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Sample records for cloudman s-91 mouse

  1. B16 and cloudman S91 mouse melanoma cells susceptibility to apoptosis after dacarbazine treatment.

    PubMed

    Olszewska-Słonina, Dorota M; Styczyńisk, Jan; Drewa, Tomasz A; Olszewski, Krzysztof J; Czajkowski, Rafał

    2005-01-01

    Considering the necessity of an individual choice of cytostatic drugs for patients with cancer disease and tumor cells' resistance to these compounds, their ability to induction of apoptosis should be investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of dacarbazine (DTIC) on morphology and kinetics of proliferation of B16 and Cloudman S91 cells. It is important to determine the kind of death induced by the DTIC and the effect of a specific concentration. The evaluation of apoptosis and necrosis in these two mouse melanoma cell lines in vitro was performed. Induction of apoptosis was estimated in annexin V binding assay by flow cytometry. DNA content and cell cycle phases were determined by propidium iodide staining. DTIC induced morphological changes typical for apoptosis and necrosis in both cell lines. DTIC caused cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phase of both cell lines which showed hypertetraploidy. The highest induction of apoptosis was observed in DTIC concentration of 200 microg/mL for B16 cells (11%) and 100 microg/mL for apoptosis Cloudman S91 cells (22.2%). Higher doses of DTIC caused intensification of necrotic process. The B16 melanoma cells are more sensitive to DTIC than the Cloudman S91 cells, however more intensive apoptotic process was detected in Cloudman S91 cells already at lower concentration of DTIC.

  2. MSH regulation of tyrosinase in Cloudman S-91 mouse melanoma cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, B.B.

    1986-05-01

    Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone (MSH) causes an increase in tyrosinase activity (O-diphenol: O/sub 2/ oxidoreductase) in Cloudman S-91 mouse melanoma cell cultures following a lag period of approximately 9 hours. Treatment of cells with 2 x 10/sup -7/M ..cap alpha..- MSH for 6 days results in a 90 fold increase in the specific activity of the enzyme. The hormone mediated increase in tyrosinase activity is dependent upon continued transcription since the enzyme induction is suppressed by either cordycepin (1..mu..g/ml) or ..cap alpha..-amanitin (10..mu..g/ml). To determine if MSH is increasing the synthesis rate of tyrosinase, cell cultures, either exposed to MSH for various times or left untreated, were pulsed with (/sup 3/H)-leucine for 4 hours and tyrosinase immunoprecipitated with an anti-tyrosinase polyclonal antiserum raised in rabbits. The immunoprecipitates were solubilized and electrophoresed on SDS polyacrylamide gels. The proteins were electroblotted to nitrocellulose and the radioactivity in the tyrosinase bands determined. These studies have shown that while tyrosinase activity in hormone-treated cells may increase 90 fold, the rate of synthesis of the enzyme increases only 3 fold at most. Immunoprecipitation analysis of equivalence points of tyrosinase from control and MSH-treated cultures suggests the presence of inactive forms of the enzyme in melanoma cell cultures. These results suggest that, in addition to stimulating tyrosinase synthesis, MSH may also promote the activation of pre-existing enzyme molecules.

  3. Dexamethasone and zinc in combination inhibit the anchorage-independent growth of S-91 Cloudman murine melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kreutzfeld, K.L.; Lei, K.Y.; Bregman, M.D.; Meyskens, F.L. Jr.

    1985-03-04

    Zinc inhibited the colony formation of Cloudman S-91 murine melanoma cells in a dose dependent manner with an ID/sub 50/ of 3.4 ..mu..g/ml. Total inhibition of the melanoma colony-forming units occurred at a zinc concentration of 4.42 ..mu..g/ml. In the presence of dexamethasone the ID/sub 50/ for zinc inhibition was reduced by 49% and total inhibition of anchorage-independent growth occurred at the achievable in vivo zinc concentration of 3.0 ..mu..g/ml. Dexamethasone and zinc in combination effected a greater than additive inhibition of the murine melanoma colony-forming units. Statistical evaluation of these results showed that zinc and dexamethasone interacted synergistically to inhibit the formation of murine melanoma colonies. 29 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  4. Survival of Cloudman mouse melanoma cells after irradiation by solar wavelengths of light.

    PubMed

    Cieszka, K; Hill, H Z; Xin, P; Azure, M; Hill, G J; Meyenhofer, M F; Boissy, R E; Mitchell, D L

    1997-08-01

    A number of variants of Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma cells that differ with respect to the amount of pigment produced are available for study. In this report, we compare the photobiological responses of S91/amel, which contains about 1 pg of melanin per cell, with S91/I3, which contains about 3 pg/cell. Earlier studies had shown that UVC induced more oxidative damage (in the form of thymine glycols) in cell line S91/I3 than in S91/amel and that cell line S91/amel was more resistant to killing by UVC than S91/I3. The present study finds that S91/amel cells are also relatively resistant to killing by near monochromatic UVB from a Philips TL01 fluorescent lamp and by near monochromatic UVA from a Philips HPW125 lamp. However, when the cells are irradiated with a Westinghouse FS20 polychromatic lamp, the S91/I3 cells are more resistant than the S91/amel cells. These findings cannot be explained on the basis of pigment induction because in S91/I3 this is about the same after UVB and FS20, although the maximum is reached earlier after UVB. Nor can our findings be explained on the basis of pyrimidine dimer formation, which is comparable in the two cell lines regardless of the type of irradiation. These results suggest that, with a pigment such as melanin, which absorbs light across the visible and ultraviolet ranges of the spectrum, cellular responses to monochromatic light do not necessarily predict responses to polychromatic mixtures.

  5. Methyl Sulfone Induces Loss of Metastatic Properties and Reemergence of Normal Phenotypes in a Metastatic Cloudman S-91 (M3) Murine Melanoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Joan McIntyre; Bannon, Marissa; Rosshirt, Lindsay; Luis, Jessica; Monteagudo, Luke; Caron, John M.; Sternstein, Gerson Marc

    2010-01-01

    Background The most deadly form of cancer is not lung or colon, breast or prostate; it is any cancer that has become metastatic. Mortality due to metastatic melanoma, one of the most aggressive and deadly cancers, has increased steadily over the last several decades. Unfortunately, the arsenal of chemotherapeutic agents available today is most often unsuccessful at extending and improving the life expectancy of afflicted individuals. We sought to identify an effective and nontoxic agent against metastatic melanoma. Methodology/Principal Findings We chose to study Cloudman S-91 mouse melanoma cells (sub-clone M3, CCL53.1) because these cells are highly aggressive and metastatic, representing one of the deadliest types of cancer. Melanoma cells also had an experimental advantage because their morphology, which is easily monitored, relates to the physiology of metastatic cells and normal melanocytes. We chose to test methyl sulfone as a chemotherapeutic agent for two reasons. Because of its chemical structure, we speculated a potential anti-cancer activity by targeting microtubules. Equally important, methyl sulfone has a well-established safety profile in humans. Surprisingly, we found that malignant melanoma cells exposed to methyl sulfone demonstrated the loss of phenotypes characteristic of malignant cells, and the reemergence of phenotypes characteristic of healthy melanocytes. Briefly, over time methyl sulfone induced contact inhibition, loss of ability to migrate through an extracellular matrix, loss of anchorage-independent growth, proper wound healing followed by contact inhibition, irreversible senescence followed by arborization with melanosomes in arbors as seen in normal melanocytes. Conclusions/Significance Methyl sulfone may have clinical potential as a non-toxic agent effective against metastatic melanoma. Additionally, methyl sulfone has promise as a tool to explore molecular mechanisms of metastatic transformation as well as fundamental processes

  6. Internal binding sites for MSH: Analyses in wild-type and variant Cloudman melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Orlow, S.J.; Hotchkiss, S.; Pawelek, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma cells express both external (plasma membrane) and internal binding sites for MSH. Using 125I-beta melanotropin (beta-MSH) as a probe, we report here an extensive series of studies on the biological relevance of these internal sites. Cells were swollen in a hypotonic buffer and lysed, and a particulate fraction was prepared by high-speed centrifugation. This fraction was incubated with 125I-beta-MSH with or without excess nonradioactive beta-MSH in the cold for 2 hours. The material was then layered onto a step-wise sucrose gradient and centrifuged; fractions were collected and counted in a gamma counter or assayed for various enzymatic activities. The following points were established: (1) Specific binding sites for MSH were observed sedimenting at an average density of 50% sucrose in amelanotic cells and at higher densities in melanotic cells. (2) These sites were similar in density to those observed when intact cells were labeled externally with 125I-beta-MSH and then warmed to promote internalization of the hormone. (3) Most of the internal binding sites were not as dense as fully melanized melanosomes. (4) In control experiments, the MSH binding sites were not found in cultured hepatoma cells. (5) Variant melanoma cells, which differed from the wild-type in their responses to MSH, had reduced expression of internal binding sites even though their ability to bind MSH to the outer cell surface appeared normal. (MSH-induced responses included changes in tyrosinase, dopa oxidase, and dopachrome conversion factor activities, melanization, proliferation, and morphology.) (6) Isobutylmethylxanthine, which enhanced cellular responsiveness to MSH, also enhanced expression of internal binding sites. The results indicate that expression of internal binding sites for MSH is an important criterion for cellular responsiveness to the hormone.

  7. Interactions between ultraviolet light and interleukin-1 on MSH binding in both mouse melanoma and human squamous carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Birchall, N.; Orlow, S.J.; Kupper, T.; Pawelek, J. )

    1991-03-29

    Interactions between beta-melanotropin (MSH), interleukin 1-a (IL-1), and ultraviolet light (UV) were examined in Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma and RHEK human squamous carcinoma cell lines. The following points were established: (1) both cell lines produced IL-1 and their production was stimulated by exposure of the cells to UV; (2) both cell lines possessed high affinity binding sites for MSH, and their ability to bind MSH was modulated by IL-1; (3) IL-1 exhibited both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on MSH binding to Cloudman cells; and (4) the stimulatory effect of IL-1 on MSH binding to melanoma cells was reflected in enhanced cellular responsiveness to MSH regarding tyrosinase activity (E.C. 1.14.18.1) and melanin content. The findings raise the possibility that interactions between keratinocytes and melanocytes may be regulated by IL-1 and MSH, and suggest a possible mechanism for stimulation of cutaneous melanogenesis by solar radiation: enhancement of MSH receptor activity by induction of IL-1.

  8. CloudMan as a platform for tool, data, and analysis distribution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cloud computing provides an infrastructure that facilitates large scale computational analysis in a scalable, democratized fashion, However, in this context it is difficult to ensure sharing of an analysis environment and associated data in a scalable and precisely reproducible way. Results CloudMan (usecloudman.org) enables individual researchers to easily deploy, customize, and share their entire cloud analysis environment, including data, tools, and configurations. Conclusions With the enabled customization and sharing of instances, CloudMan can be used as a platform for collaboration. The presented solution improves accessibility of cloud resources, tools, and data to the level of an individual researcher and contributes toward reproducibility and transparency of research solutions. PMID:23181507

  9. Using Cloud Computing infrastructure with CloudBioLinux, CloudMan and Galaxy

    PubMed Central

    Afgan, Enis; Chapman, Brad; Jadan, Margita; Franke, Vedran; Taylor, James

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing has revolutionized availability and access to computing and storage resources; making it possible to provision a large computational infrastructure with only a few clicks in a web browser. However, those resources are typically provided in the form of low-level infrastructure components that need to be procured and configured before use. In this protocol, we demonstrate how to utilize cloud computing resources to perform open-ended bioinformatics analyses, with fully automated management of the underlying cloud infrastructure. By combining three projects, CloudBioLinux, CloudMan, and Galaxy into a cohesive unit, we have enabled researchers to gain access to more than 100 preconfigured bioinformatics tools and gigabytes of reference genomes on top of the flexible cloud computing infrastructure. The protocol demonstrates how to setup the available infrastructure and how to use the tools via a graphical desktop interface, a parallel command line interface, and the web-based Galaxy interface. PMID:22700313

  10. Using cloud computing infrastructure with CloudBioLinux, CloudMan, and Galaxy.

    PubMed

    Afgan, Enis; Chapman, Brad; Jadan, Margita; Franke, Vedran; Taylor, James

    2012-06-01

    Cloud computing has revolutionized availability and access to computing and storage resources, making it possible to provision a large computational infrastructure with only a few clicks in a Web browser. However, those resources are typically provided in the form of low-level infrastructure components that need to be procured and configured before use. In this unit, we demonstrate how to utilize cloud computing resources to perform open-ended bioinformatic analyses, with fully automated management of the underlying cloud infrastructure. By combining three projects, CloudBioLinux, CloudMan, and Galaxy, into a cohesive unit, we have enabled researchers to gain access to more than 100 preconfigured bioinformatics tools and gigabytes of reference genomes on top of the flexible cloud computing infrastructure. The protocol demonstrates how to set up the available infrastructure and how to use the tools via a graphical desktop interface, a parallel command-line interface, and the Web-based Galaxy interface.

  11. Induced melanin reduces mutations and cell killing in mouse melanoma.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Hill, H Z

    1997-03-01

    When melanin absorbs light energy, it can produce potentially damaging active oxygen species. There is little doubt that constitutive pigment in dark-skinned individuals is photoprotective against skin cancer, but induced pigment-as in tanning-may not be. The first step in cancer induction is mutation in DNA. The most suitable systems for evaluating the role of melanin are those in which pigment can be varied and mutations can be measured. Several cell lines from Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma can be induced to form large quantities of melanin pigment after treatment with a number of different agents enabling comparison of mutant yields in the same cells differing principally in pigment concentration. In these studies, melanin was induced with synthetic alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and with isobutyl methyl xanthine in the cell line S91/mel. The former inducer produced about 50% more pigment than the latter. Survival and mutation induction at the Na+/K(+)-ATPase locus were studied using ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS), a standard mutagen and five UV lamps emitting near monochromatic and polychromatic UV light in the three wave-length ranges of UV. There was greater protection against killing and mutation induction in the more heavily pigmented cells after exposure to EMS and after irradiation with monochromatic UVC and UVB. There was significant protection against killing by polychromatic UVB + UVA (FS20), but the small degree of protection against mutation was not significant. No significant change in killing and mutation using the same protocol was seen in S91/amel, a related cell line that does not respond to these inducers. No mutants were produced by either monochromatic or polychromatic UVA at doses that killed 50% of the cells. Our results show that induced pigment-shown earlier to be eumelanin (K. A. Cieszka et al., Exp. Dermatol. 4, 192-198, 1995)-is photo- and chemoprotective, but it is less effective in protection against mutagenesis by polychromatic

  12. Structural/functional relationships between internal and external MSH receptors: modulation of expression in Cloudman melanoma cells by UVB radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, A.K.; Orlow, S.J.; Bolognia, J.L.; Pawelek, J.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Expression of internal receptors for MSH is an important criterion for responsiveness to MSH by Cloudman melanoma cells. Here, we show that internal and external receptors for MSH are of identical molecular weights (50-53 kDa) and share common antigenic determinants, indicating a structural relationship between the 2 populations of molecules. The internal receptors co-purified with a sub-cellular fraction highly enriched for small vesicles, many of which were coated. Ultraviolet B light (UVB) acted synergistically with MSH to increase tyrosinase activity and melanin content of cultured Cloudman melanoma cells, consistent with previous findings in the skin of mice and guinea pigs. Preceding the rise in tyrosinase activity in cultured cells, UVB elicited a decrease in internal MSH binding sites and a concomitant increase in external sites. The time frame for the UVB effects on MSH receptors and melanogenesis, 48 hours, was similar to that for a response to solar radiation in humans. Together, the results indicate a key role for MSH receptors in the induction of melanogenesis by UVB and suggest a potential mechanism of action for UVB: redistribution of MSH receptors with a resultant increase in cellular responsiveness to MSH.

  13. Effect of UVC, UVB, UVA and a solar simulator on the survival of mouse melanoma cell lines differing in melanin content

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, H.Z.; Hill, G.J.; Cieszka, K.; Azure, M.

    1994-12-31

    These studies were designed to determine the survival of cells that vary in constitutive pigment levels after exposure to different UV wave lengths. The lamps employed emitted UVC (near monochromatic 254 nm), UVB (Philips TL01-88.7% of UV output is UVB), UVA (Philips HPW125-89% of output is at 365 nm) and Westinghouse FS20 (broad band UVB and UVA). Dish lids were used to cut off UVC in the UVB and FS20 experiments and 0.25 inch plate glass was used to cut off UVB in the UVA experiments. UVC photons interact with putative intracellular photosensitizers which in turn convert O{sub 2} to active oxygen species which damage DNA to produce strand breaks, cross links and base damage. UVB acts by both mechanisms. The two cell lines studied were Cloudman S91/I3 (3.6 pg melanin/cell) and the closely related S91/amel (1.2 pg melanin/cell). Attached cells were covered with Ca{sup ++} and Mg{sup ++} free PBS and irradiated in the cold. Colonies were scored after 2 weeks. The two cell lines exhibit similar survival kinetics after UVC. S91/IE is more sensitive to killing by either UVB (TL01) or UVA. However, S91/amel cells are more sensitive to killing by UVB plus UVA (FS20). It is clear that UV of different qualities can interact to produce effects that would not be predicted based on responses to monochromatic wave lengths.

  14. Characterization of the serotoninergic system in the C57BL/6 mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej; Pisarchik, Alexander; Semak, Igor; Sweatman, Trevor; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2003-08-01

    We showed expression of the tryptophan hydroxylase gene and of tryptophan hydroxylase protein immunoreactivity in mouse skin and skin cells. Extracts from skin and melanocyte samples acetylated serotonin to N-acetylserotonin and tryptamine to N-acetyltryptamine. A different enzyme from arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase mediated this reaction, as this gene was defective in the C57BL6 mouse, coding predominantly for a protein without enzymatic activity. Serotonin (but not tryptamine) acetylation varied according to hair cycle phase and anatomic location. Serotonin was also metabolized to 5-hydroxytryptophol and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, probably through stepwise transformation catalyzed by monoamine oxidase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase. Activity of the melatonin-forming enzyme hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase was notably below detectable levels in all samples of mouse corporal skin, although it was detectable at low levels in the ears and in Cloudman melanoma (derived from the DBA/2 J mouse strain). In conclusion, mouse skin has the molecular and biochemical apparatus necessary to produce and metabolize serotonin and N-acetylserotonin, and its activity is determined by topography, physiological status of the skin, cell type and mouse strain.

  15. Determination of 1,3-butadiene in workplace air: reevaluation of NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Method S91 and development of NIOSH Method 1024

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, R.A.; Gagnon, Y.T.

    1988-08-24

    NIOSH Method S91 for the determination of 1,3-butadiene in air was reevaluated, and a new method was developed. Limitations to Method S91 included the fact that the lower quantitation limit appeared to be about 3.4 parts per million (ppm) and the packed-column gas-chromatographic analysis was subject to interference. The new method developed, Method 1024, employed collection on tandem coconut-shell charcoal tubes, desorption with methylene chloride, and high-resolution gas-chromatographic analysis. Evaluation of Method 1024 indicated that it should be useful for determining full-shift time-weighted average exposures in humid air at concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 10 ppm. The sampler's capacity should permit quantitation of levels up to 100 ppm if desorbed samples are diluted so that they fall in the calibration range. In the chromatographic process, the combination of backflushable precolumn and aluminum oxide fused-silica capillary analytical columns offered the advantages of enhanced sensitivity enabling detection down to 0.005 ppm in 25 liters, and enhanced selectivity, limiting the need for confirmatory techniques.

  16. Marine Bacteria from Danish Coastal Waters Show Antifouling Activity against the Marine Fouling Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain S91 and Zoospores of the Green Alga Ulva australis Independent of Bacteriocidal Activity▿†

    PubMed Central

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yoke Yin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Harder, Tilmann; Gram, Lone

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if marine bacteria from Danish coastal waters produce antifouling compounds and if antifouling bacteria could be ascribed to specific niches or seasons. We further assess if antibacterial effect is a good proxy for antifouling activity. We isolated 110 bacteria with anti-Vibrio activity from different sample types and locations during a 1-year sampling from Danish coastal waters. The strains were identified as Pseudoalteromonas, Phaeobacter, and Vibrionaceae based on phenotypic tests and partial 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The numbers of bioactive bacteria were significantly higher in warmer than in colder months. While some species were isolated at all sampling locations, others were niche specific. We repeatedly isolated Phaeobacter gallaeciensis at surfaces from one site and Pseudoalteromonas tunicata at two others. Twenty-two strains, representing the major taxonomic groups, different seasons, and isolation strategies, were tested for antiadhesive effect against the marine biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain S91 and zoospores of the green alga Ulva australis. The antiadhesive effects were assessed by quantifying the number of strain S91 or Ulva spores attaching to a preformed biofilm of each of the 22 strains. The strongest antifouling activity was found in Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilms of Pseudoalteromonas piscicida, Pseudoalteromonas tunicata, and Pseudoalteromonas ulvae prevented Pseudoalteromonas S91 from attaching to steel surfaces. P. piscicida killed S91 bacteria in the suspension cultures, whereas P. tunicata and P. ulvae did not; however, they did prevent adhesion by nonbactericidal mechanism(s). Seven Pseudoalteromonas species, including P. piscicida and P. tunicata, reduced the number of settling Ulva zoospores to less than 10% of the number settling on control surfaces. The antifouling alpP gene was detected only in P. tunicata strains (with purple and yellow pigmentation), so

  17. Marine bacteria from Danish coastal waters show antifouling activity against the marine fouling bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain S91 and zoospores of the green alga Ulva australis independent of bacteriocidal activity.

    PubMed

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yoke Yin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Harder, Tilmann; Gram, Lone

    2011-12-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if marine bacteria from Danish coastal waters produce antifouling compounds and if antifouling bacteria could be ascribed to specific niches or seasons. We further assess if antibacterial effect is a good proxy for antifouling activity. We isolated 110 bacteria with anti-Vibrio activity from different sample types and locations during a 1-year sampling from Danish coastal waters. The strains were identified as Pseudoalteromonas, Phaeobacter, and Vibrionaceae based on phenotypic tests and partial 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The numbers of bioactive bacteria were significantly higher in warmer than in colder months. While some species were isolated at all sampling locations, others were niche specific. We repeatedly isolated Phaeobacter gallaeciensis at surfaces from one site and Pseudoalteromonas tunicata at two others. Twenty-two strains, representing the major taxonomic groups, different seasons, and isolation strategies, were tested for antiadhesive effect against the marine biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain S91 and zoospores of the green alga Ulva australis. The antiadhesive effects were assessed by quantifying the number of strain S91 or Ulva spores attaching to a preformed biofilm of each of the 22 strains. The strongest antifouling activity was found in Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilms of Pseudoalteromonas piscicida, Pseudoalteromonas tunicata, and Pseudoalteromonas ulvae prevented Pseudoalteromonas S91 from attaching to steel surfaces. P. piscicida killed S91 bacteria in the suspension cultures, whereas P. tunicata and P. ulvae did not; however, they did prevent adhesion by nonbactericidal mechanism(s). Seven Pseudoalteromonas species, including P. piscicida and P. tunicata, reduced the number of settling Ulva zoospores to less than 10% of the number settling on control surfaces. The antifouling alpP gene was detected only in P. tunicata strains (with purple and yellow pigmentation), so

  18. Synthesis of tritium labeled Ac-(Nle/sup 4/, D-Phe/sup 7/)-. cap alpha. -MSH/sub 4-11/-NH/sub 2/: a superpotent melanotropin with prolonged biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, B.D.; Hruby, V.J.; Yamamura, H.I.; Akiyama, K.; Castrucci, A.M. de; Hadley, M.E.; Andrews, J.R.; Wan, Y.P.

    1984-03-05

    Ac-(Nle/sup 4/, D-Phe/sup 7/)-..cap alpha..-MSH/sub 4-11/-NH/sub 2/ an octapeptide, is a melanotropin analogue (Ac-Nle-Glu-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Gly-Lys-NH/sub 2/), which is a superpotent agonist of frog and lizard skin melanocytes and mouse S 91 (Cloudman) melanoma cells. This melanotropin possesses ultraprolonged activity on melanocytes, both in vitro and in vivo, and the peptide is resistant to inactivation by serum enzymes. The tritium-labeled congener was prepared by direct incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-labeled norleucine into the peptide. The melanotropic activity of the labeled peptide is identical to the unlabeled analogue. This labeled peptide should be useful for studies on the localization and characterization of melanotropin receptors.

  19. Galaxy CloudMan: delivering cloud compute clusters.

    PubMed

    Afgan, Enis; Baker, Dannon; Coraor, Nate; Chapman, Brad; Nekrutenko, Anton; Taylor, James

    2010-12-21

    Widespread adoption of high-throughput sequencing has greatly increased the scale and sophistication of computational infrastructure needed to perform genomic research. An alternative to building and maintaining local infrastructure is "cloud computing", which, in principle, offers on demand access to flexible computational infrastructure. However, cloud computing resources are not yet suitable for immediate "as is" use by experimental biologists. We present a cloud resource management system that makes it possible for individual researchers to compose and control an arbitrarily sized compute cluster on Amazon's EC2 cloud infrastructure without any informatics requirements. Within this system, an entire suite of biological tools packaged by the NERC Bio-Linux team (http://nebc.nerc.ac.uk/tools/bio-linux) is available for immediate consumption. The provided solution makes it possible, using only a web browser, to create a completely configured compute cluster ready to perform analysis in less than five minutes. Moreover, we provide an automated method for building custom deployments of cloud resources. This approach promotes reproducibility of results and, if desired, allows individuals and labs to add or customize an otherwise available cloud system to better meet their needs. The expected knowledge and associated effort with deploying a compute cluster in the Amazon EC2 cloud is not trivial. The solution presented in this paper eliminates these barriers, making it possible for researchers to deploy exactly the amount of computing power they need, combined with a wealth of existing analysis software, to handle the ongoing data deluge.

  20. Mouse phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Da Silva-Buttkus, Patricia; Neff, Frauke; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Kemter, Elisabeth; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Matloka, Mikolaj; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Rozman, Jan; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Schrewe, Anja; Stöger, Claudia; Tost, Monica; Adamski, Jerzy; Aigner, Bernhard; Beckers, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Busch, Dirk H; Esposito, Irene; Graw, Jochen; Illig, Thomas; Ivandic, Boris; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Mempel, Martin; Neschen, Susanne; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Suhre, Karsten; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Model organisms like the mouse are important tools to learn more about gene function in man. Within the last 20 years many mutant mouse lines have been generated by different methods such as ENU mutagenesis, constitutive and conditional knock-out approaches, knock-down, introduction of human genes, and knock-in techniques, thus creating models which mimic human conditions. Due to pleiotropic effects, one gene may have different functions in different organ systems or time points during development. Therefore mutant mouse lines have to be phenotyped comprehensively in a highly standardized manner to enable the detection of phenotypes which might otherwise remain hidden. The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) has been established at the Helmholtz Zentrum München as a phenotyping platform with open access to the scientific community (www.mousclinic.de; [1]). The GMC is a member of the EUMODIC consortium which created the European standard workflow EMPReSSslim for the systemic phenotyping of mouse models (http://www.eumodic.org/[2]). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Photodynamic therapy for melanoma: efficacy and immunologic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avci, Pinar; Gupta, Gaurav K.; Kawakubo, Masayoshi; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-02-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the fastest growing cancers and if it cannot be completely surgically removed the prognosis is bleak. Melanomas are known to be particularly resistant to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Various types of immunotherapy have however been investigated with mixed reports of success. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has also been tested against melanoma, again with mixed effects as the melanin pigment is thought to act as both an optical shield and as an antioxidant. We have been investigating PDT against malignant melanoma in mouse models. We have compared B16F10 melanoma syngenic to C57BL/6 mice and S91 Cloudman melanoma syngenic to DBA2 mice. We have tested the hypothesis that S91 will respond better than B16 because of higher expression of immunocritical molecules such as MHC-1, tyrosinase, tyrosinase related protein-2 gp100, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Some of these molecules can act as tumor rejection antigens that can be recognized by antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8 T cells that have been stimulated by PDT. Moreover it is possible that DBA2 mice are intrinsically better able to mount an anti-tumor immune response than C57BL/6 mice. We are also studying intratumoral injection of photosensitzers such as benzoporphyrin monoacid ring A and comparing this route with the more usual route of intravenous administration.

  2. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  3. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  4. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  5. Expression of endothelin receptors in frog, chicken, mouse and human pigment cells.

    PubMed

    Scarparo, Ana Cristina; Isoldi, Mauro César; de Lima, Leonardo Henrique Ribeiro Graciani; Visconti, Maria Aparecida; Castrucci, Ana Maria de Lauro

    2007-07-01

    Several reports have shown the participation of vasoactive endothelins (ETs) in the regulation of vertebrate pigment cells. In the present study, we identified ET receptors in pigment cells of vertebrate species by RT-PCR assays, and compared the differential expression of the various subtypes in each species by quantitative PCR. RT-PCR was performed with specific primers for ETC, ETA(X) or ETA in Xenopus laevis melanophores, ETA or ETB(2) in chicken melanocytes, ETA or ETB in murine (B-16, S-91 or Melan-A) or human (SK-Mel 23 or SK-Mel 28) melanoma cells, and the products obtained were confirmed by cloning and sequencing. The results showed the presence of ETA(X), but not ETA mRNA, and confirmed the expression of ETC in X. laevis melanophores. ETA and ETB(2) mRNAs were also demonstrated in chicken melanocytes. ETA and ETB receptor were identified in S-91, B16 and Melan-A murine cells. In human melanoma cells, SK-Mel 23 and SK-Mel 28, we confirmed the presence of ETB mRNA, and also found ETA mRNA. The comparison between the two subtypes present in the pigment cell of each species and among species demonstrated that the expression of ETAs in chicken, mouse, and human melanocytes is negligible, as is the expression of ETA(X) in Xenopus melanophores. The relative expression, as determined by quantitative PCR, was as follows: chicken ETB>SK-Mel 23 ETB>S91 ETB>Xenopus ETC, suggesting that the endothelin system plays a major role in avian and mammalian pigment cell regulation, as compared to lower vertebrates. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that subtype A receptors were probably the most primitive ET receptors, directly deriving from the ancestral type; all the other receptors, B subtypes and C, originated from diverse derivative molecules.

  6. The Knockout Mouse Project

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Christopher P; Battey, James F; Bradley, Allan; Bucan, Maja; Capecchi, Mario; Collins, Francis S; Dove, William F; Duyk, Geoffrey; Dymecki, Susan; Eppig, Janan T; Grieder, Franziska B; Heintz, Nathaniel; Hicks, Geoff; Insel, Thomas R; Joyner, Alexandra; Koller, Beverly H; Lloyd, K C Kent; Magnuson, Terry; Moore, Mark W; Nagy, Andras; Pollock, Jonathan D; Roses, Allen D; Sands, Arthur T; Seed, Brian; Skarnes, William C; Snoddy, Jay; Soriano, Philippe; Stewart, David J; Stewart, Francis; Stillman, Bruce; Varmus, Harold; Varticovski, Lyuba; Verma, Inder M; Vogt, Thomas F; von Melchner, Harald; Witkowski, Jan; Woychik, Richard P; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yancopoulos, George D; Young, Stephen G; Zambrowicz, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Mouse knockout technology provides a powerful means of elucidating gene function in vivo, and a publicly available genome-wide collection of mouse knockouts would be significantly enabling for biomedical discovery. To date, published knockouts exist for only about 10% of mouse genes. Furthermore, many of these are limited in utility because they have not been made or phenotyped in standardized ways, and many are not freely available to researchers. It is time to harness new technologies and efficiencies of production to mount a high-throughput international effort to produce and phenotype knockouts for all mouse genes, and place these resources into the public domain. PMID:15340423

  7. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    PubMed

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  8. The MOUSE Squad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a New York city after-school program started by MOUSE (Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education), a national nonprofit group that teaches students how to fix computers, and equips them with the communication and problem-solving skills to help them in the working world. The MOUSE program is part of a trend…

  9. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  10. [half-Cys4,half-Cys10]-alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone: a cyclic alpha-melanotropin exhibiting superagonist biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, T K; Hruby, V J; Darman, P S; Hadley, M E

    1982-01-01

    alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-melanotropin; alpha-MSH) is a linear tridecapeptide (Ac-Ser-Tyr-Ser-Met-Glu-His-Phe-Arg-Trp-Gly-Lys-Pro-Val-NH2) that reversibly darkens amphibian skins by stimulating melanomsome (pigment granule) dispersion within melanophores. By using a number of in vitro melanocyte assays, we have examined the conformational requirements for alpha-MSH activity. Synthesis of [half-Cys4,half-Cys10]-alpha-MSH, a cyclic, conformationally restricted, "isosteric" analogue of alpha-MSH, provided a melanotropin with a potency greater than 10,000 times that of the native hormone in stimulating frog (Rana pipiens) skin darkening. The cyclic analogue also showed substantially prolonged activity relative to the native hormone. [half-Cys4,half-Cys10]-alpha-MSH was approximately 30 times more potent than alpha-MSH in stimulating lizard (Anolis carolinensis) skin melanophores in vitro. By using a cell-free Cloudman S-91 mouse melanoma plasma membrane preparation, we found the cyclic analogue to be approximately 3 times as potent as the native hormone in stimulating adenylate cyclase activity. These results provide insight into the conformational requirements for biological activity of alpha-MSH, and the comparative conformational requirements of alpha-MSH at a number of pigment cell receptors. PMID:6281785

  11. [Echocardiography in mouse].

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A

    2008-06-01

    Assessing cardiac phenotype requires invasive or noninvasive techniques in mouse. Echocardiography is a noninvasive technique for evaluating cardiac function. The purpose of this paper is to underline echocardiography modalities and new tools Doppler applications like tissue Doppler imaging.

  12. Mouse Cleaning Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The method of using the mouse pad cleaning apparatus is disclosed and claimed. The method comprises the steps of uncovering the mouse cleaning surface, applying the mouse and ball of the mouse to the cleaning surface, moving the mouse in a rotational pattern on the mouse cleaning surface, removing the mouse form the mouse cleaning surface, washing the cleaning surface, and covering the mouse cleaning surface. A mouse pad cleaning apparatus comprising a plurality of substrates, each said substrate having adhesive thereon, said plurality of substrates residing in and affixed to a receptacle. A single substrate having adhesive, which may be washable or non-washable, thereon may be employed. The washable adhesive may be an organopolysiloxane or gelatinous elastomer.

  13. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  14. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome. PMID:22889292

  15. Researchers Create Artificial Mouse 'Embryo'

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163881.html Researchers Create Artificial Mouse 'Embryo' Experiment used two types of gene-modified stem ... they've created a kind of artificial mouse embryo using stem cells, which can be coaxed to ...

  16. The Mouse SAGE Site: database of public mouse SAGE libraries.

    PubMed

    Divina, Petr; Forejt, Jirí

    2004-01-01

    The Mouse SAGE Site is a web-based database of all available public libraries generated by the Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) from various mouse tissues and cell lines. The database contains mouse SAGE libraries organized in a uniform way and provides web-based tools for browsing, comparing and searching SAGE data with reliable tag-to-gene identification. A modified approach based on the SAGEmap database is used for reliable tag identification. The Mouse SAGE Site is maintained on an ongoing basis at the Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and is accessible at the internet address http://mouse.biomed.cas.cz/sage/.

  17. Psoralens stimulate mouse melanocyte and melanoma tyrosinase activity in the absence of ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Marwan, M M; Jiang, J W; Castrucci, A M; Hadley, M E

    1990-10-01

    Psoralens (8-methoxypsoralen, 5-methoxypsoralen and 4,5,8-trimethylpsoralen) stimulate mouse melanoma cell (S91 and B16/F10) tyrosinase activity in vitro in a dose-related manner. Stimulation of enzyme activity by the psoralens was evoked in the presence or absence of light. In the presence of a melanotropin the actions of the psoralens were generally at least additive compared to the individual actions of the two agonists. The actions of the psoralens were acute and depended upon the constant presence of the agents to maintain enhanced melanoma tyrosinase activity. Tyrosinase activation by the psoralens, like that of alpha-melanotropin, was blocked by actinomycin-D or cycloheximide demonstrating that the actions of the drugs may have involved both transcriptional and translational events in the stimulation of melanogenesis. Psoralens also stimulated an immediate darkening of frog skins in vitro. Topically applied psoralens were transdermally delivered to the systemic circulation resulting in a conversion from pheomelanogenesis to eumelanogenesis within follicular melanocytes throughout the entire skin of mice (C57BL/6JAy maintained in the dark. Taken together, these results demonstrate that psoralens activate processes within melanocytes resulting in both an immediate translocation of melanosomes within the cell (frog) or in a slower genomic event involving tyrosinase activation (melanoma cells) and eumelanin formation (mouse follicular melanocytes).

  18. The Mouse That Soared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    Astronomers have used an X-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. The image, from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. VLA Radio Image of the Mouse, Full Field VLA Radio Image of the Mouse, Full Field A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the X-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. It gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. "A few dozen pulsar wind nebulae are known, including the spectacular Crab Nebula, but none have the Mouse's combination of relatively young age and incredibly rapid motion through interstellar space," said Bryan Gaensler of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and lead author of a paper on the Mouse that will appear in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "We effectively are seeing a supersonic cosmic wind tunnel, in which we can study the effects of a pulsar's motion on its pulsar wind nebula, and test current theories." Illustration of the Mouse System Illustration of the Mouse System Pulsars are known to be rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron stars -- objects so dense that a mass equal to that of the Sun is packed into a

  19. Mouse Phenome Database

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Stephen C.; Bult, Carol J.; Bogue, Molly A.

    2014-01-01

    The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD; phenome.jax.org) was launched in 2001 as the data coordination center for the international Mouse Phenome Project. MPD integrates quantitative phenotype, gene expression and genotype data into a common annotated framework to facilitate query and analysis. MPD contains >3500 phenotype measurements or traits relevant to human health, including cancer, aging, cardiovascular disorders, obesity, infectious disease susceptibility, blood disorders, neurosensory disorders, drug addiction and toxicity. Since our 2012 NAR report, we have added >70 new data sets, including data from Collaborative Cross lines and Diversity Outbred mice. During this time we have completely revamped our homepage, improved search and navigational aspects of the MPD application, developed several web-enabled data analysis and visualization tools, annotated phenotype data to public ontologies, developed an ontology browser and released new single nucleotide polymorphism query functionality with much higher density coverage than before. Here, we summarize recent data acquisitions and describe our latest improvements. PMID:24243846

  20. UVA, pheomelanin and the carcinogenesis of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hill, H Z; Hill, G J

    2000-01-01

    Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma cells vary in constitutive and inducible melanin levels. Survival, mutation induction and DNA damage were quantitated after exposure to UVB, UVA and FS20 lamps. Assuming that the observed differences are related to melanin, induced pigment is photo-protective for survival and mutation after UVB and FS20 exposure, and is photosensitizing for survival after UVA exposure. No changes in pyrimidine dimers could be measured. DNA damage in pigmented mouse melanocytes (melan-a and melan-b) was greater than that in albino melanocytes (melan-c) after UVB and FS20, and the pigmented cells were more sensitive to killing. Pigment appears to be protective for killing by UVA in these melanocytes. Human melanocytes from different skin types vary in both melanin amount and composition (eu- and pheomelanin). Effects of pigmentation on UVB responses are unclear. In UVA, heavily pigmented cells have more DNA damage than lightly pigmented cells, but are resistant to killing. Increased pheomelanin photosensitizes DNA damage in lightly pigmented cells. Since eumelanin predominates in the mouse melanoma cells and melanocytes, they are less likely than human cells to provide a satisfactory model for human solar melanomagenesis. In order to understand the mechanism of photocarcinogenesis of melanoma, melanins in human melanocytes from different pigment types should be carefully quantitated and characterized. Mutations induced in them by solar wavelength-emitting lamps with well-characterized spectra should be measured, and mutant DNA should be sequenced to determine the nature of the solar-induced lesions. Research should focus on UVA and pheomelanin.

  1. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/.

  2. Mouse Models of Aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Olivia; Wiseman, Frances K.; Ruparelia, Aarti; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormalities of chromosome copy number are called aneuploidies and make up a large health load on the human population. Many aneuploidies are lethal because the resulting abnormal gene dosage is highly deleterious. Nevertheless, some whole chromosome aneuploidies can lead to live births. Alterations in the copy number of sections of chromosomes, which are also known as segmental aneuploidies, are also associated with deleterious effects. Here we examine how aneuploidy of whole chromosomes and segmental aneuploidy of chromosomal regions are modeled in the mouse. These models provide a whole animal system in which we aim to investigate the complex phenotype-genotype interactions that arise from alteration in the copy number of genes. Although our understanding of this subject is still in its infancy, already research in mouse models is highlighting possible therapies that might help alleviate the cognitive effects associated with changes in gene number. Thus, creating and studying mouse models of aneuploidy and copy number variation is important for understanding what it is to be human, in both the normal and genomically altered states. PMID:22262951

  3. Mouse models in oncoimmunology.

    PubMed

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Pitt, Jonathan M; Daillère, Romain; Smyth, Mark J; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental cancer research and the development of efficacious antineoplastic treatments both rely on experimental systems in which the relationship between malignant cells and immune cells can be studied. Mouse models of transplantable, carcinogen-induced or genetically engineered malignancies - each with their specific advantages and difficulties - have laid the foundations of oncoimmunology. These models have guided the immunosurveillance theory that postulates that evasion from immune control is an essential feature of cancer, the concept that the long-term effects of conventional cancer treatments mostly rely on the reinstatement of anticancer immune responses and the preclinical development of immunotherapies, including currently approved immune checkpoint blockers. Specific aspects of pharmacological development, as well as attempts to personalize cancer treatments using patient-derived xenografts, require the development of mouse models in which murine genes and cells are replaced with their human equivalents. Such 'humanized' mouse models are being progressively refined to characterize the leukocyte subpopulations that belong to the innate and acquired arms of the immune system as they infiltrate human cancers that are subjected to experimental therapies. We surmise that the ever-advancing refinement of murine preclinical models will accelerate the pace of therapeutic optimization in patients.

  4. Manipulation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells for Knockout Mouse Production

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Advait; Hall, Bradford; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2009-01-01

    The establishment of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell liness has allowed for the generation of the knockout mouse. ES cells that are genetically altered in culture can then be manipulated to derive a whole mouse containing the desired mutation. To successfully generate a knockout mouse, however, the ES cells must be carefully cultivated in a pluripotent state throughout the gene targeting experiment. This unit describes detailed step-by-step protocols, reagents, equipment, and strategies needed for the successful generation of gene knockout embryonic stem cells using homologous recombination technologies. PMID:19731225

  5. Mouse genetics: catalogue and scissors.

    PubMed

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-12-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics.

  6. A new mouse model for infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy, inad mouse, maps to mouse chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Yoshibumi; Kikuchi, Tateki; Kikuchi, Hisae; Ichihara, Nobutsune; Ishikawa, Akira; Ishijima, Yasushi; Tachibana, Masayoshi

    2005-02-01

    Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary neurodegenerative disease of humans. So far, no responsible gene has been cloned or mapped to any chromosome. For chromosome mapping and positional cloning of the responsible gene, establishment of an animal model would be useful. Here we describe a new mouse model for INAD, named inad mouse. In this mouse, the phenotype is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, symptoms occur in the infantile period, and the mouse dies before sexual maturity. Axonal dystrophic change appearing as spheroid bodies in central and peripheral nervous system was observed. These features more closely resembled human INAD than did those of the gad mouse, the traditional mouse model for INAD. Linkage analysis linked the inad gene to mouse Chromosome 1, with the highest LOD score (=128.6) at the D1Mit45 marker, and haplotype study localized the inad gene to a 7.5-Mb region between D1Mit84 and D1Mit25. In this linkage area some 60 genes exist: Mutation of one of these 60 genes is likely responsible for the inad mouse phenotype. Our preliminary mutation analysis in 15 genes examining the nucleotide sequence of exons of these genes did not find any sequence difference between inad mouse and C57BL/6 mouse.

  7. Human anti-mouse antibodies.

    PubMed

    Klee, G G

    2000-06-01

    Human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) are human immunoglobulins with specificity for mouse immunoglobulins. This topic currently is of interest because of the increased use of monoclonal mouse antibodies as diagnostic reagents both for in vitro laboratory measurements and for in vivo imaging studies. Monoclonal mouse antibodies also are being used therapeutically. This short article reviews the production of HAMA in patients receiving monoclonal antibodies and illustrates the potential ways that HAMA can interfere with immunoassay measurements. Methods for measuring and neutralizing HAMA also are discussed.

  8. MouseBook: an integrated portal of mouse resources.

    PubMed

    Blake, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Greenaway, Simon; Thomas, Steve; Pickard, Amanda; Williamson, Christine M; Adams, Niels C; Walling, Alison; Beck, Tim; Fray, Martin; Peters, Jo; Weaver, Tom; Brown, Steve D M; Hancock, John M; Mallon, Ann-Marie

    2010-01-01

    The MouseBook (http://www.mousebook.org) databases and web portal provide access to information about mutant mouse lines held as live or cryopreserved stocks at MRC Harwell. The MouseBook portal integrates curated information from the MRC Harwell stock resource, and other Harwell databases, with information from external data resources to provide value-added information above and beyond what is available through other routes such as International Mouse Stain Resource (IMSR). MouseBook can be searched either using an intuitive Google style free text search or using the Mammalian Phenotype (MP) ontology tree structure. Text searches can be on gene, allele, strain identifier (e.g. MGI ID) or phenotype term and are assisted by automatic recognition of term types and autocompletion of gene and allele names covered by the database. Results are returned in a tabbed format providing categorized results identified from each of the catalogs in MouseBook. Individual result lines from each catalog include information on gene, allele, chromosomal location and phenotype, and provide a simple click-through link to further information as well as ordering the strain. The infrastructure underlying MouseBook has been designed to be extensible, allowing additional data sources to be added and enabling other sites to make their data directly available through MouseBook.

  9. Chandra Catches the `Mouse'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronomers have used an x-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. This image, from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the x-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. G359.23-0.82 gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama manages the Chandler program.

  10. In vitro and in vivo study of melanoma tumor cell invasion and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlsen, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    In order to better understand and associate in vitro tumor cell invasion through basement membranes with in vivo tumor metastasis in syngeneic animal models, and the subsequent modulation of these processes, the following studies have been undertaken. Malignant murine melanoma cell lines designated B16F1 and B16F10, syngeneic to the C57BL6 mouse, a melanotic variant of the Cloudman S-91 melanoma cell line (denoted Mel-11a) with the syngeneic host being the DBA/2J mouse, and a malignant human melanoma line referenced as A375P (parental) and A375M (metastatic) were used for this dissertation project. Tumor cells were labeled with either /sup 14/C-thymidine or /sup 125/I-deoxyuridine using previously established protocols. Radiolabeled tumor cells were introduced into the Membrane Invasion Culture System (MICS) in vitro, a system developed in the lab, and concomitantly into the lateral tail vein by injection or intracutaneously into the appropriate syngeneic host in the presence or absence of such biological response modifying agents as (NIe/sup 4/, D-Phe/sup 7/)-MSH, and ..cap alpha..-MSH. In concert with these studies, the development of a control cell line, comprised of neural crest-derived melanocytes, and the study of their subsequent invasiveness in vitro were pursued. These studies demonstrate the ability of the MICS in vitro invasion assay to discriminate between tumor cells with differing metastatic propensities and could possibly be used in future studies to predict the effectiveness of biological response modifying agents in vivo.

  11. Mouse models for neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Hafezparast, Majid; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Wood, Nicholas W; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2002-08-01

    The mouse has many advantages over human beings for the study of genetics, including the unique property that genetic manipulation can be routinely carried out in the mouse genome. Most importantly, mice and human beings share the same mammalian genes, have many similar biochemical pathways, and have the same diseases. In the minority of cases where these features do not apply, we can still often gain new insights into mouse and human biology. In addition to existing mouse models, several major programmes have been set up to generate new mouse models of disease. Alongside these efforts are new initiatives for the clinical, behavioural, and physiological testing of mice. Molecular genetics has had a major influence on our understanding of the causes of neurological disorders in human beings, and much of this has come from work in mice.

  12. Mouse models of gastrointestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Taketo, Makoto Mark

    2006-05-01

    The laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) has become one of the best model animal species in biomedical research today because of its abundant genetic/genomic information, and easy mutagenesis using transgenic and gene knockout technology. Genetically engineered mice have become essential tools in both mechanistic studies and drug development. In this article I will review recent topics in gastrointestinal cancer model mice, with emphasis on the results obtained in our laboratory. They include: (i) mouse models for familial adenomatous polyposis (Apc mutant mice; modifier genes of Apc intestinal polyposis; stabilizing beta-catenin mutant mice); (ii) mouse models for colon cancer (mouse models for hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer; additional mutations in Apc mutant mice; models with mutations in other genes; models for colon cancer associated with inflammatory bowel diseases); and (iii) mouse models for gastric cancer.

  13. Mouse anesthesia and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Adams, Sean; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2015-03-02

    Providing anesthesia and analgesia for mouse subjects is a common and critical practice in the laboratory setting. These practices are necessary for performing invasive procedures, achieving prolonged immobility for sensitive imaging modalities (magnetic resonance imaging for instance), and providing intra- and post-procedural pain relief. In addition to facilitating the procedures performed by the investigator, the provision of anesthesia and analgesia is crucial for the preservation of animal welfare and for humane treatment of animals used in research. Furthermore, anesthesia and analgesia are important components of animal use protocols reviewed by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees, requiring careful consideration and planning for the particular animal model. In this article, we provide technical outlines for the investigator covering the provision of anesthesia by two routes (injectable and inhalant), guidelines for monitoring anesthesia, current techniques for recognition of pain, and considerations for administering preventative analgesia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Whole mouse cryo-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David; Roy, Debashish; Steyer, Grant; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Stone, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    The Case cryo-imaging system is a section and image system which allows one to acquire micron-scale, information rich, whole mouse color bright field and molecular fluorescence images of an entire mouse. Cryo-imaging is used in a variety of applications, including mouse and embryo anatomical phenotyping, drug delivery, imaging agents, metastastic cancer, stem cells, and very high resolution vascular imaging, among many. Cryo-imaging fills the gap between whole animal in vivo imaging and histology, allowing one to image a mouse along the continuum from the mouse -> organ -> tissue structure -> cell -> sub-cellular domains. In this overview, we describe the technology and a variety of exciting applications. Enhancements to the system now enable tiled acquisition of high resolution images to cover an entire mouse. High resolution fluorescence imaging, aided by a novel subtraction processing algorithm to remove sub-surface fluorescence, makes it possible to detect fluorescently-labeled single cells. Multi-modality experiments in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cryo-imaging of a whole mouse demonstrate superior resolution of cryo-images and efficiency of registration techniques. The 3D results demonstrate the novel true-color volume visualization tools we have developed and the inherent advantage of cryo-imaging in providing unlimited depth of field and spatial resolution. The recent results continue to demonstrate the value cryo-imaging provides in the field of small animal imaging research.

  15. Cell cycle in mouse development.

    PubMed

    Ciemerych, Maria A; Sicinski, Peter

    2005-04-18

    Mice likely represent the most-studied mammalian organism, except for humans. Genetic engineering in embryonic stem cells has allowed derivation of mouse strains lacking particular cell cycle proteins. Analyses of these mutant mice, and cells derived from them, facilitated the studies of the functions of cell cycle apparatus at the organismal and cellular levels. In this review, we give some background about the cell cycle progression during mouse development. We next discuss some insights about in vivo functions of the cell cycle proteins, gleaned from mouse knockout experiments. Our text is meant to provide examples of the recent experiments, rather than to supply an extensive and complete list.

  16. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  17. Reactivity of mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes with thrombin-treated mouse platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, S

    1989-01-01

    The reactivity of mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes (BrMRBC) with mouse platelets before and after thrombin treatment was assessed by flow cytometry. Anti-BrMRBC antibodies could bind to thrombin-treated platelets, although normal platelets were also weakly reactive with the antibodies. The binding of anti-BrMRBC antibodies to platelets was confirmed by complement-dependent lysis. It is suggested that thrombin-activated platelets may be a real target for anti-BrMRBC antibodies. PMID:2467876

  18. Mouse Phenome Database

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Stephen C.; Maddatu, Terry P.; Bult, Carol J.; Bogue, Molly A.

    2009-01-01

    The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD; http://www.jax.org/phenome) is an open source, web-based repository of phenotypic and genotypic data on commonly used and genetically diverse inbred strains of mice and their derivatives. MPD is also a facility for query, analysis and in silico hypothesis testing. Currently MPD contains about 1400 phenotypic measurements contributed by research teams worldwide, including phenotypes relevant to human health such as cancer susceptibility, aging, obesity, susceptibility to infectious diseases, atherosclerosis, blood disorders and neurosensory disorders. Electronic access to centralized strain data enables investigators to select optimal strains for many systems-based research applications, including physiological studies, drug and toxicology testing, modeling disease processes and complex trait analysis. The ability to select strains for specific research applications by accessing existing phenotype data can bypass the need to (re)characterize strains, precluding major investments of time and resources. This functionality, in turn, accelerates research and leverages existing community resources. Since our last NAR reporting in 2007, MPD has added more community-contributed data covering more phenotypic domains and implemented several new tools and features, including a new interactive Tool Demo available through the MPD homepage (quick link: http://phenome.jax.org/phenome/trytools). PMID:18987003

  19. Mouse genetics: Catalogue and scissors

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics. [BMB Reports 2012; 45(12): 686-692] PMID:23261053

  20. Mouse models for graft arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lingfeng; Yu, Luyang; Min, Wang

    2013-05-14

    Graft arteriosclerois (GA), also called allograft vasculopathy, is a pathologic lesion that develops over months to years in transplanted organs characterized by diffuse, circumferential stenosis of the entire graft vascular tree. The most critical component of GA pathogenesis is the proliferation of smooth muscle-like cells within the intima. When a human coronary artery segment is interposed into the infra-renal aortae of immunodeficient mice, the intimas could be expand in response to adoptively transferred human T cells allogeneic to the artery donor or exogenous human IFN-γ in the absence of human T cells. Interposition of a mouse aorta from one strain into another mouse strain recipient is limited as a model for chronic rejection in humans because the acute cell-mediated rejection response in this mouse model completely eliminates all donor-derived vascular cells from the graft within two-three weeks. We have recently developed two new mouse models to circumvent these problems. The first model involves interposition of a vessel segment from a male mouse into a female recipient of the same inbred strain (C57BL/6J). Graft rejection in this case is directed only against minor histocompatibility antigens encoded by the Y chromosome (present in the male but not the female) and the rejection response that ensues is sufficiently indolent to preserve donor-derived smooth muscle cells for several weeks. The second model involves interposing an artery segment from a wild type C57BL/6J mouse donor into a host mouse of the same strain and gender that lacks the receptor for IFN-γ followed by administration of mouse IFN-γ (delivered via infection of the mouse liver with an adenoviral vector. There is no rejection in this case as both donor and recipient mice are of the same strain and gender but donor smooth muscle cells proliferate in response to the cytokine while host-derived cells, lacking receptor for this cytokine, are unresponsive. By backcrossing additional

  1. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  2. Mouse Models of Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Erik D.

    2012-01-01

    The pace of discovery in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) has accelerated dramatically with the discovery of new genetic causes and pathological substrates of the disease. MAPT/Tau, GRN/progranulin, and C9ORF72 have emerged as common FTD genes, and TARDBP/TDP-43, VCP, FUS, and CHMP2B have been identified as less common genetic causes. TDP-43 and FUS have joined Tau as common neuropathological substrates of the disease. Mouse models provide an important tool for understanding the role of these molecules in FTD pathogenesis. Here, we review recent progress with mouse models based on Tau, TDP-43, progranulin, VCP, and CHMP2B. We also consider future prospects for FTD models, including developing new models to address unanswered questions. There are also opportunities for capitalizing on conservation of the salience network, which is selectively vulnerable in FTD, and the availability of FTD-related behavioral paradigms to analyze mouse models of the disease. PMID:23280835

  3. Mouse Models of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valkenburg, Kenneth C.; Williams, Bart O.

    2011-01-01

    The development and optimization of high-throughput screening methods has identified a multitude of genetic changes associated with human disease. The use of immunodeficient and genetically engineered mouse models that mimic the human disease has been crucial in validating the importance of these genetic pathways in prostate cancer. These models provide a platform for finding novel therapies to treat human patients afflicted with prostate cancer as well as those who have debilitating bone metastases. In this paper, we focus on the historical development and phenotypic descriptions of mouse models used to study prostate cancer. We also comment on how closely each model recapitulates human prostate cancer. PMID:22111002

  4. APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis in Whole Mouse Ovaries
    Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27711.

  5. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  6. Mouse models of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ban, Joanne; Phillips, William D

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a muscle weakness disease characterized by autoantibodies that target components of the neuromuscular junction, impairing synaptic transmission. The most common form of myasthenia gravis involves antibodies that bind the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the postsynaptic membrane. Many of the remaining cases are due to antibodies against muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Recently, autoantibodies against LRP4 (another component of the MuSK signaling complex in the postsynaptic membrane) were identified as the likely cause of myasthenia gravis in some patients. Fatiguing weakness is the common symptom in all forms of myasthenia gravis, but muscles of the body are differentially affected, for reasons that are not fully understood. Much of what we have learnt about the immunological and neurobiological aspects of the pathogenesis derives from mouse models. The most widely used mouse models involve either passive transfer of autoantibodies, or active immunization of the mouse with acetylcholine receptors or MuSK protein. These models can provide a robust replication of many of the features of the human disease. Depending upon the protocol, acute fatiguing weakness develops 2 - 14 days after the start of autoantibody injections (passive transfer) or might require repeated immunizations over several weeks (active models). Here we review mouse models of myasthenia gravis, including what they have contributed to current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and their current application to the testing of therapeutics.

  7. High-throughput mouse phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Gates, Hilary; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2011-04-01

    Comprehensive phenotyping will be required to reveal the pleiotropic functions of a gene and to uncover the wider role of genetic loci within diverse biological systems. The challenge will be to devise phenotyping approaches to characterise the thousands of mutants that are being generated as part of international efforts to acquire a mutant for every gene in the mouse genome. In order to acquire robust datasets of broad based phenotypes from mouse mutants it is necessary to design and implement pipelines that incorporate standardised phenotyping platforms that are validated across diverse mouse genetics centres or mouse clinics. We describe here the rationale and methodology behind one phenotyping pipeline, EMPReSSslim, that was designed as part of the work of the EUMORPHIA and EUMODIC consortia, and which exemplifies some of the challenges facing large-scale phenotyping. EMPReSSslim captures a broad range of data on diverse biological systems, from biochemical to physiological amongst others. Data capture and dissemination is pivotal to the operation of large-scale phenotyping pipelines, including the definition of parameters integral to each phenotyping test and the associated ontological descriptions. EMPReSSslim data is displayed within the EuroPhenome database, where a variety of tools are available to allow the user to search for interesting biological or clinical phenotypes.

  8. APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis in Whole Mouse Ovaries
    Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27711.

  9. Aging Research Using Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Anderson, Laura C; Sheehan, Susan; Hill, Warren G; Chang, Bo; Churchill, Gary A; Chesler, Elissa J; Korstanje, Ron; Peters, Luanne L

    2015-06-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in human lifespan over the past century, there remains pronounced variability in "health-span," or the period of time in which one is generally healthy and free of disease. Much of the variability in health-span and lifespan is thought to be genetic in origin. Understanding the genetic mechanisms of aging and identifying ways to boost longevity is a primary goal in aging research. Here, we describe a pipeline of phenotypic assays for assessing mouse models of aging. This pipeline includes behavior/cognition testing, body composition analysis, and tests of kidney function, hematopoiesis, and immune function, as well as physical parameters. We also describe study design methods for assessing lifespan and health-span, and other important considerations when conducting aging research in the laboratory mouse. The tools and assays provided can assist researchers with understanding the correlative relationships between age-associated phenotypes and, ultimately, the role of specific genes in the aging process.

