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Sample records for cluster forming clump

  1. Outflow Feedback Regulated Massive Star Formation in Parsec-Scale Cluster Forming Clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Li, Zhi-Yun; Abel, Tom; Nakamura, Fumitaka; /Niigata U.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate massive star formation in turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clumps of molecular clouds including protostellar outflow feedback using three dimensional numerical simulations of effective resolution 2048{sup 3}. The calculations are carried out using a block structured adaptive mesh refinement code that solves the ideal MHD equations including self-gravity and implements accreting sink particles. We find that, in the absence of regulation by magnetic fields and outflow feedback, massive stars form readily in a turbulent, moderately condensed clump of {approx} 1,600 M{sub {circle_dot}} (containing {approx} 10{sup 2} initial Jeans masses), along with a cluster of hundreds of lower mass stars. The massive stars are fed at high rates by (1) transient dense filaments produced by large-scale turbulent compression at early times, and (2) by the clump-wide global collapse resulting from turbulence decay at late times. In both cases, the bulk of the massive star's mass is supplied from outside a 0.1 pc-sized 'core' that surrounds the star. In our simulation, the massive star is clump-fed rather than core-fed. The need for large-scale feeding makes the massive star formation prone to regulation by outflow feedback, which directly opposes the feeding processes. The outflows reduce the mass accretion rates onto the massive stars by breaking up the dense filaments that feed the massive star formation at early times, and by collectively slowing down the global collapse that fuel the massive star formation at late times. The latter is aided by a moderate magnetic field of strength in the observed range (corresponding to a dimensionless clump mass-to-flux ratio {lambda} {approx} a few); the field allows the outflow momenta to be deposited more efficiently inside the clump. We conclude that the massive star formation in our simulated turbulent, magnetized, parsec-scale clump is outflow-regulated and clump-fed (ORCF for short). An important implication is that the

  2. Discovery of Infalling Motion with Rotation of the Cluster-forming Clump S235AB and Its Implication to the Clump Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2016-12-01

    We report the discovery of infalling motion with the rotation of S235AB, a massive cluster-forming clump (˜ 1× {10}3 {M}⊙ ) in the S235 region. Our C18O observations with the 45 m telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory have revealed an elliptical shape of the clump. A position-velocity diagram taken along its major axis exhibits two well-defined peaks symmetrically located, with respect to the clump center. This is similar to that found for a dynamically infalling envelope with rotation around a single protostar, modeled by N. Ohashi et al., indicating that the cluster-forming clump is also collapsing by the self-gravity toward the clump center. With analogue to Ohashi et al.'s model, we made a simple model of an infalling, rotating clump to fit the observed data. Based on the inferred model parameters, as well as results of earlier observations and simulations in the literature, we discuss the structures of the clump such as the relation among the global mass infall rate (˜ 1× {10}-3 {M}⊙ yr-1), formation of a compact core (with a mass and size of ˜4 {M}⊙ and ≲ 0.1 pc) at the center, and a massive star (˜11 {M}⊙ ) forming in the core.

  3. Filamentary flow and magnetic geometry in evolving cluster-forming molecular cloud clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Kirk, Helen

    2017-02-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between the orientation of magnetic fields and filaments that form in 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of cluster-forming, turbulent molecular cloud clumps. We examine simulated cloud clumps with size scales of L ∼ 2-4 pc and densities of n ∼ 400-1000 cm-3 with Alfvén Mach numbers near unity. We simulated two cloud clumps of different masses, one in virial equilibrium, the other strongly gravitationally bound, but with the same initial turbulent velocity field and similar mass-to-flux ratio. We apply various techniques to analyse the filamentary and magnetic structure of the resulting cloud, including the DISPERSE filament-finding algorithm in 3D. The largest structure that forms is a 1-2 parsec-long filament, with smaller connecting sub-filaments. We find that our simulated clouds, wherein magnetic forces and turbulence are comparable, coherent orientation of the magnetic field depends on the virial parameter. Sub-virial clumps undergo strong gravitational collapse and magnetic field lines are dragged with the accretion flow. We see evidence of filament-aligned flow and accretion flow on to the filament in the sub-virial cloud. Magnetic fields oriented more parallel in the sub-virial cloud and more perpendicular in the denser, marginally bound cloud. Radiative feedback from a 16 M⊙ star forming in a cluster in one of our simulation's ultimately results in the destruction of the main filament, the formation of an H II region, and the sweeping up of magnetic fields within an expanding shell at the edges of the H II region.

