processes: A Sensitivity Study With a 2D Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiao-Fan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Tao, W.-K.

    2004-01-01

    Prognostic cloud schemes are increasingly used in weather and climate models in order to better treat cloud-radiation processes. Simplifications are often made in such schemes for computational efficiency, like the scheme being used in the National Centers for Environment Prediction models that excludes some microphysical processes and precipitation-radiation interaction. In this study, sensitivity tests with a 2D cloud resolving model are carried out to examine effects of the excluded microphysical processes and precipitation-radiation interaction on tropical thermodynamics and cloud properties. The model is integrated for 10 days with the imposed vertical velocity derived from the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment. The experiment excluding the depositional growth of snow from cloud ice shows anomalous growth of cloud ice and more than 20% increase of fractional cloud cover, indicating that the lack of the depositional snow growth causes unrealistically large mixing ratio of cloud ice. The experiment excluding the precipitation-radiation interaction displays a significant cooling and drying bias. The analysis of heat and moisture budgets shows that the simulation without the interaction produces more stable upper troposphere and more unstable mid and lower troposphere than does the simulation with the interaction. Thus, the suppressed growth of ice clouds in upper troposphere and stronger radiative cooling in mid and lower troposphere are responsible for the cooling bias, and less evaporation of rain associated with the large-scale subsidence induces the drying in mid and lower troposphere.

  9. Modeling cloud microphysics using a two-moments hybrid bulk/bin scheme for use in Titan’s climate models: Application to the annual and diurnal cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgalat, J.; Rannou, P.; Cours, T.; Rivière, E. D.

    2014-03-01

    Microphysical models describe the way aerosols and clouds behave in the atmosphere. Two approaches are generally used to model these processes. While the first approach discretizes processes and aerosols size distributions on a radius grid (bin scheme), the second uses bulk parameters of the size distribution law (its mathematical moments) to represent the evolution of the particle population (moment scheme). However, with the latter approach, one needs to have an a priori knowledge of the size distributions. Moments scheme for Cloud microphysics modeling have been used and enhanced since decades for climate studies of the Earth. Most of the tools are based on Log-Normal law which are suitable for Earth, Mars or Venus. On Titan, due to the fractal structure of the aerosols, the size distributions do not follow a log-normal law. Then using a moment scheme in that case implies to define the description of the size distribution and to review the equations that are widely published in the literature. Our objective is to enable the use of a fully described microphysical model using a moment scheme within a Titan's Global Climate Model. As a first step in this direction, we present here a moment scheme dedicated to clouds microphysics adapted for Titan's atmosphere conditions. We perform comparisons between the two kinds of schemes (bin and moments) using an annual and a diurnal cycle, to check the validity of our moment description. The various forcing produce a time-variable cloud layer in relation with the temperature cycle. We compare the column opacities and the temperature for the two schemes, for each cycles. We also compare more detailed quantities as the opacity distribution of the cloud events at different periods of these cycles. Results show that differences between the two approaches have a small impact on the temperature (less than 1 K) and range between 1% and 10% for haze and clouds opacities. Both models behave in similar way when forced by an annual and

  10. Investigation of the effects of the macrophysical and microphysical properties of cirrus clouds on the retrieval of optical properties: Results for FIRE 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the prevalence and persistence of cirrus cloudiness across the globe, cirrus clouds are believed to have an important effect on the climate. Stephens et al., (1990) among others have shown that the important factor determining how cirrus clouds modulate the climate is the balance between the albedo and emittance effect of the cloud systems. This factor was shown to depend in part upon the effective sizes of the cirrus cloud particles. Since effective sizes of cirrus cloud microphysical distributions are used as a basis of parameterizations in climate models, it is crucial that the relationships between effective sizes and radiative properties be clearly established. In this preliminary study, the retrieval of cirrus cloud effective sizes are examined using a two dimensional radiative transfer model for a cirrus cloud case sampled during FIRE Cirrus 11. The purpose of this paper is to present preliminary results from the SHSG model demonstrating the sensitivity of the bispectral relationships of reflected radiances and thus the retrieval of effective sizes to phase function and dimensionality.

  11. Radiative and cloud microphysical effects of forest fire smoke over North America and Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    vant-Hull, Brian

    Siberia, as expected from the higher sulfate load with greater activity as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The aerosol indirect effect on cloud microphysics increases with aerosol loading in both regions, but much more so in Canada. This is attributed to a large sulfate background in Siberia, so the addition of smoke makes a smaller percentage change to the amount of cloud CCN.

  12. Retrieval of cloud microphysical parameters using the NOAA/PSD W-band cloud radar from R/V Ronald H. Brown during the VOCALS-REx field program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairall, C. W.; Deszoeke, S. P.; Moran, K.; Pezoa, S.; Wolfe, D. E.; Zuidema, P.

    2009-12-01

    The NOAA Physical Science Division deployed a new pitch-roll stabilized, vertically pointing W-band (94 GHz) Doppler cloud radar on the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown during the VOCALS-Rex field program in fall 2008 in the stratocumulus region off the coast of Chile. The radar operated at full sensitivity on Leg-2 (November 8-30, 2008). The radar produced profiles of full Doppler spectra and the first three moments of the spectral peak at 0.3 s time intervals; the vertical resolution is 25 m. Pitch-roll stabilization allows Doppler measurement of vertical motion without tilt-contamination by horizontal winds; ship heave is measured independently and subtracted from the radar vertical velocity to yield very accurate particle vertical motions. In this paper we describe the results of processing the radar moments in one-hour blocks to retrieve cloud and drizzle microphysical parameters using the method of Frisch, Fairall, and Snider, JAS1995. Additional inputs from a lidar ceilometer and a microwave radiometer are used. For cloud, profiles of liquid water and mean cloud drop radius are obtained; for drizzle profiles of liquid water, mean drizzle drop radius, and rainrate are obtained. Cloud microphysics processing is only possible in non-drizzling cases. The results are compared to analyses from the EPIC2001 field program in the same location.

  13. Optical-Microphysical Cirrus Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Lin, R.-F.; Hess, M.; McGee, T. J.; Starr, D. O.

    2008-01-01

    A model is presented that permits the simulation of the optical properties of cirrus clouds as measured with depolarization Raman lidars. It comprises a one-dimensional cirrus model with explicit microphysics and an optical module that transforms the microphysical model output to cloud and particle optical properties. The optical model takes into account scattering by randomly oriented or horizontally aligned planar and columnar monocrystals and polycrystals. Key cloud properties such as the fraction of plate-like particles and the number of basic crystals per polycrystal are parameterized in terms of the ambient temperature, the nucleation temperature, or the mass of the particles. The optical-microphysical model is used to simulate the lidar measurement of a synoptically forced cirrostratus in a first case study. It turns out that a cirrus cloud consisting of only monocrystals in random orientation is too simple a model scenario to explain the observations. However, good agreement between simulation and observation is reached when the formation of polycrystals or the horizontal alignment of monocrystals is permitted. Moreover, the model results show that plate fraction and morphological complexity are best parameterized in terms of particle mass, or ambient temperature which indicates that the ambient conditions affect cirrus optical properties more than those during particle formation. Furthermore, the modeled profiles of particle shape and size are in excellent agreement with in situ and laboratory studies, i.e., (partly oriented) polycrystalline particles with mainly planar basic crystals in the cloud bottom layer, and monocrystals above, with the fraction of columns increasing and the shape and size of the particles changing from large thin plates and long columns to small, more isometric crystals from cloud center to top. The findings of this case study corroborate the microphysical interpretation of cirrus measurements with lidar as suggested previously.

  14. ISDAC Microphysics

    DOE Data Explorer

    McFarquhar, Greg

    2011-07-25

    Best estimate of cloud microphysical parameters derived using data collected by the cloud microphysical probes installed on the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada Convair-580 during ISDAC. These files contain phase, liquid and ice crystal size distributions (Nw(D) and Ni(D) respectively), liquid water content (LWC), ice water content (IWC), extinction of liquid drops (bw), extinction of ice crystals (bi), effective radius of water drops (rew) and of ice crystals (rei) and median mass diameter of liquid drops (Dmml) and of ice crystals (Dmmi) at 30 second resolution.

  15. Characterization of optical and micro-physical properties of cirrus clouds using a wideband thermal infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchetti, Luca; Di Natale, Gianluca; Bianchini, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    High-altitude ice clouds such as cirrus clouds play a key role in the Earth's radiation budget since they cover permanently about 20-30% of the surface of the planet, reaching even to 60-70% in the tropics. The modulation of the incoming solar radiation and the outgoing Earth's thermal emission due to cirrus can contribute to heat or to cool the atmosphere, according to their optical properties, which must be characterised with great accuracy and over the whole spectral range involved in the scattering and emission processes. Here we present the infrared measurements over the wide spectral range from 9 to 50 micron performed by the Fourier transform spectrometer REFIR-PAD (Radiation Explorer in Far InfraRed - Prototype for Application and Development) during many field campaigns that have taken place since 2007 from different high-altitude ground-based stations: Testa Grigia Station, Cervinia-Italy, (3480 m asl), Cerro Toco, Atacama-Chile, (5380 m asl), Concordia Base, Dome C-Antarctica (3230 m asl). These measurements show for the first time the spectral effect of cirrus clouds in the long-wave part of the emission spectrum above 15 micron of wavelength. To characterise these measurements over the wide spectral range as a function of the optical properties of ice particles, a model of the radiative transfer, that integrates the well known numerical code LBLRTM, which simulates the radiative transfer in the atmosphere, with a specific code which simulates the propagation of the radiation through the cloud, was developed. The optical properties of clouds have been modelled using the δ-scaled Eddington approximation for a single layer and the Ping Yang's database for the single-scattering properties of ice crystals. The preliminary results of the fit procedure used for the determination of the micro-physical parameters of ice crystals, such as the effective diameter, ice water path, effective temperature and optical thickness will be shown in the presentation. The

  16. Microphysical Processes Affecting the Pinatubo Volcanic Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Houben, Howard; Young, Richard; Turco, Richard; Zhao, Jingxia

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we consider microphysical processes which affect the formation of sulfate particles and their size distribution in a dispersing cloud. A model for the dispersion of the Mt. Pinatubo volcanic cloud is described. We then consider a single point in the dispersing cloud and study the effects of nucleation, condensation and coagulation on the time evolution of the particle size distribution at that point.

  17. A one-dimensional radiative convective model with detailed cloud microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.; Lie-Svendsen, O.; Stamnes, K.

    1995-04-01

    The Arctic is a key element in determining the radiation budget of the earth. Within the polar regions, the net radiation (incoming solar radiation minus outgoing infrared radiation) is negative. To understand the role this energy deficit plays in the overall radiation budget, one must examine the prevalent atmospheric features of the Arctic. One such feature is a persistent layer of low-altitude, stratiform clouds found over the central Arctic predominantly from April to September. These Arctic stratus clouds (ASC) modulate the earth`s radiation budget by contributing to the vertical transport of heat. It is, therefore, crucial to understand the radiative properties of Arctic stratus clouds. We believe that the radiative properties of ASC are strongly coupled with their cloud microphysics. Our aim is to develop a model that will determine if this coupling is sufficient to describe the observed characteristic properties, such as lifetime and the multi-layered structure, of ASC. In addition, we hope to provide useful input to measurement programs at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program`s North Slope of Alaska site by isolating the measurable parameters that influence the overall radiative properties of ASC. Several features of ASC have been integrated directly into the one-dimensional model currently being developed. Generally, ASC cover large areas and exhibit reasonable horizontal homogeneity but extensive vertical inhomogeneities. Therefore, in our model, we have assumed radiative processes are important in determining vertical structure while not considering horizontal transport. In addition, ASC occur in defined, multi-layered structures. This feature of the ASC, in conjunction with their horizontal homogeneity, justifies the use of radiative transfer theory for plane-parallel geometry with multiple scattering. Finally, ASC are generally long-lived and precipitate little during their lifetimes.

  18. Vertical profiles of optical and microphysical particle properties above the northern Indian Ocean during CARDEX 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höpner, F.; Bender, F. A.-M.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Praveen, P. S.; Bosch, C.; Ogren, J. A.; Andersson, A.; Gustafsson, Ö.; Ramanathan, V.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed analysis of optical and microphysical properties of aerosol particles during the dry winter monsoon season above the northern Indian Ocean is presented. The Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing Experiment (CARDEX), conducted from 16 February to 30 March 2012 at the Maldives Climate Observatory on Hanimaadhoo island (MCOH) in the Republic of the Maldives, used autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (AUAV) to perform vertical in situ measurements of particle number concentration, particle number size distribution as well as particle absorption coefficients. These measurements were used together with surface- based Mini Micro Pulse Lidar (MiniMPL) observations and aerosol in situ and off-line measurements to investigate the vertical distribution of aerosol particles.Air masses were mainly advected over the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Peninsula. The mean surface aerosol number concentration was 1717 ± 604 cm-3 and the highest values were found in air masses from the Bay of Bengal and Indo-Gangetic Plain (2247 ± 370 cm-3). Investigations of the free tropospheric air showed that elevated aerosol layers with up to 3 times higher aerosol number concentrations than at the surface occurred mainly during periods with air masses originating from the Bay of Bengal and the Indo-Gangetic Plain. This feature is different compared to what was observed during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) conducted in winter 1999, where aerosol number concentrations generally decreased with height. In contrast, lower particle absorption at the surface (σabs(520 nm) = 8.5 ± 4.2 Wm-1) was found during CARDEX compared to INDOEX 1999.Layers with source region specific single-scattering albedo (SSA) values were derived by combining vertical in situ particle absorption coefficients and scattering coefficients calculated with Mie theory. These SSA layers were utilized to calculate vertical particle absorption profiles from MiniMPL profiles. SSA surface values for 550 nm for dry

  19. Microphysical Model of the Venus clouds between 40km and 80km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGouldrick, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    I am continuing to adapt the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) to successfully simulate the multi-layered clouds of Venus. The present version of the one-dimensional model now includes a simple parameterization of the photochemicial production of sulfuric acid around altitudes of 62km, and its thermochemical destruction below cloud base. Photochemical production in the model is limited by the availability of water vapor and insolation. Upper cloud particles are introduced into the model via binary homogeneous nucleation, while the lower and middle cloud particles are created via activation of involatile cloud condensation nuclei. Growth by condensation and coagulation and coalescence are also treated. Mass loadings and particle sizes compare favorably with the in situ observations by the Pioneer Venus Large Probe Particle Size Spectrometer, and mixing ratios of volatiles compare favorably with remotely sensed observations of water vapor and sulfuric acid vapor. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program, grant number NNX11AD79G.

  20. A Model for Particle Microphysics, Turbulent Mixing, and Radiative Transfer in the Stratocumulus-Topped Marine Boundary Layer and Comparisons with Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Andrew S.; Toon, Owen B.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed 1D model of the stratocumulus-topped marine boundary layer is described. The model has three coupled components: a microphysics module that resolves the size distributions of aerosols and cloud droplets, a turbulence module that treats vertical mixing between layers, and a multiple wavelength radiative transfer module that calculates radiative heating rates and cloud optical properties. The results of a 12-h model simulation reproduce reasonably well the bulk thermodynamics, microphysical properties, and radiative fluxes measured in an approx. 500-m thick, summertime marine stratocumulus cloud layer by Nicholls. However, in this case, the model predictions of turbulent fluxes between the cloud and subcloud layers exceed the measurements. Results of model simulations are also compared to measurements of a marine stratus layer made under gale conditions and with measurements of a high, thin marine stratocumulus layer. The variations in cloud properties are generally reproduced by the model, although it underpredicts the entrainment of overlying air at cloud top under gale conditions. Sensitivities of the model results are explored. The vertical profile of cloud droplet concentration is sensitive to the lower size cutoff of the droplet size distribution due to the presence of unactivated haze particles in the lower region of the modeled cloud. Increases in total droplet concentrations do not always produce less drizzle and more cloud water in the model. The radius of the mean droplet volume does not correlate consistently with drizzle, but the effective droplet radius does. The greatest impacts on cloud properties predicted by the model are produced by halving the width of the size distribution of input condensation nuclei and by omitting the effect of cloud-top radiative cooling on the condensational growth of cloud droplets. The omission of infrared scattering produces noticeable changes in cloud properties. The collection efficiencies for droplets less

  1. A Model for Particle Microphysics,Turbulent Mixing, and Radiative Transfer in the Stratocumulus-Topped Marine Boundary Layer and Comparisons with Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Andrew S.; Toon, Owen B.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed 1D model of the stratocumulus-topped marine boundary layer is described. The model has three coupled components: a microphysics module that resolves the size distributions of aerosols and cloud droplets, a turbulence module that treats vertical mixing between layers, and a multiple wavelength radiative transfer module that calculates radiative heating rates and cloud optical properties. The results of a 12-h model simulation reproduce reasonably well the bulk thermodynamics, microphysical properties, and radiative fluxes measured in an approx. 500-m thick, summertime marine stratocumulus cloud layer by Nicholls. However, in this case, the model predictions of turbulent fluxes between the cloud and subcloud layers exceed the measurements. Results of model simulations are also compared to measurements of a marine stratus layer made under gate conditions and with measurements of a high, thin marine stratocumulus layer. The variations in cloud properties are generally reproduced by the model, although it underpredicts the entrainment of overlying air at cloud top under gale conditions. Sensitivities of the model results are explored. The vertical profile of cloud droplet concentration is sensitive to the lower size cutoff of the droplet size distribution due to the presence of unactivated haze particles in the lower region of the modeled cloud. Increases in total droplet concentrations do not always produce less drizzle and more cloud water in the model. The radius of the mean droplet volume does not correlate consistently with drizzle, but the effective droplet radius does. The greatest impacts on cloud properties predicted by the model are produced by halving the width of the size distribution of input condensation nuclei and by omitting the effect of cloud-top radiative cooling on the condensational growth of cloud droplets. The omission of infrared scattering produces noticeable changes in cloud properties. The collection efficiencies for droplets less

  2. The Shortwave Spectroradiometer as a Versatile Sensor for Observation of Cloud Optical and Microphysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, D.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Flynn, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Recent years have seen the advent of shortwave spectroradiometers covering the ultraviolet through near-infrared parts of the spectrum. With multiple linear-array detectors, spectral coverage as wide as 350-2200 nanometers is possible. In this wide spectral interval, the downwelling irradiance is sensitive - in contrasting atmospheric windows - to surface albedo, cloud optical depth, cloud thermodynamic phase, and effective droplet/particle size. For climatological studies relevant to climate model improvement, a shortwave spectroradiometer offers four significant advantages. First, full spectral observations can be made at high time resolution, often in one-minute averages. This enables study of cloud formation, evolution, and dissipation, in response to meteorological and aerosol forcing. Second, with shortwave spectral data cloud properties can be derived for a wide range of liquid water content; in contrast to the middle-infrared window where only optically thin clouds can be studied. Third, commercial technology is now available - including some instruments nearly entirely ready for atmospheric application - that make the acquisition cost of a spectroradiometer relatively modest compared to other types of advanced atmospheric instrumentation. This offers the possibility of developing ground-based networks for geographically distributed measurements. Fourth, measurement of the downwelling spectral irradiance enables direct empirical interpretation of cloud properties' influence on the surface radiation budget. We have experience with shortwave spectroradiometer deployment in the high Arctic, at the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, and at Ross Island, Antarctica. These measurements reveal a great diversity in cloud properties, including extensive Arctic mixed-phase cloud during springtime, rapidly evolving liquid water cloud at SGP, and ice-dominated cloud in response to moisture traversing

  3. In search of the best match: probing a multi-dimensional cloud microphysical parameter space to better understand what controls cloud thermodynamic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ivy; Storelvmo, Trude

    2015-04-01

    Substantial improvements have been made to the cloud microphysical schemes used in the latest generation of global climate models (GCMs), however, an outstanding weakness of these schemes lies in the arbitrariness of their tuning parameters, which are also notoriously fraught with uncertainties. Despite the growing effort in improving the cloud microphysical schemes in GCMs, most of this effort has neglected to focus on improving the ability of GCMs to accurately simulate the present-day global distribution of thermodynamic phase partitioning in mixed-phase clouds. Liquid droplets and ice crystals not only influence the Earth's radiative budget and hence climate sensitivity via their contrasting optical properties, but also through the effects of their lifetimes in the atmosphere. The current study employs NCAR's CAM5.1, and uses observations of cloud phase obtained by NASA's CALIOP lidar over a 79-month period (November 2007 to June 2014) guide the accurate simulation of the global distribution of mixed-phase clouds in 20∘ latitudinal bands at the -10∘ C, -20∘C and -30∘C isotherms, by adjusting six relevant cloud microphysical tuning parameters in the CAM5.1 via Quasi-Monte Carlo sampling. Among the parameters include those that control the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) timescale for the conversion of supercooled liquid droplets to ice and snow in mixed-phase clouds, the fraction of ice nuclei that nucleate ice in the atmosphere, ice crystal sedimentation speed, and wet scavenging in stratiform and convective clouds. Using a Generalized Linear Model as a variance-based sensitivity analysis, the relative contributions of each of the six parameters are quantified to gain a better understanding of the importance of their individual and two-way interaction effects on the liquid to ice proportion in mixed-phase clouds. Thus, the methodology implemented in the current study aims to search for the combination of cloud microphysical parameters in a GCM that

  4. Understanding Ice Supersaturation, Particle Growth, and Number Concentration in Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Lin, Ruei-Fong; Starr, David O'C.; Yang, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Many factors control the ice supersaturation and microphysical properties in cirrus clouds. We explore the effects of dynamic forcing, ice nucleation mechanisms, and ice crystal growth rate on the evolution and distribution of water vapor and cloud properties in nighttime cirrus clouds using a one-dimensional cloud model with bin microphysics and remote sensing measurements obtained at the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility located near Lamont, OK. We forced the model using both large-scale vertical ascent and, for the first time, mean mesoscale velocity derived from radar Doppler velocity measurements. Both heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation processes are explored, where a classical theory heterogeneous scheme is compared with empirical representations. We evaluated model simulations by examining both bulk cloud properties and distributions of measured radar reflectivity, lidar extinction, and water vapor profiles, as well as retrieved cloud microphysical properties. Our results suggest that mesoscale variability is the primary mechanism needed to reproduce observed quantities. Model sensitivity to the ice growth rate is also investigated. The most realistic simulations as compared with observations are forced using mesoscale waves, include fast ice crystal growth, and initiate ice by either homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation. Simulated ice crystal number concentrations (tens to hundreds particles per liter) are typically two orders of magnitude smaller than previously published results based on aircraft measurements in cirrus clouds, although higher concentrations are possible in isolated pockets within the nucleation zone.

  5. The origin of midlatitude ice clouds and the resulting influence on their microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luebke, Anna; Rolf, Christian; Costa, Anja; Afchine, Armin; Avallone, Linnea; Borrmann, Stephan; Baumgardner, Darrel; Klingebiel, Marcus; Kraemer, Martina

    2015-04-01

    Ice clouds are known to play an important role in the radiative balance of the atmosphere. The nature of this role is determined by the macrophysical and microphysical properties of a cloud. Thus, it is crucial that we have an accurate understanding of properties such as the ice water content (IWC), ice crystal concentration (Ni), and ice crystal size (Ri). However, these properties are difficult to parameterize due to their large variability and the fact that they are influenced by a number of other factors such as temperature, vertical velocity, relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice), and the available ice nuclei. The combination of those factors ultimately establishes whether heterogeneous or homogeneous nucleation will lead to ice crystal formation. The aforementioned factors are largely determined by the dynamics of the environment in which the ice cloud forms, collectively contained in a meteorological situation. Ice clouds have been observed in a variety of situations such as frontal systems, jet streams, gravity waves, and convective systems. Most recently, the concept of the influence of large-scale dynamics on midlatitude cirrus properties has been demonstrated in the work of Muehlbauer et al. (2014). In the work presented here, we explore this concept further by examining how differences in dynamics are translated into the differences in IWC, Ni, and Ri that are found within and between datasets. Data from two American-based campaigns, the 2004 Midlatitude Cirrus Experiment (MidCiX) and the 2011 Midlatitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX), as well as some European-based campaigns, the 2004 and 2006 CIRRUS campaigns, the 2013 AIRTOSS-ICE campaign, and the 2014 ML-CIRRUS campaign are combined to form a large, and more latitudinally comprehensive database of Northern Hemisphere in-situ, midlatitude ice cloud observations. We have divided the data by meteorological situation and explored the differences and similarities between

  6. Final Report on the Development of an Improved Cloud Microphysical Product for Model and Remote Sensing Evaluation using RACORO Observations

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg

    2012-09-19

    We proposed to analyze data collected during the Routine Aerial Facilities (AAF) Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) in order to develop an integrated product of cloud microphysical properties (number concentration of drops in different size bins, total liquid drop concentration integrated over all bin sizes, liquid water content LWC, extinction of liquid clouds bw, effective radius of water drops re, and radar reflectivity factor) that could be used to evaluate large-eddy simulations (LES), general circulation models (GCMs) and ground-based remote sensing retrievals, and to develop cloud parameterizations with the end goal of improving the modeling of cloud processes and properties and their impact on atmospheric radiation. We have completed the development of this microphysical database and have submitted it to ARM for consideration of its inclusion on the ARM database as a PI product. This report describes the development of this database, and also describes research that has been conducted on cloud-aerosol interactions using the data obtained during RACORO. A list of conference proceedings and publications is also included.

  7. Phase transition observations and discrimination of small cloud particles by light polarization in expansion chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Järvinen, Emma; Ignatius, Karoliina; Florian Höppel, Niko; Dias, Antonio; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Andrea Christine; Wagner, Robert; Williamson, Christina; Yan, Chao; Connolly, Paul James; Dorsey, James Robert; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Frege, Carla; Gordon, Hamish; Hoyle, Christopher Robert; Bjerring Kristensen, Thomas; Steiner, Gerhard; McPherson Donahue, Neil; Flagan, Richard; Gallagher, Martin William; Kirkby, Jasper; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, António

    2016-03-01

    Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather, and general circulation models. The detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud particle-size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarization (CASPOL) is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure the variability in polarization state of their backscattered light. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber facility at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water, and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed-phase clouds and viscous secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are presented. We report observations of significant liquid-viscous SOA particle polarization transitions under dry conditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles according to their polarization ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organic aerosol (e.g., SOA and oxalic acid), crystalline substances such as ammonium sulfate, and volcanic ash. Finally, we discuss the benefits and limitations of this classification approach for atmospherically relevant concentrations and mixtures with respect to the CLOUD 8-9 campaigns and its potential contribution to tropical troposphere layer analysis.