  10. Mouse Models of Human Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Shedlovsky, A.; McDonald, J. D.; Symula, D.; Dove, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) results from a deficiency in phenylalanine hydroxylase, the enzyme catalyzing the conversion of phenylalanine (PHE) to tyrosine. Although this inborn error of metabolism was among the first in humans to be understood biochemically and genetically, little is known of the mechanism(s) involved in the pathology of PKU. We have combined mouse germline mutagenesis with screens for hyperphenylalaninemia to isolate three mutants deficient in phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) activity and cross-reactive protein. Two of these have reduced PAH mRNA and display characteristics of untreated human PKU patients. A low PHE diet partially reverses these abnormalities. Our success in using high frequency random germline point mutagenesis to obtain appropriate disease models illustrates how such mutagenesis can complement the emergent power of targeted mutagenesis in the mouse. The mutants now can be used as models in studying both maternal PKU and somatic gene therapy. PMID:8375656

  11. Aging Research Using Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Anderson, Laura; Sheehan, Susan; Hill, Warren G.; Chang, Bo; Churchill, Gary A.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Korstanje, Ron; Peters, Luanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in human lifespan over the past century, there remains pronounced variability in “health-span”, or the period of time in which one is generally healthy and free of disease. Much of the variability in health-span and lifespan is thought to be genetic in origin. Understanding the genetic mechanisms of aging and identifying ways to boost longevity is a primary goal in aging research. Here, we describe a pipeline of phenotypic assays for assessing mouse models of aging. This pipeline includes behavior/cognition testing, body composition analysis, and tests of kidney function, hematopoiesis, immune function and physical parameters. We also describe study design methods for assessing lifespan and health-span, and other important considerations when conducting aging research in the laboratory mouse. The tools and assays provided can assist researchers with understanding the correlative relationships between age-associated phenotypes and, ultimately, the role of specific genes in the aging process. PMID:26069080

  12. Dietary manipulation of mouse metabolism.

    PubMed

    Feige, Jérôme N; Lagouge, Marie; Auwerx, Johan

    2008-10-01

    The maintenance of metabolic homeostasis relies on the balanced intake of nutrients from food. Consequently, diet composition strongly impacts whole-body physiology. Dietary formulations with strong nutrient imbalances can lead to metabolic disorders, with lipids and simple sugars playing a prominent role. This unit describes how diet formulation can be modified to generate mouse models of human metabolic pathologies, and it details methodological procedures linked to dietary manipulations, including caloric restriction and introduction of a test compound.

  13. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Fox, James G.; Gonda, Tamas; Worthley, Daniel L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Wang, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. PMID:24216700

  14. Retinofugal Projections in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Lawrence P.; Studholme, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is increasingly a subject for visual system investigation, but there has been no comprehensive evaluation of this species’ visual projections. Here, projections were visualized and mapped following intraocular injection of cholera toxin B subunit. Tissue was processed using standard procedures applied to 30 Am free floating sections with diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. The mouse retina projects to approximately 46 brain regions, including 14 not previously described in this species. These include two amygdaloid nuclei, the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, several visual thalamic nuclei, the paranigral nucleus, several pretectal nuclei, and the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus. Dense retinal patches were also observed in a narrow portion of the ipsilateral intermediate layer of the superior colliculus. The superior fasciculus of the accessory optic tract, which innervates the medial terminal nucleus, was also determined to be a terminal zone throughout its length. The results are compared with previous descriptions of projections from mouse intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells, and with data from the hamster, Nile grass rat and laboratory rat. The retinal projection patterns are similar in all four species, although there are many differences with respect to the details. The specific visual functions of most retinorecipient areas are unknown, but there is substantial convergence of retinal projections onto regions concerned with olfaction and audition. PMID:24889098

  15. Retinofugal projections in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Morin, Lawrence P; Studholme, Keith M

    2014-11-01

    The laboratory mouse is increasingly a subject for visual system investigation, but there has been no comprehensive evaluation of this species' visual projections. Here, projections were visualized and mapped following intraocular injection of cholera toxin B subunit. Tissue was processed using standard procedures applied to 30 μm free-floating sections with diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. The mouse retina projects to ~46 brain regions, including 14 not previously described in this species. These include two amygdaloid nuclei, the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, several visual thalamic nuclei, the paranigral nucleus, several pretectal nuclei, and the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus. Dense retinal patches were also observed in a narrow portion of the ipsilateral intermediate layer of the superior colliculus. The superior fasciculus of the accessory optic tract, which innervates the medial terminal nucleus, was also determined to be a terminal zone throughout its length. The results are compared with previous descriptions of projections from mouse intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells, and with data from the hamster, Nile grass rat, and laboratory rat. The retinal projection patterns are similar in all four species, although there are many differences with respect to the details. The specific visual functions of most retinorecipient areas are unknown, but there is substantial convergence of retinal projections onto regions concerned with olfaction and audition.

  16. Mouse models of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Erik D

    2012-12-01

    The pace of discovery in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) has accelerated dramatically with the discovery of new genetic causes and pathological substrates of the disease. MAPT/tau, GRN/progranulin, and C9ORF72 have emerged as common FTD genes, and TARDBP/TDP-43, VCP, FUS, and CHMP2B have been identified as less common genetic causes. TDP-43 and FUS have joined tau as common neuropathological substrates of the disease. Mouse models provide an important tool for understanding the role of these molecules in FTD pathogenesis. Here, we review recent progress with mouse models based on tau, TDP-43, progranulin, VCP, and CHMP2B. We also consider future prospects for FTD models, including developing new models to address unanswered questions. There are also opportunities for capitalizing on conservation of the salience network, which is selectively vulnerable in FTD, and the availability of FTD-related behavioral paradigms to analyze mouse models of the disease. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  17. Mouse Models for Methylmalonic Aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Heidi L.; Pitt, James J.; Wood, Leonie R.; Hamilton, Natasha J.; Sarsero, Joseph P.; Buck, Nicole E.

    2012-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is a disorder of organic acid metabolism resulting from a functional defect of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). MMA is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, thus therapies are necessary to help improve quality of life and prevent renal and neurological complications. Transgenic mice carrying an intact human MCM locus have been produced. Four separate transgenic lines were established and characterised as carrying two, four, five or six copies of the transgene in a single integration site. Transgenic mice from the 2-copy line were crossed with heterozygous knockout MCM mice to generate mice hemizygous for the human transgene on a homozygous knockout background. Partial rescue of the uniform neonatal lethality seen in homozygous knockout mice was observed. These rescued mice were significantly smaller than control littermates (mice with mouse MCM gene). Biochemically, these partial rescue mice exhibited elevated methylmalonic acid levels in urine, plasma, kidney, liver and brain tissue. Acylcarnitine analysis of blood spots revealed elevated propionylcarnitine levels. Analysis of mRNA expression confirms the human transgene is expressed at higher levels than observed for the wild type, with highest expression in the kidney followed closely by brain and liver. Partial rescue mouse fibroblast cultures had only 20% of the wild type MCM enzyme activity. It is anticipated that this humanised partial rescue mouse model of MMA will enable evaluation of long-term pathophysiological effects of elevated methylmalonic acid levels and be a valuable model for the investigation of therapeutic strategies, such as cell transplantation. PMID:22792386

  18. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0331 TITLE: Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Miklos Sahin-Toth, M.D., Ph.D...CONTRACT NUMBER Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0331 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...The aim of our research is to generate and characterize mouse models of human hereditary pancreatitis that develop pancreatitis spontaneously or

  19. Neural stem cell transplantation in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jean-Pyo; McKercher, Scott; Muller, Franz-Josef; Snyder, Evan Y

    2008-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are the most primordial, least committed cells of the nervous system, and transplantation of these multipotent cells holds the promise of regenerative therapy for many central nervous system (CNS) diseases. This unit describes methods for NSC transplantation into neonatal mouse pups, embryonic mouse brain, and adult mouse brain. A description of options for detection of labeled donor cells in engrafted mouse brain is provided along with an example protocol for detecting lacZ-expressing cells in situ. Also included is a protocol for preparing NSCs for transplantation.

  20. Mouse models of human thalassemia

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.F.; Martinell, J.; Whitney, J.B. III; Popp, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The group of diseases called the thalassemias is the largest single-gene health problem in the world according the World Health Organization. The thalassemias are lethal hereditary anemias in which the infants cannot make their own blood. Three mouse mutants are shown to be models of the human disease ..cap alpha..-thalassemia. However, since an additional gene is affected, these mutants represent a particularly severe condition in which death occurs in the homozygous embryo even before globin genes are activated. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics are described. (ACR)

  1. Therapeutic cloning in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mombaerts, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear transfer technology can be applied to produce autologous differentiated cells for therapeutic purposes, a concept termed therapeutic cloning. Countless articles have been published on the ethics and politics of human therapeutic cloning, reflecting the high expectations from this new opportunity for rejuvenation of the aging or diseased body. Yet the research literature on therapeutic cloning, strictly speaking, is comprised of only four articles, all in the mouse. The efficiency of derivation of embryonic stem cell lines via nuclear transfer is remarkably consistent among these reports. However, the efficiency is so low that, in its present form, the concept is unlikely to become widespread in clinical practice. PMID:12949262

  2. [Psoriasis SCID-mouse model].

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, J; Kaufmann, R; Boehncke, W-H

    2006-07-01

    Psoriasis is characterized by a complex phenotype and pathogenesis along with polygenic determination. Several psoriasis animal models have only been able to incompletely reproduce the disease. A xenogeneic transplantation approach, grafting skin from psoriatic patients onto mice with a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), was the first to meet the criteria for a psoriasis model. During the last 10 years, this psoriasis SCID-mouse model not only allowed telling experiments focusing on pathogenetic aspects, but also proved being a powerful tool for drug discovery with a good predictive value.

  3. Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Esquerda-Canals, Gisela; Montoliu-Gaya, Laia; Güell-Bosch, Jofre; Villegas, Sandra

    2017-03-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that nowadays affects more than 40 million people worldwide and it is predicted to exponentially increase in the coming decades. Because no curative treatment exists, research on the pathophysiology of the disease, as well as the testing of new drugs, are mandatory. For these purposes, animal models constitute a valuable, although perfectible tool. This review takes a tour through several aspects of mouse models of AD, such as the generation of transgenic models, the relevance of the promoter driving the expression of the transgenes, and the concrete transgenes used to simulate AD pathophysiology. Then, transgenic mouse lines harboring mutated human genes at several loci such as APP, PSEN1, APOEɛ4, and ob (leptin) are reviewed. Therefore, not only the accumulation of the Aβ peptide is emulated but also cholesterol and insulin metabolism. Further novel information about the disease will allow for the development of more accurate animal models, which in turn will undoubtedly be helpful for bringing preclinical research closer to clinical trials in humans.

  4. Mouse Auditory Brainstem Response Testing

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Omar; Oursler, A. E.; Fan, Kevin; Lustig, Lawrence R.

    2016-01-01

    The auditory brainstem response (ABR) test provides information about the inner ear (cochlea) and the central pathways for hearing. The ABR reflects the electrical responses of both the cochlear ganglion neurons and the nuclei of the central auditory pathway to sound stimulation (Zhou et al., 2006; Burkard et al., 2007). The ABR contains 5 identifiable wave forms, labeled as I-V. Wave I represents the summated response from the spiral ganglion and auditory nerve while waves II-V represent responses from the ascending auditory pathway. The ABR is recorded via electrodes placed on the scalp of an anesthetized animal. ABR thresholds refer to the lowest sound pressure level (SPL) that can generate identifiable electrical response waves. This protocol describes the process of measuring the ABR of small rodents (mouse, rat, guinea pig, etc.), including anesthetizing the mouse, placing the electrodes on the scalp, recording click and tone burst stimuli and reading the obtained waveforms for ABR threshold values. As technology continues to evolve, ABR will likely provide more qualitative and quantitative information regarding the function of the auditory nerve and brainstem pathways involved in hearing.

  5. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients.

  6. Mouse models of the laminopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Colin L. . E-mail: stewartc@ncifcrf.gov; Kozlov, Serguei; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G. . E-mail: sgyoung@mednet.ucla.edu

    2007-06-10

    The A and B type lamins are nuclear intermediate filament proteins that comprise the bulk of the nuclear lamina, a thin proteinaceous structure underlying the inner nuclear membrane. The A type lamins are encoded by the lamin A gene (LMNA). Mutations in this gene have been linked to at least nine diseases, including the progeroid diseases Hutchinson-Gilford progeria and atypical Werner's syndromes, striated muscle diseases including muscular dystrophies and dilated cardiomyopathies, lipodystrophies affecting adipose tissue deposition, diseases affecting skeletal development, and a peripheral neuropathy. To understand how different diseases arise from different mutations in the same gene, mouse lines carrying some of the same mutations found in the human diseases have been established. We, and others have generated mice with different mutations that result in progeria, muscular dystrophy, and dilated cardiomyopathy. To further our understanding of the functions of the lamins, we also created mice lacking lamin B1, as well as mice expressing only one of the A type lamins. These mouse lines are providing insights into the functions of the lamina and how changes to the lamina affect the mechanical integrity of the nucleus as well as signaling pathways that, when disrupted, may contribute to the disease.

  7. Genetic mouse models of depression.

    PubMed

    Barkus, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the use of genetically modified mice in investigating the neurobiology of depressive behaviour. First, the behavioural tests commonly used as a model of depressive-like behaviour in rodents are described. These tests include those sensitive to antidepressant treatment such as the forced swim test and the tail suspension test, as well as other tests that encompass the wider symptomatology of a depressive episode. A selection of example mutant mouse lines is then presented to illustrate the use of these tests. As our understanding of depression increases, an expanding list of candidate genes is being investigated using mutant mice. Here, mice relevant to the monoamine and corticotrophin-releasing factor hypotheses of depression are covered as well as those relating to the more recent candidate, brain-derived neurotrophic factor. This selection provides interesting examples of the use of complimentary lines, such as those that have genetic removal or overexpression, and also opposing behavioural changes seen following manipulation of closely related genes. Finally, factors such as the issue of background strain and influence of environmental factors are reflected upon, before considering what can realistically be expected of a mouse model of this complex psychiatric disorder.

  8. Head Transplantation in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-Ping; Ye, Yi-Jie; Li, Peng-Wei; Shen, Zi-Long; Han, Ke-Cheng; Song, Yang

    2015-08-01

    The mouse model of allo-head and body reconstruction (AHBR) has recently been established to further the clinical development of this strategy for patients who are suffering from mortal bodily trauma or disease, yet whose mind remains healthy. Animal model studies are indispensable for developing such novel surgical practices. The goal of this work was to establish head transplant mouse model, then the next step through the feasible biological model to investigate immune rejection and brain function in next step, thereby promoting the goal of translation of AHBR to the clinic in the future. Our approach involves retaining adequate blood perfusion in the transplanted head throughout the surgical procedure by establishing donor-to-recipient cross-circulation by cannulating and anastomosing the carotid artery on one side of the body and the jugular vein on the other side. Neurological function was preserved by this strategy as indicated by electroencephalogram and intact cranial nerve reflexes. The results of this study support the feasibility of this method for avoiding brain ischemia during transplantation, thereby allowing for the possibility of long-term studies of head transplantation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Comparative stereology of mouse atria.

    PubMed

    Bossen, E H; Sommer, J R; Waugh, R A

    1981-01-01

    The left and right atria of the mouse were compared to each other and to the mouse left ventricle using stereologic techniques. The volume fraction (Vv) and surface area per unit cell volume (Sv) of the interior junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (IJSR), total JSR and extended JSR were greater in the left atrium than in right. The Vv and Sv of the free SR, transverse tubules, and mitochondria were similar in the two atria. It is suggested that the differences in junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum between the atria can be accounted for by a difference in distribution of two types of cells whose anatomy is analogous to working and conducting fibers in the ventricle. The Sv and Vv of the transverse tubules, mitochondria, and all the components of the sarcoplasmic reticulum except for the free SR were greater in the left ventricle than in either atrium. The greater calcium content and sensitivity to extracellular calcium of the atria may explain the greater volume of free SR in the atria as compared to the left ventricle. The Sv of the plasmalemma of the atria and of the Sv of the plasmalemma of the transverse tubules of the left ventricles supports the suggestion of others that there is a constant ratio of surface area to cell volume in cardiac cells.

  10. Mouse Behavior: Conjectures about Adaptations for Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rop, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Presents an experiment on mouse behavior in which students learn to observe, pay attention to details, record field notes, and ask questions about their observations. Uses a white mouse to eliminate the risk of disease that a wild rodent might carry. Lists materials, set up, and procedure. (YDS)

  11. Measuring Viscoelastic Deformation with an Optical Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using an optical mouse to track the viscoelastic deformation of low-density polyethylene films that have a fixed attached load is presented. It is seen that using an optical mouse and with rudimentary experiment paraphernalia and arrangement, it is possible to get good measurements of viscoelastic deformation.

  12. Measuring Viscoelastic Deformation with an Optical Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using an optical mouse to track the viscoelastic deformation of low-density polyethylene films that have a fixed attached load is presented. It is seen that using an optical mouse and with rudimentary experiment paraphernalia and arrangement, it is possible to get good measurements of viscoelastic deformation.

  13. Optimizing mouse models for precision cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Le Magnen, Clémentine; Dutta, Aditya; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2017-01-01

    As cancer has become increasingly more prevalent in our society, cancer prevention research has evolved toward placing a greater emphasis on reducing cancer deaths and minimizing the adverse consequences of having cancer. “Precision cancer prevention” takes into account the collaboration of intrinsic and extrinsic factors for influencing cancer incidence and aggressiveness in the context of the individual, as well as the recognition that such knowledge can improve early detection and more accurate discrimination of cancerous lesions. The premise of this review is that analyses of mouse models can greatly augment precision cancer prevention. However, as of now, mouse models, and particularly genetically-engineered mouse (GEM) models, have yet to be fully integrated into prevention research. Herein we discuss opportunities and challenges for “precision mouse modeling”, including their essential criteria of mouse models for prevention research, representative success stories, and opportunities for the more refined analyses in future studies. PMID:26893066

  14. EMMA--the European mouse mutant archive.

    PubMed

    Hagn, Michael; Marschall, Susan; Hrabè de Angelis, Martin

    2007-09-01

    The European Mouse Mutant Archive (EMMA) offers the worldwide scientific community a free archiving service for its mutant mouse lines and access to a wide range of disease models and other research tools. EMMA is currently comprised of seven partners who operate as the primary mouse repository in Europe. EMMA' s primary objectives are to establish and manage a unified repository for maintaining mouse mutations and to make them available to the scientific community. In addition to these core services, the consortium can generate germ-free (axenic) mice for its customers and also hosts courses in cryopreservation. EMMA is a founder member of the Federation of International Mouse Resources (FIMRe). The EMMA network is funded by the participating institutes, national research programmes and the European Commission Research Infrastructures Programme.

  15. A physical map of the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Simon G; Sekhon, Mandeep; Schein, Jacqueline; Zhao, Shaying; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Scott, Carol E; Evans, Richard S; Burridge, Paul W; Cox, Tony V; Fox, Christopher A; Hutton, Richard D; Mullenger, Ian R; Phillips, Kimbly J; Smith, James; Stalker, Jim; Threadgold, Glen J; Birney, Ewan; Wylie, Kristine; Chinwalla, Asif; Wallis, John; Hillier, LaDeana; Carter, Jason; Gaige, Tony; Jaeger, Sara; Kremitzki, Colin; Layman, Dan; Maas, Jason; McGrane, Rebecca; Mead, Kelly; Walker, Rebecca; Jones, Steven; Smith, Michael; Asano, Jennifer; Bosdet, Ian; Chan, Susanna; Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Chiu, Readman; Fjell, Chris; Fuhrmann, Dan; Girn, Noreen; Gray, Catharine; Guin, Ran; Hsiao, Letticia; Krzywinski, Martin; Kutsche, Reta; Lee, Soo Sen; Mathewson, Carrie; McLeavy, Candice; Messervier, Steve; Ness, Steven; Pandoh, Pawan; Prabhu, Anna-Liisa; Saeedi, Parvaneh; Smailus, Duane; Spence, Lorraine; Stott, Jeff; Taylor, Sheryl; Terpstra, Wesley; Tsai, Miranda; Vardy, Jill; Wye, Natasja; Yang, George; Shatsman, Sofiya; Ayodeji, Bola; Geer, Keita; Tsegaye, Getahun; Shvartsbeyn, Alla; Gebregeorgis, Elizabeth; Krol, Margaret; Russell, Daniel; Overton, Larry; Malek, Joel A; Holmes, Mike; Heaney, Michael; Shetty, Jyoti; Feldblyum, Tamara; Nierman, William C; Catanese, Joseph J; Hubbard, Tim; Waterston, Robert H; Rogers, Jane; de Jong, Pieter J; Fraser, Claire M; Marra, Marco; McPherson, John D; Bentley, David R

    2002-08-15

    A physical map of a genome is an essential guide for navigation, allowing the location of any gene or other landmark in the chromosomal DNA. We have constructed a physical map of the mouse genome that contains 296 contigs of overlapping bacterial clones and 16,992 unique markers. The mouse contigs were aligned to the human genome sequence on the basis of 51,486 homology matches, thus enabling use of the conserved synteny (correspondence between chromosome blocks) of the two genomes to accelerate construction of the mouse map. The map provides a framework for assembly of whole-genome shotgun sequence data, and a tile path of clones for generation of the reference sequence. Definition of the human-mouse alignment at this level of resolution enables identification of a mouse clone that corresponds to almost any position in the human genome. The human sequence may be used to facilitate construction of other mammalian genome maps using the same strategy.

  16. Mouse models of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Beuzard, Y

    2008-01-01

    In the absence of a natural animal model for sickle cell disease, transgenic mouse models have been generated to better understand the complex pathophysiology of the disease and to evaluate potential specific therapies. In the early nineties, the simple addition of human globin genes induced the expression of hemoglobin S (HbS) or HbS-related human hemoglobins in mice still expressing mouse hemoglobin. To increase the proportion of human hemoglobin and the severity of the mouse sickle cell syndrome, the proportion of mouse hemoglobin could be decreased by a combination of mouse alpha- and beta-thalassemic defects, leading to complex genotypes and mild disease. Following the discovery of gene targeting in the mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells), it was made possible to knock out all mouse adult globin genes (2alpha and 2beta) and to add the human homologous genes elsewhere in the mouse genome. In addition, the human gamma gene of fetal hemoglobin was protecting the fetus from HbS polymer formation. Accordingly, the resulting adult mouse models obtained in 1997, expressing human HbS-only, had a very severe anemia (Hb=5-6 g/dL). In order to survive, these "HbS-only mice" had to reduce the HbS concentration within the red blood cells. The phenotype could be less severe by adding modified human gamma genes, still expressed in adult mice. In 2006, a last "S-only" model was obtained by homologous knock in, replacing the mouse globin genes by human genes. This array of models contributes to better understand the role of different interacting factors in the complexity of sickle cell events, such as red cell defects, changes in blood flow and vaso-occlusion, hyperhemolysis, vascular tone dysregulation, oxidations, inflammation, activation and adhesion of cells, ischemia, reperfusion... In addition, each model has an appropriate usefulness to evaluate experimental therapies in vivo and to perform preclinical studies.

  17. Mouse models of adrenocortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Basham, Kaitlin J.; Hung, Holly A.; Lerario, Antonio M.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of the organogenesis, homeostasis, and tumorigenesis of the adrenal cortex has been the subject of intense study for many decades. Specifically, characterization of tumor predisposition syndromes with adrenocortical manifestations and molecular profiling of sporadic adrenocortical tumors have led to the discovery of key molecular pathways that promote pathological adrenal growth. However, given the observational nature of such studies, several important questions regarding the molecular pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors have remained. This review will summarize naturally occurring and genetically engineered mouse models that have provided novel tools to explore the molecular and cellular underpinnings of adrenocortical tumors. New paradigms of cancer initiation, maintenance, and progression that have emerged from this work will be discussed. PMID:26678830

  18. The mouse model for influenza.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Yumiko; Lamirande, Elaine W; Subbarao, Kanta

    2009-05-01

    A major challenge in influenza research is the selection of an appropriate animal model that accurately reflects the disease and protective immune response to influenza infection in humans. Ferrets are exquisitely susceptible to infection with human influenza viruses and are widely believed to be the ideal small animal model for influenza research. Mice have also been used for influenza vaccine research for decades. Although human influenza viruses generally cause disease in mice only if they are first adapted to the species, the ready availability of mice, their relatively low cost, and the variety of genetic backgrounds and targeted defects, and the immunologic reagents available make the mouse an attractive and heavily utilized animal model for studies of influenza. Although they are not discussed in detail in this unit, hamsters, guinea pigs, cotton rats (Sigmodon), and rats (Rattus) have also been used for influenza research.

  19. The Mouse Forced Swim Test

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T.; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E.; Piantadosi, Sean C.; Gould, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed. PMID:22314943

  20. Apoptotic Signaling in Mouse Odontogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Svandova, Eva; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Apoptosis is an important morphogenetic event in embryogenesis as well as during postnatal life. In the last 2 decades, apoptosis in tooth development (odontogenesis) has been investigated with gradually increasing focus on the mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. The molecular machinery responsible for apoptosis exhibits a high degree of conservation but also organ and tissue specific patterns. This review aims to discuss recent knowledge about apoptotic signaling networks during odontogenesis, concentrating on the mouse, which is often used as a model organism for human dentistry. Apoptosis accompanies the entire development of the tooth and corresponding remodeling of the surrounding bony tissue. It is most evident in its role in the elimination of signaling centers within developing teeth, removal of vestigal tooth germs, and in odontoblast and ameloblast organization during tooth mineralization. Dental apoptosis is caspase dependent and proceeds via mitochondrial mediated cell death with possible amplification by Fas-FasL signaling modulated by Bcl-2 family members. PMID:22204278

  1. Apoptotic signaling in mouse odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Matalova, Eva; Svandova, Eva; Tucker, Abigail S

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important morphogenetic event in embryogenesis as well as during postnatal life. In the last 2 decades, apoptosis in tooth development (odontogenesis) has been investigated with gradually increasing focus on the mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. The molecular machinery responsible for apoptosis exhibits a high degree of conservation but also organ and tissue specific patterns. This review aims to discuss recent knowledge about apoptotic signaling networks during odontogenesis, concentrating on the mouse, which is often used as a model organism for human dentistry. Apoptosis accompanies the entire development of the tooth and corresponding remodeling of the surrounding bony tissue. It is most evident in its role in the elimination of signaling centers within developing teeth, removal of vestigal tooth germs, and in odontoblast and ameloblast organization during tooth mineralization. Dental apoptosis is caspase dependent and proceeds via mitochondrial mediated cell death with possible amplification by Fas-FasL signaling modulated by Bcl-2 family members.

  2. The mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E; Piantadosi, Sean C; Gould, Todd D

    2012-01-29

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed.

  3. Bioenergetic characterization of mouse podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Yoshifusa; Sakairi, Toru; Kajiyama, Hiroshi; Shrivastav, Shashi; Beeson, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to podocyte injury, but normal podocyte bioenergetics have not been characterized. We measured oxygen consumption rates (OCR) and extracellular acidification rates (ECAR), using a transformed mouse podocyte cell line and the Seahorse Bioscience XF24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer. Basal OCR and ECAR were 55.2 ± 9.9 pmol/min and 3.1 ± 1.9 milli-pH units/min, respectively. The complex V inhibitor oligomycin reduced OCR to ∼45% of baseline rates, indicating that ∼55% of cellular oxygen consumption was coupled to ATP synthesis. Rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, reduced OCR to ∼25% of the baseline rates, suggesting that mitochondrial respiration accounted for ∼75% of the total cellular respiration. Thus ∼75% of mitochondrial respiration was coupled to ATP synthesis and ∼25% was accounted for by proton leak. Carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), which uncouples electron transport from ATP generation, increased OCR and ECAR to ∼360% and 840% of control levels. FCCP plus rotenone reduced ATP content by 60%, the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose reduced ATP by 35%, and 2-deoxyglucose in combination with FCCP or rotenone reduced ATP by >85%. The lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor oxamate and 2-deoxyglucose did not reduce ECAR, and 2-deoxyglucose had no effect on OCR, although 2-deoxyglucose reduced ATP content by 25%. Mitochondrial uncoupling induced by FCCP was associated with increased OCR with certain substrates, including lactate, glucose, pyruvate, and palmitate. Replication of these experiments in primary mouse podocytes yielded similar data. We conclude that mitochondria play the primary role in maintaining podocyte energy homeostasis, while glycolysis makes a lesser contribution. PMID:20445170

  4. Bioenergetic characterization of mouse podocytes.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yoshifusa; Sakairi, Toru; Kajiyama, Hiroshi; Shrivastav, Shashi; Beeson, Craig; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2010-08-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to podocyte injury, but normal podocyte bioenergetics have not been characterized. We measured oxygen consumption rates (OCR) and extracellular acidification rates (ECAR), using a transformed mouse podocyte cell line and the Seahorse Bioscience XF24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer. Basal OCR and ECAR were 55.2 +/- 9.9 pmol/min and 3.1 +/- 1.9 milli-pH units/min, respectively. The complex V inhibitor oligomycin reduced OCR to approximately 45% of baseline rates, indicating that approximately 55% of cellular oxygen consumption was coupled to ATP synthesis. Rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, reduced OCR to approximately 25% of the baseline rates, suggesting that mitochondrial respiration accounted for approximately 75% of the total cellular respiration. Thus approximately 75% of mitochondrial respiration was coupled to ATP synthesis and approximately 25% was accounted for by proton leak. Carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), which uncouples electron transport from ATP generation, increased OCR and ECAR to approximately 360% and 840% of control levels. FCCP plus rotenone reduced ATP content by 60%, the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose reduced ATP by 35%, and 2-deoxyglucose in combination with FCCP or rotenone reduced ATP by >85%. The lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor oxamate and 2-deoxyglucose did not reduce ECAR, and 2-deoxyglucose had no effect on OCR, although 2-deoxyglucose reduced ATP content by 25%. Mitochondrial uncoupling induced by FCCP was associated with increased OCR with certain substrates, including lactate, glucose, pyruvate, and palmitate. Replication of these experiments in primary mouse podocytes yielded similar data. We conclude that mitochondria play the primary role in maintaining podocyte energy homeostasis, while glycolysis makes a lesser contribution.

  5. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2001-05-01

    The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

  6. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2004-05-01

    The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

  7. Humanization of the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Wronski, A; Arendt, L M; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Although mouse models have provided invaluable information on the mechanisms of mammary gland development, anatomical and developmental differences between human and mice limit full understanding of this fundamental process. Humanization of the mouse mammary gland by injecting immortalized human breast stromal cells into the cleared murine mammary fat pad enables the growth and development of human mammary epithelial cells or tissue. This facilitates the characterization of human mammary gland development or tumorigenesis by utilizing the mouse mammary fat pad. Here we describe the process of isolating human mammary stromal and epithelial cells as well as their introduction into the mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice.

  8. Augmented Computer Mouse Would Measure Applied Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed computer mouse measures force of contact applied by user. Adds another dimension to two-dimensional-position-measuring capability of conventional computer mouse; force measurement designated to represent any desired continuously variable function of time and position, such as control force, acceleration, velocity, or position along axis perpendicular to computer video display. Proposed mouse enhances sense of realism and intuition in interaction between operator and computer. Useful in such applications as three-dimensional computer graphics, computer games, and mathematical modeling of dynamics.

  9. Augmented Computer Mouse Would Measure Applied Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed computer mouse measures force of contact applied by user. Adds another dimension to two-dimensional-position-measuring capability of conventional computer mouse; force measurement designated to represent any desired continuously variable function of time and position, such as control force, acceleration, velocity, or position along axis perpendicular to computer video display. Proposed mouse enhances sense of realism and intuition in interaction between operator and computer. Useful in such applications as three-dimensional computer graphics, computer games, and mathematical modeling of dynamics.

  10. The International Mouse Strain Resource (IMSR): cataloging worldwide mouse and ES cell line resources.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Motenko, Howie; Richardson, Joel E; Richards-Smith, Beverly; Smith, Cynthia L

    2015-10-01

    The availability of and access to quality genetically defined, health-status known mouse resources is critical for biomedical research. By ensuring that mice used in research experiments are biologically, genetically, and health-status equivalent, we enable knowledge transfer, hypothesis building based on multiple data streams, and experimental reproducibility based on common mouse resources (reagents). Major repositories for mouse resources have developed over time and each has significant unique resources to offer. Here we (a) describe The International Mouse Strain Resource that offers users a combined catalog of worldwide mouse resources (live, cryopreserved, embryonic stem cells), with direct access to repository sites holding resources of interest and (b) discuss the commitment to nomenclature standards among resources that remain a challenge in unifying mouse resource catalogs.

  11. Melatonin receptors: latest insights from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Tosini, Gianluca; Owino, Sharon; Guillame, Jean-Luc; Jockers, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Summary Melatonin, the neuro-hormone synthesized during the night, has recently seen an unexpected extension of its functional implications towards type 2 diabetes development, visual functions, sleep disturbances and depression. Transgenic mouse models were instrumental for the establishment of the link between melatonin and these major human diseases. Most of the actions of melatonin are mediated by two types of G protein-coupled receptors, named MT1 and MT2, which are expressed in many different organs and tissues. Understanding the pharmacology and function of mouse MT1 and MT2 receptors, including MT1/MT2 heteromers, will be of crucial importance to evaluate the relevance of these mouse models for future therapeutic developments. This review will critically discuss these aspects, and give some perspectives including the generation of new mouse models. PMID:24903552

  12. Effects of endotoxin on the lactating mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    The regulation of endogenous mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) sequences in trans by a host gene, the Lps locus on mouse chromosome 4, was suspected from a genetic linkage analysis. The Lps locus mediates the mouse's response to the injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the responder mouse while mice with the deficient allele are incapable of responding. Others have found that endotoxin exposure reduces milk production in lactating animals. This observation was confirmed in mice and extended by examining /sup 125/I-prolactin binding to liver membranes of lactating mice. Endotoxin treatment of responder mice increases liver prolactin binding within 15 minutes, followed by a decline over 6 hours. Scatchard analysis shows that the immediate increase comes from both increased affinity and abundance of the prolactin receptor. No such change in prolactin binding is seen in the non-responder following endotoxin treatment nor in /sup 125/I-insulin binding in responders.

  13. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha; Sonne, Si Brask; Xia, Zhongkui; Qiu, Xinmin; Li, Xiaoping; Long, Hua; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Dongya; Liu, Chuan; Fang, Zhiwei; Chou, Joyce; Glanville, Jacob; Hao, Qin; Kotowska, Dorota; Colding, Camilla; Licht, Tine Rask; Wu, Donghai; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Li, Junhua; Jia, Huijue; Lan, Zhou; Tremaroli, Valentina; Dworzynski, Piotr; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Doré, Joël; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Lin, John C; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Wang, Jun; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2015-10-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing laboratories and fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Similar to the human gut microbiome, >99% of the cataloged genes are bacterial. We identified 541 metagenomic species and defined a core set of 26 metagenomic species found in 95% of the mice. The mouse gut microbiome is functionally similar to its human counterpart, with 95.2% of its Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthologous groups in common. However, only 4.0% of the mouse gut microbial genes were shared (95% identity, 90% coverage) with those of the human gut microbiome. This catalog provides a useful reference for future studies.

  14. Integration of Mouse Phenome Data Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, John M; Adams, Neils; Aidinis, Vassilis; Blake, Judith A; Bogue, Molly; Brown, Steve D M; Chesler, Elissa J; Davidson, Duncan; Duran, Christopher; Eppig, Janan T; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Greenaway, Simon; Angelis, Martin Hrabe de; Kollias, George; Leblanc, Sophie; Lee, Kirsty; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Masuya, Hiroshi; Melvin, David; Muller, Werner; Parkinson, Helen; Proctor, Glenn; Reuveni, Eli; Schofield, Paul; Shukla, Aadya; Smith, Cynthia; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Vasseur, Laurent; Wakana, Shigeharu; Walling, Alison; White, Jacqui; Wood, Joe; Zouberakis, Michalis

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the functions encoded in the mouse genome will be central to an understanding of the genetic basis of human disease. To achieve this it will be essential to be able to characterise the phenotypic consequences of variation and alterations in individual genes. Data on the phenotypes of mouse strains are currently held in a number of different forms (detailed descriptions of mouse lines, first line phenotyping data on novel mutations, data on the normal features of inbred lines, etc.) at many sites worldwide. For the most efficient use of these data sets, we have set in train a process to develop standards for the description of phenotypes (using ontologies), and file formats for the description of phenotyping protocols and phenotype data sets. This process is ongoing, and needs to be supported by the wider mouse genetics and phenotyping communities to succeed. We invite interested parties to contact us as we develop this process further.

  15. Mouse Models of Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Pavan; Negrin, Robert; Hill, Geoffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, mouse models of bone marrow transplantation have provided the critical links between graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) pathophysiology and clinical practice. The initial insight from mouse models that GVHD and GVL were T cell dependent has long been confirmed clinically. More recent translations from mouse models have included the important role of inflammatory cytokines in GVHD. Newly developed concepts relating to the ability of antigen presenting cell (APC) and T cell subsets to mediate GVHD now promise significant clinical advances. The ability to use knockout and transgenic approaches to dissect mechanisms of GVHD and GVL mean that mouse systems will continue as the predominant preclinical platform. The basic transplant approach in these models, coupled with modern “real-time” immunologic imaging of GVHD and GVL is discussed. PMID:18162233

  16. New mouse primary retinal degeneration (rd-3)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B.; Hawes, N.L.; Roderick, T.H. ); Heckenlively, J.R. )

    1993-04-01

    A new mouse retinal degeneration that appears to be an excellent candidate for modeling human retinitis pigmentosa is reported. In this degeneration, called rd-3, differentiation proceeds postnatally through 2 weeks, and photoreceptor degeneration starts by 3 weeks. The rod photoreceptor loss is essentially complete by 5 weeks, whereas remnant cone cells are seen through 7 weeks. This is the only mouse homozygous retinal degeneration reported to date in which photoreceptors are initially normal. Crosses with known mouse retinal degenerations rd, Rds, nr, and pcd are negative for retinal degeneration in offspring, and linkage analysis places rd-3 on mouse chromosome 1 at 10 [+-]2.5 cM distal to Akp-1. Homology mapping suggests that the homologous human locus should be on chromosome 1q. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse-human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human-Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene-phenotype-disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community.

  18. The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium: past and future perspectives on mouse phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Determining the function of all mammalian genes remains a major challenge for the biomedical science community in the 21st century. The goal of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) over the next 10 years is to undertake broad-based phenotyping of 20,000 mouse genes, providing an unprecedented insight into mammalian gene function. This short article explores the drivers for large-scale mouse phenotyping and provides an overview of the aims and processes involved in IMPC mouse production and phenotyping. PMID:22940749

  19. Aging, Breast Cancer and the Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Presenescent or senescent hBF (1.2 or 18x×10 4/well, respectively) [M, Stampfer , P. Yaswen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory wdre suspended in 60 l cold...2.8 1 2.8 Inducing a human-like senescent phenotype in mouse fibroblasts Jean-Philihoo Copp , Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher K. Patil...MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELL PROLIFERATION AND TUMORIGENESIS: A MOUSE MODEL FOR HUMAN AGING. Jean-Philippe Coppe, Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher

  20. Photoreceptors Regulating Circadian Behavior: A Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-14

    retina (Dr. M. Applebury. personal communication). On the basis of their similarity to human opsins and ERG responses recorded from the mouse eye they... opsin that is almost identical to the mouse and human green cone opsins . Whether mammalian circadian responses to light are mediated by cones themselves...transgenic (Tm) mice of various ages. Transgenic mice carry a DT-A gene under the control of the human rod opsin promoter. Phase shifting paradigm is

  1. Mouse homologues of human hereditary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Searle, A G; Edwards, J H; Hall, J G

    1994-01-01

    Details are given of 214 loci known to be associated with human hereditary disease, which have been mapped on both human and mouse chromosomes. Forty two of these have pathological variants in both species; in general the mouse variants are similar in their effects to the corresponding human ones, but exceptions include the Dmd/DMD and Hprt/HPRT mutations which cause little, if any, harm in mice. Possible reasons for phenotypic differences are discussed. In most pathological variants the gene product seems to be absent or greatly reduced in both species. The extensive data on conserved segments between human and mouse chromosomes are used to predict locations in the mouse of over 50 loci of medical interest which are mapped so far only on human chromosomes. In about 80% of these a fairly confident prediction can be made. Some likely homologies between mapped mouse loci and unmapped human ones are also given. Sixty six human and mouse proto-oncogene and growth factor gene homologies are also listed; those of confirmed location are all in known conserved segments. A survey of 18 mapped human disease loci and chromosome regions in which the manifestation or severity of pathological effects is thought to be the result of genomic imprinting shows that most of the homologous regions in the mouse are also associated with imprinting, especially those with homologues on human chromosomes 11p and 15q. Useful methods of accelerating the production of mouse models of human hereditary disease include (1) use of a supermutagen, such as ethylnitrosourea (ENU), (2) targeted mutagenesis involving ES cells, and (3) use of gene transfer techniques, with production of 'knockout mutations'. PMID:8151633

  2. Genetic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mineur, Yann S; McLoughlin, Declan; Crusio, Wim E; Sluyter, Frans

    2005-01-01

    In the current minireview, we focus on genetic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because various excellent, up-to-date reviews, special issues, and reliable websites are already dedicated to the genetics of Alzheimer's disease in general and of animal models in particular, this review is not meant to be comprehensive. Rather, we aim to steer the Alzheimer's novice through the recent mouse literature on AD. Special attention will be paid to genetic models that have been tested behaviorally.

  3. Genetic Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mineur, Yann S.; McLoughlin, Declan; Crusio, Wim E.; Sluyter, Frans

    2005-01-01

    In the current minireview, we focus on genetic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because various excellent, up-to-date reviews, special issues, and reliable websites are already dedicated to the genetics of Alzheimer's disease in general and of animal models in particular, this review is not meant to be comprehensive. Rather, we aim to steer the Alzheimer's novice through the recent mouse literature on AD. Special attention will be paid to genetic models that have been tested behaviorally. PMID:16444901

  4. Mouse behavioral endophenotypes for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Amann, Laura C; Gandal, Michael J; Halene, Tobias B; Ehrlichman, Richard S; White, Samantha L; McCarren, Hilary S; Siegel, Steven J

    2010-09-30

    An endophenotype is a heritable trait that is generally considered to be more highly, associated with a gene-based neurological deficit than a disease phenotype itself. Such, endophenotypic deficits may therefore be observed in the non-affected relatives of disease patients. Once endophenotypes have been established for a given illness, such as schizophrenia, mechanisms of, action may then be established and treatment options developed in order to target such measures. The, current paper describes and assesses the merits and limitations of utilizing behavioral and, electrophysiological endophenotypes of schizophrenia in mice. Such endophenotypic deficits include: decreased auditory event related potential (ERP) amplitude and gating (specifically, that of the P20, N40, P80 and P120); impaired mismatch negativity (MMN); changes in theta and gamma frequency, analyses; decreased pre-pulse inhibition (PPI); impaired working and episodic memories (for instance, novel object recognition [NOR], contextual and cued fear conditioning, latent inhibition, Morris and, radial arm maze identification and nose poke); sociability; and locomotor activity. A variety of, pharmacological treatments, including ketamine, MK-801 and phencyclidine (PCP) can be used to, induce some of the deficits described above, and numerous transgenic mouse strains have been, developed to address the mechanisms responsible for such endophenotypic differences. We also, address the viability and validity of using such measures regarding their potential clinical implications, and suggest several practices that could increase the translatability of preclinical data.

  5. Mouse models for filovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Bradfute, Steven B; Warfield, Kelly L; Bray, Mike

    2012-09-01

    The filoviruses marburg- and ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans and nonhuman primates. Because many cases have occurred in geographical areas lacking a medical research infrastructure, most studies of the pathogenesis of filoviral HF, and all efforts to develop drugs and vaccines, have been carried out in biocontainment laboratories in non-endemic countries, using nonhuman primates (NHPs), guinea pigs and mice as animal models. NHPs appear to closely mirror filoviral HF in humans (based on limited clinical data), but only small numbers may be used in carefully regulated experiments; much research is therefore done in rodents. Because of their availability in large numbers and the existence of a wealth of reagents for biochemical and immunological testing, mice have become the preferred small animal model for filovirus research. Since the first experiments following the initial 1967 marburgvirus outbreak, wild-type or mouse-adapted viruses have been tested in immunocompetent or immunodeficient mice. In this paper, we review how these types of studies have been used to investigate the pathogenesis of filoviral disease, identify immune responses to infection and evaluate antiviral drugs and vaccines. We also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of murine models for filovirus research, and identify important questions for further study.

  6. [Coprophagy in the germfree mouse].

    PubMed

    Ebino, K Y; Amao, H; Suwa, T; Kuwabara, Y; Saito, T R; Takahashi, K W

    1987-01-01

    Coprophagy was observed in germfree (GF) ICR mice of both sexes, and the results were compared with those of conventional mice. Frequency of coprophagy per animal per day in GF mice was 5.1 in males and 5.8 in females. In conventional (CV) mice, the frequencies were 6.2 in males and 5.3 in females (data from Zoological Science 2:249-255, 1985), with no significant differences compared with GF mice. Coprophagy in CV mice was frequently observed during 6-8 hr after lighting, whereas such close time relationships tended to weaken in GF animals. In a comparison of levels of constituents per unit weight between feces and diet, fecal crude protein and crude fat exhibited lower values than those in the diet. Levels of fecal crude ash and crude fiber were higher than those in the diet, and nitrogen-free extract was almost equal to that in the diet. No essential difference in these tendencies was found compared with CV mice. Levels of fecal vitamin B1, B2, B12 and folic acid were lower than those in the diet. In CV mice, except for vitamin B1, these vitamins exhibited either almost equal or much higher levels compared with those in the diet (data from Experimental Animals 35: 381-386, 1986). From the fact that coprophagy was observed in GF mice, it is suggested that the behavior is inherent in the mouse.

  7. Mouse models of intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Emeto, Theophilus I; Lee, James; Marshman, Laurence; Moran, Corey; Seto, Sai-wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is a highly lethal medical condition. Current management strategies for unruptured intracranial aneurysms involve radiological surveillance and neurosurgical or endovascular interventions. There is no pharmacological treatment available to decrease the risk of aneurysm rupture and subsequent subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is growing interest in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysm focused on the development of drug therapies to decrease the incidence of aneurysm rupture. The study of rodent models of intracranial aneurysms has the potential to improve our understanding of intracranial aneurysm development and progression. This review summarizes current mouse models of intact and ruptured intracranial aneurysms and discusses the relevance of these models to human intracranial aneurysms. The article also reviews the importance of these models in investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in the disease. Finally, potential pharmaceutical targets for intracranial aneurysm suggested by previous studies are discussed. Examples of potential drug targets include matrix metalloproteinases, stromal cell-derived factor-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, the renin-angiotensin system and the β-estrogen receptor. An agreed clear, precise and reproducible definition of what constitutes an aneurysm in the models would assist in their use to better understand the pathology of intracranial aneurysm and applying findings to patients.

  8. Transcriptome map of mouse isochores

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The availability of fully sequenced genomes and the implementation of transcriptome technologies have increased the studies investigating the expression profiles for a variety of tissues, conditions, and species. In this study, using RNA-seq data for three distinct tissues (brain, liver, and muscle), we investigate how base composition affects mammalian gene expression, an issue of prime practical and evolutionary interest. Results We present the transcriptome map of the mouse isochores (DNA segments with a fairly homogeneous base composition) for the three different tissues and the effects of isochores' base composition on their expression activity. Our analyses also cover the relations between the genes' expression activity and their localization in the isochore families. Conclusions This study is the first where next-generation sequencing data are used to associate the effects of both genomic and genic compositional properties to their corresponding expression activity. Our findings confirm previous results, and further support the existence of a relationship between isochores and gene expression. This relationship corroborates that isochores are primarily a product of evolutionary adaptation rather than a simple by-product of neutral evolutionary processes. PMID:22004510

  9. Mouse Models for Filovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bradfute, Steven B.; Warfield, Kelly L.; Bray, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The filoviruses marburg- and ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans and nonhuman primates. Because many cases have occurred in geographical areas lacking a medical research infrastructure, most studies of the pathogenesis of filoviral HF, and all efforts to develop drugs and vaccines, have been carried out in biocontainment laboratories in non-endemic countries, using nonhuman primates (NHPs), guinea pigs and mice as animal models. NHPs appear to closely mirror filoviral HF in humans (based on limited clinical data), but only small numbers may be used in carefully regulated experiments; much research is therefore done in rodents. Because of their availability in large numbers and the existence of a wealth of reagents for biochemical and immunological testing, mice have become the preferred small animal model for filovirus research. Since the first experiments following the initial 1967 marburgvirus outbreak, wild-type or mouse-adapted viruses have been tested in immunocompetent or immunodeficient mice. In this paper, we review how these types of studies have been used to investigate the pathogenesis of filoviral disease, identify immune responses to infection and evaluate antiviral drugs and vaccines. We also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of murine models for filovirus research, and identify important questions for further study. PMID:23170168

  10. Optical mouse acting as biospeckle sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Michel Melo; Nozela, Jose Roberto de Almeida; Chaves, Marcio Jose; Alves Braga, Roberto; Rabal, Hector Jorge

    2011-04-01

    In this work we propose some experiments with the use of optical computer mouse, associated to low cost lasers that can be used to perform several measurements with applications in industry and in human health monitoring. The mouse was used to grab the movements produced by speckle pattern changes and to get information through the adaptation of its structure. We measured displacements in wood samples under strain, variations of the diameter of an artery due to heart beat and, through a hardware simulation, the movement of an eye, an experiment that could be of low cost help for communication to severely handicapped motor patients. Those measurements were done in spite of the fact that the CCD sensor of the mice is monolithically included into an integrated circuit so that the raw image cannot be accessed. If, as was the case with primitive optical mouse, that signal could be accessed, the quality and usefulness of the measurements could be significantly increased. As it was not possible, a webcam sensor was used for measuring the drying of paint, a standard phenomenon for testing biospeckle techniques, in order to prove the usefulness of the mouse design. The results showed that the use of the mouse associated to a laser pointer could be the way to get metrological information from many phenomena involving the whole field spatial displacement, as well as the use of the mouse as in its prime version allowed to get images of the speckle patterns and to analyze them.

  11. Neurogenesis in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tsu Tshen

    2010-10-01

    The brains of the adult mouse and human possess neural stem cells (NSCs) that retain the capacity to generate new neurons through the process of neurogenesis. They share the same anatomical locations of stem cell niches in the brain, as well as the prominent feature of rostral migratory stream formed by neuroblasts migrating from the lateral ventricles towards the olfactory bulb. Therefore the mouse possesses some fundamental features that may qualify it as a relevant model for adult human neurogenesis. Adult born young hippocampal neurons in the mouse display the unique property of enhanced plasticity, and can integrate physically and functionally into existing neural circuits in the brain. Such crucial properties of neurogenesis may at least partially underlie the improved learning and memory functions observed in the mouse when hippocampal neurogenesis is augmented, leading to the suggestion that neurogenesis induction may be a novel therapeutic approach for diseases with cognitive impairments such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Research towards this goal has benefited significantly from the use of AD mouse models to facilitate the understanding in the impact of AD pathology on neurogenesis. The present article reviews the growing body of controversial data on altered neurogenesis in mouse models of AD and attempts to assess their relative relevance to humans.

  12. Incremental lines in mouse molar enamel.

    PubMed

    Sehic, Amer; Nirvani, Minou; Risnes, Steinar

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the occurrence and periodicity of enamel incremental lines in mouse molars in an attempt to draw attention to some key questions about the rhythm in the activity of the secreting ameloblasts during formation of mouse molar enamel. The mouse molars were ground, etched, and studied using scanning electron microscopy. Lines interpreted as incremental lines generally appeared as grooves of variable distinctness, and were only observed cervically, in the region about 50-250μm from the enamel-cementum junction. The lines were most readily observable in the outer enamel and in the superficial prism-free layer, and were difficult to identify in the deeper parts of enamel, i.e. in the inner enamel with prism decussation. However, in areas where the enamel tended to be hypomineralized the incremental lines were observed as clearly continuous from outer into inner enamel. The incremental lines in mouse molar enamel exhibited an average periodicity of about 4μm, and the distance between the lines decreased towards the enamel surface. We conclude that incremental lines are to some extent visible in mouse molar enamel. Together with data from the literature and theoretical considerations, we suggest that they probably represent a daily rhythm in enamel formation. This study witnesses the layered apposition of mouse molar enamel and supports the theory that circadian clock probably regulates enamel development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Heme synthesis in normal mouse liver and mouse liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, D.L.; Becker, F.F. )

    1990-04-15

    Hepatic cancers from mice and rats demonstrate decreased levels of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the heme synthetic pathway, and increased heme oxygenase, the heme-catabolizing enzyme. These findings suggest that diminution of P-450, b5, and catalase in these lesions may result from a heme supply that is limited by decreased heme synthesis and increased heme catabolism. Heme synthesis was measured in mouse liver tumors (MLT) and adjacent tumor-free lobes (BKG) by administering the radiolabeled heme precursors {sup 55}FeCl3 and (2-{sup 14}C)glycine and subsequently extracting the heme for determination of specific activity. Despite reduced delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase activity in MLT, both tissues incorporated (2-14C)glycine into heme at similar rates. At early time points, heme extracted from MLT contained less 55Fe than that from BKG. This was attributed to the findings that MLT took up 55Fe at a slower rate than BKG and had larger iron stores than BKG. The amount of heme per milligram of protein was also similar in both tissues. These findings militate against the hypothesis that diminished hemoprotein levels in MLT result from limited availability of heme. It is probable, therefore, that decreased hemoprotein levels in hepatic tumors are linked to a general program of dedifferentiation associated with the cancer phenotype. Diminution of hemoprotein in MLT may result in a relatively increased intracellular heme pool. delta-Aminolevulinic acid synthase and heme oxygenase are, respectively, negatively and positively regulated by heme. Thus, their alteration in MLT may be due to the regulatory influences of the heme pool.

  14. Mickey Mouse Spotted on Mercury!

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    NASA image acquired: June 03, 2012 This scene is to the northwest of the recently named crater Magritte, in Mercury's south. The image is not map projected; the larger crater actually sits to the north of the two smaller ones. The shadowing helps define the striking "Mickey Mouse" resemblance, created by the accumulation of craters over Mercury's long geologic history. This image was acquired as part of MDIS's high-incidence-angle base map. The high-incidence-angle base map is a major mapping activity in MESSENGER's extended mission and complements the surface morphology base map of MESSENGER's primary mission that was acquired under generally more moderate incidence angles. High incidence angles, achieved when the Sun is near the horizon, result in long shadows that accentuate the small-scale topography of geologic features. The high-incidence-angle base map is being acquired with an average resolution of 200 meters/pixel. The MESSENGER spacecraft is the first ever to orbit the planet Mercury, and the spacecraft's seven scientific instruments and radio science investigation are unraveling the history and evolution of the Solar System's innermost planet. Visit the Why Mercury? section of this website to learn more about the key science questions that the MESSENGER mission is addressing. During the one-year primary mission, MESSENGER acquired 88,746 images and extensive other data sets. MESSENGER is now in a yearlong extended mission, during which plans call for the acquisition of more than 80,000 additional images to support MESSENGER's science goals. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency

  15. Ceramide metabolism in mouse tissue.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Susanne; Birod, Kerstin; Männich, Julia; Eberle, Max; Wegner, Marthe-Susanna; Wanger, Ruth; Hartmann, Daniela; Ferreiros, Nerea; Geisslinger, Gerd; Grösch, Sabine

    2013-08-01

    Ceramides with different N-acyl chains can act as second messengers in various signaling pathways. They are involved in cell processes such as apoptosis, differentiation and inflammation. Ceramide synthases (CerS) are key enzymes in the biosynthesis of ceramides and dihydroceramides. Six isoenzymes (CerS1-6) catalyze the N-acylation of the sphingoid bases, albeit with strictly acyl-Coenzyme A (CoA) chain length specificity. We analyzed the mRNA expression, the protein expression, the specific activity of the CerS, and acyl-CoA, dihydroceramide and ceramide levels in different tissues by LC-MS/MS. Our data indicate that each tissue express a distinct composition of CerS, whereby the CerS mRNA expression levels do not correlate with the respective protein expression levels in the tissues. Furthermore, we found a highly significant negative correlation between the protein expression level of CerS6 and the C16:0-acyl-CoA amounts as well as between the protein expression of CerS2 and C24:0-acyl-CoA amounts. These data indicate that in mouse tissues low substrate availability is compensated by higher CerS protein expression level and vice versa. Apart from the expression level and the specific activity of the CerS, other enzymes of the sphingolipid pathway also influence the composition of ceramides with distinct chain lengths in each cell. Acyl-CoA availability seems to be less important for ceramide composition and might be compensated for by CerS expression/activity.

  16. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse–human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human–Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene–phenotype–disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community. PMID:25348401

  17. Surfing the internet with a BCI mouse.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianyou; Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Gu, Zhenghui

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present a new web browser based on a two-dimensional (2D) brain-computer interface (BCI) mouse, where our major concern is the selection of an intended target in a multi-target web page. A real-world web page may contain tens or even hundreds of targets, including hyperlinks, input elements, buttons, etc. In this case, a target filter designed in our system can be used to exclude most of those targets of no interest. Specifically, the user filters the targets of no interest out by inputting keywords with a P300-based speller, while keeps those containing the keywords. Such filtering largely facilitates the target selection task based on our BCI mouse. When there are only several targets in a web page (either an original sparse page or a target-filtered page), the user moves the mouse toward the target of interest using his/her electroencephalographic signal. The horizontal movement and vertical movement are controlled by motor imagery and P300 potential, respectively. If the mouse encounters a target of no interest, the user rejects it and continues to move the mouse. Otherwise the user selects the target and activates it. With the collaboration of the target filtering and a series of mouse movements and target selections/rejections, the user can select an intended target in a web page. Based on our browser system, common navigation functions, including history rolling forward and backward, hyperlink selection, page scrolling, text input, etc, are available. The system has been tested on seven subjects. Experimental results not only validated the efficacy of the proposed method, but also showed that free internet surfing with a BCI mouse is feasible.

  18. Mouse allergen-specific immunoglobulin G4 and risk of mouse skin test sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Matsui, E C; Diette, G B; Krop, E J M; Aalberse, R C; Smith, A L; Eggleston, P A

    2006-08-01

    High serum levels of cat-specific IgG and IgG4 are associated with protection against allergic sensitization to cat, but whether this association applies to other animal allergens remains unclear. To determine if high levels of mouse-specific IgG and IgG4 are associated with a decreased risk of mouse skin test sensitivity. Two hundred and sixty workers of a mouse facility underwent skin prick testing and completed a questionnaire. Serum levels of mouse-specific IgG and IgG4 were quantified by solid-phase antigen binding assays. Room air samples were collected and airborne Mus m 1 was quantified by ELISA. Forty-nine participants had a positive skin prick test to mouse. Mouse-specific IgG was detected in 219 (84%) participants and IgG4 was detected in 72 (28%) participants. A detectable mouse-specific IgG4 level was associated with an increased risk of mouse skin test sensitivity (odds ratios (OR) 6.4, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 3.3-12.4). Mouse-specific IgG and IgG4 were both positively correlated with mouse allergen exposure (r(s)=0.31, P=0.0001, and r(s)=0.27, P=0.0006, respectively). The odds of skin test sensitivity peaked at moderate levels of IgG4, but decreased at the highest levels of mouse-specific IgG4. In contrast, the odds of skin test sensitivity increased monotonically with IgG levels. A detectable level of mouse-specific IgG4 is associated with an increased risk of skin test sensitivity to mouse. However, the highest IgG4 levels appear to be associated with an attenuated risk of mouse skin test sensitivity, suggesting that induction of high levels of IgG4 through natural exposure may protect against the development of allergic sensitization.

  19. Avoiding Mouse Traps in Schizophrenia Genetics: Lessons and Promises from Current and Emerging Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Kvajo, Mirna; McKellar, Heather; Gogos, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most common psychiatric disorders, but despite progress in identifying the genetic factors implicated in its development, the mechanisms underlying its etiology and pathogenesis remain poorly understood. Development of mouse models is critical for expanding our understanding of the causes of schizophrenia. However, translation of disease pathology into mouse models has proven to be challenging, primarily due to the complex genetic architecture of schizophrenia and the difficulties in the recreation of susceptibility alleles in the mouse genome. In this review we highlight current research on models of major susceptibility loci and the information accrued from their analysis. We describe and compare the different approaches that are necessitated by diverse susceptibility alleles, and discuss their advantage and drawbacks. Finally, we discuss emerging mouse models, such as second-generation pathophysiology models based on innovative approaches that are facilitated by the information gathered from the current genetic mouse models. PMID:21821099

  20. The morphology of the mouse masticatory musculature

    PubMed Central

    Baverstock, Hester; Jeffery, Nathan S; Cobb, Samuel N

    2013-01-01

    The mouse has been the dominant model organism in studies on the development, genetics and evolution of the mammalian skull and associated soft-tissue for decades. There is the potential to take advantage of this well studied model and the range of mutant, knockin and knockout organisms with diverse craniofacial phenotypes to investigate the functional significance of variation and the role of mechanical forces on the development of the integrated craniofacial skeleton and musculature by using computational mechanical modelling methods (e.g. finite element and multibody dynamic modelling). Currently, there are no detailed published data of the mouse masticatory musculature available. Here, using a combination of micro-dissection and non-invasive segmentation of iodine-enhanced micro-computed tomography, we document the anatomy, architecture and proportions of the mouse masticatory muscles. We report on the superficial masseter (muscle, tendon and pars reflecta), deep masseter, zygomaticomandibularis (anterior, posterior, infraorbital and tendinous parts), temporalis (lateral and medial parts), external and internal pterygoid muscles. Additionally, we report a lateral expansion of the attachment of the temporalis onto the zygomatic arch, which may play a role in stabilising this bone during downwards loading. The data presented in this paper now provide a detailed reference for phenotypic comparison in mouse models and allow the mouse to be used as a model organism in biomechanical and functional modelling and simulation studies of the craniofacial skeleton and particularly the masticatory system. PMID:23692055

  1. In Amnio MRI of Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Thomas A.; Norris, Francesca C.; Carnaghan, Helen; Savery, Dawn; Wells, Jack A.; Siow, Bernard; Scambler, Peter J.; Pierro, Agostino; De Coppi, Paolo; Eaton, Simon; Lythgoe, Mark F.