  4. Self-shielding clumps in starburst clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palouš, Jan; Wünsch, Richard; Ehlerová, Soňa; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2017-03-01

    Young and massive star clusters above a critical mass form thermally unstable clumps reducing locally the temperature and pressure of the hot 107 K cluster wind. The matter reinserted by stars, and mass loaded in interactions with pristine gas and from evaporating circumstellar disks, accumulate on clumps that are ionized with photons produced by massive stars. We discuss if they may become self-shielded when they reach the central part of the cluster, or even before it, during their free fall to the cluster center. Here we explore the importance of heating efficiency of stellar winds.

  5. DYNAMO-HST survey: clumps in nearby massive turbulent discs and the effects of clump clustering on kiloparsec scale measurements of clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, David B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Damjanov, Ivana; Abraham, Roberto G.; Obreschkow, Danail; Wisnioski, Emily; Bassett, Robert; Green, Andy; McGregor, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We present ˜100 pc resolution Hubble Space Telescope Hα images of 10 galaxies from the DYnamics of Newly-Assembled Massive Objects (DYNAMO) survey of low-z turbulent disc galaxies, and use these to undertake the first detailed systematic study of the effects of resolution and clump clustering on observations of clumps in turbulent discs. In the DYNAMO-HST sample, we measure clump diameters spanning the range dclump ˜ 100-800 pc, and individual clump star formation rates as high as ˜5 M⊙ yr-1. DYNAMO clumps have very high SFR surface densities, ΣSFR ˜ 1 - 15 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2, ˜100 × higher than in H II regions of nearby spirals. Indeed, SFR surface density provides a simple dividing line between massive star-forming clumps and local star-forming regions, where massive star-forming clumps have ΣSFR > 0.5 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. When degraded to match the observations of galaxies in z ˜ 1-3 surveys, DYNAMO galaxies are similar in morphology and measured clump properties to clumpy galaxies observed in the high-z Universe. Emission peaks in the simulated high-redshift maps typically correspond to multiple clumps in full resolution images. This clustering of clumps systematically increases the apparent size and SFR of clumps in 1 kpc resolution maps, and decreases the measured SFR surface density of clumps by as much as a factor of 20×. From these results we can infer that clump clustering is likely to strongly affect the measured properties of clumps in high-z galaxies, which commonly have kiloparsec scale resolution.

  6. ATLASGAL: Chemical evolution of star forming clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figura, Charles C.; Urquhart, James S.; Wyrowski, Friedrich

    2017-01-01

    Although massive stars are few in number, they impact their host molecular clouds, clusters, and galaxies in profound ways, playing a vital role in regulating star formation in their host galaxy. Understanding the formation of these massive stars is critical to understanding this evolution, but their rapid early development causes them to reach the main sequence while still shrouded in their natal molecular cloud. Many studies have investigated these regions in a targeted manner, but a full understanding necessitates a broader view at all stages of formation across many star forming regions.We have used mid-infrared continuum surveys to guide selection of a statistically large sample of massive dust clumps from the 10,000 such clumps identified in the ATLASGAL Compact Source Catalogue (CSC), ensuring that all stages of the evolutionary process are included. A final sample of 600 fourth-quadrant sources within 1 degree of the Galactic plane were observed with the Mopra telescope with an 8 GHz bandwidth between 85.2 and 93.4 GHz.We present an overview of our results. We have identified over 30 molecular lines, seven of which with detected hyperfine structure, as well as several mm-radio recombination line transitions. Source velocities indicate that these regions trace the Crux-Scutum, Norma, and Carina Sagitarius arms. We have performed an analysis of linewidth and line intensity ratios, correlating these with star formation stages as identified by IR brightness at the 70 and 24 μm bands, and present several molecular pairs whose linewidth and intensity might serve as significant tracers of the evolutionary stage of star formation. We comment on the results of PCA analysis of the measured parameters for the overall population and the star formation stage subgroups with an eye toward characterising early stellar development through molecular line observations.