  8. Tropical deep convective life cycle: Cb-anvil cloud microphysics from high-altitude aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, W.; Borrmann, S.; Fierli, F.; Weigel, R.; Mitev, V.; Matthey, R.; Ravegnani, F.; Sitnikov, N. M.; Ulanovsky, A.; Cairo, F.

    2014-12-01

    The case study presented here focuses on the life cycle of clouds in the anvil region of a tropical deep convective system. During the SCOUT-O3 campaign from Darwin, Northern Australia, the Hector storm system has been probed by the Geophysica high-altitude aircraft. Clouds were observed by in situ particle probes, a backscatter sonde, and a miniature lidar. Additionally, aerosol number concentrations have been measured. On 30 November 2005 a double flight took place and Hector was probed throughout its life cycle in its developing, mature, and dissipating stage. The two flights were four hours apart and focused on the anvil region of Hector in altitudes between 10.5 and 18.8 km (i.e. above 350 K potential temperature). Trajectory calculations, satellite imagery, and ozone measurements have been used to ensure that the same cloud air masses have been probed in both flights. The size distributions derived from the measurements show a change not only with increasing altitude but also with the evolution of Hector. Clearly different cloud to aerosol particle ratios as well as varying ice crystal morphology have been found for the different development stages of Hector, indicating different freezing mechanisms. The development phase exhibits the smallest ice particles (up to 300 μm) with a rather uniform morphology. This is indicative for rapid glaciation during Hector's development. Sizes of ice crystals are largest in the mature stage (larger than 1.6 mm) and even exceed those of some continental tropical deep convective clouds, also in their number concentrations. The backscatter properties and particle images show a change in ice crystal shape from the developing phase to rimed and aggregated particles in the mature and dissipating stages; the specific shape of particles in the developing phase cannot be distinguished from the measurements. Although optically thin, the clouds in the dissipating stage have a large vertical extent (roughly 6 km) and persist for at

  9. Parameterizations of Depositional Growth of Cloud Ice in a Bulk Microphysical Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Ferrier, Brad S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    1999-01-01

    Two aspects of the cloud ice parameterization in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model cloud physics parameterization are examined: the conversion of cloud ice to snow by depositional growth, designated PSFI, and the saturation adjustment scheme. The original formulation of PSFI is shown to produce excessive conversion of cloud ice to snow because of an implicit assumption that the relative humidity is 100% with respect to water even though the air may actually be quite less humid. Two possible corrections to this problem are proposed, the first involving application of a relative humidity dependent correction factor to the original formulation of PSFI, and the second involving a new formulation of PSFI based on the equation for depositional growth of cloud ice. The sensitivity of these formulations of PSFI to the assumed masses of the ice particles is examined. Possible problems associated with using a saturation adjustment scheme for cloud ice are discussed and simulations of a squall line with and without application of the adjustment scheme for ice are compared.

  10. Challenges in Analyzing and Representing Cloud Microphysical Data Measured with Airborne Cloud Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Freer, M.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Heymsfield, A.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    There are a variety of in-situ instruments that are deployed on aircraft for measuring cloud properties, some of which provide data which are used to produce number and mass concentrations of water droplets and ice crystals and their size and shape distributions. Each of these instruments has its strengths and limitations that must be recognized and taken into account during analysis of the data. Various processing techniques have been developed by different groups and techniques implemented to partially correct for the known uncertainties and limitations. The cloud measurement community has in general acknowledged the various issues associated with these instruments and numerous studies have published processing algorithms that seek to improve data quality; however, there has not been a forum in which these various algorithms and processing techniques have been discussed and consensus reached both on optimum analysis strategy and on quantification of uncertainties on the derived data products. Prior to the 2014 AMS Cloud Physics Conference, a study was conducted in which many data sets taken from various aircraft (NCAR-130, North Dakota Citation, Wyoming King Air and FAAM BAE-146) and many instruments (FSSP, CDP, SID, 2D-C/P, CIP/PIP, 2D-S, CPI, Nevzorov Probe and King Hot-wire LWC sensor) were processed by more than 20 individuals or groups to produce a large number of derived products (size distributions, ice fraction, number and mass concentrations, CCN/IN concentrations and median volume diameter). Each person or group that processed a selected data set used their own software and algorithm to produce a secondary data file with derived parameters whose name was encoded to conceal the source of the file so that this was a blind comparison. The workshop that was convened July 5 and 6, 2014, presented the results of the evaluation of the derived products with respect to individual instruments as well as the types of conditions under which the measurements were

  11. Influence of different microphysical schemes on the prediction of dissolution of nonreactive gases by cloud droplets and raindrops

    SciTech Connect

    Huret, N.; Chaumerliac, N.; Isaka, H.; Nickerson, E.C. |

    1994-09-01

    Three microphysical formulations are closely compared to evaluate their impact upon gas scavenging and wet deposition processes. They range from a classical bulk approach to a fully spectral representation, including an intermediate semispectral parameterization. Detailed comparisons among the microphysical rates provided by these three parameterizations are performed with special emphasis on evaporation rate calculations. This comparative study is carried out in the context of a mountain wave simulation. Major differences are essentially found in the contrasted spreading of the microphysical fields on the downwind side of the mountain. A detailed chemical module including the dissolution of the species and their transfer between phases (air, cloud, and rain) is coupled with the three microphysical parameterizations in the framework of the dynamical mesoscale model. An assessment of the accuracy of each scheme is then proposed by comparing their ability to represent the drop size dependency of chemical wet processes. The impact of evaporation (partial versus total) upon the partition of species between gas and aqueous phases is also studied in detail.

  12. Boundary layer regulation in the southeast Atlantic cloud microphysics during the biomass burning season as seen by the A-train satellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painemal, David; Kato, Seiji; Minnis, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    Solar radiation absorption by biomass burning aerosols has a strong warming effect over the southeast Atlantic. Interactions between the overlying smoke aerosols and low-level cloud microphysics and the subsequent albedo perturbation are, however, generally ignored in biomass burning radiative assessments. In this study, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) are combined with Aqua satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E), and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) to assess the effect of variations in the boundary layer height and the separation distance between the cloud and aerosol layers on the cloud microphysics. The merged data analyzed at a daily temporal resolution suggest that overlying smoke aerosols modify cloud properties by decreasing cloud droplet size despite an increase in the cloud liquid water as boundary layer deepens, north of 5°S. These changes are controlled by the proximity of the aerosol layer to the cloud top rather than increases in the column aerosol load. The correlations are unlikely driven by meteorological factors, as three predictors of cloud variability, lower tropospheric stability, surface winds, and mixing ratio suggest that cloud effective radius, cloud top height, and liquid water path should correlate positively. Because cloud effective radius anticorrelates with cloud liquid water over the region with large microphysical changes—north of 5°S—the overall radiative consequence at the top of the atmosphere is a strong albedo susceptibility, equivalent to a 3% albedo increase due to a 10% decrease in cloud effective radius. This albedo enhancement partially offsets the aerosol solar absorption. Our analysis emphasizes the importance of accounting for the indirect effect of smoke aerosols in the cloud microphysics when estimating the radiative impact of the biomass burning at the

  13. Particle Cloud Flames in Acoustic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlad, A. L.; Tangirala, V.; Ross, H.; Facca, L.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on a study of flames supported by clouds of particles suspended in air, at pressures about 100 times lower than normal. In the experiment, an acoustic driver (4-in speaker) placed at one end of a closed tube, 0.75-m long and 0.05 m in diameter, disperses a cloud of lycopodium particles during a 0.5-sec powerful acoustic burst. Properties of the particle cloud and the flame were recorded by high-speed motion pictures and optical transmission detectors. Novel flame structures were observed, which owe their features to partial confinement, which encourages flame-acoustic interactions, segregation of particle clouds into laminae, and penetration of the flame's radiative flux density into the unburned particle-cloud regimes. Results of these experiments imply that, for particles in confined spaces, uncontrolled fire and explosion may be a threat even if the Phi(0) values are below some apparent lean limit.

  14. Final Report: Operational Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties Using Combined Measurements by Diverse Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Richard T. Austin

    2008-06-30

    The report on the final phase of the project describes improvements in the ice and liquid cloud retrieval algorithms due to the use of three-parameter particle size distributions in which all three parameters may vary with height, testing of the improved retrievals by comparisons of measured and calculated fluxes, and further improvement in liquid retrievals obtained by adding liquid water path information from the microwave radiometer to radar and visible optical depth information.

  15. Effects of long-range aerosol transport on the microphysical properties of low-level liquid clouds in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopman, Quentin; Garrett, Timothy J.; Riedi, Jérôme; Eckhardt, Sabine; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The properties of low-level liquid clouds in the Arctic can be altered by long-range pollution transport to the region. Satellite, tracer transport model, and meteorological data sets are used here to determine a net aerosol-cloud interaction (ACInet) parameter that expresses the ratio of relative changes in cloud microphysical properties to relative variations in pollution concentrations while accounting for dry or wet scavenging of aerosols en route to the Arctic. For a period between 2008 and 2010, ACInet is calculated as a function of the cloud liquid water path, temperature, altitude, specific humidity, and lower tropospheric stability. For all data, ACInet averages 0.12 ± 0.02 for cloud-droplet effective radius and 0.16 ± 0.02 for cloud optical depth. It increases with specific humidity and lower tropospheric stability and is highest when pollution concentrations are low. Carefully controlling for meteorological conditions we find that the liquid water path of arctic clouds does not respond strongly to aerosols within pollution plumes. Or, not stratifying the data according to meteorological state can lead to artificially exaggerated calculations of the magnitude of the impacts of pollution on arctic clouds.

  16. Microphysical aerosol parameters of spheroidal particles via regularized inversion of lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaras, Stefanos; Böckmann, Christine

    2015-04-01

    One of the main topics in understanding the aerosol impact on climate requires the investigation of the spatial and temporal variability of microphysical properties of particles, e.g., the complex refractive index, the effective radius, the volume and surface-area concentration, and the single-scattering albedo. Remote sensing is a technique used to monitor aerosols in global coverage and fill in the observational gap. This research topic involves using multi-wavelength Raman lidar systems to extract the microphysical properties of aerosol particles, along with depolarization signals to account for the non-sphericity of the latter. Given, the optical parameters (measured by a lidar), the kernel functions, which summarize the size, shape and composition of particles, we solve for the size distribution of the particles modeled by a Fredholm integral system and further calculate the refractive index. This model works well for spherical particles (e.g. smoke); the kernel functions are derived from relatively simplified formulas (Mie scattering theory) and research has led to successful retrievals for particles which at least resemble a spherical geometry (small depolarization ratio). Obviously, more complicated atmospheric structures (e.g dust) require employment of non-spherical kernels and/or more complicated models which are investigated in this paper. The new model is now a two-dimensional one including the aspect ratio of spheroidal particles. The spheroidal kernel functions are able to be calculated via T-Matrix; a technique used for computing electromagnetic scattering by single, homogeneous, arbitrarily shaped particles. In order to speed up the process and massively perform simulation tests, we created a software interface using different regularization methods and parameter choice rules. The following methods have been used: Truncated singular value decomposition and Pade iteration with the discrepancy principle, and Tikhonov regularization with the L

  17. LIMA (v1.0): A quasi two-moment microphysical scheme driven by a multimodal population of cloud condensation and ice freezing nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vié, B.; Pinty, J.-P.; Berthet, S.; Leriche, M.

    2016-02-01

    The paper describes the LIMA (Liquid Ice Multiple Aerosols) quasi two-moment microphysical scheme, which relies on the prognostic evolution of an aerosol population, and the careful description of the nucleating properties that enable cloud droplets and pristine ice crystals to form from aerosols. Several modes of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice freezing nuclei (IFN) are considered individually. A special class of partially soluble IFN is also introduced. These "aged" IFN act first as CCN and then as IFN by immersion nucleation at low temperatures. All the CCN modes are in competition with each other, as expressed by the single equation of maximum supersaturation. The IFN are insoluble aerosols that nucleate ice in several ways (condensation, deposition and immersion freezing) assuming the singular hypothesis. The scheme also includes the homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets, the Hallett-Mossop ice multiplication process and the freezing of haze at very low temperatures. LIMA assumes that water vapour is in thermodynamic equilibrium with the population of cloud droplets (adjustment to saturation in warm clouds). In ice clouds, the prediction of the number concentration of the pristine ice crystals is used to compute explicit deposition and sublimation rates (leading to free under/supersaturation over ice). The autoconversion, accretion and self-collection processes shape the raindrop spectra. The initiation of the large crystals and aggregates category is the result of the depositional growth of large crystals beyond a critical size. Aggregation and riming are computed explicitly. Heavily rimed crystals (graupel) can experience a dry or wet growth mode. An advanced version of the scheme includes a separate hail category of particles forming and growing exclusively in the wet growth mode. The sedimentation of all particle types is included. The LIMA scheme is inserted into the Meso-NH cloud-resolving mesoscale model. The flexibility of LIMA is illustrated

  18. Separating dynamical and microphysical impacts of aerosols on deep convection applying piggybacking methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Wojciech W.

    2016-04-01

    Formation and growth of cloud and precipitation particles ("cloud microphysics") affect cloud dynamics and such macroscopic cloud field properties as the mean surface rainfall, cloud cover, and liquid/ice water paths. Traditional approaches to investigate the impacts involve parallel simulations with different microphysical schemes or with different scheme parameters (such as the assumed droplet/ice concentration for single-moment bulk schemes or the assumed CCN/IN concentration for double-moment schemes). Such methodologies are not reliable because of the natural variability of a cloud field that is affected by the feedback between cloud microphysics and cloud dynamics. In a nutshell, changing the cloud microphysics leads to a different realization of the cloud-scale flow, and separating dynamical and microphysical impacts is cumbersome. A novel modeling methodology, referred to as the microphysical piggybacking, was recently developed to separate purely microphysical effects from the impact on the dynamics. The main idea is to use two sets of thermodynamic variables driven by two microphysical schemes or by the same scheme with different scheme parameters. One set is coupled to the dynamics and drives the simulation, and the other set piggybacks the simulated flow, that is, it responds to the simulated flow but does not affect it. By switching the sets (i.e., the set driving the simulation becomes the piggybacking one, and vice versa), the impact on the cloud dynamics can be isolated from purely microphysical effects. Application of this methodology to the daytime deep convection development over land based on the observations during the Large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere (LBA) field project in Amazonia will be discussed applying single-moment and double-moment bulk microphysics schemes. We show that the new methodology documents a small indirect aerosol impact on convective dynamics, and a strong microphysical effect. These results question the postulated strong

  19. Remote sensing of cirrus cloud microphysical properties using spectral measurements over the full range of their thermal emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchetti, L.; Di Natale, G.; Bianchini, G.

    2016-09-01

    The thermal emission of cirrus clouds, spectrally resolved in the 100-1400 cm-1 range (100-7.1 μm), has been modeled and compared with measurements performed during two field campaigns from the ground-based site of Testa Grigia on the Italian Alps at 3480 m of altitude. The analysis of cirrus microphysics, through spectral fitting, shows the importance of using also the far infrared portion of the emitted spectrum at wave numbers below the 667 cm-1 carbon dioxide absorption band, where only a few measurements exist because of the high opacity of the atmosphere caused by the strong water vapor absorption. The resulted distribution of the fitted cloud parameters is in good agreement with the typical statistical distribution of the midlatitude cirrus cloud parameters.

  20. Micro-physical properties of carbonaceous aerosol particles generated by laser ablation of a graphite target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajtai, T.; Utry, N.; Pintér, M.; Tápai, Cs.; Kecskeméti, G.; Smausz, T.; Hopp, B.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    In this work the authors propose laser ablation as a highly versatile tool for carbonaceous aerosol generation. The generated carbonaceous particles can be used as a model aerosol for atmospheric black carbon. Various microphysical properties including mass concentration, size distribution and morphology of aerosol particles generated by laser ablation of a high purity graphite sample were investigated in detail. These measurements proved that the proposed method can be used to generate both primary particles and fractal aggregates with a high yield. As a further advantage of the method the size distribution of the generated aerosol can cover a wide range, and can be tuned accurately with laser fluence, the ambient composition or with the volumetric flow rate of the carrier gas.

  1. Ice nucleation active particles are efficiently removed by precipitating clouds.

    PubMed

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Morris, Cindy E; Herrmann, Erik; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Alewell, Christine

    2015-11-10

    Ice nucleation in cold clouds is a decisive step in the formation of rain and snow. Observations and modelling suggest that variations in the concentrations of ice nucleating particles (INPs) affect timing, location and amount of precipitation. A quantitative description of the abundance and variability of INPs is crucial to assess and predict their influence on precipitation. Here we used the hydrological indicator δ(18)O to derive the fraction of water vapour lost from precipitating clouds and correlated it with the abundance of INPs in freshly fallen snow. Results show that the number of INPs active at temperatures ≥ -10 °C (INPs-10) halves for every 10% of vapour lost through precipitation. Particles of similar size (>0.5 μm) halve in number for only every 20% of vapour lost, suggesting effective microphysical processing of INPs during precipitation. We show that INPs active at moderate supercooling are rapidly depleted by precipitating clouds, limiting their impact on subsequent rainfall development in time and space.

  2. Ice nucleation active particles are efficiently removed by precipitating clouds

    PubMed Central

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Morris, Cindy E.; Herrmann, Erik; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Alewell, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Ice nucleation in cold clouds is a decisive step in the formation of rain and snow. Observations and modelling suggest that variations in the concentrations of ice nucleating particles (INPs) affect timing, location and amount of precipitation. A quantitative description of the abundance and variability of INPs is crucial to assess and predict their influence on precipitation. Here we used the hydrological indicator δ18O to derive the fraction of water vapour lost from precipitating clouds and correlated it with the abundance of INPs in freshly fallen snow. Results show that the number of INPs active at temperatures ≥ −10 °C (INPs−10) halves for every 10% of vapour lost through precipitation. Particles of similar size (>0.5 μm) halve in number for only every 20% of vapour lost, suggesting effective microphysical processing of INPs during precipitation. We show that INPs active at moderate supercooling are rapidly depleted by precipitating clouds, limiting their impact on subsequent rainfall development in time and space. PMID:26553559

  3. Numerical simulation of precipitation formation in the case orographically induced convective cloud: Comparison of the results of bin and bulk microphysical schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkadi, N.; Geresdi, I.; Thompson, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, results of bulk and bin microphysical schemes are compared in the case of idealized simulations of pre-frontal orographic clouds with enhanced embedded convection. The description graupel formation by intensive riming of snowflakes was improved compared to prior versions of each scheme. Two methods of graupel melting coincident with collisions with water drops were considered: (1) all simulated melting and collected water drops increase the amount of melted water on the surface of graupel particles with no shedding permitted; (2) also no shedding permitted due to melting, but the collision with the water drops can induce shedding from the surface of the graupel particles. The results of the numerical experiments show: (i) The bin schemes generate graupel particles more efficiently by riming than the bulk scheme does; the intense riming of snowflakes was the most dominant process for the graupel formation. (ii) The collision-induced shedding significantly affects the evolution of the size distribution of graupel particles and water drops below the melting level. (iii) The three microphysical schemes gave similar values for the domain integrated surface precipitation, but the patterns reveal meaningful differences. (iv) Sensitivity tests using the bulk scheme show that the depth of the melting layer is sensitive to the description of the terminal velocity of the melting snow. (v) Comparisons against Convair-580 flight measurements suggest that the bin schemes simulate well the evolution of the pristine ice particles and liquid drops, while some inaccuracy can occur in the description of snowflakes riming. (vi) The bin scheme with collision-induced shedding reproduced well the quantitative characteristics of the observed bright band.

  4. The microphysics of clouds over the Antarctic Peninsula - Part 1: Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachlan-Cope, Tom; Listowski, Constantino; O'Shea, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    Observations of clouds over the Antarctic Peninsula during summer 2010 and 2011 are presented here. The peninsula is up to 2500 m high and acts as a barrier to weather systems approaching from the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. Observations of the number of ice and liquid particles as well as the ice water content and liquid water content in the clouds from both sides of the peninsula and from both years were compared. In 2011 there were significantly more water drops and ice crystals, particularly in the east, where there were approximately twice the number of drops and ice crystals in 2011.Ice crystals observations as compared to ice nuclei parameterizations suggest that secondary ice multiplication at temperatures around -5 °C is important for ice crystal formation on both sides of the peninsula below 2000 m. Also, back trajectories have shown that in 2011 the air masses over the peninsula were more likely to have passed close to the surface over the sea ice in the Weddell Sea. This suggests that the sea-ice-covered Weddell Sea can act as a source of both cloud condensation nuclei and ice-nucleating particles.

  5. Variational assimilation of satellite cloud water/ice path and microphysics scheme sensitivity to the assimilation of a rainfall case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yaodeng; Zhang, Ruizhi; Meng, Deming; Min, Jinzhong; Zhang, Lina

    2016-10-01

    Hydrometeor variables (cloud water and cloud ice mixing ratios) are added into the WRF three-dimensional variational assimilation system as additional control variables to directly analyze hydrometeors by assimilating cloud observations. In addition, the background error covariance matrix of hydrometeors is modeled through a control variable transform, and its characteristics discussed in detail. A suite of experiments using four microphysics schemes (LIN, SBU-YLIN, WDM6 and WSM6) are performed with and without assimilating satellite cloud liquid/ice water path. We find analysis of hydrometeors with cloud assimilation to be significantly improved, and the increment and distribution of hydrometeors are consistent with the characteristics of background error covariance. Diagnostic results suggest that the forecast with cloud assimilation represents a significant improvement, especially the ability to forecast precipitation in the first seven hours. It is also found that the largest improvement occurs in the experiment using the WDM6 scheme, since the assimilated cloud information can sustain for longer in this scheme. The least improvement, meanwhile, appears in the experiment using the SBU-YLIN scheme.

  6. Improving representation of convective transport for scale-aware parameterization: 1. Convection and cloud properties simulated with spectral bin and bulk microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Yi-Chin; Xu, Kuan-Man; North, Kirk; Collis, Scott; Dong, Xiquan; Zhang, Guang J.; Chen, Qian; Kollias, Pavlos; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-01

    The ultimate goal of this study is to improve the representation of convective transport by cumulus parameterization for mesoscale and climate models. As Part 1 of the study, we perform extensive evaluations of cloud-resolving simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complexes in midlatitude continent and tropical regions using the Weather Research and Forecasting model with spectral bin microphysics (SBM) and with two double-moment bulk microphysics schemes: a modified Morrison (MOR) and Milbrandt and Yau (MY2). Compared to observations, in general, SBM gives better simulations of precipitation and vertical velocity of convective cores than MOR and MY2 and therefore will be used for analysis of scale dependence of eddy transport in Part 2. The common features of the simulations for all convective systems are (1) the model tends to overestimate convection intensity in the middle and upper troposphere, but SBM can alleviate much of the overestimation and reproduce the observed convection intensity well; (2) the model greatly overestimates Ze in convective cores, especially for the weak updraft velocity; and (3) the model performs better for midlatitude convective systems than the tropical system. The modeled mass fluxes of the midlatitude systems are not sensitive to microphysics schemes but are very sensitive for the tropical case indicating strong microphysics modification to convection. Cloud microphysical measurements of rain, snow, and graupel in convective cores will be critically important to further elucidate issues within cloud microphysics schemes.

  7. Derivation of physical and optical properties of mid-latitude cirrus ice crystals for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-06-01

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100 µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette masses are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5-2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by ˜ 0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from ˜ 0.05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.

  8. Derivation of physical and optical properties of mid-latitude cirrus ice crystals for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model

    DOE PAGES

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; ...

    2016-06-10

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100 µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette massesmore » are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5–2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by  ∼  0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from  ∼ 0.05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.« less

  9. Impacts of the Manaus pollution plume on the microphysical properties of Amazonian warm-phase clouds in the wet season

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchini, Micael A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mei, Fan; Wang, Jian; Fan, Jiwen; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Schmid, Beat; Albrecht, Rachel; Martin, Scot T.; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The remote atmosphere over the Amazon can be similar to oceanic regions in terms of aerosol conditions and cloud type formations. This is especially true during the wet season. The main aerosol-related disturbances over the Amazon have both natural sources, such as dust transport from Africa, and anthropogenic sources, such as biomass burning or urban pollution. The present work considers the impacts of the latter on the microphysical properties of warm-phase clouds by analysing observations of the interactions between the Manaus pollution plume and its surroundings, as part of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The analysed period corresponds to the wet season (specifically from February to March 2014 and corresponding to the first Intensive Operating Period (IOP1) of GoAmazon2014/5). The droplet size distributions reported are in the range 1 µm ≤ D≤50 µm in order to capture the processes leading up to the precipitation formation. The wet season largely presents a clean background atmosphere characterized by frequent rain showers. As such, the contrast between background clouds and those affected by the Manaus pollution can be observed and detailed. The focus is on the characteristics of the initial microphysical properties in cumulus clouds predominantly at their early stages. The pollution-affected clouds are found to have smaller effective diameters and higher droplet number concentrations. The differences range from 10 to 40% for the effective diameter and are as high as 1000% for droplet concentration for the same vertical levels. The growth rates of droplets with altitude are slower for pollution-affected clouds (2.90 compared to 5.59 µm km₋1), as explained by the absence of bigger droplets at the onset of cloud development. Clouds under background conditions have higher concentrations of larger droplets (>20 µm) near the cloud base, which would contribute significantly to the growth rates through the collision

  10. Impacts of the Manaus pollution plume on the microphysical properties of Amazonian warm-phase clouds in the wet season

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchini, Micael A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mei, Fan; Wang, Jian; Fan, Jiwen; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Schmid, Beat; Albrecht, Rachel; Martin, Scot T.; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-06-09

    The remote atmosphere over the Amazon can be similar to oceanic regions in terms of aerosol conditions and cloud type formations. This is especially true during the wet season. The main aerosol-related disturbances over the Amazon have both natural sources, such as dust transport from Africa, and anthropogenic sources, such as biomass burning or urban pollution. The present work considers the impacts of the latter on the microphysical properties of warm-phase clouds by analyzing observations of the interactions between the Manaus pollution plume and its surroundings, as part of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The analyzed period corresponds to the wet season (specifically from February to March 2014 and corresponding to the first Intensive Operating Period (IOP1) of GoAmazon2014/5). The droplet size distributions reported are in the range 1 µm ≤ D ≤ 50 µm in order to capture the processes leading up to the precipitation formation. The wet season largely presents a clean background atmosphere characterized by frequent rain showers. As such, the contrast between background clouds and those affected by the Manaus pollution can be observed and detailed. The focus is on the characteristics of the initial microphysical properties in cumulus clouds predominantly at their early stages. The pollution-affected clouds are found to have smaller effective diameters and higher droplet number concentrations. The differences range from 10 to 40 % for the effective diameter and are as high as 1000% for droplet concentration for the same vertical levels. The growth rates of droplets with altitude are slower for pollution-affected clouds (2.90 compared to 5.59 µm km–1), as explained by the absence of bigger droplets at the onset of cloud development. Clouds under background conditions have higher concentrations of larger droplets (> 20 µm) near the cloud base, which would contribute significantly to the growth rates through the collision

  11. Impacts of the Manaus pollution plume on the microphysical properties of Amazonian warm-phase clouds in the wet season

    DOE PAGES

    Cecchini, Micael A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; ...