    2014-01-01

    Mouse embryo imaging is conventionally carried out on ex vivo embryos excised from the amniotic sac, omitting vital structures and abnormalities external to the body. Here, we present an in amnio MR imaging methodology in which the mouse embryo is retained in the amniotic sac and demonstrate how important embryonic structures can be visualised in 3D with high spatial resolution (100 µm/px). To illustrate the utility of in amnio imaging, we subsequently apply the technique to examine abnormal mouse embryos with abdominal wall defects. Mouse embryos at E17.5 were imaged and compared, including three normal phenotype embryos, an abnormal embryo with a clear exomphalos defect, and one with a suspected gastroschisis phenotype. Embryos were excised from the mother ensuring the amnion remained intact and stereo microscopy was performed. Embryos were next embedded in agarose for 3D, high resolution MRI on a 9.4T scanner. Identification of the abnormal embryo phenotypes was not possible using stereo microscopy or conventional ex vivo MRI. Using in amnio MRI, we determined that the abnormal embryos had an exomphalos phenotype with varying severities. In amnio MRI is ideally suited to investigate the complex relationship between embryo and amnion, together with screening for other abnormalities located outside of the mouse embryo, providing a valuable complement to histology and existing imaging methods available to the phenotyping community. PMID:25330230

  2. In amnio MRI of mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Thomas A; Norris, Francesca C; Carnaghan, Helen; Savery, Dawn; Wells, Jack A; Siow, Bernard; Scambler, Peter J; Pierro, Agostino; De Coppi, Paolo; Eaton, Simon; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2014-01-01

    Mouse embryo imaging is conventionally carried out on ex vivo embryos excised from the amniotic sac, omitting vital structures and abnormalities external to the body. Here, we present an in amnio MR imaging methodology in which the mouse embryo is retained in the amniotic sac and demonstrate how important embryonic structures can be visualised in 3D with high spatial resolution (100 µm/px). To illustrate the utility of in amnio imaging, we subsequently apply the technique to examine abnormal mouse embryos with abdominal wall defects. Mouse embryos at E17.5 were imaged and compared, including three normal phenotype embryos, an abnormal embryo with a clear exomphalos defect, and one with a suspected gastroschisis phenotype. Embryos were excised from the mother ensuring the amnion remained intact and stereo microscopy was performed. Embryos were next embedded in agarose for 3D, high resolution MRI on a 9.4T scanner. Identification of the abnormal embryo phenotypes was not possible using stereo microscopy or conventional ex vivo MRI. Using in amnio MRI, we determined that the abnormal embryos had an exomphalos phenotype with varying severities. In amnio MRI is ideally suited to investigate the complex relationship between embryo and amnion, together with screening for other abnormalities located outside of the mouse embryo, providing a valuable complement to histology and existing imaging methods available to the phenotyping community.

  3. Functional genetic analysis of mouse chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Kile, Benjamin T; Hentges, Kathryn E; Clark, Amander T; Nakamura, Hisashi; Salinger, Andrew P; Liu, Bin; Box, Neil; Stockton, David W; Johnson, Randy L; Behringer, Richard R; Bradley, Allan; Justice, Monica J

    2003-09-04

    Now that the mouse and human genome sequences are complete, biologists need systematic approaches to determine the function of each gene. A powerful way to discover gene function is to determine the consequence of mutations in living organisms. Large-scale production of mouse mutations with the point mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) is a key strategy for analysing the human genome because mouse mutants will reveal functions unique to mammals, and many may model human diseases. To examine genes conserved between human and mouse, we performed a recessive ENU mutagenesis screen that uses a balancer chromosome, inversion chromosome 11 (refs 4, 5). Initially identified in the fruitfly, balancer chromosomes are valuable genetic tools that allow the easy isolation of mutations on selected chromosomes. Here we show the isolation of 230 new recessive mouse mutations, 88 of which are on chromosome 11. This genetic strategy efficiently generates and maps mutations on a single chromosome, even as mutations throughout the genome are discovered. The mutations reveal new defects in haematopoiesis, craniofacial and cardiovascular development, and fertility.

  4. Mouse models in tendon and ligament research.

    PubMed

    Mienaltowski, Michael J; Birk, David E

    2014-01-01

    Mutant mouse models are valuable resources for the study of tendon and ligament biology. Many mutant mouse models are used because their manifested phenotypes mimic clinical pathobiology for several heritable disorders, such as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Osteogenesis Imperfecta. Moreover, these models are helpful for discerning roles of specific genes in the development, maturation, and repair of musculoskeletal tissues. There are several categories of genes with essential roles in the synthesis and maintenance of tendon and ligament structures. The form and function of these tissues depend highly upon fibril-forming collagens, the primary extracellular macromolecules of tendons and ligaments. Models for these fibril-forming collagens, as well as for regulatory molecules like FACITs and SLRPs, are important for studying fibril assembly, growth, and maturation. Additionally, mouse models for growth factors and transcription factors are useful for defining regulation of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and cues that stimulate matrix synthesis. Models for membrane-bound proteins assess the roles of cell-cell communication and cell-matrix interaction. In some cases, special considerations need to be given to spatio-temporal control of a gene in a model. Thus, conditional and inducible mouse models allow for specific regulation of genes of interest. Advances in mouse models have provided valuable tools for gaining insight into the form and function of tendons and ligaments.

  5. OCT guided microinjections for mouse embryonic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Kirill V.; Syed, Saba H.; Coughlin, Andrew J.; Wang, Shang; West, Jennifer L.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larina, Irina V.

    2013-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is gaining popularity as live imaging tool for embryonic research in animal models. Recently we have demonstrated that OCT can be used for live imaging of cultured early mouse embryos (E7.5-E10) as well as later stage mouse embryos in utero (E12.5 to the end of gestation). Targeted delivery of signaling molecules, drugs, and cells is a powerful approach to study normal and abnormal development, and image guidance is highly important for such manipulations. Here we demonstrate that OCT can be used to guide microinjections of gold nanoshell suspensions in live mouse embryos. This approach can potentially be used for variety of applications such as guided injections of contrast agents, signaling molecules, pharmacological agents, cell transplantation and extraction, as well as other image-guided micromanipulations. Our studies also reveal novel potential for gold nanoshells in embryonic research.

  6. FISH probes for mouse chromosome identification

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yu-Ping; Mohapatra, G.; Hanahan, D.; Miller, J.

    1997-10-01

    P1 clones near the telomeres and centromeres of each mouse chromosome except Y have been selected from a mouse genomic library and mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Each clone was selected to contain a genetically mapped polymorphic DNA sequence as close as possible to the centromere or telomere of a chromosome. The genetic distance from the various P1 clones to the most distal genetically mapped polymorphic sequence ranged from 0 for about half of the clones to 6.7 cM for the probe at the telomere of chromosome 14. The average distance to the most distal or proximal chromosome marker was 1.5 cM. The use of FISH with these probes for mouse chromosome identification during comparative genomic hybridization is illustrated. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Contemporary approaches for modifying the mouse genome

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David J.; van der Weyden, Louise

    2008-01-01

    The mouse is a premiere experimental organism that has contributed significantly to our understanding of vertebrate biology. Manipulation of the mouse genome via embryonic stem (ES) cell technology makes it possible to engineer an almost limitless repertoire of mutations to model human disease and assess gene function. In this review we outline recent advances in mouse experimental genetics and provide a “how-to” guide for those people wishing to access this technology. We also discuss new technologies, such as transposon-mediated mutagenesis, and resources of targeting vectors and ES cells, which are likely to dramatically accelerate the pace with which we can assess gene function in vivo, and the progress of forward and reverse genetic screens in mice. PMID:18559964

  8. Biotransformation in Egyptian spiny mouse Acomys cahirinus.

    PubMed

    Watkins, J B; LaFollette, J W; Sanders, R A

    1995-01-01

    The activities of several representative biotransformation enzymes were determined in male and female spiny mouse tissues. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity toward benzo(a)pyrene was significantly greater in female spiny mouse intestine than in males. Activity toward benzphetamine in both sexes was high in the liver, with little activity in the kidney and intestine. Sulfotransferase activity was high in kidney and intestine of female spiny mice but undetectable in the same tissues in males. Hepatic glutathione S-transferase activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in females was significantly higher than in males. UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase activity toward 1-naphthol in both sexes in the kidney was significantly higher than hepatic and intestinal activity. Intestinal N-acetyltransferase activity towards 2-aminofluorene and beta-naphthylamine was significantly greater in females than males. No consistent relation appeared to exist between biotransformation activities in spiny mouse and those in other related rodent species.

  9. Evaluation of Atlas based Mouse Brain Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joohwi; Jomier, Julien; Aylward, Stephen; Tyszka, Mike; Moy, Sheryl; Lauder, Jean; Styner, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Magentic Reasonance Imaging for mouse phenotype study is one of the important tools to understand human diseases. In this paper, we present a fully automatic pipeline for the process of morphometric mouse brain analysis. The method is based on atlas-based tissue and regional segmentation, which was originally developed for the human brain. To evaluate our method, we conduct a qualitative and quantitative validation study as well as compare of b-spline and fluid registration methods as components in the pipeline. The validation study includes visual inspection, shape and volumetric measurements and stability of the registration methods against various parameter settings in the processing pipeline. The result shows both fluid and b-spline registration methods work well in murine settings, but the fluid registration is more stable. Additionally, we evaluated our segmentation methods by comparing volume differences between Fmr1 FXS in FVB background vs C57BL/6J mouse strains. PMID:20640188

  10. Tetracycline-regulated mouse models of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Elizabeth S; Vernon-Grey, Ann; Martin, Heather; Chodosh, Lewis A

    2014-10-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) have proven essential to the study of mammalian gene function in both development and disease. However, traditional constitutive transgenic mouse model systems are limited by the temporal and spatial characteristics of the experimental promoter used to drive transgene expression. To address this limitation, considerable effort has been dedicated to developing conditional and inducible mouse model systems. Although a number of approaches to generating inducible GEMMs have been pursued, several have been restricted by toxic or undesired physiological side effects of the compounds used to activate gene expression. The development of tetracycline (tet)-dependent regulatory systems has allowed for circumvention of these issues resulting in the widespread adoption of these systems as an invaluable tool for modeling the complex nature of cancer progression.

  11. Mouse behavioural analysis in systems biology

    PubMed Central

    van Meer, Peter; Raber, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    Molecular techniques allowing in vivo modulation of gene expression have provided unique opportunities and challenges for behavioural studies aimed at understanding the function of particular genes or biological systems under physiological or pathological conditions. Although various animal models are available, the laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) has unique features and is therefore a preferred animal model. The mouse shares a remarkable genetic resemblance and aspects of behaviour with humans. In this review, first we describe common mouse models for behavioural analyses. As both genetic and environmental factors influence behavioural performance and need to be carefully evaluated in behavioural experiments, considerations for designing and interpretations of these experiments are subsequently discussed. Finally, common behavioural tests used to assess brain function are reviewed, and it is illustrated how behavioural tests are used to increase our understanding of the role of histaminergic neurotransmission in brain function. PMID:16035954

  12. The German Mouse Clinic: a platform for systemic phenotype analysis of mouse models.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, H; Gailus-Durner, V; Adler, T; Pimentel, J A Aguilar; Becker, L; Bolle, I; Brielmeier, M; Calzada-Wack, J; Dalke, C; Ehrhardt, N; Fasnacht, N; Ferwagner, B; Frischmann, U; Hans, W; Hölter, S M; Hölzlwimmer, G; Horsch, M; Javaheri, A; Kallnik, M; Kling, E; Lengger, C; Maier, H; Mossbrugger, I; Mörth, C; Naton, B; Nöth, U; Pasche, B; Prehn, C; Przemeck, G; Puk, O; Racz, I; Rathkolb, B; Rozman, J; Schäble, K; Schreiner, R; Schrewe, A; Sina, C; Steinkamp, R; Thiele, F; Willershäuser, M; Zeh, R; Adamski, J; Busch, D H; Beckers, J; Behrendt, H; Daniel, H; Esposito, I; Favor, J; Graw, J; Heldmaier, G; Höfler, H; Ivandic, B; Katus, H; Klingenspor, M; Klopstock, T; Lengeling, A; Mempel, M; Müller, W; Neschen, S; Ollert, M; Quintanilla-Martinez, L; Rosenstiel, P; Schmidt, J; Schreiber, S; Schughart, K; Schulz, H; Wolf, E; Wurst, W; Zimmer, A; Hrabé de Angelis, M

    2009-02-01

    The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) is a large scale phenotyping center where mouse mutant lines are analyzed in a standardized and comprehensive way. The result is an almost complete picture of the phenotype of a mouse mutant line--a systemic view. At the GMC, expert scientists from various fields of mouse research work in close cooperation with clinicians side by side at one location. The phenotype screens comprise the following areas: allergy, behavior, clinical chemistry, cardiovascular analyses, dysmorphology, bone and cartilage, energy metabolism, eye and vision, host-pathogen interactions, immunology, lung function, molecular phenotyping, neurology, nociception, steroid metabolism, and pathology. The German Mouse Clinic is an open access platform that offers a collaboration-based phenotyping to the scientific community (www.mouseclinic.de). More than 80 mutant lines have been analyzed in a primary screen for 320 parameters, and for 95% of the mutant lines we have found new or additional phenotypes that were not associated with the mouse line before. Our data contributed to the association of mutant mouse lines to the corresponding human disease. In addition, the systemic phenotype analysis accounts for pleiotropic gene functions and refines previous phenotypic characterizations. This is an important basis for the analysis of underlying disease mechanisms. We are currently setting up a platform that will include environmental challenge tests to decipher genome-environmental interactions in the areas nutrition, exercise, air, stress and infection with different standardized experiments. This will help us to identify genetic predispositions as susceptibility factors for environmental influences.

  13. Sphingolipid metabolism in organotypic mouse keratinocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, K.C.; Swartzendruber, D.C.; Wertz, P.W.; Downing, D.T. )

    1990-12-01

    Ceramides are the dominant component of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid lamellae, which constitute the epidermal permeability barrier. Only pig and human epidermal ceramides have been extensively characterized and the structures of the ceramides of cultured keratinocytes have not been previously investigated. In the present studies, we have characterized the ceramides synthesized by organotypic lifted mouse keratinocyte cultures for the first time and compared them to the ceramides of intact mouse epidermis. Both mouse epidermis and cultures contained five ceramides, ceramide 1 being the least polar and ceramide 5 the most polar. Ceramide 1 was a group of acylceramides, i.e., very-long-chain omega-hydroxyceramides with an ester-linked nonhydroxy fatty acid. Ceramide 2 contained medium-length saturated nonhydroxy fatty acids. (In culture, the ceramide 2 band was split into two parts with the slightly more polar ceramide 2' containing short-chain saturated nonhydroxy fatty acids.) Ceramide 5 contained short-chain alpha-hydroxy fatty acids. The structures of ceramides 1, 2, and 5 were analagous to those of pig and human epidermis. Mouse epidermal ceramide 3 was quite unusual, containing beta-hydroxy fatty acids, a structure not previously identified among mammalian ceramides. In contrast, culture ceramide 3 was composed of omega-hydroxy fatty acids with a chain-length distribution similar to that of ceramide 1. Mouse ceramide 4 was composed of fatty acids with chromatographic mobility similar to hydroxy fatty acids but with different chemical reactivity; it remains only partially characterized. Culture ceramide 4 was present in quantities too small for analysis. All ceramides in mouse epidermis and cultures contained only sphingosine bases, whereas pig and human ceramides also contain phytosphingosine.

  14. General Considerations for Mouse Survival Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Bonnie L; Waterman, Linda L

    2012-09-01

    Personnel performing surgery on mice commonly lack formal medical training and most training in mouse surgery focuses on the mechanical skills required for a procedure with less emphasis on perioperative techniques. Consequently, a basic concept that underpins successful surgery, aseptic technique, may not be fully understood or incorporated into the training process. This unit provides a framework in which to plan and carry out surgical procedures in mice using appropriate aseptic technique. Curr. Protoc. Mouse Biol. 2:263-271 © 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Effects of alphafetoprotein on isolated mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J C; Seralini, G E; Stora, C; Vallette, G; Vranckx, R; Nunez, E A

    1986-01-01

    The supposition of an effect of alphafetoprotein (AFP) on female germinal cells is put forward. The spontaneous in vitro maturation of adult mouse oocytes is significantly inhibited when mouse AFP replaces albumin in culture medium. Furthermore, the very unusual degenerative appearance of the cells subjected to AFP seems to indicate that this meiotic inhibition is linked to a premature degeneration of the oocytes rather than to a blockage of the cells at an earlier stage of maturation. Accordingly AFP, perhaps through its ligands, may play a role in reducing the number of gonocytes during fetal and immediate post-natal life rather than in stopping oocyte meiosis at the diplotene stage.

  16. The Riken mouse genome encyclopedia project.

    PubMed

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    The Riken mouse genome encyclopedia a comprehensive full-length cDNA collection and sequence database. High-level functional annotation is based on sequence homology search, expression profiling, mapping and protein-protein interactions. More than 1000000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced and classified into 128000 clusters, and 60000 representative clones were fully sequenced representing 24000 clear protein-encoding genes. The application of the mouse genome database for positional cloning and gene network regulation analysis is reported.

  17. Mouse Models of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tuveson, David A; Yu, Kenneth H

    2015-08-01

    Only 10% to 15% of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are candidates for potentially curative surgery due to the location or spread of disease at the time of diagnosis. Despite rapid progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying PDAC, translation to effective therapies has been modest at best. One of the key tools available for studying biology and developing more effective therapeutics is the laboratory mouse, mus musculus. This article explores new and innovative approaches to mouse modeling and how these approaches can be utilized to move the field forward. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mouse polyoma virus and adenovirus replication in mouse cells temperature-sensitive in DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sheinin, R; Fabbro, J; Dubsky, M

    1985-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus multiplies, apparently without impediment, in temperature-inactivated ts A1S9, tsC1 and ts2 mouse fibroblasts. Thus, the DNA of mouse adenovirus can replicate in the absence of functional DNA topoisomerase II, a DNA-chain-elongation factor, and a protein required for traverse of the G1/S interface, respectively, encoded in the ts A1S9, tsC1 and ts2 genetic loci. These results are compared with those obtained with polyoma virus.

  19. 9 CFR 113.33 - Mouse safety tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mouse safety tests. 113.33 Section 113... Procedures § 113.33 Mouse safety tests. One of the mouse safety tests provided in this section shall be... or more ingredients makes the biological product lethal or toxic for mice but not lethal or toxic...

  20. 9 CFR 113.33 - Mouse safety tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mouse safety tests. 113.33 Section 113... Procedures § 113.33 Mouse safety tests. One of the mouse safety tests provided in this section shall be... or more ingredients makes the biological product lethal or toxic for mice but not lethal or toxic...

  1. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since “Dolly,” the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories.

  2. A mouse model for too much TV?

    PubMed

    Bilimoria, Parizad M; Hensch, Takao K; Bavelier, Daphne

    2012-11-01

    In a new study published in Scientific Reports, Christakis and colleagues investigate a mouse model for technology-induced overstimulation. We review their findings, discuss the challenges of defining overstimulation, and consider the resemblance of the phenotypes observed in Christakis et al. to those noted in genetic models of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

  3. Optical properties of the mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ying; Schery, Lee Anne; Sharma, Robin; Dubra, Alfredo; Ahmad, Kamran; Libby, Richard T.; Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS) spots upon which ocular aberration measurements depend have poor quality in mice due to light reflected from multiple retinal layers. We have designed and implemented a SHWS that can favor light from a specific retinal layer and measured monochromatic aberrations in 20 eyes from 10 anesthetized C57BL/6J mice. Using this instrument, we show that mice are myopic, not hyperopic as is frequently reported. We have also measured longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) of the mouse eye and found that it follows predictions of the water-filled schematic mouse eye. Results indicate that the optical quality of the mouse eye assessed by measurement of its aberrations is remarkably good, better for retinal imaging than the human eye. The dilated mouse eye has a much larger numerical aperture (NA) than that of the dilated human eye (0.5 NA vs. 0.2 NA), but it has a similar amount of root mean square (RMS) higher order aberrations compared to the dilated human eye. These measurements predict that adaptive optics based on this method of wavefront sensing will provide improvements in retinal image quality and potentially two times higher lateral resolution than that in the human eye. PMID:21483598

  4. Pressure volume analysis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, DeWayne

    2017-01-01

    SHORT ABSTRACT This manuscript describes a detailed protocol for the collection of pressure-volume data from the mouse. LONG ABSTRACT Understanding the causes and progression of heart disease presents a significant challenge to the biomedical community. The genetic flexibility of the mouse provides great potential to explore cardiac function at the molecular level. The mouse’s small size does present some challenges in regards to performing detailed cardiac phenotyping. Miniaturization and other advancements in technology have made many methods of cardiac assessment possible in the mouse. Of these, the simultaneous collection of pressure and volume data provides a detailed picture of cardiac function that is not available through any other modality. Here a detailed procedure for the collection of pressure-volume loop data is described. Included is a discussion of the principles underlying the measurements and the potential sources of error. Anesthetic management and surgical approaches are discussed in great detail as they are both critical to obtaining high quality hemodynamic measurements from the mouse. The principles of hemodynamic protocol development and relevant aspects of data analysis are also addressed. PMID:27166576

  5. Mouse Driven Window Graphics for Network Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makinson, G. J.; And Others

    Computer enhanced teaching of computational mathematics on a network system driving graphics terminals is being redeveloped for a mouse-driven, high resolution, windowed environment of a UNIX work station. Preservation of the features of networked access by heterogeneous terminals is provided by the use of the X Window environment. A dmonstrator…

  6. Mouse Polyomavirus: Propagation, Purification, Quantification, and Storage.

    PubMed

    Horníková, Lenka; Žíla, Vojtěch; Španielová, Hana; Forstová, Jitka

    2015-08-03

    Mouse polyomavirus (MPyV) is a member of the Polyomaviridae family, which comprises non-enveloped tumorigenic viruses infecting various vertebrates including humans and causing different pathogenic responses in the infected organisms. Despite the variations in host tropism and pathogenicity, the structure of the virions of these viruses is similar. The capsid, with icosahedral symmetry (ø, 45 nm, T = 7d), is composed of a shell of 72 capsomeres of structural proteins, arranged around the nucleocore containing approximately 5-kbp-long circular dsDNA in complex with cellular histones. MPyV has been one of the most studied polyomaviruses and serves as a model virus for studies of the mechanisms of cell transformation and virus trafficking, and for use in nanotechnology. It can be propagated in primary mouse cells (e.g., in whole mouse embryo cells) or in mouse epithelial or fibroblast cell lines. In this unit, propagation, purification, quantification, and storage of MPyV virions are presented.

  7. Having Fun with a Cordless Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, John

    2016-01-01

    A cordless mouse with an added reed switch is used as a wireless data logger to record every time the wheel of a trolley completes a revolution. The limitations of the system in terms of maximum clicking rate and spatial resolution are considered and data obtained from the descent of a trolley down a ramp at various different angles is analysed in…

  8. Morphological properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Coombs, J; van der List, D; Wang, G-Y; Chalupa, L M

    2006-06-19

    The mouse retina offers an increasingly valuable model for vision research given the possibilities for genetic manipulation. Here we assess how the structural properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells relate to the stratification pattern of the dendrites of these neurons within the inner plexiform layer. For this purpose, we used 14 morphological measures to classify mouse retinal ganglion cells parametrically into different clusters. Retinal ganglion cells were labeled in one of three ways: Lucifer Yellow injection, 'DiOlistics' or transgenic expression of yellow fluorescent protein. The resulting analysis of 182 cells revealed 10 clusters of monostratified cells, with dendrites confined to either On or Off sublaminae of the inner plexiform layer, and four clusters of bistratified cells, dendrites spanning the On and Off sublaminae. We also sought to establish how these parametrically identified retinal ganglion cell clusters relate to cell types identified previously on the basis of immunocytochemical staining and the expression of yellow fluorescent protein. Cells labeled with an antibody against melanopsin were found to be located within a single cluster, while those labeled with the SMI-32 antibody were in four different clusters. Yellow fluorescent protein expressing cells were distributed within 13 of the 14 clusters identified here, which demonstrates that yellow fluorescent protein expression is a useful method for labeling virtually the entire population of mouse retinal ganglion cells. Collectively, these findings provide a valuable baseline for future studies dealing with the effects of genetic mutations on the morphological development of these neurons.

  9. Having Fun with a Cordless Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, John

    2016-01-01

    A cordless mouse with an added reed switch is used as a wireless data logger to record every time the wheel of a trolley completes a revolution. The limitations of the system in terms of maximum clicking rate and spatial resolution are considered and data obtained from the descent of a trolley down a ramp at various different angles is analysed in…

  10. Agglutination of Mouse Erythrocytes by Eperythrozoon coccoides

    PubMed Central

    Iralu, Vichazelhu; Ganong, Kevin D.

    1983-01-01

    Erythrocytes from blood of mice infected with Eperythrozoon coccoides for 3 or 4 days agglutinated spontaneously. Washed E. coccoides particles agglutinated washed erythrocytes of uninfected mice. E. coccoides-mediated agglutination of normal mouse erythrocytes would be an excellent system for studies of bacterial adhesion. Images PMID:6832825

  11. Effects of verbenalin on prostatitis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Mingsan; Guo, Lin; Yan, Xiaoli; Wang, Tan; Li, Zuming

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the treatment characteristics of verbenalin on a prostatitis mouse model. Give Xiaozhiling injection in the prostate locally to make a prostatitis mouse model. High, medium and low doses of verbenalin were each given to different mouse groups. The amount of water was determined in 14th, 28th. The number of white cells and lecithin corpuscle density in prostatic fluid were determined. Morphological changes in the prostate, testis, epididymis and kidney were detected. Compared with the model control group, the mice treated with high, medium and low doses of verbenalin had significantly increased amounts of water, and prostate white blood cell count and prostate volume density (Vv) were decreased significantly, the density of lecithin corpuscle score increased, and pathologic prostatitis changes were significantly reduced. Pathological change in the testis was significantly reduced and the change in the epididymis was obviously reduced. The thymic cortex thickness and the number of lymphocytes increased significantly and could reduce the renal pathological changes in potential. Verbenalin has a good therapeutic effect on the prostatitis mouse model. PMID:26858560

  12. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    short N-terminal extension on trypsinogen which becomes cleaved off during activation (Figure 1). This activating cleavage can be accelerated by...the cassette by breeding with mice expressing the Cre recombinase in the mouse embryo (Cre-deleter strain). The offspring of this mating has the

  13. Chemical synthesis of the mouse mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Daniel G; Smith, Hamilton O; Hutchison, Clyde A; Venter, J Craig; Merryman, Chuck

    2010-11-01

    We describe a one-step, isothermal assembly method for synthesizing DNA molecules from overlapping oligonucleotides. The method cycles between in vitro recombination and amplification until the desired length is reached. As a demonstration of its simplicity and robustness, we synthesized the entire 16.3-kilobase mouse mitochondrial genome from 600 overlapping 60-mers.

  14. Mouse manipulation through single-switch scanning.

    PubMed

    Blackstien-Adler, Susie; Shein, Fraser; Quintal, Janet; Birch, Shae; Weiss, Patrice L Tamar

    2004-01-01

    Given the current extensive reliance on the graphical user interface, independent access to computer software requires that users be able to manipulate a pointing device of some type (e.g., mouse, trackball) or be able to emulate a mouse by some other means (e.g., scanning). The purpose of the present study was to identify one or more optimal single-switch scanning mouse emulation strategies. Four alternative scanning strategies (continuous Cartesian, discrete Cartesian, rotational, and hybrid quadrant/continuous Cartesian) were selected for testing based on current market availability as well as on theoretical considerations of their potential speed and accuracy. Each strategy was evaluated using a repeated measures study design by means of a test program that permitted mouse emulation via any one of four scanning strategies in a motivating environment; response speed and accuracy could be automatically recorded and considered in view of the motor, cognitive, and perceptual demands of each scanning strategy. Ten individuals whose disabilities required them to operate a computer via single-switch scanning participated in the study. Results indicated that Cartesian scanning was the preferred and most effective scanning strategy. There were no significant differences between results from the Continuous Cartesian and Discrete Cartesian scanning strategies. Rotational scanning was quite slow with respect to the other strategies, although it was equally accurate. Hybrid Quadrant scanning improved access time but at the cost of fewer correct selections. These results demonstrated the importance of testing and comparing alternate single-switch scanning strategies.

  15. Myc mouse and anti-ageing therapy.

    PubMed

    Alic, Nazif; Partridge, Linda

    2015-04-01

    Reduction in the expression and activity of a well-known proto-oncogene, Myc, has a beneficial effect on mouse health and survival to old age, in part independently of cancer impact, a recent study reveals. Is this new anti-ageing intervention pointing a way towards new treatments for age-related diseases?

  16. Neuroanatomy and Neurochemistry of Mouse Cornea.

    PubMed

    He, Jiucheng; Bazan, Haydee E P

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the entire nerve architecture and content of the two main sensory neuropeptides in mouse cornea to determine if it is a good model with similarities to human corneal innervation. Mice aged 1 to 24 weeks were used. The corneas were stained with neuronal-class βIII-tubulin, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and substance P (SP) antibodies; whole-mount images were acquired to build an entire view of corneal innervation. To test the origin of CGRP and SP, trigeminal ganglia (TG) were processed for immunofluorescence. Relative corneal nerve fiber densities or neuron numbers were assessed by computer-assisted analysis. Between 1 and 3 weeks after birth, mouse cornea was mainly composed of a stromal nerve network. At 4 weeks, a whorl-like structure (or vortex) appeared that gradually became more defined. By 8 weeks, anatomy of corneal nerves had reached maturity. Epithelial bundles converged into the central area to form the vortex. The number and pattern of whorl-like structures were different. Subbasal nerve density and nerve terminals were greater in the center than the periphery. Nerve fibers and terminals that were CGRP-positive were more abundant than SP-positive nerves and terminals. In trigeminal ganglia, the number of CGRP-positive neurons significantly outnumbered those positive for SP. This is the first study to show a complete map of the entire corneal nerves and CGRP and SP sensory neuropeptide distribution in the mouse cornea. This finding shows mouse corneal innervation has many similarities to human cornea and makes the mouse an appropriate model to study pathologies involving corneal nerves.

  17. Neuroanatomy and Neurochemistry of Mouse Cornea

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiucheng; Bazan, Haydee E. P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the entire nerve architecture and content of the two main sensory neuropeptides in mouse cornea to determine if it is a good model with similarities to human corneal innervation. Methods Mice aged 1 to 24 weeks were used. The corneas were stained with neuronal-class βIII-tubulin, calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP), and substance P (SP) antibodies; whole-mount images were acquired to build an entire view of corneal innervation. To test the origin of CGRP and SP, trigeminal ganglia (TG) were processed for immunofluorescence. Relative corneal nerve fiber densities or neuron numbers were assessed by computer-assisted analysis. Results Between 1 and 3 weeks after birth, mouse cornea was mainly composed of a stromal nerve network. At 4 weeks, a whorl-like structure (or vortex) appeared that gradually became more defined. By 8 weeks, anatomy of corneal nerves had reached maturity. Epithelial bundles converged into the central area to form the vortex. The number and pattern of whorl-like structures were different. Subbasal nerve density and nerve terminals were greater in the center than the periphery. Nerve fibers and terminals that were CGRP-positive were more abundant than SP-positive nerves and terminals. In trigeminal ganglia, the number of CGRP-positive neurons significantly outnumbered those positive for SP. Conclusions This is the first study to show a complete map of the entire corneal nerves and CGRP and SP sensory neuropeptide distribution in the mouse cornea. This finding shows mouse corneal innervation has many similarities to human cornea and makes the mouse an appropriate model to study pathologies involving corneal nerves. PMID:26906155

  18. Mouse Activity across Time Scales: Fractal Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Lima, G. Z. dos Santos; Lobão-Soares, B.; do Nascimento, G. C.; França, Arthur S. C.; Muratori, L.; Ribeiro, S.; Corso, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we devise a classification of mouse activity patterns based on accelerometer data using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. We use two characteristic mouse behavioural states as benchmarks in this study: waking in free activity and slow-wave sleep (SWS). In both situations we find roughly the same pattern: for short time intervals we observe high correlation in activity - a typical 1/f complex pattern - while for large time intervals there is anti-correlation. High correlation of short intervals ( to : waking state and to : SWS) is related to highly coordinated muscle activity. In the waking state we associate high correlation both to muscle activity and to mouse stereotyped movements (grooming, waking, etc.). On the other side, the observed anti-correlation over large time scales ( to : waking state and to : SWS) during SWS appears related to a feedback autonomic response. The transition from correlated regime at short scales to an anti-correlated regime at large scales during SWS is given by the respiratory cycle interval, while during the waking state this transition occurs at the time scale corresponding to the duration of the stereotyped mouse movements. Furthermore, we find that the waking state is characterized by longer time scales than SWS and by a softer transition from correlation to anti-correlation. Moreover, this soft transition in the waking state encompass a behavioural time scale window that gives rise to a multifractal pattern. We believe that the observed multifractality in mouse activity is formed by the integration of several stereotyped movements each one with a characteristic time correlation. Finally, we compare scaling properties of body acceleration fluctuation time series during sleep and wake periods for healthy mice. Interestingly, differences between sleep and wake in the scaling exponents are comparable to previous works regarding human heartbeat. Complementarily, the nature of these sleep-wake dynamics could lead to a better

  19. The Mouse Genome Database: integration of and access to knowledge about the laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2014-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) (http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the community model organism database resource for the laboratory mouse, a premier animal model for the study of genetic and genomic systems relevant to human biology and disease. MGD maintains a comprehensive catalog of genes, functional RNAs and other genome features as well as heritable phenotypes and quantitative trait loci. The genome feature catalog is generated by the integration of computational and manual genome annotations generated by NCBI, Ensembl and Vega/HAVANA. MGD curates and maintains the comprehensive listing of functional annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology, and MGD curates and integrates comprehensive phenotype annotations including associations of mouse models with human diseases. Recent improvements include integration of the latest mouse genome build (GRCm38), improved access to comparative and functional annotations for mouse genes with expanded representation of comparative vertebrate genomes and new loads of phenotype data from high-throughput phenotyping projects. All MGD resources are freely available to the research community.

  20. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): comprehensive resource for genetics and genomics of the laboratory mouse

    PubMed Central

    Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2012-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the international community resource for integrated genetic, genomic and biological data about the laboratory mouse. Data in MGD are obtained through loads from major data providers and experimental consortia, electronic submissions from laboratories and from the biomedical literature. MGD maintains a comprehensive, unified, non-redundant catalog of mouse genome features generated by distilling gene predictions from NCBI, Ensembl and VEGA. MGD serves as the authoritative source for the nomenclature of mouse genes, mutations, alleles and strains. MGD is the primary source for evidence-supported functional annotations for mouse genes and gene products using the Gene Ontology (GO). MGD provides full annotation of phenotypes and human disease associations for mouse models (genotypes) using terms from the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology and disease names from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) resource. MGD is freely accessible online through our website, where users can browse and search interactively, access data in bulk using Batch Query or BioMart, download data files or use our web services Application Programming Interface (API). Improvements to MGD include expanded genome feature classifications, inclusion of new mutant allele sets and phenotype associations and extensions of GO to include new relationships and a new stream of annotations via phylogenetic-based approaches. PMID:22075990

  1. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): comprehensive resource for genetics and genomics of the laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2012-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the international community resource for integrated genetic, genomic and biological data about the laboratory mouse. Data in MGD are obtained through loads from major data providers and experimental consortia, electronic submissions from laboratories and from the biomedical literature. MGD maintains a comprehensive, unified, non-redundant catalog of mouse genome features generated by distilling gene predictions from NCBI, Ensembl and VEGA. MGD serves as the authoritative source for the nomenclature of mouse genes, mutations, alleles and strains. MGD is the primary source for evidence-supported functional annotations for mouse genes and gene products using the Gene Ontology (GO). MGD provides full annotation of phenotypes and human disease associations for mouse models (genotypes) using terms from the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology and disease names from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) resource. MGD is freely accessible online through our website, where users can browse and search interactively, access data in bulk using Batch Query or BioMart, download data files or use our web services Application Programming Interface (API). Improvements to MGD include expanded genome feature classifications, inclusion of new mutant allele sets and phenotype associations and extensions of GO to include new relationships and a new stream of annotations via phylogenetic-based approaches.

  2. The Mouse Genome Database: integration of and access to knowledge about the laboratory mouse

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) (http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the community model organism database resource for the laboratory mouse, a premier animal model for the study of genetic and genomic systems relevant to human biology and disease. MGD maintains a comprehensive catalog of genes, functional RNAs and other genome features as well as heritable phenotypes and quantitative trait loci. The genome feature catalog is generated by the integration of computational and manual genome annotations generated by NCBI, Ensembl and Vega/HAVANA. MGD curates and maintains the comprehensive listing of functional annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology, and MGD curates and integrates comprehensive phenotype annotations including associations of mouse models with human diseases. Recent improvements include integration of the latest mouse genome build (GRCm38), improved access to comparative and functional annotations for mouse genes with expanded representation of comparative vertebrate genomes and new loads of phenotype data from high-throughput phenotyping projects. All MGD resources are freely available to the research community. PMID:24285300

  3. Structures of Mouse SOD1 and Human/Mouse SOD1 Chimeras†

    PubMed Central

    Seetharaman, Sai V.; Taylor, Alexander B.; Holloway, Stephen; Hart, P. John

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in human copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause an inherited form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Inclusions enriched in pathogenic SOD1 accumulate in the spinal cords of transgenic mice expressing these proteins, but endogenous mouse SOD1 is not found as a component of these aggregates. In the accompanying paper, Karch and colleagues analyze aggregation propensities of human/mouse SOD1 chimeras in cell culture and identify two sequence elements in the human enzyme that seem to enhance its aggregation relative to the mouse enzyme. Here, we report the first structure of mouse SOD1 along with those of SOD1 chimeras in which residues 1-80 come from human SOD1 and residues 81-153 come from mouse SOD1 and vice versa. Taken together, the structural and cell-based data suggest a model in which residues Q42 and Q123 in mouse SOD1 modulate nonnative SOD1-SOD1 intermolecular interactions at edge strands in the SOD1 Greek key β-barrel. PMID:20727846

  4. Criteria for Validating Mouse Models of Psychiatric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chadman, Kathryn K.; Yang, Mu; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2010-01-01

    Animal models of human diseases are in widespread use for biomedical research. Mouse models with a mutation in a single gene or multiple genes are excellent research tools for understanding the role of a specific gene in the etiology of a human genetic disease. Ideally, the mouse phenotypes will recapitulate the human phenotypes exactly. However, exact matches are rare, particularly in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. This article summarizes the current strategies for optimizing the validity of a mouse model of a human brain dysfunction. We address the common question raised by molecular geneticists and clinical researchers in psychiatry, “what is a ‘good enough’ mouse model”? PMID:18484083

  5. Fibrosis and inflammation are greater in muscles of beta-sarcoglycan-null mouse than mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Gibertini, Sara; Zanotti, Simona; Savadori, Paolo; Curcio, Maurizio; Saredi, Simona; Salerno, Franco; Andreetta, Francesca; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Mora, Marina

    2014-05-01

    The Sgcb-null mouse, with knocked-down β-sarcoglycan, develops severe muscular dystrophy as in type 2E human limb girdle muscular dystrophy. The mdx mouse, lacking dystrophin, is the most used model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Unlike DMD, the mdx mouse has mild clinical features and shows little fibrosis in limb muscles. To characterize ECM protein deposition and the progression of muscle fibrosis, we evaluated protein and transcript levels of collagens I, III and VI, decorin, and TGF-β1, in quadriceps and diaphragm, at 2, 4, 8, 12, 26, and 52 weeks in Sgcb-null mice, and protein levels at 12, 26, and 52 weeks in mdx mice. In Sgcb-null mice, severe morphological disruption was present from 4 weeks in both quadriceps and diaphragm, and included conspicuous deposition of extracellular matrix components. Histopathological features of Sgcb-null mouse muscles were similar to those of age-matched mdx muscles at all ages examined, but, in the Sgcb-null mouse, the extent of connective tissue deposition was generally greater than mdx. Furthermore, in the Sgcb-null mouse, the amount of all three collagen isoforms increased steadily, while, in the mdx, they remained stable. We also found that, at 12 weeks, macrophages were significantly more numerous in mildly inflamed areas of Sgcb-null quadriceps compared to mdx quadriceps (but not in highly inflamed regions), while, in the diaphragm, macrophages did not differ significantly between the two models, in either region. Osteopontin mRNA was also significantly greater at 12 weeks in laser-dissected highly inflamed areas of the Sgcb-null quadriceps compared to the mdx quadriceps. TGF-β1 was present in areas of degeneration-regeneration, but levels were highly variable and in general did not differ significantly between the two models and controls. The roles of the various subtypes of macrophages in muscle repair and fibrosis in the two models require further study. The Sgcb-null mouse, which develops early fibrosis

  6. Random cloning of genes from mouse chromosome 17.

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, M; Figueroa, F; Klein, J

    1987-01-01

    We describe a method for isolating cosmid clones randomly from mouse chromosome 17. A cosmid library was constructed from the mouse-Chinese hamster cell line R4 4-1 that contains a limited amount of mouse DNA (chromosomes 17 and 18 and some other unidentified material) on a Chinese hamster background. The library was screened with the murine repetitive sequence probe pMBA14, which selectively hybridizes with mouse DNA. The mouse-derived cosmid clones thus identified were individually hybridized with DNA from the mouse-Syrian hamster cell line JS17 containing all mouse chromosomes except chromosome 17 on a Syrian hamster background. We deduced that the cosmid clones that contained sequences absent in JS17 were derived from mouse chromosome 17. One of the chromosome 17-derived cosmid clones, 3-4-1 (located proximal to the T122/T66C segment) was found to be highly polymorphic among European wild-mouse populations and may be a useful probe to elucidate the evolution and migration of Mus species. The randomly isolated mouse-derived cosmid clones can also be screened for the presence of functional genes. Using testicular cDNA as a probe, a testis-specific gene was cloned from mouse chromosome 17. Images PMID:3472212

  7. Mouse models of otitis media: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Mahmood Fazal

    2012-10-01

    There has been a rapid rise in the use of the mouse to investigate pathobiology of otitis media. This is for good reason, including easy husbandry, but also capacity for genetic manipulation of the mouse. Insights into human disease have been gleaned from mouse models, but there are limitations of the mouse-to-man approach. First, important differences exist between mouse and man, particularly in immune function. Second, functional equivalence of genes in the 2 species is not ensured. Third, laboratory mice of a uniform genetic background and environment are an inadequate model of the plethora of factors affecting complex disease in humans. Finally, gene function in mouse models is often obliterated using gene knockout technology, but this is a poor mimic of normal gene variation in man. These drawbacks of the mouse may in the future limit its usefulness in otitis media research.

  8. MouseMine: a new data warehouse for MGI.

    PubMed

    Motenko, H; Neuhauser, S B; O'Keefe, M; Richardson, J E

    2015-08-01

    MouseMine (www.mousemine.org) is a new data warehouse for accessing mouse data from Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI). Based on the InterMine software framework, MouseMine supports powerful query, reporting, and analysis capabilities, the ability to save and combine results from different queries, easy integration into larger workflows, and a comprehensive Web Services layer. Through MouseMine, users can access a significant portion of MGI data in new and useful ways. Importantly, MouseMine is also a member of a growing community of online data resources based on InterMine, including those established by other model organism databases. Adopting common interfaces and collaborating on data representation standards are critical to fostering cross-species data analysis. This paper presents a general introduction to MouseMine, presents examples of its use, and discusses the potential for further integration into the MGI interface.

  9. A transgenic tri-modality reporter mouse.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinrui; Ray, Pritha; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Tong, Ricky; Gong, Yongquan; Sathirachinda, Ataya; Wu, Joseph C; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic mouse with a stably integrated reporter gene(s) can be a valuable resource for obtaining uniformly labeled stem cells, tissues, and organs for various applications. We have generated a transgenic mouse model that ubiquitously expresses a tri-fusion reporter gene (fluc2-tdTomato-ttk) driven by a constitutive chicken β-actin promoter. This "Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse" system allows one to isolate most cells from this donor mouse and image them for bioluminescent (fluc2), fluorescent (tdTomato), and positron emission tomography (PET) (ttk) modalities. Transgenic colonies with different levels of tri-fusion reporter gene expression showed a linear correlation between all three-reporter proteins (R(2)=0.89 for TdTomato vs Fluc, R(2)=0.94 for Fluc vs TTK, R(2)=0.89 for TdTomato vs TTK) in vitro from tissue lysates and in vivo by optical and PET imaging. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from this transgenics showed high level of reporter gene expression, which linearly correlated with the cell numbers (R(2)=0.99 for bioluminescence imaging (BLI)). Both BLI (R(2)=0.93) and micro-PET (R(2)=0.94) imaging of the subcutaneous implants of Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse derived MSCs in nude mice showed linear correlation with the cell numbers and across different imaging modalities (R(2)=0.97). Serial imaging of MSCs transplanted to mice with acute myocardial infarction (MI) by intramyocardial injection exhibited significantly higher signals in MI heart at days 2, 3, 4, and 7 (p<0.01). MSCs transplanted to the ischemic hindlimb of nude mice showed significantly higher BLI and PET signals in the first 2 weeks that dropped by 4(th) week due to poor cell survival. However, laser Doppler perfusion imaging revealed that blood circulation in the ischemic limb was significantly improved in the MSCs transplantation group compared with the control group. In summary, this mouse can be used as a source of donor cells and organs in various research areas such as stem cell

  10. Application of hairless mouse strain to bioluminescence imaging of Arc expression in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hironori; Ishimoto, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Mori, Hisashi

    2017-01-23

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a powerful technique for monitoring the temporal and spatial dynamics of gene expression in the mouse brain. However, the black fur, skin pigmentation and hair regrowth after depilation of mouse interfere with BLI during developmental and daily examination. The aim of this study was to extend the application of Arc-Luc transgenic (Tg) mice to the BLI of neuronal activity in the mouse brain by introducing the hairless (HL) gene and to examine Arc-Luc expression at various developmental stages without interference from black fur, skin pigmentation, and hair regrowth. The Arc-Luc Tg HL mice were established by crossing the Tg C57BL/6 mouse strain with the HL mouse strain. Under physiological and pathological conditions, BLI was performed to detect the signal intensity changes at various developmental stages and at an interval of <7 days. The established Arc-Luc Tg HL mice exhibited clear and stable photon signals from the brain without interference during development. After surgical monocular deprivation during visual-critical period, large signal intensity changes in bioluminescence were observed in the mouse visual cortex. Exposure of mice to a novel object changed the photon distribution in the caudal and rostral cerebral areas. The temporal pattern of kainic-acid-induced Arc-Luc expression showed biphasic changes in signal intensity over 24 h. This study showed the advantages of using the mutant HL gene in BLI of Arc expression in the mouse brain at various developmental stages. Thus, the use of the Arc-Luc Tg HL mice enabled the tracking of neuronal-activity-dependent processes over a wide range from a focal area to the entire brain area with various time windows.

  11. OptiMouse: a comprehensive open source program for reliable detection and analysis of mouse body and nose positions.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shaul, Yoram

    2017-05-15

    Accurate determination of mouse positions from video data is crucial for various types of behavioral analyses. While detection of body positions is straightforward, the correct identification of nose positions, usually more informative, is far more challenging. The difficulty is largely due to variability in mouse postures across frames. Here, we present OptiMouse, an extensively documented open-source MATLAB program providing comprehensive semiautomatic analysis of mouse position data. The emphasis in OptiMouse is placed on minimizing errors in position detection. This is achieved by allowing application of multiple detection algorithms to each video, including custom user-defined algorithms, by selection of the optimal algorithm for each frame, and by correction when needed using interpolation or manual specification of positions. At a basic level, OptiMouse is a simple and comprehensive solution for analysis of position data. At an advanced level, it provides an open-source and expandable environment for a detailed analysis of mouse position data.

  12. Elemental profiles in Emory mouse lens

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, M.; Emanuel, K. )

    1991-01-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray microprobe analysis was used to determine the distribution of chloride, potassium, phosphorus and sulfur in the epithelial cells of the lenses obtained from 3 to 7 month old Emory mice and 7 month old cataract resistant strain of Emory mice. Rapidly frozen lenses were fractured in the frozen state and lyophilized. The anterior epithelial cells were analyzed from equator to equator. The results show that the epithelial cells of the 7 month old Emory mouse lens have considerably higher amounts of chloride, sulfur, potassium and phosphorus. Presence of increased amount of potassium in the epithelial cells is intriguing. The data obtained from these experiments show that the changes in the elemental levels of epithelial cells are similar to observed alteration found in the lens fiber mass of 7 month old Emory mouse.

  13. Identification of structural variation in mouse genomes

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Thomas M.; Wong, Kim; Adams, David J.; Flint, Jonathan; Reymond, Alexandre; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2014-01-01

    Structural variation is variation in structure of DNA regions affecting DNA sequence length and/or orientation. It generally includes deletions, insertions, copy-number gains, inversions, and transposable elements. Traditionally, the identification of structural variation in genomes has been challenging. However, with the recent advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing and paired-end mapping (PEM) methods, the ability to identify structural variation and their respective association to human diseases has improved considerably. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of structural variation in the mouse, one of the prime model systems for studying human diseases and mammalian biology. We further present the evolutionary implications of structural variation on transposable elements. We conclude with future directions on the study of structural variation in mouse genomes that will increase our understanding of molecular architecture and functional consequences of structural variation. PMID:25071822

  14. Mouse brain imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yang; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) provides structural and functional information when used in small animal brain imaging. Acoustic distortion caused by bone structures largely limits the deep brain image quality. In our work, we present ex vivo PACT images of freshly excised mouse brain, intending that can serve as a gold standard for future PACT in vivo studies on small animal brain imaging. Our results show that structures such as the striatum, hippocampus, ventricles, and cerebellum can be clearly di erentiated. An artery feature called the Circle of Willis, located at the bottom of the brain, can also be seen. These results indicate that if acoustic distortion can be accurately accounted for, PACT should be able to image the entire mouse brain with rich structural information.

  15. Having fun with a cordless mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, John

    2016-07-01

    A cordless mouse with an added reed switch is used as a wireless data logger to record every time the wheel of a trolley completes a revolution. The limitations of the system in terms of maximum clicking rate and spatial resolution are considered and data obtained from the descent of a trolley down a ramp at various different angles is analysed in different ways. The data is analysed to obtain initial accelerations (down the ramp) and subsequent decelerations (on the flat), as well as maximum velocities, and these results are used to compare the actual performance of the trolley (with friction) with the theoretical expectation. An agreement of better than 2% on the value of gravity is obtained. Encouraging agreement on frictional forces (and accelerations) is also obtained by considering the maximum kinetic energies reached at the bottom of the ramp. This paper includes the free provision of custom software to record the time history of the clicking of a mouse.

  16. Micrognathia in mouse models of ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Adel Al-Lami, Hadeel; Barrell, William B; Liu, Karen J

    2016-12-15

    Defects in the development of the mandible can lead to micrognathia, or small jaw, which manifests in ciliopathic conditions, such as orofaciodigital syndrome, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, and Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Although micrognathia occurs frequently in human and mouse ciliopathies, it has been difficult to pinpoint the underlying cellular causes. In this mini-review, we shed light on the tissue-specific contributions to ciliary dysfunction in the development of the mandible. First, we outline the steps involved in setting up the jaw primordium and subsequent steps in the outgrowth of the mandibular skeleton. We then determine the critical tissue interactions using mice carrying a conditional mutation in the cilia gene Ofd1 Our studies highlight the usefulness of the Ofd1 mouse model and illustrate long-term possibilities for understanding the cellular and biochemical events underlying micrognathia. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  17. Regulation of mouse satellite DNA replication time.

    PubMed

    Selig, S; Ariel, M; Goitein, R; Marcus, M; Cedar, H

    1988-02-01

    The satellite DNA sequences located near the centromeric regions of mouse chromosomes replicate very late in S in both fibroblast and lymphocyte cells and are heavily methylated at CpG residues. F9 teratocarcinoma cells, on the other hand, contain satellite sequences which are undermethylated and replicate much earlier in S. DNA methylation probably plays some role in the control of satellite replication time since 5-azacytidine treatment of RAG fibroblasts causes a dramatic temporal shift of replication to mid S. In contrast to similar changes accompanying the inactivation of the X-chromosome, early replication of satellite DNA is not associated with an increase in local chromosomal DNase I sensitivity. Fusion of F9 with mouse lymphocytes caused a dramatic early shift in the timing of the normally late replicating lymphocyte satellite heterochromatin, suggesting that trans-activating factors may be responsible for the regulation of replication timing.

  18. Analysis of Mouse Growth Plate Development.

    PubMed

    Mangiavini, Laura; Merceron, Christophe; Schipani, Ernestina

    2016-03-01

    To investigate skeletal development, pathophysiological mechanisms of cartilage and bone disease, and eventually assess innovative treatments, the mouse is a very important resource. During embryonic development, mesenchymal condensations are formed, and cells within these mesenchymal condensations either directly differentiate into osteoblasts and give origin to intramembranous bone, or differentiate into chondrocytes and form a cartilaginous anlage. The cartilaginous anlage or fetal growth plate is then replaced with bone. This process is also called endochondral bone development, and it is responsible for the generation of most of our skeleton. Here we discuss in detail the most common in vivo and in vitro techniques our laboratory is currently using for the analysis of the mouse fetal growth plate during development. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Analysis of Mouse Growth Plate Development

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavini, Laura; Merceron, Christophe; Schipani, Ernestina

    2016-01-01

    To investigate skeletal development, pathophysiological mechanisms of cartilage and bone disease, and eventually assess innovative treatments, the mouse is a very important resource. During embryonic development, mesenchymal condensations are formed, and cells within these mesenchymal condensations either directly differentiate into osteoblasts and give origin to intramembranous bone, or differentiate into chondrocytes and form a cartilaginous anlage. The cartilaginous anlage or fetal growth plate is then replaced with bone. This process is also called endochondral bone development, and it is responsible for the generation of most of our skeleton. In this Review, we will discuss in detail the most common in vivo and in vitro techniques our laboratory is currently using for the analysis of the mouse fetal growth plate during development. PMID:26928664

  20. Retinal degeneration mutants in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Chang, B; Hawes, N L; Hurd, R E; Davisson, M T; Nusinowitz, S; Heckenlively, J R

    2002-02-01

    The Jackson Laboratory, having the world's largest collection of mouse mutant stocks and genetically diverse inbred strains, is an ideal place to look for genetically determined eye variations and disorders. Through ophthalmoscopy, electroretinography and histology, we have discovered disorders affecting all aspects of the eye including the lid, cornea, iris, lens and retina, resulting in corneal disorders, cataracts, glaucoma and retinal degenerations. Mouse models of retinal degeneration have been investigated for many years in the hope of understanding the causes of photoreceptor cell death. Sixteen naturally occurring mouse mutants that manifest degeneration of photoreceptors in the retina with preservation of all other retinal cell types have been found: retinal degeneration (formerly rd, identical with rodless retina, r, now Pde6b(rd1)); Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd); nervous (nr); retinal degeneration slow (rds, now Prph(Rd2)); retinal degeneration 3 (rd3); motor neuron degeneration (mnd); retinal degeneration 4 (Rd4); retinal degeneration 5 (rd5, now tub); vitiligo (vit, now Mitf(mi-vit)); retinal degeneration 6 (rd6); retinal degeneration 7 (rd7, now Nr2e3(rd7)); neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (nclf); retinal degeneration 8 (rd8); retinal degeneration 9 (Rd9); retinal degeneration 10 (rd10, now Pde6b(rd10)); and cone photoreceptor function loss (cpfl1). In this report, we first review the genotypes and phenotypes of these mutants and second, list the mouse strains that carry each mutation. We will also provide detailed information about the cpfl1 mutation. The phenotypic characteristics of cpfl1 mice are similar to those observed in patients with complete achromatopsia (ACHM2, OMIM 216900) and the cpfl1 mutation is the first naturally-arising mutation in mice to cause cone-specific photoreceptor function loss. cpfl1 mice may provide a model for congenital achromatopsia in humans.

  1. Development of amnesia in different mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Sinovyev, D R; Dubrovina, N I; Kulikov, A V

    2009-05-01

    We studied passive avoidance retrieval after amnestic stimulation (arrest in unsafe section of the experimental setup) in C57Bl/6J, BALB/c, CBA/Lac, AKR/J, DBA/2J, C3H/HeJ, and ASC/Icg mice. We demonstrated resistance to amnestic stimulation in mice with high predisposition to freezing reaction (ASC/Icg) and memory deficit in other mouse strains.

  2. Using ontologies to describe mouse phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gkoutos, Georgios V; Green, Eain CJ; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Hancock, John M; Davidson, Duncan

    2005-01-01

    The mouse is an important model of human genetic disease. Describing phenotypes of mutant mice in a standard, structured manner that will facilitate data mining is a major challenge for bioinformatics. Here we describe a novel, compositional approach to this problem which combines core ontologies from a variety of sources. This produces a framework with greater flexibility, power and economy than previous approaches. We discuss some of the issues this approach raises. PMID:15642100

  3. Engineering a new mouse model for vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Manga, Prashiela; Orlow, Seth J

    2012-07-01

    Although the precise mechanisms that trigger vitiligo remain elusive, autoimmune responses mediate its progression. The development of therapies has been impeded by a paucity of animal models, since mice lack interfollicular melanocytes, the primary targets in vitiligo. In this issue, Harris et al. describe a mouse model in which interfollicular melanocytes are retained by Kit ligand overexpression and an immune response is initiated by transplanting melanocyte-targeting CD8+ T cells.

  4. Development of Mouse Lung Deposition Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Particle inhalability in mice was lower than that in rats . In contrast, deposition of the same size particle was higher in mice nasal passages than...that in rats . Thus, fewer particles entered the mouse lung in comparison with rat particle inhalation. The penetration was severely limited for...geometry that was previously developed for humans, rats , and rhesus monkeys [6], [7]. Inputs to the model included lung geometry and volumes, and

  5. Imaging of mouse aorta using OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateasik, Anton; Uherek, Frantisek; Chorvat, Dusan, Jr.; Tazka, D.; Kyselovic, J.

    2001-05-01

    There are many fields in medicine and biology where optical coherence tomography (OCT) is starting to be used for diagnostics imaging. In our work, OCT imaging has been applied to obtain 3D structure and geometry of mouse aorta and atherosclerotic plaques in it. Differences in plaque formation have been detected between mice fed with cholesterol rich food, and mice kept on special diet. The results of OCT measurements have been confirmed with optical microscopy.

  6. Complex Loci in human and mouse genomes.

    PubMed

    Engström, Pär G; Suzuki, Harukazu; Ninomiya, Noriko; Akalin, Altuna; Sessa, Luca; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Brozzi, Alessandro; Luzi, Lucilla; Tan, Sin Lam; Yang, Liang; Kunarso, Galih; Ng, Edwin Lian-Chong; Batalov, Serge; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Wells, Christine; Bajic, Vladimir B; Orlando, Valerio; Reid, James F; Lenhard, Boris; Lipovich, Leonard

    2006-04-01

    Mammalian genomes harbor a larger than expected number of complex loci, in which multiple genes are coupled by shared transcribed regions in antisense orientation and/or by bidirectional core promoters. To determine the incidence, functional significance, and evolutionary context of mammalian complex loci, we identified and characterized 5,248 cis-antisense pairs, 1,638 bidirectional promoters, and 1,153 chains of multiple cis-antisense and/or bidirectionally promoted pairs from 36,606 mouse transcriptional units (TUs), along with 6,141 cis-antisense pairs, 2,113 bidirectional promoters, and 1,480 chains from 42,887 human TUs. In both human and mouse, 25% of TUs resided in cis-antisense pairs, only 17% of which were conserved between the two organisms, indicating frequent species specificity of antisense gene arrangements. A sampling approach indicated that over 40% of all TUs might actually be in cis-antisense pairs, and that only a minority of these arrangements are likely to be conserved between human and mouse. Bidirectional promoters were characterized by variable transcriptional start sites and an identifiable midpoint at which overall sequence composition changed strand and the direction of transcriptional initiation switched. In microarray data covering a wide range of mouse tissues, genes in cis-antisense and bidirectionally promoted arrangement showed a higher probability of being coordinately expressed than random pairs of genes. In a case study on homeotic loci, we observed extensive transcription of nonconserved sequences on the noncoding strand, implying that the presence rather than the sequence of these transcripts is of functional importance. Complex loci are ubiquitous, host numerous nonconserved gene structures and lineage-specific exonification events, and may have a cis-regulatory impact on the member genes.