  7. The connection between prestellar cores and filaments in cluster-forming clumps of the Aquila Rift complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könyves, Vera; André, Philippe; Maury, Anaëlle

    2015-08-01

    One of the main goals of the Herschel Gould Belt survey (André et al. 2010) is to elucidate the physicalmechanisms responsible for the formation and evolution of prestellar cores in molecular clouds. In theAquila cloud complex imaged with Herschel/SPIRE-PACS between 70-500 μm, we have recently identifieda complete sample of 651 starless cores, 446 of them are gravitationally-bound prestellar cores, likelyforming stars in the future. We also detected 58 protostellar cores (Könyves et al. 2010 and 2015, subm.- see http://gouldbelt-herschel.cea.fr/archives). This region is dominated by two (proto)clusters which arecurrently active sites of clustered star formation (SF): the filamentary Serpens South cloud and the W40HII region. The latter is powered by massive young stars, and a 2nd-generation SF can be witnessed inthe surroundings (Maury et al. 2011).Our Herschel observations also provide an unprecedented census of filaments in Aquila and suggest aclose connection between them and the formation process of prestellar cores, where both structures arehighly concentrated around the protoclusters. About 10-20% of the gas mass is in the form of filamentsbelow Av~7, while ~50-75% of the dense gas mass above Av~7-10 is in filamentary structures.Furthermore, ~90% of our prestellar cores are located above a background column density correspondingto Av~7, and ~75% of them lie within the densest filamentary structures with supercritical masses per unitlength >16 M⊙/pc. Indeed, a strong correlation is found between the spatial distribution of prestellar coresand the densest filaments.Comparing the statistics of cores and filaments with the number of young stellar objects found by Spitzerin the same complex, we also infer a typical timescale ~1 Myr for the formation and evolution of bothprestellar cores and filaments.In summary, our Herschel findings in Aquila support a filamentary paradigm for the early stages of SF,where the cores result from the gravitational fragmentation

  8. On the Stellar Masses of Giant Clumps in Distant Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Schaerer, Daniel; Cava, Antonio; Mayer, Lucio; Tamburello, Valentina

    2017-02-01

    We analyze stellar masses of clumps drawn from a compilation of star-forming galaxies at 1.1 < z < 3.6. Comparing clumps selected in different ways, and in lensed or blank field galaxies, we examine the effects of spatial resolution and sensitivity on the inferred stellar masses. Large differences are found, with median stellar masses ranging from ∼ {10}9 {M}ȯ for clumps in the often-referenced field galaxies to ∼ {10}7 {M}ȯ for fainter clumps selected in deep-field or lensed galaxies. We argue that the clump masses, observed in non-lensed galaxies with a limited spatial resolution of ∼1 kpc, are artificially increased due to the clustering of clumps of smaller mass. Furthermore, we show that the sensitivity threshold used for the clump selection affects the inferred masses even more strongly than resolution, biasing clumps at the low-mass end. Both improved spatial resolution and sensitivity appear to shift the clump stellar mass distribution to lower masses, qualitatively in agreement with clump masses found in recent high-resolution simulations of disk fragmentation. We discuss the nature of the most massive clumps, and we conclude that it is currently not possible to properly establish a meaningful clump stellar mass distribution from observations and to infer the existence and value of a characteristic clump mass scale.

  9. Stellar age spreads in clusters as imprints of cluster-parent clump densities

    SciTech Connect

    Parmentier, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Pfalzner, S.