    2016-06-09

    The remote atmosphere over the Amazon can be similar to oceanic regions in terms of aerosol conditions and cloud type formations. This is especially true during the wet season. The main aerosol-related disturbances over the Amazon have both natural sources, such as dust transport from Africa, and anthropogenic sources, such as biomass burning or urban pollution. The present work considers the impacts of the latter on the microphysical properties of warm-phase clouds by analyzing observations of the interactions between the Manaus pollution plume and its surroundings, as part of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The analyzed period corresponds to the wet seasonmore » (specifically from February to March 2014 and corresponding to the first Intensive Operating Period (IOP1) of GoAmazon2014/5). The droplet size distributions reported are in the range 1 µm ≤ D ≤ 50 µm in order to capture the processes leading up to the precipitation formation. The wet season largely presents a clean background atmosphere characterized by frequent rain showers. As such, the contrast between background clouds and those affected by the Manaus pollution can be observed and detailed. The focus is on the characteristics of the initial microphysical properties in cumulus clouds predominantly at their early stages. The pollution-affected clouds are found to have smaller effective diameters and higher droplet number concentrations. The differences range from 10 to 40 % for the effective diameter and are as high as 1000% for droplet concentration for the same vertical levels. The growth rates of droplets with altitude are slower for pollution-affected clouds (2.90 compared to 5.59 µm km–1), as explained by the absence of bigger droplets at the onset of cloud development. Clouds under background conditions have higher concentrations of larger droplets (> 20 µm) near the cloud base, which would contribute significantly to the growth rates through the collision–coalescence process. The

  12. Impacts of the Manaus pollution plume on the microphysical properties of Amazonian warm-phase clouds in the wet season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchini, Micael A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mei, Fan; Wang, Jian; Fan, Jiwen; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Schmid, Beat; Albrecht, Rachel; Martin, Scot T.; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-06-01

    The remote atmosphere over the Amazon can be similar to oceanic regions in terms of aerosol conditions and cloud type formations. This is especially true during the wet season. The main aerosol-related disturbances over the Amazon have both natural sources, such as dust transport from Africa, and anthropogenic sources, such as biomass burning or urban pollution. The present work considers the impacts of the latter on the microphysical properties of warm-phase clouds by analysing observations of the interactions between the Manaus pollution plume and its surroundings, as part of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The analysed period corresponds to the wet season (specifically from February to March 2014 and corresponding to the first Intensive Operating Period (IOP1) of GoAmazon2014/5). The droplet size distributions reported are in the range 1 µm ≤ D ≤ 50 µm in order to capture the processes leading up to the precipitation formation. The wet season largely presents a clean background atmosphere characterized by frequent rain showers. As such, the contrast between background clouds and those affected by the Manaus pollution can be observed and detailed. The focus is on the characteristics of the initial microphysical properties in cumulus clouds predominantly at their early stages. The pollution-affected clouds are found to have smaller effective diameters and higher droplet number concentrations. The differences range from 10 to 40 % for the effective diameter and are as high as 1000 % for droplet concentration for the same vertical levels. The growth rates of droplets with altitude are slower for pollution-affected clouds (2.90 compared to 5.59 µm km-1), as explained by the absence of bigger droplets at the onset of cloud development. Clouds under background conditions have higher concentrations of larger droplets (> 20 µm) near the cloud base, which would contribute significantly to the growth rates through the collision-coalescence process. The overall shape

  13. Physical and Optical/Radiative Characteristics of Aerosol and Cloud Particles in Tropical Cirrus: Importance in Radiation Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Howard, S. D.; Foster, T. C.; Hallett, J.; Arnott, W. P.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Whether cirrus clouds heat or cool the Earth-atmosphere system depends on the relative importance of the cloud shortwave albedo effect and the cloud thermal greenhouse effect. Both are determined by the distribution of ice condensate with cloud particle size. The microphysics instrument package flown aboard the NASA DC-8 in TOGA/COARE included an ice crystal replicator, a 2D Greyscale Cloud Particle Probe and a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Aerosol Probe. In combination, the electro-optical instruments permitted particle size measurements between 0.5 micrometer and 2.6 millimeter diameter. Ice crystal replicas were used to validate signals from the electrooptical instruments. Both optical and scanning electron microscopy were utilized to analyze aerosol and ice particle replicas between 0.1 micrometer and several 100 micrometer diameter. In first approximation, the combined aerosol-cloud particle spectrum in several clouds followed a power law N alpha D(sup -2.5). Thus, large cloud particles carried most of the condensate mass, while small cloud and aerosol particles determined the surface area. The mechanism of formation of small particles is growth of (hygroscopic, possibly ocean-derived) aerosol particles along the Kohler curves. The concentration of small particles is higher and less variable in space and time, and their tropospheric residence time is longer, than those of large cloud particles because of lower sedimentation velocities. Small particles shift effective cloud particle radii to sizes much smaller than the mean diameter of the cloud particles. This causes an increase in shortwave reflectivity and IR emissivity, and a decrease in transmissivity. Occasionally, the cloud reflectivity increased with altitude (decreasing temperature) stronger than did cloud emissivity, yielding enhanced radiative cooling at higher altitudes. Thus, cirrus produced by deep convection in the tropics may be critical in controlling processes whereby energy from warm

  14. Japan's research on particle clouds and sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Jun'ichi

    1995-01-01

    Most of energy used by us is generated by combustion of liquid and solid fuels. These fuels are burned in combustors mainly as liquid sprays and pulverized solids, respectively. A knowledge of the combustion processes in combustors is needed to achieve proper designs that have stable operation, high efficiency, and low emission levels. However, current understanding of liquid and solid particle cloud combustion is far from complete. If combustion experiments for these fuels are performed under a normal gravity field, some experimental difficulties are encountered. These difficulties encountered include, that since the particles fall by the force of gravity it is impossible to stop the particles in the air, the falling speeds of particles are different from each other, and are depend on the particle size, the flame is lifted up and deformed by the buoyancy force, and natural convection makes the flow field more complex. Since these experimental difficulties are attributable to the gravity force, a microgravity field can eliminate the above problems. This means that the flame propagation experiments in static homogeneous liquid and solid particle clouds can be carried out under a microgravity field. This will provide much information for the basic questions related to combustion processes of particle clouds and sprays. In Japan, flame propagation processes in the combustible liquid and solid particle clouds have been studied experimentally by using a microgravity field generated by a 4.5 s dropshaft, a 10 s dropshaft, and by parabolic flight. Described in this presentation are the recent results of flame propagations studies in a homogeneous liquid particle cloud, in a mixture of liquid particles/gas fuel/air, in a PMMA particle cloud, and in a pulverized coal particle cloud.

  15. Comparison of Ice Cloud Particle Sizes Retrieved from Satellite Data Derived from In Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Qingyuan; Rossow, William B.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1997-01-01

    Cloud microphysical parameterizations have attracted a great deal of attention in recent years due to their effect on cloud radiative properties and cloud-related hydrological processes in large-scale models. The parameterization of cirrus particle size has been demonstrated as an indispensable component in the climate feedback analysis. Therefore, global-scale, long-term observations of cirrus particle sizes are required both as a basis of and as a validation of parameterizations for climate models. While there is a global scale, long-term survey of water cloud droplet sizes (Han et al.), there is no comparable study for cirrus ice crystals. This study is an effort to supply such a data set.

  16. Microphysical particle properties derived from inversion algorithms developed in the framework of EARLINET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Detlef; Böckmann, Christine; Kolgotin, Alexei; Schneidenbach, Lars; Chemyakin, Eduard; Rosemann, Julia; Znak, Pavel; Romanov, Anton

    2016-10-01

    We present a summary on the current status of two inversion algorithms that are used in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) for the inversion of data collected with EARLINET multiwavelength Raman lidars. These instruments measure backscatter coefficients at 355, 532, and 1064 nm, and extinction coefficients at 355 and 532 nm. Development of these two algorithms started in 2000 when EARLINET was founded. The algorithms are based on a manually controlled inversion of optical data which allows for detailed sensitivity studies. The algorithms allow us to derive particle effective radius as well as volume and surface area concentration with comparably high confidence. The retrieval of the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index still is a challenge in view of the accuracy required for these parameters in climate change studies in which light absorption needs to be known with high accuracy. It is an extreme challenge to retrieve the real part with an accuracy better than 0.05 and the imaginary part with accuracy better than 0.005-0.1 or ±50 %. Single-scattering albedo can be computed from the retrieved microphysical parameters and allows us to categorize aerosols into high- and low-absorbing aerosols. On the basis of a few exemplary simulations with synthetic optical data we discuss the current status of these manually operated algorithms, the potentially achievable accuracy of data products, and the goals for future work. One algorithm was used with the purpose of testing how well microphysical parameters can be derived if the real part of the complex refractive index is known to at least 0.05 or 0.1. The other algorithm was used to find out how well microphysical parameters can be derived if this constraint for the real part is not applied. The optical data used in our study cover a range of Ångström exponents and extinction-to-backscatter (lidar) ratios that are found from lidar measurements of various aerosol types. We also tested

  17. What do we need to know to model the microphysical evolution of volcanic clouds and how can we make these measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, J. M.; Toon, O. B.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions can inject millions of tons of ash, sulfate and gaseous precursors into the stratosphere. The magnitude and duration of the volcanic cloud on Earth's temperatures, circulation, clouds, and stratospheric ozone is strongly affected by the microphysical properties of the aerosol size distribution, which can evolve in complex ways. This presentation will cover the impacts and uncertainties associated with microphysical aerosol measurements and modeling of the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption, and valuable future measurements after the next large volcanic eruption. These additional measurements can help improve our understanding of stratospheric processes as well as possible consequences of large volcanic eruptions and hypothetical geoengineering scenarios on radiative forcing and chemistry.

  18. The microphysical and radiative properties of tropical cirrus from the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Jun Shik

    During the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment conducted in the region near Darwin, Australia, the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft executed spiral profiles and flew horizontal legs through aging cirrus, fresh anvils, and cirrus of unknown origin. Data from 27 Jan., 29 Jan., and 2 Feb., when all the microphysical probes a Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS), a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP), a Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP), and a Cloud Particle Imager (CPI) were working, are used to investigate whether a single parameterization can be used to characterize tropical cirrus in terms of prognostic variables used in large-scale models, to calculate the single-scattering properties (scattering phase function P11 and asymmetry parameter g) of aggregates and small ice crystals that more closely match observed ice crystals, and to quantify the influences of small ice crystals on the bulk scattering properties of tropical cirrus. A combination of CDP (D < 50 mum), fits (50 < D < 125 microm), and CIP (D > 125 mum) distributions is used to represent ice crystal size distributions. The CDP measurements are used for small ice crystals because comparison between the CAS and CDP suggested the CAS was artificially amplifying small ice crystal concentrations by detecting remnants of shattered large ice crystals. Artifacts in CIP images are removed or corrected and then CIP measurements are used to represent large ice crystals. Because of the uncertainties in both the CPI and CIP for 50 < D < 125 mum, the incomplete gamma fitting method with the CDP (D < 50 mum) and CIP (D > 125 mum) measurements as input is used to characterize these distributions. A new quasi-automatic habit classification scheme is developed. For all days, small quasi-spheres dominated the contributions from all ice crystal sizes (D > 0 mum, by number) for all 3 days. The areal fraction (D > 200 mum) from bullet rosettes and their aggregates was 48% and 60% for 27 and 29 Jan., respectively, but only 7

  19. Understanding Ice Supersaturation, Particle Growth, and Number Concentration in Cirrus Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Lin, Ruei-Fong; Starr, David O.; Yang, P.

    2008-12-10

    Many factors control the ice supersaturation and microphysical properties in cirrus clouds. We explore the effects of dynamic forcing, ice nucleation mechanisms, and ice crystal growth rate on the evolution and distribution of water vapor and cloud properties in cirrus clouds using a detailed microphysical model and remote sensing measurements obtained at the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility located near Lamont, OK. To help understand dynamic scales important in cirrus formation, we force the model using both large-scale forcing derived using ARM variational analysis, and mean mesoscale velocity derived from radar Doppler velocity measurements. Both heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation processes are explored, where we have implemented a rigorous classical theory heterogeneous nucleation scheme to compare with empirical representations. We evaluate model simulations by examining both bulk cloud properties and distributions of measured radar reflectivity, lidar extinction, and water vapor profiles, as well as retrieved cloud microphysical properties. This approach allows for independent verification of both the large and small particle modes of the particle size distribution. Our results suggest that mesoscale variability is the primary mechanism needed to reproduce observed quantities, while nucleation mechanism is secondary. Slow ice crystal growth tends to overestimate the number of small ice crystals, but does not seem to influence bulk properties such as ice water path and cloud thickness. The most realistic simulations as compared with observations are forced using mesoscale waves, include fast ice crystal growth, and initiate ice by either homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation. Ice crystal number concentrations on the order of 10-100 L-1 produce results consistent with both lidar and radar observations during a cirrus event observed on 7 December 1999, which has an optical depth range typical of

  20. A new approach to modeling aerosol effects on East Asian climate: Parametric uncertainties associated with emissions, cloud microphysics, and their interactions: AEROSOL EFFECTS ON EAST ASIAN CLIMATE

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Huiping; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Minghuai; Yang, Ben; Liu, Xiaohong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-09-09

    In this study, we adopt a parametric sensitivity analysis framework that integrates the quasi-Monte Carlo parameter sampling approach and a surrogate model to examine aerosol effects on the East Asian Monsoon climate simulated in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5). A total number of 256 CAM5 simulations are conducted to quantify the model responses to the uncertain parameters associated with cloud microphysics parameterizations and aerosol (e.g., sulfate, black carbon (BC), and dust) emission factors and their interactions. Results show that the interaction terms among parameters are important for quantifying the sensitivity of fields of interest, especially precipitation, to the parameters. The relative importance of cloud-microphysics parameters and emission factors (strength) depends on evaluation metrics or the model fields we focused on, and the presence of uncertainty in cloud microphysics imposes an additional challenge in quantifying the impact of aerosols on cloud and climate. Due to their different optical and microphysical properties and spatial distributions, sulfate, BC, and dust aerosols have very different impacts on East Asian Monsoon through aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions. The climatic effects of aerosol do not always have a monotonic response to the change of emission factors. The spatial patterns of both sign and magnitude of aerosol-induced changes in radiative fluxes, cloud, and precipitation could be different, depending on the aerosol types, when parameters are sampled in different ranges of values. We also identify the different cloud microphysical parameters that show the most significant impact on climatic effect induced by sulfate, BC and dust, respectively, in East Asia.

  1. Approximate analytical scattering phase function dependent on microphysical characteristics of dust particles.

    PubMed

    Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2011-06-10

    The approximate bulk-scattering phase function of a polydisperse system of dust particles is derived in an analytical form. In the theoretical solution, the particle size distribution is modeled by a modified gamma function that can satisfy various media differing in modal radii. Unlike the frequently applied power law, the modified gamma distribution shows no singularity when the particle radius approaches zero. The approximate scattering phase function is related to the parameters of the size distribution function. This is an important advantage compared to the empirical Henyey-Greenstein (HG) approximation, which is a simple function of the average cosine. However, any optimized value of average cosine of the HG function cannot provide the information on particle microphysical characteristics, such as the size distribution function. In this paper, the mapping between average cosine and the parameters of size distribution function is given by a semianalytical expression that is applicable in rapid numerical simulations on various dust populations. In particular, the modal radius and half-width can be quickly estimated using the presented formulas.

  2. Evaluation of A New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with the NCAR Climate Atmospheric Model (CAM3) and ARM Observations Fourth Quarter 2007 ARM Metric Report

    SciTech Connect

    X Liu; SJ Ghan; S Xie; J Boyle; SA Klein

    2007-09-30

    Mixed-phase clouds are composed of a mixture of cloud droplets and ice crystals. The cloud microphysics in mixed-phase clouds can significantly impact cloud optical depth, cloud radiative forcing, and cloud coverage. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models is crude and the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets and ice crystals is prescribed as temperature dependent functions. In our previous 2007 ARM metric reports a new mixed-phase cloud microphysics parameterization (for ice nucleation and water vapor deposition) was documented and implemented in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 (CAM3). The new scheme was tested against the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) observations using the single column modeling and short-range weather forecast approaches. In this report this new parameterization is further tested with CAM3 in its climate simulations. It is shown that the predicted ice water content from CAM3 with the new parameterization is in better agreement with the ARM measurements at the Southern Great Plain (SGP) site for the mixed-phase clouds.

  3. Modulations of aerosol impacts on cloud microphysics induced by the warm Kuroshio Current under the East Asian winter monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, M.; Asano, N.; Nakamura, H.; Sakai, S.; Nagao, T. M.; Nakajima, T. Y.

    2016-10-01

    In our previous aircraft observations, the possible influence of high sea surface temperature (SST) along the Kuroshio Current on aerosol-cloud interactions over the western North Pacific was revealed. The cloud droplet number concentration (Nc) was found to increase with decreasing near-surface static stability (NSS), which was evaluated locally as the difference between the SST and surface air temperature (SAT). To explore the spatial and temporal extent to which this warm SST influence can be operative, the present study analyzed Nc values estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite measurements. The comparison of the local Nc values between the high and low SST - SAT days revealed a marked increase in Nc (up to a factor of 1.8) along the Kuroshio Current in the southern East China Sea, where particularly high SST - SAT values (up to 8 K) were observed in winter under monsoonal cold air outflows from the Asian Continent. This cold airflow destabilizes the atmospheric boundary layer, which leads to enhanced updraft velocities within the well-developed mixed layer and thus greater Nc. The monsoonal northwesterlies also bring a large amount of anthropogenic aerosols from the Asian continent that increase Nc in the first place. These results suggest that the same modulations of cloud microphysics can occur over other warm western boundary currents, including the Gulf Stream, under polluted cool continental airflows. Possibilities of influencing the cloud liquid water path are also discussed.

  4. First results of the AIRS Version 6 cloud top microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, B. H.; Irion, F. W.; Manning, E.; Nasiri, S. L.; Jin, H.; Schreier, M. M.; Yue, Q.; Fetzer, E.; Liou, K.

    2012-12-01

    The new cloud products from the upcoming Version 6 release of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) algorithm is described and initial results are presented. The three new cloud retrieval products include cloud thermodynamic phase, cirrus cloud optical thickness, and cirrus cloud effective diameter. The retrieval methodology of the cirrus cloud parameters is based on an optimal estimation approach that uses observed radiances and cloud clearing-derived atmospheric profiles that define the atmospheric state, surface temperature and emissivity, and cloud top temperature. We will compare the new AIRS retrievals to similar retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and possibly other A-train instruments, and also will demonstrate that the new suite of AIRS cloud products offer useful and tangible constraints for climate model development.

  5. Measurements of regional-scale aerosol impacts on cloud microphysics over the East China Sea: Possible influences of warm sea surface temperature over the Kuroshio ocean current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, M.; Takegawa, N.; Moteki, N.; Kondo, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Kita, K.; Matsui, H.; Oshima, N.; Kajino, M.; Nakajima, T. Y.

    2012-09-01

    Cloud microphysical properties and aerosol concentrations were measured aboard an aircraft over the East China Sea and Yellow Sea in April 2009 during the Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia (A-FORCE) experiment. We sampled stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds over the ocean in 9 cases during 7 flights 500-900 km off the east coast of Mainland China. In this study we report aerosol impacts on cloud microphysical properties by focusing on regional characteristics of two key parameters, namely updraft velocity and aerosol size distribution. First, we show that the cloud droplet number concentration (highest 5%, Nc_max) correlates well with the accumulation-mode aerosol number concentration (Na) below the clouds. We then show that Nc_maxcorrelates partly with near-surface stratification evaluated as the difference between the sea surface temperature (SST) and 950-hPa temperature (SST - T950). Cold air advection from China to the East China Sea was found to bring not only a large number of aerosols but also a dry and cold air mass that destabilized the atmospheric boundary layer, especially over the warm Kuroshio ocean current. Over this high-SST region, greater updraft velocities and hence greater Nc_maxlikely resulted. We hypothesize that the low-level static stability determined by SST and regional-scale airflow modulates both the cloud microphysics (aerosol impact on clouds) and macro-structure of clouds (cloud base and top altitudes, hence cloud liquid water path). Second, we show that not only higher aerosol loading in terms of total aerosol number concentration (NCN, D > 10 nm) but also larger aerosol mode diameters likely contributed to high Ncduring A-FORCE. The mean Nc of 650 ± 240 cm-3was more than a factor of 2 larger than the global average for clouds influenced by continental sources. A crude estimate of the aerosol-induced cloud albedo radiative forcing is also given.

  6. Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds Simulated by a Cloud-Resolving Model: Comparison with ARM Observations and Sensitivity to Microphysics Parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kuan-Man; Luo, Yali; Morrison, Hugh; Mcfarquhar, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Single-layer mixed-phase stratiform (MPS) Arctic clouds, which formed under conditions of large surface heat flux combined with general subsidence during a subperiod of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), are simulated with a cloud resolving model (CRM). The CRM is implemented with either an advanced two-moment (M05) or a commonly used one-moment (L83) bulk microphysics scheme and a state-of-the-art radiative transfer scheme. The CONTROL simulation, that uses the M05 scheme and observed aerosol size distribution and ice nulei (IN) number concentration, reproduces the magnitudes and vertical structures of cloud liquid water content (LWC), total ice water content (IWC), number concentration and effective radius of cloud droplets as suggested by the M-PACE observations. It underestimates ice crystal number concentrations by an order of magnitude and overestimates effective radius of ice crystals by a factor of 2-3. The OneM experiment, that uses the L83 scheme, produces values of liquid water path (LWP) and ice plus snow water path (ISWP) that were about 30% and 4 times, respectively, of those produced by the CONTROL. Its vertical profile of IWC exhibits a bimodal distribution in contrast to the constant distribution of IWC produced in the CONTROL and observations.

  7. Role of interaction between dynamics, thermodynamics and cloud microphysics on summer monsoon precipitating clouds over the Myanmar Coast and the Western Ghats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Siddharth; Hazra, Anupam; Goswami, B. N.

    2014-08-01

    Indian summer monsoon circulation can be characterized by mean tropospheric temperature (TT) gradient between ocean and land. Two major heat sources, one near the Myanmar Coast and the other near the Western Ghats play seminal role in defining this TT gradient. While both regions are characterized by very similar orographic features, there are significant differences in frequency of occurrence of precipitating clouds and their characteristics even when the amount of rain in June-July months is almost same in the two regions. Deeper (shallower) clouds appear more frequently over the Myanmar Coast (the Western Ghats). There is a sharp decrease in amount of rainfall from June-July to August-September in both the areas. Rather counter intuitively, during the June-July-August-September season, low and moderate rains contribute more to the total rain in the Myanmar Coast while heavy rains contribute more to the total rain in the Western Ghats. Western Ghats also gets more intense rains but less frequently. With significant differences in moisture availability, updraft, amount and characteristics of cloud condensate in the two regions, this study proposes that the nontrivial differences in features between them could be explained by linkages between cloud microphysics and large scale dynamics. Presence of more cloud liquid water and the role of giant cloud condensation nuclei reveals dominance of warm rain process in the Western Ghats whereas more cloud ice, snow and graupel formation in the Myanmar Coast indicates stronger possibility of cold rain coming from mixed phase processes. Stronger heating caused by mixed phase process in the mid and upper troposphere in the Myanmar Coast and its feedback on buoyancy of air parcel explains the appearance of deeper clouds. Thus, our study highlights importance of mixed phase processes, a major cause of uncertainty in GCMs.

  8. 3D Cloud Tomography, Followed by Mean Optical and Microphysical Properties, with Multi-Angle/Multi-Pixel Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. B.; von Allmen, P. A.; Marshak, A.; Bal, G.

    2010-12-01

    The geometrical assumption in all operational cloud remote sensing algorithms is that clouds are plane-parallel slabs, which applies relatively well to the most uniform stratus layers. Its benefit is to justify using classic 1D radiative transfer (RT) theory, where angular details (solar, viewing, azimuthal) are fully accounted for and precise phase functions can be used, to generate the look-up tables used in the retrievals. Unsurprisingly, these algorithms catastrophically fail when applied to cumulus-type clouds, which are highly 3D. This is unfortunate for the cloud-process modeling community that may thrive on in situ airborne data, but would very much like to use satellite data for more than illustrations in their presentations and publications. So, how can we obtain quantitative information from space-based observations of finite aspect ratio clouds? Cloud base/top heights, vertically projected area, mean liquid water content (LWC), and volume-averaged droplet size would be a good start. Motivated by this science need, we present a new approach suitable for sparse cumulus fields where we turn the tables on the standard procedure in cloud remote sensing. We make no a priori assumption about cloud shape, save an approximately flat base, but use brutal approximations about the RT that is necessarily 3D. Indeed, the first order of business is to roughly determine the cloud's outer shape in one of two ways, which we will frame as competing initial guesses for the next phase of shape refinement and volume-averaged microphysical parameter estimation. Both steps use multi-pixel/multi-angle techniques amenable to MISR data, the latter adding a bi-spectral dimension using collocated MODIS data. One approach to rough cloud shape determination is to fit the multi-pixel/multi-angle data with a geometric primitive such as a scalene hemi-ellipsoid with 7 parameters (translation in 3D space, 3 semi-axes, 1 azimuthal orientation); for the radiometry, a simple radiosity

  9. Polar stratospheric cloud microphysical properties measured by the microRADIBAL instrument on 25 January 2000 above Esrange and modeling interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogniez, C.; Huret, N.; Eckermann, S.; RivièRe, E. D.; Pirre, M.; Herman, M.; Balois, J.-Y.; Verwaerde, C.; Larsen, N.; Knudsen, B.