  7. Refined structures of mouse P-glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingzhi; Jaimes, Kimberly F; Aller, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    The recently determined C. elegans P-glycoprotein (Pgp) structure revealed significant deviations compared to the original mouse Pgp structure, which suggested possible misinterpretations in the latter model. To address this concern, we generated an experimental electron density map from single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing of an original mouse Pgp dataset to 3.8 Å resolution. The map exhibited significantly more detail compared to the original MAD map and revealed several regions of the structure that required de novo model building. The improved drug-free structure was refined to 3.8 Å resolution with a 9.4 and 8.1% decrease in Rwork and Rfree, respectively, (Rwork = 21.2%, Rfree = 26.6%) and a significant improvement in protein geometry. The improved mouse Pgp model contains ∼95% of residues in the favorable Ramachandran region compared to only 57% for the original model. The registry of six transmembrane helices was corrected, revealing amino acid residues involved in drug binding that were previously unrecognized. Registry shifts (rotations and translations) for three transmembrane (TM)4 and TM5 and the addition of three N-terminal residues were necessary, and were validated with new mercury labeling and anomalous Fourier density. The corrected position of TM4, which forms the frame of a portal for drug entry, had backbone atoms shifted >6 Å from their original positions. The drug translocation pathway of mouse Pgp is 96% identical to human Pgp and is enriched in aromatic residues that likely play a collective role in allowing a high degree of polyspecific substrate recognition. PMID:24155053

  8. 18th International Mouse Genome Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Lossie, Amy C.; Meehan, Thomas P.; Castillo, Andrew; Zheng, Lihua; Weiser, Keith C.; Strivens, Mark A.; Justice, Monica J.

    2005-07-01

    The 18th International Mouse Genome Conference was held in Seattle, WA, US on October 18-22,2004. The meeting was partially supported by the Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER63851. Abstracts can be seen at imgs.org and the summary of the meeting was published in Mammalian Genome, Vol 16, Number 7, Pages 471-475.

  9. Cell Lineage Analysis of Mouse Prostate Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    are derived from luminal or basal epithelial cells using genetic lineage tracing of prostate carcinogenesis in PSA-CreERT2;R26RmT/mG;EAF2-/-;PTEN...derived from luminal epithelial cells in the prostate, because a hallmark of prostate cancer is the loss of basal epithelial cells and prostate...publications [2, 3]. This project will determine whether prostate cancer cells are derived from luminal or basal epithelial cells in an EAF2-/- mouse

  10. mouseTube – a database to collaboratively unravel mouse ultrasonic communication

    PubMed Central

    Torquet, Nicolas; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Faure, Philippe; Bourgeron, Thomas; Ey, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic vocalisation is a broadly used proxy to evaluate social communication in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. The efficacy and robustness of testing these models suffer from limited knowledge of the structure and functions of these vocalisations as well as of the way to analyse the data. We created mouseTube, an open database with a web interface, to facilitate sharing and comparison of ultrasonic vocalisations data and metadata attached to a recording file. Metadata describe 1) the acquisition procedure, e.g., hardware, software, sampling frequency, bit depth; 2) the biological protocol used to elicit ultrasonic vocalisations; 3) the characteristics of the individual emitting ultrasonic vocalisations ( e.g., strain, sex, age). To promote open science and enable reproducibility, data are made freely available. The website provides searching functions to facilitate the retrieval of recording files of interest. It is designed to enable comparisons of ultrasonic vocalisation emission between strains, protocols or laboratories, as well as to test different analysis algorithms and to search for protocols established to elicit mouse ultrasonic vocalisations. Over the long term, users will be able to download and compare different analysis results for each data file. Such application will boost the knowledge on mouse ultrasonic communication and stimulate sharing and comparison of automatic analysis methods to refine phenotyping techniques in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27830061

  11. Isolation of the mouse homologue of BRCA1 and genetic mapping to mouse chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, L.M.; Haugen-Strano, A.; Cochran, C.

    1995-10-10

    The BRCA1 gene is in large part responsible for hereditary human breast and ovarian cancer. Here we report the isolation of the murine Brca1 homologue cDNA clones. In addition, we identified genomic P1 clones that contain most, if not all, of the mouse Brca1 locus. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the mouse and human coding regions are 75% identical at the nucleotide level while the predicted amino acid identity is only 58%. A DNA sequence variant in the Brcal locus was identified and used to map this gene on a (Mus m. musculus Czech II x C57BL/KsJ)F1 x C57BL/KsJ intersubspecific backcross to distal mouse chromosome 11. The mapping of this gene to a region highly syntenic with human chromosome 17, coupled with Southern and Northern analyses, confirms that we isolated the murine Brcal homologue rather than a related RING finger gene. The isolation of the mouse Brca1 homologue will facilitate the creation of mouse models for germline BRCA1 defects. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB): a database of mouse models for human cancer.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Krupke, Debra M; Begley, Dale A; Richardson, Joel E; Neuhauser, Steven B; Sundberg, John P; Eppig, Janan T

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) database is a unique online compendium of mouse models for human cancer. MTB provides online access to expertly curated information on diverse mouse models for human cancer and interfaces for searching and visualizing data associated with these models. The information in MTB is designed to facilitate the selection of strains for cancer research and is a platform for mining data on tumor development and patterns of metastases. MTB curators acquire data through manual curation of peer-reviewed scientific literature and from direct submissions by researchers. Data in MTB are also obtained from other bioinformatics resources including PathBase, the Gene Expression Omnibus and ArrayExpress. Recent enhancements to MTB improve the association between mouse models and human genes commonly mutated in a variety of cancers as identified in large-scale cancer genomics studies, provide new interfaces for exploring regions of the mouse genome associated with cancer phenotypes and incorporate data and information related to Patient-Derived Xenograft models of human cancers.

  13. SEROLOGICALLY DEMONSTRABLE ALLOANTIGENS OF MOUSE EPIDERMAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Scheid, Margrit; Boyse, Edward A.; Carswell, Elizabeth A.; Old, Lloyd J.

    1972-01-01

    Single cells were prepared from mouse tail epidermis by a method which gives high viability counts and so permits their use in cytotoxicity tests. According to tests with standard alloantisera, the antigen phenotype of mouse epidermal cells is H-2+θ+Sk+H-Y+TL-Ly-A-Ly-B,C-PC-. The skin differentiation alloantigen Sk, which is responsible for homograft reactions directed selectively against skin, is expressed also on brain, but not on other cell types; it is present on the transplanted neuroblastoma C1300. Cytotoxicity tests with epidermal cells of H-2 congenic mouse stocks confirm that the Sk locus is not closely linked to H-2. The lymphoid cell differentiation antigen θ also is present on both epidermal cells and brain. Mice frequently retain θ-incompatible or Sk-incompatible skin grafts although they have formed substantial titers of θ or Sk antibody in response to grafting. Male (H-Y) antigen is demonstrable on epidermal cells by cytotoxicity tests with H-Y antibody, as it is also on one other type of cell, spermatozoa. PMID:4553016

  14. Implementation of the mouse frailty index.

    PubMed

    Kane, Alice E; Ayaz, Omar; Ghimire, Anjali; Feridooni, Hirad A; Howlett, Susan E

    2017-05-02

    Frailty is considered a state of high vulnerability for adverse health outcomes for people of the same age. Those who are frail have higher mortality, worse health outcomes, and use more health care services than those who are not frail. Despite this, little is known about the biology of frailty, the effect of frailty on pharmacological or surgical outcomes, and potential interventions to attenuate frailty. In humans, frailty can be quantified using a frailty index (FI) based on the principle of deficit accumulation. The recent development of an FI in naturally ageing mice provides an opportunity to conduct frailty research in a validated preclinical model. The mouse FI has been successfully used across a wide range of applications; however, there are some factors that should be considered in implementing this tool. This review summarises the current literature, presents some original data, and suggests areas for future research on the current applications of the mouse FI, inter-rater reliability of the FI, the effect of observer characteristics and environmental factors on mouse FI scores, and the individual items that make up the FI assessment. The implementation of this tool into preclinical frailty research should greatly accelerate translational research in this important field.

  15. Mouse models for neural tube closure defects.

    PubMed

    Juriloff, D M; Harris, M J

    2000-04-12

    Neural tube closure defects (NTDs), in particular anencephaly and spina bifida, are common human birth defects (1 in 1000), their genetics is complex and their risk is reduced by periconceptional maternal folic acid supplementation. There are > 60 mouse mutants and strains with NTDs, many reported within the past 2 years. Not only are NTD mutations at loci widely heterogeneous in function, but also most of the mutants demonstrate variable low penetrance and some show complex inheritance patterns (e.g. SELH/Bc, Abl / Arg, Mena / Profilin1 ). In most of these mouse models, the NTDs are exencephaly (equivalent to anencephaly) or spina bifida or both, reflecting failure of neural fold elevation in well defined, mechanistically distinct elevation zones. NTD risk is reduced in various models by different maternal nutrient supplements, including folic acid ( Pax3, Cart1, Cd mutants), inositol ( ct ) and methionine ( Axd ). Lack of de novo methylation in embryos ( Dnmt3b -null) leads to NTD risk, and we suggest a potential link between methylation and the observed female excess among cranial NTDs in several models. Some surprising NTD mutants ( Gadd45a, Terc, Trp53 ) suggest that genes with a basic mitotic function also have a function specific to neural fold elevation. The genes mutated in several mouse NTD models involve actin regulation ( Abl/Arg, Macs, Mena/Profilin1, Mlp, Shrm, Vcl ), support the postulated key role of actin in neural fold elevation, and may be a good candidate pathway to search for human NTD genes.

  16. Transmission of mouse parvovirus to neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Compton, Susan R; Paturzo, Frank X; Macy, James D

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the infection of newborn mice with mouse parvovirus (MPV), a single MPV-infected mouse was added to each of 15 cages, each of which housed an uninfected breeding pair of Swiss Webster mice just before parturition. Seven litters were left with their parents, and the remaining 8 litters were fostered at postpartum day 1. All dams were shedding MPV at 1 and 2 wk after exposure. Soiled-bedding transmission did not differ between cages with and without litters. Half the foster dams but none of the fostered pups seroconverted to MPV. None of the pups left with their birth mothers had MPV DNA in their feces at 3 or 6 wk after exposure, but pups in 6 of 7 litters were MPV seropositive at 6 wk. To investigate MPV infection of older neonatal mice, 9 dams with 7-d-old litters and 9 dams with 14-d-old litters each were exposed to an MPV-infected mouse. At weaning, pups exposed to MPV at 7 or 14 d of age were shedding MPV and were seronegative but became seropositive by 6 wk of age and transmitted the infection to sentinels. In conclusion, fostering of pups had no benefit and may spread infection because the pups may act as fomites, infecting the foster dam. Infection of 7- or 14-d-old mice likely occurred because maternal antibodies had not been transferred to the progeny before they began to ingest MPV-laden feces.

  17. A Mouse Model for Osseous Heteroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Michael T.; Vowell, Kate; Hough, Tertius A.; Jones, Lynn; Pathak, Paras; Tyrer, Hayley E.; Kelly, Michelle; Cox, Roger; Warren, Madhuri V.; Peters, Jo

    2012-01-01

    GNAS/Gnas encodes Gsα that is mainly biallelically expressed but shows imprinted expression in some tissues. In Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) heterozygous loss of function mutations of GNAS can result in ectopic ossification that tends to be superficial and attributable to haploinsufficiency of biallelically expressed Gsα. Oed-Sml is a point missense mutation in exon 6 of the orthologous mouse locus Gnas. We report here both the late onset ossification and occurrence of benign cutaneous fibroepithelial polyps in Oed-Sml. These phenotypes are seen on both maternal and paternal inheritance of the mutant allele and are therefore due to an effect on biallelically expressed Gsα. The ossification is confined to subcutaneous tissues and so resembles the ossification observed with AHO. Our mouse model is the first with both subcutaneous ossification and fibroepithelial polyps related to Gsα deficiency. It is also the first mouse model described with a clinically relevant phenotype associated with a point mutation in Gsα and may be useful in investigations of the mechanisms of heterotopic bone formation. Together with earlier results, our findings indicate that Gsα signalling pathways play a vital role in repressing ectopic bone formation. PMID:23284784

  18. Murine cytomegalovirus infection of cultured mouse embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Y.; Naruse, I.

    1987-01-01

    Isolated mouse whole embryos of 7.5 days' gestation were infected with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and cultured in pure rat serum. Although the MCMV infection had little effect on the survival and development of the embryos during 3 days of cultivation, immunohistochemical analysis of their serial sections using monoclonal antibody showed MCMV-infected cells in various portions of the embryos. This monoclonal antibody, when tested with the use of infected cultured mouse fibroblasts, reacted with nuclear antigen within 2 hours after infection and also reacted with nuclear inclusions in the late phase of infection. The viral antigen-positive cells detected by the monoclonal antibody were present in almost all of the ectoplacental cone and the yolk sac and in about 82% of the embryos. In the embryos, antigen-positive cells were frequently observed in the epithelium of the digestive tracts, endothelial cells of the blood vessels, and the mesodermal cells. In some of the embryos, viral antigen-positive cells were clearly observed in a small percentage of the blood cells. These findings indicate that blood cells, in addition to cell migration during embryogenesis, may play an important role in transmission of infectious virus into the embryos. Mouse whole embryo culture infected with MCMV can provide a model for the study of cellular tropism related to congenital infection by cytomegalovirus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3034066

  19. The Mouse Isolated Perfused Kidney Technique.

    PubMed

    Czogalla, Jan; Schweda, Frank; Loffing, Johannes

    2016-11-17

    The mouse isolated perfused kidney (MIPK) is a technique for keeping a mouse kidney under ex vivo conditions perfused and functional for 1 hr. This is a prerequisite for studying the physiology of the isolated organ and for many innovative applications that may be possible in the future, including perfusion decellularization for kidney bioengineering or the administration of anti-rejection or genome-editing drugs in high doses to prime the kidney for transplantation. During the time of the perfusion, the kidney can be manipulated, renal function can be assessed, and various pharmaceuticals administered. After the procedure, the kidney can be transplanted or processed for molecular biology, biochemical analysis, or microscopy. This paper describes the perfusate and the surgical technique needed for the ex vivo perfusion of mouse kidneys. Details of the perfusion apparatus are given and data are presented showing the viability of the kidney's preparation: renal blood flow, vascular resistance, and urine data as functional, transmission electron micrographs of different nephron segments as morphological readouts, and western blots of transport proteins of different nephron segments as molecular readout.

  20. Transplantation Into the Mouse Ovarian Fat Pad

    PubMed Central

    Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Harlan, Blaine A.; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Orthotopic transplantation assays in mice are invaluable for studies of cell regeneration and neoplastic transformation. Common approaches for orthotopic transplantation of ovarian surface and tubal epithelia include intraperitoneal and intrabursal administration of cells. The respective limitations of these methods include poorly defined location of injected cells and limited space volume. Furthermore, they are poorly suited for long-term structural preservation of transplanted organs. To address these challenges, we have developed an alternative approach, which is based on the introduction of cells and tissue fragments into the mouse fat pad. The mouse ovarian fat pad is located in the immediate vicinity of the ovary and uterine tube (aka oviduct, fallopian tube), and provides a familiar microenvironment for cells and tissues of these organs. In our approach fluorescence-labeled mouse and human cells, and fragments of the uterine tube are engrafted by using minimally traumatic dorsal incision surgery. Transplanted cells and their outgrowths are easily located in the ovarian fat pad for over 40 days. Long-term transplantation of the entire uterine tube allows correct preservation of all principle tissue components, and does not result in adverse side effects, such as fibrosis and inflammation. Our approach should be uniquely applicable for answering important biological questions such as differentiation, regenerative and neoplastic potential of specific cell populations. Furthermore, it should be suitable for studies of microenvironmental factors in normal development and cancer. PMID:27684746

  1. Biological characteristics of mouse skin melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhanquan; Ji, Kaiyuan; Yang, Shanshan; Zhang, Junzhen; Yao, Jianbo; Dong, Changsheng; Fan, Ruiwen

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the optimal passage number according to the biological characteristics of mouse skin melanocytes from different passages. Skin punch biopsies harvested from the dorsal region of 2-day old mice were used to establish melanocyte cultures. The cells from passage 4, 7, 10 and 13 were collected and evaluated for their melanogenic activity. Histochemical staining for tyrosinase (TYR) activity and immunostaining for the melanocyte specific markers including S-100 antigen, TYR, tyrosinase related protein 1 (TYRP1), tyrosinase related protein 2 (TYRP2) and micropthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF) confirmed purity and melanogenic capacity of melanocytes from different passages, with better melanogenic activity of passage 10 and 13 cells being observed. Treatment of passage 13 melanocytes with α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) showed increased expression of MITF, TYR and TYRP2 mRNA. However, considering the TYR mRNA dramatically high expression which is the characteristics of melanoma cells, melanocytes from passage 10 was the optimal passage number for the further research. Our results demonstrate culture of pure populations of mouse melanocytes to at least 10 passages and illustrate the potential utility of passage 10 cells for studies of intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of genes controlling pigmentation and coat color in mouse.

  2. Mouse models for core binding factor leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chin, D W L; Watanabe-Okochi, N; Wang, C Q; Tergaonkar, V; Osato, M

    2015-10-01

    RUNX1 and CBFB are among the most frequently mutated genes in human leukemias. Genetic alterations such as chromosomal translocations, copy number variations and point mutations have been widely reported to result in the malfunction of RUNX transcription factors. Leukemias arising from such alterations in RUNX family genes are collectively termed core binding factor (CBF) leukemias. Although adult CBF leukemias generally are considered a favorable risk group as compared with other forms of acute myeloid leukemia, the 5-year survival rate remains low. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanism for CBF leukemia is imperative to uncover novel treatment options. Over the years, retroviral transduction-transplantation assays and transgenic, knockin and knockout mouse models alone or in combination with mutagenesis have been used to study the roles of RUNX alterations in leukemogenesis. Although successful in inducing leukemia, the existing assays and models possess many inherent limitations. A CBF leukemia model which induces leukemia with complete penetrance and short latency would be ideal as a platform for drug discovery. Here, we summarize the currently available mouse models which have been utilized to study CBF leukemias, discuss the advantages and limitations of individual experimental systems, and propose suggestions for improvements of mouse models.

  3. A mesoscale connectome of the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung Wook; Harris, Julie A.; Ng, Lydia; Winslow, Brent; Cain, Nicholas; Mihalas, Stefan; Wang, Quanxin; Lau, Chris; Kuan, Leonard; Henry, Alex M.; Mortrud, Marty T.; Ouellette, Benjamin; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Sorensen, Staci A.; Slaughterbeck, Clifford R.; Wakeman, Wayne; Li, Yang; Feng, David; Ho, Anh; Nicholas, Eric; Hirokawa, Karla E.; Bohn, Phillip; Joines, Kevin M.; Peng, Hanchuan; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Phillips, John W.; Hohmann, John G.; Wohnoutka, Paul; Gerfen, Charles R.; Koch, Christof; Bernard, Amy; Dang, Chinh; Jones, Allan R.; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of the brain’s wiring diagram is fundamental for understanding how the nervous system processes information at both local and global scales. However, with the singular exception of the C. elegans microscale connectome, there are no complete connectivity data sets in other species. Here we report a brain-wide, cellular-level, mesoscale connectome for the mouse. The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas uses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing adeno-associated viral vectors to trace axonal projections from defined regions and cell types, and high-throughput serial two-photon tomography to image the EGFP-labelled axons throughout the brain. This systematic and standardized approach allows spatial registration of individual experiments into a common three dimensional (3D) reference space, resulting in a whole-brain connectivity matrix. A computational model yields insights into connectional strength distribution, symmetry and other network properties. Virtual tractography illustrates 3D topography among interconnected regions. Cortico-thalamic pathway analysis demonstrates segregation and integration of parallel pathways. The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a freely available, foundational resource for structural and functional investigations into the neural circuits that support behavioural and cognitive processes in health and disease. PMID:24695228

  4. Experimental photoallergic contact dermatitis: a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, H.C. Jr.; Kaidbey, K.

    1982-09-01

    We have induced photoallergic contact dermatitis in mice to 3,3',4',5 tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCSA), chlorpromazine and 6-methylcoumarin. These compounds are known to produce photoallergic contact dermatitis in humans. The photoallergic contact dermatitis reaction in the mouse is immunologically specific viz. mice photosensitized to TCSA react, by photochallenge, to that compound and not to chlorpromazine, and conversely. The reaction requires UVA at both sensitization and challenge. It appears to be T-cell mediated in that it can be passively transferred to syngeneic mice by lymph node cells from actively sensitized mice, the histology of the reactions resembles that of classic allergic contact dermatitis in mice, challenge reactions are seen at 24 but not at 4 hr, and photoallergic contact dermatitis can be induced in B-cell deficient mice. The availability of a mouse model for the study of photo-ACD will facilitate the identification of pertinent control mechanisms and may aid in the management of the disease. It is likely that a bioassay for photoallergens of humans can be based on this mouse model.

  5. Structure of mouse IP-10, a chemokine

    SciTech Connect

    Jabeen, Talat; Leonard, Philip; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2008-06-01

    The structure of mouse IP-10 shows a novel tetrameric association. Interferon-γ-inducible protein (IP-10) belongs to the CXC class of chemokines and plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of various immune and inflammatory responses. It is also a potent angiostatic factor with antifibrotic properties. The biological activities of IP-10 are exerted by interactions with the G-protein-coupled receptor CXCR3 expressed on Th1 lymphocytes. IP-10 thus forms an attractive target for structure-based rational drug design of anti-inflammatory molecules. The crystal structure of mouse IP-10 has been determined and reveals a novel tetrameric association. In the tetramer, two conventional CXC chemokine dimers are associated through their N-terminal regions to form a 12-stranded elongated β-sheet of ∼90 Å in length. This association differs significantly from the previously studied tetramers of human IP-10, platelet factor 4 and neutrophil-activating peptide-2. In addition, heparin- and receptor-binding residues were mapped on the surface of IP-10 tetramer. Two heparin-binding sites were observed on the surface and were present at the interface of each of the two β-sheet dimers. The structure supports the formation of higher order oligomers of IP-10, as observed in recent in vivo studies with mouse IP-10, which will have functional relevance.

  6. Diverse application of MRI for mouse phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yijen L; Lo, Cecilia W

    2017-06-01

    Small animal models, particularly mouse models, of human diseases are becoming an indispensable tool for biomedical research. Studies in animal models have provided important insights into the etiology of diseases and accelerated the development of therapeutic strategies. Detailed phenotypic characterization is essential, both for the development of such animal models and mechanistic studies into disease pathogenesis and testing the efficacy of experimental therapeutics. MRI is a versatile and noninvasive imaging modality with excellent penetration depth, tissue coverage, and soft tissue contrast. MRI, being a multi-modal imaging modality, together with proven imaging protocols and availability of good contrast agents, is ideally suited for phenotyping mutant mouse models. Here we describe the applications of MRI for phenotyping structural birth defects involving the brain, heart, and kidney in mice. The versatility of MRI and its ease of use are well suited to meet the rapidly increasing demands for mouse phenotyping in the coming age of functional genomics. Birth Defects Research 109:758-770, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A non-transgenic mouse model (icv-STZ mouse) of Alzheimer's disease: similarities to and differences from the transgenic model (3xTg-AD mouse).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanxing; Liang, Zhihou; Blanchard, Julie; Dai, Chun-Ling; Sun, Shenggang; Lee, Moon H; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be divided into sporadic AD (SAD) and familial AD (FAD). Most AD cases are sporadic and result from multiple etiologic factors, including environmental, genetic, and metabolic factors, whereas FAD is caused by mutations in the presenilins or amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) genes. A commonly used animal model for AD is the 3xTg-AD transgenic mouse model, which harbors mutated presenilin 1, APP, and tau genes and thus represents a model of FAD. There is an unmet need in the field to characterize animal models representing different AD mechanisms, so that potential drugs for SAD can be evaluated preclinically in these animal models. A mouse model generated by intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of streptozocin (STZ), the icv-STZ mouse, shows many aspects of SAD. In this study, we compared the non-cognitive and cognitive behaviors as well as biochemical and immunohistochemical alterations between the icv-STZ mouse and the 3xTg-AD mouse. We found that both mouse models showed increased exploratory activity as well as impaired learning and spatial memory. Both models also demonstrated neuroinflammation, altered synaptic proteins and insulin/IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) signaling, and increased hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain. The most prominent brain abnormality in the icv-STZ mouse was neuroinflammation, and in the 3xTg-AD mouse it was elevation of hyperphosphorylated tau. These observations demonstrate the behavioral and neuropathological similarities and differences between the icv-STZ mouse and the 3xTg-AD mouse models and will help guide future studies using these two mouse models for the development of AD drugs.

  8. A Transgenic Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinrui; Ray, Pritha; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Tong, Ricky; Gong, Yongquan; Sathirachinda, Ataya; Wu, Joseph C.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic mouse with a stably integrated reporter gene(s) can be a valuable resource for obtaining uniformly labeled stem cells, tissues, and organs for various applications. We have generated a transgenic mouse model that ubiquitously expresses a tri-fusion reporter gene (fluc2-tdTomato-ttk) driven by a constitutive chicken β-actin promoter. This “Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse” system allows one to isolate most cells from this donor mouse and image them for bioluminescent (fluc2), fluorescent (tdTomato), and positron emission tomography (PET) (ttk) modalities. Transgenic colonies with different levels of tri-fusion reporter gene expression showed a linear correlation between all three-reporter proteins (R2=0.89 for TdTomato vs Fluc, R2=0.94 for Fluc vs TTK, R2=0.89 for TdTomato vs TTK) in vitro from tissue lysates and in vivo by optical and PET imaging. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from this transgenics showed high level of reporter gene expression, which linearly correlated with the cell numbers (R2=0.99 for bioluminescence imaging (BLI)). Both BLI (R2=0.93) and micro-PET (R2=0.94) imaging of the subcutaneous implants of Tri-Modality Reporter Mouse derived MSCs in nude mice showed linear correlation with the cell numbers and across different imaging modalities (R2=0.97). Serial imaging of MSCs transplanted to mice with acute myocardial infarction (MI) by intramyocardial injection exhibited significantly higher signals in MI heart at days 2, 3, 4, and 7 (p<0.01). MSCs transplanted to the ischemic hindlimb of nude mice showed significantly higher BLI and PET signals in the first 2 weeks that dropped by 4th week due to poor cell survival. However, laser Doppler perfusion imaging revealed that blood circulation in the ischemic limb was significantly improved in the MSCs transplantation group compared with the control group. In summary, this mouse can be used as a source of donor cells and organs in various research areas such as stem cell research

  9. Mouse Genome Database (MGD)-2017: community knowledge resource for the laboratory mouse

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Judith A.; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Bult, Carol J.

    2017-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD: http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community data resource for the laboratory mouse. It provides a highly integrated and highly curated system offering a comprehensive view of current knowledge about mouse genes, genetic markers and genomic features as well as the associations of those features with sequence, phenotypes, functional and comparative information, and their relationships to human diseases. MGD continues to enhance access to these data, to extend the scope of data content and visualizations, and to provide infrastructure and user support that ensures effective and efficient use of MGD in the advancement of scientific knowledge. Here, we report on recent enhancements made to the resource and new features. PMID:27899570

  10. Searching the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) Resources for Information on Mouse Biology from Genotype to Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Shaw, David R

    2016-12-08

    The Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) resource provides the research community with access to information on the genetics, genomics, and biology of the laboratory mouse. Core data in MGI include gene characterization and function, phenotype and disease model descriptions, DNA and protein sequence data, gene expression data, vertebrate homologies, SNPs, mapping data, and links to other bioinformatics databases. Semantic integration is supported through the use of standardized nomenclature, and through the use of controlled vocabularies such as the mouse Anatomical Dictionary, the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology, and the Gene Ontologies. MGI extracts and organizes data from primary literature. MGI data are shared with and widely displayed from other bioinformatics resources. The database is updated weekly with curated annotations, and regularly adds new datasets and features. This unit provides a guide to using the MGI bioinformatics resource. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. The Virtual Mouse Brain: A Computational Neuroinformatics Platform to Study Whole Mouse Brain Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Melozzi, Francesca; Woodman, Marmaduke M; Jirsa, Viktor K; Bernard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Connectome-based modeling of large-scale brain network dynamics enables causal in silico interrogation of the brain's structure-function relationship, necessitating the close integration of diverse neuroinformatics fields. Here we extend the open-source simulation software The Virtual Brain (TVB) to whole mouse brain network modeling based on individual diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI)-based or tracer-based detailed mouse connectomes. We provide practical examples on how to use The Virtual Mouse Brain (TVMB) to simulate brain activity, such as seizure propagation and the switching behavior of the resting state dynamics in health and disease. TVMB enables theoretically driven experimental planning and ways to test predictions in the numerous strains of mice available to study brain function in normal and pathological conditions.

  12. A flexible mouse-on-mouse immunohistochemical staining technique adaptable to biotin-free reagents, immunofluorescence, and multiple antibody staining.

    PubMed

    Goodpaster, Tracy; Randolph-Habecker, Julie

    2014-03-01

    Immunohistochemistry on mouse tissue utilizing mouse monoclonal antibodies presents a challenge. Secondary antibodies directed against the mouse monoclonal primary antibody of interest will also detect endogenous mouse immunoglobulin in the tissue. This can lead to significant spurious staining. Therefore, a "mouse-on-mouse" staining strategy is needed to yield credible data. This paper presents a method that is easy to use and highly flexible to accommodate both an avidin-biotin detection system as well as a biotin-free polymer detection system. The mouse primary antibody is first combined with an Fab fragment of an anti-mouse antibody in a tube and allowed sufficient time to form an antibody complex. Any non-complexed secondary antibody is bound up with mouse serum. The mixture is then applied to the tissue. The flexibility of this method is confirmed with the use of different anti-mouse antibodies followed by a variety of detection reagents. These techniques can be used for immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF), as well as staining with multiple primary antibodies. This method has also been adapted to other models, such as using human antibodies on human tissue and using multiple rabbit antibodies in dual immunofluorescence.

  13. Structure of the mouse IL-10 gene and chromosomal localization of the mouse and human genes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.M.; Khan, T.A.; Moore, K.W. ); Brannan, C.I.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A. )

    1992-06-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 7.2-kb segment containing the mouse IL-10 (mIL-10) gene was determined. Comparison to the mIL-10 cDNA sequence revealed the presence of five exons that span [approximately]5.1 kb of genomic DNA. The noncoding regions of the mIL-10 gene contain sequences that have been associated with transcriptional regulation of several cytokine genes. The mIL-10 gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 1 and the human IL-10 gene was also mapped to human chromosome 1. 35 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Comparative anatomy of mouse and human nail units.

    PubMed

    Fleckman, Philip; Jaeger, Karin; Silva, Kathleen A; Sundberg, John P

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies of mice with hair defects have resulted in major contributions to the understanding of hair disorders. To use mouse models as a tool to study nail diseases, a basic understanding of the similarities and differences between the human and mouse nail unit is required. In this study we compare the human and mouse nail unit at the macroscopic and microscopic level and use immunohistochemistry to determine the keratin expression patterns in the mouse nail unit. Both species have a proximal nail fold, cuticle, nail matrix, nail bed, nail plate, and hyponychium. Distinguishing features are the shape of the nail and the presence of an extended hyponychium in the mouse. Expression patterns of most keratins are similar. These findings indicate that the mouse nail unit shares major characteristics with the human nail unit and overall represents a very similar structure, useful for the investigation of nail diseases and nail biology.

  15. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models for Studying Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Takahito; Himuro, Hidetomo; Okada, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition that is mediated by very complex mechanisms controlled by genetic, immune, and environmental factors. More than 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse strains have been established since 1993 for studying IBD. Although mouse models cannot fully reflect human IBD, they have provided significant contributions for not only understanding the mechanism, but also developing new therapeutic means for IBD. Indeed, 20 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models carry the susceptibility genes identified in human IBD, and the functions of some other IBD susceptibility genes have also been dissected out using mouse models. Cutting-edge technologies such as cell-specific and inducible knockout systems, which were recently employed to mouse IBD models, have further enhanced the ability of investigators to provide important and unexpected rationales for developing new therapeutic strategies for IBD. In this review article, we briefly introduce 74 kinds of genetically engineered mouse models that spontaneously develop intestinal inflammation. PMID:26387641

  16. A report from the Sixth International Mouse Genome Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.

    1992-12-31

    The Sixth Annual Mouse Genome Conference was held in October, 1992 at Buffalo, USA. The mouse is one of the primary model organisms in the Human Genome Project. Through the use of gene targeting studies the mouse has become a powerful biological model for the study of gene function and, in addition, the comparison of the many homologous mutations identified in human and mouse have widened our understanding of the biology of these two organisms. A primary goal in the mouse genome program has been to create a genetic map of STSs of high resolution (<1cM) that would form the basis for the physical mapping of the whole mouse genome. Buffalo saw substantial new progress towards the goal of a very high density genetic map and the beginnings of substantive efforts towards physical mapping in chromosome regions with a high density of genetic markers.

  17. Orthology for comparative genomics in the mouse genome database.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Mary E; Baldarelli, Richard M; Bello, Susan M; Ni, Li; McAndrews, Monica S; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A

    2015-08-01

    The mouse genome database (MGD) is the model organism database component of the mouse genome informatics system at The Jackson Laboratory. MGD is the international data resource for the laboratory mouse and facilitates the use of mice in the study of human health and disease. Since its beginnings, MGD has included comparative genomics data with a particular focus on human-mouse orthology, an essential component of the use of mouse as a model organism. Over the past 25 years, novel algorithms and addition of orthologs from other model organisms have enriched comparative genomics in MGD data, extending the use of orthology data to support the laboratory mouse as a model of human biology. Here, we describe current comparative data in MGD and review the history and refinement of orthology representation in this resource.

  18. Imaging Mouse Development with Confocal Time-Lapse Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nowotschin, Sonja; Ferrer-Vaquer, Anna; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2012-01-01

    The gene expression, signaling, and cellular dynamics driving mouse embryo development have emerged through embryology and genetic studies. However, since mouse development is a temporally regulated three-dimensional process, any insight needs to be placed in this context of real-time visualization. Live imaging using genetically encoded fluorescent protein reporters is pushing the envelope of our understanding by uncovering unprecedented insights into mouse development and leading to the formulation of quantitative accurate models. PMID:20691876

  19. Mouse Genome Editing Using the CRISPR/Cas System.

    PubMed

    Harms, Donald W; Quadros, Rolen M; Seruggia, Davide; Ohtsuka, Masato; Takahashi, Gou; Montoliu, Lluis; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah B

    2014-10-01

    The availability of techniques to create desired genetic mutations has enabled the laboratory mouse as an extensively used model organism in biomedical research including human genetics. A new addition to this existing technical repertoire is the CRISPR/Cas system. Specifically, this system allows editing of the mouse genome much more quickly than the previously used techniques, and, more importantly, multiple mutations can be created in a single experiment. Here we provide protocols for preparation of CRISPR/Cas reagents and microinjection into one-cell mouse embryos to create knockout or knock-in mouse models.

  20. Mouse Genome Editing using CRISPR/Cas System

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Donald W; Quadros, Rolen M; Seruggia, Davide; Ohtsuka, Masato; Takahashi, Gou

    2015-01-01

    The availability of techniques to create desired genetic mutations has enabled the laboratory mouse as an extensively used model organism in biomedical research including human genetics. A new addition to this existing technical repertoire is the CRISPR/Cas system. Specifically, this system allows editing of the mouse genome much faster than the previously used techniques and more importantly multiple mutations can be created in a single experiment. Here we provide protocols for preparation of CRISPR/Cas reagents and microinjection into one cell mouse embryos to create knockout or knock-in mouse models. PMID:25271839

  1. Structural and functional characterization of the mouse Hlx homeobox gene.

    PubMed

    Bates, M D; Schatzman, L C; Lints, T; Hamlin, P E; Harvey, R P; Potter, S S

    2000-10-01

    Hlx is a mesenchymally expressed homeobox transcription factor gene that is essential for normal intestinal and hepatic development in the mouse. Here we report further characterization of the mouse Hlx gene, including an additional 3.7 kb of 5' sequence as well as the sequence of the three introns. Comparison of the sequence of the mouse Hlx gene 5' to the coding region with that of the human gene revealed multiple regions of high conservation. Neither the mouse nor the human gene contained a TATA box, and ribonuclease protection studies defined heterogeneous transcription start sites for the mouse gene. A number of consensus transcription factor binding sites were conserved between the mouse and human Hlx genes both within and outside of the highly conserved regions. Reporter constructs containing 4.2 or 1.4 kb of mouse 5' sequence showed active expression in cell lines that express Hlx. Further characterization of the mouse Hlx gene will provide insight into the developmental regulation of the mouse digestive system.

  2. Mouse models for the study of human hair loss.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; King, L E

    1996-10-01

    A comparison has been presented to illustrate many of the similarities in patterns of disease between mouse and human hair follicle diseases and how various mouse mutations can be used as research tools to investigate these observations. The powerful genetic tools available for investigating mouse mutations and human homologues will continue to result in many breakthroughs in the understanding of hair follicle biology and pathology. Many more mouse mutations are available than are described here. Information on these mutations fills books and computer databases, providing an unlimited resource.

  3. Finding Mouse Models of Human Lymphomas and Leukemia’s using The Jackson Laboratory Mouse Tumor Biology Database

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Dale A.; Sundberg, John P.; Krupke, Debra M.; Neuhauser, Steven B.; Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ward, Jerrold M.

    2015-01-01

    Many mouse models have been created to study hematopoietic cancer types. There are over thirty hematopoietic tumor types and subtypes, both human and mouse, with various origins, characteristics and clinical prognoses. Determining the specific type of hematopoietic lesion produced in a mouse model and identifying mouse models that correspond to the human subtypes of these lesions has been a continuing challenge for the scientific community. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database (MTB; http://tumor.informatics.jax.org) is designed to facilitate use of mouse models of human cancer by providing detailed histopathologic and molecular information on lymphoma subtypes, including expertly annotated, on line, whole slide scans, and providing a repository for storing information on and querying these data for specific lymphoma models. PMID:26302176

  4. Structural covariance networks in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Marco; Bifone, Angelo; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The presence of networks of correlation between regional gray matter volume as measured across subjects in a group of individuals has been consistently described in several human studies, an approach termed structural covariance MRI (scMRI). Complementary to prevalent brain mapping modalities like functional and diffusion-weighted imaging, the approach can provide precious insights into the mutual influence of trophic and plastic processes in health and pathological states. To investigate whether analogous scMRI networks are present in lower mammal species amenable to genetic and experimental manipulation such as the laboratory mouse, we employed high resolution morphoanatomical MRI in a large cohort of genetically-homogeneous wild-type mice (C57Bl6/J) and mapped scMRI networks using a seed-based approach. We show that the mouse brain exhibits robust homotopic scMRI networks in both primary and associative cortices, a finding corroborated by independent component analyses of cortical volumes. Subcortical structures also showed highly symmetric inter-hemispheric correlations, with evidence of distributed antero-posterior networks in diencephalic regions of the thalamus and hypothalamus. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed six identifiable clusters of cortical and sub-cortical regions corresponding to previously described neuroanatomical systems. Our work documents the presence of homotopic cortical and subcortical scMRI networks in the mouse brain, thus supporting the use of this species to investigate the elusive biological and neuroanatomical underpinnings of scMRI network development and its derangement in neuropathological states. The identification of scMRI networks in genetically homogeneous inbred mice is consistent with the emerging view of a key role of environmental factors in shaping these correlational networks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Innervation of the Mouse Cornea during Development

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Chelsey C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Dense innervation of the cornea is important for maintaining its homeostasis and transparency. Although corneal nerves have been well studied in adults, little is known about mammalian corneal innervation during development. This study provides a detailed profile of nerves at various stages of mouse cornea development. Methods. Mouse heads and corneas were collected at various stages of development including embryonic days (E)12.5 to E16.5, postnatal days (P)0, P10, three weeks after birth, and the adult. Corneas were immunostained with an anti-neuron–specific β-tubulin antibody (TUJ1). Fluorescently labeled nerves in whole-mount tissues and sections were imaged and analyzed for their axonal projections during eye development. Results. The first nerve bundles appear at the periphery of the anterior portion of the eye by E12.5. Initial projection into the stroma occurs at E13.5 without formation of a pericorneal nerve ring. Between E13.5 and E16.5, nerve bundles project directly into the periphery of the presumptive cornea stroma. They branch repeatedly as they extend toward the cornea center and epithelium. Concomitantly, nerve bundles originating from four quadrants of the eye bifurcate into smaller branches that innervate the entire stroma. The first epithelial innervation occurs at E16.5. Epithelial nerves arrange into patterns that project toward the center subsequently forming a swirl at three weeks after birth, which becomes more pronounced in adults. Conclusions. Nerve bundles that arise from four quadrants of the eye innervate the mouse cornea. The nerve bundles directly innervate the stroma without forming a pericorneal nerve ring. Radial arrangement of epithelial nerves gradually becomes centrally oriented, subsequently forming a swirl pattern. PMID:20811061

  6. Functional connectivity hubs of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Liska, Adam; Galbusera, Alberto; Schwarz, Adam J; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2015-07-15

    Recent advances in functional connectivity methods have made it possible to identify brain hubs - a set of highly connected regions serving as integrators of distributed neuronal activity. The integrative role of hub nodes makes these areas points of high vulnerability to dysfunction in brain disorders, and abnormal hub connectivity profiles have been described for several neuropsychiatric disorders. The identification of analogous functional connectivity hubs in preclinical species like the mouse may provide critical insight into the elusive biological underpinnings of these connectional alterations. To spatially locate functional connectivity hubs in the mouse brain, here we applied a fully-weighted network analysis to map whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity (i.e., the functional connectome) at a high-resolution voxel-scale. Analysis of a large resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) dataset revealed the presence of six distinct functional modules related to known large-scale functional partitions of the brain, including a default-mode network (DMN). Consistent with human studies, highly-connected functional hubs were identified in several sub-regions of the DMN, including the anterior and posterior cingulate and prefrontal cortices, in the thalamus, and in small foci within well-known integrative cortical structures such as the insular and temporal association cortices. According to their integrative role, the identified hubs exhibited mutual preferential interconnections. These findings highlight the presence of evolutionarily-conserved, mutually-interconnected functional hubs in the mouse brain, and may guide future investigations of the biological foundations of aberrant rsfMRI hub connectivity associated with brain pathological states.

  7. Significant determinants of mouse pain behaviour.

    PubMed

    Minett, Michael S; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Wood, John N

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mouse behavioural analysis has furthered our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying damage sensing and pain. However, it is not unusual for conflicting data on the pain phenotypes of knockout mice to be generated by reputable groups. Here we focus on some technical aspects of measuring mouse pain behaviour that are often overlooked, which may help explain discrepancies in the pain literature. We examined touch perception using von Frey hairs and mechanical pain thresholds using the Randall-Selitto test. Thermal pain thresholds were measured using the Hargreaves apparatus and a thermal place preference test. Sodium channel Nav1.7 knockout mice show a mechanical deficit in the hairy skin, but not the paw, whilst shaving the abdominal hair abolished this phenotype. Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 knockout mice show deficits in noxious mechanosensation in the tail, but not the paw. TRPA1 knockout mice, however, have a loss of noxious mechanosensation in the paw but not the tail. Studies of heat and cold sensitivity also show variability depending on the intensity of the stimulus. Deleting Nav1.7, Nav1.8 or Nav1.9 in Nav1.8-positive sensory neurons attenuates responses to slow noxious heat ramps, whilst responses to fast noxious heat ramps are only reduced when Nav1.7 is lost in large diameter sensory neurons. Deleting Nav1.7 from all sensory neurons attenuates responses to noxious cooling but not extreme cold. Finally, circadian rhythms dramatically influence behavioural outcome measures such as von Frey responses, which change by 80% over the day. These observations demonstrate that fully characterising the phenotype of a transgenic mouse strain requires a range of behavioural pain models. Failure to conduct behavioural tests at different anatomical locations, stimulus intensities, and at different points in the circadian cycle may lead to a pain behavioural phenotype being misinterpreted, or missed altogether.

  8. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed-for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants' responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants' performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse's approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks.

  9. Mouse hypospadias: A critical examination and definition.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Adriane Watkins; Cao, Mei; Shen, Joel; Cooke, Paul; Risbridger, Gail; Baskin, Laurence; Cunha, Gerald R

    2016-12-01

    Hypospadias is a common malformation whose etiology is based upon perturbation of normal penile development. The mouse has been previously used as a model of hypospadias, despite an unacceptably wide range of definitions for this malformation. The current paper presents objective criteria and a definition of mouse hypospadias. Accordingly, diethylstilbestrol (DES) induced penile malformations were examined at 60 days postnatal (P60) in mice treated with DES over the age range of 12 days embryonic to 20 days postnatal (E12-P20). DES-induced hypospadias involves malformation of the urethral meatus, which is most severe in DES E12-P10, DES P0-P10 and DES P5-P15 groups, and less so or absent in the other treatment groups. A frenulum-like ventral tether between the penis and the prepuce was seen in the most severely affected DES-treated mice. Internal penile morphology was also altered in the DES E12-P10, DES P0-P10 and DES P5-P15 groups (with little effect in the other DES treatment groups). Thus, adverse effects of DES are a function of the period of DES treatment and most severe in the P0-P10 period. In "estrogen mutant mice" (NERKI, βERKO, αERKO and AROM+) hypospadias was only seen in AROM+ male mice having genetically-engineered elevation is serum estrogen. Significantly, mouse hypospadias was only seen distally at and near the urethral meatus where epithelial fusion events are known to take place and never in the penile midshaft, where urethral formation occurs via an entirely different morphogenetic process.

  10. Properties of genes essential for mouse development

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Mitra; Barradas, Ana; Tzotzos, George T.; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2017-01-01

    Essential genes are those that are critical for life. In the specific case of the mouse, they are the set of genes whose deletion means that a mouse is unable to survive after birth. As such, they are the key minimal set of genes needed for all the steps of development to produce an organism capable of life ex utero. We explored a wide range of sequence and functional features to characterise essential (lethal) and non-essential (viable) genes in mice. Experimental data curated manually identified 1301 essential genes and 3451 viable genes. Very many sequence features show highly significant differences between essential and viable mouse genes. Essential genes generally encode complex proteins, with multiple domains and many introns. These genes tend to be: long, highly expressed, old and evolutionarily conserved. These genes tend to encode ligases, transferases, phosphorylated proteins, intracellular proteins, nuclear proteins, and hubs in protein-protein interaction networks. They are involved with regulating protein-protein interactions, gene expression and metabolic processes, cell morphogenesis, cell division, cell proliferation, DNA replication, cell differentiation, DNA repair and transcription, cell differentiation and embryonic development. Viable genes tend to encode: membrane proteins or secreted proteins, and are associated with functions such as cellular communication, apoptosis, behaviour and immune response, as well as housekeeping and tissue specific functions. Viable genes are linked to transport, ion channels, signal transduction, calcium binding and lipid binding, consistent with their location in membranes and involvement with cell-cell communication. From the analysis of the composite features of essential and viable genes, we conclude that essential genes tend to be required for intracellular functions, and viable genes tend to be involved with extracellular functions and cell-cell communication. Knowledge of the features that are over

  11. A humanoid mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Takumi, Toru

    2010-10-01

    Even now fruit of the human genome project is available, we have difficulties to approach neuropsychiatric disorders at the molecular level. Autism is a complex psychiatric illness but has received considerable attention as a developmental brain disorder not only from basic researchers but also from society. Substantial evidence suggests that chromosomal abnormalities contribute to autism risk. The duplication of human chromosome 15q11-13 is known to be the most frequent cytogenetic abnormality in autism. We succeeded to generate mice with a 6.3-Mb-wide interstitial duplication in mouse chromosome 7c that is highly syntenic to human 15q11-13 by using a Cre-loxP-based chromosome-engineering technique. The only paternally duplicated mice display autistic behavioral features such as poor social interaction and stereotypical behavior, and exhibit a developmental abnormality in ultrasonic vocalizations as well as anxiety. The detailed analysis focusing on a non-coding small nucleolar RNA, MBII52, within the duplicated region, revealed that the paternally duplicated mice alter the editing ratio of serotonin (5-HT) 2c receptor pre-mRNA and intracellular calcium responses by a 5-HT2c receptor specific agonist are changed in neurons. This result may explain one of molecular mechanisms of abnormal behaviors in the paternal duplicated mice. The first chromosome-engineered mouse model for human chromosome 15q11-13 duplication fulfills not only face validity of human autistic phenotypes but also construct validity based on human chromosome abnormality. This model will be a founder mouse for forward genetics of autistic disease and an invaluable tool for its therapeutic development.

  12. Neutron issues in the JANUS mouse program

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, B.A.; Grahn, D.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, the JANUS program in the Biological and Medical Research Division at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has compiled a database on the response of both sexes of an F{sub 1} hybrid mouse, the B6CF{sub 1} (C57BL/6 x BALB/c), to external whole- body irradiation by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays and fission neutrons. Three basic patterns of exposure for both neutrons and {gamma}-rays have been investigated: single exposures, 24 equal once-weekly exposures, and 60 equal once-weekly exposures. All irradiations were terminated at predetermined total doses, with dose calculated in centigrays at the midline of the mouse. Three endpoints will be discussed in this paper: (1) life shortening, (2) a point estimate for cumulative mortality, and (3) the hazard function. Life shortening is used as an analysis endpoint because it summarizes, in a single index, the integrated effect of all injuries accumulated by an organism. Histopathological analyses of the mice used in the ANL studies have indicated that 85% of the deaths were caused by neoplasms. Connective tissue tumors were the dominant tumor in the B6CF{sub 1} mouse, with tumors of lymphoreticular origin accounting for approximately 80% of this class. The latter two endpoints will therefore be used to describe the life table experience of mice dying from the lymphoreticular class of tumors. Dose-response models will be applied to the three endpoints in order to describe the response function for neutron exposures, evaluate the effect of dose range and pattern of exposure on the response function for neutrons, and provide a set of neutron relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of the ANL database. 25 refs.

  13. Mouse Model of Coxiella burnetii Aerosolization

    PubMed Central

    Melenotte, Cléa; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Bechah, Yassina; Audoly, Gilles; Terras, Jérôme; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is mainly transmitted by aerosols and is responsible for multiple-organ lesions. Animal models have shown C. burnetii pathogenicity, but long-term outcomes still need to be clarified. We used a whole-body aerosol inhalation exposure system to mimic the natural route of infection in immunocompetent (BALB/c) and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. After an initial lung inoculum of 104 C. burnetii cells/lung, the outcome, serological response, hematological disorders, and deep organ lesions were described up to 3 months postinfection. C. burnetii-specific PCR, anti-C. burnetii immunohistochemistry, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) targeting C. burnetii-specific 16S rRNA completed the detection of the bacterium in the tissues. In BALB/c mice, a thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia were first observed, prior to evidence of C. burnetii replication. In all SCID mouse organs, DNA copies increased to higher levels over time than in BALB/c ones. Clinical signs of discomfort appeared in SCID mice, so follow-up had to be shortened to 2 months in this group. At this stage, all animals presented bone, cervical, and heart lesions. The presence of C. burnetii could be attested in situ for all organs sampled using immunohistochemistry and FISH. This mouse model described C. burnetii Nine Mile strain spread using aerosolization in a way that corroborates the pathogenicity of Q fever described in humans and completes previously published data in mouse models. C. burnetii infection occurring after aerosolization in mice thus seems to be a useful tool to compare the pathogenicity of different strains of C. burnetii. PMID:27160294

  14. Optogenetic Control of Mouse Outer Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Wilson, Teresa; Chen, Fangyi; Porsov, Edward; Subhash, Hrebesh; Foster, Sarah; Zhang, Yuan; Omelchenko, Irina; Bateschell, Michael; Wang, Lingyan; Brigande, John V; Jiang, Zhi-Gen; Mao, Tianyi; Nuttall, Alfred L

    2016-01-19

    Normal hearing in mammals depends on sound amplification by outer hair cells (OHCs) presumably by their somatic motility and force production. However, the role of OHC force production in cochlear amplification and frequency tuning are not yet fully understood. Currently, available OHC manipulation techniques for physiological or clinical studies are limited by their invasive nature, lack of precision, and poor temporal-spatial resolution. To overcome these limitations, we explored an optogenetic approach based on channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR-2), a direct light-activated nonselective cation channel originally discovered in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Three approaches were compared: 1) adeno-associated virus-mediated in utero transfer of the ChR-2 gene into the developing murine otocyst, 2) expression of ChR-2(H134R) in an auditory cell line (HEI-OC1), and 3) expression of ChR-2 in the OHCs of a mouse line carrying a ChR-2 conditional allele. Whole cell recording showed that blue light (470 nm) elicited the typical nonselective cation current of ChR-2 with reversal potential around zero in both mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells and generated depolarization in both cell types. In addition, pulsed light stimulation (10 Hz) elicited a 1:1 repetitive depolarization and ChR-2 currents in mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells, respectively. The time constant of depolarization in OHCs, 1.45 ms, is 10 times faster than HEI-OC1 cells, which allowed light stimulation up to rates of 10/s to elicit corresponding membrane potential changes. Our study demonstrates that ChR-2 can successfully be expressed in mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells and that these present a typical light-sensitive current and depolarization. However, the amount of ChR-2 current induced in our in vivo experiments was insufficient to result in measurable cochlear effects. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus skin infection.

    PubMed

    Malachowa, Natalia; Kobayashi, Scott D; Braughton, Kevin R; DeLeo, Frank R

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial skin and soft tissue infections are abundant worldwide and many are caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Indeed, S. aureus is the leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections in the USA. Here, we describe a mouse model of skin and soft tissue infection induced by subcutaneous inoculation of S. aureus. This animal model can be used to investigate a number of factors related to the pathogenesis of skin and soft tissue infections, including strain virulence and the contribution of specific bacterial molecules to disease, and it can be employed to test the potential effectiveness of antibiotic therapies or vaccine candidates.

  16. A mouse model of in utero transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nijagal, Amar; Le, Tom; Wegorzewska, Marta; Mackenzie, Tippi C

    2011-01-27

    The transplantation of stem cells and viruses in utero has tremendous potential for treating congenital disorders in the human fetus. For example, in utero transplantation (IUT) of hematopoietic stem cells has been used to successfully treat patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. In several other conditions, however, IUT has been attempted without success. Given these mixed results, the availability of an efficient non-human model to study the biological sequelae of stem cell transplantation and gene therapy is critical to advance this field. We and others have used the mouse model of IUT to study factors affecting successful engraftment of in utero transplanted hematopoietic stem cells in both wild-type mice and those with genetic diseases. The fetal environment also offers considerable advantages for the success of in utero gene therapy. For example, the delivery of adenoviral, adeno-associated viral, retroviral, and lentiviral vectors into the fetus has resulted in the transduction of multiple organs distant from the site of injection with long-term gene expression. in utero gene therapy may therefore be considered as a possible treatment strategy for single gene disorders such as muscular dystrophy or cystic fibrosis. Another potential advantage of IUT is the ability to induce immune tolerance to a specific antigen. As seen in mice with hemophilia, the introduction of Factor IX early in development results in tolerance to this protein. In addition to its use in investigating potential human therapies, the mouse model of IUT can be a powerful tool to study basic questions in developmental and stem cell biology. For example, one can deliver various small molecules to induce or inhibit specific gene expression at defined gestational stages and manipulate developmental pathways. The impact of these alterations can be assessed at various timepoints after the initial transplantation. Furthermore, one can transplant pluripotent or lineage specific progenitor

  17. Embryonic in vivo electroporation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Saito, Tetsuichiro

    2010-01-01

    Electroporation combined with surgery is a quick and highly efficient method to transfect nucleic acids into various embryonic tissues in a spatiotemporally restricted manner. Forceps-type electrodes facilitate transfection by delivering electric pulses from outside of the embryo. Many electroporated embryos survive in the pregnant mouse, are born, and are reared. The developing central nervous system (CNS) is a good target for transfection, because there are many neural progenitors adjacent to the ventricle, into which nucleic acids are relatively easily injected. The expression of transfected genes persists in neurons for months.

  18. The volume effect in irradiated mouse colorectum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skwarchuk, Mark William

    1997-11-01

    Damage of the colorectum is the dose-limiting normal tissue complication following radiotherapy of prostate and cervical cancers. One approach for decreasing complications is to physically reduce the treatment volume. Mathematical models have been previously developed to describe the change in associated toxicity with a change in irradiated volume, i.e. the 'volume effect', for serial-type normal tissues including the colorectum. The first goal of this thesis was to test the hypothesis that there would not be a threshold length in the development of obstruction after irradiation of mouse colorectum, as predicted by the Probability model of the volume effect. The second goal was to examine if there were differences in the threshold and in the incidence of colorectal obstruction after irradiation of two mouse strains, C57B1/6 (C57) and C3Hf/Kam (C3H), previously found to be fibrosis-prone and-resistant, respectively, after lung irradiation due, in part, to genetic differences. The hypothesis examined was that differences in incidence between strains were due to the differential expression of the fibrogenic cytokines TGF/beta and TNF/alpha. Various lengths of C57 and C3H mouse colorectum were irradiated and the incidence of colorectal obstruction was followed up to 15 months. A threshold length was observed for both mouse strains, in contradiction of model predictions. The mechanism of the threshold was epithelial regeneration after irradiation. C57 mice had significantly higher incidence of colorectal obstruction compared to C3H mice, especially at smaller irradiated lengths. Colorectal tissue was obtained at various times after irradiation and prepared for histology, immunohistochemistry and RNase protection assay for measurement of TGF/beta 1, 2, 3 and TNF/alpha mRNA. Distinct strain differences in the histological time of appearance and spatial locations of fibrosis were observed. However, there were no consistent strain difference in mRNA levels or

  19. Mouse models for understanding human developmental anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Generoso, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    The mouse experimental system presents an opportunity for studying the nature of the underlying mutagenic damage and the molecular pathogenesis of this class of anomalies by virtue of the accessibility of the zygote and its descendant blastomeres. Such studies could contribute to the understanding of the etiology of certain sporadic but common human malformations. The vulnerability of the zygotes to mutagens as demonstrated in the studies described in this report should be a major consideration in chemical safety evaluation. It raises questions regarding the danger to human zygotes when the mother is exposed to drugs and environmental chemicals.

  20. Mononuclear phagocyte subpopulations in the mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    George, James F; Lever, Jeremie M; Agarwal, Anupam

    2017-04-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes are the most common cells in the kidney associated with immunity and inflammation. Although the presence of these cells in the kidney has been known for decades, the study of mononuclear phagocytes in the context of kidney function and dysfunction is still at an early stage. The purpose of this review is to summarize the present knowledge regarding classification of these cells in the mouse kidney and to identify relevant questions that would further advance the field and potentially lead to new opportunities for treatment of acute kidney injury and other kidney diseases.

  1. Centromere organization in man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppesen, P.; Mitchell, A.; Kipling, D.; Nicol, L.

    1993-12-31

    The kinetochore, located at the primary constriction or centromere in mammalian metaphase chromosomes, is the site of attachment of spindle microtubules to the mitotic chromosome, and is thus essential for correct chromosome movement and segregation at anaphase. Errors in organization of the kinetochore and/or centromere may therefore lead to non-disjunction and aneuploidy. The centromeres of most, if not all, mammalian chromosomes contain repetitive DNA sequences, which are observed at the cytogenetic level as heterochromatin. We have combined immunofluorescence with primed in situ hybridization (PRINS) techniques to study the organization of repetitive DNA families in relation to chromosomal proteins located at centromeres in both man and mouse species.

  2. [An efficient way in mouse brain dissection].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Zhao; Long, Cheng; Yang, Li

    2014-04-25

    Laboratory mice are common experimental animals in biological, medical, pharmacological and psychological researches primarily because they are easy to maintain and reproduce quickly. The protection of the welfare of experimental animals is gaining greater attention during the application of a large number of mice. It's therefore essential to consider how to reduce the unnecessary use of animals and fully exploit each experimental animal. We report, in this article, an efficient way to dissect various brain regions from a mouse for protein immunoblot and/or neuronal culture, providing technical reference information for minimizing the number of animals used in projects, and refining methods and procedures to quick brain dissection.