    2014-08-20

    It has recently been suggested that high-density star clusters have stellar age distributions much narrower than that of the Orion Nebula Cluster, indicating a possible trend of narrower age distributions for denser clusters. We show this effect to likely arise from star formation being faster in gas with a higher density. We model the star formation history of molecular clumps in equilibrium by associating a star formation efficiency per free-fall time, ε{sub ff}, to their volume density profile. We focus on the case of isothermal spheres and we obtain the evolution with time of their star formation rate. Our model predicts a steady decline of the star formation rate, which we quantify with its half-life time, namely, the time needed for the star formation rate to drop to half its initial value. Given the uncertainties affecting the star formation efficiency per free-fall time, we consider two distinct values: ε{sub ff} = 0.1 and ε{sub ff} = 0.01. When ε{sub ff} = 0.1, the half-life time is of the order of the clump free-fall time, τ{sub ff}. As a result, the age distributions of stars formed in high-density clumps have smaller full-widths at half-maximum than those of stars formed in low-density clumps. When the star formation efficiency per free-fall time is 0.01, the half-life time is 10 times longer, i.e., 10 clump free-fall times. We explore what happens if the duration of star formation is shorter than 10τ{sub ff}, that is, if the half-life time of the star formation rate cannot be defined. There, we build on the invariance of the shape of the young cluster mass function to show that an anti-correlation between the clump density and the duration of star formation is expected. We therefore conclude that, regardless of whether the duration of star formation is longer than the star formation rate half-life time, denser molecular clumps yield narrower star age distributions in clusters. Published densities and stellar age spreads of young clusters and star-forming

  10. Modeling Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in Cool-core Clusters: The Formation of Cold Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t TI/t ff < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s-1. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  11. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  12. ATLASGAL - towards a complete sample of massive star forming clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, J. S.; Moore, T. J. T.; Csengeri, T.; Wyrowski, F.; Schuller, F.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Mottram, J. C.; Thompson, M. A.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.; Bronfman, L.; Pfalzner, S.; König, C.; Wienen, M.

    2014-09-01

    By matching infrared-selected, massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and compact H II regions in the Red MSX Source survey to massive clumps found in the submillimetre ATLASGAL (APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy) survey, we have identified ˜1000 embedded young massive stars between 280° < ℓ < 350° and 10° < ℓ < 60° with | b | < 1.5°. Combined with an existing sample of radio-selected methanol masers and compact H II regions, the result is a catalogue of ˜1700 massive stars embedded within ˜1300 clumps located across the inner Galaxy, containing three observationally distinct subsamples, methanol-maser, MYSO and H II-region associations, covering the most important tracers of massive star formation, thought to represent key stages of evolution. We find that massive star formation is strongly correlated with the regions of highest column density in spherical, centrally condensed clumps. We find no significant differences between the three samples in clump structure or the relative location of the embedded stars, which suggests that the structure of a clump is set before the onset of star formation, and changes little as the embedded object evolves towards the main sequence. There is a strong linear correlation between clump mass and bolometric luminosity, with the most massive stars forming in the most massive clumps. We find that the MYSO and H II-region subsamples are likely to cover a similar range of evolutionary stages and that the majority are near the end of their main accretion phase. We find few infrared-bright MYSOs associated with the most massive clumps, probably due to very short pre-main-sequence lifetimes in the most luminous sources.

  13. Star Cluster Formation from Turbulent Clumps. I. The Fast Formation Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, Juan P.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Chatterjee, Sourav

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the formation and early evolution of star clusters, assuming that they form from a turbulent starless clump of a given mass bounded inside a parent self-gravitating molecular cloud characterized by a particular mass surface density. As a first step, we assume instantaneous star cluster formation and gas expulsion. We draw our initial conditions from observed properties of starless clumps. We follow the early evolution of the clusters up to 20 Myr, investigating the effects of different star formation efficiencies, primordial binary fractions and eccentricities, and primordial mass segregation levels. We investigate clumps with initial masses of {M}{cl}=3000 {M}ȯ embedded in ambient cloud environments with mass surface densities {{{Σ }}}{cloud}=0.1 and 1 {{g}} {{cm}}-2. We show that these models of fast star cluster formation result, in the fiducial case, in clusters that expand rapidly, even considering only the bound members. Clusters formed from higher {{{Σ }}}{cloud} environments tend to expand more quickly and thus are soon larger than clusters born from lower {{{Σ }}}{cloud} conditions. To form a young cluster of a given age, stellar mass, and mass surface density, these models need to assume a parent molecular clump that is many times denser, which is unrealistic compared to observed systems. We also show that, in these models, the initial binary properties are only slightly modified by interactions, meaning that the binary properties, e.g., at 20 Myr, are very similar to those at birth. With this study, we set up the foundation for future work, where we will investigate more realistic models of star formation compared to this instantaneous, baseline case.