    2003-03-01

    The balloonborne microRADIBAL instrument is a radiometer that measures the radiance and polarization of the sunlight scattered by the atmosphere, gas, and aerosols in a horizontal plane in the near-infrared range. It was launched from Esrange, Sweden, on 25 January 2000 in the framework of the Third European Stratospheric Experiment on Ozone (THESEO) 2000 campaign, and performed measurements in the vicinity of a large polar stratospheric cloud (PSC). The measurements provide diagrams of the radiance versus scattering angle at several altitudes. The aerosol signature, derived from the radiance measurements, has been modeled via Mie theory and the T-Matrix code. Three different size distributions of aerosols have been tested: monomodal and bimodal size distributions of spherical particles, and bimodal size distributions including a mode of spherical and a mode of nonspherical particles. The best agreement between the measured and modeled signatures is obtained considering a bimodal size distribution composed by a mode of medium spherical particles (median radius about 0.15 μm) and a second mode of larger nonspherical particles (median radius about 1.1 μm, aspect ratio about 0.6). Concentrations and surface densities of the PSC particles have been estimated. The existence of such particles has been tentatively explained using the Lagrangian Microphysical and Photochemical Lagrangian Stratospheric Model of Ozone (MiPLaSMO) model. On 25 January 2000 the polar stratospheric cloud detected by microRADIBAL is associated with a lee-wave event. Temperature perturbations due to lee-wave events were calculated using the National Research Laboratory Mountain Wave Forecast Model (MWFM) and have been included along trajectories. They are localized in a large region between the Norwegian mountains and Esrange. Their amplitude varies from 3 to 7 K. Detailed comparisons between measured and modeled surfaces and dimensional distributions of PSCs' particles are achieved. The two

  10. Particle Size Distributions in Atmospheric Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Center for Turbulence Research 39 Annual Research Briefs 2003 Particle size distributions in atmospheric clouds By Roberto Paoli & Karim...atmospheric turbulence is an important, though complex, problem in cloud physics ( Shaw 2003). From a computational point of view, two major factors...contribute to this complexity. First is the very high turbulence Reynolds number and the large range of spatial scales (Vaillancourt & Yau 2000; Shaw 2003

  11. Statistical characteristics of cloud variability. Part 2: Implication for parameterizations of microphysical and radiative transfer processes in climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Dong; Liu, Yangang

    2014-09-17

    The effects of subgrid cloud variability on grid-average microphysical rates and radiative fluxes are examined by use of long-term retrieval products at the Tropical West Pacific, Southern Great Plains, and North Slope of Alaska sites of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program. Four commonly used distribution functions, the truncated Gaussian, Gamma, lognormal, and Weibull distributions, are constrained to have the same mean and standard deviation as observed cloud liquid water content. The probability density functions are then used to upscale relevant physical processes to obtain grid-average process rates. It is found that the truncated Gaussian representation results in up to 30% mean bias in autoconversion rate, whereas the mean bias for the lognormal representation is about 10%. The Gamma and Weibull distribution function performs the best for the grid-average autoconversion rate with the mean relative bias less than 5%. For radiative fluxes, the lognormal and truncated Gaussian representations perform better than the Gamma and Weibull representations. The results show that the optimal choice of subgrid cloud distribution function depends on the nonlinearity of the process of interest, and thus, there is no single distribution function that works best for all parameterizations. Examination of the scale (window size) dependence of the mean bias indicates that the bias in grid-average process rates monotonically increases with increasing window sizes, suggesting the increasing importance of subgrid variability with increasing grid sizes.

  12. Passive Remote Sensing of Cloud Ice Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Wang, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Hurricanes, blizzards and other weather events are important to understand not only for disaster preparation, but also to track the global energy balance and to improve weather and climate forecasts. For several decades, passive radiometers and active radars on aircraft and satellites have been employed to remotely sense rain rates and the properties of liquid particles. In the past few years the relationships between frozen particles and millimeter-wave observations have become understood well enough to estimate the properties of ice in clouds. A brief background of passive remote sensing of precipitation will be presented followed by a focused discussion of recent research at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center estimating the properties of frozen particles in clouds. The retrievals are for (1) ice that will eventually melt into rain, (2) for solid precipitation falling in northern climates, and (3) cirrus ice clouds. The electromagnetic absorption and scattering properties and differences of liquid rain versus frozen particles will be summarized for frequencies from 6 to 340+ GHz. Challenges of this work including surface emissivity variability, non-linear and under-constrained relationships, and frozen particle unknowns will be discussed. Retrieved cloud particle contents and size distributions for ice above the melting layer in hurricanes, retrieved snowfall rates for a blizzard, and cirrus ice estimates will be presented. Future directions of this work will also be described.

  13. Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Wuyin; Ghan, Steven J.; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-12-24

    Arctic clouds simulated by the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic Spring and Fall seasons performed under the Cloud- Associated Parameterizations Testbed (CAPT) framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase stratocumulus, and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level clouds, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons and cloud fraction in the Spring season. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave (LW) radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m-2. The model with a new ice nucleation parameterization moderately improves the model simulations by increasing cloud liquid water content in mixed-phase clouds through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron- Findeisen (WBF) process. The CAM5 single column model testing shows that change in the homogeneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C has a substantial impact on the modeled liquid water content through the slowing-down of liquid and rain-related processes. In contrast, collections of cloud ice by snow and cloud liquid by rain are of minor importance for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic.

  14. Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu X.; Lin W.; Xie, S.; Boyle, J.; Klein, S. A.; Shi, X.; Wang, Z.; Ghan, S. J.; Earle, M.; Liu, P. S. K.; Zelenyuk, A.

    2011-12-24

    Arctic clouds simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic spring and fall seasons performed under the Cloud-Associated Parameterizations Testbed framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level stratocumulus, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m{sup -2}. Introducing a new ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase clouds by increasing cloud liquid water content through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The CAM5 single-column model testing shows that changing the instantaneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C causes a large increase in modeled cloud liquid water content through the slowing down of cloud liquid and rain-related processes (e.g., autoconversion of cloud liquid to rain). The underestimation of aerosol concentrations in CAM5 in the Arctic also plays an important role in the low bias of cloud liquid water in the single-layer mixed-phase clouds. In addition, numerical issues related to the coupling of model physics and time stepping in CAM5 are responsible for the model biases and will be explored in future studies.

  15. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2: Rain Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher R.

    2014-12-27

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, co-located UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain published results showing a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rain water contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (μ) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes, but lower RWCs than observed. Two moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a μ of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing μ to have values greater than 0 may improve two-moment schemes. Under-predicted stratiform rain rates are associated with under-predicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. In addition to stronger convective updrafts than observed, limited domain size prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region from developing in CRMs, while a dry bias in ECMWF analyses does the same to the LAMs.

  16. Evaluation of Cloud-Resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations Using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2 ; Precipitation Microphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridland, Ann M.; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Ten 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3-D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on 23-24 January 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, colocated UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rainwater contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (mu) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes but lower RWCs. Two-moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and, thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision-coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a mu of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing mu to have values greater than 0 may improve excessive size sorting in two-moment schemes. Underpredicted stratiform rain rates are associated with underpredicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. A limited domain size also prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region like the one observed from developing in CRMs, although LAMs also fail to produce such a region.

  17. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization – Part I: Convection and Cloud Properties Simulated with Spectral Bin and Bulk Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Yi-Chin; Xu, Kuan-Man; North, Kirk; Collis, Scott M.; Dong, Xiquan; Zhang, Guang J.; Chen, Qian; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    The ultimate goal of this study is to improve representation of convective transport by cumulus parameterization for meso-scale and climate models. As Part I of the study, we perform extensive evaluations of cloud-resolving simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complexes in mid-latitude continent and tropical regions using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with spectral-bin microphysics (SBM) and with two double-moment bulk microphysics schemes: a modified Morrison (MOR) and Milbrandt and Yau (MY2). Compared to observations, in general, SBM gives better simulations of precipitation, vertical velocity of convective cores, and the vertically decreasing trend of radar reflectivity than MOR and MY2, and therefore will be used for analysis of scale-dependence of eddy transport in Part II. The common features of the simulations for all convective systems are (1) the model tends to overestimate convection intensity in the middle and upper troposphere, but SBM can alleviate much of the overestimation and reproduce the observed convection intensity well; (2) the model greatly overestimates radar reflectivity in convective cores (SBM predicts smaller radar reflectivity but does not remove the large overestimation); and (3) the model performs better for mid-latitude convective systems than tropical system. The modeled mass fluxes of the mid latitude systems are not sensitive to microphysics schemes, but are very sensitive for the tropical case indicating strong microphysics modification to convection. Cloud microphysical measurements of rain, snow and graupel in convective cores will be critically important to further elucidate issues within cloud microphysics schemes.

  18. Modeling of microphysics and optics of aerosol particles in the marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloshin, Gennady

    2013-05-01

    We present a microphysical model for the surface layer marine and coastal atmospheric aerosols that is based on long-term observations of size distributions for 0.01-100 μm particles. The fundamental feature of the model is a parameterization of amplitudes and widths for aerosol modes of the aerosol size distribution function (ASDF) as functions of fetch and wind speed. The shape of ASDF and its dependence on meteorological parameters, height above sea level (H), fetch (X), wind speed (U) and relative humidity (RH), are investigated. At present, the model covers the ranges H = 0 - 25 m, U = 3 - 18 km s-1, X ≤ 120 km and RH = 40 - 98%. The latest version of the Marine Aerosol Extinction Profiles model (MaexPro) is described and applied for the computation and analysis of the spectral profiles of aerosol extinction coefficients α(λ) in the wavelength band λ = 0.2-12 μm. MaexPro is based on the aforementioned aerosol model assuming spherically shaped aerosol particles and the well-known Mie theory. The spectral profiles of α(λ) calculated by MaexPro are in good agreement with observational data and the numerical results. Moreover, MaexPro was found to be an accurate and reliable tool for investigating the optical properties of atmospheric aerosols.

  19. Development and testing of parameterizations for continental and tropical ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties in GCM and mesoscale models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heymsfield, A.

    1997-09-01

    The overall purpose of this research was to exploit measurements in clouds sampled during several field programs, especially from experiments in tropical regions, in a four-component study to develop and validate cloud parameterizations for general circulation models, emphasizing ice clouds. The components were: (1) parameterization of basic properties of mid- and upper-tropospheric clouds, such as condensed water content, primarily with respect to cirrus from tropical areas; (2) the second component was to develop parameterizations which express cloud radiative properties in terms of basic cloud microphysical properties, dealing primarily with tropical oceanic cirrus clouds and continental thunderstorm anvils, but also including altocumulus clouds; (3) the third component was to validate the parameterizations through use of ground-based measurements calibrated using existing and planned in-situ measurements of cloud microphysical properties and bulk radiative properties, as well as time-resolved data collected over extended periods of time; (4) the fourth component was to implement the parameterizations in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) community climate model (CCM) II or in the NOAA-GFDL model (by L. Donner GFDL) and to perform sensitivity studies.

  20. Heterogeneous chemistry on Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds - A microphysical estimate of the extent of chemical processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drdla, K.; Turco, R. P.; Elliott, S.

    1993-01-01

    A detailed model of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), which includes nucleation, condensational growth. and sedimentation processes, has been applied to the study of heterogeneous chemical reactions. For the first time, the extent of chemical processing during a polar winter has been estimated for an idealized air parcel in the Antarctic vortex by calculating in detail the rates of heterogeneous reactions on PSC particles. The resulting active chlorine and NO(x) concentrations at first sunrise are analyzed with respect to their influence upon the Antarctic ozone hole using a photochemical model. It is found that the species present at sunrise are primarily influenced by the relative values of the heterogeneous reaction rate constants and the initial gas concentrations. However, the extent of chlorine activation is also influenced by whether N2O5 is removed by reaction with HCl or H2O. The reaction of N2O5 with HCl, which occurs rapidly on type 1 PSCs, activates the chlorine contained in the reservoir species HCl. Hence the presence and surface area of type 1 PSCs early in the winter are crucial in determining ozone depletion.

  1. Microphysical development of a pulsating cumulus tower - A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.; Sax, R. I.

    1981-01-01

    In-cloud microphysical data collected within a 22-minute period during seven consecutive passes at the -13 C sampling level of a deep (base +22 C) convective cloud provide observational evidence for a secondary ice production mechanism at work in the Florida environment. The observed microphysical characteristics of the convective tower, particularly the spatial distribution and habit of the ice phase relative to the updraft, are consistent with a rime-splintering hypothesis for secondary ice production. It is shown that the cloud's updraft structure is critically important in governing the timing of the ice production by controlling the flux of graupel particles through the critical temperature zone (-3 C to -8 C). The importance of the cloud's pulsation growth dynamics on the microphysics is emphasized, particularly as it relates to rapidly glaciating cumuli.

  2. Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2015-12-23

    Quantifying the aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative effect at a global scale requires simultaneous satellite retrievals of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and cloud base updraft velocities (Wb). Hitherto, the inability to do so has been a major cause of high uncertainty regarding anthropogenic aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative forcing. This can be addressed by the emerging capability of estimating CCN and Wb of boundary layer convective clouds from an operational polar orbiting weather satellite. Our methodology uses such clouds as an effective analog for CCN chambers. The cloud base supersaturation (S) is determined by Wb and the satellite-retrieved cloud base drop concentrations (Ndb), which is the same as CCN(S). Developing and validating this methodology was possible thanks to the ASR/ARM measurements of CCN and vertical updraft profiles. Validation against ground-based CCN instruments at the ARM sites in Oklahoma, Manaus, and onboard a ship in the northeast Pacific showed a retrieval accuracy of ±25% to ±30% for individual satellite overpasses. The methodology is presently limited to boundary layer not raining convective clouds of at least 1 km depth that are not obscured by upper layer clouds, including semitransparent cirrus. The limitation for small solar backscattering angles of <25º restricts the satellite coverage to ~25% of the world area in a single day. This methodology will likely allow overcoming the challenge of quantifying the aerosol indirect effect and facilitate a substantial reduction of the uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing.

  3. Correlation Between Cirrus Particle Optical Properties: Microphysics and Implications for Spaceborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, Jens; Hess, M.; Reichardt, S.; Behrendt, A.; McGee, T. J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Cirrus measurements obtained with a ground-based polarization Raman lidar at 67.9 deg N in arctic winter reveal a strong correlation between the particle optical properties, specifically depolarization ratio and extinction-to-backscatter ratio, for ambient cloud temperatures above approximately -45 C, and an anti-correlation for colder temperatures. Similar correlations are evident in a 2-year midlatitude (53.4 deg N) cirrus data set. Scattering calculations show that the observed dependences can be interpreted in terms of the shapes and sizes of the cirrus ice particles. These findings suggest a retrieval method for determining cirrus extinction profiles from spaceborne lidar polarization data.

  4. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  5. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H.; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-01-01

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges. PMID:24297908

  6. Final Report fir DE-SC0005507 (A1618): The Development of an Improved Cloud Microphysical Product for Model and Remote Sensing Evaluation using RACORO Observations

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg M.

    2012-09-21

    We proposed to analyze data collected during the Routine Aerial Facilities (AAF) Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) in order to develop an integrated product of cloud microphysical properties (number concentration of drops in different size bins, total liquid drop concentration integrated over all bin sizes, liquid water content LWC, extinction of liquid clouds, effective radius of water drops, and radar reflectivity factor) that could be used to evaluate large-eddy simulations (LES), general circulation models (GCMs) and ground-based remote sensing retrievals, and to develop cloud parameterizations with the end goal of improving the modeling of cloud processes and properties and their impact on atmospheric radiation. We have completed the development of this microphysical database. we investigated the differences in the size distributions measured by the Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) and the Forward Scattering Probe (FSSP), between the one dimensional cloud imaging probe (1DC) and the two-dimensional cloud imaging probe (2DC), and between the bulk LWCs measured by the Gerber probe against those derived from the size resolved probes.

  7. Sensitivity and dependence of mesoscale downscaled prediction results on different parameterizations of convection and cloud microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remesan, R.; Bellerby, T.

    2012-04-01

    These days as operational real-time flood forecasting and warning systems rely more on high resolution mesoscale models employed with coupling system of hydrological models. So it is inevitable to assess prediction sensitivity or disparity in collection with selection of different cumulus and microphysical parameterization schemes, to assess the possible uncertainties associated with mesoscale downscaling. This study investigates the role of physical parameterization in mesoscale model simulations on simulation of unprecedented heavy rainfall over Yorkshire-Humberside in United Kingdom during 1-14th March, 1999. The study has used a popular mesoscale numerical weather prediction model named Advanced Research Weather Research Forecast model (version 3.3) which was developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in the USA. This study has performed a comprehensive evaluation of four cumulus parameterization schemes (CPSs) [Kian-Fritsch (KF), Betts-Miller-Janjic (BMJ) and Grell-Devenyi ensemble (GD)] and five microphysical schemes Lin et al scheme, older Thompson scheme, new Thompson scheme, WRF Single Moment - 6 class scheme, and WRF Single Moment - 5 class scheme] to identify how their inclusion influences the mesoscale model's meteorological parameter estimation capabilities and related uncertainties in prediction. The case study was carried out at the Upper River Derwent catchment in Northern Yorkshire, England using both the ERA-40 reanalysis data and the land based observation data.

  8. Particle Size Distributions in Atmospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paoli, Roberto; Shariff, Karim

    2003-01-01

    In this note, we derive a transport equation for a spatially integrated distribution function of particles size that is suitable for sparse particle systems, such as in atmospheric clouds. This is done by integrating a Boltzmann equation for a (local) distribution function over an arbitrary but finite volume. A methodology for evolving the moments of the integrated distribution is presented. These moments can be either tracked for a finite number of discrete populations ('clusters') or treated as continuum variables.

  9. Vertical velocities within a Cirrus cloud from Doppler lidar and aircraft measurements during FIRE: Implications for particle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    A large and comprehensive data set taken by the NOAA CO2 Doppler lidar, the NCAR King Air, and rawinsondes on 31 October 1986 during the FIRE (First ISCCP Regional Experiment) field program which took place in Wisconsin are presented. Vertical velocities are determined from the Doppler lidar data, and are compared with velocities derived from the aircraft microphysical data. The data are used for discussion of particle growth and dynamical processes operative within the cloud.

  10. Estimation of Microphysical and Radiative Parameters of Precipitating Cloud Systems Using mm-Wavelength Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, Sergey Y.

    2009-03-01

    A remote sensing approach is described to retrieve cloud and rainfall parameters within the same precipitating system. This approach is based on mm-wavelength radar signal attenuation effects which are observed in a layer of liquid precipitation containing clouds and rainfall. The parameters of ice clouds in the upper part of startiform precipitating systems are then retrieved using the absolute measurements of radar reflectivity. In case of the ground-based radar location, these measurements are corrected for attenuation in the intervening layer of liquid hydrometers.

  11. Probing Black Carbon-containing Particle Microphysics with the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J.; Lewis, E. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Lambe, A. T.; Davidovits, P.; Kleinman, L. I.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of the structure and mixing state of black-carbon containing particles is important for calculating their radiative forcing and provides insight into their source and life cycle. Recently analysis of black carbon-containing particles has demonstrated that for a fraction of such particles, the black carbon may reside on or near the surface of the particle as opposed to the traditional core-shell configuration typically assumed in which the black carbon core is surrounded by a shell of non-refractory material. During the DOE-sponsored Aerosol Lifecycle field campaign held in summer, 2011 at Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, NY, episodes were encountered in which a high fraction of particles containing black carbon had such configurations, and these episodes corresponded to air masses that contained biomass burning plumes (Sedlacek et al., 2012). Subsequent analysis found other episodes in field campaigns in Colorado and California in which high fractions this configuration corresponded to biomass burning plumes. In an effort to evaluate this interpretation and explore formation mechanisms, a series of laboratory-based experiments examining the coagulation of regal black (surrogate for collapsed soot) with model non-refractory coatings [dioctyl sebacate (surrogate for organic aerosols with liquid-like character) and deliquesced ammonium sulfate (solid)] were carried out. The results of these experiments and their potential implications on black carbon radiative forcing will be discussed. Sedlacek, III, Arthur, E. R. Lewis, L. I. Kleinman, J. Xu and Q. Zhang (2012), Determination of and Evidence for Non-core-shell structure of particles containing black carbon using the single particle soot photometer (SP2). Geophys. Res. Lett., 39 L06802, doi:10.1029/2012GL050905

  12. Small scale variations of the atmosphere and their implications for the size of noctilucent cloud particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarten, Gerd; Fiedler, Jens; Lübken, Franz-Josef; Ridder, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Noctilucent clouds (NLC) in the summer mesopause region (about 83 km altitude) are well known since more than 130 years. They are primarily made of ice particles of a few tens of nanometers and thus much smaller than the wavelength of visible light. Nevertheless, lidar measurements allow calculating particle size and inferring particle shape when combined with optical and microphysical modeling of non-spherical ice particles. We use the ALOMAR RMR-lidar, located in Northern Norway at 69°N, that is able to measure NLC with sub-second resolution. The signal levels at three widely separated wavelengths from 335 nm to 1064 nm allow deriving particle sizes with a temporal resolution of two minutes. We will use lidar observations between 2008 and 2014 to investigate the shape of the size distribution. The fundamental question of the shape of the size distribution is a link to the microphysics but also to atmospheric variability by turbulence and waves. Due to large sounding volumes (compared to the lidar sounding volume) this shape of the size distribution is of essential importance for most optical remote sensing methods that depend on assumptions about the width of the size distribution when retrieving mean particle sizes. The actual shape of the size distribution is of essential importance for most optical remote sensing methods (which have larger sounding volumes than the lidar) that depend on assumptions about the width of the size distribution when retrieving mean particle sizes.

  13. Cloud Properties Simulated by a Single-Column Model. Part II: Evaluation of Cumulus Detrainment and Ice-phase Microphysics Using a Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Yali; Krueger, Steven K.; Xu, Kuan-Man

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series in which kilometer-scale-resolving observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and a cloud-resolving model (CRM) are used to evaluate the single-column model (SCM) version of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System model. Part I demonstrated that kilometer-scale cirrus properties simulated by the SCM significantly differ from the cloud radar observations while the CRM simulation reproduced most of the cirrus properties as revealed by the observations. The present study describes an evaluation, through a comparison with the CRM, of the SCM's representation of detrainment from deep cumulus and ice-phase microphysics in an effort to better understand the findings of Part I. It is found that detrainment occurs too infrequently at a single level at a time in the SCM, although the detrainment rate averaged over the entire simulation period is somewhat comparable to that of the CRM simulation. Relatively too much detrained ice is sublimated when first detrained. Snow falls over too deep of a layer due to the assumption that snow source and sink terms exactly balance within one time step in the SCM. These characteristics in the SCM parameterizations may explain many of the differences in the cirrus properties between the SCM and the observations (or between the SCM and the CRM). A possible improvement for the SCM consists of the inclusion of multiple cumulus cloud types as in the original Arakawa-Schubert scheme, prognostically determining the stratiform cloud fraction and snow mixing ratio. This would allow better representation of the detrainment from deep convection, better coupling of the volume of detrained air with cloud fraction, and better representation of snow field.

  14. Parameterizations of Depositional Growth of Cloud Ice in a Bulk Microphysical Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Ferrier, Brad S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The conversion of cloud ice to snow by depositional growth, designated P(sub SFI), in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model cloud physics parameterization is examined. The original formulation of P(sub SFI) is shown to produce excessive conversion of cloud ice to snow because of an implicit assumption that the relative humidity is 100% with respect to water even though the air may actually be quite less humid. Two possible corrections to this problem are proposed, the first involving application of a relative humidity dependent correction factor to the original formulation of P(sub SFI), and the second involving a new formulation of P(sub SFI) based on the equation for depositional growth of cloud ice.

  15. libcloudph++ 1.0: a single-moment bulk, double-moment bulk, and particle-based warm-rain microphysics library in C++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabas, S.; Jaruga, A.; Pawlowska, H.; Grabowski, W. W.

    2015-06-01

    This paper introduces a library of algorithms for representing cloud microphysics in numerical models. The library is written in C++, hence the name libcloudph++. In the current release, the library covers three warm-rain schemes: the single- and double-moment bulk schemes, and the particle-based scheme with Monte Carlo coalescence. The three schemes are intended for modelling frameworks of different dimensionalities and complexities ranging from parcel models to multi-dimensional cloud-resolving (e.g. large-eddy) simulations. A two-dimensional (2-D) prescribed-flow framework is used in the paper to illustrate the library features. The libcloudph++ and all its mandatory dependencies are free and open-source software. The Boost.units library is used for zero-overhead dimensional analysis of the code at compile time. The particle-based scheme is implemented using the Thrust library that allows one to leverage the power of graphics processing units (GPU), retaining the possibility of compiling the unchanged code for execution on single or multiple standard processors (CPUs). The paper includes a complete description of the programming interface (API) of the library and a performance analysis including comparison of GPU and CPU set-ups.

  16. Microphysical Properties of Clouds with Low Liquid Water Paths: An Update from Clouds with Low Optical (Water) Depth

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.D.; Flynn, C.; Long, C.; McFarlane, S.; Vogelmann, A.; Johnson, K.; Miller, M.; Chiu, C.; Marshak, A.; Wiscombe, W.; Clough, S.A.; Heck, P.; Minnis, P.; Liljegren, J.; Min, Q.; O'Hirok, W.; Wang, Z.