  3. Microinjection of Follicle-Enclosed Mouse Oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Laurinda A.; Norris, Rachael P.; Freudzon, Marina; Ratzan, William J.; Mehlmann, Lisa M.

    The mammalian oocyte develops within a complex of somatic cells known as a follicle, within which signals from the somatic cells regulate the oocyte, and signals from the oocyte regulate the somatic cells. Because isolation of the oocyte from the follicle disrupts these communication pathways, oocyte physiology is best studied within an intact follicle. Here we describe methods for quantitative microinjection of follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes, thus allowing the introduction of signaling molecules as well as optical probes into the oocyte within its physiological environment.

  4. Optogenetic Control of Mouse Outer Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Wilson, Teresa; Chen, Fangyi; Porsov, Edward; Subhash, Hrebesh; Foster, Sarah; Zhang, Yuan; Omelchenko, Irina; Bateschell, Michael; Wang, Lingyan; Brigande, John V.; Jiang, Zhi-Gen; Mao, Tianyi; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2016-01-01

    Normal hearing in mammals depends on sound amplification by outer hair cells (OHCs) presumably by their somatic motility and force production. However, the role of OHC force production in cochlear amplification and frequency tuning are not yet fully understood. Currently, available OHC manipulation techniques for physiological or clinical studies are limited by their invasive nature, lack of precision, and poor temporal-spatial resolution. To overcome these limitations, we explored an optogenetic approach based on channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR-2), a direct light-activated nonselective cation channel originally discovered in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Three approaches were compared: 1) adeno-associated virus-mediated in utero transfer of the ChR-2 gene into the developing murine otocyst, 2) expression of ChR-2(H134R) in an auditory cell line (HEI-OC1), and 3) expression of ChR-2 in the OHCs of a mouse line carrying a ChR-2 conditional allele. Whole cell recording showed that blue light (470 nm) elicited the typical nonselective cation current of ChR-2 with reversal potential around zero in both mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells and generated depolarization in both cell types. In addition, pulsed light stimulation (10 Hz) elicited a 1:1 repetitive depolarization and ChR-2 currents in mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells, respectively. The time constant of depolarization in OHCs, 1.45 ms, is 10 times faster than HEI-OC1 cells, which allowed light stimulation up to rates of 10/s to elicit corresponding membrane potential changes. Our study demonstrates that ChR-2 can successfully be expressed in mouse OHCs and HEI-OC1 cells and that these present a typical light-sensitive current and depolarization. However, the amount of ChR-2 current induced in our in vivo experiments was insufficient to result in measurable cochlear effects. PMID:26789771

  5. Hydrodynamic Phase Locking in Mouse Node Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Ishikawa, Takuji; Hamada, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    Rotational movement of mouse node cilia generates leftward fluid flow in the node cavity, playing an important role in left-right determination in the embryo. Although rotation of numerous cilia was believed necessary to trigger the determination, recent reports indicate the action of two cilia to be sufficient. We examine cooperative cilia movement via hydrodynamic interaction. Results show cilia to be cooperative, having phases locked in a certain relation; a system with a pair of nonidentical cilia can achieve phase-locked states more easily than one with a pair of identical cilia.

  6. Genetic dissection of mouse exploratory behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crusio, W E

    2001-11-01

    A large variety of apparatus and procedures are being employed to measure mouse exploratory behaviour. Definitions of what constitutes exploration also vary widely. The present article reviews two studies whose results permit a genetic dissection of behaviour displayed in an open-field situation. The results agree that factors representing exploration and stress/fear underlie this type of behaviour. Both factors appear to be linked to neuroanatomical variation in the sizes of the hippocampal intra- and infrapyramidal mossy fibre terminal fields. Multivariate analysis of genetic correlations may render important insights into the structure of behaviour and its relations with neuroanatomical and neurophysiological systems.

  7. Ovarian abnormalities in the staggerer mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Guastavino, Jean-Marie; Boufares, Salima; Crusio, Wim E

    2005-08-24

    Disturbances in several reproductive functions of the staggerer cerebellar mutant mouse have been observed. In this study, reproductive efficiency of staggerer mice was compared to normal mice by recording the number of pups produced and the number of oocytes occurring. It was found that staggerer mothers produced smaller litters than controls and the number of oocytes produced in their ovaries was reduced by the staggerer mutation. These results indicate a pleiotropic effect on fertility of the Rora(sg) gene underlying the cerebellar abnormalities of the staggerer mutant.

  8. TracMouse: A computer aided movement analysis script for the mouse inverted horizontal grid test.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomski, W; Palasz, E; Skupinska, M; Zylinski, M; Steczkowska, M; Gasiorowska, A; Niewiadomska, G; Riedel, G

    2016-12-16

    In rodents, detection and quantification of motor impairments is difficult. The traction test (inverted grid with mice clinging to the underside) currently has no objective rating system. We here developed and validated the semi-automatic MATLAB script TracMouse for unbiased detection of video-recorded movement patterns. High precision videos were analyzed by: (i) principal identification of anatomical paw details frame-by-frame by an experimentally blinded rater; (ii) automatic retrieval of proxies by TracMouse for individual paws. The basic states of Hold and Step were discriminated as duration and frequency, and these principle parameters were converted into static and dynamic endpoints and their discriminating power assessed in a dopaminergic lesion model. Relative to hind paws, forepaws performed ~4 times more steps, they were ~20% longer, and Hold duration was ~5 times shorter in normal C57Bl/6 mice. Thus, forepaw steps were classified as exploratory, hind paw movement as locomotive. Multiple novel features pertaining to paw sequence, step lengths and exploratory touches were accessible through TracMouse and revealed subtle Parkinsonian phenotypes. Novel proxies using TracMouse revealed previously unidentified features of movement and may aid the understanding of (i) brain circuits related to motor planning and execution, and (ii) phenotype detection in experimental models of movement disorders.

  9. Fusion of Mouse-Mouse Cells to Produce Hybridomas Secreting Monoclonal Antibody,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the plasmacytoma cells for fusion, the fusion method, and the method of taking samples for identification of colonies secreting monoclonal antibody...The plasmacytoma cell line used is designated SP2/0 ag14. This continuous cell line is a nonimmunoglobulin secreting mouse hybridoma cell line

  10. TracMouse: A computer aided movement analysis script for the mouse inverted horizontal grid test

    PubMed Central

    Niewiadomski, W.; Palasz, E.; Skupinska, M.; Zylinski, M.; Steczkowska, M.; Gasiorowska, A.; Niewiadomska, G.; Riedel, G.

    2016-01-01

    In rodents, detection and quantification of motor impairments is difficult. The traction test (inverted grid with mice clinging to the underside) currently has no objective rating system. We here developed and validated the semi-automatic MATLAB script TracMouse for unbiased detection of video-recorded movement patterns. High precision videos were analyzed by: (i) principal identification of anatomical paw details frame-by-frame by an experimentally blinded rater; (ii) automatic retrieval of proxies by TracMouse for individual paws. The basic states of Hold and Step were discriminated as duration and frequency, and these principle parameters were converted into static and dynamic endpoints and their discriminating power assessed in a dopaminergic lesion model. Relative to hind paws, forepaws performed ~4 times more steps, they were ~20% longer, and Hold duration was ~5 times shorter in normal C57Bl/6 mice. Thus, forepaw steps were classified as exploratory, hind paw movement as locomotive. Multiple novel features pertaining to paw sequence, step lengths and exploratory touches were accessible through TracMouse and revealed subtle Parkinsonian phenotypes. Novel proxies using TracMouse revealed previously unidentified features of movement and may aid the understanding of (i) brain circuits related to motor planning and execution, and (ii) phenotype detection in experimental models of movement disorders. PMID:27982134

  11. Phospholipid epitopes for mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, S

    1987-01-01

    The reactivity of mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes (BrMRBC) with phospholipid epitopes was assessed by ELISA, using four clones of monoclonal anti-BrMRBC antibodies that had idiotypes distinct from one another. The four antibodies could bind to low-density lipoproteins (LDL) from human and chicken, but not to LDL from mouse and rat. As to liposomes of natural phospholipids, all the clones reacted with liposomes of phosphatidylcholine, and some of them could react with liposomes of sphingomyelin, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylic acid or cardiolipin. For liposomes of synthetic phosphatidylcholine with different fatty acids, the length of carbon chains and the number of unsaturated carbon chains of the fatty acids markedly affected the binding of each monoclonal antibody to the liposomes. The addition of dicetyl phosphate or stearylamine to phosphatidylcholine liposomes changed the reactivity of the liposomes. These results support the view that mouse anti-BrMRBC antibodies can recognize appropriately spaced phosphorylcholine residues on the surface of phospholipid liposomes, LDL and cells. The four clones had similar capacities for binding to LDL as well as to BrMRBC, but they had obviously different capacities for binding to phospholipid liposomes; the epitopes on phospholipid liposomes used in the present study were not so perfect as to react well with every anti-BrMRBC antibody. PMID:2443446

  12. Expression of two cross-reactive idiotypes on mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, S

    1987-01-01

    Two cross-reactive anti-idiotype (Id) antibodies were previously prepared from sera of rabbits immunized with mouse monoclonal antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes (BrMRBC). Most of the anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming cells (PFC) were suppressed by either of the two anti-Id antibodies. The Id profiles of anti-BrMRBC PFC were almost identical among various cell populations in a strain, but different among various mouse strains. Mouse sera contained both of the Id-bearing immunoglobulins Ig, and a significant part of the Id-bearing Ig were eliminated by absorption with BrMRBC. Nude BALB/c mice were almost equal to normal BALB/c mice in the Id patterns of anti-BrMRBC PFC and in the concentrations of the Id-bearing Ig. The injections of anti-Id antibodies into suckling mice suppressed, specifically, the development of the B cells to produce the homologous Id-bearing Ig, but the injection of Id-bearing monoclonal antibodies barely affected Id expression. It is suggested that the two Id are encoded in germ-line genes of mice, and are expressed independently of each other and Id-anti-Id regulations by T cells or B cells. PMID:3327804

  13. Immune Activity of BCG Infected Mouse Macrophages Treated with a Novel Recombinant Mouse Lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Kelly M; Hwang, Shen-An; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin has been investigated for its adjuvant action to boost the BCG vaccine. Previous studies demonstrated that lactoferrin (LF) enhanced efficacy of the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine to protect mice against the virulent Erdman Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The studies here investigate the hypothesis that a novel CHO-derived recombinant mouse LF can modify cytokine production and antigen presentation molecules on macrophages. The mouse LF (rmLF) was examined for effects on bone marrow derived macrophage (BMM) activities when cultured with BCG. Comparisons were made to CHO-derived recombinant human LF (rhLF). Inflammatory cytokine responses were investigated, as were antigen presentation and associated co-stimulatory molecules. Cytokine responses were subsequently measured when these cells were co-cultured with naïve or BCG sensitized CD4+ lymphocytes. While overall responses were similar between mouse, human, and bovine forms, the homologous rmLF treated infected BMMs showed unique activation patterns of cytokine production. These results indicate that species-specific LF can have different effects on mouse macrophages exposed to BCG, thus potentially affecting adjuvant activity when used in models of vaccination in mice.

  14. Involvement of mouse and porcine PLCζ-induced calcium oscillations in preimplantation development of mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, Akihiro; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, phospholipase Cζ (PLCζ) has the ability to trigger calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in oocytes, leading to oocyte activation. Although there is a species-specific difference in the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern, whether PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations affect preimplantation embryonic development remains unclear. Here, we show that Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in mouse PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes stopped just before pronuclear formation, while that in porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes continued for several hours after pronuclei had been formed. This difference of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in oocytes after pronuclear formation was dependent on the difference in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence of PLCζ between the mouse and pig. However, mouse and porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts regardless of the absence or presence of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations after pronuclear formation. Furthermore, the developmental rate of mouse or porcine PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids to the blastocyst stage was not significantly different from that of strontium-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids. These results suggest that the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern in mouse oocytes is dependent on the NLS sequence of PLCζ and injection of PLCζ may be a useful method for activation of round spermatid-injected and somatic nuclear transferred oocytes. - Highlights: • Porcine PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations continued after pronuclear formation. • The Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern was dependent on the difference in the NLS sequence of PLCζ. • PLCζ-activated oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts. • PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids developed to blastocysts.

  15. Mouse IDGenes: a reference database for genetic interactions in the developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Matthes, Michaela; Preusse, Martin; Zhang, Jingzhong; Schechter, Julia; Mayer, Daniela; Lentes, Bernd; Theis, Fabian; Prakash, Nilima; Wurst, Wolfgang; Trümbach, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    The study of developmental processes in the mouse and other vertebrates includes the understanding of patterning along the anterior–posterior, dorsal–ventral and medial– lateral axis. Specifically, neural development is also of great clinical relevance because several human neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, autism disorders or drug addiction and also brain malformations are thought to have neurodevelopmental origins, i.e. pathogenesis initiates during childhood and adolescence. Impacts during early neurodevelopment might also predispose to late-onset neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease. The neural tube develops from its precursor tissue, the neural plate, in a patterning process that is determined by compartmentalization into morphogenetic units, the action of local signaling centers and a well-defined and locally restricted expression of genes and their interactions. While public databases provide gene expression data with spatio-temporal resolution, they usually neglect the genetic interactions that govern neural development. Here, we introduce Mouse IDGenes, a reference database for genetic interactions in the developing mouse brain. The database is highly curated and offers detailed information about gene expressions and the genetic interactions at the developing mid-/hindbrain boundary. To showcase the predictive power of interaction data, we infer new Wnt/β-catenin target genes by machine learning and validate one of them experimentally. The database is updated regularly. Moreover, it can easily be extended by the research community. Mouse IDGenes will contribute as an important resource to the research on mouse brain development, not exclusively by offering data retrieval, but also by allowing data input. Database URL: http://mouseidgenes.helmholtz-muenchen.de. PMID:25145340

  16. Mouse IDGenes: a reference database for genetic interactions in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Matthes, Michaela; Preusse, Martin; Zhang, Jingzhong; Schechter, Julia; Mayer, Daniela; Lentes, Bernd; Theis, Fabian; Prakash, Nilima; Wurst, Wolfgang; Trümbach, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    The study of developmental processes in the mouse and other vertebrates includes the understanding of patterning along the anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral and medial- lateral axis. Specifically, neural development is also of great clinical relevance because several human neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, autism disorders or drug addiction and also brain malformations are thought to have neurodevelopmental origins, i.e. pathogenesis initiates during childhood and adolescence. Impacts during early neurodevelopment might also predispose to late-onset neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. The neural tube develops from its precursor tissue, the neural plate, in a patterning process that is determined by compartmentalization into morphogenetic units, the action of local signaling centers and a well-defined and locally restricted expression of genes and their interactions. While public databases provide gene expression data with spatio-temporal resolution, they usually neglect the genetic interactions that govern neural development. Here, we introduce Mouse IDGenes, a reference database for genetic interactions in the developing mouse brain. The database is highly curated and offers detailed information about gene expressions and the genetic interactions at the developing mid-/hindbrain boundary. To showcase the predictive power of interaction data, we infer new Wnt/β-catenin target genes by machine learning and validate one of them experimentally. The database is updated regularly. Moreover, it can easily be extended by the research community. Mouse IDGenes will contribute as an important resource to the research on mouse brain development, not exclusively by offering data retrieval, but also by allowing data input. http://mouseidgenes.helmholtz-muenchen.de. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. Chimeric elk/mouse prion proteins in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Oehler, Abby; Johnson, Natrina L; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2013-02-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer and elk is a highly communicable neurodegenerative disorder caused by prions. Investigations of CWD are hampered by slow bioassays in transgenic (Tg) mice. Towards the development of Tg mice that will be more susceptible to CWD prions, we created a series of chimeric elk/mouse transgenes that encode the N terminus of elk PrP (ElkPrP) up to residue Y168 and the C terminus of mouse PrP (MoPrP) beyond residue 169 (mouse numbering), designated Elk3M(SNIVVK). Between codons 169 and 219, six residues distinguish ElkPrP from MoPrP: N169S, T173N, V183I, I202V, I214V and R219K. Using chimeric elk/mouse PrP constructs, we generated 12 Tg mouse lines and determined incubation times after intracerebral inoculation with the mouse-passaged RML scrapie or Elk1P CWD prions. Unexpectedly, one Tg mouse line expressing Elk3M(SNIVVK) exhibited incubation times of <70 days when inoculated with RML prions; a second line had incubation times of <90 days. In contrast, mice expressing full-length ElkPrP had incubation periods of >250 days for RML prions. Tg(Elk3M,SNIVVK) mice were less susceptible to CWD prions than Tg(ElkPrP) mice. Changing three C-terminal mouse residues (202, 214 and 219) to those of elk doubled the incubation time for mouse RML prions and rendered the mice resistant to Elk1P CWD prions. Mutating an additional two residues from mouse to elk at codons 169 and 173 increased the incubation times for mouse prions to >300 days, but made the mice susceptible to CWD prions. Our findings highlight the role of C-terminal residues in PrP that control the susceptibility and replication of prions.

  18. Chimeric elk/mouse prion proteins in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Oehler, Abby; Johnson, Natrina L.; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer and elk is a highly communicable neurodegenerative disorder caused by prions. Investigations of CWD are hampered by slow bioassays in transgenic (Tg) mice. Towards the development of Tg mice that will be more susceptible to CWD prions, we created a series of chimeric elk/mouse transgenes that encode the N terminus of elk PrP (ElkPrP) up to residue Y168 and the C terminus of mouse PrP (MoPrP) beyond residue 169 (mouse numbering), designated Elk3M(SNIVVK). Between codons 169 and 219, six residues distinguish ElkPrP from MoPrP: N169S, T173N, V183I, I202V, I214V and R219K. Using chimeric elk/mouse PrP constructs, we generated 12 Tg mouse lines and determined incubation times after intracerebral inoculation with the mouse-passaged RML scrapie or Elk1P CWD prions. Unexpectedly, one Tg mouse line expressing Elk3M(SNIVVK) exhibited incubation times of <70 days when inoculated with RML prions; a second line had incubation times of <90 days. In contrast, mice expressing full-length ElkPrP had incubation periods of >250 days for RML prions. Tg(Elk3M,SNIVVK) mice were less susceptible to CWD prions than Tg(ElkPrP) mice. Changing three C-terminal mouse residues (202, 214 and 219) to those of elk doubled the incubation time for mouse RML prions and rendered the mice resistant to Elk1P CWD prions. Mutating an additional two residues from mouse to elk at codons 169 and 173 increased the incubation times for mouse prions to >300 days, but made the mice susceptible to CWD prions. Our findings highlight the role of C-terminal residues in PrP that control the susceptibility and replication of prions. PMID:23100369

  19. Mouse assay for determination of arsenic bioavailability in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Bradham, Karen D; Diamond, Gary L; Scheckel, Kirk G; Hughes, Michael F; Casteel, Stan W; Miller, Bradley W; Klotzbach, Julie M; Thayer, William C; Thomas, David J

    2013-01-01

    A mouse assay for measuring the relative bioavailability (RBA) of arsenic (As) in soil was developed. In this study, results are presented of RBA assays of 16 soils, including multiple assays of the same soils, which provide a quantitative assessment of reproducibility of mouse assay results, as well as a comparison of results from the mouse assay with results from a swine and monkey assay applied to the same test soils. The mouse assay is highly reproducible; three repeated assays on the same soils yielded RBA estimates that ranged from 1 to 3% of the group mean. The mouse, monkey, and swine models yielded similar results for some, but not all, test materials. RBA estimates for identical soils (nine test soils and three standard reference materials [SRM]) assayed in mice and swine were significantly correlated (r = 0.70). Swine RBA estimates for 6 of the 12 test materials were higher than those from the mouse assay. RBA estimates for three standard reference materials (SRM) were not statistically different (mouse/swine ratio ranged from 0.86-1). When four test soils from the same orchard were assessed in the mouse, monkey, and swine assays, the mean soil As RBA were not statistically different. Mouse and swine models predicted similar steady state urinary excretion fractions (UEF) for As of 62 and 74%, respectively, during repeated ingestion doses of sodium arsenate, the water-soluble As form used as the reference in the calculation of RBA. In the mouse assay, the UEF for water soluble As(V) (sodium arsenate) and As(III) (sodium [meta] arsenite) were 62% and 66%, respectively, suggesting similar absolute bioavailabilities for the two As species. The mouse assay can serve as a highly cost-effective alternative or supplement to monkey and swine assays for improving As risk assessments by providing site-specific assessments of RBA of As in soils.

  20. Cytogenetic effect of griseofulvin in mouse spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, M A; Hassan, N H

    1996-01-01

    The genotoxic effects of griseofulvin (GF) in mouse primary spermatocytes at diakinesis metaphase I of meiosis were investigated. Griseofulvin was administered orally as a single dose of 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000 mg kg-1 body wt. and a multiple treatment with a daily dose of 1000 mg kg-1 body wt. for three and five successive doses. Both single and multiple treatment induced a statistically significant increase in the percentage of chromosomal aberrations which have a dose and time-dependent relationship. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations peaked 6 and 12 h post treatment; with the highest dose of the drug it reached 27.8% +/- 0.87 and 27.66% +/- 0.48 6 and 12 h respectively, compared with 5.6% +/- 0.39 and 5.2% +/- 0.48 for the control. The types of aberrations recorded were structural, including X-Y and autosomal univalent, gaps, breaks, fragments, chain IV and numerical in the form of diploid, triploid, tetraploid and aneuploid. The results of this study suggest that griseofulvin has a genotoxic effect in mouse spermatocytes.

  1. Mouse Models of Anemia of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Airie; Rivera, Seth; Shprung, Dana; Limbrick, Donald; Gabayan, Victoria; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Anemia of cancer (AC) may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI), with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC. PMID:24681760

  2. The hairless mouse in skin research

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Fernando; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.; VanBuskirk, Anne M.; Reeve, Vivienne E.; Kusewitt, Donna F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The hairless (Hr) gene encodes a transcriptional co-repressor highly expressed in the mammalian skin. In the mouse, several null and hypomorphic Hr alleles have been identified resulting in hairlessness in homozygous animals, characterized by alopecia developing after a single cycle of relatively normal hair growth. Mutations in the human ortholog have also been associated with congenital alopecia. Although a variety of hairless strains have been developed, outbred SKH1 mice are the most widely used in dermatologic research. These unpigmented and immunocompetent mice allow for ready manipulation of the skin, application of topical agents, and exposure to UVR, as well as easy visualization of the cutaneous response. Wound healing, acute photobiologic responses, and skin carcinogenesis have been extensively studied in SKH1 mice and are well characterized. In addition, tumors induced in these mice resemble, both at the morphologic and molecular levels, UVR-induced skin malignancies in man. Two limitations of the SKH1 mouse in dermatologic research are the relatively uncharacterized genetic background and its outbred status, which precludes inter-individual transplantation studies. PMID:18938063

  3. New types of mouse centromeric satellite DNAs.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Inna S; Prusov, Andrey N; Enukashvily, Natella I; Podgornaya, Olga I

    2005-01-01

    Genomic databases do not contain complete sequences of the centromeric regions. We created a pUC19-based library of DNA fragments from isolated chromocentres of interphase nuclei. In this library we have found major satellite (MaSat) and two new satellite sequences - MS3 and MS4. The computer analysis of MS3 and MS4 sequences by alignment, fragment curved state and search for MAR motifs in comparison with the mouse major and minor satellite (MiSat) DNA has shown them to be new satellite fragments. Southern blot of MS3 and MS4 with total DNA digested by restriction enzymes shows the ladder characteristic of satellite DNA. 2.2% of the total DNA consists of MS3, the monomer of which is 150 bp long. The MS4 monomer is 300 bp long and accounts for 1.6% of the total DNA. On metaphase chromosomes MS3 and MS4 are located at the centromeric region. FISH analysis of L929 nuclei during the cell cycle showed relative positions of MaSat, MiSat, MS3, and MS4. All mapped satDNA fragments except MaSat belong to the outer layer of the chromocentres in the G0/G1 phase. MS3 is likely to be involved in the centromere formation. The mouse genome contains at least four satDNA types: AT-rich (MaSat and MiSat), and CG-rich (MS3 and MS4).

  4. Turnover of cytokeratin polypeptides in mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Denk, H.; Lackinger, E.; Zatloukal, K. ); Franke, W.W. )

    1987-11-01

    The turnover of cytokeratin polypeptides A (equivalent to No. 8 of the human cytokeratin catalog) and D (equivalent to human cytokeratin No. 18) of mouse hepatocytes was studied by pulse-labeling of mouse liver proteins after intraperitoneal injection of L-(guanido{sup 14}C)arginine and ({sup 14}C)sodium bicarbonate. With L-(guanido-{sup 14}C)arginine a rapid increase in the specific radioactivity of both cytokeratins was observed which reached a plateau between 12 and 24 h. With ({sup 14}C)sodium bicarbonate maximal specific radioactivity was obtained at 6 h followed by a rapid decrease to half maximum values within the subsequent 6 h and then a slower decrease. Half-lives were determined from the decrease of specific radioactivities after pulse-labeling by least-squares plots and found to be 84 h (for cytokeratin component A) and 104 h (component D) for arginine labeling . Values obtained after bicarbonate labeling were similar (95 h for A and 98 h for D). These results show that liver cytokeratins are relatively stable proteins and suggest that components A and D are synthesized and degraded at similar rates, probably in a coordinate way.

  5. Applying thiouracil tagging to mouse transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Gay, Leslie; Karfilis, Kate V; Miller, Michael R; Doe, Chris Q; Stankunas, Kryn

    2014-02-01

    Transcriptional profiling is a powerful approach for studying mouse development, physiology and disease models. Here we describe a protocol for mouse thiouracil tagging (TU tagging), a transcriptome analysis technology that includes in vivo covalent labeling, purification and analysis of cell type-specific RNA. TU tagging enables the isolation of RNA from a given cell population of a complex tissue, avoiding transcriptional changes induced by cell isolation trauma, as well as the identification of actively transcribed RNAs and not preexisting transcripts. Therefore, in contrast to other cell-specific transcriptional profiling methods based on the purification of tagged ribosomes or nuclei, TU tagging provides a direct examination of transcriptional regulation. We describe how to (i) deliver 4-thiouracil to transgenic mice to thio-label cell lineage-specific transcripts, (ii) purify TU-tagged RNA and prepare libraries for Illumina sequencing and (iii) follow a straightforward bioinformatics workflow to identify cell type-enriched or differentially expressed genes. Tissue containing TU-tagged RNA can be obtained in 1 d, RNA-seq libraries can be generated within 2 d and, after sequencing, an initial bioinformatics analysis can be completed in 1 additional day.

  6. Genetic Networks in Mouse Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Struebing, Felix L.; Lee, Richard K.; Williams, Robert W.; Geisert, Eldon E.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the output neuron of the eye, transmitting visual information from the retina through the optic nerve to the brain. The importance of RGCs for vision is demonstrated in blinding diseases where RGCs are lost, such as in glaucoma or after optic nerve injury. In the present study, we hypothesize that normal RGC function is transcriptionally regulated. To test our hypothesis, we examine large retinal expression microarray datasets from recombinant inbred mouse strains in GeneNetwork and define transcriptional networks of RGCs and their subtypes. Two major and functionally distinct transcriptional networks centering around Thy1 and Tubb3 (Class III beta-tubulin) were identified. Each network is independently regulated and modulated by unique genomic loci. Meta-analysis of publically available data confirms that RGC subtypes are differentially susceptible to death, with alpha-RGCs and intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs) being less sensitive to cell death than other RGC subtypes in a mouse model of glaucoma. PMID:27733864

  7. Prdm9 polymorphism unveils mouse evolutionary tracks.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiromitsu; Tamura, Masaru; Osada, Naoki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Abe, Kuniya; Moriwaki, Kazuo; Ohta, Kunihiro; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-06-01

    PR/SET domain containing 9 (Prdm9) mediates histone modifications such as H3K4me3 and marks hotspots of meiotic recombination. In many mammalian species, the Prdm9 gene is highly polymorphic. Prdm9 polymorphism is assumed to play two critical roles in evolution: to diversify the spectrum of meiotic recombination hotspots and to cause male hybrid sterility, leading to reproductive isolation and speciation. Nevertheless, information about Prdm9 sequences in natural populations is very limited. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive population survey on Prdm9 polymorphism in the house mouse, Mus musculus. Overall M. musculus Prdm9 displays an extraordinarily high level of polymorphism, particularly in regions encoding zinc finger repeats, which recognize recombination hotspots. Prdm9 alleles specific to various M. musculus subspecies dominate in subspecies territories. Moreover, introgression into other subspecies territories was found for highly divergent Prdm9 alleles associated with t-haplotype. The results of our phylogeographical analysis suggest that the requirement for hotspot diversity depends on geographical range and time span in mouse evolution, and that Prdm9 polymorphism has not been maintained by a simple balanced selection in the population of each subspecies.

  8. The scarless heart and the MRL mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Heber-Katz, Ellen; Leferovich, John; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Gourevitch, Dmitri; Clark, Lise

    2004-01-01

    The ability to regenerate tissues and limbs in its most robust form is seen in many non-mammalian species. The serendipitous discovery that the MRL mouse has a profound capacity for regeneration in some ways rivalling the classic newt and axolotl species raises the possibility that humans, too, may have an innate regenerative ability. The adult MRL mouse regrows cartilage, skin, hair follicles and myocardium with near perfect fidelity and without scarring. This is seen in the ability to close through-and-through ear holes, which are generally used for lifelong identification of mice, and the anatomic and functional recovery of myocardium after a severe cryo-injury. We present histological, biochemical and genetic data indicating that the enhanced breakdown of scar-like tissue may be an underlying factor in the MRL regenerative response. Studies as to the source of the cells in the regenerating MRL tissue are discussed. Such studies appear to support multiple mechanisms for cell replacement. PMID:15293806

  9. Mouse genome engineering using designer nucleases.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Mario; Cermak, Tomas; Voytas, Daniel F; Pelczar, Pawel

    2014-04-02

    Transgenic mice carrying site-specific genome modifications (knockout, knock-in) are of vital importance for dissecting complex biological systems as well as for modeling human diseases and testing therapeutic strategies. Recent advances in the use of designer nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 system for site-specific genome engineering open the possibility to perform rapid targeted genome modification in virtually any laboratory species without the need to rely on embryonic stem (ES) cell technology. A genome editing experiment typically starts with identification of designer nuclease target sites within a gene of interest followed by construction of custom DNA-binding domains to direct nuclease activity to the investigator-defined genomic locus. Designer nuclease plasmids are in vitro transcribed to generate mRNA for microinjection of fertilized mouse oocytes. Here, we provide a protocol for achieving targeted genome modification by direct injection of TALEN mRNA into fertilized mouse oocytes.

  10. ROCK inhibition prevents early mouse embryo development.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xing; Chen, Kun-Lin; Zhang, Yu; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-08-01

    ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector that is important for actin assembly and is involved in various cellular functions, including cell contraction, migration, motility, and tumor cell invasion. In this study, we investigated ROCK expression and function during early mouse embryo development. Inhibiting ROCK by Y-27632 treatment at the zygote stage resulted in first cleavage failure, and most embryos failed to develop to the 8-cell stage. When adding Y-27632 at the 8-cell stage, embryos failed to undergo compaction and could not develop into blastocysts. In addition, fluorescence staining intensity analysis indicated that actin expression at blastomere membranes was significantly reduced. After ROCK inhibition, two or more nuclei were observed in a cell, which indicated possible cytokinesis failure. Moreover, after ROCK inhibition with Y-27632, the phosphorylation levels of LIMK1/2, a downstream molecule of ROCK, were decreased at blastomere membranes. Thus, our results showed conserved roles for ROCK in this mammalian embryo model and indicated that a ROCK-LIMK1/2-actin pathway might regulate cleavage and blastocyst formation during early mouse embryo development.

  11. Knockout mouse production assisted by Blm knockdown

    PubMed Central

    FUKUDA, Mikiko; INOUE, Mayuko; MURAMATSU, Daisuke; MIYACHI, Hitoshi; SHINKAI, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Production of knockout mice using targeted embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is a powerful approach for investigating the function of specific genes in vivo. Although the protocol for gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) in ESCs is already well established, the targeting efficiency varies at different target loci and is sometimes too low. It is known that knockdown of the Bloom syndrome gene, BLM, enhances HR-mediated gene targeting efficiencies in various cell lines. However, it has not yet been investigated whether this approach in ESCs is applicable for successful knockout mouse production. Therefore, we attempted to answer this question. Consistent with previous reports, Blm knockdown enhanced gene targeting efficiencies for three gene loci that we examined by 2.3–4.1-fold. Furthermore, the targeted ESC clones generated good chimeras and were successful in germline transmission. These data suggest that Blm knockdown provides a general benefit for efficient ESC-based and HR-mediated knockout mouse production. PMID:26598326

  12. Life without white fat: a transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Moitra, Jaideep; Mason, Mark M.; Olive, Michelle; Krylov, Dmitry; Gavrilova, Oksana; Marcus-Samuels, Bernice; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Lee, Eric; Aoyama, Toshifumi; Eckhaus, Michael; Reitman, Marc L.; Vinson, Charles

    1998-01-01

    We have generated a transgenic mouse with no white fat tissue throughout life. These mice express a dominant-negative protein, termed A-ZIP/F, under the control of the adipose-specific aP2 enhancer/promoter. This protein prevents the DNA binding of B-ZIP transcription factors of both the C/EBP and Jun families. The transgenic mice (named A-ZIP/F-1) have no white adipose tissue and dramatically reduced amounts of brown adipose tissue, which is inactive. They are initially growth delayed, but by week 12, surpass their littermates in weight. The mice eat, drink, and urinate copiously, have decreased fecundity, premature death, and frequently die after anesthesia. The physiological consequences of having no white fat tissue are profound. The liver is engorged with lipid, and the internal organs are enlarged. The mice are diabetic, with reduced leptin (20-fold) and elevated serum glucose (3-fold), insulin (50- to 400-fold), free fatty acids (2-fold), and triglycerides (3- to 5-fold). The A-ZIP/F-1 phenotype suggests a mouse model for the human disease lipoatrophic diabetes (Seip-Berardinelli syndrome), indicating that the lack of fat can cause diabetes. The myriad of consequences of having no fat throughout development can be addressed with this model. PMID:9784492

  13. Neuronal mechanism of epileptogenesis in EL mouse.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jiro

    2013-01-01

    The convulsions of the EL mouse (EL) were described by Imaizumi et al. in 1954 and were established as epilepsy by Suzuki in 1976. The EL mouse has been kept as an inbred strain and is considered one of the best animal models originated in Japan. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant, and environmental risk factors for seizure occurrence are hypothesised to contribute to the polygenic background. Paroxysmal activities in the EL brain arise from the parietal cortex (PCX) and are augmented in the hippocampus, demonstrated by electrophysiology and autoradiography using 2-deoxy glucose when clinical symptoms of seizures appeared. The neurons in the EL PCX, where GABA activity is lower than that of DDY PCX demonstrate increased excitability to proprioceptive sensory input. After repetitive seizure-provoking stimuli, seizures are more easily induced, eventually occurring spontaneously. This phenomenon of "abnormal plasticity" is also observed in the EEG, decreasing GABA activity, expression of the immediately early gene, and various biochemical and molecular processes. This phenomenon is similar to the learning or progressive process of certain neurological diseases.

  14. Overview of mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bobela, Wojciech; Zheng, Lu; Schneider, Bernard L

    2014-09-03

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of neurons in specific regions of the nervous system, notably in the substantia nigra pars compacta and, in most cases, by the deposition of intraneuronal inclusions named Lewy bodies. These pathological alterations have profound effects on the brain function, leading to the progressive development of various symptoms, the most prominent being the impaired initiation of voluntary movements caused by the loss of dopamine signaling in the basal ganglia. Here, we provide an overview of the mouse models of Parkinson's disease, with the goal of guiding selection of the most appropriate model for studying the question at hand. Pharmacological approaches targeting dopamine signaling and toxins leading to selective degeneration of nigral neurons are used to validate symptomatic treatments that aim at restoring effective dopaminergic function for motor control. Alternative mouse models are based on genetic modifications that are meant to reproduce the inherited alterations associated with familial forms of Parkinson's disease. Although genetic models have most often failed to induce overt degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons, they provide essential tools to explore the multifactorial etiology of this complex neurodegenerative disorder. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  16. Neuronal mechanism of epileptogenesis in EL mouse

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Jiro

    2013-01-01

    The convulsions of the EL mouse (EL) were described by Imaizumi et al. in 1954 and were established as epilepsy by Suzuki in 1976. The EL mouse has been kept as an inbred strain and is considered one of the best animal models originated in Japan. The mode of inheritance is autosomal dominant, and environmental risk factors for seizure occurrence are hypothesised to contribute to the polygenic background. Paroxysmal activities in the EL brain arise from the parietal cortex (PCX) and are augmented in the hippocampus, demonstrated by electrophysiology and autoradiography using 2-deoxy glucose when clinical symptoms of seizures appeared. The neurons in the EL PCX, where GABA activity is lower than that of DDY PCX demonstrate increased excitability to proprioceptive sensory input. After repetitive seizure-provoking stimuli, seizures are more easily induced, eventually occurring spontaneously. This phenomenon of “abnormal plasticity” is also observed in the EEG, decreasing GABA activity, expression of the immediately early gene, and various biochemical and molecular processes. This phenomenon is similar to the learning or progressive process of certain neurological diseases. PMID:23759944

  17. 4D cardiac MRI in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Feintuch, Akiva; Zhu, Yonghong; Bishop, Jonathan; Davidson, Lorinda; Dazai, Jun; Bruneau, Benoit G; Henkelman, R Mark

    2007-05-01

    With the introduction of mouse models for the study of cardiac morphogenesis, there arises a need for new imaging protocols that can capture both morphological and functional information. High-resolution 2D cardiac cine MRI has often been used to quantify left and right ventricular function. In this study we propose a 3D isotropic cardiac cine MRI protocol with a voxel size of 200 microm(3) as a means of studying cardiac multi-chamber morphology and function. A black blood sequence was used to enhance blood myocardium contrast. Manual segmentation of the ventricles was used to measure ventricular volumes at end diastole and end systole. This method is demonstrated on an Irx4-deficient mouse model. We have been able to identify the volumes of both ventricles dynamically and to show differences in ejection fraction in the mutant. We have also identified an abnormality of the papillary muscle in the mutant that had been missed in previous phenotyping with ultrasound and histology. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of mouse embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan; Norris, Francesca; Cleary, Jon; Zhang, Edward; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Johnson, Peter; Scambler, Pete; Lythgoe, Mark; Beard, Paul

    2012-06-01

    The ability to noninvasively image embryonic vascular anatomy in mouse models is an important requirement for characterizing the development of the normal cardiovascular system and malformations in the heart and vascular supply. Photoacoustic imaging, which can provide high resolution non invasive images of the vasculature based upon optical absorption by endogenous hemoglobin, is well suited to this application. In this study, photoacoustic images of mouse embryos were obtained ex vivo and in vivo. The images show intricate details of the embryonic vascular system to depths of up to 10 mm, which allowed whole embryos to be imaged in situ. To achieve this, an all-optical photoacoustic scanner and a novel time reversal image reconstruction algorithm, which provide deep tissue imaging capability while maintaining high spatial resolution and contrast were employed. This technology may find application as an imaging tool for preclinical embryo studies in developmental biology as well as more generally in preclinical and clinical medicine for studying pathologies characterized by changes in the vasculature.

  19. Molecular analysis of heritable mouse mutations.

    PubMed

    Rinchik, E M

    1987-10-01

    Germ-line mutations of the mouse have for years comprised one class of biological markers for mammalian reproductive and developmental toxicology. Understanding the molecular nature of mutations and the mechanisms by which mutations are translated into specific (and often complex) phenotypes, however, still looms as a major goal of mammalian biology. Molecular genetic analysis of heritable mouse mutations constitutes a significant, experimentally malleable strategy for relating genomic DNA structure to genic expression and function in mammals. The integrated use of recombinant DNA technology, which allows both the identification and analysis of expression of single genes, and classical genetic and cytogenetic analysis, which allow the important correlation between basic DNA defects and the organismic consequences of such defects, has been crucial to this strategy. Some of the approaches (e.g., specific-gene cloning, random-clone analysis of genomic regions, insertional mutagenesis) for studying the nature and effect of both mutations and their wild-type counterparts that have resulted from this integration of genetic analysis and molecular biology have been applied to many loci within the murine genome. Studies of the nature and effects of a complex set of radiation-induced mutations at the dilute-short ear (d-se) region of chromosome 9, a specific example of this type of integrated analysis, are discussed.

  20. Antibodies to mouse lung capillary endothelium.

    PubMed

    Rorvik, M C; Allison, D P; Hotchkiss, J A; Witschi, H P; Kennel, S J

    1988-07-01

    We are interested in developing monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) that recognize specific cell types in the lung of BALB/c mice. Normal mouse lung homogenate was used to immunize F344 rats and hybridomas were produced by fusion of rat spleen cells with mouse myeloma SP 2/0. Two hybridomas were selected which produced MoAbs active in immunohistochemistry of lung cells. MoAb 273-34A and 411-201B both show extensive peroxidase staining of capillary endothelial cells within alveolar walls of lungs at the light microscopic level. To demonstrate cell specificity, immunoelectron microscopy with gold-labeled antibody was performed. Lightly fixed lungs were frozen and thin-sectioned before staining with MoAb and 5-nm gold particles coupled to secondary antibody. Quantitative analyses of these cryosections show that both antibodies, used at optimal concentrations, are specific for binding to capillary endothelial cells. More than 95% of the gold particles are associated with capillary endothelial cells on the thin side of the alveolar wall. When capillaries adjoined thick septa containing interstitial cells, about two thirds of the gold particles were associated with endothelial cells and about one quarter with interstitial cells. These MoAbs should be useful in studying the role of endothelial cells in toxic lung injury.

  1. A Mouse Model of Endocardial Fibroelastosis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Elizabeth S.; Pepper, Victoria K.; Best, Cameron; Onwuka, Ekene; Yi, Tai; Tara, Shuhei; Cianciolo, Rachel; Baker, Peter; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endocardial Fibroelastosis (EFE) is a pathologic condition of abnormal deposition of collagen and elastin within the endocardium of the heart. It is seen in conjunction with a variety of diseases including hypoplastic left heart syndrome and viral endocarditis. While an experimental model using heterotopic heart transplant in rats has been described, we sought to fully describe a mouse model that can be used to further elucidate the potential mechanisms of and treatments for EFE. Materials and Methods The hearts of 2-day-old C57BL/6 mice were transplanted into the abdomen of 7-week-old C57BL/6 mice. At 2 weeks, the hearts were harvested and histologic analysis performed using hematoxylin and eosin, Masson’s Trichrome, Russell-Movat’s Pentachrome, Picrosirius Red, Hart’s, Verhoeff-Van Gieson, and Weigert’s Resorcin-Fuschin stains. Additionally, one heart was analysed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results Specimens demonstrated abnormal accumulation of both collagen and elastin within the endocardium with occasional expansion in to the myocardium. Heterogeneity in extracellular matrix deposition was noted in the histologic specimens. In addition, TEM demonstrated the presence of excess collagen within the endocardium. Conclusions The heterotopic transplantation of an immature heart into a mouse results in changes consistent with EFE. This model is appropriate to investigate the etiology and treatment of endocardial fibroelastosis. PMID:26363814

  2. Nucleotide sequence of mouse satellite DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hörz, W; Altenburger, W

    1981-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of uncloned mouse satellite DNA has been determined by analyzing Sau96I restriction fragments that correspond to the repeat unit of the satellite DNA. An unambiguous sequence of 234 bp has been obtained. The sequence of the first 250 bases from dimeric satellite fragments present in Sau96I limit digests corresponds almost exactly to two tandemly arranged monomer sequences including a complete Sau96I site in the center. This is in agreement with the hypothesis that a low level of divergence which cannot be detected in sequence analyses of uncloned DNA is responsible for the appearance of dimeric fragments. Most of the sequence of the 5% fraction of Sau96 monomers that are susceptible to TaqI has also been determined and has been found to agree completely with the prototype sequence. The monomer sequence is internally repetitious being composed of eight diverged subrepeats. The divergence pattern has interesting implications for theories on the evolution of mouse satellite DNA. PMID:6261227

  3. Genetically-defined ovarian cancer mouse models.

    PubMed

    Morin, Patrice J; Weeraratna, Ashani T

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the deadliest of gynaecological cancers, is a disease that remains difficult to detect early and treat efficiently. A significant challenge for researchers in the field is that the aetiology of EOC and the molecular pathways important for its development are poorly understood. Moreover, precursor lesions have not been readily identifiable, making the mechanisms of EOC progression difficult to delineate. In order to address these issues, several genetically-defined ovarian mouse models have been generated in the past 15 years. However, because of the recent suggestion that most EOCs may not originate from the ovarian surface 'epithelium', but from other tissues of the female genital tract, some models may need to be re-evaluated within this new paradigm. In this review, we examine several genetically-defined EOC models and discuss how the new paradigm may explain some of the features of these models. A better understanding of the strengths and limitations of the current EOC mouse models will undoubtedly allow us to utilize these tools to better understand the biology of the disease and develop new approaches for EOC prevention, detection, and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Characterization of mouse IFT complex B.

    PubMed

    Follit, John A; Xu, Fenghui; Keady, Brian T; Pazour, Gregory J

    2009-08-01

    The primary cilium plays a key role in the development of mammals and in the maintenance of health. Primary cilia are assembled and maintained by the process of intraflagellar transport (IFT). In this work, we characterize mouse IFT complex B by identifying all of the mammalian orthologues of complex B and B-associated proteins previously identified in Chlamydomonas and Caenorhabditis and also identify a new component (IFT25/Hspb11) of complex B by database analysis. We tagged each of these proteins with the FLAG epitope and show that all except IFT172 and IFT20 localize to cilia and the peri-basal body or centrosomal region at the base of cilia. All of the proteins except IFT172 immunoprecipitate IFT88 indicating that they are co-assembled into a complex. IFT20 is the only complex B protein that localizes to the Golgi apparatus. However, overexpression of IFT54/Traf3ip1, the mouse orthologue of Dyf-11/Elipsa, displaces IFT20 from the Golgi apparatus. IFT54 does not localize to the Golgi complex nor does it interact with GMAP210, which is the protein that anchors IFT20 to the Golgi apparatus. This suggests that IFT54s effect on IFT20 is a dominant negative phenotype caused by its overexpression. Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Unitary response of mouse olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Chaim, Yair; Cheng, Melody M.; Yau, King-Wai

    2011-01-01

    The sense of smell begins with odorant molecules binding to membrane receptors on the cilia of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), thereby activating a G protein, Golf, and the downstream effector enzyme, an adenylyl cyclase (ACIII). Recently, we have found in amphibian ORNs that an odorant-binding event has a low probability of activating sensory transduction at all; even when successful, the resulting unitary response apparently involves a single active Gαolf–ACIII molecular complex. This low amplification is in contrast to rod phototransduction in vision, the best-quantified G-protein signaling pathway, where each photoisomerized rhodopsin molecule is well known to produce substantial amplification by activating many G-protein, and hence effector-enzyme, molecules. We have now carried out similar experiments on mouse ORNs, which offer, additionally, the advantage of genetics. Indeed, we found the same low probability of transduction, based on the unitary olfactory response having a fairly constant amplitude and similar kinetics across different odorants and randomly encountered ORNs. Also, consistent with our picture, the unitary response of Gαolf+/− ORNs was similar to WT in amplitude, although their Gαolf-protein expression was only half of normal. Finally, from the action potential firing, we estimated that ≤19 odorant-binding events successfully triggering transduction in a WT mouse ORN will lead to signaling to the brain. PMID:21187398

  6. Tracking Mouse Bone Marrow Monocytes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, Pauline; Rodero, Mathieu Paul; Combadière, Christophe; Boissonnas, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Real time multiphoton imaging provides a great opportunity to study cell trafficking and cell-to-cell interactions in their physiological 3-dimensionnal environment. Biological activities of immune cells mainly rely on their motility capacities. Blood monocytes have short half-life in the bloodstream; they originate in the bone marrow and are constitutively released from it. In inflammatory condition, this process is enhanced, leading to blood monocytosis and subsequent infiltration of the peripheral inflammatory tissues. Identifying the biomechanical events controlling monocyte trafficking from the bone marrow towards the vascular network is an important step to understand monocyte physiopathological relevance. We performed in vivo time-lapse imaging by two-photon microscopy of the skull bone marrow of the Csf1r-Gal4VP16/UAS-ECFP (MacBlue) mouse. The MacBlue mouse expresses the fluorescent reporters enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP) under the control of a myeloid specific promoter 1, in combination with vascular network labelling. We describe how this approach enables the tracking of individual medullar monocytes in real time to further quantify the migratory behaviour within the bone marrow parenchyma and the vasculature, as well as cell-to-cell interactions. This approach provides novel insights into the biology of the bone marrow monocyte subsets and allows to further address how these cells can be influenced in specific pathological conditions. PMID:25867540

  7. Peptidylarginine deiminase in rat and mouse hemopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Nagata, S; Senshu, T

    1990-01-15

    Peptidylarginine (protein-L-arginine) deiminase activities have been demonstrated in extracts of rat and mouse peritoneal macrophages, bone marrow cells, splenic adherent cells, neutrophils, and mouse monocyte/macrophage cell lines. The enzyme in these cells is indistinguishable from the skeletal muscle enzyme with respect to immunochemical properties.

  8. Designing Mouse Behavioral Tasks Relevant to Autistic-Like Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2004-01-01

    The importance of genetic factors in autism has prompted the development of mutant mouse models to advance our understanding of biological mechanisms underlying autistic behaviors. Mouse models of human neuropsychiatric diseases are designed to optimize (1) face validity, i.e., resemblance to the human symptoms; (2) construct validity, i.e.,…

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of mouse Gipc3.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Tetsuroh; Mine, Tetsuya; Katoh, Masaru

    2002-03-01

    GIPC1/GIPC interacts with GTPase-activating protein RGS-GAIP, transmembrane protein M-SemF, receptor tyrosine kinase TrkA, integrin alpha 6A subunit, and TGF beta type III receptor. Kermit, a Xenopus orthologue of human GIPC1, interacts with Frizzled-3 (FZD3) class of WNT receptor. We have recently cloned and characterized human GIPC2 and GIPC3. Here, we identified mouse Gipc3 gene fragments by using bioinformatics, and isolated mouse Gipc3 cDNAs by using cDNA-PCR. Mouse Gipc3 gene encoded a 297-amino-acid protein, showing 86.2% total-amino-acid identity with human GIPC3. In addition to the central PDZ domain, GIPC homologous domain 1 (GH1 domain) and GH2 domain were found to be conserved among mouse Gipc3, Gipc1, Gipc2, and Xenopus Kermit. Mouse Gipc3 gene was found to consist of 6 exons, and exon-intron structure was well conserved between mouse Gipc3 gene and human GIPC3 gene. Mouse Gipc3 mRNA was relatively highly expressed in adult lung, and was also expressed in brain and testis, but was almost undetectable in 7-, 11-, 15, and 17-day whole embryos. This is the first report on molecular cloning and initial characterization of mouse Gipc3.

  10. Recognizing Student Emotions Using Brainwaves and Mouse Behavior Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azcarraga, Judith; Suarez, Merlin Teodosia

    2013-01-01

    Brainwaves (EEG signals) and mouse behavior information are shown to be useful in predicting academic emotions, such as confidence, excitement, frustration and interest. Twenty five college students were asked to use the Aplusix math learning software while their brainwaves signals and mouse behavior (number of clicks, duration of each click,…

  11. Mouse Vocal Communication System: Are Ultrasounds Learned or Innate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arriaga, Gustavo; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) are often used as behavioral readouts of internal states, to measure effects of social and pharmacological manipulations, and for behavioral phenotyping of mouse models for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. However, little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms of rodent USV production.…

  12. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be conducted... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The...

  13. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be conducted... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The...

  14. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be conducted... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The...

  15. Now and future of mouse mutagenesis for human disease models.

    PubMed

    Gondo, Yoichi

    2010-09-01

    One of the major objectives of the Human Genome Project is to understand the biological function of the gene and genome as well as to develop clinical applications for human diseases. For this purpose, the experimental validations and preclinical trails by using animal models are indispensable. The mouse (Mus musculus) is one of the best animal models because genetics is well established in the mouse and embryonic manipulation technologies are also well developed. Large-scale mouse mutagenesis projects have been conducted to develop various mouse models since 1997. Originally, the phenotype-driven mutagenesis with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) has been the major efforts internationally then knockout/conditional mouse projects and gene-driven mutagenesis have been following. At the beginning, simple monogenic traits in the experimental condition have been elucidated. Then, more complex traits with variety of environmental interactions and gene-to-gene interactions (epistasis) have been challenged with mutant mice. In addition, chromosomal substitution strains and collaborative cross strains are also available to elucidate the complex traits in the mouse. Altogether, mouse models with mutagenesis and various laboratory strains will accelerate the studies of functional genomics in the mouse as well as in human. Copyright © 2010 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology and the Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Designing Mouse Behavioral Tasks Relevant to Autistic-Like Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2004-01-01

    The importance of genetic factors in autism has prompted the development of mutant mouse models to advance our understanding of biological mechanisms underlying autistic behaviors. Mouse models of human neuropsychiatric diseases are designed to optimize (1) face validity, i.e., resemblance to the human symptoms; (2) construct validity, i.e.,…

  17. Effects of Computer Skill on Mouse Move and Click Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panagiotakopoulos, Chris; Sarris, Menelaos

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on the use of computers in the field of education. It reports a series of experimental mouse move and click tasks on constant and moving stimuli. These experiments attempt to explore the efficiency with which individuals of different skill level and age group perform using a mouse. Differences in performance between high-skill…

  18. Principles and application of LIMS in mouse clinics.

    PubMed

    Maier, Holger; Schütt, Christine; Steinkamp, Ralph; Hurt, Anja; Schneltzer, Elida; Gormanns, Philipp; Lengger, Christoph; Griffiths, Mark; Melvin, David; Agrawal, Neha; Alcantara, Rafael; Evans, Arthur; Gannon, David; Holroyd, Simon; Kipp, Christian; Raj, Navis Pretheeba; Richardson, David; LeBlanc, Sophie; Vasseur, Laurent; Masuya, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Kimio; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Nobuhiko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Walling, Alison; Clary, David; Gallegos, Juan; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Gailus-Durner, Valerie

    2015-10-01

    Large-scale systemic mouse phenotyping, as performed by mouse clinics for more than a decade, requires thousands of mice from a multitude of different mutant lines to be bred, individually tracked and subjected to phenotyping procedures according to a standardised schedule. All these efforts are typically organised in overlapping projects, running in parallel. In terms of logistics, data capture, data analysis, result visualisation and reporting, new challenges have emerged from such projects. These challenges could hardly be met with traditional methods such as pen & paper colony management, spreadsheet-based data management and manual data analysis. Hence, different Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) have been developed in mouse clinics to facilitate or even enable mouse and data management in the described order of magnitude. This review shows that general principles of LIMS can be empirically deduced from LIMS used by different mouse clinics, although these have evolved differently. Supported by LIMS descriptions and lessons learned from seven mouse clinics, this review also shows that the unique LIMS environment in a particular facility strongly influences strategic LIMS decisions and LIMS development. As a major conclusion, this review states that there is no universal LIMS for the mouse research domain that fits all requirements. Still, empirically deduced general LIMS principles can serve as a master decision support template, which is provided as a hands-on tool for mouse research facilities looking for a LIMS.

  19. Recognizing Student Emotions Using Brainwaves and Mouse Behavior Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azcarraga, Judith; Suarez, Merlin Teodosia

    2013-01-01

    Brainwaves (EEG signals) and mouse behavior information are shown to be useful in predicting academic emotions, such as confidence, excitement, frustration and interest. Twenty five college students were asked to use the Aplusix math learning software while their brainwaves signals and mouse behavior (number of clicks, duration of each click,…

  20. Mouse Genome Database: From sequence to phenotypes and disease models

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Joel E.; Kadin, James A.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, www.informatics.jax.org) is the international scientific database for genetic, genomic, and biological data on the laboratory mouse to support the research requirements of the biomedical community. To accomplish this goal, MGD provides broad data coverage, serves as the authoritative standard for mouse nomenclature for genes, mutants, and strains, and curates and integrates many types of data from literature and electronic sources. Among the key data sets MGD supports are: the complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features, comparative homology data for mouse and vertebrate genes, the authoritative set of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for mouse gene functions, a comprehensive catalog of mouse mutations and their phenotypes, and a curated compendium of mouse models of human diseases. Here, we describe the data acquisition process, specifics about MGD's key data areas, methods to access and query MGD data, and outreach and user help facilities. genesis 53:458–473, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Genesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26150326

  1. Mouse Vocal Communication System: Are Ultrasounds Learned or Innate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arriaga, Gustavo; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) are often used as behavioral readouts of internal states, to measure effects of social and pharmacological manipulations, and for behavioral phenotyping of mouse models for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. However, little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms of rodent USV production.…

  2. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The biochemical.... Offspring are examined in the next generation for evidence that a new mutation has arisen. (3) Animal...

  3. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The biochemical.... Offspring are examined in the next generation for evidence that a new mutation has arisen. (3) Animal...

  4. Biological Basis of Differential Susceptibility to Hepatocarcinogenesis among Mouse Strains*

    PubMed Central

    Maronpot, Robert R.

    2009-01-01

    There is a vast amount of literature related to mouse liver tumorigenesis generated over the past 60 years, not all of which has been captured here. The studies reported in this literature have generally been state of the art at the time they were carried out. A PubMed search on the topic “mouse liver tumors” covering the past 10 years yields over 7000 scientific papers. This review address several important topics related to the unresolved controversy regarding the relevance of mouse liver tumor responses observed in cancer bioassays. The inherent mouse strain differential sensitivities to hepatocarcinogenesis largely parallel the strain susceptibility to chemically induced liver neoplasia. The effects of phenobarbital and halogenated hydrocarbons in mouse hepatocarcinogenesis have been summarized because of recurring interest and numerous publications on these topics. No single simple paradigm fully explains differential mouse strain responses, which can vary more than 50-fold among inbred strains. In addition to inherent genetics, modifying factors including cell cycle balance, enzyme induction, DNA methylation, oncogenes and suppressor genes, diet, and intercellular communication influence susceptibility to spontaneous and induced mouse hepatocarcinogenesis. Comments are offered on the evaluation, interpretation, and relevance of mouse liver tumor responses in the context of cancer bioassays. PMID:22271974

  5. Cloning and expression of mouse legumain, a lysosomal endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Dando, P M; Stevens, R A; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    1998-10-01

    Legumain, a recently discovered mammalian cysteine endopeptidase, was found in all mouse tissues examined, but was particularly abundant in kidney and placenta. The distribution in subcellular fractions of mouse and rat kidney showed a lysosomal localization, and activity was detectable only after the organelles were disrupted. Nevertheless, ratios of legumain activity to that of cathepsin B differed considerably between mouse tissues. cDNA encoding mouse legumain was cloned and sequenced, the deduced amino acid sequence proving to be 83% identical to that of the human protein [Chen, Dando, Rawlings, Brown, Young, Stevens, Hewitt, Watts and Barrett (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8090-8098]. Recombinant mouse legumain was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells by use of a vector containing a cytomegalovirus promoter. The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and found to be an asparagine-specific endopeptidase closely similar to naturally occurring pig kidney legumain.

  6. Cloning and expression of mouse legumain, a lysosomal endopeptidase.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J M; Dando, P M; Stevens, R A; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    1998-01-01

    Legumain, a recently discovered mammalian cysteine endopeptidase, was found in all mouse tissues examined, but was particularly abundant in kidney and placenta. The distribution in subcellular fractions of mouse and rat kidney showed a lysosomal localization, and activity was detectable only after the organelles were disrupted. Nevertheless, ratios of legumain activity to that of cathepsin B differed considerably between mouse tissues. cDNA encoding mouse legumain was cloned and sequenced, the deduced amino acid sequence proving to be 83% identical to that of the human protein [Chen, Dando, Rawlings, Brown, Young, Stevens, Hewitt, Watts and Barrett (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8090-8098]. Recombinant mouse legumain was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells by use of a vector containing a cytomegalovirus promoter. The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and found to be an asparagine-specific endopeptidase closely similar to naturally occurring pig kidney legumain. PMID:9742219

  7. Generation of transgenic mouse model using PTTG as an oncogene.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Sham S; Kakar, Cohin

    2015-01-01

    The close physiological similarity between the mouse and human has provided tools to understanding the biological function of particular genes in vivo by introduction or deletion of a gene of interest. Using a mouse as a model has provided a wealth of resources, knowledge, and technology, helping scientists to understand the biological functions, translocation, trafficking, and interaction of a candidate gene with other intracellular molecules, transcriptional regulation, posttranslational modification, and discovery of novel signaling pathways for a particular gene. Most importantly, the generation of the mouse model for a specific human disease has provided a powerful tool to understand the etiology of a disease and discovery of novel therapeutics. This chapter describes in detail the step-by-step generation of the transgenic mouse model, which can be helpful in guiding new investigators in developing successful models. For practical purposes, we will describe the generation of a mouse model using pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) as the candidate gene of interest.