  14. Clumps of z 2 Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicheng; Giavalisco, M.; Cassata, P.; CANDELS Collaboration

    2011-05-01

    We study the properties of red clumps of star-forming galaxies at z 2. A sample of 15 galaxies with spectroscopic redshift is selected from the HUDF, where ultra--deep and high- resolution optical (HST/ACS) and near--IR (HST/WFC3 IR) images are available to resolve the internal structure of z 2 galaxies at the kpc scale. We generate rest-frame UV-optical color maps of these galaxies after carefully matching image PSFs. Clumps are identified through visual inspection on the (z-H) maps. We run SED-fitting using the seven-band BVizYJH HST photometry of each pixel and measure the spatial distributions of stellar population parameters, such as stellar mass, star-formation rate, age and obscuration. In order to understand the origin of sub-galactic structures, we study the distributions of these properties of the pixels that are part of clumps and compare them with those of the surrounding disks. Our results help answer two questions: (1) whether the clumps are the progenitor of bulges and (2) whether old stellar populations (with age of a few Gyr) exist in star-forming galaxies at z 2.

  15. Entropy flattening, gas clumping, and turbulence in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Fusco-Femiano, R.; Lapi, A.

    2014-03-10

    Several physical processes and formation events are expected in cluster outskirts, a vast region up to now essentially not covered by observations. The recent Suzaku (X-ray) and Planck (Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect) observations out to the virial radius have highlighted in these peripheral regions a rather sharp decline of the intracluster gas temperature, an entropy flattening in contrast with the theoretically expected power law increase, the break of the hydrostatic equilibrium even in some relaxed clusters, a derived gas mass fraction above the cosmic value measured from several cosmic microwave background experiments, and a total X-ray mass lower than the weak lensing mass determinations. Here we present the analysis of four clusters (A1795, A2029, A2204, and A133) with the SuperModel that includes a nonthermal pressure component due to turbulence to sustain the hydrostatic equilibrium also in the cluster outskirts. In this way, we obtain a correct determination of the total X-ray mass and of the gas mass fraction; this in turn allows us to determine the level of the gas clumping that can affect the shape of the entropy profiles reported by the Suzaku observations. Our conclusion is that the role of the gas clumping is very marginal and that the observed entropy flattening is due to the rapid decrement of the temperature in the cluster outskirts caused by non-gravitational effects. Moreover, we show that the X-ray/SZ joint analysis from ROSAT and Planck data, as performed in some recent investigations, is inadequate for discriminating between a power law increase and a flattening of the entropy.

  16. MOLECULAR CLUMPS AND INFRARED CLUSTERS IN THE S247, S252, AND BFS52 REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Saito, Hiro; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Nishimura, Atsushi; Kimura, Kimihiro; Onishi, Toshikazu; Ogawa, Hideo

    2013-05-01

    We present results of the observations carried out toward the S247, S252, and BFS52 H II regions with various molecular lines using the 1.85 m radio telescope and the 45 m telescope at Nobeyama Radio Observatory. There are at least 11 young infrared clusters (IR clusters) within the observed region. We found that there are two velocity components in {sup 12}CO (J = 2-1), and also that their spatial distributions show an anti-correlation. The IR clusters are located at their interfaces, suggesting that two distinct clouds with different velocities are colliding with each other, which may have induced the cluster formation. Based on {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0) and C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) observations, we identified 16 clumps in and around the three H II regions. Eleven of the clumps are associated with the IR clusters and the other five clumps are not associated with any known young stellar objects. We investigated variations in the velocity dispersions of the 16 clumps as a function of the distance from the center of the clusters or the clumps. Clumps with clusters tend to have velocity dispersions that increase with distance from the cluster center, while clumps without clusters show a flat velocity dispersion over the clump extents. A {sup 12}CO outflow has been found in some of the clumps with IR clusters but not in the other clumps, supporting a strong relation of these clumps to the broader velocity dispersion region. We also estimated a mean star formation efficiency of {approx}30% for the clumps with IR clusters in the three H II regions.