    2005-03-18

    Clouds play a critical role in the modulation of the radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and how clouds interact with radiation is one of the primary uncertainties in global climate models (GCMs). To reduce this uncertainty, the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program collects an immense amount of data from its Climate Research Facilities (CRFs); these data include observations of radiative fluxes, cloud properties from active and passive remote sensors, upper atmospheric soundings, and other observations. The program's goal is to use these coincident, longterm observations to improve the parameterization of radiative transfer in clear and cloudy atmospheres in GCMs.

  17. Microphysical Effects of Wintertime Cloud Seeding with Silver Iodide over the Rocky Mountains. Part III: Observations over the Grand Mesa, Colorado.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Super, Arlin B.; Boe, Bruce A.

    1988-10-01

    During March 1986, several airborne and ground-based silver iodide (AgI) seeding experiments were conducted over the Grand Mesa, Colorado, during a three-day period of northerly flow and shallow orographic cloud. While little natural snowfall was observed during these experiments, supercooled liquid water formed over the windward slopes and evaporated to the lee of the mesa of many hours. Seeding-induced microphysical changes coincident with the AgI plumes were found in all eight experiments, (including two that employed ground-based seeding) by aircraft sampling about 500 m above the mesa top. Precipitation rates estimated from ice particle images at light levels suggested increases within the seeded volumes in all but one experiment. Surface precipitation increases were observed in three aircraft seeding experiments and one ground-based seeding experiment that coincided with the passage of AgI plumes aloft. Surface observations were not possible during the other ground-based seeding experiment, but some increase in snowfall is thought probable. Three aircraft seeding experiments failed to show surface snowfall increases, and reasons for this are explored.

  18. Studying Precipitation Processes in WRF with Goddard Bulk Microphysics in Comparison with Other Microphysical Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.K.; Shi, J.J.; Braun, S.; Simpson, J.; Chen, S.S.; Lang, S.; Hong, S.Y.; Thompson, G.; Peters-Lidard, C.

    2009-01-01

    A Goddard bulk microphysical parameterization is implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. This bulk microphysical scheme has three different options, 2ICE (cloud ice & snow), 3ICE-graupel (cloud ice, snow & graupel) and 3ICE-hail (cloud ice, snow & hail). High-resolution model simulations are conducted to examine the impact of microphysical schemes on different weather events: a midlatitude linear convective system and an Atlantic hurricane. The results suggest that microphysics has a major impact on the organization and precipitation processes associated with a summer midlatitude convective line system. The Goddard 3ICE scheme with the cloud ice-snow-hail configuration agreed better with observations ill of rainfall intensity and having a narrow convective line than did simulations with the cloud ice-snow-graupel and cloud ice-snow (i.e., 2ICE) configurations. This is because the Goddard 3ICE-hail configuration has denser precipitating ice particles (hail) with very fast fall speeds (over 10 m/s) For an Atlantic hurricane case, the Goddard microphysical scheme (with 3ICE-hail, 3ICE-graupel and 2ICE configurations) had no significant impact on the track forecast but did affect the intensity slightly. The Goddard scheme is also compared with WRF's three other 3ICE bulk microphysical schemes: WSM6, Purdue-Lin and Thompson. For the summer midlatitude convective line system, all of the schemes resulted in simulated precipitation events that were elongated in southwest-northeast direction in qualitative agreement with the observed feature. However, the Goddard 3ICE-hail and Thompson schemes were closest to the observed rainfall intensities although the Goddard scheme simulated more heavy rainfall (over 48 mm/h). For the Atlantic hurricane case, none of the schemes had a significant impact on the track forecast; however, the simulated intensity using the Purdue-Lin scheme was much stronger than the other schemes. The vertical distributions of

  19. Comparison of CERES-MODIS cloud microphysical properties with surface observations over Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hongru; Huang, Jianping; Minnis, Patrick; Yi, Yuhong; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Wang, Tianhe; Nakajima, Takashi Y.

    2015-03-01

    To enhance the utility of satellite-derived cloud properties for studying the role of clouds in climate change and the hydrological cycle in semi-arid areas, it is necessary to know their uncertainties. This paper estimates the uncertainties of several cloud properties by comparing those derived over the China Loess Plateau from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua by the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) with surface observations at the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL). The comparisons use data from January 2008 to June 2010 limited to single layer and overcast stratus conditions during daytime. Cloud optical depths (τ) and liquid water paths (LWP) from both Terra and Aqua generally track the variation of the surface counterparts with modest correlation, while cloud effective radius (re) is only weakly correlated with the surface retrievals. The mean differences between Terra and the SACOL retrievals are -4.7±12.9, 2.1±3.2 μm and 30.2±85.3 g m-2 for τ, re and LWP, respectively. The corresponding differences for Aqua are 2.1±8.4, 1.2±2.9 μm and 47.4±79.6 g m-2, respectively. Possible causes for biases of satellite retrievals are discussed through statistical analysis and case studies. Generally, the CERES-MODIS cloud properties have a bit larger biases over the Loess Plateau than those in previous studies over other locations.

  20. Comparison of Ice Cloud Particle Sizes Retrieved From Satellite Data Derived From In Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Qingyuan; Rossow, William B.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1997-01-01

    Cloud microphysical parameterizations have attracted a great deal of attention in recent years due to their effect on cloud radiative properties and cloud-related hydrological processes in large-scale models. The parameterization of cirrus particle size has been demonstrated as an indispensable component in the climate feedback analysis. Therefore, global-scale, long-term observations of cirrus particle sizes are required both as a basis of and as a validation of parameterizations for climate models. While there is a global scale, long-term survey of water cloud droplet sizes (Han et al. 1994), there is no comparable study for cirrus ice crystals. In this paper a near-global survey of cirrus ice crystal sizes is conducted using ISCCP satellite data analysis. The retrieval scheme uses phase functions based upon hexagonal crystals calculated by a ray tracing technique. The results show that global mean values of D(e) are about 60 micro-m. This study also investigates the possible reasons for the significant difference between satellite retrieved effective radii (approx. 60 micro-m) and aircraft measured particle sizes (approx. 200 micro-m) during the FIRE I IFO experiment. They are (1) vertical inhomogeneity of cirrus particle sizes; (2) lower limit of the instrument used in aircraft measurements; (3) different definitions of effective particle sizes; and (4) possible inappropriate phase functions used in satellite retrieval.

  1. Design, Evaluation and GCM-Performance of a New Parameterization for Microphysics of Clouds with Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert Scheme (McRas)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    A prognostic cloud scheme named McRAS (Microphysics of clouds with Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert Scheme) was developed with the aim of improving cloud-microphysics, and cloud-radiation interactions in GCMs. McRAS distinguishes convective, stratiform, and boundary-layer clouds. The convective clouds merge into stratiform clouds on an hourly time-scale, while the boundary-layer clouds do so instantly. The cloud condensate transforms into precipitation following the auto-conversion relations of Sundqvist that contain a parametric adaptation for the Bergeron-Findeisen process of ice crystal growth and collection of cloud condensate by precipitation. All clouds convect, advect, and diffuse both horizontally and vertically with a fully active cloud-microphysics throughout its life-cycle, while the optical properties of clouds are derived from the statistical distribution of hydrometeors and idealized cloud geometry. An evaluation of McRAS in a single column model (SCM) with the GATE Phase III data has shown that McRAS can simulate the observed temperature, humidity, and precipitation without discernible systematic errors. An evaluation with the ARM-CART SCM data in a cloud model intercomparison exercise shows reasonable but not an outstanding accurate simulation. Such a discrepancy is common to almost all models and is related, in part, to the input data quality. McRAS was implemented in the GEOS II GCM. A 50 month integration that was initialized with the ECMWF analysis of observations for January 1, 1987 and forced with the observed sea-surface temperatures and sea-ice distribution and vegetation properties (biomes, and soils), with prognostic soil moisture, snow-cover, and hydrology showed a very realistic simulation of cloud process, incloud water and ice, and cloud-radiative forcing (CRF). The simulated ITCZ showed a realistic time-mean structure and seasonal cycle, while the simulated CRF showed sensitivity to vertical distribution of cloud water which can be easily

  2. Comparison of Satellite and Aircraft Measurements of Cloud Microphysical Properties in Icing Conditions During ATREC/AIRS-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Louis; Minnis, Patrick; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Nordeen, Michele L.; Palikonda, Rabindra; Khaiyer, Mandana M.; Gultepe, Ismail; Reehorst, Andrew L.

    2004-01-01

    Satellites are ideal for continuous monitoring of aircraft icing conditions in many situations over extensive areas. The satellite imager data are used to diagnose a number of cloud properties that can be used to develop icing intensity indices. Developing and validating these indices requires comparison with objective "cloud truth" data in addition to conventional pilot reports (PIREPS) of icing conditions. Minnis et al. examined the relationships between PIREPS icing and satellite-derived cloud properties. The Atlantic-THORPEX Regional Campaign (ATReC) and the second Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS-II) field programs were conducted over the northeastern USA and southeastern Canada during late 2003 and early 2004. The aircraft and surface measurements are concerned primarily with the icing characteristics of clouds and, thus, are ideal for providing some validation information for the satellite remote sensing product. This paper starts the process of comparing cloud properties and icing indices derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) with the aircraft in situ measurements of several cloud properties during campaigns and some of the The comparisons include cloud phase, particle size, icing intensity, base and top altitudes, temperatures, and liquid water path. The results of this study are crucial for developing a more reliable and objective icing product from satellite data. This icing product, currently being derived from GOES data over the USA, is an important complement to more conventional products based on forecasts, and PIREPS.

  3. The impact of mineral dust particles on radiation and cloud formation during a Saharan dust event over Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, M.; Nenes, A.; Vogel, B.; Vogel, H.; Barahona, D.; Kumar, P.; Blahak, U.; Seifert, A.

    2010-12-01

    Dust, through their action as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), has long been hypothesized to impact clouds and the hydrological cycle. This effect is particularly strong during dust outbreaks. Europe, being adjacent to the Sahara, is susceptible to the effects of dust storms; a quantitative assessment remains elusive and is the subject of this study. This talk focuses on one major dust event that occurred in May 2008. Its origin was in the Sahara and from there mineral dust particles were transported over the western Mediterranean, covering large areas of Western Europe. During the episode, high aerosol concentrations were observed throughout Europe; ice nuclei concentrations significantly increased (compared to pre-event levels) at Kleiner Feldberg, Germany (Bingemer et al. 2009). During this time, traditional weather forecast models (which currently neglect aerosol impacts on atmospheric processes) exhibited poor prediction skill. The impacts of dust on atmospheric state is studied with the regional scale online coupled model system COSMO-ART (Vogel et al., 2009) that accounts for feedbacks between chemistry, aerosols, radiation, and clouds. A two-moment cloud microphysics scheme (Seifert & Beheng 2001) is coupled together with comprehensive parameterisations for aerosol activation (Kumar et al. 2009; Barahona et al. 2010) and ice nucleation (Barahona and Nenes 2009) to simulate the impact of the various aerosol particles on the cloud microphysics and therefore on cloud properties and precipitation. The sensitivity of predicted atmospheric state to the dust amount, properties (hygroscopicity) and parameterization is thoroughly studied.

  4. Climatic implications of ice microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, K.N.

    1995-09-01

    Based on aircraft measurements of mid-latitude cirrus clouds, ice crystal size distribution and ice water content (IWC) are shown to be dependent on temperature. This dependence is also evident from the theoretical consideration of ice crystal growth. Using simple models of the diffusion and accretion growth of ice particles, the computed mean ice crystal size and IWC compare reasonably well with the measured mean values. The temperature dependence of ice crystal size and IWC has important climatic implications in that the temperature field perturbed by external radiative forcings, such as greenhouse warming, can alter the composition of ice crystal clouds. Through radiative transfer, ice microphysics can in turn affect the temperature field. Higher IWC would increase cloud solar albedo and infrared emissivity, while for a given IWC, larger crystals would reduce cloud albedo and emissivity. The competing effects produced by greenhouse temperature perturbations via ice micro-physics and radiation interactions and feedbacks are assessed by a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model that includes an advanced radiation parameterization program. 3 figs.

  5. Large scale and cloud scale dynamics and microphysics in the formation and evolution of a TTL cirrus : a case modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podglajen, Aurélien; Plougonven, Riwal; Hertzog, Albert; Legras, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    Cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) control dehydration of air masses entering the stratosphere and strongly contribute to the local radiative heating. In this study, we aim at understanding, through a real case simulation, the dynamics controlling the formation and life cycle of a cirrus cloud event in the TTL. We also aim at quantifying the chemical and radiative impacts of the clouds. To do this, we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model to simulate a large scale TTL cirrus event happening in January 2009 (27-29) over the Eastern Pacific, which has been extensively described through satellite observations (Taylor et al., 2011). Comparison of simulated and observed high clouds shows a fair agreement, and validates the reference simulation regarding cloud extension, location and life time. The simulation and Lagrangian trajectories within the simulation are then used to characterize the evolution of the cloud : displacement, Lagrangian life time and links with dynamics. The efficiency of dehydration by such clouds is also examined. Sensitivity tests were performed to evaluate the importance of different microphysics schemes and initial and boundary conditions to accurately simulate the cirrus. As expected, both were found to have strong impacts. In particular, there were substantial differences between simulations using different initial and boundary conditions from atmospheric analyses (NCEP CFSR and ECMWF). This illustrates the primordial role of accurate vapour and dynamics for realistic cirrus modelling, on top of the need for appropriate microphysics. Last, we examined the effects of cloud radiative heating. Long wave radiative heating in cirrus clouds has been invoked to induce a cloud scale circulation that would lengthen the cloud lifetime, and increase the size of its dehydration area (Dinh et al. 2010). To try to diagnose this, we have carried out simulations using different radiative schemes, including or suppressing the

  6. Retrievals of cloud microphysical properties from the Research Scanning Polarimeter measurements made during PODEX field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, M. D.; Cairns, B.; Sinclair, K.

    2013-12-01

    We present the retrievals of cloud droplet size distribution parameters (effective radius and variance) from the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) measurements made during NASA's POlarimeter Definition EXperiment (PODEX), which was based in Palmdale, California in January - February 2013. The RSP is an airborne prototype for the Aerosol Polarimetery Sensor (APS), which was built for the NASA Glory Mission project. This instrument measures both polarized and total reflectances in 9 spectral channels with center wavelengths of 410, 470, 555, 670, 865, 960, 1590, 1880 and 2250 nm. The RSP is a push broom scanner making samples at 0.8 degree intervals within 60 degrees from nadir in both forward and backward directions. The data from actual RSP scans is aggregated into "virtual" scans, each consisting of all reflectances (at a variety of scattering angles) from a single point on the ground or at the cloud top. In the case of water clouds the rainbow is observed in the polarized reflectances in the scattering angle range between 135 and 170 degrees. It has a unique signature that is being used to accurately determine the droplet size and is not affected by cloud morphology. Simple parametric fitting algorithm applied to these polarized reflectances provides retrievals of the droplet effective radius and variance assuming a prescribed size distribution shape (gamma distribution). In addition to this, we use a non-parametric method, Rainbow Fourier Transform (RFT), which allows to retrieve the droplet size distribution a parametric model. Of particular interest is the information contained in droplet size distribution width, which is indicative of cloud life cycle. The absorbing band method is also applied to RSP total reflectance observations. The difference in the retrieved droplet size between polarized and absorbing band techniques is expected to reflect the strength of the vertical gradient in cloud liquid water content. In addition to established retrieval

  7. Classification of particle effective shape ratios in cirrus clouds based on the lidar depolarization ratio.

    PubMed

    Noel, Vincent; Chepfer, Helene; Ledanois, Guy; Delaval, Arnaud; Flamant, Pierre H

    2002-07-20

    A shape classification technique for cirrus clouds that could be applied to future spaceborne lidars is presented. A ray-tracing code has been developed to simulate backscattered and depolarized lidar signals from cirrus clouds made of hexagonal-based crystals with various compositions and optical depth, taking into account multiple scattering. This code was used first to study the sensitivity of the linear depolarization rate to cloud optical and microphysical properties, then to classify particle shapes in cirrus clouds based on depolarization ratio measurements. As an example this technique has been applied to lidar measurements from 15 mid-latitude cirrus cloud cases taken in Palaiseau, France. Results show a majority of near-unity shape ratios as well as a strong correlation between shape ratios and temperature: The lowest temperatures lead to high shape ratios. The application of this technique to space-borne measurements would allow a large-scale classification of shape ratios in cirrus clouds, leading to better knowledge of the vertical variability of shapes, their dependence on temperature, and the formation processes of clouds.

  8. Testing ice microphysics parameterizations in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 using Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment data

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weiguo; Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, Jim; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2009-07-23

    Here, cloud properties have been simulated with a new double-moment microphysics scheme under the framework of the single-column version of NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 3 (CAM3). For comparison, the same simulation was made with the standard single-moment microphysics scheme of CAM3. Results from both simulations compared favorably with observations during the Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment by the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program in terms of the temporal variation and vertical distribution of cloud fraction and cloud condensate. Major differences between the two simulations are in the magnitude and distribution of ice water content within the mixed-phase cloud during the monsoon period, though the total frozen water (snow plus ice) contents are similar. The ice mass content in the mixed-phase cloud from the new scheme is larger than that from the standard scheme, and ice water content extends 2 km further downward, which is in better agreement with observations. The dependence of the frozen water mass fraction on temperature from the new scheme is also in better agreement with available observations. Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from the simulation with the new scheme is, in general, larger than that with the standard scheme, while the surface downward longwave radiation is similar. Sensitivity tests suggest that different treatments of the ice crystal effective radius contribute significantly to the difference in the calculations of TOA OLR, in addition to cloud water path. Numerical experiments show that cloud properties in the new scheme can respond reasonably to changes in the concentration of aerosols and emphasize the importance of correctly simulating aerosol effects in climate models for aerosol-cloud interactions. Further evaluation, especially for ice cloud properties based on in-situ data, is needed.

  9. Testing ice microphysics parameterizations in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 using Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment data

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Weiguo; Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; ...

    2009-07-23

    Here, cloud properties have been simulated with a new double-moment microphysics scheme under the framework of the single-column version of NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 3 (CAM3). For comparison, the same simulation was made with the standard single-moment microphysics scheme of CAM3. Results from both simulations compared favorably with observations during the Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment by the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program in terms of the temporal variation and vertical distribution of cloud fraction and cloud condensate. Major differences between the two simulations are in the magnitude and distribution of ice water content within themore » mixed-phase cloud during the monsoon period, though the total frozen water (snow plus ice) contents are similar. The ice mass content in the mixed-phase cloud from the new scheme is larger than that from the standard scheme, and ice water content extends 2 km further downward, which is in better agreement with observations. The dependence of the frozen water mass fraction on temperature from the new scheme is also in better agreement with available observations. Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from the simulation with the new scheme is, in general, larger than that with the standard scheme, while the surface downward longwave radiation is similar. Sensitivity tests suggest that different treatments of the ice crystal effective radius contribute significantly to the difference in the calculations of TOA OLR, in addition to cloud water path. Numerical experiments show that cloud properties in the new scheme can respond reasonably to changes in the concentration of aerosols and emphasize the importance of correctly simulating aerosol effects in climate models for aerosol-cloud interactions. Further evaluation, especially for ice cloud properties based on in-situ data, is needed.« less

  10. Aerosol and cloud microphysics covariability in the northeast Pacific boundary layer estimated with ship-based and satellite remote sensing observations: NE Pacific Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Painemal, David; Chiu, J. -Y. Christine; Minnis, Patrick; ...

    2017-02-27

    We utilized ship measurements collected over the northeast Pacific along transects between the port of Los Angeles (33.7°N, 118.2°W) and Honolulu (21.3°N, 157.8°W) during May to August 2013 in order to investigate the covariability between marine low cloud microphysical and aerosol properties. Ship-based retrievals of cloud optical depth (τ) from a Sun photometer and liquid water path (LWP) from a microwave radiometer were combined to derive cloud droplet number concentration Nd and compute a cloud-aerosol interaction (ACI) metric defined as ACICCN=∂ ln(Nd)/∂ ln(CCN), with CCN denoting the cloud condensation nuclei concentration measured at 0.4% (CCN0.4) and 0.3% (CCN0.3) supersaturation. Analysismore » of CCN0.4, accumulation mode aerosol concentration (Na), and extinction coefficient (σext) indicates that Na and σext can be used as CCN0.4 proxies for estimating ACI. ACICCN derived from 10 min averaged Nd and CCN0.4 and CCN0.3, and CCN0.4 regressions using Na and σext, produce high ACICCN: near 1.0, that is, a fractional change in aerosols is associated with an equivalent fractional change in Nd. ACICCN computed in deep boundary layers was small (ACICCN=0.60), indicating that surface aerosol measurements inadequately represent the aerosol variability below clouds. Satellite cloud retrievals from MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and GOES-15 data were compared against ship-based retrievals and further analyzed to compute a satellite-based ACICCN. We found that the satellite data correlated well with their ship-based counterparts with linear correlation coefficients equal to or greater than 0.78. Combined satellite Nd and ship-based CCN0.4 and Na yielded a maximum ACICCN=0.88–0.92, a value slightly less than the ship-based ACICCN, but still consistent with aircraft-based studies in the eastern Pacific.« less

  11. Final Report: Investigations of Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Shupe, Matthew

    2016-08-18

    This project supported the principle investigator’s work on a number of studies regarding mixed-phase clouds and in various related collaborations with ARM and related scientists. This project has contributed to numerous publications and conference/meeting presentations.

  12. Physico-chemical properties of cloud drop residual and interstitial particles sampled inside hill capped clouds during a field experiment in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertes, S.; Schneider, J.; Merkel, M.; Roth, A.; Van Pinxteren, D.; Wiedensohler, A.; Herrmann, H.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction, particle activation and phase partitioning of ambient aerosol particles between the liquid and interstitial phase in continental boundary layer clouds were investigated during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia field experiment in autumn 2010 (HCCT 2010). An interstitial inlet (INT) and two counterflow virtual impactors (CVI) were operated inside cloud in order to separate and collect non-activated interstitial particles (IP) and cloud drops, respectively, on the mountain site Schmücke (938 m asl) in Central Europe. Both inlet types were designed for a separation diameter of 5 μm. Inside the CVI systems the collected drops are evaporated releasing dry cloud drop residues (CDR), which are closely related to the original cloud condensation nuclei forming the cloud. By two sets of instruments that measured the same parameter connected to each inlet type, the CDR and IP were micro-physically and chemically characterized simultaneously. Number concentration and size distribution were determined by a condensation particle counter (CPC) and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) + optical particle counter (OPC) at INT and CVI. The chemical composition of CDR and IP was inferred in various ways. The amount of black carbon in each reservoir was measured by two particle soot absorption photometers (PSAP) supplemented by a multiangle absorption photometer (MAAP) at the interstitial inlet only. The content of non-refractory chemical compounds was analyzed by a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS) and a high-resolution (HR)-ToF- AMS for the CDR and IP, respectively. Filter and adsorption cartridge samples were taken at both inlet types to determine selected inorganic and organic species. The mixing state of single cloud drop residues was derived from the aircraft-based laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometer ALABAMA. During the analyzed cloud events, the cloud microphysical parameters measured by a particle volume monitor (PVM

  13. Unified Aerosol Microphysics for NWP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    observations during an Algerian dust storm with the 12-hour forecast from COAMPS , valid at 12GMT March 3, 2013. Left: MSG visible image (black and white...nuclei in the COAMPS two-moment cloud microphysics scheme. The dust and cloud microphysical processes are fully interactive in that the cloud...and satellite data show that COAMPS has captured this event. The dust plume is accurately aligned with the observed dust event. COAMPS forecasts

  14. Particle cloud combustion in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlad, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    The prinicipal objectives of this microgravity experiment program are to obtain flame propagation rate and flame extinction limit data for several important premixed, quiescent particle cloud combustion systems under near zero-gravity conditions. The data resulting from these experiments are needed for utilization with currently available and tractable flame propagation and extinction theory. These data are also expected to provide standards for the evaluation of fire hazards in particle suspensions in both Earth-based and space-based applications. Both terrestrial and space-based fire safety criteria require the identification of the critical concentrations of particulate fuels and inerts at the flame extinction conditions.

  15. In situ exhaust cloud measurements. [particle size distribution and cloud physics of rocket exhaust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wornom, D.

    1980-01-01

    Airborne in situ exhaust cloud measurements were conducted to obtain definitions of cloud particle size range, Cl2 content, and HCl partitioning. Particle size distribution data and Cl2 measurements were made during the May, August, and September 1977 Titan launches. The measurements of three basic effluents - HCl, NO sub X, and particles - against minutes after launch are plotted. The maximum observed HCl concentration to the maximum Cl2 concentration are compared and the ratios of the Cl2 to the HCl is calculated.