  8. An imputed genotype resource for the laboratory mouse

    PubMed Central

    Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Beane, Glen L.; Ding, Yueming; Hutchins, Lucie; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; Churchill, Gary A.

    2009-01-01

    We have created a high-density SNP resource encompassing 7.87 million polymorphic loci across 49 inbred mouse strains of the laboratory mouse by combining data available from public databases and training a hidden Markov model to impute missing genotypes in the combined data. The strong linkage disequilibrium found in dense sets of SNP markers in the laboratory mouse provides the basis for accurate imputation. Using genotypes from eight independent SNP resources, we empirically validated the quality of the imputed genotypes and demonstrate that they are highly reliable for most inbred strains. The imputed SNP resource will be useful for studies of natural variation and complex traits. It will facilitate association study designs by providing high density SNP genotypes for large numbers of mouse strains. We anticipate that this resource will continue to evolve as new genotype data become available for laboratory mouse strains. The data are available for bulk download or query at http://cgd.jax.org/. PMID:18301946

  9. Mouse Models for Down Syndrome-Associated Developmental Cognitive Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunhong; Belichenko, Pavel V.; Zhang, Li; Fu, Dawei; Kleschevnikov, Alexander M.; Baldini, Antonio; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Mobley, William C.; Yu, Y. Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is mainly caused by the presence of an extra copy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) and is a leading genetic cause for developmental cognitive disabilities in humans. The mouse is a premier model organism for DS because the regions on Hsa21 are syntenically conserved with three regions in the mouse genome, which are located on mouse chromosome 10 (Mmu10), Mmu16 and Mmu17. With the advance of chromosomal manipulation technologies, new mouse mutants have been generated to mimic DS at both the genotypic and phenotypic levels. Further mouse-based molecular genetic studies in the future may lead to the unraveling of the mechanisms underlying DS-associated developmental cognitive disabilities, which would lay the groundwork for developing effective treatments for this phenotypic manifestation. In this review, we will discuss recent progress and future challenges in modeling DS-associated developmental cognitive disability in mice with an emphasis on hippocampus-related phenotypes. PMID:21865664

  10. Trb2, a mouse homolog of tribbles, is dispensable for kidney and mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Takasato, Minoru; Kobayashi, Chiyoko; Okabayashi, Koji; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Oshima, Naoko; Asashima, Makoto; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2008-09-05

    Glomeruli comprise an important filtering apparatus in the kidney and are derived from the metanephric mesenchyme. A nuclear protein, Sall1, is expressed in this mesenchyme, and we previously reported that Trb2, a mouse homolog of Drosophila tribbles, is expressed in the mesenchyme-derived tissues of the kidney by microarray analyses using Sall1-GFP knock-in mice. In the present report, we detected Trb2 expression in a variety of organs during gestation, including the kidneys, mesonephros, testes, heart, eyes, thymus, blood vessels, muscle, bones, tongue, spinal cord, and ganglions. In the developing kidney, Trb2 signals were detected in podocytes and the prospective mesangium of the glomeruli, as well as in ureteric bud tips. However, Trb2 mutant mice did not display any apparent phenotypes and no proteinuria was observed, indicating normal glomerular functions. These results suggest that Trb2 plays minimal roles during kidney and mouse development.

  11. Innovations in phenotyping of mouse models in the German Mouse Clinic.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Neschen, Susanne; Adler, Thure; Afonso, Luciana Caminha; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Bohla, Alexander; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cohrs, Christian; Dewert, Anna; Fridrich, Barbara; Garrett, Lillian; Glasl, Lisa; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Hurt, Anja; Janas, Eva; Janik, Dirk; Kahle, Melanie; Kistler, Martin; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Lengger, Christoph; Ludwig, Tonia; Maier, Holger; Marschall, Susan; Micklich, Kateryna; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Räss, Michael; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Scheerer, Markus; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Steinkamp, Ralph; Stöger, Claudia; Sun, Minxuan; Szymczak, Wilfried; Treise, Irina; Vargas Panesso, Ingrid Liliana; Vernaleken, Alexandra M; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolff-Muscate, Annemarie; Zeh, Ramona; Adamski, Jerzy; Beckers, Johannes; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H; Eickelberg, Oliver; Favor, Jack; Graw, Jochen; Höfler, Heinz; Höschen, Christoph; Katus, Hugo; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Neff, Frauke; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Stöger, Tobias; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Under the label of the German Mouse Clinic (GMC), a concept has been developed and implemented that allows the better understanding of human diseases on the pathophysiological and molecular level. This includes better understanding of the crosstalk between different organs, pleiotropy of genes, and the systemic impact of envirotypes and drugs. In the GMC, experts from various fields of mouse genetics and physiology, in close collaboration with clinicians, work side by side under one roof. The GMC is an open-access platform for the scientific community by providing phenotypic analysis in bilateral collaborations ("bottom-up projects") and as a partner and driver in international large-scale biology projects ("top-down projects"). Furthermore, technology development is a major topic in the GMC. Innovative techniques for primary and secondary screens are developed and implemented into the phenotyping pipelines (e.g., detection of volatile organic compounds, VOCs).

  12. Mouse intragastric infusion (iG) model

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Akiko; Lazaro, Raul; Wang, Ping-Yen; Higashiyama, Reiichi; Machida, Keigo; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Direct intragastric delivery of a diet, nutrient or test substance can be achieved in rodents (mice and rats) on a long-term (2–3 months) basis using a chronically implanted gastrostomy catheter and a flow-through swivel system. This rodent intragastric infusion (iG) model has broad applications in research on food intake, gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, GI neuroendocrinology, drug metabolism and toxicity, obesity and liver disease. It achieves maximal control over the rate and pattern of delivery and it can be combined with normal ad libitum feeding of solid diet if so desired. It may be adopted to achieve infusion at other sites of the GI system to test the role of a bypassed GI segment in neuroendocrine physiology, and its use in genetic mouse models facilitates the genetic analysis of a central question under investigation. PMID:22461066

  13. Chemical synthesis of mouse cripto CFC variants.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Daniela; Saporito, Angela; Ponticelli, Salvatore; Chambery, Angela; De Falco, Sandro; Pedone, Carlo; Minchiotti, Gabriella; Ruvo, Menotti

    2006-08-15

    We report for the first time the chemical synthesis of refolded CFC domain of mouse Cripto (mCFC) and of two variants bearing mutations on residues W107 and H104 involved in Alk4 binding. The domains undergo spontaneous and quantitative refolding in about 4 h, yet with very different kinetics. Disulfide linkages have been assessed by enzyme digestion and mass spectrometry analysis of resulting fragments, and the first experimental studies on structural organization have been conducted by circular dichroism spectroscopy under different pH conditions. Upon refolding, the domains considerably change their conformations, although they do not assume canonical structures, and become highly resistant to enzyme degradation. A comparative study of receptor binding shows that the CFC domain can bind Alk4 and confirms the importance of W107 and H104 for receptor recognition.

  14. Placental copper transport in the brindled mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Garnica, A.; Bates, J.

    1986-03-01

    Pregnant brindled (brin) mice were injected at 16 or 19 days gestation with 2 doses of CuCl/sub 2/ 6 mcg/g/dose, separated by 12 h, and sacrificed 6 h after the second. The copper conc. in placenta (P) and kidneys (K) of uninjected (UI) brin mice were higher than in UI controls, while conc. in liver (L) and fetal carcass (F) were lower. After injection (I), placental copper conc. increased while the carcass conc. remained unchanged. Brin mouse is a model for the human inborn error of copper metabolism, Menkes syndrome, which is characterized by signs of copper deficiency. These data indicate that metabolism of copper in brin fetus is abnormal, but depressed fetal copper levels cannot be corrected by acute copper dosing because of the sequestration of copper in placenta.

  15. Insights from Human/Mouse genome comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-03-30

    Large-scale public genomic sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of vertebrate sequence data poised to provide insights into mammalian biology. These include deep genomic sequence coverage of human, mouse, rat, zebrafish, and two pufferfish (Fugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis) (Aparicio et al. 2002; Lander et al. 2001; Venter et al. 2001; Waterston et al. 2002). In addition, a high-priority has been placed on determining the genomic sequence of chimpanzee, dog, cow, frog, and chicken (Boguski 2002). While only recently available, whole genome sequence data have provided the unique opportunity to globally compare complete genome contents. Furthermore, the shared evolutionary ancestry of vertebrate species has allowed the development of comparative genomic approaches to identify ancient conserved sequences with functionality. Accordingly, this review focuses on the initial comparison of available mammalian genomes and describes various insights derived from such analysis.

  16. Mouse Models of Neurofibromatosis 1 and 21

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, David H; Giovannini, Marco

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The neurofibromatoses represent two of the most common inherited tumor predisposition syndromes affecting the nervous system. Individuals with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) are prone to the development of astrocytomas and peripheral nerve sheath tumors whereas those affected with neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) develop schwannomas and meningiomas. The development of traditional homozygous knockout mice has provided insights into the roles of the NF1 and NF2 genes during development and in differentiation, but has been less instructive regarding the contribution of NF1 and NF2 dysfunction to the pathogenesis of specific benign and malignant tumors. Recent progress employing novel mouse targeting strategies has begun to illuminate the roles of the NF1 and NF2 gene products in the molecular pathogenesis of NF-associated tumors. PMID:12082543

  17. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-03-20

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  18. Photobiomodulation of early mouse embryo development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviridova-Chailakhyan, T. A.; Fakhranurova, L. I.; Simonova, N. B.; Khramov, R. N.; Manokhin, A. A.; Paskevich, S. I.; Chailakhyan, L. M.

    2008-04-01

    The effect of artificial sunlight (AS) from a xenon source and of converted AS with an additional orange-red luminescent (λ MAX=626 nm) component (AS+L) on the development of mouse zygotes was investigated. A plastic screen with a photoluminophore layer was used for production of this orange-red luminescent (L) component. A single short-term (15 min) exposure produced a long-term stable positive effect on early embryo development of mice, which persisted during several days. After exposure to AS+L, a stimulating influence on preimplantation development was observed, in comparison with the control group without AS exposure. The positive effects were as follows: increase in percent of embryos (P <= 0.05) developed to the blastocyst stage (96.2 %) with hatching from the zona pellucida (80.8 %) within 82-96 hours in vitro compared to the control (67.1 % and 28.8 %, respectively).

  19. HOST-PARASITE RELATIONS IN MOUSE TYPHOID

    PubMed Central

    Mackaness, G. B.; Blanden, R. V.; Collins, F. M.

    1966-01-01

    The development of acquired resistance to Salmonella typhimurium has been studied in mice infected intravenously with small numbers of streptomycin-sensitive or streptomycin-resistant organisms. By the 14th day of a primary infection the mouse develops a mechanism capable of destroying completely a super infecting dose of organisms, but is unable to eliminate organisms of the primary infection. The latter are constantly returned to the circulation from necrotic foci at the sites of implantation. Passive transfer of serum from actively infected or vaccinated animals, and immunization with heat-killed organisms, increase the capacity of the host to clear organisms from the blood, but do not interfere to any significant extent with their subsequent multiplication in the tissues. It is concluded that the resistance of actively infected animals depends on a nonhumoral mechanism capable of destroying organisms from endogenous or exogenous sources. PMID:5922285

  20. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model.

  1. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  2. Distribution of mitochondria in reconstructed mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Fulka, Helena

    2004-02-01

    It has been suggested that nucleus replacement (transfer) may be used as an efficient oocyte therapy in order to prevent transmission of mutated mitochondrial DNA from mother to offspring in humans. The essential and not yet answered question is how mitochondria surrounding the karyoplast will be distributed in the newly reconstructed oocytes. In our model experiments, we have evaluated the distribution of mitochondria in reconstructed immature mouse oocytes when germinal vesicle karyoplasts, with labeled mitochondria, were fused to unlabeled cytoplasts. The penetration of mitochondria from karyoplasts into cytoplasts can be detected almost immediately after the beginning of fusion. In immature reconstructed oocytes, mitochondria are first located in the oocyte center but they are homogeneously distributed within the whole cytoplasm before the completion of maturation. Fusion of oocytes at different stages of maturation suggests that the speed of mitochondria distribution is cell cycle dependent.

  3. Multiphoton microscopy of cleared mouse organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Sonia G.; Chia, Thomas H.; Zinter, Joseph P.; Levene, Michael J.

    2010-05-01

    Typical imaging depths with multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are limited to less than 300 μm in many tissues due to light scattering. Optical clearing significantly reduces light scattering by replacing water in the organ tissue with a fluid having a similar index of refraction to that of proteins. We demonstrate MPM of intact, fixed, cleared mouse organs with penetration depths and fields of view in excess of 2 mm. MPM enables the creation of large 3-D data sets with flexibility in pixel format and ready access to intrinsic fluorescence and second-harmonic generation. We present high-resolution images and 3-D image stacks of the brain, small intestine, large intestine, kidney, lung, and testicle with image sizes as large as 4096×4096 pixels.

  4. Quantitative Microinjection of Mouse Oocytes and Eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Douglas

    Quantitative microinjection is used to introduce known quantities of molecules or probes into single cells to examine cellular function. The relatively large mammalian oocyte or egg is easily manipulated and can be injected with impermeant reagents including a variety of signaling molecules and fluorescent probes. Techniques have been developed to inject picoliter quantities of solution into oocytes and eggs with precision and reliability. The methods described here outline the quantitative injection procedures as they are used to inject mouse oocytes and eggs in a culture dish on the stage on an inverted microscope. The techniques are applicable to the oocytes, eggs, and early embryos of most mammalian species. Included are some general instructions on fabrication of transfer pipettes, holding pipettes, beveled injection pipettes, and equipment for quantitative injection.

  5. Actin dynamics in mouse fibroblasts in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moes, Maarten J. A.; Bijvelt, Jose J.; Boonstra, Johannes

    2007-09-01

    After stimulating with the growth factor PDGF, cells exhibit abundant membrane ruffling and other morphological changes under normal gravity conditions. These morphological changes are largely determined by the actin microfilament system. Now these actin dynamics were studied under microgravity conditions in mouse fibroblasts during the DELTA mission. The aim of the present study was to describe the actin morphology in detail, to establish the effect of PDGF on actin morphology and to study the role of several actin-interacting proteins involved in introduced actin dynamics in microgravity. Identical experiments were conducted at 1G on earth as a reference. No results in microgravity were obtained due to a combination of malfunctioning hardware and unfulfilled temperature requirements.

  6. Molecular characterization of the mouse agouti locus.

    PubMed

    Bultman, S J; Michaud, E J; Woychik, R P

    1992-12-24

    The agouti (a) locus acts within the microenvironment of the hair follicle to regulate coat color pigmentation in the mouse. We have characterized a gene encoding a novel 131 amino acid protein that we propose is the one gene associated with the agouti locus. This gene is normally expressed in a manner consistent with a locus function, and, more importantly, its structure and expression are affected by a number of representative alleles in the agouti dominance hierarchy. In addition, we found that the pleiotropic effects associated with the lethal yellow (Ay) mutation, which include pronounced obesity, diabetes, and the development of neoplasms, are accompanied by deregulated overexpression of the agouti gene in numerous tissues of the adult animal.

  7. ACUTE HEPATITIS ASSOCIATED WITH MOUSE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, John B.

    1953-01-01

    The mortality rate for 80 Swiss weanlings infected with mouse hepatitis was 2.5 per cent in comparison with 98 per cent for 140 Princeton weanlings. In Swiss weanlings discrete lesions, which generally failed to progress, were observed in the liver from the 3rd through the 10th day after intraperitoneal injection. The causal virus was demonstrable in peritoneal washings through the 21st day and less regularly in the liver through the 14th day. It was also detectable in both loci after subcutaneous injection. Infant Swiss mice were susceptible through the 10th day of life, intraperitoneal injection being commonly followed by death. The pathogenicity and titer of the virus were significantly increased by successive passage in Swiss weanlings. The virus was detected in the blood of Swiss weanlings on subcutaneous injection only after it had been modified by passage. PMID:13109100

  8. An extended retinotopic map of mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jun; Ng, Lydia; Williams, Derric; Valley, Matthew; Li, Yang; Garrett, Marina; Waters, Jack

    2017-01-01

    Visual perception and behavior are mediated by cortical areas that have been distinguished using architectonic and retinotopic criteria. We employed fluorescence imaging and GCaMP6 reporter mice to generate retinotopic maps, revealing additional regions of retinotopic organization that extend into barrel and retrosplenial cortices. Aligning retinotopic maps to architectonic borders, we found a mismatch in border location, indicating that architectonic borders are not aligned with the retinotopic transition at the vertical meridian. We also assessed the representation of visual space within each region, finding that four visual areas bordering V1 (LM, P, PM and RL) display complementary representations, with overlap primarily at the central hemifield. Our results extend our understanding of the organization of mouse cortex to include up to 16 distinct retinotopically organized regions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18372.001 PMID:28059700

  9. The Mouse House: A brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947–2009

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Liane B.

    2013-10-01

    The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Lab is often re-membered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-Chromosome s importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a valuable

  10. The Mouse House: a brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947-2009.

    PubMed

    Russell, Liane B

    2013-01-01

    The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is often remembered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-chromosome's importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a

  11. Biology of Mouse Thymic Virus, a Herpesvirus of Mice, and the Antigenic Relationship to Mouse Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Cross, S. S.; Parker, J. C.; Rowe, W. P.; Robbins, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Mouse thymic virus (TA) is a herpesvirus which produces extensive necrosis of the thymus of newborn mice 7 to 14 days after infection. Infectious virus can be recovered from the thymus for only 10 days after infection, with highest titers occurring between days 5 and 7. In mice 5 days old or less, TA infects thymus cells and produces massive necrosis. TA also infects the salivary glands and persists as a chronic infection. Newborn mice infected with TA have no detectable humoral immune response. Infected adult mice respond, and humoral antibody is detected 7 days after infection. Titers are maintained for months thereafter. Regardless of the age of the mice inoculated with TA, persistent infection was established in the salivary glands, but no evidence for thymus involvement was observed when adults were infected. TA does not cross-react serologically by immunofluorescent, complement fixation, or virus neutralization tests with mouse cytomegalovirus; however, interestingly, the epidemiology of the two herpesviruses are similar. Both mouse cytomegalovirus and TA were isolated from the same animals in populations of laboratory and wild mice. Evidence of infection with mouse cytomegalovirus and TA were most apparent by virus isolations, since humoral antibody responses are rarely observed. All strains of mice tested were susceptible to TA infection. However, in some strains maximum necrosis occurred at 7 days, compared with 10 to 14 days for other strains. The difference in age susceptibility and the target tissue of thymus in newborn mice suggests that TA is a model herpesvirus for studying the effects of viral infections on humoral and cell-mediated immunological functions. Images PMID:231008

  12. Area map of mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanxin; Burkhalter, Andreas

    2007-05-20

    It is controversial whether mouse extrastriate cortex has a "simple" organization in which lateral primary visual cortex (V1) is adjoined by a single area V2 or has a "complex" organization, in which lateral V1 is adjoined by multiple distinct areas, all of which share the vertical meridian with V1. Resolving this issue is important for understanding the evolution and development of cortical arealization. We have used triple pathway tracing combined with receptive field recordings to map azimuth and elevation in the same brain and have referenced these maps against callosal landmarks. We found that V1 projects to 15 cortical fields. At least nine of these contain maps with complete and orderly representations of the entire visual hemifield and therefore represent distinct areas. One of these, PM, adjoins V1 at the medial border. Five areas, P, LM, AL, RL, and A, adjoin V1 on the lateral border, but only LM shares the vertical meridian representation with V1. This suggests that LM is homologous to V2 and that the lateral extrastriate areas do not represent modules within a single area V2. Thus, mouse visual cortex is "simple" in the sense that lateral V1 is adjoined by a single V2-like area, LM, and "complex" in having a string of areas in lateral extrastriate cortex, which receive direct V1 input. The results suggest that large numbers of areas with topologically equivalent maps of the visual field emerge early in evolution and that homologous areas are inherited in different mammalian lineages. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Blastocoel expansion in the preimplantation mouse embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Manejwala, F.M.

    1989-01-01

    Since cAMP can regulate fluid transport in many types of epithelia, the mechanism of fluid transport and the role of cAMP in the mouse blastocyst were examined. Results described here indicate an increase in the ability of mouse embryos to elevate cAMP levels in response to activators of adenylate cyclase, which is the enzyme that synthesizes cAMP, during the transition from morula to blastocyst. In addition, a positive correlation is observed between the increase in activatable adenylate cyclase and the presence of a blastocoel. Moreover, elevating intracellular cAMP in nascent cavitating embryos stimulates the rate of fluid transport in the blastocoel. Accumulation of fluid in the blastocoel is a function of the tight permeability seal around the embryo and the vectorial flow of ions into the blastocoel. Results reported here indicate that extracellular Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} are required for expansion of the blastocoel in nascent cavitating blastocysts. Sodium uptake into the embryo is carrier-mediated and probably occurs through multiple routes which include the Na{sup +}-channel and the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger. Chloride uptake is non-carrier mediated and may occur by a paracellular route. In addition, cAMP, which stimulates blastocoel expansion, also stimulates uptake of {sup 22}Na{sup +}. This effect may be mediated by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase, since inhibition of this enzyme inhibits both the cAMP-stimulated rate of blastocoel expansion and {sup 22}Na{sup +} uptake.

  14. Phoenixin: a candidate pruritogen in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Alan; Lyu, Rong-Ming; Chen, Yi-Hung; Dun, Siok Le; Chang, Jaw-Kang; Dun, Nae J.

    2015-01-01

    Phoenixin (PNX) is a 14-amino acid amidated peptide (PNX-14) or an N-terminal extended 20-residue amidated peptide (PNX-20) recently identified in neural and non-neural tissue. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a major peak corresponding to PNX-14, with negligible PNX-20, in mouse spinal cord extracts. Using a previously characterized antiserum that recognized both PNX-14 and PNX-20, PNX-immunoreactivity (irPNX) was detected in a population of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells and in cell processes densely distributed to the superficial layers of the dorsal horn; irPNX cell processes were also detected in the skin. The retrograde tracer, Fluorogold, injected subcutaneously (s.c.) to the back of the cervical and thoracic spinal cord of mice, labeled a population of DRG, some of which were also irPNX. PNX-14 (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg) injected s.c.to the nape of the neck provoked dose-dependent repetitive scratching bouts directed to the back of the neck with the hindpaws. The number of scratching bouts varied from 16–95 in 30 min, commencing within 5 min post-injection and lasted 10–15 min. Pretreatment of mice at −20 min with nalfurafine (20 µg/kg, s.c.), the kappa opioid receptor agonist, significantly reduced the number of bouts induced by PNX-14 (4 mg/kg) compared with that of saline-pretreated mice. Our results suggest that the peptide, PNX-14, serves as one of the endogenous signal molecules transducing itch sensation in the mouse. PMID:26415767

  15. Cardiac mouse lymphatics: developmental and anatomical update.

    PubMed

    Flaht-Zabost, Aleksandra; Gula, Grzegorz; Ciszek, Bogdan; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Jankowska-Steifer, Ewa; Madej, Maria; Niderla-Bielińska, Justyna; Radomska-Leśniewska, Dorota; Ratajska, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The adult mouse heart possesses an extensive lymphatic plexus draining predominantly the subepicardium and the outer layer of the myocardial wall. However, the development of this plexus has not been entirely explored, partially because of the lack of suitable methods for its visualization as well as prolonged lymphatic vessel formation that starts prenatally and proceeds during postnatal stages. Also, neither the course nor location of collecting vessels draining lymph from the mouse heart have been precisely characterized. In this article, we report that murine cardiac lymphatic plexus development that is limited prenatally only to the subepicardial area, postnatally proceeds from the subepicardium toward the myocardial wall with the base-to-apex gradient; this plexus eventually reaches the outer half of the myocardium with a predominant location around branches of coronary arteries and veins. Based on multiple marker immunostaining, the molecular marker-phenotype of cardiac lymphatic endothelial cells can be characterized as: Prox-1(+), Lyve-1(+), VEGFR3(+), Podoplanin(+), VEGFR2(+), CD144(+), Tie2(+), CD31(+), vWF(-), CD34(-), CD133(-). There are two major collecting vessels: one draining the right and left ventricles along the left conal vein and running upwards to the left side of the pulmonary trunk and further to the nearest lymph nodes (under the aortic arch and near the trachea), and the other one with its major branch running along the left cardiac vein and further on the surface of the coronary sinus and the left atrium to paratracheal lymph nodes. The extracardiac collectors gain the smooth muscle cell layer during late postnatal stages.

  16. A mouse model of mandibular osteotomy healing.

    PubMed

    Paccione, M F; Warren, S M; Spector, J A; Greenwald, J A; Bouletreau, P J; Longaker, M T

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a novel mouse model of membranous osteotomy healing. By applying this model to transgenic mice or using in situ hybridization techniques, we can subsequently investigate candidate genes that are believed to be important in membranous osteotomy healing. In the current study, 20 adult male CD-1 mice underwent a full-thickness osteotomy between the second and third molars of the right hemimandible using a 3-mm diamond disc and copious irrigation. Compo-Post pins were secured into the mandible, 2 mm anterior and posterior to the osteotomy. After the soft tissues were reapproximated and the skin was closed, an acrylic external fixator was attached to the exposed posts for stabilization. The animals were killed on postoperative day number 7, 10, 14, and 28 (n=5 animals per time point). The right hemimandibles were decalcified and embedded in paraffin for histologic evaluation or immunohistochemistry localizing osteocalcin. At 7 days after the osteotomy, early intramembranous bone formation could be seen extending from either edge of the osteotomized bone. By 10 days, an increasing number of small blood vessels could be seen within and around the osteotomy. At 14 days, the bone edges were in close approximation, and by 28 days the callus had been replaced by actively remodeling woven bone in all specimens examined. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that osteocalcin expression correlated temporally with the transition from a soft to a hard callus. Furthermore, osteocalcin was spatially confined to osteoblasts actively laying down new osteoid or remodeling bone. This study describes a novel mouse model of membranous osteotomy healing that can be used as a paradigm for future osteotomy healing studies investigating candidate genes critical for osteogenesis and successful bone repair.

  17. Phoenixin: A candidate pruritogen in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Cowan, A; Lyu, R-M; Chen, Y-H; Dun, S L; Chang, J-K; Dun, N J

    2015-12-03

    Phoenixin (PNX) is a 14-amino acid amidated peptide (PNX-14) or an N-terminal extended 20-residue amidated peptide (PNX-20) recently identified in neural and non-neural tissue. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a major peak corresponding to PNX-14, with negligible PNX-20, in mouse spinal cord extracts. Using a previously characterized antiserum that recognized both PNX-14 and PNX-20, PNX-immunoreactivity (irPNX) was detected in a population of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells and in cell processes densely distributed to the superficial layers of the dorsal horn; irPNX cell processes were also detected in the skin. The retrograde tracer, Fluorogold, injected subcutaneously (s.c.) to the back of the cervical and thoracic spinal cord of mice, labeled a population of DRG, some of which were also irPNX. PNX-14 (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg) injected s.c.to the nape of the neck provoked dose-dependent repetitive scratching bouts directed to the back of the neck with the hindpaws. The number of scratching bouts varied from 16 to 95 in 30 min, commencing within 5 min post-injection and lasted 10-15 min. Pretreatment of mice at -20 min with nalfurafine (20 μg/kg, s.c.), the kappa opioid receptor agonist, significantly reduced the number of bouts induced by PNX-14 (4 mg/kg) compared with that of saline-pretreated mice. Our results suggest that the peptide, PNX-14, serves as one of the endogenous signal molecules transducing itch sensation in the mouse.

  18. The functional landscape of mouse gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Morris, Quaid D; Chang, Richard; Shai, Ofer; Bakowski, Malina A; Mitsakakis, Nicholas; Mohammad, Naveed; Robinson, Mark D; Zirngibl, Ralph; Somogyi, Eszter; Laurin, Nancy; Eftekharpour, Eftekhar; Sat, Eric; Grigull, Jörg; Pan, Qun; Peng, Wen-Tao; Krogan, Nevan; Greenblatt, Jack; Fehlings, Michael; van der Kooy, Derek; Aubin, Jane; Bruneau, Benoit G; Rossant, Janet; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Frey, Brendan J; Hughes, Timothy R

    2004-01-01

    Background Large-scale quantitative analysis of transcriptional co-expression has been used to dissect regulatory networks and to predict the functions of new genes discovered by genome sequencing in model organisms such as yeast. Although the idea that tissue-specific expression is indicative of gene function in mammals is widely accepted, it has not been objectively tested nor compared with the related but distinct strategy of correlating gene co-expression as a means to predict gene function. Results We generated microarray expression data for nearly 40,000 known and predicted mRNAs in 55 mouse tissues, using custom-built oligonucleotide arrays. We show that quantitative transcriptional co-expression is a powerful predictor of gene function. Hundreds of functional categories, as defined by Gene Ontology 'Biological Processes', are associated with characteristic expression patterns across all tissues, including categories that bear no overt relationship to the tissue of origin. In contrast, simple tissue-specific restriction of expression is a poor predictor of which genes are in which functional categories. As an example, the highly conserved mouse gene PWP1 is widely expressed across different tissues but is co-expressed with many RNA-processing genes; we show that the uncharacterized yeast homolog of PWP1 is required for rRNA biogenesis. Conclusions We conclude that 'functional genomics' strategies based on quantitative transcriptional co-expression will be as fruitful in mammals as they have been in simpler organisms, and that transcriptional control of mammalian physiology is more modular than is generally appreciated. Our data and analyses provide a public resource for mammalian functional genomics. PMID:15588312

  19. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  20. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T.

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed—for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants’ responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants’ performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse’s approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks. PMID:27199881

  1. Leptin targets in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael M; Lachey, Jennifer L; Sternson, Scott M; Lee, Charlotte E; Elias, Carol F; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Elmquist, Joel K

    2009-06-10

    The central actions of leptin are essential for homeostatic control of adipose tissue mass, glucose metabolism, and many autonomic and neuroendocrine systems. In the brain, leptin acts on numerous different cell types via the long-form leptin receptor (LepRb) to elicit its effects. The precise identification of leptin's cellular targets is fundamental to understanding the mechanism of its pleiotropic central actions. We have systematically characterized LepRb distribution in the mouse brain using in situ hybridization in wildtype mice as well as by EYFP immunoreactivity in a novel LepRb-IRES-Cre EYFP reporter mouse line showing high levels of LepRb mRNA/EYFP coexpression. We found substantial LepRb mRNA and EYFP expression in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic sites described before, including the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, ventral premammillary nucleus, ventral tegmental area, parabrachial nucleus, and the dorsal vagal complex. Expression in insular cortex, lateral septal nucleus, medial preoptic area, rostral linear nucleus, and in the Edinger-Westphal nucleus was also observed and had been previously unreported. The LepRb-IRES-Cre reporter line was used to chemically characterize a population of leptin receptor-expressing neurons in the midbrain. Tyrosine hydroxylase and Cre reporter were found to be coexpressed in the ventral tegmental area and in other midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Lastly, the LepRb-IRES-Cre reporter line was used to map the extent of peripheral leptin sensing by central nervous system (CNS) LepRb neurons. Thus, we provide data supporting the use of the LepRb-IRES-Cre line for the assessment of the anatomic and functional characteristics of neurons expressing leptin receptor.

  2. Reliability of soiled bedding transfer for detection of mouse parvovirus and mouse hepatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter C; Nucifora, Michelle; Reuter, Jon D; Compton, Susan R

    2007-02-01

    Serologic monitoring of sentinel mice exposed to soiled bedding is a common method of detecting viral infections in mice. Because bedding transfer protocols vary, the sensitivity of this method has not been documented sufficiently. We examined the reliability of bedding transfer during various stages of infection with mouse parvovirus (MPV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV). Most mice exposed to bedding contaminated with MPV 0, 3, or 7 d previously seroconverted, whereas only mice exposed to bedding contaminated with MHV 4 h previously seroconverted, thus confirming the differing stabilities of these viruses. Index mice were inoculated with 30 times the infectious dose 50 (ID50) of MPV or 300 ID50 of MHV. At 3 d, 1 wk, and 2 wk postinoculation (PI), we transferred 25, 50, or 100 ml of bedding to cages of sentinel mice. Viral infection and shedding by index mice was confirmed by serology and fecal polymerase chain reaction assay. Transfer of soiled bedding between mice in static cages induced seroconversion of sentinel mice most reliably during peak viral shedding (1 wk PI for MPV and 3 d PI for MHV). Soiled bedding transfer between mice in individually ventilated cages induced a higher prevalence of sentinel seroconversion to MPV and MHV than that after transfer between mice in static cages. Our findings indicate that although soiled bedding transfer is an effective method for detecting MHV and MPV under optimal conditions, the method is less than 100% reliable under many conditions in contemporary mouse facilities.

  3. A pilot study comparing mouse and mouse-emulating interface devices for graphic input.

    PubMed

    Kanny, E M; Anson, D K

    1991-01-01

    Adaptive interface devices make it possible for individuals with physical disabilities to use microcomputers and thus perform many tasks that they would otherwise be unable to accomplish. Special equipment is available that purports to allow functional access to the computer for users with disabilities. As technology moves from purely keyboard applications to include graphic input, it will be necessary for assistive interface devices to support graphics as well as text entry. Headpointing systems that emulate the mouse in combination with on-screen keyboards are of particular interest to persons with severe physical impairment such as high level quadriplegia. Two such systems currently on the market are the HeadMaster and the Free Wheel. The authors have conducted a pilot study comparing graphic input speed using the mouse and two headpointing interface systems on the Macintosh computer. The study used a single subject design with six able-bodied subjects, to establish a baseline for comparison with persons with severe disabilities. Results of these preliminary data indicated that the HeadMaster was nearly as effective as the mouse and that it was superior to the Free Wheel for graphics input. This pilot study, however, demonstrated several experimental design problems that need to be addressed to make the study more robust. It also demonstrated the need to include the evaluation of text input so that the effectiveness of the interface devices with text and graphic input could be compared.

  4. Characterization of the Mouse Pancreatic Islet Proteome and Comparative Analysis with Other Mouse Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Hinault, Charlotte; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Singhal, Mudita; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans, and especially the insulin-producing beta cells, play a central role in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Alterations in the expression of multiple proteins in the islets that contribute to the maintenance of islet function are likely to underlie the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. To identify proteins that constitute the islet proteome, we provide the first comprehensive proteomic characterization of pancreatic islets for mouse, the most commonly used animal model in diabetes research. Using strong cation exchange fractionation coupled with reversed phase LC-MS/MS we report the confident identification of 17,350 different tryptic peptides covering 2,612 proteins having at least two unique peptides per protein. The dataset also identified ~60 post-translationally modified peptides including oxidative modifications and phosphorylation. While many of the identified phosphorylation sites corroborate those previously known, the oxidative modifications observed on cysteinyl residues reveal potentially novel information suggesting a role for oxidative stress in islet function. Comparative analysis with 15 available proteomic datasets from other mouse tissues and cells revealed a set of 133 proteins predominantly expressed in pancreatic islets. This unique set of proteins, in addition to those with known functions such as peptide hormones secreted from the islets, contains several proteins with as yet unknown functions. The mouse islet protein and peptide database accessible at http://ncrr.pnl.gov, provides an important reference resource for the research community to facilitate research in the diabetes and metabolism fields. PMID:18570455

  5. Transplanting mouse induced pluripotent stem cells into mouse otocysts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroki; Minoda, Ryosei; Miwa, Toru; Yamada, Takao; Ise, Momoko

    2017-03-27

    The otocyst is an attractive target for studying treatment strategies for genetic hearing loss and for understanding inner ear development. We have previously reported that trans-uterine supplemental gene therapy in vivo into the otocysts of mice, which had a loss of function mutation in a causative gene of deafness, was able to prevent putative hearing loss. We herein set out to clarify the feasibility of allogenic cell transplantation into the mouse otocysts in vivo. We transplanted naive mouse-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (miPSCs) into the otocysts of wild type mice or connexin (Cx) 30 deficient mice, at embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5). The transplanted m-iPSCs survived in the lumens of the inner ears at E13.5 and E15.5 in wild type mice. In the Cx30 deficient mouse, the transplanted cells survived similarly, with some of the transplanted cells migrating into the lining cells of the lumens of the inner ears at E13.5 and showing tumorigenic cell proliferation at E15.5. In addition, engrafted cells appear to be able to differentiate after the cell transplantation. Our results suggest that otocyst transplanted cells survived and differentiated. A Cx30 deficiency may facilitate cell migration. These findings may offer some hope for cell transplantation therapy for profound genetic hearing loss caused by a Cxs deficiency.

  6. OCT angiography in the mouse: A novel evaluation method for vascular pathologies of the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Alnawaiseh, Maged; Rosentreter, André; Hillmann, Anja; Alex, Anne F; Niekämper, Daniel; Heiduschka, Peter; Pap, Thomas; Eter, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the application of optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography in the retinas of healthy mice and to evaluate choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in a mouse model of laser-induced CNV. C57BL/6J mice aged 18-25 weeks were examined using the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography device RTVue XR Avanti (Optovue, Inc, Fremont, California, USA). Blood flow in different retinal layers was detected using the split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography algorithm. Fluorescein angiography (FA) images were obtained using the Heidelberg Spectralis device (Heidelberg, Germany). Using the RTVue XR Avanti, we were able to obtain high-quality OCT angiography images of normal vasculature in the superficial, deep capillary and choriocapillary layers in laser-treated mice and untreated controls. Whereas no blood flow was detectable in the outer retina of untreated mice, blood flow and hence neovascular vessels were found in laser-treated mice. OCT angiography can clearly visualize the normal vascular plexus in the different retinal layers in the mouse retina and choroid. With OCT angiography, it is possible to verify the choroidal neovascularization induced by laser treatment. Thus, OCT angiography is a helpful imaging tool for non-invasive, in vivo evaluation of laser-induced CNV in the mouse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biological activity of the bryostatin analog Merle 23 on mouse epidermal cells and mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, Jessica S; Cataisson, Christophe; Chen, Jinqiu; Herrmann, Michelle A; Petersen, Mark E; Baumann, David O; McGowan, Kevin M; Yuspa, Stuart H; Keck, Gary E; Blumberg, Peter M

    2016-12-01

    Bryostatin 1, a complex macrocyclic lactone, is the subject of multiple clinical trials for cancer chemotherapy. Although bryostatin 1 biochemically functions like the classic mouse skin tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to bind to and activate protein kinase C, paradoxically, it fails to induce many of the typical phorbol ester responses, including tumor promotion. Intense synthetic efforts are currently underway to develop simplified bryostatin analogs that preserve the critical functional features of bryostatin 1, including its lack of tumor promoting activity. The degree to which bryostatin analogs maintain the unique pattern of biological behavior of bryostatin 1 depends on the specific cellular system and the specific response. Merle 23 is a significantly simplified bryostatin analog that retains bryostatin like activity only to a limited extent. Here, we show that in mouse epidermal cells the activity of Merle 23 was either similar to bryostatin 1 or intermediate between bryostatin 1 and PMA, depending on the specific parameter examined. We then examined the hyperplastic and tumor promoting activity of Merle 23 on mouse skin. Merle 23 showed substantially reduced hyperplasia and was not tumor promoting at a dose comparable to that for PMA. These results suggest that there may be substantial flexibility in the design of bryostatin analogs that retain its lack of tumor promoting activity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Development of mouse models for analysis of human virus infections.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Hiromi; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Shingai, Masashi; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2017-04-01

    Viruses usually exhibit strict species-specificity as a result of co-evolution with the host. Thus, in mouse models, a great barrier exists for analysis of infections with human-tropic viruses. Mouse models are unlikely to faithfully reproduce the human immune response to viruses or viral compounds and it is difficult to evaluate human therapeutic efficacy with antiviral reagents in mouse models. Humans and mice essentially have different immune systems, which makes it difficult to extrapolate mouse results to humans. In addition, apart from immunological reasons, viruses causing human diseases do not always infect mice because of species tropism. One way to determine tropism would be a virus receptor that is expressed on affected cells. The development of gene-disrupted mice and Tg mice, which express human receptor genes, enables us to analyze several viral infections in mice. Mice are, indeed, susceptible to human viruses when artificially infected in receptor-supplemented mice. Although the mouse cells less efficiently permit viral replication than do human cells, the models for analysis of human viruses have been established in vivo as well as in vitro, and explain viral pathogenesis in the mouse systems. In most systems, however, nucleic acid sensors and type I interferon suppress viral propagation to block the appearance of infectious manifestation. We herein review recent insight into in vivo antiviral responses induced in mouse infection models for typical human viruses. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Chromosomal localization of the human and mouse hyaluronan synthase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A.; Seldin, M.F.

    1997-05-01

    We have recently identified a new vertebrate gene family encoding putative hyaluronan (HA) synthases. Three highly conserved related genes have been identified, designated HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3 in humans and Has1, Has2, and Has3 in the mouse. All three genes encode predicted plasma membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane domains and approximately 25% amino acid sequence identity to the Streptococcus pyogenes HA synthase, HasA. Furthermore, expression of any one HAS gene in transfected mammalian cells leads to high levels of HA biosynthesis. We now report the chromosomal localization of the three HAS genes in human and in mouse. The genes localized to three different positions within both the human and the mouse genomes. HAS1 was localized to the human chromosome 19q13.3-q13.4 boundary and Has1 to mouse Chr 17. HAS2 was localized to human chromosome 8q24.12 and Has2 to mouse Chr 15. HAS3 was localized to human chromosome 16q22.1 and Has3 to mouse Chr 8. The map position for HAS1 reinforces the recently reported relationship between a small region of human chromosome 19q and proximal mouse chromosome 17. HAS2 mapped outside the predicted critical region delineated for the Langer-Giedion syndrome and can thus be excluded as a candidate gene for this genetic syndrome. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Comparative stereology of the mouse and finch left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Bossen, E H; Sommer, J R; Waugh, R A

    1978-01-01

    The volume fractions and surface per unit cell volume of some subcellular components of the left ventricles of the finch and mouse were quantitated by stereologic techniques. These species were chosen for study because they have similar heart rates but differ morphologically in some respects: fiber diameter is larger in the mouse; the mouse has transverse tubules while the finch does not; and the finch has a form of junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (JSR), extended JSR (EJSR), located in the cell interior with no direct plasmalemmal contact, while the mouse interior JSR (IJSR) abuts on transverse tubules. Our data show that the volume fraction (Vv) and surface area per unit cell volume (Sv) of total SR, and free SR (FSR) are similar. The volume fractions of mitochondria, myofibrils, and total junctional SR were also similar. The Sv of the cell surface of the finch was similar to the Sv of the cell surface of the mouse (Sv-plasmalemma plus Sv of the transverse tubules). The principal difference was in the distribution of JSR; the mouse peripheral JSR (PJSR) represents only 9% of the total JSR, while the finch PJSR accounts for 24% of the bird's JSR. The similar volume fractions of total junctional SR (PJSR + EJSR in the finch; PJSR + IJSR in the mouse) suggest that the EJSR is not an embryologic remnant, and raises the possibility that some function of JSR is independent of plasmalemmal contact.

  11. The spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) completes nephrogenesis before birth.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Hayley; Walker, David W; Cullen-McEwen, Luise; Wintour, E Marelyn; Moritz, Karen

    2005-08-01

    The spiny mouse is relatively mature at birth. We hypothesized that like other organs, the kidney may be more developed in the spiny mouse at birth, than in other rodents. If nephrogenesis is complete before birth, the spiny mouse may provide an excellent model with which to study the effects of an altered intrauterine environment on renal development. Due to its desert adaptation, the spiny mouse may have a reduced cortex-to-medulla ratio but an equivalent total nephron number to the C57/BL mouse. Kidneys were collected from fetal and neonatal spiny mice and sectioned for gross examination of metanephric development. Kidneys were collected from adult spiny mice (10 wk of age), and glomerular number, volume, and cortex-to-medulla ratios were determined using unbiased stereology. Nephrogenesis is complete in spiny mouse kidneys before birth. Metanephrogenesis begins at approximately day 18, and by day 38 of a 40-day gestation, the nephrogenic zone is no longer present. Spiny mice have a significantly (P < 0.001) lower total nephron number compared with C57/BL mice, although the total glomerular volume is similar. The cortex-to-medulla ratio of the spiny mouse is significantly (P < 0.01) smaller. The spiny mouse is the first rodent species shown to complete nephrogenesis before birth. This makes it an attractive candidate for the study of fetal and neonatal kidney development and function. The reduced total nephron number and cortex-to-medulla ratio in the spiny mouse may contribute to its ability to highly concentrate its urine under stressful conditions (i.e., dehydration).

  12. Sequence, molecular properties, and chromosomal mapping of mouse lumican

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Hevelone, N. D.; Stech, M. E.; Justice, M. J.; Liu, C. Y.; Kao, W. W.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE. Lumican is a major proteoglycan of vertebrate cornea. This study characterizes mouse lumican, its molecular form, cDNA sequence, and chromosomal localization. METHODS. Lumican sequence was determined from cDNA clones selected from a mouse corneal cDNA expression library using a bovine lumican cDNA probe. Tissue expression and size of lumican mRNA were determined using Northern hybridization. Glycosidase digestion followed by Western blot analysis provided characterization of molecular properties of purified mouse corneal lumican. Chromosomal mapping of the lumican gene (Lcn) used Southern hybridization of a panel of genomic DNAs from an interspecific murine backcross. RESULTS. Mouse lumican is a 338-amino acid protein with high-sequence identity to bovine and chicken lumican proteins. The N-terminus of the lumican protein contains consensus sequences for tyrosine sulfation. A 1.9-kb lumican mRNA is present in cornea and several other tissues. Antibody against bovine lumican reacted with recombinant mouse lumican expressed in Escherichia coli and also detected high molecular weight proteoglycans in extracts of mouse cornea. Keratanase digestion of corneal proteoglycans released lumican protein, demonstrating the presence of sulfated keratan sulfate chains on mouse corneal lumican in vivo. The lumican gene (Lcn) was mapped to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10. The Lcn map site is in the region of a previously identified developmental mutant, eye blebs, affecting corneal morphology. CONCLUSIONS. This study demonstrates sulfated keratan sulfate proteoglycan in mouse cornea and describes the tools (antibodies and cDNA) necessary to investigate the functional role of this important corneal molecule using naturally occurring and induced mutants of the murine lumican gene.

  13. Sequence, molecular properties, and chromosomal mapping of mouse lumican

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Hevelone, N. D.; Stech, M. E.; Justice, M. J.; Liu, C. Y.; Kao, W. W.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE. Lumican is a major proteoglycan of vertebrate cornea. This study characterizes mouse lumican, its molecular form, cDNA sequence, and chromosomal localization. METHODS. Lumican sequence was determined from cDNA clones selected from a mouse corneal cDNA expression library using a bovine lumican cDNA probe. Tissue expression and size of lumican mRNA were determined using Northern hybridization. Glycosidase digestion followed by Western blot analysis provided characterization of molecular properties of purified mouse corneal lumican. Chromosomal mapping of the lumican gene (Lcn) used Southern hybridization of a panel of genomic DNAs from an interspecific murine backcross. RESULTS. Mouse lumican is a 338-amino acid protein with high-sequence identity to bovine and chicken lumican proteins. The N-terminus of the lumican protein contains consensus sequences for tyrosine sulfation. A 1.9-kb lumican mRNA is present in cornea and several other tissues. Antibody against bovine lumican reacted with recombinant mouse lumican expressed in Escherichia coli and also detected high molecular weight proteoglycans in extracts of mouse cornea. Keratanase digestion of corneal proteoglycans released lumican protein, demonstrating the presence of sulfated keratan sulfate chains on mouse corneal lumican in vivo. The lumican gene (Lcn) was mapped to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10. The Lcn map site is in the region of a previously identified developmental mutant, eye blebs, affecting corneal morphology. CONCLUSIONS. This study demonstrates sulfated keratan sulfate proteoglycan in mouse cornea and describes the tools (antibodies and cDNA) necessary to investigate the functional role of this important corneal molecule using naturally occurring and induced mutants of the murine lumican gene.

  14. Meeting Report: The Twelfth International Mouse Genome Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Manolakou, Katerina; Cross, Sally H.; Simpson, Eleanor H.; Jackson, Ian J.

    1998-10-01

    The annual International Mouse Genome Conference (IMGC) is where, scientifically speaking, classical mouse genetics meets the relative newcomer of genomics. The 12th meeting took place last October in the delightful Bavarian village of Garmisch-Partenkirchen, and we were greeted by the sight on the mountains of the first snowfall of the season. However the discussions left little time for exploration. Minds of participants in Garmisch were focused by a recent document produced by the NIH and by discussions within other funding agencies worldwide. If implemented, the proposals will further enhance the status of the mouse as the principal model for study of the function of the human genome.

  15. Mouse Models in Bone Marrow Transplantation and Adoptive Cellular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Arber, Caroline; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Reddy, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models of transplantation have been indispensable to the development of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Their role in the generation of basic science knowledge is invaluable and is subject to discussion below. However, this article focuses on the direct role and relevance of mouse models towards the clinical development and advances in BMT and adoptive T-cell therapy for human diseases. The authors aim to present a thoughtful perspective on the pros and cons of mouse models while noting that despite imperfections these models are obligatory for the development of science-based medicine. PMID:24216170

  16. Carbon-13 and proton magnetic resonance of mouse muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, B M

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that roughly 4 mmol carbon atoms/g mouse muscle can give rise to a "high resolution" 13C NMR spectrum. From the 13C spectrum, it is estimated that the protons from mobile organic molecules or molecular segments amount to 6-8%of total nonrigid protons (organic plus water) in muscle. Their spin-spin relaxation times (T2) are of the order of 0.4-2 ms. At 37 degrees C, the proton spin-echo decay of mouse muscle changes rapidly with time after death, while that of mouse brain does not. PMID:890043

  17. Isolation and manipulation of mouse trophoblast stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Koji; Himeno, Emi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kunath, Tilo

    2015-02-02

    The isolation of stable trophoblast stem (TS) cell lines from early mouse embryos has provided a useful cell culture model to study trophoblast development. TS cells are derived from pre-implantation blastocysts or from the extraembryonic ectoderm of early post-implantation embryos. The derivation and maintenance of mouse TS cells is dependent upon continuous fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. Gene expression analysis, differentiation in culture, and chimera formation show that TS cells accurately model the mouse trophoblast lineage. This unit describes how to derive, maintain, and manipulate TS cells, including DNA transfection and chimera formation.

  18. Mouse embryos' fusion for the tetraploid complementation assay.

    PubMed

    Gertsenstein, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Production of the germline-competent chimeras using genetically modified ES cell lines is an essential step in the establishment of novel mouse models. In addition chimeras provide a powerful tool to study the cell lineage and to analyze complex phenotypes of mutant mice. Mouse chimeras with tetraploid embryos are used to rescue extraembryonic defects, to analyze an impact of gene function on specific lineage, to study the interaction between embryonic and extraembryonic tissues, and to produce mutant embryos and mice for the phenotype analysis. Tetraploid embryos are generated by the fusion of two blastomeres of the mouse embryo. The applications of tetraploid complementation assay and the protocol are described below.

  19. The atlas of mouse development eHistology resource.

    PubMed

    Graham, Elizabeth; Moss, Julie; Burton, Nick; Roochun, Yogmatee; Armit, Chris; Richardson, Lorna; Baldock, Richard

    2015-06-01

    The Atlas of Mouse Development by Professor Mathew Kaufman is an essential text for understanding mouse developmental anatomy. This definitive and authoritative atlas is still in production and is essential for any biologist working with the mouse embryo, although the last revision dates back to 1994. Here, we announce the eHistology online resource that provides free access to high-resolution colour images digitized from the original histological sections (www.emouseatlas.org/emap/eHistology/index.php) used by Kaufman for the Atlas. The images are provided with the original annotations and plate numbering of the paper atlas and enable viewing the material to cellular resolution.

  20. Mouse Models for Studying the Formation and Propagation of Prions*

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Joel C.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2014-01-01

    Prions are self-propagating protein conformers that cause a variety of neurodegenerative disorders in humans and animals. Mouse models have played key roles in deciphering the biology of prions and in assessing candidate therapeutics. The development of transgenic mice that form prions spontaneously in the brain has advanced our understanding of sporadic and genetic prion diseases. Furthermore, the realization that many proteins can become prions has necessitated the development of mouse models for assessing the potential transmissibility of common neurodegenerative diseases. As the universe of prion diseases continues to expand, mouse models will remain crucial for interrogating these devastating illnesses. PMID:24860095

  1. Generation of targeted mouse mutants by embryo microinjection of TALENs.

    PubMed

    Wefers, Benedikt; Ortiz, Oskar; Wurst, Wolfgang; Kühn, Ralf

    2014-08-15

    Gene engineering for generating targeted mouse mutants is a key technology for biomedical research. Using TALENs as nucleases to induce targeted double-strand breaks, the mouse genome can be directly modified in zygotes in a single step, without the need for embryonic stem cells. Thereby, knockout and knockin alleles can be generated fast and efficiently by embryo microinjection of TALEN mRNAs and targeting vectors. In this article we present an introduction into the TALEN technology and provide protocols for the application of TALENs in mouse zygotes.

  2. Mouse models of rhinovirus infection and airways disease.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Nathan W; Singanayagam, Aran; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models are invaluable tools for gaining insight into host immunity during virus infection. Until recently, no practical mouse model for rhinovirus infection was available. Development of infection models was complicated by the existence of distinct groups of viruses that utilize different host cell surface proteins for binding and entry. Here, we describe mouse infection models, including virus purification and measurement of host immune responses, for representative viruses from two of these groups: (1) infection of unmodified Balb/c mice with minor group rhinovirus serotype 1B (RV-1B) and (2) infection of transgenic Balb/c mice with major group rhinovirus serotype 16 (RV-16).

  3. Energy harvesting from mouse click of robot finger using piezoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Youngsu; Hong, Jin; Lee, Jaemin; Park, Jung-Min; Kim, Keehoon

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of energy harvesting from the mouse click motion using a piezoelectric energy transducer. Specifically, we use a robotic finger to realize repeatable mouse click motion. The robotic finger wears a glove with a pocket for including the piezoelectric material as an energy transducer. We propose a model for the energy harvesting system through the inverse kinematic framework of parallel joints in the finger and the electromechanical coupling equations of the piezoelectric material. Experiments are performed to elucidate the effect of the load resistance and the mouse click motion on energy harvesting.

  4. Virtual simulation of mouse anatomy and procedural techniques.

    PubMed

    Stredney, Don; Hittle, Bradley; Chen, Chun-Ming; Kerwin, Thomas; Bratasz, Anna; Manivannan, Niranchana; Powell, Kimerly

    2012-01-01

    Translational science requires the use of mouse models for the characterization of disease and evaluation of treatment therapies. However, often there is a lack of comprehensive training for scientists in the systemic and regional anatomy of the mouse that limits their ability to perform studies involving complex interventional procedures. We present our methodologies for the development, evaluation, and dissemination of an interactive 3D mouse atlas that includes designs for presenting emulation of procedural technique. We present the novel integration of super-resolution imaging techniques, depth-of-field interactive volume rendering of large data, and the seamless delivery of remote visualization and interaction to thin clients.

  5. The mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus disease.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the species of choice for most immunological studies, ranging from simple vaccine testing to the intricate dissection of fundamental immunopathogenic mechanisms. Although not fully mouse adapted, some strains of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) replicate in the murine respiratory tract and induce specific T and B cell responses. Passive transfer of neutralising antibody is protective and assist in viral clearance. In addition, many of RSV's complex behaviours are recapitulated in the mouse (including enhancement of disease by vaccination and delayed effects of neonatal infection). However, human studies remain essential to confirm or refute predictions from animal models.

  6. Estimating relative bioavailability of soil lead in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Bradham, Karen D; Green, William; Hayes, Hunter; Nelson, Clay; Alava, Pradeep; Misenheimer, John; Diamond, Gary L; Thayer, William C; Thomas, David J

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) in soil is an important exposure source for children. Thus, determining bioavailability of Pb in soil is critical in evaluating risk and selecting appropriate strategies to minimize exposure. A mouse model was developed to estimate relative bioavailability of Pb in NIST SRM 2710a (Montana 1 Soil). Based on Pb levels in tissues, the mean relative bioavailability of this metal in this soil was 0.5. Estimates of relative bioavailabilities derived from mouse compared favorably with those obtained in juvenile swine. The mouse model is thus an efficient and inexpensive method to obtain estimates of relative bioavailability of soil Pb.

  7. Rats and mice immunised with chimeric human/mouse proteinase 3 produce autoantibodies to mouse Pr3 and rat granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    van der Geld, Ymke M; Hellmark, Thomas; Selga, Daina; Heeringa, Peter; Huitema, Minke G; Limburg, Pieter C; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2007-01-01

    Aim In this study, we employed chimeric human/mouse Proteinase 3 (PR3) proteins as tools to induce an autoantibody response to PR3 in rats and mice. Method Rats and mice were immunised with recombinant human PR3 (HPR3), recombinant murine PR3 (mPR3), single chimeric human/mouse PR3 (HHm, HmH, mHH, mmH, mHm, Hmm) or pools of chimeric proteins. Antibodies to mPR3 and HPR3 were measured by ELISA. Antibodies to rat PR3 were determined by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on rat white blood cells. Urinalysis was performed by dipstick analysis. Kidney and lung tissue was obtained for pathological examination. Results In mice, immunisation with the chimeric human/mouse PR3 Hmm led to an autoantibody response to mPR3. Rats immunised with the chimeric human/mouse PR3 Hmm, HmH and mmH, or a pool of the chimeric human/mouse PR3 proteins, produced antibodies selectively binding to rat granulocytes as detected by IIF. No gross pathological abnormalities could be detected in kidney or lungs of mice or rats immunised with chimeric human/mouse PR3. Conclusion Immunisation with chimeric human/mouse proteins induces autoantibodies to PR3 in rats and mice. Chimeric proteins can be instrumental in developing experimental models for autoimmune diseases. PMID:17644551

  8. Genomes of the Mouse Collaborative Cross

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Anuj; Morgan, Andrew P.; Najarian, Maya L.; Sarsani, Vishal Kumar; Sigmon, J. Sebastian; Shorter, John R.; Kashfeen, Anwica; McMullan, Rachel C.; Williams, Lucy H.; Giusti-Rodríguez, Paola; Ferris, Martin T.; Sullivan, Patrick; Hock, Pablo; Miller, Darla R.; Bell, Timothy A.; McMillan, Leonard; Churchill, Gary A.; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The Collaborative Cross (CC) is a multiparent panel of recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains derived from eight founder laboratory strains. RI panels are popular because of their long-term genetic stability, which enhances reproducibility and integration of data collected across time and conditions. Characterization of their genomes can be a community effort, reducing the burden on individual users. Here we present the genomes of the CC strains using two complementary approaches as a resource to improve power and interpretation of genetic experiments. Our study also provides a cautionary tale regarding the limitations imposed by such basic biological processes as mutation and selection. A distinct advantage of inbred panels is that genotyping only needs to be performed on the panel, not on each individual mouse. The initial CC genome data were haplotype reconstructions based on dense genotyping of the most recent common ancestors (MRCAs) of each strain followed by imputation from the genome sequence of the corresponding founder inbred strain. The MRCA resource captured segregating regions in strains that were not fully inbred, but it had limited resolution in the transition regions between founder haplotypes, and there was uncertainty about founder assignment in regions of limited diversity. Here we report the whole genome sequence of 69 CC strains generated by paired-end short reads at 30× coverage of a single male per strain. Sequencing leads to a substantial improvement in the fine structure and completeness of the genomes of the CC. Both MRCAs and sequenced samples show a significant reduction in the genome-wide haplotype frequencies from two wild-derived strains, CAST/EiJ and PWK/PhJ. In addition, analysis of the evolution of the patterns of heterozygosity indicates that selection against three wild-derived founder strains played a significant role in shaping the genomes of the CC. The sequencing resource provides the first description of tens of thousands of

  9. Adaptive plasticity in the mouse mandible

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasticity, i.e. non-heritable morphological variation, enables organisms to modify the shape of their skeletal tissues in response to varying environmental stimuli. Plastic variation may also allow individuals to survive in the face of new environmental conditions, enabling the evolution of heritable adaptive traits. However, it is uncertain whether such a plastic response of morphology constitutes an evolutionary adaption itself. Here we investigate whether shape differences due to plastic bone remodelling have functionally advantageous biomechanical consequences in mouse mandibles. Shape characteristics of mandibles from two groups of inbred laboratory mice fed either rodent pellets or ground pellets mixed with jelly were assessed using geometric morphometrics and mechanical advantage measurements of jaw adductor musculature. Results Mandibles raised on diets with differing food consistency showed significant differences in shape, which in turn altered their biomechanical profile. Mice raised on a soft food diet show a reduction in mechanical advantage relative to mice of the same inbred strain raised on a typical hard food diet. Further, the soft food eaters showed lower levels of integration between jaw regions, particularly between the molar and angular region relative to hard food eaters. Conclusions Bone remodelling in mouse mandibles allows for significant shifts in biomechanical ability. Food consistency significantly influences this process in an adaptive direction, as mice raised on hard food develop jaws better suited to handle hard foods. This remodelling also affects the organisation of the mandible, as mice raised on soft food appear to be released from developmental constraints showing less overall integration than those raised on hard foods, but with a shift of integration towards the most solicited regions of the mandible facing such a food, namely the incisors. Our results illustrate how environmentally driven plasticity can lead to

  10. CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY OF APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy of Apoptosis in Whole Mouse Ovaries. Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle...