  17. MAPS OF MASSIVE CLUMPS IN THE EARLY STAGE OF CLUSTER FORMATION: TWO MODES OF CLUSTER FORMATION, COEVAL OR NON-COEVAL?

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Aya E.; Saito, Masao; Mauersberger, Rainer; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kurono, Yasutaka; Naoi, Takahiro

    2013-03-10

    We present maps of seven young massive molecular clumps within five target regions in C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) line emission, using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. These clumps, which are not associated with clusters, lie at distances between 0.7 and 2.1 kpc. We find C{sup 18}O clumps with radii of 0.5-1.7 pc, masses of 470-4200 M{sub Sun }, and velocity widths of 1.4-3.3 km s{sup -1}. All of the clumps are massive and approximately in virial equilibrium, suggesting they will potentially form clusters. Three of our target regions are associated with H II regions (CWHRs), while the other two are unassociated with H II regions (CWOHRs). The C{sup 18}O clumps can be classified into two morphological types: CWHRs with a filamentary or shell-like structure and spherical CWOHRs. The two CWOHRs have systematic velocity gradients. Using the publicly released WISE database, Class I and Class II protostellar candidates are identified within the C{sup 18}O clumps. The fraction of Class I candidates among all YSO candidates (Class I+Class II) is {>=}50% in CWHRs and {<=}50% in CWOHRs. We conclude that effects from the H II regions can be seen in (1) the spatial distributions of the clumps: filamentary or shell-like structure running along the H II regions; (2) the velocity structures of the clumps: large velocity dispersion along shells; and (3) the small age spreads of YSOs. The small spreads in age of the YSOs show that the presence of H II regions tends to trigger coeval cluster formation.

  18. A super lithium-rich red-clump star in the open cluster Trumpler 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, L.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Bonifacio, P.; Villanova, S.; Carraro, G.; Caffau, E.; Steffen, M.; Ahumada, J. A.; Beletsky, Y.; Beccari, G.

    2014-04-01

    Context. The existence of lithium-rich low-mass red giant stars still represents a challenge for stellar evolution models. Stellar clusters are privileged environments for this kind of investigation. Aims: To investigate the chemical abundance pattern of the old open cluster Trumpler 5, we observed a sample of four red-clump stars with high-resolution optical spectrographs. One of them (#3416) reveals extremely strong lithium lines in its spectrum. Methods: One-dimensional, local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis was performed on the spectra of the observed stars. A 3D-NLTE analysis was performed to derive the lithium abundance of star #3416. Results: Star #3416 is super Li-rich with A(Li) = 3.75 dex. The lack of 6Li enrichment (6Li/7Li < 2%), the low carbon isotopic ratio (12C/13C = 14 ± 3), and the lack of evidence for radial velocity variation or enhanced rotational velocity (vsini = 2.8 km s-1) all suggest that lithium production has occurred in this star through the Cameron & Fowler mechanism. Conclusions: We identified a super Li-rich core helium-burning, red-clump star in an open cluster. Internal production is the most likely cause of the observed enrichment. Given the expected short duration of a star's Li-rich phase, enrichment is likely to have occurred at the red clump or in the immediately preceding phases, namely during the He-flash at the tip of the red giant branch (RGB) or while ascending the brightest portion of the RGB. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 088.D-0045(A).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Dynamical Fate of Clumps Formed in Satellite Mergers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desireé; Asphaug, Erik; Reufer, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The middle-sized moons (MSMs) of Saturn are icy bodies approximately 300-1500 km diameter, whose cumulative mass is approximately 5% the mass of Titan. Although it is generally thought that they accreted from a gas and particle disk around Saturn [Charnoz, S. et al. (2011), Canup, R. M. & Ward, W. R. (2006)], this classical scenario seems unable to explain their diverse geology and composition, ranging from pure ice to mostly rock. Recently the idea that the MSMs (and perhaps Titan) formed in a series of collisions has flourished [Sekine & Genda, H. (2012), Asphaug, E. & Reufer, A. (2013), Hamilton, D. P. (2013) AAS/DPS Meetings, Cuk, M. (2013) ASU, SESE Colloquium]. Sekine & Genda (2012) proposed that the MSMs are remnants of a hit and run collision into a disappeared Titan-like satellite of Saturn. Asphaug & Reufer (2013) proposed instead that they are unaccreted remnants from the few collisional mergers that formed Titan. In each scenario, the main uncertainty and skepticism, which motivates the research presented here, is whether unaccreted or hit and run remnants can attain stable orbits and avoid becoming accreted. We study the dynamical fate of clumps formed in satellite mergers by coupling N-body simulations with the results of collisional mergers in SPH simulations. We define stable orbital configurations of one or more satellites in a planetary system in which a collision (merger or other giant impact) is assumed to have occurred. The outcome of different SPH simulations, representative of realistic collisions (mergers, hit and runs, disruptions), is integrated using the N-body integrator Mercury [Chambers, J. E. (1999)]. We study a variety of scenarios, including: single major collisions, multiple major collisions and successions of major collisions. External perturbations that would cause the system to go unstable in the first place and trigger the major collisions are also studied. We aim to identify the characteristic fraction of clumps from