  16. Cirrus Cloud Radiative and Microphysical Properties from Ground Observations and In Situ Measurements During FIRE 1991 and Their Application to Exhibit Problems in Cirrus Solar Radiative Transfer Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinne, Stefan; Akerman, T. P.; Shiobara, M.; Uchiyama, A.; Heymsfield, A. J.; Miloshevich, L.; Wendell, J.; Eloranta, E. W.; Purgold, C.; Bergstrom, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements from the FIRE 1991 cirrus cloud field experiment in the central United States are presented and analyzed. The first part focuses on cirrus microphysical properties. Aircraft 2D-probe in situ data at different cloud altitudes were evaluated for cirrus cases on four different days. Also presented are simultaneous data samples from balloonborne videosondes. Only these balloonsondes could detect the smaller crystals. Their data suggest (at least for midlatitude altitudes below 10 km) that ice crystals smaller than 15 microns in size are rare and that small ice crystals not detected by 2D-probe measurements are radiatively of minor importance, as overlooked 2D-probe crystals account for about 10% of the total extinction. The second part focuses on the link between cirrus cloud properties and radiation. With cloud macrophysical properties from surface remote sensing added to the microphysical data and additional radiation measurements at the surface, testbeds for radiative transfer models were created. To focus on scattering processes, model evaluations were limited to the solar radiative transfer by comparing calculated and measured transmissions of sunlight at the surface. Comparisons under cloud-free conditions already reveal a model bias of about +45 W/sq m for the hemispheric solar downward broadband flux. This discrepancy, which is (at least in part) difficult to explain, has to be accounted for in comparisons involving clouds. Comparisons under cirrus cloud conditions identify as the major obstacle in cirrus solar radiative transfer modeling the inability of one-dimensional radiative transfer models to account for horizontal inhomogeneities. The successful incorporation of multidimensional radiative transfer effects will depend not only on better models but critically on the ability to measure and to define characteristic inhomogeneity scales of cloud fields. The relative minor error related to the microphysical treatment is in part a reflection of

  17. Testing ice microphysics parameterizations in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 using Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment data

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weiguo; Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2009-07-23

    Cloud properties have been simulated with a new double-moment microphysics scheme under the framework of the single column version of NCAR CAM3. For comparisons, the same simulation was made with the standard single-moment microphysics scheme of CAM3. Results from both simulations were compared favorably with observations during the Tropical Warm Pool- International Cloud Experiment by US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Program in terms of the temporal variation and vertical distribution of cloud fraction and cloud condensate. Major differences between the two simulations are in the magnitude and distribution of ice water content within the mixed-phase cloud during the monsoon period, though the total frozen water (snow plus ice) content is similar. The ice mass content in the mixed-phase cloud from the new scheme is larger than that from the standard scheme, and extends 2 km further downward, which are closer to observations. The dependence of the frozen water mass fraction in total condensate on temperature from the new scheme is also closer to available observations. Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from the simulation with the new scheme is in general larger than that with the standard scheme, while the surface downward longwave radiation is similar. Sensitivity tests suggest that different treatments of the ice effective radius contribute significantly to the difference in the TOA OLR in addition to cloud water path. The deep convection process affects both TOA OLR and surface downward longwave radiation. The over-frequently-triggered deep convention process in the model is not the only mechanism for the excess middle and high level clouds. Further evaluation especially for ice cloud properties based on in-situ data is needed.

  18. Aircraft observations and model simulations of concentration and particle size distribution in the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacre, H. F.; Grant, A. L. M.; Johnson, B. T.

    2013-02-01

    The Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland emitted a cloud of ash into the atmosphere during April and May 2010. Over the UK the ash cloud was observed by the FAAM BAe-146 Atmospheric Research Aircraft which was equipped with in-situ probes measuring the concentration of volcanic ash carried by particles of varying sizes. The UK Met Office Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME) has been used to simulate the evolution of the ash cloud emitted by the Eyjafjallajökull volcano during the period 4-18 May 2010. In the NAME simulations the processes controlling the evolution of the concentration and particle size distribution include sedimentation and deposition of particles, horizontal dispersion and vertical wind shear. For travel times between 24 and 72 h, a 1/t relationship describes the evolution of the concentration at the centre of the ash cloud and the particle size distribution remains fairly constant. Although NAME does not represent the effects of microphysical processes, it can capture the observed decrease in concentration with travel time in this period. This suggests that, for this eruption, microphysical processes play a small role in determining the evolution of the distal ash cloud. Quantitative comparison with observations shows that NAME can simulate the observed column-integrated mass if around 4% of the total emitted mass is assumed to be transported as far as the UK by small particles (< 30 μm diameter). NAME can also simulate the observed particle size distribution if a distal particle size distribution that contains a large fraction of < 10 μm diameter particles is used, consistent with the idea that phraetomagmatic volcanoes, such as Eyjafjallajökull, emit very fine particles.

  19. Aircraft observations and model simulations of concentration and particle size distribution in the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacre, H. F.; Grant, A. L. M.; Johnson, B. T.

    2012-09-01

    The Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland emitted a cloud of ash into the atmosphere during April and May 2010. Over the UK the ash cloud was observed by the FAAM BAe-146 Atmospheric Research Aircraft which was equipped with in-situ probes measuring the concentration of volcanic ash carried by particles of varying sizes. The UK Met Office Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME) has been used to simulate the evolution of the ash cloud emitted by the Eyjafjallajökull volcano during the period 4-18 May 2010. In the NAME simulations the processes controlling the evolution of the concentration and particle size distribution include sedimentation and deposition of particles, horizontal dispersion and vertical wind shear. For travel times between 24 and 72 h a 1/t relationship describes the evolution of the concentration at the centre of the ash cloud and the particle size distribution remains fairly constant. Although NAME does not represent the effects of microphysical processes it can capture the observed decrease in concentration with travel time in this period. This suggests that, for this eruption, microphysical processes play a small role in determining the evolution of the distal ash cloud. Quantitative comparison with observations shows that NAME can simulate the observed column integrated mass if around 4% of the total emitted mass is assumed to be transported as far as the UK by small (<30 m diameter) particles. NAME can also simulate the observed particle size distribution if a distal particle size distribution that contains a large fraction of <10 m diameter particles is used, consistent with the idea that phraetomagmatic volcanoes, such as Eyjafjallajökull, emit very fine particles.

  20. Aerosol Mass Loading, Mixing State, Size and Number in Present Day (2000) and Future (2100): Study with the Advanced Particle Microphysics (APM) module in the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, G.; Yu, F.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols affect the global energy budget by scattering and absorbing sunlight (direct effects) and by changing the microphysical properties, lifetime, and coverage of clouds (indirect effects). One of the key challenges in quantifying the aerosol direct and indirect effects is to deep our understanding about the size distribution, size-resolved composition, and mixing state of aerosols. However, detailed information on size distribution and mixing state is often not available or incomplete in current climate models. Here, we incorporated APM into CESM. APM is a multi-type, multi-component (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, SOA, BC, OC, dust, and sea salt), size-resolved particle microphysics model. Online chemistry, up-to-date nucleation, oxidation aging of medium-volatile and semi-volatile organic gases, aerosol-cloud interaction with stratiform cloud, shallow convection cloud, and deep convection cloud are considered. The amounts of secondary species coated on primary particles, through condensation, coagulation, equilibrium uptake, and aqueous chemistry, are also tracked. Model results are compared with aerosol mass observed by IMPROVE/EMEP, vertical structure of global particle number from aircraft-based field campaigns, particle and cloud condensation nuclei number at ground-based stations, aerosol optical properties retrieved by several satellites. Model results can capture the major characteristics shown in these observations. With this model system, we find that global burdens of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, BC, OC from 2000 to 2100, under scenario RCP 4.5 where total radiative forcing is stabilized before 2100, are decreased by 44%, 50%, 43%, 40%, 40%, respectively. Dust and sea salt increase slightly. Global burdens of secondary species coated on BCOC, dust, and sea salt are deceased by 34%, 30% and 60%, respectively. Global averaged aerosol number in the lower troposphere (from surface to 3 km) is significantly decreased, especially for particles smaller than

  1. Microphysical response of cloud droplets in a fluctuating updraft. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, D. D.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of a fluctuating updraft upon a distribution of cloud droplets is examined. Computations are performed for fourteen vertical velocity patterns; each allows a closed parcel of cloud air to undergo downward as well as upward motion. Droplet solution and curvature effects are included. The classical equations for the growth rate of an individual droplet by vapor condensation relies on simplifying assumptions. Those assumptions are isolated and examined. A unique approach is presented in which all energy sources and sinks of a droplet may be considered and is termed the explicit model. It is speculated that the explicit model may enhance the growth of large droplets at greater heights. Such a model is beneficial to the studies of pollution scavenging and acid rain.

  2. Understanding the Microphysical Properties of Developing Cloud Clusters during TCS-08

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    Demetriades and Holle, 2005), have identified differences in the lightning flash rates associated with developing cloud clusters compared with non...particularly for regions where the LLDN has extremely low detection efficiency. RELATED PROJECTS None. REFERENCES Demetriades , N.W.S...Meteorology, 10-14 May 2010, Tucson AZ. Leary, L., E. A, Ritchie, N. Demetriades , and R. Holle, 2007: Using lightning data to monitor the

  3. Evaluation of Cloud Microphysics Simulated using a Meso-Scale Model Coupled with a Spectral Bin Microphysical Scheme through Comparison with Observation Data by Ship-Borne Doppler and Space-Borne W-Band Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iguchi, T.; Nakajima, T.; Khain, A. P.; Saito, K.; Takemura, T.; Okamoto, H.; Nishizawa, T.; Tao, W.-K.

    2012-01-01

    Equivalent radar reflectivity factors (Ze) measured by W-band radars are directly compared with the corresponding values calculated from a three-dimensional non-hydrostatic meso-scale model coupled with a spectral-bin-microphysical (SBM) scheme for cloud. Three case studies are the objects of this research: one targets a part of ship-borne observation using 95 GHz Doppler radar over the Pacific Ocean near Japan in May 2001; other two are aimed at two short segments of space-borne observation by the cloud profiling radar on CloudSat in November 2006. The numerical weather prediction (NWP) simulations reproduce general features of vertical structures of Ze and Doppler velocity. A main problem in the reproducibility is an overestimation of Ze in ice cloud layers. A frequency analysis shows a strong correlation between ice water contents (IWC) and Ze in the simulation; this characteristic is similar to those shown in prior on-site studies. From comparing with the empirical correlations by the prior studies, the simulated Ze is overestimated than the corresponding values in the studies at the same IWC. Whereas the comparison of Doppler velocities suggests that large-size snowflakes are necessary for producing large velocities under the freezing level and hence rules out the possibility that an overestimation of snow size causes the overestimation of Ze. Based on the results of several sensitivity tests, we conclude that the source of the overestimation is a bias in the microphysical calculation of Ze or an overestimation of IWC. To identify the source of the problems needs further validation research with other follow-up observations.

  4. Assessment of marine boundary layer cloud simulations in the CAM with CLUBB and updated microphysics scheme based on ARM observations from the Azores

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xue; Klein, S. A.; Ma, H. -Y.; Bogenschutz, P.; Gettelman, A.; Larson, V. E.

    2016-07-19

    To assess marine boundary layer (MBL) cloud simulations in three versions of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), three sets of short-term global hindcasts are performed and compared to Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) observations on Graciosa Island in the Azores from June 2009 to December 2010. Here, the three versions consist of CAM5.3 with default schemes (CAM5.3), CAM5.3 with Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB-MG1), and CAM5.3 with CLUBB and updated microphysics scheme (CLUBB-MG2). Our results show that relative to CAM5.3 default schemes, simulations with CLUBB better represent MBL cloud base height, the height of the major cloud layer, and the daily cloud cover variability. CLUBB also better simulates the relationship of cloud fraction to cloud liquid water path (LWP) most likely due to CLUBB's consistent treatment of these variables through a probability distribution function (PDF) approach. Subcloud evaporation of precipitation is substantially enhanced in simulations with CLUBB-MG2 and is more realistic based on the limited observational estimate. Despite these improvements, all model versions underestimate MBL cloud cover. CLUBB-MG2 reduces biases in in-cloud LWP (clouds are not too bright) but there are still too few of MBL clouds due to an underestimate in the frequency of overcast scenes. Thus, combining CLUBB with MG2 scheme better simulates MBL cloud processes, but because biases remain in MBL cloud cover CLUBB-MG2 does not improve the simulation of the surface shortwave cloud radiative effect (CRESW).

  5. Assessment of marine boundary layer cloud simulations in the CAM with CLUBB and updated microphysics scheme based on ARM observations from the Azores

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Xue; Klein, S. A.; Ma, H. -Y.; ...

    2016-07-19

    To assess marine boundary layer (MBL) cloud simulations in three versions of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), three sets of short-term global hindcasts are performed and compared to Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) observations on Graciosa Island in the Azores from June 2009 to December 2010. Here, the three versions consist of CAM5.3 with default schemes (CAM5.3), CAM5.3 with Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB-MG1), and CAM5.3 with CLUBB and updated microphysics scheme (CLUBB-MG2). Our results show that relative to CAM5.3 default schemes, simulations with CLUBB better represent MBL cloud base height, the height of the major cloud layer, andmore » the daily cloud cover variability. CLUBB also better simulates the relationship of cloud fraction to cloud liquid water path (LWP) most likely due to CLUBB's consistent treatment of these variables through a probability distribution function (PDF) approach. Subcloud evaporation of precipitation is substantially enhanced in simulations with CLUBB-MG2 and is more realistic based on the limited observational estimate. Despite these improvements, all model versions underestimate MBL cloud cover. CLUBB-MG2 reduces biases in in-cloud LWP (clouds are not too bright) but there are still too few of MBL clouds due to an underestimate in the frequency of overcast scenes. Thus, combining CLUBB with MG2 scheme better simulates MBL cloud processes, but because biases remain in MBL cloud cover CLUBB-MG2 does not improve the simulation of the surface shortwave cloud radiative effect (CRESW).« less

  6. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.

    2005-01-01

    Cloud microphysics are inevitable affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distributions below the clouds, Therefore, size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effect of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, rainfall production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bim microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles [i.e., pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail]. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e., 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions.

  7. The Deep Impact of Cloud Turbulence (and Microphysics) on Solar Radiation Transport: An Asymptotic Scaling Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. B.

    2007-05-01

    Clouds have a first-order role in the balance of the Earth's climate system both in the hydrological and energy (radiation) budget. Yet their representation in climate models, as well as in remote sensing retrievals of their condensed water content, is beyond simplistic: uniform plane-parallel slabs with infinite horizontal extent, irrespective of the scale of computational or observation resolution. At best, a nominal cloud fraction is used to account for unresolved variability, and sometimes 1-point cloud optical depth variability is accounted for; very rarely are spatial correlations even considered. Notwithstanding, the turbulence of Earth's cloudy atmosphere exhibits even to the most casual observer spatial correlations across broad ranges of scales, and these can often be quantified by power-law scaling relations (viz. wavenumber spectra typically in 1/k5/3). A straightforward corollary of such scaling is stochastic continuity (almost everywhere) of the cloud field, as sampled in situ by aircraft as well as remotely with air- and space-borne remote sensing instruments. I will show that, as long as the scaling range contains the scales that matter optically (most importantly, the photon mean- free-path), this quasi-universal behavior has nontrivial consequences for the mean flow of radiation in the cloudy atmosphere. Indeed, the basic propagation kernel in integral radiative transfer equation is no longer exponential but, given the nature of the observed variability, a step distribution with a power-law tail. From there, new scaling laws follow for domain-average radiation properties at wavelengths dominated by multiple scattering using (1) Lévy's generalizations of the central limit theorem to infinite variance steps, (2) the Sparre-Anderson/Frisch law for first passages of random walks in a half-space, and (3) an ansatz that accounts for the finite thickness of the cloudy atmosphere. Recent observations of solar photon path length statistics using O2

  8. Radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds as probes of shock microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barniol Duran, Rodolfo; Whitehead, Joseph F.; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2016-10-01

    A large number of supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy and galaxies nearby have been resolved in various radio bands. This radio emission is thought to be produced via synchrotron emission from electrons accelerated by the shock that the supernova ejecta drives into the external medium. Here we consider the sample of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds. Given the size and radio flux of an SNR, we seek to constrain the fraction of shocked fluid energy in non-thermal electrons (ɛe) and magnetic field (ɛB), and find ɛeɛB ˜ 10-3. These estimates do not depend on the largely uncertain values of the external density and the age of the SNR. We develop a Monte Carlo scheme that reproduces the observed distribution of radio fluxes and sizes of the population of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds. This simple model provides a framework that could potentially be applied to other galaxies with complete radio SNRs samples.

  9. Additional development of remote sensing techniques for observing morphology, microphysics, and radiative properties of clouds and tests using a new, robust CO{sub 2} lidar. Annual progress report, August 15, 1994--August 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, W.L.; Intrieri, J.M.; Brewer, W.A.

    1996-04-01

    The bulk morphology and microphysical characteristics of a cloud are both important in determining the cloud`s effect on radiative transfer. A better understanding of all these properties, and the links among them, are needed for developing adequate parameterizations of these components in climate models. The objective of this project is to develop remote sensing techniques for observing key cloud properties, including the linkages. The research has technique development and instrument development prongs.

  10. Raman lidar observations of a Saharan dust outbreak event: Characterization of the dust optical properties and determination of particle size and microphysical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Summa, Donato; Bhawar, Rohini; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Cacciani, Marco; Veselovskii, Igor; Dubovik, Oleg; Kolgotin, Alexey

    2012-04-01

    The Raman lidar system BASIL was operational in Achern (Black Forest) between 25 May and 30 August 2007 in the framework of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS). The system performed continuous measurements over a period of approx. 36 h from 06:22 UTC on 1 August to 18:28 UTC on 2 August 2007, capturing the signature of a severe Saharan dust outbreak episode. The data clearly reveal the presence of two almost separate aerosol layers: a lower layer located between 1.5 and 3.5 km above ground level (a.g.l.) and an upper layer extending between 3.0 and 6.0 km a.g.l. The time evolution of the dust cloud is illustrated and discussed in the paper in terms of several optical parameters (particle backscatter ratio at 532 and 1064 nm, the colour ratio and the backscatter Angström parameter). An inversion algorithm was used to retrieve particle size and microphysical parameters, i.e., mean and effective radius, number, surface area, volume concentration, and complex refractive index, as well as the parameters of a bimodal particle size distribution (PSD), from the multi-wavelength lidar data of particle backscattering, extinction and depolarization. The retrieval scheme employs Tikhonov's inversion with regularization and makes use of kernel functions for randomly oriented spheroids. Size and microphysical parameters of dust particles are estimated as a function of altitude at different times during the dust outbreak event. Retrieval results reveal the presence of a fine mode with radii of 0.1-0.2 μm and a coarse mode with radii of 3-5 μm both in the lower and upper dust layers, and the dominance in the upper dust layer of a coarse mode with radii of 4-5 μm. Effective radius varies with altitude in the range 0.1-1.5 μm, while volume concentration is found to not exceed 92 μm3 cm-3. The real and imaginary part of the complex refractive index vary in the range 1.4-1.6 and 0.004-0.008, respectively.

  11. On the Sensitivity of Atmospheric Ensembles to Cloud Microphysics in Long-Term Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Xiping; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen; Hou, Arthur Y.; Zhang, Minghua; Simpson, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Month-long large-scale forcing data from two field campaigns are used to drive a cloud-resolving model (CRM) and produce ensemble simulations of clouds and precipitation. Observational data are then used to evaluate the model results. To improve the model results, a new parameterization of the Bergeron process is proposed that incorporates the number concentration of ice nuclei (IN). Numerical simulations reveal that atmospheric ensembles are sensitive to IN concentration and ice crystal multiplication. Two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) simulations are carried out to address the sensitivity of atmospheric ensembles to model dimensionality. It is found that the ensembles with high IN concentration are more sensitive to dimensionality than those with low IN concentration. Both the analytic solutions of linear dry models and the CRM output show that there are more convective cores with stronger updrafts in 3D simulations than in 2D, which explains the differing sensitivity of the ensembles to dimensionality at different IN concentrations.

  12. Ice cloud microphysics study from combined active and passive radiometric observations in visible and thermal infrared domains during FRENCH-DIRAC campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bécu, L.; Brogniez, G.; Parol, F.; Pelon, J.; Gayet, J. F.; Auriol, F.; Balois, J. Y.; Verwearde, C.; Damiri, B.

    2003-04-01

    Radiative properties of cirrus clouds in relation to their microphysical characteristics were studied during the airborne FRENCH-DIRAC campaign. It was held in September/October 2001 in south western France and over the Mediterranean sea. During this campaign, two aircrafts were involved. A TBM 700 aircraft devoted to insitu measurements has carried out a 2D-C probe and a nephelometer sensor. A Mystere 20 aircraft devoted to remote sensing measurements has carried out a backscatter lidar with polarisation capability (LEANDRE), a three channel infrared radiometer (CLIMAT), an imaging polarisation radiometer (POLDER) operating in the shortwave domain, and a visible-near infrared polarimeter (MINIMIR). As an example, we particularly focus this presentation on the synergy between LEANDRE, CLIMAT, and POLDER instruments in order to analyse radiative parameters and microphysical characteristics of an evidenced mixed phase cloud with a transition between liquid and solid phase of water at one km-scale. We show how the combined lidar and radiometry measurements are complementing each others to characterise such a complex cloud structure and better retrieve cloud properties.

  13. Influence of Solar Wind on the Global Electric Circuit, and Inferred Effects on Cloud Microphysics, Temperature, and Dynamics in the Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, Brian A.

    2000-11-01

    There are at least three independent ways in which the solar wind modulates the flow of current density (Jz) in the global electric circuit. These are (A) changes in the galactic cosmic ray energy spectrum, (B) changes in the precipitation of relativistic electrons from the magnetosphere, and (C) changes in the ionospheric potential distribution in the polar caps due to magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The current density J_z flows between the ionosphere and the surface, and as it passes through conductivity gradients it generates space charge concentrations dependent on J_z and the conductivity gradient. The gradients are large at the surfaces of clouds and space charge concentrations of order 1000 to 10,000 elementary charges per cm^3 can be generated at cloud tops. The charge transfers to droplets, many of which are evaporating at the cloud-clear air interface. The charge remains on the residual evaporation nuclei with a lifetime against leakage of order 1000 sec, and for a longer period the nuclei also retain coatings of sulfate and organic compounds adsorbed by the droplet while in the cloud. The charged evaporation nuclei become well mixed with more droplets in many types of clouds with penetrative mixing. The processes of entrainment and evaporation are also efficient for these clouds. The collection of such nuclei by nearby droplets is greatly increased by the electrical attraction between the charge on the particle and the image charge that it creates on the droplet. This process is called electroscavenging. Because the charge on the evaporation nuclei is derived from the original space charge, it depends on J_z, giving a rate of electroscavenging responsive to the solar wind inputs. There may be a number of ways in which the electroscavenging has consequences for weather and climate. One possibility is enhanced production of ice. The charged evaporation nuclei have been found to be good ice forming nuclei because of their coatings, and so in supercooled

  14. The structure of particle cloud premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, K.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a numerical and asymptotic description of the structure of planar laminar flames, propagating in a medium containing a uniform cloud of fuel-particles premixed with air. Attention is restricted here to systems where the fuel-particles first vaporize to form a known gaseous fuel, which is then oxidized in the gas-phase. This program is supported for the period September 14, 1991 to September 13, 1992. Some results of the study is shown in Ref. 1. The work summarized in Ref. 1 was initiated prior to September 14, 1991 and was completed on February 1992. Research performed in addition to that described in Ref. 1 in collaboration with Professor A. Linan, is summarized here.

  15. Performance of the Goddard Multiscale Modeling Framework with Goddard Ice Microphysical Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, J. D.; Tao, W. K.; Lang, S. E.; Matsui, T.; Li, J. L. F.; Mohr, K. I.

    2015-12-01

    The multiscale modeling framework (MMF), which replaces traditional cloud parameterizations with cloud-resolving models (CRMs) within a host atmospheric general circulation model (GCM), has become a new approach for climate modeling. The embedded CRMs make it possible to apply CRM-based cloud microphysics directly within a GCM. However, most such schemes have never been tested in a global environment for long-term climate simulation. The benefits of using an MMF to evaluate rigorously and improve microphysics schemes are here demonstrated. Four one-moment microphysical schemes are implemented into the Goddard MMF and their results validated against three CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud ice products, CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud fractions, and other satellite data. The new four-class (cloud ice, snow, graupel, and frozen drops/hail) ice scheme produces a better overall spatial distribution of cloud ice amount and total cloud radiative forcing than earlier three-class ice schemes, with biases within the observational uncertainties. Sensitivity experiments are conducted to examine the impact of recently upgraded microphysical processes on global hydrometeor distributions. Five processes dominate the global distributions of cloud ice and snow amount in long-term simulations: (1) allowing for ice supersaturation in the saturation adjustment, (2) three additional correction terms in the depositional growth of cloud ice to snow, (3) accounting for cloud ice fall speeds, (4) limiting cloud ice particle size, and (5) new size-mapping schemes for snow/graupel as functions of temperature and mixing ratio. Despite the cloud microphysics improvements, systematic errors associated with sub-grid processes and cyclic lateral boundaries in the embedded CRMs remain and will require future improvement.

  16. Multiparameter radar and aircraft based studies of microphysical, kinematic, and electrical structure of convective clouds during CaPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringi, V. N.

    1994-03-01

    Two storms from the 9 August, 1991 CaPE case were analyzed in-depth focusing on multiparameter radar signature evolution over 60 min. in coordination with 24 aircraft penetrations which provided particle image and electric field data together with vertical air motion, cloud water and other state parameters. A total of five discrete 'cells' were identified in the two storms and their life cycle fully documented. Collaboration with South Dakota School of Mines and University of Alabama at Huntsville has resulted in a full integration of aircraft image and field mill data (from SDSM&T T-28 aircraft) with vertical air motion from dual-Doppler wind synthesis (UAH). The cellular evolution starts with a warm rain phase where updrafts and a very low concentration of large drops dominate the cloud. As the supercooled drops rise in the updraft they freeze and acquire a water-coat possibly by collisions with other liquid drops. The multi-parameter radar signatures clearly identify this mixed-phase zone. The cloud thereafter gets electrified which may intensify to produce lightning depending on cloud vertical growth, and generation of updraft/ downdrafts.

  17. Collaborative Research: The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Kerry Emanuel; Michael J. Iacono

    2011-06-28

    Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to an accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR climate model. To better understand and eventually better represent these processes, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, intra-seasonal oscillations and the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. The effect of the MIT and AER physics also has been tested in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 (hereinafter STD) and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics (hereinafter MOD) are still unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of the intra-seasonal oscillations (ISOs). The new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor relative to satellite measurements.

  18. A modeling study of the response of tropical deep convection to the increase of cloud condensation nuclei concentration: 1. Dynamics and microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chien

    2005-11-01

    The responses of cloud physical processes of a developing tropical deep convection to the increase of CCN concentration have been studied using a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model. Three sets of model simulations, each consisting of 30 runs initialized using a set of 30 different CCN profiles with maximum concentrations ranging from 50 to 6000/cm3, have been carried out. The finding of this study that cloud droplet number concentration increases while cloud droplet size decreases with aerosol concentration is similar to the previous results mainly revealed in studies of stratiform clouds. However, the responses to increasing aerosol concentration of many other cloud properties illustrated in this study, particularly precipitation, are very different from those found or suggested in studies of stratiform clouds. Increasing CCN concentration causes a stronger convection, added mass of condensed water, and enhanced microphysical conversions, all leading to the increase in precipitation as well as the expansion of the cloud coverage. Interestingly, when initial CCN concentration exceeds a certain level, many of the above effects become insignificant, suggesting a relationship between some cloud properties and the logarithm of CCN concentration and further implying that a more substantial aerosol effect on deep convection could be seen over a clean rather than polluted region. Overall speaking, increasing CCN concentration does not significantly affect the precipitation efficiency. The increase with CCN concentration of upward flux of water vapor entering the cloud thus leads to an enhancement in moistening the free troposphere brought by the modeled cloud, besides adding more precipitation to the ground.