  11. Conservation of molecular interactions stabilizing bovine and mouse rhodopsin †

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Shiho; Colozo, Alejandro T.; Müller, Daniel J.; Park, Paul S.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the light receptor that initiates phototransduction in rod photoreceptor cells. The structure and function of rhodopsin is tightly linked to molecular interactions that stabilize and determine the receptor's functional state. Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used to localize and quantify molecular interactions that structurally stabilize bovine and mouse rhodopsin from native disc membranes of rod photoreceptor cells. The mechanical unfolding of bovine and mouse rhodopsin revealed nine major unfolding intermediates, each intermediate defining a structurally stable segment in the receptor. These stable structural segments had similar localization and occurrence in both bovine and mouse samples. For each structural segment, parameters describing their unfolding energy barrier were determined by dynamic SMFS. No major differences were observed between bovine and mouse rhodopsin thereby implying that the structures of both rhodopsins are largely stabilized by similar molecular interactions. PMID:21038881

  12. Immunologic Applications of Conditional Gene Modification Technology in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Suveena; Zhu, Jinfang

    2014-01-01

    Since the success of homologous recombination in altering mouse genome and the discovery of Cre-loxP system, the combination of these two breakthroughs has created important applications for studying the immune system in the mouse. Here, we briefly summarize the general principles of this technology and its applications in studying immune cell development and responses; such implications include conditional gene knockout and inducible and/or tissue-specific gene over-expression, as well as lineage fate mapping. We then discuss the pros and cons of a few commonly used Cre-expressing mouse lines for studying lymphocyte development and functions. We also raise several general issues, such as efficiency of gene deletion, leaky activity of Cre, and Cre toxicity, all of which may have profound impacts on data interpretation. Finally, we selectively list some useful links to the Web sites as valuable mouse resources. PMID:24700321

  13. Enzyme kinetics and characterization of mouse pancreatic elastase.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Deepa; Atkinson, Mark A L; Huebner, Paul; Starcher, Barry

    2008-01-01

    In the present study we have purified and characterized murine pancreatic elastase. The enzyme was extracted from acetone powders of mouse pancreas, fractionally precipitated with ammonium sulfate, and further purified by ion exchange chromatography to a single band on SDS-PAGE. The mouse enzyme exists in a proform, which was activated by removing a signal peptide by tryptic cleavage. The active form of mouse pancreatic elastase was shown by ultracentrifugation to have a molecular weight of 25.9 kDa and a frictional ratio of 1.26. The pH optimum for proteolytic activity was 8.0. Kinetic measurements were made with a variety of substrates and inhibitors and compared with elastases from other sources. The enzymatic properties and kinetic profiles for mouse pancreatic elastase were similar to other known serine elastases.

  14. Identification of transcriptional regulators in the mouse immune system

    PubMed Central

    Jojic, Vladimir; Shay, Tal; Sylvia, Katelyn; Zuk, Or; Sun, Xin; Kang, Joonsoo; Regev, Aviv; Koller, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    The differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into immune cells has been extensively studied in mammals, but the transcriptional circuitry controlling it is still only partially understood. Here, the Immunological Genome Project gene expression profiles across mouse immune lineages allowed us to systematically analyze these circuits. Using a computational algorithm called Ontogenet, we uncovered differentiation-stage specific regulators of mouse hematopoiesis, identifying many known hematopoietic regulators, and 175 new candidate regulators, their target genes, and the cell types in which they act. Among the novel regulators, we highlight the role of ETV5 in γδT cells differntiation. Since the transcriptional program of human and mouse cells is highly conserved1, it is likely that many lessons learned from the mouse model apply to humans. PMID:23624555

  15. 29. INTERIOR VIEW OF FERRY MOUSE, SOUTH CENTRAL BUILDING, FIRST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. INTERIOR VIEW OF FERRY MOUSE, SOUTH CENTRAL BUILDING, FIRST LEVEL, LOOKING WEST, FERRYMEN'S QUARTERS - Central Railroad of New Jersey, Jersey City Ferry Terminal, Johnson Avenue at Hudson River, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  16. Gene expression and behaviour in mouse models of HD.

    PubMed

    Bowles, K R; Brooks, S P; Dunnett, S B; Jones, L

    2012-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease, resulting in expansion of the CAG repeat in exon 1 of the HTT gene. The resulting mutant huntingtin protein has been implicated in the disruption of a variety of cellular functions, including transcription. Mouse models of HD have been central to the development of our understanding of gene expression changes in this disease, and are now beginning to elucidate the relationship between gene expression and behaviour. Here, we review current mouse models of HD and their characterisation in terms of gene expression. In addition, we look at how this can inform behaviours observed in mouse models of disease. The relationship between gene expression and behaviour in mouse models of HD is important, as this will further our knowledge of disease progression and its underlying molecular events, highlight new treatment targets, and potentially provide new biomarkers for therapeutic trials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A reanalysis of mouse ENCODE comparative gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Gilad, Yoav; Mizrahi-Man, Orna

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium reported that comparative gene expression data from human and mouse tend to cluster more by species rather than by tissue. This observation was surprising, as it contradicted much of the comparative gene regulatory data collected previously, as well as the common notion that major developmental pathways are highly conserved across a wide range of species, in particular across mammals. Here we show that the Mouse ENCODE gene expression data were collected using a flawed study design, which confounded sequencing batch (namely, the assignment of samples to sequencing flowcells and lanes) with species. When we account for the batch effect, the corrected comparative gene expression data from human and mouse tend to cluster by tissue, not by species. PMID:26236466

  18. A Comparative Encyclopedia of DNA Elements in the Mouse Genome

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Feng; Cheng, Yong; Breschi, Alessandra; Vierstra, Jeff; Wu, Weisheng; Ryba, Tyrone; Sandstrom, Richard; Ma, Zhihai; Davis, Carrie; Pope, Benjamin D.; Shen, Yin; Pervouchine, Dmitri D.; Djebali, Sarah; Thurman, Bob; Kaul, Rajinder; Rynes, Eric; Kirilusha, Anthony; Marinov, Georgi K.; Williams, Brian A.; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine; Antoshechkin, Igor; DeSalvo, Gilberto; See, Lei-Hoon; Fastuca, Meagan; Drenkow, Jorg; Zaleski, Chris; Dobin, Alex; Prieto, Pablo; Lagarde, Julien; Bussotti, Giovanni; Tanzer, Andrea; Denas, Olgert; Li, Kanwei; Bender, M. A.; Zhang, Miaohua; Byron, Rachel; Groudine, Mark T.; McCleary, David; Pham, Long; Ye, Zhen; Kuan, Samantha; Edsall, Lee; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Rasmussen, Matthew D.; Bansal, Mukul S.; Keller, Cheryl A.; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Dogan, Nergiz; Harris, Robert S.; Cayting, Philip; Kawli, Trupti; Boyle, Alan P.; Euskirchen, Ghia; Kundaje, Anshul; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Jansen, Camden; Malladi, Venkat S.; Cline, Melissa S.; Erickson, Drew T.; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Sloan, Cricket A.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; de Sousa, Beatriz Lacerda; Beal, Kathryn; Pignatelli, Miguel; Flicek, Paul; Lian, Jin; Kahveci, Tamer; Lee, Dongwon; Kent, W. James; Santos, Miguel Ramalho; Herrero, Javier; Notredame, Cedric; Johnson, Audra; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Neri, Fidencio; Diegel, Morgan; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter J.; Wilken, Matthew S.; Reh, Thomas A.; Giste, Erika; Shafer, Anthony; Kutyavin, Tanya; Haugen, Eric; Dunn, Douglas; Reynolds, Alex P.; Neph, Shane; Humbert, Richard; Hansen, R. Scott; De Bruijn, Marella; Selleri, Licia; Rudensky, Alexander; Josefowicz, Steven; Samstein, Robert; Eichler, Evan E.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Levasseur, Dana; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Skoultchi, Arthur; Gosh, Srikanta; Disteche, Christine; Treuting, Piper; Wang, Yanli; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Good, Peter J.; Lowdon, Rebecca F.; Adams, Leslie B.; Zhou, Xiao-Qiao; Pazin, Michael J.; Feingold, Elise A.; Wold, Barbara; Taylor, James; Kellis, Manolis; Mortazavi, Ali; Weissman, Sherman M.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Snyder, Michael P.; Guigo, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Gilbert, David M.; Hardison, Ross C.; Beer, Michael A.; Ren, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Summary As the premier model organism in biomedical research, the laboratory mouse shares the majority of protein-coding genes with humans, yet the two mammals differ in significant ways. To gain greater insights into both shared and species-specific transcriptional and cellular regulatory programs in the mouse, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium has mapped transcription, DNase I hypersensitivity, transcription factor binding, chromatin modifications, and replication domains throughout the mouse genome in diverse cell and tissue types. By comparing with the human genome, we not only confirm substantial conservation in the newly annotated potential functional sequences, but also find a large degree of divergence of other sequences involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin state and higher order chromatin organization. Our results illuminate the wide range of evolutionary forces acting on genes and their regulatory regions, and provide a general resource for research into mammalian biology and mechanisms of human diseases. PMID:25409824

  19. Characteristics of the mouse genomic histamine H1 receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Isao; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Kitamura, Daisuke

    1996-08-15

    We report here the molecular cloning of a mouse histamine H1 receptor gene. The protein deduced from the nucleotide sequence is composed of 488 amino acid residues with characteristic properties of GTP binding protein-coupled receptors. Our results suggest that the mouse histamine H1 receptor gene is a single locus, and no related sequences were detected. Interspecific backcross analysis indicated that the mouse histamine H1 receptor gene (Hrh1) is located in the central region of mouse Chromosome 6 linked to microphthalmia (Mitfmi), ras-related fibrosarcoma oncogene 1 (Raf1), and ret proto-oncogene (Ret) in a region of homology with human chromosome 3p. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Immunologic applications of conditional gene modification technology in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suveena; Zhu, Jinfang

    2014-04-02

    Since the success of homologous recombination in altering mouse genome and the discovery of Cre-loxP system, the combination of these two breakthroughs has created important applications for studying the immune system in the mouse. Here, we briefly summarize the general principles of this technology and its applications in studying immune cell development and responses; such implications include conditional gene knockout and inducible and/or tissue-specific gene over-expression, as well as lineage fate mapping. We then discuss the pros and cons of a few commonly used Cre-expressing mouse lines for studying lymphocyte development and functions. We also raise several general issues, such as efficiency of gene deletion, leaky activity of Cre, and Cre toxicity, all of which may have profound impacts on data interpretation. Finally, we selectively list some useful links to the Web sites as valuable mouse resources.

  1. A Mouse Model of Chronic West Nile Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jessica B.; Swarts, Jessica L.; Wilkins, Courtney; Thomas, Sunil; Green, Richard; Sekine, Aimee; Voss, Kathleen M.; Mooney, Michael; Choonoo, Gabrielle; Miller, Darla R.; Pardo Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Gale, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Infection with West Nile virus (WNV) leads to a range of disease outcomes, including chronic infection, though lack of a robust mouse model of chronic WNV infection has precluded identification of the immune events contributing to persistent infection. Using the Collaborative Cross, a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains with high levels of standing genetic variation, we have identified a mouse model of persistent WNV disease, with persistence of viral loads within the brain. Compared to lines exhibiting no disease or marked disease, the F1 cross CC(032x013)F1 displays a strong immunoregulatory signature upon infection that correlates with restraint of the WNV-directed cytolytic response. We hypothesize that this regulatory T cell response sufficiently restrains the immune response such that a chronic infection can be maintained in the CNS. Use of this new mouse model of chronic neuroinvasive virus will be critical in developing improved strategies to prevent prolonged disease in humans. PMID:27806117

  2. The functional diversity of retinal ganglion cells in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Baden, Tom; Berens, Philipp; Franke, Katrin; Román Rosón, Miroslav; Bethge, Matthias; Euler, Thomas

    2016-01-21

    In the vertebrate visual system, all output of the retina is carried by retinal ganglion cells. Each type encodes distinct visual features in parallel for transmission to the brain. How many such 'output channels' exist and what each encodes are areas of intense debate. In the mouse, anatomical estimates range from 15 to 20 channels, and only a handful are functionally understood. By combining two-photon calcium imaging to obtain dense retinal recordings and unsupervised clustering of the resulting sample of more than 11,000 cells, here we show that the mouse retina harbours substantially more than 30 functional output channels. These include all known and several new ganglion cell types, as verified by genetic and anatomical criteria. Therefore, information channels from the mouse eye to the mouse brain are considerably more diverse than shown thus far by anatomical studies, suggesting an encoding strategy resembling that used in state-of-the-art artificial vision systems.

  3. Identification of transcriptional regulators in the mouse immune system.

    PubMed

    Jojic, Vladimir; Shay, Tal; Sylvia, Katelyn; Zuk, Or; Sun, Xin; Kang, Joonsoo; Regev, Aviv; Koller, Daphne; Best, Adam J; Knell, Jamie; Goldrath, Ananda; Joic, Vladimir; Koller, Daphne; Shay, Tal; Regev, Aviv; Cohen, Nadia; Brennan, Patrick; Brenner, Michael; Kim, Francis; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Wagers, Amy; Heng, Tracy; Ericson, Jeffrey; Rothamel, Katherine; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe; Bezman, Natalie A; Sun, Joseph C; Min-Oo, Gundula; Kim, Charlie C; Lanier, Lewis L; Miller, Jennifer; Brown, Brian; Merad, Miriam; Gautier, Emmanuel L; Jakubzick, Claudia; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Monach, Paul; Blair, David A; Dustin, Michael L; Shinton, Susan A; Hardy, Richard R; Laidlaw, David; Collins, Jim; Gazit, Roi; Rossi, Derrick J; Malhotra, Nidhi; Sylvia, Katelyn; Kang, Joonsoo; Kreslavsky, Taras; Fletcher, Anne; Elpek, Kutlu; Bellemarte-Pelletier, Angelique; Malhotra, Deepali; Turley, Shannon

    2013-06-01

    The differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into cells of the immune system has been studied extensively in mammals, but the transcriptional circuitry that controls it is still only partially understood. Here, the Immunological Genome Project gene-expression profiles across mouse immune lineages allowed us to systematically analyze these circuits. To analyze this data set we developed Ontogenet, an algorithm for reconstructing lineage-specific regulation from gene-expression profiles across lineages. Using Ontogenet, we found differentiation stage-specific regulators of mouse hematopoiesis and identified many known hematopoietic regulators and 175 previously unknown candidate regulators, as well as their target genes and the cell types in which they act. Among the previously unknown regulators, we emphasize the role of ETV5 in the differentiation of γδ T cells. As the transcriptional programs of human and mouse cells are highly conserved, it is likely that many lessons learned from the mouse model apply to humans.

  4. Malaria Drug Protected Mouse Fetus from Zika: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... 167128.html Malaria Drug Protected Mouse Fetus From Zika: Study More research is needed on effects in ... A malaria drug protected mice fetuses from the Zika virus, researchers report. In humans, Zika infection during ...

  5. A novel mutant mouse, joggle, with inherited ataxia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziyan; Hayasaka, Shizu; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Murata, Yoshiharu; Oda, Sen-ichi

    2006-07-01

    While establishing a new mouse strain, we discovered a novel mutant mouse that exhibited ataxia. Mating experiments showed that the mutant phenotype was due to a single autosomal recessive gene, which we have termed joggle (gene symbol: jog). The ataxia becomes apparent around postnatal day 12, when the mice first attempt to walk, and worsens thereafter. The life span of the mutant mouse is comparable to that of the wild-type mouse. After 21 days of age, the cerebellum weights of the jog/jog mice are significantly lower than those of the wild-type mice. These observations indicate that jog/jog mutant mice could be useful models for biomedical research.

  6. Localization and regulation of mouse pantothenate kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Roberta; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Lykidis, Athanasios; Rock, Charles O; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2007-10-02

    Coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis is initiated by pantothenate kinase (PanK) and CoA levels are controlled through differential expression and feedback regulation of PanK isoforms. PanK2 is a mitochondrial protein in humans, but comparative genomics revealed that acquisition of a mitochondrial targeting signal was limited to primates. Human and mouse PanK2 possessed similar biochemical properties, with inhibition by acetyl-CoA and activation by palmitoylcarnitine. Mouse PanK2 localized in the cytosol, and the expression of PanK2 was higher in human brain compared to mouse brain. Differences in expression and subcellular localization should be considered in developing a mouse model for human PanK2 deficiency.

  7. Cloning, characterization, and localization of mouse and human SPO11.

    PubMed

    Romanienko, P J; Camerini-Otero, R D

    1999-10-15

    Spo11 is a meiosis-specific protein in yeast that has been found covalently bound to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during the early stages of meiosis. These DSBs initiate homologous recombination, which is required for proper segregation of chromosomes and the generation of genetic diversity during meiosis. Here we report the cloning, characterization, tissue expression, and chromosomal localization of both mouse and human homologues of Spo11. The putative mouse and human proteins are 82% identical and share approximately 25% identity with other family members. Northern blot analysis revealed testis-specific expression for both genes, but RT-PCR results showed ubiquitous expression of at least a portion of Spo11 in mouse. Human SPO11 was also detected in several somatic tissues. Mouse Spo11 was localized to chromosome 2H4, and human SPO11 was localized to chromosome 20q13.2-q13.3, a region amplified in some breast and ovarian tumors.

  8. CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY OF APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy of Apoptosis in Whole Mouse Ovaries. Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle...

  9. A comparative encyclopedia of DNA elements in the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Yue, Feng; Cheng, Yong; Breschi, Alessandra; Vierstra, Jeff; Wu, Weisheng; Ryba, Tyrone; Sandstrom, Richard; Ma, Zhihai; Davis, Carrie; Pope, Benjamin D; Shen, Yin; Pervouchine, Dmitri D; Djebali, Sarah; Thurman, Robert E; Kaul, Rajinder; Rynes, Eric; Kirilusha, Anthony; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine; Antoshechkin, Igor; DeSalvo, Gilberto; See, Lei-Hoon; Fastuca, Meagan; Drenkow, Jorg; Zaleski, Chris; Dobin, Alex; Prieto, Pablo; Lagarde, Julien; Bussotti, Giovanni; Tanzer, Andrea; Denas, Olgert; Li, Kanwei; Bender, M A; Zhang, Miaohua; Byron, Rachel; Groudine, Mark T; McCleary, David; Pham, Long; Ye, Zhen; Kuan, Samantha; Edsall, Lee; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Rasmussen, Matthew D; Bansal, Mukul S; Kellis, Manolis; Keller, Cheryl A; Morrissey, Christapher S; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Dogan, Nergiz; Harris, Robert S; Cayting, Philip; Kawli, Trupti; Boyle, Alan P; Euskirchen, Ghia; Kundaje, Anshul; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Jansen, Camden; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Erickson, Drew T; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Sloan, Cricket A; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Lacerda de Sousa, Beatriz; Beal, Kathryn; Pignatelli, Miguel; Flicek, Paul; Lian, Jin; Kahveci, Tamer; Lee, Dongwon; Kent, W James; Ramalho Santos, Miguel; Herrero, Javier; Notredame, Cedric; Johnson, Audra; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Neri, Fidencio; Diegel, Morgan; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter J; Wilken, Matthew S; Reh, Thomas A; Giste, Erika; Shafer, Anthony; Kutyavin, Tanya; Haugen, Eric; Dunn, Douglas; Reynolds, Alex P; Neph, Shane; Humbert, Richard; Hansen, R Scott; De Bruijn, Marella; Selleri, Licia; Rudensky, Alexander; Josefowicz, Steven; Samstein, Robert; Eichler, Evan E; Orkin, Stuart H; Levasseur, Dana; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Skoultchi, Arthur; Gosh, Srikanta; Disteche, Christine; Treuting, Piper; Wang, Yanli; Weiss, Mitchell J; Blobel, Gerd A; Cao, Xiaoyi; Zhong, Sheng; Wang, Ting; Good, Peter J; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B; Zhou, Xiao-Qiao; Pazin, Michael J; Feingold, Elise A; Wold, Barbara; Taylor, James; Mortazavi, Ali; Weissman, Sherman M; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael P; Guigo, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R; Gilbert, David M; Hardison, Ross C; Beer, Michael A; Ren, Bing

    2014-11-20

    The laboratory mouse shares the majority of its protein-coding genes with humans, making it the premier model organism in biomedical research, yet the two mammals differ in significant ways. To gain greater insights into both shared and species-specific transcriptional and cellular regulatory programs in the mouse, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium has mapped transcription, DNase I hypersensitivity, transcription factor binding, chromatin modifications and replication domains throughout the mouse genome in diverse cell and tissue types. By comparing with the human genome, we not only confirm substantial conservation in the newly annotated potential functional sequences, but also find a large degree of divergence of sequences involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin state and higher order chromatin organization. Our results illuminate the wide range of evolutionary forces acting on genes and their regulatory regions, and provide a general resource for research into mammalian biology and mechanisms of human diseases.

  10. Magnolol inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mouse mastitis model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wang; Dejie, Liang; Xiaojing, Song; Tiancheng, Wang; Yongguo, Cao; Zhengtao, Yang; Naisheng, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Mastitis comprises an inflammation of the mammary gland, which is almost always linked with bacterial infection. The treatment of mastitis concerns antimicrobial substances, but not very successful. On the other hand, anti-inflammatory therapy with Chinese traditional medicine becomes an effective way for treating mastitis. Magnolol is a polyphenolic binaphthalene compound extracted from the stem bark of Magnolia sp., which has been shown to exert a potential for anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effects of magnolol on inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis mouse model in vivo and the mechanism of this protective effects in LPS-stimulated mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMECs) in vitro. The damage of tissues was determined by histopathology and myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B (IκBα) protein, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were determined by Western blot. The results showed that magnolol significantly inhibit the LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production both in vivo and vitro. Magnolol declined the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, ERK, and JNK in LPS-stimulated MMECs. Furthermore, magnolol inhibited the expression of TLR4 in LPS-stimulated MMECs. In vivo study, it was also observed that magnolol attenuated the damage of mastitis tissues in the mouse models. These findings demonstrated that magnolol attenuate LPS-stimulated inflammatory response by suppressing TLR4/NF-κB/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling system. Thereby, magnolol may be a therapeutic agent against mastitis.

  11. Characterization of the mouse pancreatic islet proteome and comparative analysis with other mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Hinault, Charlotte; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Singhal, Mudita; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans and insulin-producing beta cells in particular play a central role in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and the islet dysfunction is associated with the pathogenesis of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. To contribute to the understanding of the biology of the pancreatic islets we applied proteomic techniques based on liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Here as an initial step we present the first comprehensive proteomic characterization of pancreas islets of the mouse, the commonly used animal model for diabetes research. Two-dimensional SCX LC/RP LC-MS/MS has been applied to characterize of the mouse islet proteome, resulting in the confident identification of 17,350 different tryptic peptides covering 2,612 proteins with at least two unique peptide identifications per protein. The dataset also allowed identification of a number of post-translational modifications including several modifications relevant to oxidative stress and phosphorylation. While many of the identified phosphorylation sites corroborates with previous known sites, the oxidative modifications observed on cysteinyl residues potentially reveal novel information related to the role of oxidation stress in islet functions. Comparative analysis of the islet proteome database with 15 available proteomic datasets from other mouse tissues and cells revealed a set of 68 proteins uniquely detected only in the pancreatic islets. Besides proteins with known functions, like islet secreted peptide hormones, this unique set contains a number of proteins with yet unknown functions. The resulting peptide and protein database will be available at ncrr.pnl.gov web site of the NCRR proteomic center (ncrr.pnl.gov).

  12. End Sequencing and Finger Printing of Human & Mouse BAC Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, C

    2005-09-27

    This project provided for continued end sequencing of existing and new BAC libraries constructed to support human sequencing as well as to initiate BAC end sequencing from the mouse BAC libraries constructed to support mouse sequencing. The clones, the sequences, and the fingerprints are now an available resource for the community at large. Research and development of new metaodologies for BAC end sequencing have reduced costs and increase throughput.

  13. Staining and embedding the whole mouse brain for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mikula, Shawn; Binding, Jonas; Denk, Winfried

    2012-12-01

    The development of methods for imaging large contiguous volumes with the electron microscope could allow the complete mapping of a whole mouse brain at the single-axon level. We developed a method based on prolonged immersion that enables staining and embedding of the entire mouse brain with uniform myelin staining and a moderate preservation of the tissue's ultrastructure. We tested the ability to follow myelinated axons using serial block-face electron microscopy.

  14. The mouse F3/contactin glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Bizzoca, Antonella; Corsi, Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    F3/Contactin is an immunoglobulin superfamily component expressed in the nervous tissue of several species. Here we focus on the structural and functional properties of its mouse relative, on the mechanisms driving its regulated expression and on its developmental role. F3/Contactin is differentially expressed in distinct populations of central and peripheral neurons and in some non-neuronal cells. Accordingly, the regulatory region of the underlying gene includes promoter elements undergoing differential activation, associated with an intricate splicing profile, indicating that transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms contribute to its expression. Transgenic models allowed to follow F3/Contactin promoter activation in vivo and to modify F3/Contactin gene expression under a heterologous promoter, which resulted in morphological and functional phenotypes. Besides axonal growth and pathfinding, these concerned earlier events, including precursor proliferation and commitment. This wide role in neural ontogenesis is consistent with the recognized interaction of F3/Contactin with developmental control genes belonging to the Notch pathway. PMID:19372728

  15. Preclinical fluorescent mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2007-02-01

    Here we describe our cumulative experience with the development and preclinical application of several highly fluorescent, clinically-relevant, metastatic orthotopic mouse models of pancreatic cancer. These models utilize the human pancreatic cancer cell lines which have been genetically engineered to selectively express high levels of the bioluminescent green fluorescent (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP). Fluorescent tumors are established subcutaneously in nude mice, and tumor fragments are then surgically transplanted onto the pancreas. Locoregional tumor growth and distant metastasis of these orthotopic implants occurs spontaneously and rapidly throughout the abdomen in a manner consistent with clinical human disease. Highly specific, high-resolution, real-time visualization of tumor growth and metastasis may be achieved in vivo without the need for contrast agents, invasive techniques, or expensive imaging equipment. We have shown a high correlation between florescent optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging in these models. Alternatively, transplantation of RFP-expressing tumor fragments onto the pancreas of GFP-expressing transgenic mice may be used to facilitate visualization of tumor-host interaction between the pancreatic tumor fragments and host-derived stroma and vasculature. Such in vivo models have enabled us to serially visualize and acquire images of the progression of pancreatic cancer in the live animal, and to demonstrate the real-time antitumor and antimetastatic effects of several novel therapeutic strategies on pancreatic malignancy. These fluorescent models are therefore powerful and reliable tools with which to investigate human pancreatic cancer and therapeutic strategies directed against it.

  16. Promoter region of mouse Tcrg genes

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimi, Y.; Huang, Y.Y.; Ohta, S.

    1996-06-01

    The mouse T-cell receptor (Tcr){gamma} chain is characterized by a specific expression of V gene segments in the thymus corresponding to consecutive developmental stages; i.e., the Vg5 in fetal, Vg6 in neonatal, and Vg4 and Vg7 in adult. The order of the Vg gene usage correlates with the localization of the Vg gene segment on the chromosome; i.e., the Vg5 gene, being most proximal to the Jg1, is used first, followed by the Vg segments away from the Jg1 in a sequential manner. Since they all rearrange to the same Jg1 gene segment, the sequences in the coding region and/or in the 5{prime} upstream region are responsible for the stage-specific transcription. Also, Goldman and co-workers reported the germline transcription of Vg genes preceding their rearrangement. Therefore, the stage-specific transcription may be involved in the regulation of the stage-specific rearrangement; we sequenced and analyzed the 5{prime} flanking regions of the Vg5, Vg6, Vg4, and Vg7 genes to study the transcriptional relation. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. A Mouse Model of Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Katerina; Szabolcs, Matthias; Fisher, Peter; Kljuic, Ana; Ludwig, Thomas; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    2004-01-01

    We are using an approach that is based on the cre/loxP recombination process and involves a binary system of Cre-producing and Cre-responding transgenic mice to achieve ubiquitous or tissue-specific expression of oncoproteins. To develop mouse models of tumorigenesis, Cre-producers are mated with responder animals carrying a dormant oncogene targeted into the 3′ untranslated region of the locus encoding cytoplasmic β-actin (actin cassette). Production of oncoprotein from a bicistronic message is accomplished in bitransgenic progeny by Cre-mediated excision of a segment flanked by loxP sites that is located upstream from the oncogenic sequence. Widespread Cre-dependent activation and expression of an actin-cassette transgene encoding the T antigens of the SV40 early region (SVER) commencing in embryos was compatible with normal development and did not impair viability. However, at ∼3 months of age, all female animals developed massive uterine leiomyosarcomas, whereas practically all males exhibited enormously enlarged seminal vesicles because of pronounced hyperplasia of the smooth muscle layers. In addition, because of smooth muscle hyperproliferation, marked dilation of the gallbladder was observed in mice of both sexes. To begin exploring aberrant signaling events in the SVER-triggered tumorigenic pathways, we analyzed the expression profile of leiomyosarcomas by DNA microarray analysis. PMID:14695345

  18. Combinatorial effects of odorants on mouse behavior

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Luis R.; Kondoh, Kunio; Ye, Xiaolan; Yoon, Kyoung-hye; Hernandez, Marcus; Buck, Linda B.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which odors induce instinctive behaviors are largely unknown. Odor detection in the mouse nose is mediated by >1, 000 different odorant receptors (ORs) and trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs). Odor perceptions are encoded combinatorially by ORs and can be altered by slight changes in the combination of activated receptors. However, the stereotyped nature of instinctive odor responses suggests the involvement of specific receptors and genetically programmed neural circuits relatively immune to extraneous odor stimuli and receptor inputs. Here, we report that, contrary to expectation, innate odor-induced behaviors can be context-dependent. First, different ligands for a given TAAR can vary in behavioral effect. Second, when combined, some attractive and aversive odorants neutralize one another’s behavioral effects. Both a TAAR ligand and a common odorant block aversion to a predator odor, indicating that this ability is not unique to TAARs and can extend to an aversive response of potential importance to survival. In vitro testing of single receptors with binary odorant mixtures indicates that behavioral blocking can occur without receptor antagonism in the nose. Moreover, genetic ablation of a single receptor prevents its cognate ligand from blocking predator odor aversion, indicating that the blocking requires sensory input from the receptor. Together, these findings indicate that innate odor-induced behaviors can depend on context, that signals from a single receptor can block innate odor aversion, and that instinctive behavioral responses to odors can be modulated by interactions in the brain among signals derived from different receptors. PMID:27208093

  19. Longitudinal analysis of mouse SDOCT volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, Bhavna J.; Carass, Aaron; Lang, Andrew; Kim, Byung-Jin; Zack, Donald J.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2017-03-01

    Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT), in addition to its routine clinical use in the diagnosis of ocular diseases, has begun to fund increasing use in animal studies. Animal models are frequently used to study disease mechanisms as well as to test drug efficacy. In particular, SDOCT provides the ability to study animals longitudinally and non-invasively over long periods of time. However, the lack of anatomical landmarks makes the longitudinal scan acquisition prone to inconsistencies in orientation. Here, we propose a method for the automated registration of mouse SDOCT volumes. The method begins by accurately segmenting the blood vessels and the optic nerve head region in the scans using a pixel classification approach. The segmented vessel maps from follow-up scans were registered using an iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm to the baseline scan to allow for the accurate longitudinal tracking of thickness changes. Eighteen SDOCT volumes from a light damage model study were used to train a random forest utilized in the pixel classification step. The area under the curve (AUC) in a leave-one-out study for the retinal blood vessels and the optic nerve head (ONH) was found to be 0.93 and 0.98, respectively. The complete proposed framework, the retinal vasculature segmentation and the ICP registration, was applied to a secondary set of scans obtained from a light damage model. A qualitative assessment of the registration showed no registration failures.

  20. Mouse models of p53 functions.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Guillermina

    2010-04-01

    Studies in mice have yielded invaluable insight into our understanding of the p53 pathway. Mouse models with activated p53, no p53, and mutant p53 have queried the role of p53 in development and tumorigenesis. In these models, p53 is activated and stabilized via redundant posttranslational modifications. On activation, p53 initiates two major responses: inhibition of proliferation (via cell-cycle arrest, quiescence, senescence, and differentiation) and induction of apoptosis. Importantly, these responses are cell-type and tumor-type-specific. The analysis of mutant p53 alleles has established a gain-of-function role for p53 mutants in metastasis. The development of additional models that can precisely time the oncogenic events in single cells will provide further insight into the evolution of tumors, the importance of the stroma, and the cooperating events that lead to disruption of the p53 pathway. Ultimately, these models should serve to study the effects of novel drugs on tumor response as well as normal homeostasis.

  1. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  2. Expression of mouse metallothionein genes in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, I.B.; Yeargan, R.; Wagner, G.J.; Hunt, A.G. )

    1990-05-01

    We have expressed a mouse metallothionein (NT) gene in tobacco under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and a pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) gene promoter. Seedlings in which MT gene expression is driven by the 35S promoter are resistant to toxic levels of cadmium. Mature plants carrying the 35S-MT gene accumulate less Cd in their leaves when exposed to low levels of Cd in laboratory growth conditions. Plants with the rbcS-MT construction express this gene in a light-regulated and tissue-specific manner, as expected. Moreover, the MT levels in leaves in these plants are about 20% of those seen in 35S-MT plants. These plants are currently being tested for Cd resistance. In addition, a small field evaluation of 35S-MT lines for Cd levels is being evaluated. These experiments will address the possibility of using MTs to alter Cd levels in crop species.

  3. Mouse models for human hereditary deafness.

    PubMed

    Leibovici, Michel; Safieddine, Saaid; Petit, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Hearing impairment is a frequent condition in humans. Identification of the causative genes for the early onset forms of isolated deafness began 15 years ago and has been very fruitful. To date, approximately 50 causative genes have been identified. Yet, limited information regarding the underlying pathogenic mechanisms can be derived from hearing tests in deaf patients. This chapter describes the success of mouse models in the elucidation of some pathophysiological processes in the auditory sensory organ, the cochlea. These models have revealed a variety of defective structures and functions at the origin of deafness genetic forms. This is illustrated by three different examples: (1) the DFNB9 deafness form, a synaptopathy of the cochlear sensory cells where otoferlin is defective; (2) the Usher syndrome, in which deafness is related to abnormal development of the hair bundle, the mechanoreceptive structure of the sensory cells to sound; (3) the DFNB1 deafness form, which is the most common form of inherited deafness in Caucasian populations, mainly caused by connexin-26 defects that alter gap junction communication between nonsensory cochlear cells.

  4. Mouse Model of Halogenated Platinum Salt Hypersensitivity ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Occupational exposure to halogenated platinum salts can trigger the development of asthma. Concern for increased asthma risk exists for the general population due to the use of platinum (Pt) in catalytic converters and its emerging use as a diesel fuel additive. To investigate airway responses to Pt, we developed a mouse model of Pt hypersensitivity. Previously, we confirmed the dermal sensitizing potency of ammonium hexachloroplatinate (AHCP) using an ex vivo [3H]methyl thymidine labeling version of the local lymph node assay in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the ability of AHCP to induce airway responses in mice sensitized by the dermal route. Mice were sensitized through application of 100 µL 1% AHCP in DMSO to the shaved back on days 0, 5 and 19, and 25 µl to each ear on days 10, 11 and 12. Unsensitized mice received vehicle. On day 24, mice were challenged by oropharyngeal aspiration (OPA) with 0 or 100 µg AHCP in saline. Before and immediately after challenge, airway responses were assessed using whole body plethysmography (WBP). On day 26, changes in ventilatory responses to methacholine (Mch) aerosol were assessed by WBP; dose-dependent increases in Mch responsiveness occurred in sensitized mice. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid harvested from sensitized mice contained an average of 7.5% eosinophils compared to less than 0.5% in control mice (p < 0.05). This model will be useful for assessing both relative sensitizing potency and cross-reacti

  5. Mouse Models of Rare Craniofacial Disorders.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, Annita; Trainor, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    A rare disease is defined as a condition that affects less than 1 in 2000 individuals. Currently more than 7000 rare diseases have been documented, and most are thought to be of genetic origin. Rare diseases primarily affect children, and congenital craniofacial syndromes and disorders constitute a significant proportion of rare diseases, with over 700 having been described to date. Modeling craniofacial disorders in animal models has been instrumental in uncovering the etiology and pathogenesis of numerous conditions and in some cases has even led to potential therapeutic avenues for their prevention. In this chapter, we focus primarily on two general classes of rare disorders, ribosomopathies and ciliopathies, and the surprising finding that the disruption of fundamental, global processes can result in tissue-specific craniofacial defects. In addition, we discuss recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of an extremely rare and specific craniofacial condition known as syngnathia, based on the first mouse models for this condition. Approximately 1% of all babies are born with a minor or major developmental anomaly, and individuals suffering from rare diseases deserve the same quality of treatment and care and attention to their disease as other patients. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy; Chapers, S. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  7. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy; Chapers, S. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  8. UCP2 knockout suppresses mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Jackson, Kasey; Shen, Xingui; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Kevil, Christopher G; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial uncoupling (uncouples electron transport from ATP production) has recently been proposed as a novel survival mechanism for cancer cells, and reduction in free radical generation is the accepted mechanism of action. However, there is no direct evidence supporting that uncoupling proteins promote carcinogenesis. Herein, we examined whether mitochondrial uncoupling affects mouse skin carcinogenesis using uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) homozygous knockout and wild-type mice. The results indicate that knockout of Ucp2 significantly reduced the formation of both benign (papilloma) and malignant (squamous cell carcinoma) tumors. UCP2 knockout did not cause increases in apoptosis during skin carcinogenesis. The rates of oxygen consumption were decreased only in the carcinogen-treated UCP2 knockout mice, whereas glycolysis was increased only in the carcinogen-treated wild-type mice. Finally, the levels of metabolites pyruvate, malate, and succinate showed different trends after carcinogen treatments between the wild-type and UCP2 knockout mice. Our study is the first to demonstrate that Ucp2 knockout suppresses carcinogenesis in vivo. Together with early studies showing that UCP2 is overexpressed in a number of human cancers, UCP2 could be a potential target for cancer prevention and/or therapy. Cancer Prev Res; 8(6); 487-91. ©2015 AACR. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Mig-6 Mouse Model of Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Jeong, Jae-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is a frequently occurring gynecological disorder. Estrogen-dependent endometrioid carcinoma is the most common type of gynecological cancer. One of the major pathologic phenomena of endometrial cancer is the loss of estrogen (E2) and progesterone (P4) control over uterine epithelial cell proliferation. P4 antagonizes the growth-promoting properties of E2 in the uterus. P4 prevents the development of endometrial cancer associated with unopposed E2 by blocking E2 actions. Mitogen inducible gene 6 (Mig-6, Errfi1, RALT, or gene 33) is an immediate early response gene that can be induced by various mitogens and common chronic stress stimuli. Mig-6 has been identified as an important component of P4-mediated inhibition of E2 signaling in the uterus. Decreased expression of MIG-6 is observed in human endometrial carcinomas. Transgenic mice with Mig-6 ablation in the uterus develop endometrial hyperplasia and E2-dependent endometrial cancer. Thus, MIG-6 has a tumor suppressor function in endometrial tumorigenesis. The following discussion summarizes our current knowledge of Mig-6 mouse models and their role in understanding the molecular mechanisms of endometrial tumorigenesis and in the development of therapeutic approaches for endometrial cancer.

  10. Neural localization of addicsin in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Akiduki, Saori; Ochiishi, Tomoyo; Ikemoto, Mitsushi J

    2007-10-22

    Addicsin is a member of the prenylated Rab acceptor (PRA) 1 domain family and a murine homolog of the rat glutamate-transporter-associated protein 3-18 (GTRAP3-18). This protein is considered to function as a modulator of the neural glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1). However, its molecular functions remain largely unknown. Here, we examined the regional and cellular localization of addicsin in the central nervous system (CNS) by using a newly generated antibody specific for the protein. Distribution analysis by Western blot and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the protein was widely distributed in various regions of the mature CNS, including the olfactory bulbs, cerebral cortex, amygdala, hippocampus CA1-3 fields, dentate gyrus, and cerebellum. Double immunofluorescence analysis revealed that addicsin was expressed in the somata of principal neurons in the CNS such as the pyramidal cells and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons scattered in the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the protein showed pre-synaptic localization in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 field of the hippocampal formation. Subcellular localization analysis of highly purified synaptic fractions prepared from mouse forebrain supported the cytoplasmic and pre-synaptic distribution of addicsin. These results suggest that addicsin has neural expression and may play crucial roles in the basic physiological functions of the mature CNS.

  11. Arachidonic acid metabolism in cultured mouse keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kondoh, H.; Sato, Y.; Kanoh, H.

    1985-07-01

    The authors attempted to characterize the general features of arachidonate metabolism in cultured mouse keratinocytes. The cells labeled with (/sup 3/H)arachidonate were stimulated by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), ionophore A23187, and fetal bovine serum (FBS). Common to the three substances, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylcholine almost equally served as sources of arachidonate liberated by the action of phospholipase A2. The stimulation of phospholipase A2 action was observed in the order of A23187 greater than FBS greater than TPA. When stimulated by TPA or A23187, the radioactivity released into the extracellular medium was mostly found in prostaglandin (PG) E2. Formation of other PGs and hydroxyeicosatetraenoate (HETE) was extremely limited. In the case of stimulation by FBS, however, the released radioactivity was mainly associated with non-converted arachidonate. FBS also inhibited the TPA- and A23187-induced conversion of arachidonate to PGE2. Phospholipid degradation induced by the three stimulators was similarly dependent on extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. The stimulation by FBS and A23187 was suppressed by calmodulin antagonists, though the effect of A23187 was much more sensitive to the antagonists when compared to that of FBS. The authors observed more than additive effects of the three stimulators when tested together.

  12. Adiponectin Enhances Mouse Fetal Fat Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Liping; Yoo, Hyung sun; Madon, Alysha; Kinney, Brice; Hay, William W.; Shao, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Maternal obesity increases offspring birth weight and susceptibility to obesity. Adiponectin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone with a prominent function in maintaining energy homeostasis. In contrast to adults, neonatal blood adiponectin levels are positively correlated with anthropometric parameters of adiposity. This study was designed to investigate the role of adiponectin in maternal obesityenhanced fetal fat deposition. By using high-fat diet–induced obese mouse models, our study showed that maternal obesity increased fetal fat tissue mass, with a significant elevation in fetal blood adiponectin. However, adiponectin gene knockout (Adipoq−/−) attenuated maternal obesity-induced high fetal fat tissue mass. We further studied the effects of fetal adiponectin on fetal fat deposition by using a cross breeding approach to create Adipoq−/+ and Adipoq−/− offspring, whereas maternal adiponectin was null. Adipoq−/+ offspring had more fat tissue mass at both birth and adulthood. Significantly high levels of lipogenic genes, such as sterol regulatory element–binding protein 1c and fatty acid synthase, were detected in the livers of Adipoq−/+ fetuses. In addition, expression of genes for placental fatty acid transport was significantly increased in Adipoq−/+ fetuses. Together, our study indicates that adiponectin enhances fetal fat deposition and plays an important role in maternal obesity-induced high birth weight. PMID:22872236

  13. Plantarflexion Contracture in the mdx Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Garlich, Michael W.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Call, Jarrod A.; Dorsey, Lisa L.; Lowe, Dawn A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Contractures are a major clinical issue for patients with muscular dystrophies. However, it is unknown whether contractures are present in the widely used mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to develop methods to measure muscle contractures in mice, to determine whether plantarflexion contractures are present in mdx mice, and to analyze the composition of the major muscles involved. Design Hindlimbs of eight wild type and six mdx mice were assessed every 2 wks during the course of a 12-wk study. Assessments included range of motion and in vivo torques about the ankle. At the end of the study, mice were euthanized, and muscles were analyzed for composition. Results The mdx mice had ~10 degrees less dorsiflexion, increased passive torque moving the ankle into dorsiflexion, and an increased passive-to-active torque ratio relative to wild type mice. Gastrocnemius muscle composition alterations included increased wet mass, decreased protein content, and increased collagen. Conclusions The results indicate that mdx mice have plantarflexion contractures similar to those seen in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In future studies, these measures can be used to assess strategies to slow the progression of contractures that occur with muscular dystrophies. PMID:21403594

  14. Standardized bioenergetic profiling of adult mouse cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Readnower, Ryan D; Brainard, Robert E; Hill, Bradford G; Jones, Steven P

    2012-12-18

    Mitochondria are at the crux of life and death and as such have become ideal targets of intervention in cardiovascular disease. Generally, current methods to measure mitochondrial dysfunction rely on working with the isolated organelle and fail to incorporate mitochondrial function in a cellular context. Extracellular flux methodology has been particularly advantageous in this respect; however, certain primary cell types, such as adult cardiac myocytes, have been difficult to standardize with this technology. Here, we describe methods for using extracellular flux (XF) analysis to measure mitochondrial bioenergetics in isolated, intact, adult mouse cardiomyocytes (ACMs). Following isolation, ACMs were seeded overnight onto laminin-coated (20 μg/ml) microplates, which resulted in high attachment efficiency. After establishing seeding density, we found that a commonly used assay medium (containing a supraphysiological concentration of pyruvate at 1 mmol/l) produced a maximal bioenergetic response. After performing a pyruvate dose-response, we determined that pyruvate titrated to 0.1 mmol/l was optimal for examining alternative substrate oxidation. Methods for measuring fatty acid oxidation were established. These methods lay the framework using XF analysis to profile metabolism of ACMs and will likely augment our ability to understand mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure and acute myocardial ischemia. This platform could easily be extended to models of diabetes or other metabolic defects.

  15. Isolation and Culture of Neonatal Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Elisabeth; Moore-Morris, Thomas; Lange, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes have long been used to study myofibrillogenesis and myofibrillar functions. Cultured cardiomyocytes allow for easy investigation and manipulation of biochemical pathways, and their effect on the biomechanical properties of spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes. The following 2-day protocol describes the isolation and culture of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes. We show how to easily dissect hearts from neonates, dissociate the cardiac tissue and enrich cardiomyocytes from the cardiac cell-population. We discuss the usage of different enzyme mixes for cell-dissociation, and their effects on cell-viability. The isolated cardiomyocytes can be subsequently used for a variety of morphological, electrophysiological, biochemical, cell-biological or biomechanical assays. We optimized the protocol for robustness and reproducibility, by using only commercially available solutions and enzyme mixes that show little lot-to-lot variability. We also address common problems associated with the isolation and culture of cardiomyocytes, and offer a variety of options for the optimization of isolation and culture conditions. PMID:24056408

  16. Active axial stress in mouse aorta.

    PubMed

    Agianniotis, A; Rachev, A; Stergiopulos, N

    2012-07-26

    The study verifies the development of active axial stress in the wall of mouse aorta over a range of physiological loads when the smooth muscle cells are stimulated to contract. The results obtained show that the active axial stress is virtually independent of the magnitude of pressure, but depends predominately on the longitudinal stretch ratio. The dependence is non-monotonic and is similar to the active stress-stretch dependence in the circumferential direction reported in the literature. The expression for the active axial stress fitted to the experimental data shows that the maximum active stress is developed at longitudinal stretch ratio 1.81, and 1.56 is the longitudinal stretch ratio below which the stimulation does not generate active stress. The study shows that the magnitude of active axial stress is smaller than the active circumferential stress. There is need for more experimental investigations on the active response of different types of arteries from different species and pathological conditions. The results of these studies can promote building of refined constrictive models in vascular rheology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dissection and Culture of Mouse Embryonic Kidney.

    PubMed

    Aresh, Bejan; Peuckert, Christiane

    2017-05-17

    The goal of this protocol is to describe a method for the dissection, isolation, and culture of mouse metanephric rudiments. During mammalian kidney development, the two progenitor tissues, the ureteric bud and the metanephric mesenchyme, communicate and reciprocally induce cellular mechanisms to eventually form the collecting system and the nephrons of the kidney. As mammalian embryos grow intrauterine and therefore are inaccessible to the observer, an organ culture has been developed. With this method, it is possible to study epithelial-mesenchymal interactions and cellular behavior during kidney organogenesis. Furthermore, the origin of congenital kidney and urogenital tract malformations can be investigated. After careful dissection, the metanephric rudiments are transferred onto a filter that floats on culture medium and can be kept in a cell culture incubator for several days. However, one must be aware that the conditions are artificial and could influence the metabolism in the tissue. Also, the penetration of test substances could be limited due to the extracellular matrix and basal membrane present in the explant. One main advantage of organ culture is that the experimenter can gain direct access to the organ. This technology is cheap, simple, and allows a large number of modifications, such as the addition of biologically active substances, the study of genetic variants, and the application of advanced imaging techniques.

  18. Euthanasia of mouse fetuses and neonates.

    PubMed

    Klaunberg, Brenda A; O'malley, James; Clark, Terri; Davis, Judith A

    2004-09-01

    We sought to determine whether any of the common methods of euthanasia for adult rodents would lead to an acceptable death for fetuses or neonates. We wanted to identify a method that was rapid, free of signs of pain or distress, reliable, and minimally distressful to the person performing the procedure and that minimized the amount of handling required to perform the procedure. We evaluated six methods of euthanasia, with and without anesthesia, in three age groups of mice: gravid mice (E14-20) and neonatal pups (P1-P7 and P8-P14). Euthanasia methods included: halothane inhalation, carbon dioxide inhalation, intraperitoneal sodium pentobarbital, intravenous potassium chloride, and cervical dislocation with and without anesthesia. Noninvasive echocardiography was used to assess heartbeat during euthanasia. With cardiac arrest as the definition of death, no method of euthanasia killed fetal mice. Halothane inhalation (5% by vaporizer) was not an acceptable method of euthanasia for mice of the age groups tested. Intraperitoneal administration of sodium pentobarbital for euthanasia required a higher dose than the previously established dose, and there is a risk of reduced efficacy in pregnant animals due to potential intrauterine injection. Carbon dioxide asphyxiation was the most efficient method of euthanasia for neonatal mouse pups P1-14. For pregnant adult mice, intravenous potassium chloride under anesthesia, carbon dioxide asphyxiation, and cervical dislocation alone or under anesthesia were excellent methods of euthanasia. Copyright 2004 American Association for Laboratory Animal Science

  19. Modeling RASopathies with Genetically Modified Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Porras, Isabel; Guerra, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    The RAS/MAPK signaling pathway plays key roles in development, cell survival and proliferation, as well as in cancer pathogenesis. Molecular genetic studies have identified a group of developmental syndromes, the RASopathies, caused by germ line mutations in this pathway. The syndromes included within this classification are neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), Noonan syndrome (NS), Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NS-ML, formerly known as LEOPARD syndrome), Costello syndrome (CS), cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC), Legius syndrome (LS, NF1-like syndrome), capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (CM-AVM), and hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) type 1. Although these syndromes present specific molecular alterations, they are characterized by a large spectrum of functional and morphological abnormalities, which include heart defects, short stature, neurocognitive impairment, craniofacial malformations, and, in some cases, cancer predisposition. The development of genetically modified animals, such as mice (Mus musculus), flies (Drosophila melanogaster), and zebrafish (Danio rerio), has been instrumental in elucidating the molecular and cellular bases of these syndromes. Moreover, these models can also be used to determine tumor predisposition, the impact of different genetic backgrounds on the variable phenotypes found among the patients and to evaluate preventative and therapeutic strategies. Here, we review a wide range of genetically modified mouse models used in the study of RASopathies and the potential application of novel technologies, which hopefully will help us resolve open questions in the field.

  20. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Control of nucleus positioning in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Maria; Terret, Marie-Emilie; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2017-08-12

    The position of the nucleus in a cell can instruct morphogenesis in some cases, conveying spatial and temporal information and abnormal nuclear positioning can lead to disease. In oocytes from worm, sea urchin, frog and some fish, nucleus position regulates embryo development, it marks the animal pole and in Drosophila it defines the future dorso-ventral axis of the embryo and of the adult body plan. However, in mammals, the oocyte nucleus is centrally located and does not instruct any future embryo axis. Yet an off-center nucleus correlates with poor outcome for mouse and human oocyte development. This is surprising since oocytes further undergo two extremely asymmetric divisions in terms of the size of the daughter cells (enabling polar body extrusion), requiring an off-centering of their chromosomes. In this review we address not only the bio-physical mechanism controlling nucleus positioning via an actin-mediated pressure gradient, but we also speculate on potential biological relevance of nuclear positioning in mammalian oocytes and early embryos. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology.

    PubMed

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  3. Multimodal optical imaging of mouse Ischemic cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Phillip B.; Shin, Hwa Kyuong; Dunn, Andrew K.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Boas, David A.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Ayata, Cenk

    2005-11-01

    Real time investigation of cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxy/deoxy hemoglobin volume (HbO,HbR) dynamics has been difficult until recently due to limited spatial and temporal resolution of techniques like laser Doppler flowmetry and MRI. This is especially true for studies of disease models in small animals, owing to the fine structure of the cerebral vasculature. The combination of laser speckle flowmetry (LSF) and multi-spectral reflectance imaging (MSRI) yields high resolution spatio-temporal maps of hemodynamic changes in response to events such as sensory stimuli or arterial occlusion. Ischemia was induced by distal occlusion of the medial cerebral artery (dMCAO). Rapid changes in CBF, HbO, and HbR during the acute phase were captured with high temporal and spatial resolution through the intact skull. Hemodynamic changes that were correlated with vasoconstrictive events, peri-infarct spreading depressions (PISD), were observed. These experiments demonstrate the utility of LSF and Multi-spectral reflectance imaging (MSRI) in mouse disease models.

  4. Computer simulations of the mouse spermatogenic cycle.

    PubMed

    Ray, Debjit; Pitts, Philip B; Hogarth, Cathryn A; Whitmore, Leanne S; Griswold, Michael D; Ye, Ping

    2014-12-12

    The spermatogenic cycle describes the periodic development of germ cells in the testicular tissue. The temporal-spatial dynamics of the cycle highlight the unique, complex, and interdependent interaction between germ and somatic cells, and are the key to continual sperm production. Although understanding the spermatogenic cycle has important clinical relevance for male fertility and contraception, there are a number of experimental obstacles. For example, the lengthy process cannot be visualized through dynamic imaging, and the precise action of germ cells that leads to the emergence of testicular morphology remains uncharacterized. Here, we report an agent-based model that simulates the mouse spermatogenic cycle on a cross-section of the seminiferous tubule over a time scale of hours to years, while considering feedback regulation, mitotic and meiotic division, differentiation, apoptosis, and movement. The computer model is able to elaborate the germ cell dynamics in a time-lapse movie format, allowing us to trace individual cells as they change state and location. More importantly, the model provides mechanistic understanding of the fundamentals of male fertility, namely how testicular morphology and sperm production are achieved. By manipulating cellular behaviors either individually or collectively in silico, the model predicts causal events for the altered arrangement of germ cells upon genetic or environmental perturbations. This in silico platform can serve as an interactive tool to perform long-term simulation and to identify optimal approaches for infertility treatment and contraceptive development.

  5. Mouse vocal communication system: are ultrasounds learned or innate?

    PubMed Central

    Arriaga, Gustavo; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) are often used as behavioral readouts of internal states, to measure effects of social and pharmacological manipulations, and for behavioral phenotyping of mouse models for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. However, little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms of rodent USV production. Here we discuss the available data to assess whether male mouse song behavior and the supporting brain circuits resemble those of known vocal non-learning or vocal learning species. Recent neurobiology studies have demonstrated that the mouse USV brain system includes motor cortex and striatal regions, and that the vocal motor cortex sends a direct sparse projection to the brainstem vocal motor nucleus ambiguous, a projection thought be unique to humans among mammals. Recent behavioral studies have reported opposing conclusions on mouse vocal plasticity, including vocal ontogeny changes in USVs over early development that might not be explained by innate maturation processes, evidence for and against a role for auditory feedback in developing and maintaining normal mouse USVs, and evidence for and against limited vocal imitation of song pitch. To reconcile these findings, we suggest that the trait of vocal learning may not be dichotomous but encompass a broad set of behavioral and neural traits we call the continuum hypothesis, and that mice possess some of the traits associated with a capacity for limited vocal learning. PMID:23295209

  6. Molecular genetic linkage maps of mouse chromosomes 4 and 6.

    PubMed

    Bahary, N; Zorich, G; Pachter, J E; Leibel, R L; Friedman, J M

    1991-09-01

    We have generated a moderate resolution genetic map of mouse chromosomes 4 and 6 utilizing a (C57BL/6J x Mus spretus) F1 x Mus spretus backcross with RFLPs for 31 probes. The map for chromosome 4 covers 77 cM and details a large region of homology to human chromosome 1p. The map establishes the breakpoints in the mouse 4-human 1p region of homology to a 2-cM interval between Ifa and Jun in mouse and to the interval between JUN and ACADM in human. The map for mouse chromosome 6 spans a 65-cM region and contains a large region of homology to human 7q. These maps also provide chromosomal assignment and order for a number of previously unmapped probes. The maps should allow the rapid regional assignment of new markers to mouse chromosomes 4 and 6. In addition, knowledge of the gene order in mouse may prove useful in determining the gene order of the homologous regions in human.

  7. Astonishing advances in mouse genetic tools for biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Jackson, Walker S

    2015-01-01

    The humble house mouse has long been a workhorse model system in biomedical research. The technology for introducing site-specific genome modifications led to Nobel Prizes for its pioneers and opened a new era of mouse genetics. However, this technology was very time-consuming and technically demanding. As a result, many investigators continued to employ easier genome manipulation methods, though resulting models can suffer from overlooked or underestimated consequences. Another breakthrough, invaluable for the molecular dissection of disease mechanisms, was the invention of high-throughput methods to measure the expression of a plethora of genes in parallel. However, the use of samples containing material from multiple cell types could obfuscate data, and thus interpretations. In this review we highlight some important issues in experimental approaches using mouse models for biomedical research. We then discuss recent technological advances in mouse genetics that are revolutionising human disease research. Mouse genomes are now easily manipulated at precise locations thanks to guided endonucleases, such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or the CRISPR/Cas9 system, both also having the potential to turn the dream of human gene therapy into reality. Newly developed methods of cell type-specific isolation of transcriptomes from crude tissue homogenates, followed by detection with next generation sequencing (NGS), are vastly improving gene regulation studies. Taken together, these amazing tools simplify the creation of much more accurate mouse models of human disease, and enable the extraction of hitherto unobtainable data.

  8. Gene Expression Profile Analysis of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases. PMID:23469233

  9. Variables influencing DNA-binding in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Neumann, H G

    1987-01-01

    The suitability of certain mouse strains for carcinogenicity testing has been questioned. Some chemicals increase the incidence of liver tumors above a relatively high background, an effect not seen in rats. This raises the question whether species and tissue specific effects are involved which are reflected in the DNA binding of metabolites. DNA binding indices in mouse liver have been determined in only a few instances. They are comparable to those found for rat liver DNA with aniline, benzo(a)-pyrene, butadiene, dimethylnitrosamine, methylnitrosourea and they are lower in the mouse with aflatoxin B1, trans-4-acetylaminostilbene and 2-aminofluorene derivatives. The available data on DNA binding in mouse liver suggest that the same adducts are formed as in rats but that metabolism and repair are variables which can modify the extent of DNA damage. However, the extent of DNA binding does not always correlate with the susceptibility of this tissue to carcinogenesis. But mouse liver is no exception in this respect. It is concluded that the formation of mouse liver tumors in long term studies with genotoxic chemicals indicates tumor initiating potential. In contrast, there are other chemicals such as chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides which do not bind to DNA to any extent and which are not genotoxic in common short term tests and yet give rise to liver tumors in mice but not in rats. Positive results in long term studies are suggested to indicate promoting properties of such compounds.