  20. ALMA survey of massive cluster progenitors from ATLASGAL. Limited fragmentation at the early evolutionary stage of massive clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Wyrowski, F.; Motte, F.; Menten, K. M.; Beuther, H.; Bronfman, L.; Commerçon, B.; Chapillon, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Henning, Th.; Leurini, S.; Longmore, S.; Palau, A.; Peretto, N.; Schuller, F.; Tan, J. C.; Testi, L.; Traficante, A.; Urquhart, J. S.

    2017-04-01

    The early evolution of massive cluster progenitors is poorly understood. We investigate the fragmentation properties from 0.3 pc to 0.06 pc scales of a homogenous sample of infrared-quiet massive clumps within 4.5 kpc selected from the ATLASGAL survey. Using the ALMA 7 m array we detect compact dust continuum emission towards all targets and find that fragmentation, at these scales, is limited. The mass distribution of the fragments uncovers a large fraction of cores above 40 M⊙, corresponding to massive dense cores (MDCs) with masses up to 400 M⊙. Seventy-seven percent of the clumps contain at most 3 MDCs per clump, and we also reveal single clumps/MDCs. The most massive cores are formed within the more massive clumps and a high concentration of mass on small scales reveals a high core formation efficiency. The mass of MDCs highly exceeds the local thermal Jeans mass, and we lack the observational evidence of a sufficiently high level of turbulence or strong enough magnetic fields to keep the most massive MDCs in equilibrium. If already collapsing, the observed fragmentation properties with a high core formation efficiency are consistent with the collapse setting in at parsec scales. Full Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/600/L10

  1. An extremely young massive clump forming by gravitational collapse in a primordial galaxy.

    PubMed

    Zanella, A; Daddi, E; Le Floc'h, E; Bournaud, F; Gobat, R; Valentino, F; Strazzullo, V; Cibinel, A; Onodera, M; Perret, V; Renaud, F; Vignali, C

    2015-05-07

    When cosmic star formation history reaches a peak (at about redshift z ≈ 2), galaxies vigorously fed by cosmic reservoirs are dominated by gas and contain massive star-forming clumps, which are thought to form by violent gravitational instabilities in highly turbulent gas-rich disks. However, a clump formation event has not yet been observed, and it is debated whether clumps can survive energetic feedback from young stars, and afterwards migrate inwards to form galaxy bulges. Here we report the spatially resolved spectroscopy of a bright off-nuclear emission line region in a galaxy at z = 1.987. Although this region dominates star formation in the galaxy disk, its stellar continuum remains undetected in deep imaging, revealing an extremely young (less than ten million years old) massive clump, forming through the gravitational collapse of more than one billion solar masses of gas. Gas consumption in this young clump is more than tenfold faster than in the host galaxy, displaying high star-formation efficiency during this phase, in agreement with our hydrodynamic simulations. The frequency of older clumps with similar masses, coupled with our initial estimate of their formation rate (about 2.5 per billion years), supports long lifetimes (about 500 million years), favouring models in which clumps survive feedback and grow the bulges of present-day galaxies.