  19. Impact of uncertainties in parameterized cloud-microphysical processes on the simulated development of an idealized 2-D squall line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Sara; Bao, Jian-Wen; Grell, Evelyn

    2016-04-01

    In this study, numerical model simulations of an idealized 2-D squall line are investigated using microphysics budget analysis. Four commonly-used microphysics schemes of various complexity are used in the simulations. Diagnoses of the source and sink terms of the hydrometeor budget equations reveal that the differences related to the assumptions of hydrometeor size-distributions between the schemes lead to the differences in the simulations due to the net effect of various microphysical processes on the interaction between latent heating/evaporative cooling and flow dynamics as the squall line develops. Results from this study also highlight the possibility that the advantage of double-moment formulations can be overshadowed by the uncertainties in the spectral definition of individual hydrometeor categories and spectrum-dependent microphysical processes.

  20. Unified Aerosol Microphysics for NWP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    prediction is now integrated, for example, with the COAMPS two- moment cloud microphysics scheme where it serves as a source of cloud droplet nuclei. The dust ...behavior. To evaluate the new handling of aerosol dust and its interaction with COAMPS microphysics, an operational test case has been developed...Sahara Air Layer (SAL) and Hurricane Nadine off of West Africa. Dust is seen wrapping around the north side of the storm on Sep 11 in Figure 2. We

  1. Acid rain: Microphysical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingle, A. N.

    1980-01-01

    A microphysical model was used to simulate the case of a ground cloud without dilution by entrainment and without precipitation. The numerical integration techniques of the model are presented. The droplet size spectra versus time and the droplet molalities for each value of time are discussed.

  2. The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Emanuel, Kerry; Iacono, Michael J.

    2010-11-11

    Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to the accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). To better understand and eventually better represent these processes in this major national climate model, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global climate models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, on intra-seasonal oscillations and on the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. In addition, the MIT and AER physics packages have been incorporated and tested in combination within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model for the purpose of evaluating and improving convective and radiative processes on time scales appropriate to weather simulations. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics are unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of dynamical intra-seasonal oscillations such as the Madden-Julian Oscillation. In addition, it has been shown that the new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor in CAM as established through the comparison of modeled and observed satellite radiances. This suggests that continuing regional discrepancies in water vapor amounts in the climate model may not be solely related to convective or radiative processes. The major

  3. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.; Johnson, D.; Remer, L.

    2004-01-01

    Cloud microphysics is inevitably affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distributions below the clouds. Therefore, size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effects of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, rainfall production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, two detailed spectral-bin microphysical schemes were implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensembel (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles [i.e. pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail]. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e. 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and in the mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "c1ean"concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. In addition, differences and similarities between bulk microphysics and spectral-bin microphysical schemes will be examined and discussed.

  4. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.; Johnson, D.; Remer, L.

    2004-01-01

    Cloud microphysics is inevitably affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distributions below the clouds. Therefore, size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effects of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, r d a U production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, two detailed spectral-bin microphysical schemes were implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensembe1 (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles [i.e. pristine ice crystals (columnar and platelike), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail]. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e. 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and in the mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "c1ean"concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. In addition, differences and similarities between bulk microphysics and spectral-bin microphysical schemes will be examined and discussed.

  5. Performance of the Goddard Multiscale Modeling Framework with Goddard Ice Microphysical Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, Jiun-Dar; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Matsui, Toshihisa; Li, J.-L.; Mohr, Karen I.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail M.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2016-01-01

    The multiscale modeling framework (MMF), which replaces traditional cloud parameterizations with cloud-resolving models (CRMs) within a host atmospheric general circulation model (GCM), has become a new approach for climate modeling. The embedded CRMs make it possible to apply CRM-based cloud microphysics directly within a GCM. However, most such schemes have never been tested in a global environment for long-term climate simulation. The benefits of using an MMF to evaluate rigorously and improve microphysics schemes are here demonstrated. Four one-moment microphysical schemes are implemented into the Goddard MMF and their results validated against three CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud ice products and other satellite data. The new four-class (cloud ice, snow, graupel, and frozen drops/hail) ice scheme produces a better overall spatial distribution of cloud ice amount, total cloud fractions, net radiation, and total cloud radiative forcing than earlier three-class ice schemes, with biases within the observational uncertainties. Sensitivity experiments are conducted to examine the impact of recently upgraded microphysical processes on global hydrometeor distributions. Five processes dominate the global distributions of cloud ice and snow amount in long-term simulations: (1) allowing for ice supersaturation in the saturation adjustment, (2) three additional correction terms in the depositional growth of cloud ice to snow, (3) accounting for cloud ice fall speeds, (4) limiting cloud ice particle size, and (5) new size-mapping schemes for snow and graupel. Despite the cloud microphysics improvements, systematic errors associated with subgrid processes, cyclic lateral boundaries in the embedded CRMs, and momentum transport remain and will require future improvement.

  6. Performance of the Goddard multiscale modeling framework with Goddard ice microphysical schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jiun-Dar; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Matsui, Toshihisa; Li, J.-L. F.; Mohr, Karen I.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail M.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2016-03-01

    The multiscale modeling framework (MMF), which replaces traditional cloud parameterizations with cloud-resolving models (CRMs) within a host atmospheric general circulation model (GCM), has become a new approach for climate modeling. The embedded CRMs make it possible to apply CRM-based cloud microphysics directly within a GCM. However, most such schemes have never been tested in a global environment for long-term climate simulation. The benefits of using an MMF to evaluate rigorously and improve microphysics schemes are here demonstrated. Four one-moment microphysical schemes are implemented into the Goddard MMF and their results validated against three CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud ice products and other satellite data. The new four-class (cloud ice, snow, graupel, and frozen drops/hail) ice scheme produces a better overall spatial distribution of cloud ice amount, total cloud fractions, net radiation, and total cloud radiative forcing than earlier three-class ice schemes, with biases within the observational uncertainties. Sensitivity experiments are conducted to examine the impact of recently upgraded microphysical processes on global hydrometeor distributions. Five processes dominate the global distributions of cloud ice and snow amount in long-term simulations: (1) allowing for ice supersaturation in the saturation adjustment, (2) three additional correction terms in the depositional growth of cloud ice to snow, (3) accounting for cloud ice fall speeds, (4) limiting cloud ice particle size, and (5) new size-mapping schemes for snow and graupel. Despite the cloud microphysics improvements, systematic errors associated with subgrid processes, cyclic lateral boundaries in the embedded CRMs, and momentum transport remain and will require future improvement.

  7. Analysis of TRMM Microphysical Measurements: Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    SPEC Incorporated participated in three of the four TRMM field campaigns (TEFLUN-A, TEFLUN-B and KWAJEX), installing and operating a cloud particle imager (CPI) and a high volume precipitation spectrometer (HVPS) on the SPEC Learjet in TEFLUN-A, the University of North Dakota Citation in TEFLUN-B and KWAJEX, and a CPI on the NASA DC-8 in KWAJEX. This report presents and discusses new software tools and algorithms that were developed to analyze microphysical data collected during these field campaigns, as well as scientific interpretations of the data themselves. Software algorithms were developed to improve the analysis of microphysical measurements collected by the TRMM aircraft during the field campaigns. Particular attention was paid to developing and/or improving algorithms used to compute particle size distributions and ice water content. Software was also developed in support of production of the TRMM Common Microphysical Product (CMP) data files. CMP data files for TEFLUN-A field campaign were produced and submitted to the DAAC. Typical microphysical properties of convective and stratiform regions from TEFLUN-A and KWAJEX clouds were produced. In general, it was found that in the upper cloud region near -20 to -25 C, stratiform clouds contain very high (greater than 1 per cubic centimeter) concentrations of small ice particles, which are suspected to be a residual from homogeneous freezing and sedimentation of small drops in a convective updraft. In the upper cloud region near -20 to -25 C, convective clouds contain aggregates, which are not found lower in the cloud. Stratiform clouds contain aggregates at all levels, with the majority in the lowest levels. Convective cloud regions contain much higher LWC and drop concentrations than stratiform regions at all levels, and higher LWC in the middle and upper regions. Stratiform clouds contain higher IWC than convective clouds only at the lowest level. Irregular shaped ice particles are found in very high

  8. Measurement of Aerosol and Cloud Particles with PACS and HARP Hyperangular Imaging Polarimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J.; Fernandez-Borda, R.; Remer, L. A.; Sparr, L.; Buczkowski, S.; Munchak, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    PACS is new hyper-angular imaging polarimeter for aeorosol and cloud measurerents designed to meet the requirements of the proposed ACE decadal survey mission. The full PACS system consists of three wide field of view (110deg cross track) telescopes covering the UV, VNIR, and SWIR spectral ranges with angular coverage between +55 deg forward to -55deg backwards. The angular density can be selected to cover up to 100 different viewing angles at selected wavelengths. PACS_VNIR is a prototype airborne instrument designed to demonstrate PACS capability by deploying just one of the three wavelength modules of the full PACS. With wavelengths at 470, 550, 675, 760 and 875nm, PACS_VNIR flew for the first time during the PODEX experiment in January/February 2013 aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. PACS SWIR (1.64, 1.88, 2.1, and 2.25um) is currently under construction and should be operational in the lab by Fall/2013. PACS_ UV has been fully designed, but is not yet under construction. During the PODEX flights PACS_VNIR collected data for aerosol and clouds over variable surface types including, water, vegetation, urban areas, and snow. The data is currently being calibrated, geolocated and prepared for the inversion of geophysical parameters including water cloud size distribution and aerosol microphysical parameters. The large density of angles in PACS allows for the characterization of cloudbow features in relatively high spatial resolution in a pixel to pixel basis. This avoids the need for assumptions of cloud homogeneity over any distance. The hyperangle capability also allows detailed observation of cloud ice particles, surface characterization, and optimum selection of the number of angles desired for aerosol retrievals. The aerosol and cloud retrieval algorithms under development for the retrieval of particle microphysical properties from the PACS data will be discussed in this presentation. As an extension of the PACS concept we are currently developing the HARP (Hyper

  9. Liquid and Ice Cloud Microphysics in the CSU General Circulation Model. Part II: Impact on Cloudiness, the Earth's Radiation Budget, and the General Circulation of the Atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Laura D.; Randall, David A.

    1996-03-01

    A prognostic equation for the mass of condensate associated with large-scale cloudiness introduces a direct coupling between the atmospheric moisture budget and the radiation budget through interactive cloud amounts and cloud optical properties. We have compared the cloudiness, the top-of-the-atmosphere and surface radiation budgets, the radiative forcing of clouds, and the atmospheric general circulation simulated with the Colorado State University general circulation model with and without such a prognostic cloud parameterization. In the EAULIQ run, the radiative effects of cloud water, cloud ice, and snow are considered; those of rain are omitted. The cloud optical depth and cloud infrared emissivity depend on the cloud water, cloud ice, and snow paths predicted by a bulk cloud microphysics parameterization. In the CONTROL run, a conventional large-scale condensation scheme is used. Cloud optical properties depend on the mean cloud temperatures. Results are presented in terms of January and July means.Comparisons with data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment show that EAULIQ yields improved simulations of the geographical distributions of the simulated cloudiness, the top-of-the-atmosphere radiation budget, and the longwave and shortwave cloud radiative forcings. Differences between EAULIQ and CONTROL are largest in the Tropics and are mostly due to a decrease, in the EAULIQ run, in the amount and optical thickness of upper-tropospheric clouds. In particular, the cold bias in the outgoing longwave radiation and the overestimation of the planetary albedo obtained in the CONTROL run over the tropical convective regions are substantially reduced. Differences in the radiative and latent heating rates between EAULIQ and CONTROL lead to some improvements in the atmospheric general circulation simulated by EAULIQ when compared against statistics on the observed circulation assembled by the European Centre

  10. Why do particle clouds generate electric charges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pähtz, T.; Herrmann, H. J.; Shinbrot, T.

    2010-05-01

    Grains in desert sandstorms spontaneously generate strong electrical charges; likewise volcanic dust plumes produce spectacular lightning displays. Charged particle clouds also cause devastating explosions in food, drug and coal processing industries. Despite the wide-ranging importance of granular charging in both nature and industry, even the simplest aspects of its causes remain elusive, because it is difficult to understand how inert grains in contact with little more than other inert grains can generate the large charges observed. Here, we present a simple yet predictive explanation for the charging of granular materials in collisional flows. We argue from very basic considerations that charge transfer can be expected in collisions of identical dielectric grains in the presence of an electric field, and we confirm the model's predictions using discrete-element simulations and a tabletop granular experiment.

  11. Individual aerosol particles in ambient and updraft conditions below convective cloud bases in the Oman mountain region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeniuk, T. A.; Bruintjes, R. T.; Salazar, V.; Breed, D. W.; Jensen, T. L.; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-03-01

    An airborne study of cloud microphysics provided an opportunity to collect aerosol particles in ambient and updraft conditions of natural convection systems for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Particles were collected simultaneously on lacey carbon and calcium-coated carbon (Ca-C) TEM grids, providing information on particle morphology and chemistry and a unique record of the particle's physical state on impact. In total, 22 particle categories were identified, including single, coated, aggregate, and droplet types. The fine fraction comprised up to 90% mixed cation sulfate (MCS) droplets, while the coarse fraction comprised up to 80% mineral-containing aggregates. Insoluble (dry), partially soluble (wet), and fully soluble particles (droplets) were recorded on Ca-C grids. Dry particles were typically silicate grains; wet particles were mineral aggregates with chloride, nitrate, or sulfate components; and droplets were mainly aqueous NaCl and MCS. Higher numbers of droplets were present in updrafts (80% relative humidity (RH)) compared with ambient conditions (60% RH), and almost all particles activated at cloud base (100% RH). Greatest changes in size and shape were observed in NaCl-containing aggregates (>0.3 µm diameter) along updraft trajectories. Their abundance was associated with high numbers of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and cloud droplets, as well as large droplet sizes in updrafts. Thus, compositional dependence was observed in activation behavior recorded for coarse and fine fractions. Soluble salts from local pollution and natural sources clearly affected aerosol-cloud interactions, enhancing the spectrum of particles forming CCN and by forming giant CCN from aggregates, thus, making cloud seeding with hygroscopic flares ineffective in this region.

  12. The role of organic compounds in cloud formation: Relative importance of entrainment, co-condensation and particle-phase properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Samuel; Partridge, Daniel; Topping, David; Riipinen, Ilona

    2016-04-01

    The organic fraction of atmospheric aerosols is widely acknowledged to affect the cloud nucleating potential of aerosols. Cloud droplet formation through activation of non-volatile CCN is considered to be relatively well understood, however, there are fewer systematic studies on the activation of aerosols containing semi-volatile organic compounds that co-condense alongside water vapour, thus enhancing CCN activity. Although the significance of co-condensation of organic vapours for cloud droplet number concentration predictions has recently been identified, it remains uncertain how this process may interact with atmospheric dynamics. In addition to co-condensation of existing in-cloud material, additional semi-volatile mass can be entrained from the surrounding environment. Reduced cloud droplet number concentrations are expected as the parcel is diluted with clean air; however, additional soluble mass in the particle phase promotes droplet activation. The extent of increased droplet activation due to co-condensation relies also on the physiochemical properties of the organic compounds, as seen in several other phase partitioning sensitivity studies. In this work we study the simultaneous impact of entrainment and co-condensation, the relative importance of these two processes at different atmospheric conditions, their interactions with each other, and the particle-phase chemistry in terms of cloud microphysical properties and their parametric sensitivities. To assess the importance of the entrainment of semi-volatile materials as compared with their co-condensation and chemical properties, a pseudo-adiabatic cloud parcel model with a detailed description of bin microphysics is employed. We have added the co-condensation process to the model such that it is coupled with the parametric entrainment representation. The effects of entrainment and co-condensation are benchmarked independently and simultaneously against a control simulation. Furthermore, we probe the

  13. Modelling cloud processing of gases and particles in urban-industrial plumes: Comparison of several meso-scale aerosol forecasting models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, W.; Zhang, J.; Kim, S.; Leriche, M.; Frost, G. J.; Grell, G. A.; Mari, C.; McKeen, S. A.; Pinty, J.; Pierre, T.; MacDonald, A.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2010-12-01

    Clouds play an active role in the processing and cycling of chemicals in the atmosphere. Particularly, it is known that a large portion of the atmospheric particulate sulphate, which contributes to a significant fraction of the total PM mass, is produced in cloud via aqueous-phase oxidation. As a result, most of the current aerosol forecast models do include the representation of in-cloud oxidation. On the other hand, the modelling of cloud processing of gases and aerosols and its evaluation are challenging. Past studies have shown that the modeled cloud processing of gases and aerosols depends critically on the predicted cloud microphysics fields. Furthermore, observations suited for evaluating cloud chemistry in models are extremely limited, and there is also the issue with scale disparity (both temporal and spatial) between the model resolution and the observation. This study examines model simulations from three different regional/meso-scale aerosol models, WRF-CHEM (NOAA/ESRL), MESO-NHC (LA/CNRS), and AURAMS (EC), with a focus on cloud processing of urban-industrial plumes. The study case is based on airborne measurements from two flights during the ICARTT field campaign in summer 2004, when the National Research Council of Canada Convair 580 sampled in and below stratocumulus downwind of Chicago along each of the 84°W and 86°W meridians between 40.5 and 42.6°N. The Chicago urban plume was encountered along both meridians, and the observations indicate cloud processing. Model simulations of cloud microphysics, trace gases and aerosol particle concentrations are compared with aircraft observations. Uncertainties in model predicted gases and aerosol concentrations due to model resolution, microphysics and aqueous-phase chemistry parameterization will be assessed.

  14. Impact of cloud microphysics and cumulus parameterization on simulation of heavy rainfall event during 7-9 October 2007 over Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahbub Alam, M.

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) version 3.2.1 has been used to simulate the heavy rainfall event that occurred between 7 and 9 October 2007 in the southern part of Bangladesh. Weather Research and Forecast (WRF-ARW version) modelling system with six different microphysics (MP) schemes and two different cumulus parameterization (CP) schemes in a nested configuration was chosen for simulating the event. The model domains consist of outer and inner domains having 9 and 3 km horizontal resolution, respectively with 28 vertical sigma levels. The impacts of cloud microphysical processes by means of precipitation, wind and reflectivity, kinematic and thermodynamic characteristics of the event have been studied. Sensitivity experiments have been conducted with the WRF model to test the impact of microphysical and cumulus parameterization schemes in capturing the extreme weather event. NCEP FNL data were used for the initial and boundary condition. The model ran for 72 h using initial data at 0000 UTC of 7 October 2007. The simulated rainfall shows that WSM6-KF combination gives better results for all combinations and after that Lin-KF combination. WSM3-KF has simulated, less area average rainfall out of all MP schemes that were coupled with KF scheme. The sharp peak of relative humidity up to 300 hPa has been simulated along the vertical line where maximum updraft has been found for all MPs coupled with KF and BMJ schemes. The simulated rain water and cloud water mixing ratio were maximum at the position where the vertical velocity and reflectivity has also been maximum. The production of rain water mixing ratio depends on MP schemes as well as CP schemes. Rainfall depends on rain water mixing ratio between 950 and 500 hPa. Rain water mixing ratio above 500 hPa level has no effect on surface rain.

  15. Analysis of In situ Observations of Cloud Microphysics from M-PACE Final Report, DOE Grant Agreement No. DE-FG02-06ER64168

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Poellot

    2009-01-09

    This report summarizes the findings and accomplishments of work performed under DOE Grant Agreement No. DE-FG02-06ER64168. The focus of the work was the analysis of in situ observations collected by the University of North Dakota Citation research aircraft during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE). This project was conducted in 2004 along the North Slope of Alaska. The objectives of the research were: to characterize certain microphysical properties of clouds sampled during M-PACE, including spatial variability, precipitation formation, ice multiplication; to examine instrument performance and certain data processing algorithms; and to collaborate with other M-PACE investigators on case study analyses. A summary of the findings of the first two objectives is given here in parts 1 and 2; full results are contained in reports listed in part 3 of this report. The collaborative efforts are described in the publications listed in part 3.

  16. Microphysics of Clouds with the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert Scheme (McRAS). Part II: Implementation and Performance in GEOS II GCM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    1999-09-01

    A prognostic cloud scheme named the Microphysics of Clouds with the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert Scheme (McRAS) and the Simple Biosphere Model have been implemented in a version of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) II GCM at a 4° latitude × 5° longitude × 20 sigma-layer resolution. The McRAS GCM was integrated for 50 months. The integration was initialized with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis of observations for 1 January 1987 and was forced with the observed sea surface temperatures and sea-ice distribution; on land, the permanent ice and vegetation properties (biomes and soils) were climatological, while the soil moisture and snow cover were prognostic. The simulation shows that the McRAS GCM yields realistic structures of in-cloud water and ice, and cloud-radiative forcing (CRF) even though the cloudiness has some discernible systematic errors. The simulated intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) has a realistic time mean structure and seasonal cycle. The simulated CRF is sensitive to vertical distribution of cloud water, which can be affected hugely with the choice of minimum in-cloud water for the onset of autoconversion or critical cloud water amount that regulates the autoconversion itself. The generation of prognostic cloud water is accompanied by reduced global precipitation and interactive CRF. These feedbacks have a profound effect on the ITCZ. Even though somewhat weaker than observed, the McRAS GCM simulation produces robust 30-60-day oscillations in the 200-hPa velocity potential. Comparisons of CRFs and precipitation produced in a parallel simulation with the GEOS II GCM are included.Several seasonal simulations were performed with the McRAS-GEOS II GCM for the summer (June-July-August) and winter (December-January-February) periods to determine how the simulated clouds and CRFs would be affected by (i) advection of clouds, (ii) cloud-top entrainment instability, (iii) cloud water inhomogeneity correction, and

  17. Interactions of mineral dust with pollution and clouds: An individual-particle TEM study of atmospheric aerosol from Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pósfai, Mihály; Axisa, Duncan; Tompa, Éva; Freney, Evelyn; Bruintjes, Roelof; Buseck, Peter R.

    2013-03-01

    Aerosol particles from desert dust interact with clouds and influence climate on regional and global scales. The Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) aerosol campaign was initiated to study the effects of dust particles on cloud droplet nucleation and cloud properties. Here we report the results of individual-particle studies of samples that were collected from an aircraft in April 2007. We used analytical transmission electron microscopy, including energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, electron diffraction, and imaging techniques for the morphological, chemical, and structural characterization of the particles. Dust storms and regional background conditions were encountered during four days of sampling. Under dusty conditions, the coarse (supermicrometer) fraction resembles freshly crushed rock. The particles are almost exclusively mineral dust grains and include common rock-forming minerals, among which clay minerals, particularly smectites, are most abundant. Unaltered calcite grains also occur, indicating no significant atmospheric processing. The particles have no visible coatings but some contain traces of sulfur. The fine (submicrometer) fraction is dominated by particles of anthropogenic origin, primarily ammonium sulfate (with variable organic coating and some with soot inclusions) and combustion-derived particles (mostly soot). In addition, submicrometer, iron-bearing clay particles also occur, many of which are internally mixed with ammonium sulfate, soot, or both. We studied the relationships between the properties of the aerosol and the droplet microphysics of cumulus clouds that formed above the aerosol layer. Under dusty conditions, when a large concentration of coarse-fraction mineral particles was in the aerosol, cloud drop concentrations were lower and droplet diameters larger than under regional background conditions, when the aerosol was dominated by submicrometer sulfate particles.

  18. A radiation closure study of Arctic stratus cloud microphysical properties using the collocated satellite-surface data and Fu-Liou radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Qiu, Shaoyue; Minnis, Patrick; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Rose, Fred

    2016-09-01

    Retrievals of cloud microphysical properties based on passive satellite imagery are especially difficult over snow-covered surfaces because of the bright and cold surface. To help quantify their uncertainties, single-layered overcast liquid-phase Arctic stratus cloud microphysical properties retrieved by using the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Edition 2 and Edition 4 (CERES Ed2 and Ed4) algorithms are compared with ground-based retrievals at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement North Slope of Alaska (ARM NSA) site at Barrow, AK, during the period from March 2000 to December 2006. A total of 206 and 140 snow-free cases (Rsfc ≤ 0.3), and 108 and 106 snow cases (Rsfc > 0.3), respectively, were selected from Terra and Aqua satellite passes over the ARM NSA site. The CERES Ed4 and Ed2 optical depth (τ) and liquid water path (LWP) retrievals from both Terra and Aqua are almost identical and have excellent agreement with ARM retrievals under snow-free and snow conditions. In order to reach a radiation closure study for both the surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiation budgets, the ARM precision spectral pyranometer-measured surface albedos were adjusted (63.6% and 80% of the ARM surface albedos for snow-free and snow cases, respectively) to account for the water and land components of the domain of 30 km × 30 km. Most of the radiative transfer model calculated SW↓sfc and SW↑TOA fluxes by using ARM and CERES cloud retrievals and the domain mean albedos as input agree with the ARM and CERES flux observations within 10 W m-2 for both snow-free and snow conditions. Sensitivity studies show that the ARM LWP and re retrievals are less dependent on solar zenith angle (SZA), but all retrieved optical depths increase with SZA.