  10. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism

    PubMed Central

    Kazdoba, T. M.; Leach, P. T.; Crawley, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism. PMID:26403076

  11. Gene expression profile analysis of type 2 diabetic mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases.

  12. Novel Transgenic Mouse Model of Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kito, Yusuke; Saigo, Chiemi; Takeuchi, Tamotsu

    2017-09-01

    Transmembrane protein 207 (TMEM207) is characterized as an important molecule for invasiveness of gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma cells. To clarify the pathobiological effects of TMEM207, we generated 13 transgenic mouse strains, designated C57BL/6-transgenic (Tg) (ITF-TMEM207), where the mouse Tmem207 is ectopically expressed under the proximal promoter of the murine intestinal trefoil factor gene. A C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) mouse strain unexpectedly exhibited a high incidence of spontaneous kidney cysts with histopathological features resembling human polycystic kidney disease, which were found in approximately all mice within 1 year. TMEM207 immunoreactivity was found in noncystic kidney tubules and in renal cysts of the transgenic mice. The ITF-TMEM207 construct was inserted into Mitf at chromosome 6. Cystic kidney was not observed in other C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) transgenic mouse strains. Although several genetically manipulated animal models exist, this mouse strain harboring a genetic mutation in Mitf and overexpression of Tmem207 protein was not reported as a model of polycystic kidney disease until now. This study demonstrates that the C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) mouse may be a suitable model for understanding human polycystic kidney disease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluating eyegaze targeting to improve mouse pointing for radiology tasks.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Tien, Geoffrey; Kirkpatrick, Arthur E; Forster, Bruce B; Atkins, M Stella

    2011-02-01

    In current radiologists' workstations, a scroll mouse is typically used as the primary input device for navigating image slices and conducting operations on an image. Radiological analysis and diagnosis rely on careful observation and annotation of medical images. During analysis of 3D MRI and CT volumes, thousands of mouse clicks are performed everyday, which can cause wrist fatigue. This paper presents a dynamic control-to-display (C-D) gain mouse movement method, controlled by an eyegaze tracker as the target predictor. By adjusting the C-D gain according to the distance to the target, the mouse click targeting time is reduced. Our theoretical and experimental studies show that the mouse movement time to a known target can be reduced by up to 15%. We also present an experiment with 12 participants to evaluate the role of eyegaze targeting in the realistic situation of unknown target positions. These results indicate that using eyegaze to predict the target position, the dynamic C-D gain method can improve pointing performance by 8% and reduce the error rate over traditional mouse movement.

  14. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism.

    PubMed

    Kazdoba, T M; Leach, P T; Crawley, J N

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  15. Transcriptional divergence and conservation of human and mouse erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Pishesha, Novalia; Thiru, Prathapan; Shi, Jiahai; Eng, Jennifer C; Sankaran, Vijay G; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-03-18

    Mouse models have been used extensively for decades and have been instrumental in improving our understanding of mammalian erythropoiesis. Nonetheless, there are several examples of variation between human and mouse erythropoiesis. We performed a comparative global gene expression study using data from morphologically identical stage-matched sorted populations of human and mouse erythroid precursors from early to late erythroblasts. Induction and repression of major transcriptional regulators of erythropoiesis, as well as major erythroid-important proteins, are largely conserved between the species. In contrast, at a global level we identified a significant extent of divergence between the species, both at comparable stages and in the transitions between stages, especially for the 500 most highly expressed genes during development. This suggests that the response of multiple developmentally regulated genes to key erythroid transcriptional regulators represents an important modification that has occurred in the course of erythroid evolution. In developing a systematic framework to understand and study conservation and divergence between human and mouse erythropoiesis, we show how mouse models can fail to mimic specific human diseases and provide predictions for translating findings from mouse models to potential therapies for human disease.

  16. Differences in susceptibility of mouse strains to tetrodotoxin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hodaka

    2016-09-01

    The mouse bioassay for tetrodotoxin has been used for many years in Japan. To the best of our knowledge, however, there have only been a few reports that have specifically investigated differences in susceptibility to tetrodotoxin among mouse strains. In this study, we investigated the response of various mouse strains to tetrodotoxin. Tetrodotoxin solution was injected intraperitoneally into male mice of 5 inbred strains (A/J, BALB/c, C3H/He, C57BL/6, and DBA/2) and male and female mice of 2 non-inbred strains (ddY and ICR). Significant differences in susceptibility to tetrodotoxin were found among the mouse strains tested. In comparison to the ddY male mice, which are designated to be used in the Japanese reference method, the 5 inbred strains of mice tested were significantly more resistant to tetrodotoxin. However, no significant differences in tetrodotoxin susceptibility were observed between ddY male and female mice or between ddY male mice and ICR male and female mice. These results indicate that the users of the mouse bioassay should pay attention to differences in mouse strain in susceptibility to tetrodotoxin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. On Parallel Streams through the Mouse Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Denman, Daniel J.; Contreras, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The mouse visual system is an emerging model for the study of cortical and thalamic circuit function. To maximize the usefulness of this model system, it is important to analyze the similarities and differences between the organization of all levels of the murid visual system with other, better studied systems (e.g., non-human primates and the domestic cat). While the understanding of mouse retina and cortex has expanded rapidly, less is known about mouse dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). Here, we study whether parallel processing streams exist in mouse dLGN. We use a battery of stimuli that have been previously shown to successfully distinguish parallel streams in other species: electrical stimulation of the optic chiasm, contrast-reversing stationary gratings at varying spatial phase, drifting sinusoidal gratings, dense noise for receptive field reconstruction, and frozen contrast-modulating noise. As in the optic nerves of domestic cats and non-human primates, we find evidence for multiple conduction velocity groups after optic chiasm stimulation. As in so-called “visual mammals”, we find a subpopulation of mouse dLGN cells showing non-linear spatial summation. However, differences in stimulus selectivity and sensitivity do not provide sufficient basis for identification of clearly distinct classes of relay cells. Nevertheless, consistent with presumptively homologous status of dLGNs of all mammals, there are substantial similarities between response properties of mouse dLGN neurons and those of cats and primates. PMID:27065811

  18. Mouse Models to Study Dengue Virus Immunology and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zellweger, Raphaël M.; Shresta, Sujan

    2014-01-01

    The development of a compelling murine model of dengue virus (DENV) infection has been challenging, because DENV clinical isolates do not readily replicate or cause pathology in immunocompetent mice. However, research using immunocompromised mice and/or mouse-adapted viruses allows investigation of questions that may be impossible to address in human studies. In this review, we discuss the potential strengths and limitations of existing mouse models of dengue disease. Human studies are descriptive by nature; moreover, the strain, time, and sequence of infection are often unknown. In contrast, in mice, the conditions of infection are well defined and a large number of experimental parameters can be varied at will. Therefore, mouse models offer an opportunity to experimentally test hypotheses that are based on epidemiological observations. In particular, gain-of-function or loss-of-function models can be established to assess how different components of the immune system (either alone or in combination) contribute to protection or pathogenesis during secondary infections or after vaccination. In addition, mouse models have been used for pre-clinical testing of anti-viral drugs or for vaccine development studies. Conclusions based on mouse experiments must be extrapolated to DENV-infection in humans with caution due to the inherent limitations of animal models. However, research in mouse models is a useful complement to in vitro and epidemiological data, and may delineate new areas that deserve attention during future human studies. PMID:24782859

  19. On Parallel Streams through the Mouse Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Denman, Daniel J; Contreras, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The mouse visual system is an emerging model for the study of cortical and thalamic circuit function. To maximize the usefulness of this model system, it is important to analyze the similarities and differences between the organization of all levels of the murid visual system with other, better studied systems (e.g., non-human primates and the domestic cat). While the understanding of mouse retina and cortex has expanded rapidly, less is known about mouse dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). Here, we study whether parallel processing streams exist in mouse dLGN. We use a battery of stimuli that have been previously shown to successfully distinguish parallel streams in other species: electrical stimulation of the optic chiasm, contrast-reversing stationary gratings at varying spatial phase, drifting sinusoidal gratings, dense noise for receptive field reconstruction, and frozen contrast-modulating noise. As in the optic nerves of domestic cats and non-human primates, we find evidence for multiple conduction velocity groups after optic chiasm stimulation. As in so-called "visual mammals", we find a subpopulation of mouse dLGN cells showing non-linear spatial summation. However, differences in stimulus selectivity and sensitivity do not provide sufficient basis for identification of clearly distinct classes of relay cells. Nevertheless, consistent with presumptively homologous status of dLGNs of all mammals, there are substantial similarities between response properties of mouse dLGN neurons and those of cats and primates.

  20. Cytotoxic effects of propiconazole and its metabolites in mouse and human hepatoma cells and primary mouse hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Propiconazole is a triazole-containing fungicide that is used agriculturally on grasses, fruits, grains, seeds, hardwoods, and conifers. Propiconazole is a mouse liver hepatotoxicant and a hepatocarcinogen and has adverse reproductive and developmental toxicities in exp...

  1. Cytotoxic effects of propiconazole and its metabolites in mouse and human hepatoma cells and primary mouse hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Propiconazole is a triazole-containing fungicide that is used agriculturally on grasses, fruits, grains, seeds, hardwoods, and conifers. Propiconazole is a mouse liver hepatotoxicant and a hepatocarcinogen and has adverse reproductive and developmental toxicities in exp...

  2. Characterization of the EP receptor types that mediate longitudinal smooth muscle contraction of human colon, mouse colon and mouse ileum.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, S E; Smith, J E; Borman, R A; Cox, H M

    2011-08-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ) is an inflammatory mediator implicated in several gastrointestinal pathologies that affect normal intestinal transit. The aim was to establish the contribution of the four EP receptor types (EP(1-4) ), in human colon, that mediate PGE(2) -induced longitudinal smooth muscle contraction. Changes in isometric muscle tension of human colon, mouse colon and mouse ileum were measured in organ baths in response to receptor-specific agonists and antagonists. In addition, lidocaine was used to block neurogenic activity to investigate whether EP receptors were pre- or post-junctional. PGE(2) contracted longitudinal muscle from human and mouse colon and mouse ileum. These contractions were inhibited by the EP(1) receptor antagonist, EP(1) A in human colon, whereas a combination of EP(1) A and the EP(3) antagonist, L798106 inhibited agonist responses in both mouse preparations. The EP(3) agonist, sulprostone also increased muscle tension in both mouse tissues, and these responses were inhibited by lidocaine in the colon but not in the ileum. Although PGE(2) consistently contracted all three muscle preparations, butaprost decreased tension by activating smooth muscle EP(2) receptors in both colonic tissues. Alternatively, in mouse ileum, butaprost responses were lidocaine-sensitive, suggesting that it was activating prejunctional EP(2) receptors on inhibitory motor neurons. Conversely, EP(4) receptors were not functional in all the intestinal muscle preparations tested. PGE(2) -induced contraction of longitudinal smooth muscle is mediated by EP(1) receptors in human colon and by a combination of EP(1) and EP(3) receptors in mouse intestine, whereas EP(2) receptors modulate relaxation in all three preparations. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. MR images of mouse brain using clinical 3T MR scanner and 4CH-Mouse coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Soo Mee; Park, Eun Mi; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Lee, Junghyun; Han, Bo Mi; Lee, Jeong Kyong; Lee, Su Bin

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Although small-bore high-field magnets are useful for research in small rodent models,this technology, however, has not been easily accessible to most researchers. This current study, thus,tried to evaluate the usability of 4CH-Mouse coil (Philips Healthcare, Best, the Netherlands) forpreclinical investigations in clinical 3T MR scan environment. We evaluated the effects of ischemicpreconditioning (IP) in the mouse stroke model with clinical 3T MR scanner and 4CH-Mouse coil. Materials and Methods: Experiments were performed on male C57BL/6 mice that either received the IP or sham operation (control). Three different MR sequences including diffusion weighted images (DWI), T2-weighted images (T2WI), and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) were performed on the mouse brains following 24, 72 hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and analyzed for infarct lesions. Results: The images showed that the IP-treated mouse brains had significantly smaller infarct volumes compared to the control group. Of the MR sequences employed, the T2WI showed the highest level of correlations with postmortem infarct volume measurements. Conclusions: The clinical 3T MR scanner turned out to have a solid potential as a practical tool for imaging small animal brains. MR sequences including DWI, T2WI, FLAIR were obtained with acceptable resolution and in a reasonable time constraint in evaluating a mouse stroke model brain.

  4. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies.

    PubMed

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-Ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-Aki K; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-05-20

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module ("Kibo") on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides "space-based controls" by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments.

  5. A Progressive Translational Mouse Model of Human VCP Disease: The VCP R155H/+ Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nalbandian, Angèle; Llewellyn, Katrina J.; Badadani, Mallikarjun; Yin, Hong Z.; Nguyen, Christopher; Katheria, Veeral; Watts, Giles; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Vesa, Jouni; Caiozzo, Vincent; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Weiss, John H.; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP) gene cause hereditary Inclusion Body Myopathy (hIBM) associated with Paget disease of bone (PDB), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). More recently they have been linked to 2% of familial ALS cases. A knock-in mouse model offers the opportunity to study VCP-associated pathogenesis. Methods The VCPR155H/+ knock-in mouse model was assessed for muscle strength, immunohistochemical, Western, apoptosis, autophagy and MicroPET/CT imaging analyses. Results VCPR155H/+ mice developed significant progressive muscle weakness, and the quadriceps and brain developed progressive cytoplasmic accumulation of TDP-43, ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies and increased LC3-II staining. MicroCT analyses revealed Paget-like lesions at the ends of long bones. Spinal cord demonstrated neurodegenerative changes, ubiquitin, and TDP-43 pathology of motor neurons. Discussion VCPR155H/+ knock-in mice represent an excellent pre-clinical model for understanding VCP-associated disease mechanisms and future treatments. PMID:23169451

  6. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-aki K.; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module (“Kibo”) on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides “space-based controls” by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments. PMID:26822934

  7. Phenotype of the taurine transporter knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Warskulat, Ulrich; Heller-Stilb, Birgit; Oermann, Evelyn; Zilles, Karl; Haas, Helmut; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    This chapter reports present knowledge on the properties of mice with disrupted gene coding for the taurine transporter (taut-/- mice). Study of those mice unraveled some of the roles of taurine and its membrane transport for the development and maintenance of normal organ functions and morphology. When compared with wild-type controls, taut-/- mice have decreased taurine levels in skeletal and heart muscle by about 98%, in brain, kidney, plasma, and retina by 80 to 90%, and in liver by about 70%. taut-/- mice exhibit a lower body mass as well as a strongly reduced exercise capacity compared with taut+/- and wild-type mice. Furthermore, taut-/- mice show a variety of pathological features, for example, subtle derangement of renal osmoregulation, changes in neuroreceptor expression, and loss of long-term potentiation in the striatum, and they develop clinically relevant age-dependent disorders, for example, visual, auditory, and olfactory dysfunctions, unspecific hepatitis, and liver fibrosis. Taurine-deficient animal models such as acutely dietary-manipulated foxes and cats, pharmacologically induced taurine-deficient rats, and taurine transporter knockout mouse are powerful tools allowing identification of the mechanisms and complexities of diseases mediated by impaired taurine transport and taurine depletion (Chapman et al., 1993; Heller-Stilb et al., 2002; Huxtable, 1992; Lake, 1993; Moise et al., 1991; Novotny et al., 1991; Pion et al., 1987; Timbrell et al., 1995; Warskulat et al., 2004, 2006b). Taurine, which is the most abundant amino acid in many tissues, is normally found in intracellular concentrations of 10 to 70 mmol/kg in mammalian heart, brain, skeletal muscle, liver, and retina (Chapman et al., 1993; Green et al., 1991; Huxable, 1992; Timbrell et al., 1995). These high taurine levels are maintained by an ubiquitous expression of Na(+)-dependent taurine transporter (TAUT) in the plasma membrane (Burg, 1995; Kwon and Handler, 1995; Lang et al., 1998

  8. Genetically modified mouse models addressing gonadotropin function.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Laura D; Rulli, Susana B; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2014-03-01

    The development of genetically modified animals has been useful to understand the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the gonadotropin function. It is well known that alterations in the secretion of a single hormone is capable of producing profound reproductive abnormalities. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone normally secreted by the human placenta, and structurally and functionally it is related to pituitary LH. LH and hCG bind to the same LH/hCG receptor, and hCG is often used as an analog of LH to boost gonadotropin action. There are many physiological and pathological conditions where LH/hCG levels and actions are elevated. In order to understand how elevated LH/hCG levels may impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis we have developed a transgenic mouse model with chronic hCG hypersecretion. Female mice develop many gonadal and extragonadal phenotypes including obesity, infertility, hyperprolactinemia, and pituitary and mammary gland tumors. This article summarizes recent findings on the mechanisms involved in pituitary gland tumorigenesis and hyperprolactinemia in the female mice hypersecreting hCG, in particular the relationship of progesterone with the hyperprolactinemic condition of the model. In addition, we describe the role of hyperprolactinemia as the main cause of infertility and the phenotypic abnormalities in these mice, and the use of dopamine agonists bromocriptine and cabergoline to normalize these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  9. Transgenic mouse offspring generated by ROSI.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Pedro; Pérez-Cerezales, Serafín; Laguna, Ricardo; Fernández-Gonzalez, Raúl; Sanjuanbenito, Belén Pintado; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The production of transgenic animals is an important tool for experimental and applied biology. Over the years, many approaches for the production of transgenic animals have been tried, including pronuclear microinjection, sperm-mediated gene transfer, transfection of male germ cells, somatic cell nuclear transfer and the use of lentiviral vectors. In the present study, we developed a new transgene delivery approach, and we report for the first time the production of transgenic animals by co-injection of DNA and round spermatid nuclei into non-fertilized mouse oocytes (ROSI). The transgene used was a construct containing the human CMV immediate early promoter and the enhanced GFP gene. With this procedure, 12% of the live offspring we obtained carried the transgene. This efficiency of transgenic production by ROSI was similar to the efficiency by pronuclear injection or intracytoplasmic injection of male gamete nuclei (ICSI). However, ICSI required fewer embryos to produce the same number of transgenic animals. The expression of Egfp mRNA and fluorescence of EGFP were found in the majority of the organs examined in 4 transgenic lines generated by ROSI. Tissue morphology and transgene expression were not distinguishable between transgenic animals produced by ROSI or pronuclear injection. Furthermore, our results are of particular interest because they indicate that the transgene incorporation mediated by intracytoplasmic injection of male gamete nuclei is not an exclusive property of mature sperm cell nuclei with compact chromatin but it can be accomplished with immature sperm cell nuclei with decondensed chromatin as well. The present study also provides alternative procedures for transgene delivery into embryos or reconstituted oocytes.

  10. Exploring Mouse Protein Function via Multiple Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Kong, Xiangyin; Zhang, Yunhua; Zhang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Although the number of available protein sequences is growing exponentially, functional protein annotations lag far behind. Therefore, accurate identification of protein functions remains one of the major challenges in molecular biology. In this study, we presented a novel approach to predict mouse protein functions. The approach was a sequential combination of a similarity-based approach, an interaction-based approach and a pseudo amino acid composition-based approach. The method achieved an accuracy of about 0.8450 for the 1st-order predictions in the leave-one-out and ten-fold cross-validations. For the results yielded by the leave-one-out cross-validation, although the similarity-based approach alone achieved an accuracy of 0.8756, it was unable to predict the functions of proteins with no homologues. Comparatively, the pseudo amino acid composition-based approach alone reached an accuracy of 0.6786. Although the accuracy was lower than that of the previous approach, it could predict the functions of almost all proteins, even proteins with no homologues. Therefore, the combined method balanced the advantages and disadvantages of both approaches to achieve efficient performance. Furthermore, the results yielded by the ten-fold cross-validation indicate that the combined method is still effective and stable when there are no close homologs are available. However, the accuracy of the predicted functions can only be determined according to known protein functions based on current knowledge. Many protein functions remain unknown. By exploring the functions of proteins for which the 1st-order predicted functions are wrong but the 2nd-order predicted functions are correct, the 1st-order wrongly predicted functions were shown to be closely associated with the genes encoding the proteins. The so-called wrongly predicted functions could also potentially be correct upon future experimental verification. Therefore, the accuracy of the presented method may be much higher in

  11. Myofiber orientation in the weanling mouse heart.

    PubMed

    McLean, M; Prothero, J

    1991-12-01

    This study provides a quantitative description at the cellular level of myofiber orientation throughout the ventricles of the mouse heart. We employed computer-based methods of three-dimensional reconstruction from 3 microns plastic-embedded serial sections. Registration marks were introduced by drilling minute holes into each plastic block. Subfields of selected sections were photographed at 20 x magnification, using a computer-controlled microscope. The 35-mm film frames were projected onto a digitizer tablet and the epi- and endocardial boundaries were digitized manually. The "heads" and "tails" of linear segments of a representative myofiber sample present in each projected image were digitized in point mode. The many x-, y-, z-coordinate tables generated by digitization were reassembled automatically, giving a numerical description of the myofiber pattern. This pattern was studied interactively on a high-performance graphics workstation. We find that the heart wall is, to a first approximation, a "sandwich," in which the myofibers in the middle layer run mainly circumferentially, whereas those in the inner and outer layers run parallel or oblique to the apical-basal axis, a variant of the classical model of the myofiber pattern. We observed a "sleeve" in the interventricular septum, formed by longitudinal and oblique myofibers, a feature which apparently has not been described previously. Myofibers not running parallel to the transverse or longitudinal planes were not resolved in this study. We conclude that three-dimensional reconstruction of the cardiac myofiber pattern at the light-microscopic level, while laborious, is technically feasible and scientifically worthwhile.

  12. Acute Bacterial Inflammation of the Mouse Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Bayli J.; Colopy, Sara A.; Jerde, Travis J.; Loftus, Christopher J.; Bushman, Wade

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostatic inflammation is gaining increasing attention as a potential etiologic factor in prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia, lower urinary tract symptoms, and CPPS. This study was performed to address the need for a well characterized model of acute prostatic inflammation that may be used to study the effect of acute inflammation on epithelial and stromal cell proliferation, voiding behavior, and neurovascular physiology. METHODS Uropathogenic E. coli 1677 was instilled transurethrally into adult C57BL/6J male mice. Prostates were analyzed at 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, or 14 days post-instillation and compared to saline-instilled and naïve controls. Time course and severity of inflammation were characterized by the quantity and type of inflammatory infiltrate present, hemorrhage, proliferation, and reactive hyperplasia. RT-PCR was performed to characterize inflammatory mediators including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-18, IL-6, IL-10, IL-8, TNFα, and COX-2. RESULTS Inflammation was evident in all lobes of the prostate with the DLP most severely affected. Infection consistently led to a significant increase in neutrophils and macrophages in the early stages of prostate infection, followed by lymphocytic inflammation at the later time points. Inflammation was accompanied by induction of several inflammatory genes, including IL-1 family members, IL-6, and COX-2, and induced a significant increase in epithelial proliferation and reactive hyperplasia in all three prostate lobes. CONCLUSIONS Transurethral inoculation of uropathogenic E. coli 1677 reliably infects the mouse prostate, produces a significant inflammatory response, and induces quantifiable epithelial proliferation and reactive hyperplasia. PMID:21681776

  13. Development of a novel mouse constipation model

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chao; Wang, Kai-Yue; Yu, Zhi; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a novel mouse constipation model. METHODS: Animals were randomly divided into three groups, and intragastrically administered 0-4 °C saline (ice-cold group) or 15-20 °C saline (saline control group) daily for 14 d, or were left untreated (blank control group). Stools were collected 3-24 h after treatment to record the wet and dry weights and the stool form. Intestinal propulsion experiments were carried out and defecation time was measured for six days continuously after suspending treatments. The expressions of PGP9.5 were detected by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Based on the percentage of stool weight changes compared with baseline (before irritation) in 9-14 d, stool weight changes were classified into three levels. Each level shows a different body state, which is state I (no change: plus or minus 5%), state II (slightly decreased: 5%-15%) and state III (decreased: 15%-25%). In state III, between day 9-14, the stool weights decreased by 15%-25% compared with the baseline, and changed at a rate > 10% compared with blank control values, and the stools became small and dry. Additionally, intestinal functions degenerated in these animals, and PGP9.5-positive expression markedly decreased in jejunum, ileum and proximal colon myenteric plexus. CONCLUSION: Irritation with ice-cold saline is a stable, repeatable method in building constipation model in mice for exploring the pathogenesis and treatment options of constipation, and the change of stool weight and size may serve as a useful tool to judge a constipation model success or not. PMID:26973418

  14. Genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Carmen; Barbacid, Mariano

    2013-04-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal types of human cancer for which there are no effective therapies. Deep sequencing of PDAC tumors has revealed the presence of a high number of mutations (>50) that affect at least a dozen key signaling pathways. This scenario highlights the urgent need to develop experimental models that faithfully reproduce the natural history of these human tumors in order to understand their biology and to design therapeutic approaches that might effectively interfere with their multiple mutated pathways. Over the last decade, several models, primarily based on the genetic activation of resident KRas oncogenes knocked-in within the endogenous KRas locus have been generated. These models faithfully reproduce the histological lesions that characterize human pancreatic tumors. Decoration of these models with additional mutations, primarily involving tumor suppressor loci known to be also mutated in human PDAC tumors, results in accelerated tumor progression and in the induction of invasive and metastatic malignancies. Mouse PDACs also display a desmoplastic stroma and inflammatory responses that closely resemble those observed in human patients. Interestingly, adult mice appear to be resistant to PDAC development unless the animals undergo pancreatic damage, mainly in the form of acute, chronic or even temporary pancreatitis. In this review, we describe the most representative models available to date and how their detailed characterization is allowing us to understand their cellular origin as well as the events involved in tumor progression. Moreover, their molecular dissection is starting to unveil novel therapeutic strategies that could be translated to the clinic in the very near future. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Radioadaptive Cytoprotective Pathways in the Mouse Retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Wotring, V.; Theriot, C.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation implies a risk of tissue degeneration. Radiation retinopathy is a complication of radiotherapy and exhibits common features with other retinopathies and neuropathies. Exposure to a low radiation dose elicits protective cellular events (radioadaptive response), reducing the stress of a subsequent higher dose. To assess the risk of radiation-induced retinal changes and the extent to which a small priming dose reduces this risk, we used a mouse model exposed to a source of Cs-137-gamma radiation. Gene expression profiling of retinas from non-irradiated control C57BL/6J mice (C) were compared to retinas from mice treated with a low 50 mGy dose (LD), a high 6 Gy dose (HD), and a combined treatment of 50 mGy (priming) and 6 Gy (challenge) doses (LHD). Whole retina RNA was isolated and expression analysis for selected genes performed by RTqPCR. Relevant target genes associated with cell death/survival, oxidative stress, cellular stress response and inflammation pathways, were analyzed. Cellular stress response genes were upregulated at 4 hr after the challenge dose in LHD retinas (Sirt1: 1.5 fold, Hsf1: 1.7 fold, Hspa1a: 2.5 fold; Hif1a: 1.8 fold, Bag1: 1.7). A similar trend was observed in LD animals. Most antioxidant enzymes (Hmox1, Sod2, Prdx1, Cygb, Cat1) and inflammatory mediators (NF B, Ptgs2 and Tgfb1) were upregulated in LHD and LD retinas. Expression of the pro-survival gene Bcl2 was upregulated in LD (6-fold) and LHD (4-fold) retinas. In conclusion, cytoprotective gene networks activation in the retina suggests a radioadaptive response to a priming irradiation dose, with mitigation of the deleterious effects of a subsequent high dose exposure. The enhancement of these cytoprotective mechanisms has potential value as a countermeasure to ocular alterations caused by radiation alone or in combination with other factors in spaceflight environments.

  16. Mouse p63 variants and chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junxia; Lu, Yaojuan; Qiao, Longwei; Ran, Deyuan; Li, Na; Cao, Hong; Gao, Yan; Zheng, Qiping

    2013-01-01

    As a critical member of the p53 family of transcription factors, p63 has been implicated a role in development than in tumor formation, because p63 is seldom mutated in human cancers, while p63 null mice exhibit severe developmental abnormalities without increasing cancer susceptibility. Notably, besides the major epithelial and cardiac defect, p63 deficient mice show severe limb and craniofacial abnormalities. In addition, humans with p63 mutations also show severe limb and digit defects, suggesting a putative role of p63 in skeletal development. There are eight p63 variants which encode for the TAp63 and ΔNp63 isoforms by alternative promoters. How these isoforms function during skeletal development is currently largely unknown. Our recent transgenic studies suggest a role of TAP63α, but not ΔNP63α, during embryonic long bone development. However, the moderate skeletal phenotypes in the TAP63α transgenic mice suggest requirement of additional p63 isoform(s) for the limb defects in p63 null mice. Here, we report analysis of mouse p63 variants in MCT and ATDC5 cells, two cell models undergo hypertrophic differentiation and mimic the process of endochondral bone formation upon growth arrest or induction. We detected increased level of p63 variants in hypertrophic MCT cells by regular RT-PCR analysis. Further analysis by qRT-PCR, we detected significantly upregulated level of γ variant (p<0.05), but not α or β variant (p>0.05), in hypertrophic MCT cells than in proliferative MCT cells. Moreover, we detected upregulated TAP63γ in ATDC5 cells undergoing hypertrophic differentiation. Our results suggest that TAp63γ plays a positive role during endochondral bone formation. PMID:24294373

  17. Thyroid Hormone Signaling in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Arbogast, Patrick; Flamant, Frédéric; Godement, Pierre; Glösmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is a crucial regulator of gene expression in the developing and adult retina. Here we sought to map sites of thyroid hormone signaling at the cellular level using the transgenic FINDT3 reporter mouse model in which neurons express β-galactosidase (β-gal) under the control of a hybrid Gal4-TRα receptor when triiodothyronine (T3) and cofactors of thyroid receptor signaling are present. In the adult retina, nearly all neurons of the ganglion cell layer (GCL, ganglion cells and displaced amacrine cells) showed strong β-gal labeling. In the inner nuclear layer (INL), a minority of glycineric and GABAergic amacrine cells showed β-gal labeling, whereas the majority of amacrine cells were unlabeled. At the level of amacrine types, β-gal labeling was found in a large proportion of the glycinergic AII amacrines, but only in a small proportion of the cholinergic/GABAergic ‘starburst’ amacrines. At postnatal day 10, there also was a high density of strongly β-gal-labeled neurons in the GCL, but only few amacrine cells were labeled in the INL. There was no labeling of bipolar cells, horizontal cells and Müller glia cells at both stages. Most surprisingly, the photoreceptor somata in the outer nuclear layer also showed no β-gal label, although thyroid hormone is known to control cone opsin expression. This is the first record of thyroid hormone signaling in the inner retina of an adult mammal. We hypothesize that T3 levels in photoreceptors are below the detection threshold of the reporter system. The topographical distribution of β-gal-positive cells in the GCL follows the overall neuron distribution in that layer, with more T3-signaling cells in the ventral than the dorsal half-retina. PMID:27942035

  18. Distribution of Cytoglobin in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Reuss, Stefan; Wystub, Sylvia; Disque-Kaiser, Ursula; Hankeln, Thomas; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a vertebrate globin with so far poorly defined function. It is expressed in the fibroblast cell-lineage but has also been found in neurons. Here we provide, using immunohistochemistry, a detailed study on the distribution of Cygb in the mouse brain. While Cygb is a cytoplasmic protein in active cells of the supportive tissue, in neurons it is located in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. We found the expression of Cygb in all brain regions, although only a fraction of the neurons was Cygb-positive. Signals were of different intensity ranging from faint to very intense. Telencephalic neurons in all laminae of the cerebral cortex (CCo), in the olfactory bulb (in particular periglomerular cells), in the hippocampal formation (strongly stained pyramidal cells with long processes), basal ganglia (scattered multipolar neurons in the dorsal striatum, dorsal and ventral pallidum (VP)), and in the amygdala (neurons with unlabeled processes) were labeled by the antibody. In the diencephalon, we observed Cygb-positive neurons of moderate intensity in various nuclei of the dorsal thalamus, in the hypothalamus, metathalamus (geniculate nuclei), epithalamus with strong labeling of habenular nucleus neurons and no labeling of pineal cells, and in the ventral thalamus. Tegmental neurons stood out by strongly stained somata with long processes in, e.g., the laterodorsal nucleus. In the tectum, faintly labeled neurons and fibers were detected in the superior colliculus (SC). The cerebellum exhibited unlabeled Purkinje-neurons but signs of strong afferent cortical innervation. Neurons in the gray matter of the spinal cord showed moderate immunofluorescence. Peripheral ganglia were not labeled by the antibody. The Meynert-fascicle and the olfactory and optic nerves/tracts were the only Cygb-immunoreactive (Cygb-IR) fiber systems. Notably, we found a remarkable level of colocalization of Cygb and neuronal nitric oxide (NO)-synthase in neurons, which supports a

  19. Mouse models of radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Schiestl, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced (RI) secondary cancers were not a major clinical concern even as little as 15 years ago. However, advances in cancer diagnostics, therapy, and supportive care have saved numerous lives and many former cancer patients are now living for 5, 10, 20, and more years beyond their initial diagnosis. The majority of these patients have received radiotherapy as a part of their treatment regimen and are now beginning to develop secondary cancers arising from normal tissue exposure to damaging effects of ionizing radiation. Because historically patients rarely survived past the extended latency periods inherent to these RI cancers, very little effort was channeled towards the research leading to the development of therapeutic agents intended to prevent or ameliorate oncogenic effects of normal tissue exposure to radiation. The number of RI cancers is expected to increase very rapidly in the near future, but the field of cancer biology might not be prepared to address important issues related to this phenomena. One such issue is the ability to accurately differentiate between primary tumors and de novo arising secondary tumors in the same patient. Another issue is the lack of therapeutic agents intended to reduce such cancers in the future. To address these issues, large-scale epidemiological studies must be supplemented with appropriate animal modeling studies. This work reviews relevant mouse (Mus musculus) models of inbred and F1 animals and methodologies of induction of most relevant radiation-associated cancers: leukemia, lymphoma, and lung and breast cancers. Where available, underlying molecular pathologies are included. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mouse Genetic Background Influences the Dental Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Konicki, William S.; Wright, J. Timothy; Suggs, Cynthia; Xue, Hui; Kuehl, Melissa A.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Gibson, Carolyn W.

    2014-01-01

    Dental enamel covers the crown of the vertebrate tooth and is considered to be the hardest tissue in the body. Enamel develops during secretion of an extracellular matrix by ameloblast cells in the tooth germ, prior to eruption of the tooth into the oral cavity. Secreted enamel proteins direct mineralization patterns during the maturation stage of amelogenesis as the tooth prepares to erupt. The amelogenins are the most abundant enamel proteins, and are required for normal enamel development. Phenotypic differences were observed between incisors from individual Amelx (Amelogenin) null mice that had a mixed 129xC57BL/6J genetic background, and between inbred wld-type (WT) mice with different genetic backgrounds (C57BL/6J, C3H/HEJ, FVB/NJ). We hypothesized this could be due to modifier genes, as human patients with a mutation in an enamel protein gene causing the enamel defect amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) also can have varied appearance of dentitions within a kindred. Enamel density measurements varied for all WT inbred strains midway during incisor development. Enamel thickness varied between some WT strains and, unexpectedly, dentin density varied extensively between incisors and molars of all WT and Amelx null strains studied. WT FVB/NJ incisors were more similar to Amelx null than to the other WT strains in incisor height/weight ratio and pattern of enamel mineralization. Strain-specific differences led to the conclusion that modifier genes may be implicated in determining both normal development and severity of enamel appearance in AI mouse models and may in future studies be related to phenotypic heterogeneity within human AI kindreds reported in the literature. PMID:24732779

  1. Transmission of Mouse Parvovirus by Fomites

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Susan R; Paturzo, Frank X; Smith, Peter C; Macy, James D

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the current studies was to determine the risk of transmission of mouse parvovirus (MPV) by caging and husbandry practices. To determine whether MPV can be transmitted during cage changes in a biologic safety cabinet without the use of disinfectants, 14 cages of Swiss Webster mice were inoculated with MPV. Cages containing infected mice were interspersed among 14 cages housing naïve Swiss Webster mice. At 1, 2, and 4 wk after inoculation of the mice, cages were changed across each row. All naïve mice housed adjacent to infected mice remained seronegative. To determine the risk of environmental contamination, nesting pads that were used to sample the room floor during husbandry procedures at 1, 2, 4, and 6 wk after inoculation of the mice were placed in cages with naïve mice. None of the mice exposed to the pads became MPV seropositive. To determine whether components from cages that had housed MPV-infected mice could transmit MPV, Swiss Webster mice were exposed to soiled bedding or used cages, drinking valves, food, cage bottoms, wire bars and filter tops, nesting material, or shelters. With the exception of drinking valves, all mice exposed to other components became MPV seropositive. Fourteen cages that had housed MPV-infected mice were washed but not autoclaved; mice housed in the washed cages did not become MPV seropositive. In conclusion, all cage components can serve as fomites, with the drinking valve being the least risky. Cage washing alone was sufficient to remove or inactivate MPV. PMID:23294883

  2. Integrative analysis of the mouse embryonic transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amar V; Knudsen, Kenneth B; Knudsen, Thomas B

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring global gene expression provides insight into how genes and regulatory signals work together to guide embryo development. The fields of developmental biology and teratology are now confronted with the need for automated access to a reference library of gene-expression signatures that benchmark programmed (genetic) and adaptive (environmental) regulation of the embryonic transcriptome. Such a library must be constructed from highly-distributed microarray data. Birth Defects Systems Manager (BDSM), an open access knowledge management system, provides custom software to mine public microarray data focused on developmental health and disease. The present study describes tools for seamless data integration in the BDSM library (MetaSample, MetaChip, CIAeasy) using the QueryBDSM module. A field test of the prototype was run using published microarray data series derived from a variety of laboratories, experiments, microarray platforms, organ systems, and developmental stages. The datasets focused on several developing systems in the mouse embryo, including preimplantation stages, heart and nerve development, testis and ovary development, and craniofacial development. Using BDSM data integration tools, a gene-expression signature for 346 genes was resolved that accurately classified samples by organ system and developmental sequence. The module builds a potential for the BDSM approach to decipher a large number developmental processes through comparative bioinformatics analysis of embryological systems at-risk for specific defects, using multiple scenarios to define the range of probabilities leading from molecular phenotype to clinical phenotype. We conclude that an integrative analysis of global gene-expression of the developing embryo can form the foundation for constructing a reference library of signaling pathways and networks for normal and abnormal regulation of the embryonic transcriptome. These tools are available free of charge from the web-site http

  3. Integrative analysis of the mouse embryonic transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar V; Knudsen, Kenneth B; Knudsen, Thomas B

    2007-04-10

    Monitoring global gene expression provides insight into how genes and regulatory signals work together to guide embryo development. The fields of developmental biology and teratology are now confronted with the need for automated access to a reference library of gene-expression signatures that benchmark programmed (genetic) and adaptive (environmental) regulation of the embryonic transcriptome. Such a library must be constructed from highly-distributed microarray data. Birth Defects Systems Manager (BDSM), an open access knowledge management system, provides custom software to mine public microarray data focused on developmental health and disease. The present study describes tools for seamless data integration in the BDSM library (MetaSample, MetaChip, CIAeasy) using the QueryBDSM module. A field test of the prototype was run using published microarray data series derived from a variety of laboratories, experiments, microarray platforms, organ systems, and developmental stages. The datasets focused on several developing systems in the mouse embryo, including preimplantation stages, heart and nerve development, testis and ovary development, and craniofacial development. Using BDSM data integration tools, a gene-expression signature for 346 genes was resolved that accurately classified samples by organ system and developmental sequence. The module builds a potential for the BDSM approach to decipher a large number developmental processes through comparative bioinformatics analysis of embryological systems at-risk for specific defects, using multiple scenarios to define the range of probabilities leading from molecular phenotype to clinical phenotype. We conclude that an integrative analysis of global gene-expression of the developing embryo can form the foundation for constructing a reference library of signaling pathways and networks for normal and abnormal regulation of the embryonic transcriptome. These tools are available free of charge from the web-site http

  4. Kisspeptin modulates fertilization capacity of mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Meng-Chieh; Wang, Jyun-Yuan; Lee, Yue-Jia; Jong, De-Shien; Tsui, Kuan-Hao; Chiu, Chih-Hsien

    2014-06-01

    Kisspeptin acts as an upstream regulator of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis, which is one of the main regulatory systems for mammalian reproduction. Kiss1 and its receptor Kiss1r (also known as G protein-coupled receptor 54 (Gpr54)) are expressed in various organs, but their functions are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression profiles and functions of kisspeptin and KISS1R in the reproductive tissues of imprinting control region mice. To identify the expression pattern and location of kisspeptin and KISS1R in gonads, testes and ovarian tissues were examined by immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining. Kisspeptin and KISS1R were expressed primarily in Leydig cells and seminiferous tubules respectively. KISS1R was specifically localized in the acrosomal region of spermatids and mature spermatozoa. Kisspeptin, but not KISS1R, was expressed in the cumulus-oocyte complex and oviductal epithelium of ovarian and oviductal tissues. The sperm intracellular calcium concentrations significantly increased in response to treatment with kisspeptin 10 in Fluo-4-loaded sperm. The IVF rates decreased after treatment of sperm with the kisspeptin antagonist peptide 234. These results suggest that kisspeptin and KISS1R might be involved in the fertilization process in the female reproductive tract. In summary, this study indicates that kisspeptin and KISS1R are expressed in female and male gametes, respectively, and in mouse reproductive tissues. These data strongly suggest that the kisspeptin system could regulate mammalian fertilization and reproduction. © 2014 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  5. TRPM3 expression in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Brown, R Lane; Xiong, Wei-Hong; Peters, James H; Tekmen-Clark, Merve; Strycharska-Orczyk, Iwona; Reed, Brian T; Morgans, Catherine W; Duvoisin, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels constitute a large family of cation permeable ion channels that serve crucial functions in sensory systems by transducing environmental changes into cellular voltage and calcium signals. Within the retina, two closely related members of the melastatin TRP family, TRPM1 and TRPM3, are highly expressed. TRPM1 has been shown to be required for the depolarizing response to light of ON-bipolar cells, but the role of TRPM3 in the retina is unknown. Immunohistochemical staining of mouse retina with an antibody directed against the C-terminus of TRPM3 labeled the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and a subset of cells in the ganglion cell layer. Within the IPL, TRPM3 immunofluorescence was markedly stronger in the OFF sublamina than in the ON sublamina. Electroretinogram recordings showed that the scotopic and photopic a- and b-waves of TRPM3(-/-) mice are normal indicating that TRPM3 does not play a major role in visual processing in the outer retina. TRPM3 activity was measured by calcium imaging and patch-clamp recording of immunopurified retinal ganglion cells. Application of the TRPM3 agonist, pregnenolone sulfate (PS), stimulated increases in intracellular calcium in ~40% of cells from wild type and TRPM1(‑/‑) mice, and the PS-stimulated increases in calcium were blocked by co-application of mefenamic acid, a TRPM3 antagonist. No PS-stimulated changes in fluorescence were observed in ganglion cells from TRPM3(-/-) mice. Similarly, PS-stimulated currents that could be blocked by mefenamic acid were recorded from wild type retinal ganglion cells but were absent in ganglion cells from TRPM3-/- mice.

  6. Operant sensation seeking in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Christopher M; Winder, Danny G

    2010-11-10

    Operant methods are powerful behavioral tools for the study of motivated behavior. These 'self-administration' methods have been used extensively in drug addiction research due to their high construct validity. Operant studies provide researchers a tool for preclinical investigation of several aspects of the addiction process. For example, mechanisms of acute reinforcement (both drug and non-drug) can be tested using pharmacological or genetic tools to determine the ability of a molecular target to influence self-administration behavior. Additionally, drug or food seeking behaviors can be studied in the absence of the primary reinforcer, and the ability of pharmacological compounds to disrupt this process is a preclinical model for discovery of molecular targets and compounds that may be useful for the treatment of addiction. One problem with performing intravenous drug self-administration studies in the mouse is the technical difficulty of maintaining catheter patency. Attrition rates in these experiments are high and can reach 40% or higher. Another general problem with drug self-administration is discerning which pharmacologically-induced effects of the reinforcer produce specific behaviors. For example, measurement of the reinforcing and neurological effects of psychostimulants can be confounded by their psychomotor effects. Operant methods using food reinforcement can avoid these pitfalls, although their utility in studying drug addiction is limited by the fact that some manipulations that alter drug self-administration have a minimal impact on food self-administration. For example, mesolimbic dopamine lesion or knockout of the D1 dopamine receptor reduce cocaine self-administration without having a significant impact on food self-administration. Sensory stimuli have been described for their ability to support operant responding as primary reinforcers (i.e. not conditioned reinforcers). Auditory and visual stimuli are self-administered by several species

  7. Mouse models for inherited endocrine and metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Piret, Siân E; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2011-12-01

    In vivo models represent important resources for investigating the physiological mechanisms underlying endocrine and metabolic disorders, and for pre-clinical translational studies that may include the assessments of new treatments. In the study of endocrine diseases, which affect multiple organs, in vivo models provide specific advantages over in vitro models, which are limited to investigation of isolated systems. In recent years, the mouse has become the popular choice for developing such in vivo mammalian models, as it has a genome that shares ∼85% identity to that of man, and has many physiological systems that are similar to those in man. Moreover, methods have been developed to alter the expression of genes in the mouse, thereby generating models for human diseases, which may be due to loss- or gain-of-function mutations. The methods used to generate mutations in the mouse genome include: chemical mutagenesis; conventional, conditional and inducible knockout models; knockin models and transgenic models, and these strategies are often complementary. This review describes some of the different strategies that are utilised for generating mouse models. In addition, some mouse models that have been successfully generated by these methods for some human hereditary endocrine and metabolic disorders are reviewed. In particular, the mouse models generated for parathyroid disorders, which include: the multiple endocrine neoplasias; hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome; disorders of the calcium-sensing receptor and forms of inherited hypoparathyroidism are discussed. The advances that have been made in our understanding of the mechanisms of these human diseases by investigations of these mouse models are described.

  8. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Hepcidin Peptides in Experimental Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    van Swelm, Rachel P. L.; Theurl, Milan; Theurl, Igor; Kemna, Erwin H.; van der Burgt, Yuri E. M.; Venselaar, Hanka; Dutilh, Bas E.; Russel, Frans G. M.; Weiss, Günter; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Fleming, Robert E.; Swinkels, Dorine W.

    2011-01-01

    The mouse is a valuable model for unravelling the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis, however, such studies still report hepcidin mRNA levels as a surrogate marker for bioactive hepcidin in its pivotal function to block ferroportin-mediated iron transport. Here, we aimed to assess bioactive mouse Hepcidin-1 (Hep-1) and its paralogue Hepcidin-2 (Hep-2) at the peptide level. To this purpose, fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) and tandem-MS was used for hepcidin identification, after which a time-of-flight (TOF) MS-based methodology was exploited to routinely determine Hep-1 and -2 levels in mouse serum and urine. This method was biologically validated by hepcidin assessment in: i) 3 mouse strains (C57Bl/6; DBA/2 and BABL/c) upon stimulation with intravenous iron and LPS, ii) homozygous Hfe knock out, homozygous transferrin receptor 2 (Y245X) mutated mice and double affected mice, and iii) mice treated with a sublethal hepatotoxic dose of paracetamol. The results showed that detection of Hep-1 was restricted to serum, whereas Hep-2 and its presumed isoforms were predominantly present in urine. Elevations in serum Hep-1 and urine Hep-2 upon intravenous iron or LPS were only moderate and varied considerably between mouse strains. Serum Hep-1 was decreased in all three hemochromatosis models, being lowest in the double affected mice. Serum Hep-1 levels correlated with liver hepcidin-1 gene expression, while acute liver damage by paracetamol depleted Hep-1 from serum. Furthermore, serum Hep-1 appeared to be an excellent indicator of splenic iron accumulation. In conclusion, Hep-1 and Hep-2 peptide responses in experimental mouse agree with the known biology of hepcidin mRNA regulators, and their measurement can now be implemented in experimental mouse models to provide novel insights in post-transcriptional regulation, hepcidin function, and kinetics. PMID:21408141

  9. Trans-NIH neuroscience initiatives on mouse phenotyping and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Moldin, S O; Farmer, M E; Chin, H R; Battey, J F

    2001-08-01

    In the post-genomic era, the laboratory mouse will excel as a premier mammalian system to study normal and disordered biological processes, in part because of low cost, but largely because of the rich opportunities that exist for exploiting genetic tools and technologies in the mouse to systematically determine mammalian gene function. Many robust models of human disease may therefore be developed, and these in turn will provide critical clues to understanding gene function. The full potential of the mouse for understanding many of the neural and behavioral phenotypes of relevance to neuroscientists has yet to be realized. With the full anatomy of the mouse genome at hand, researchers for the first time will be able to move beyond traditional gene-by-gene approaches and take a global view of gene expression patterns crucial for neurobiological processes. In response to an action plan for mouse genomics developed on the basis of recommendations from the scientific community, seven institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) initiated in 1999 a mouse genetics research program that specifically focused on neurobiology and complex behavior. The specific goals of these neuroscience initiatives are to develop high-throughput phenotyping assays and to initiate genome-wide mutagenesis projects to identify hundreds of mutant strains with heritable abnormalities of high relevance to neuroscientists. Assays and mutants generated in these efforts will be made widely available to the scientific community, and such resources will provide neuroscientists unprecedented opportunities to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of neural function and complex behavior. Such research tools ultimately will permit the manipulation and analysis of the mouse genome, as a means of gaining insight into the genetic bases of the mammalian nervous system and its complex disorders.

  10. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the mouse IKBKAP gene.

    PubMed

    Coli, R; Anderson, S L; Volpi, S A; Rubin, B Y

    2001-11-14

    The autosomal recessive disorder familial dysautonomia (FD) has recently been demonstrated to be caused by mutations in the IKBKAP gene, so named because an initial report suggested that it encoded an IkappaB kinase complex associated protein (IKAP). Two mutations in IKBKAP have been reported to cause FD. The major mutation is a T-->C transition in the donor splice site of intron 20 and the minor mutation is a missense mutation in exon 19 that disrupts a consensus serine/threonine kinase phosphorylation site. We have characterized the cDNA sequences of the mouse, rat and rabbit IKBKAP-encoded mRNAs and determined the genomic organization and chromosomal location of mouse IKBKAP. There is significant homology in the amino acid sequence of IKAP across species and the serine/threonine kinase phosphorylation site altered in the minor FD mutation of IKAP is conserved. The mouse and human IKBKAP genes exhibit significant conservation of their genomic organization and the intron 20 donor splice site sequence, altered in the major FD mutation, is conserved in the human and mouse genes. Mouse IKBKAP is located on the central portion of chromosome 4 and maps to a region in which there is conserved linkage homology between the human and mouse genomes. The homologies observed in the human and mouse sequences should allow, through the process of homologous recombination, for the generation of mice that bear the IKBKAP mutations present in individuals with FD. The characterization of such mice should provide significant information regarding the pathophysiology of FD.

  11. Assisting People with Multiple Disabilities Improve Their Computer-Pointing Efficiency with Hand Swing through a Standard Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Chiu, Sheng-Kai; Chu, Chiung-Ling; Shih, Ching-Tien; Liao, Yung-Kun; Lin, Chia-Chen

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated whether two people with multiple disabilities would be able to improve their pointing performance using hand swing with a standard mouse through an Extended Dynamic Pointing Assistive Program (EDPAP) and a newly developed mouse driver (i.e., a new mouse driver replaces standard mouse driver, and changes a mouse into a precise…

  12. Assisting People with Multiple Disabilities and Minimal Motor Behavior to Control Environmental Stimulation through a Mouse Wheel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Shih, Ching-Tien; Lin, Kun-Tsan; Chiang, Ming-Shan

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed whether two people with profound multiple disabilities and minimal motor behavior would be able to control environmental stimulation using thumb poke ability with a mouse wheel and a newly developed mouse driver (i.e., a new mouse driver replacing standard mouse driver, and turning a mouse into a precise thumb poke detector).…

  13. Assisting People with Multiple Disabilities and Minimal Motor Behavior to Control Environmental Stimulation through a Mouse Wheel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Shih, Ching-Tien; Lin, Kun-Tsan; Chiang, Ming-Shan

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed whether two people with profound multiple disabilities and minimal motor behavior would be able to control environmental stimulation using thumb poke ability with a mouse wheel and a newly developed mouse driver (i.e., a new mouse driver replacing standard mouse driver, and turning a mouse into a precise thumb poke detector).…

  14. Ultraviolet stimulated melanogenesis by human melanocytes is augmented by di-acyl glycerol but not TPA

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, P.S.; Wren, F.E.; Matthews, J.N. )

    1990-02-01

    Epidermal melanocytes (MC) synthesize melanin in response to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The mechanisms mediating the UV-induced activation of melanogenesis are unknown but since UVR induces turnover of membrane phospholipids generating prostaglandins (PGs) and other products, it is possible that one of these might provide the activating signal. We have examined the effects of prostaglandins (PGs) E1, E2, D2, F2 alpha, and di-acyl glycerol upon the UV-induced responses of cultured human MC and the Cloudman S91 melanoma cell line. The PGs had little effect on unirradiated cells and did not alter the response to UVR in either human MC or S91 melanoma cells. However, a synthetic analogue of di-acyl glycerol, 1-oleyl 2-acetyl glycerol (OAG), caused a significant (P less than 0.0001), dose-related augmentation of melanin content both in human MC (seven-fold) and S91 cells (three-fold). UVR caused a significant augmentation of the OAG-induced melanogenesis of both human MC and S91 cells. Since OAG is known to activate protein kinase C, it was possible that the observed modulation of the UVR signal could be via that pathway. Di-octanoyl glycerol, another di-acyl glycerol, which activates kinase C, caused a small (70%) increase in melanogenesis in MC which was not altered by UVR. However, 12-0 tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA), a potent activator of protein kinase C, had no significant effect on either basal or UV-induced melanin synthesis in either cell type. These data suggest that the UV-induced signal activating melanogenesis could be mediated by di-acyl glycerol. Furthermore, they imply that the signal is transduced via an alternative, pathway that might be independent of protein kinase C.

  15. Chromosomal localization of mouse bullous pemphigoid antigens, BPAG1 and BPAG2: Identification of a new region of homology between mouse and human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A. ); Li, K.; Sawamura, D.; Chu, Monli; Uitto, J. ); Giudice, G.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Two bullous pemphigoid antigens, BPAG1 and BPAG2, have been recently cloned and mapped to human chromosomes 6p12-p11 and 10q24.3, respectively. In this study, we localized the corresponding mouse genes by interspecific backcross analysis. Bpag-1 mapped to the proximal region of mouse chromosome 1, identifying a new region of homology between human chromosome 6 and mouse chromosome 1. Bpag-2 mapped to the distal end of mouse chromosome 19 in a region of homology to human chromosome 10q. These assignments confirm and extend the relationships between the human and the mouse chromosomes. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  16. A superovulation protocol for the spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus).

    PubMed

    Pasco, Rachael; Gardner, David K; Walker, David W; Dickinson, Hayley

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a superovulation protocol for the spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus). The spiny mouse is a desert-adapted rodent species, with a long oestrus cycle (11 days) compared with rat and mouse, and gives birth to few (mean litter size is 3) precocial offspring after a relatively long gestation (39 days). We successfully optimised a superovulation protocol that elicited a 5-fold increase in the normal ovulation rate of this species. To induce superovulation in the spiny mouse 2 injections of equine chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG, 10 IU each), 9h apart, were required, followed by 20 IU of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG). This protocol was successful in 100% of females trialed and at 33 h post-hCG an average of 14.7 ± 1.5, 1-2 cell embryos were recovered. Histological analysis of ovaries following superovulation revealed large corpus lutea and post-ovulatory follicles occupying a large part of the ovary. Ovulation commenced 6-12 h after the hCG injection and continued until 24-33 h post-hCG as indicated by both histological analysis of ovaries and the presence of oocytes/embryos in the oviduct. This superovulation protocol will facilitate the development of an in vitro culture system for spiny mouse embryos.

  17. Dipole Source Localization of Mouse Electroencephalogram Using the Fieldtrip Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chungki; Oostenveld, Robert; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Lae Hyun; Sung, Hokun; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The mouse model is an important research tool in neurosciences to examine brain function and diseases with genetic perturbation in different brain regions. However, the limited techniques to map activated brain regions under specific experimental manipulations has been a drawback of the mouse model compared to human functional brain mapping. Here, we present a functional brain mapping method for fast and robust in vivo brain mapping of the mouse brain. The method is based on the acquisition of high density electroencephalography (EEG) with a microarray and EEG source estimation to localize the electrophysiological origins. We adapted the Fieldtrip toolbox for the source estimation, taking advantage of its software openness and flexibility in modeling the EEG volume conduction. Three source estimation techniques were compared: Distribution source modeling with minimum-norm estimation (MNE), scanning with multiple signal classification (MUSIC), and single-dipole fitting. Known sources to evaluate the performance of the localization methods were provided using optogenetic tools. The accuracy was quantified based on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The mean detection accuracy was high, with a false positive rate less than 1.3% and 7% at the sensitivity of 90% plotted with the MNE and MUSIC algorithms, respectively. The mean center-to-center distance was less than 1.2 mm in single dipole fitting algorithm. Mouse microarray EEG source localization using microarray allows a reliable method for functional brain mapping in awake mouse opening an access to cross-species study with human brain. PMID:24244506

  18. Dipole source localization of mouse electroencephalogram using the Fieldtrip toolbox.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chungki; Oostenveld, Robert; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kim, Lae Hyun; Sung, Hokun; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The mouse model is an important research tool in neurosciences to examine brain function and diseases with genetic perturbation in different brain regions. However, the limited techniques to map activated brain regions under specific experimental manipulations has been a drawback of the mouse model compared to human functional brain mapping. Here, we present a functional brain mapping method for fast and robust in vivo brain mapping of the mouse brain. The method is based on the acquisition of high density electroencephalography (EEG) with a microarray and EEG source estimation to localize the electrophysiological origins. We adapted the Fieldtrip toolbox for the source estimation, taking advantage of its software openness and flexibility in modeling the EEG volume conduction. Three source estimation techniques were compared: Distribution source modeling with minimum-norm estimation (MNE), scanning with multiple signal classification (MUSIC), and single-dipole fitting. Known sources to evaluate the performance of the localization methods were provided using optogenetic tools. The accuracy was quantified based on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The mean detection accuracy was high, with a false positive rate less than 1.3% and 7% at the sensitivity of 90% plotted with the MNE and MUSIC algorithms, respectively. The mean center-to-center distance was less than 1.2 mm in single dipole fitting algorithm. Mouse microarray EEG source localization using microarray allows a reliable method for functional brain mapping in awake mouse opening an access to cross-species study with human brain.

  19. Interspecies toxicity correlations of rat, mouse and Photobacterium phosphoreum

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, K.L.E.; McKinnon, M.B. ); Fort, F.L. )

    1994-10-01

    This study investigates quantitatively the interspecies relationships of the acute toxicity of 684 organic chemicals to the rate, the mouse, and the luminescent marine bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum, commonly known as the Microtox[reg sign] test. The results indicate significant relationships between the Microtox EC50 and rat and mouse LD50 values. The goodness of fit increases strongly from the oral to the intraperitoneal to the intravenous route of administration for each of the mouse and rat. Standard errors of the estimated rat values range from 0.52 to 0.72 log units of toxicity (after and before outlier removal, respectively) over a toxicity range of 4.6 (intraperitoneal) to 5.0 (oral) log units (mmol/kg body weight) of toxicity. For each of the three routes of administration, rat and mouse data are also highly correlated. This allows the computation of rat toxicities from mouse data and vice versa with standard errors of the estimates of 0.28 (intraperitoneal) to 0.30 (oral) log units.

  20. Chemically-induced Mouse Lung Tumors: Applications to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to better understand the mouse lung tumor data’s role in human health assessments. Three environmental chemicals - naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbenzene were chosen for the analysis due to the commonality of mouse lung tumors in all three chemicals. The goals of the workshop were to: identify the evidence, from multiple scientific disciplines, regarding formation of chemically-induced lung tumors in mice; discuss analysis and interpretation of the evidence; discuss how such evidence informs human health assessments; and identify commonalities, linkages, or differences between the evidence from various disciplines and across the chemicals. Evidence informing the association between occupational exposure to styrene, ethylbenzene, or naphthalene and lung cancer; comparative biology of mouse lung tumors, associated pathologic effects, issues related to tissue and species concordance; mode of action analysis and biological mechanisms including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics; and evidence from cellular, genetic and molecular toxicity was discussed. In summary, although consensus was not sought, the panelists agreed that available mouse lung tumor data should be considered for human health risk evaluation on an individual chemical basis. Key data gaps were identified that would assist in further understanding the mechanism and relevan