  19. Incorporation of New Convective Ice Microphysics into the NASA GISS GCM and Impacts on Cloud Ice Water Path (IWP) Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsaesser, Greg; Del Genio, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The CMIP5 configurations of the GISS Model-E2 GCM simulated a mid- and high latitude ice IWP that decreased by 50 relative to that simulated for CMIP3 (Jiang et al. 2012; JGR). Tropical IWP increased by 15 in CMIP5. While the tropical IWP was still within the published upper-bounds of IWP uncertainty derived using NASA A-Train satellite observations, it was found that the upper troposphere (200 mb) ice water content (IWC) exceeded the published upper-bound by a factor of 2. This was largely driven by IWC in deep-convecting regions of the tropics.Recent advances in the model-E2 convective parameterization have been found to have a substantial impact on tropical IWC. These advances include the development of both a cold pool parameterization (Del Genio et al. 2015) and new convective ice parameterization. In this presentation, we focus on the new parameterization of convective cloud ice that was developed using data from the NASA TC4 Mission. Ice particle terminal velocity formulations now include information from a number of NASA field campaigns. The new parameterization predicts both an ice water mass weighted-average particle diameter and a particle cross sectional area weighted-average size diameter as a function of temperature and ice water content. By assuming a gamma-distribution functional form for the particle size distribution, these two diameter estimates are all that are needed to explicitly predict the distribution of ice particles as a function of particle diameter.GCM simulations with the improved convective parameterization yield a 50 decrease in upper tropospheric IWC, bringing the tropical and global mean IWP climatologies into even closer agreement with the A-Train satellite observation best estimates.

  20. Aerosol particles from tropical convective systems: 2. Cloud bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Tomoko; Buseck, Peter R.; Reeves, J. Michael

    2005-05-01

    Aerosol particles were collected at the altitudes of cloud bases during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) and analyzed using transmission electron microscopy. The particles consist of ammonium sulfate (45-90% by number), sea salt (5-45%), mineral dust (1-20%), and anthropogenic materials such as soot and fly ash (<3%). Ammonium sulfate particles have rather uniform, submicron sizes (mostly 0.5 μm across). Sea-salt particles are larger, apparently having been deliquesced. However, submicron particles are also common. Many contain Na and mixed cation sulfates in addition to NaCl. Mineral dust consists largely of tabular clay particles. Samples from the 28 July flight contain much mineral dust, probably because of transport from the Saharan Desert. Aggregates of sea salt and mineral dust, ammonium sulfate, and soot particles are common. Such mixed aggregates are especially abundant in in-cloud samples. Cirrus samples from CRYSTAL-FACE contain many H2SO4 droplets (Kojima et al., 2004), but acidic sulfate particles are rare at the altitudes of cloud bases. H2SO4 probably formed at higher altitudes through oxidation of SO2 in cloud droplets. Sea salt and mineral dust have been reported to be abundant in cloud particles collected using a counterflow virtual impactor (Cziczo et al., 2004), suggesting that these particles were incorporated into the convective systems from the cloud bases and akted as ice nuclei while being vertically transported.

  1. Formation of mixed-phase particles during the freezing of polar stratospheric ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Anatoli; Molina, Mario J; Tenhu, Heikki; Mayer, Erwin; Loerting, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are extremely efficient at catalysing the transformation of photostable chlorine reservoirs into photolabile species, which are actively involved in springtime ozone-depletion events. Why PSCs are such efficient catalysts, however, is not well understood. Here, we investigate the freezing behaviour of ternary HNO₃-H₂SO₄-H₂O droplets of micrometric size, which form type II PSC ice particles. We show that on freezing, a phase separation into pure ice and a residual solution coating occurs; this coating does not freeze but transforms into glass below ∼150 K. We find that the coating, which is thicker around young ice crystals, can still be approximately 30 nm around older ice crystals of diameter about 10 µm. These results affect our understanding of PSC microphysics and chemistry and suggest that chlorine-activation reactions are better studied on supercooled HNO₃-H₂SO₄-H₂O solutions rather than on a pure ice surface.

  2. Particle sedimentation and diffusive convection in volcanic ash-clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carazzo, G.; Jellinek, A. M.

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the longevity of volcanic ash-clouds generated by powerful explosive eruptions is a long standing problem for assessing volcanic hazards and the nature and time scale of volcanic forcings on climate change. It is well known that the lateral spreading and longevity of these clouds is influenced by stratospheric winds, particle settling and turbulent diffusion. Observations of the recent 2010 Eyjafjallajökull and 2011 Grimsvötn umbrella clouds, as well as the structure of atmospheric aerosol clouds from the 1991 Mt Pinatubo event, suggest that an additional key process governing the cloud dynamics is the production of internal layering. Here, we use analog experiments on turbulent particle-laden umbrella clouds to show that this layering occurs where natural convection driven by particle sedimentation and the differential diffusion of primarily heat and fine particles give rise to a large scale instability. Where umbrella clouds are particularly enriched in fine ash, this "particle diffusive convection" strongly influences the cloud longevity. More generally, cloud residence time will depend on fluxes due to both individual settling and diffusive convection. We develop a new sedimentation model that includes both sedimentation processes, and which is found to capture real-time measurements of the rate of change of particle concentration in the 1982 El Chichon, 1991 Mt Pinatubo and 1992 Mt Spurr ash-clouds. A key result is that these combined sedimentation processes enhance the fallout of fine particles relative to expectations from individual settling suggesting that particle aggregation is not the only mechanism required to explain volcanic umbrella longevity.

  3. Microphysical And Macrophysical Characteristics Of Non-Precipitating Morning Shallow Clouds In Central Amazonia Using One-Year Of Data From GOAMAZON 2014/15 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauliquevis, T.; Barbosa, H. M.; Rosario, N. M. E. D.; Rizzo, L. V.; Correia, A. L.; Adams, D. K.; Calheiros, A. J. P.; Alves, C. F.

    2015-12-01

    Shallow cumulus cloud fields in Amazonia are typical of the morning hours. They play a critical role in the mean observed diurnal cycle of precipitation in the Amazon Basin, which is characterized by the occurrence of heavy precipitation events in the afternoon. Shallow clouds act both to reduce incident shortwave radiation at the surface and in the transport of humidity from the lowest portions of the troposphere to higher levels. These two processes are poorly represented in numerical models, but are critical in the transition to deep convection and associated precipitation. Numerical models have problems in properly representing shallow cumulus fields and their transition to deep precipitating convection, the net result of which is producing rainfall to early in the diurnal cycle. Due to their importance, detailed characterization of morning shallow clouds is critical for understanding the shallow-to-deep transition as well as providing for model validation purposes. In this study we report 16 month data of observations of shallow cumulus with respect to cloud cover (CC), cloud base height (CBH), liquid water path (LWP), precipitable water vapor (PWV) and GOES (Visible and IR)analysis. Results showed a consistent pattern of evolution in the cloud field throughout the morning period. After sunrise the cloud field starts to move from a random cloud field to an organized shallow clouds field. In fact, there is an absence of any pattern in CBH from 6LT to 7LT. Once some amount of radiation reaches the surface shallow convection is established around 8:00LT, when a mode of CBH at 100 m is established and rises to 900 m at noon. During this time interval, CC grows up to 50% (mean), however with significant variability and oscillations. With respect to microphysical properties, both LWP and PWV were remarkably stable for single mornings and for shallow clouds, with LWP/PWV ~ 6.10-4. All of these results are being compared with GOES observations of cloud fields (Visible

  4. Intercomparison of four cloud microphysics schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for the simulation of summer monsoon precipitation in the Langtang Valley, Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Andrew; Couttet, Margaux; Collier, Emily; Immerzeel, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Better understanding of regional-scale precipitation patterns in the Himalayan region, and how these are affecting snow and ice, is critically required to increase our knowledge of the impacts of climate change on glaciers and snowpacks. This study examines how 4 different cloud microphysical schemes (Thompson, Morrison, WRF Single-Moment 5-class (WSM5; which is the WRF default scheme), and WRF Double-Moment 6-class (WDM6)) simulated precipitation in the Langtang Valley, Himalayas during the summer monsoon in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The precipitation is simulated for a ten-day period during July 2012 at high spatial-resolution (1.1 km) so as to simulate the local conditions in great detail. The model results are validated through a comparison with precipitation and radiation measurements made at two observation sites located on the main Langtang Valley floor and the mountain slopes. Analysis of water vapour and hydrometeors from each of the 4 schemes are also investigated to elucidate the main microphysics processes. The results show that the choice of microphysics scheme has a strong influence on precipitation in the Langtang Valley, with the simulated precipitation exhibiting large inter-model differences and significantly different day-to-day variability compared to measurements. The inter-model differences in simulated radiation were less marked, although under cloudy conditions all schemes demonstrated a significant positive bias in incoming radiation. However, overall the Morrison scheme showed the best agreement in terms of both precipitation and radiation over the ten-day period, while the poorest performing scheme is WDM6. Analysis of microphysics outputs suggested that 'cold-rain processes' is a key precipitation formation mechanism. The good performance of the Morrison scheme is consistent with its double-moment prediction of every ice-phase hydrometeor, which is ideally suited to represent this mechanism. By contrast, WDM6 is

  5. Microgravity acoustic mixing for particle cloud combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic; Rubinstein, Robert I.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations of acoustic mixing procedures designed to uniformly distribute fuel particles in a combustion tube for application in the proposed Particle Cloud Combustion Experiment (PCCE) are described. Two acoustic mixing methods are investigated: mixing in a cylindrical tube using high frequency spinning modes generated by suitably phased, or quadrature speakers, and acoustic premixing in a sphere. Quadrature mixing leads to rapid circumferential circulation of the powder around the tube. Good mixing is observed in the circulating regions. However, because axial inhomogeneities are necessarily present in the acoustic field, this circulation does not extend throughout the tube. Simultaneous operation of the quadrature-speaker set and the axial-speaker was observed to produce considerably enhanced mixing compared to operation of the quadrature-speaker set alone. Mixing experiments using both types of speakers were free of the longitudinal powder drift observed using axial-speakers alone. Vigorous powder mixing was obtained in the sphere for many normal modes: however, in no case was the powder observed to fill the sphere entirely. Theoretical analysis indicated that mixing under steady conditions cannot fill more than a hemisphere except under very unusual conditions. Premixing in a hemisphere may be satisfactory; otherwise, complete mixing in microgravity might be possible by operating the speaker in short bursts. A general conclusion is that acoustic transients are more likely to produce good mixing than steady state conditions. The reason is that in steady conditions, flow structures like nodal planes are possible and often even unavoidable. These tend to separate the mixing region into cells across which powder cannot be transferred. In contrast, transients not only are free of such structures, they also have the characteristics, desirable for mixing, of randomness and disorder. This conclusion is corroborated by mixing

  6. Ice Particle Impact on Cloud Water Content Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Edward F.; Miller, Dean R.; Plaskon, Stephen R.; Strapp, Walter; Lillie, Lyle

    2004-01-01

    Determining the total amount of water contained in an icing cloud necessitates the measurement of both the liquid droplets and ice particles. One commonly accepted method for measuring cloud water content utilizes a hot wire sensing element, which is maintained at a constant temperature. In this approach, the cloud water content is equated with the power required to keep the sense element at a constant temperature. This method inherently assumes that impinging cloud particles remain on the sensing element surface long enough to be evaporated. In the case of ice particles, this assumption requires that the particles do not bounce off the surface after impact. Recent tests aimed at characterizing ice particle impact on a thermally heated wing section, have raised questions about the validity of this assumption. Ice particles were observed to bounce off the heated wing section a very high percentage of the time. This result could have implications for Total Water Content sensors which are designed to capture ice particles, and thus do not account for bouncing or breakup of ice particles. Based on these results, a test was conducted to investigate ice particle impact on the sensing elements of the following hot-wire cloud water content probes: (1) Nevzorov Total Water Content (TWC)/Liquid Water Content (LWC) probe, (2) Science Engineering Associates TWC probe, and (3) Particle Measuring Systems King probe. Close-up video imaging was used to study ice particle impact on the sensing element of each probe. The measured water content from each probe was also determined for each cloud condition. This paper will present results from this investigation and attempt to evaluate the significance of ice particle impact on hot-wire cloud water content measurements.

  7. Validation of Microphysical Schemes in a CRM Using TRMM Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Tao, W.; Matsui, T.; Liu, C.; Masunaga, H.

    2007-12-01

    The microphysical scheme in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model has been the most heavily developed component in the past decade. The cloud-resolving model now has microphysical schemes ranging from the original Lin type bulk scheme, to improved bulk schemes, to a two-moment scheme, to a detailed bin spectral scheme. Even with the most sophisticated bin scheme, many uncertainties still exist, especially in ice phase microphysics. In this study, we take advantages of the long-term TRMM observations, especially the cloud profiles observed by the precipitation radar (PR), to validate microphysical schemes in the simulations of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). Two contrasting cases, a midlatitude summertime continental MCS with leading convection and trailing stratiform region, and an oceanic MCS in tropical western Pacific are studied. The simulated cloud structures and particle sizes are fed into a forward radiative transfer model to simulate the TRMM satellite sensors, i.e., the PR, the TRMM microwave imager (TMI) and the visible and infrared scanner (VIRS). MCS cases that match the structure and strength of the simulated systems over the 10-year period are used to construct statistics of different sensors. These statistics are then compared with the synthetic satellite data obtained from the forward radiative transfer calculations. It is found that the GCE model simulates the contrasts between the continental and oceanic case reasonably well, with less ice scattering in the oceanic case comparing with the continental case. However, the simulated ice scattering signals for both PR and TMI are generally stronger than the observations, especially for the bulk scheme and at the upper levels in the stratiform region. This indicates larger, denser snow/graupel particles at these levels. Adjusting microphysical schemes in the GCE model according the observations, especially the 3D cloud structure observed by TRMM PR, result in a much better agreement.

  8. Microphysical properties of cirrus clouds between 75°N and 25°S derived from extensive airborne in-situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Martina

    2016-04-01

    Numerous airborne field campaigns were performed in the last decades to record cirrus clouds microphysical properties. Beside the understanding of the processes of cirrus formation and evolution, an additional motivation for those studies is to provide a database to evaluate the representation of cirrus clouds in global climate models. This is of importance for an improved certainty of climate predictions, which are affected by the poor understanding of the microphysical processes of ice clouds (IPCC, 2013). To this end, the observations should ideally cover the complete respective parameter range and not be influenced by instrumental artifacts. However, due to the difficulties in measuring cirrus properties on fast-flying, high-altitude aircraft, some issues with respect to the measurements %evolved have arisen. In particular, concerns about the relative humidity in and around cirrus clouds and the ice crystal number concentrations were under discussion. Too high ice supersaturations as well as ice number concentrations were often reported. These issues have made more challenging the goal of compiling a large database using data from a suite of different instruments that were used on different campaigns. In this study, we have have addressed these challenges and compiled a large data set of cirrus clouds, sampled during eighteen field campaigns between 75°N and 25°S, representing measurements fulfilling the above mentioned requirements. The most recent campaigns were performed in 2014; namely, the ATTREX campaign with the research aircraft Global Hawk and the ML-CIRRUS and ACRIDICON campaigns with HALO. % The observations include ice water content (IWC: 130 hours of observations), ice crystal numbers (N_ice: 83 hours), ice crystal mean mass size (Rice: 83 hours) and relative humidity (RH_ice) in- and outside of cirrus clouds (78 and 140 hours). % We will present the parameters as PDFs versus temperature and derive medians and core ranges (including the most

  9. Volcanic explosion clouds - Density, temperature, and particle content estimates from cloud motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.; Self, S.

    1980-01-01

    Photographic records of 10 vulcanian eruption clouds produced during the 1978 eruption of Fuego Volcano in Guatemala have been analyzed to determine cloud velocity and acceleration at successive stages of expansion. Cloud motion is controlled by air drag (dominant during early, high-speed motion) and buoyancy (dominant during late motion when the cloud is convecting slowly). Cloud densities in the range 0.6 to 1.2 times that of the surrounding atmosphere were obtained by fitting equations of motion for two common cloud shapes (spheres and vertical cylinders) to the observed motions. Analysis of the heat budget of a cloud permits an estimate of cloud temperature and particle weight fraction to be made from the density. Model results suggest that clouds generally reached temperatures within 10 K of that of the surrounding air within 10 seconds of formation and that dense particle weight fractions were less than 2% by this time. The maximum sizes of dense particles supported by motion in the convecting clouds range from 140 to 1700 microns.

  10. Theory of inversion with two-dimensional regularization: profiles of microphysical particle properties derived from multiwavelength lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Kolgotin, Alexei; Müller, Detlef

    2008-09-01

    We present the theory of inversion with two-dimensional regularization. We use this novel method to retrieve profiles of microphysical properties of atmospheric particles from profiles of optical properties acquired with multiwavelength Raman lidar. This technique is the first attempt to the best of our knowledge, toward an operational inversion algorithm, which is strongly needed in view of multiwavelength Raman lidar networks. The new algorithm has several advantages over the inversion with so-called classical one-dimensional regularization. Extensive data postprocessing procedures, which are needed to obtain a sensible physical solution space with the classical approach, are reduced. Data analysis, which strongly depends on the experience of the operator, is put on a more objective basis. Thus, we strongly increase unsupervised data analysis. First results from simulation studies show that the new methodology in many cases outperforms our old methodology regarding accuracy of retrieved particle effective radius, and number, surface-area, and volume concentration. The real and the imaginary parts of the complex refractive index can be estimated with at least as equal accuracy as with our old method of inversion with one-dimensional regularization. However, our results on retrieval accuracy still have to be verified in a much larger simulation study.

  11. The Impact of Microphysical Schemes on Hurricane Intensity and Track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Shi, Jainn Jong; Chen, Shuyi S.; Lang, Stephen; Lin, Pay-Liam; Hong, Song-You; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Hou, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade, both research and operational numerical weather prediction models [e.g. the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF)] have started using more complex microphysical schemes originally developed for high-resolution cloud resolving models (CRMs) with 1-2 km or less horizontal resolutions. WRF is a next-generation meso-scale forecast model and assimilation system. It incorporates a modern software framework, advanced dynamics, numerics and data assimilation techniques, a multiple moveable nesting capability, and improved physical packages. WRF can be used for a wide range of applications, from idealized research to operational forecasting, with an emphasis on horizontal grid sizes in the range of 1-10 km. The current WRF includes several different microphysics options. At NASA Goddard, four different cloud microphysics options have been implemented into WRF. The performance of these schemes is compared to those of the other microphysics schemes available in WRF for an Atlantic hurricane case (Katrina). In addition, a brief review of previous modeling studies on the impact of microphysics schemes and processes on the intensity and track of hurricanes is presented and compared against the current Katrina study. In general, all of the studies show that microphysics schemes do not have a major impact on track forecasts but do have more of an effect on the simulated intensity. Also, nearly all of the previous studies found that simulated hurricanes had the strongest deepening or intensification when using only warm rain physics. This is because all of the simulated precipitating hydrometeors are large raindrops that quickly fall out near the eye-wall region, which would hydrostatically produce the lowest pressure. In addition, these studies suggested that intensities become unrealistically strong when evaporative cooling from cloud droplets and melting from ice particles are removed as this results in much weaker downdrafts in the simulated

  12. Modelling the reversible uptake of chemical species in the gas phase by ice particles formed in a convective cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marécal, V.; Pirre, M.; Rivière, E. D.; Pouvesle, N.; Crowley, J. N.; Freitas, S. R.; Longo, K. M.

    2009-11-01

    The present paper is a preliminary study preparing the introduction of reversible trace gas uptake by ice particles into a 3-D cloud resolving model. For this a 3-D simulation of a tropical deep convection cloud was run with the BRAMS cloud resolving model using a two-moment bulk microphysical parameterization. Trajectories encountering the convective clouds were computed from these simulation outputs along which the variations of the pristine ice, snow and aggregate mixing ratios and size distributions were extracted. The reversible uptake of 11 trace gases by ice was examined assuming applicability of Langmuir isotherms using recently evaluated (IUPAC) laboratory data. The results show that ice uptake is only significant for HNO3, HCl, CH3COOH and HCOOH. For H2O2, using new results for the partition coefficient results in significant partitioning to the ice phase for this trace gas also. It was also shown that the uptake is largely dependent on the temperature for some species. The adsorption saturation at the ice surface for large gas concentrations is generally not a limiting factor except for HNO3 and HCl for gas concentration greater than 1 ppbv. For HNO3, results were also obtained using a trapping theory, resulting in a similar order of magnitude of uptake, although the two approaches are based on different assumptions. The results were compared to those obtained using a BRAMS cloud simulation based on a single-moment microphysical scheme instead of the two moment scheme. We found similar results with a slightly more important uptake when using the single-moment scheme which is related to slightly higher ice mixing ratios in this simulation. The way to introduce these results in the 3-D cloud model is discussed.

  13. Modelling the reversible uptake of chemical species in the gas phase by ice particles formed in a convective cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marécal, V.; Pirre, M.; Rivière, E. D.; Pouvesle, N.; Crowley, J. N.; Freitas, S. R.; Longo, K. M.

    2010-05-01

    The present paper is a preliminary study preparing the introduction of reversible trace gas uptake by ice particles into a 3-D cloud resolving model. For this a 3-D simulation of a tropical deep convection cloud was run with the BRAMS cloud resolving model using a two-moment bulk microphysical parameterization. Trajectories within the convective clouds were computed from these simulation outputs along which the variations of the pristine ice, snow and aggregate mixing ratios and concentrations were extracted. The reversible uptake of 11 trace gases by ice was examined assuming applicability of Langmuir isotherms using recently evaluated (IUPAC) laboratory data. The results show that ice uptake is only significant for HNO3, HCl, CH3COOH and HCOOH. For H2O2, using new results for the partition coefficient results in significant partitioning to the ice phase for this trace gas also. It was also shown that the uptake is largely dependent on the temperature for some species. The adsorption saturation at the ice surface for large gas mixing ratios is generally not a limiting factor except for HNO3 and HCl for gas mixing ratio greater than 1 ppbv. For HNO3, results were also obtained using a trapping theory, resulting in a similar order of magnitude of uptake, although the two approaches are based on different assumptions. The results were compared to those obtained using a BRAMS cloud simulation based on a single-moment microphysical scheme instead of the two moment scheme. We found similar results with a slightly more important uptake when using the single-moment scheme which is related to slightly higher ice mixing ratios in this simulation. The way to introduce these results in the 3-D cloud model is discussed.

  14. Simulations of Hurricane Nadine (2012) during HS3 Using the NASA Unified WRF with Aerosol-Cloud Microphysics-Radiation Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J. J.; Braun, S. A.; Sippel, J. A.; Tao, W. K.; Tao, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of the SAL on the development and intensification of hurricanes has garnered significant attention in recent years. Many past studies have shown that synoptic outbreaks of Saharan dust, which usually occur from late spring to early fall and can extend from western Africa across the Atlantic Ocean into the Caribbean, can have impacts on hurricane genesis and subsequent intensity change. The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission is a multiyear NASA field campaign with the goal of improving understanding of hurricane formation and intensity change. One of HS3's primary science goals is to obtain measurements to help determine the extent to which the Saharan air layer impacts storm intensification. HS3 uses two of NASA's unmanned Global Hawk aircrafts equipped with three instruments each to measure characteristics of the storm environment and inner core. The Goddard microphysics and longwave/shortwave schemes in the NASA Unified Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) model have been coupled in real-time with the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model in WRF-Chem to account for the direct (radiation) and indirect (microphysics) impact. NU-WRF with interactive aerosol-cloud-radiation physics is used to generate 30-member ensemble simulations of Nadine (2012) with and without the aerosol interactions. Preliminary conclusions related to the impact of the SAL on the evolution of Nadine from the HS3 observations and model output will be described.

  15. Comparison of collision velocity differences of drops and graupel particles in a very turbulent cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, M.; Khain, A.; Rosenfeld, D.; Pokrovsky, A.

    The motion of water drops and graupel particles within a turbulent medium is analyzed. The turbulence is assumed to be homogeneous and isotropic. It is demonstrated that the inertia of drops and graupel particles falling within a turbulent flow leads to the formation of significant velocity deviations from the surrounding air, as well as to the formation of substantial relative velocity between drops and graupel particles. The results of calculations of the continuous growth of raindrops and graupel particles moving within a cloud of small droplets are presented both in a non-turbulent medium and within turbulent flows of different turbulence intensity. Continuous growth of a drop-collector was calculated with the coalescence efficiency E ɛ=1, as well as using E ɛ values provided by Beard and Ochs [Beard, K.V., Ochs, H.T., 1984. Collection and coalescence efficiencies for accretion. J. Geophys. Res., 89: 7165-7169.] ranging from 0.5 to about 0.75 for different droplet sizes. In the case of graupel-droplet interaction E ɛ was assumed equal to 1. It is shown that in the case E ɛ=1 in a non-turbulent medium, the growth rates of graupel and raindrops are close. Under turbulent conditions typical of mature convective clouds, graupel grows much faster than a raindrop. In the case E ɛ<1 the growth rate of a water drop slows down significantly, so that graupel grows faster than raindrops even under non-turbulent conditions. Turbulence greatly increases the difference between the growth rates of graupel and drop-collectors. Possible consequences of the faster growth of graupel in terms of cloud microphysics are discussed.

  16. Sustainment of Fine Particle Cloud by Means of Time-Averaged Particle Driving Force in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gohda, Takuma; Iizuka, Satoru

    2008-09-07

    We have succeeded in sustaining fine particle cloud by using a time-averaged particle driving (TAPD) method in the RF discharge plasma. The particles feel only time-averaged force when the period of pulses applied to those point-electrodes is shorter than the particle response time. The particles are transported to a middle point between two point-electrodes.

  17. Decadal simulation and comprehensive evaluation of CESM/CAM5.1 with advanced chemistry, aerosol microphysics, and aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian; Zhang, Yang; Glotfelty, Tim; He, Ruoying; Bennartz, Ralf; Rausch, John; Sartelet, Karine

    2015-03-01

    Earth system models have been used for climate predictions in recent years due to their capabilities to include biogeochemical cycles, human impacts, as well as coupled and interactive representations of Earth system components (e.g., atmosphere, ocean, land, and sea ice). In this work, the Community Earth System Model (CESM) with advanced chemistry and aerosol treatments, referred to as CESM-NCSU, is applied for decadal (2001-2010) global climate predictions. A comprehensive evaluation is performed focusing on the atmospheric component—the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5.1) by comparing simulation results with observations/reanalysis data and CESM ensemble simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The improved model can predict most meteorological and radiative variables relatively well with normalized mean biases (NMBs) of -14.1 to -9.7% and 0.7-10.8%, respectively, although temperature at 2 m (T2) is slightly underpredicted. Cloud variables such as cloud fraction (CF) and precipitating water vapor (PWV) are well predicted, with NMBs of -10.5 to 0.4%, whereas cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), cloud liquid water path (LWP), and cloud optical thickness (COT) are moderately-to-largely underpredicted, with NMBs of -82.2 to -31