  2. Giant Clumps in Star-forming Galaxies at z>1 in CANDELS Observations and CANDElized Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicheng; Closson Ferguson, Henry; Ravindranath, Swara; Primack, Joel; Dekel, Avishai; Koo, David; Faber, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    A common feature of star-forming galaxies at z>1 is the existence of giant star-forming clumps, which are fundamental to our understanding of the accretion history of galaxies, formation of bulges, and evolution of gas-rich disks. In this talk, I will present our work on understanding the nature of clumps in high-redshift galaxies by comparing CANDELS observations with CANDELized high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. The CANDELized simulations take into account of all observational effects, e.g., spatial resolution and sensitivity, of CANDELS images and thus provide a direct way to compare clumps identified in both observations and simulations. The comparison with the cosmological simulations also sheds a light on the roles that clumps play in the broad picture of galaxy formation and evolution. Our work focus on three questions: (1) When and how clumps are formed? (2) How they evolve once formed? (3) Can we use clumps as diagnostics of physical mechanisms that govern star formation, e.g., feedback? The three aspects provide important clues of tracing how distant clumpy galaxies evolve into galaxies seen in the local universe.

  3. Early evolution of clumps formed via gravitational instability in protoplanetary discs: precursors of Hot Jupiters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvagni, M.; Mayer, L.

    2014-01-01

    Although it is fairly established that Gravitational Instability (GI) should occur in the early phases of the evolution of a protoplanetary disc, the fate of the clumps resulting from disc fragmentation and their role in planet formation is still unclear. In the present study we investigate semi-analytically their evolution following the contraction of a synthetic population of clumps with varied initial structure and orbits coupled with the surrounding disc and the central star. Our model is based on recently published state-of-the-art 3D collapse simulations of clumps with varied thermodynamics. Various evolutionary mechanisms are taken into account, and their effect is explored both individually and in combination with others: migration and tidal disruption, mass accretion, gap opening and disc viscosity. It is found that, in general, at least 50 per cent of the initial clumps survive tides, leaving behind potential gas giant progenitors after ˜105 yr of evolution in the disc. The rest might either be disrupted or produce super-Earths and other low-mass planets provided that a solid core can be assembled on a sufficiently short time-scale, a possibility that we do not address in this paper. Extrapolating to million year time-scales, all our surviving protoplanets would lead to close-in gas giants. This outcome might in part reflect the limitations of the migration model adopted, and is reminiscent of the analogous result found in core-accretion models in absence of fine-tuning of the migration rate. Yet it suggests that a significant fraction of the clumps formed by GI could be the precursors of Hot Jupiters.

  4. A LITHIUM-RICH RED GIANT BELOW THE CLUMP IN THE KEPLER CLUSTER, NGC 6819

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Rich, Evan; Twarog, Bruce A.; Deliyannis, Constantine P. E-mail: evan66210@gmail.com E-mail: con@astro.indiana.edu

    2013-04-10

    WIYN/HYDRA spectra in the Li 6708 A region have been obtained for 332 probable members of the old open cluster, NGC 6819. Preliminary analysis shows a pattern of Li depletion from the top of the turnoff to the base of the giant branch. Starting 1 mag below the level of the clump, all brighter giants have A(Li) below 1.0, with most having upper limits below 0.5. Star W007017, located below the first-ascent red giant bump is Li-rich with A(Li) = 2.3. As a highly probable single-star astrometric and radial-velocity cluster member, its discrepant asteroseismic membership could be a by-product of the processes that triggered Li enhancement. Its color-magnitude diagram location is consistent with only one proposed enhanced mixing process among first-ascent red giants.

  5. Multi-wavelength View of Kiloparsec-scale Clumps in Star-forming Galaxies at z ~ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Ferguson, Henry C.; Cassata, Paolo; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2012-10-01

    This paper studies the properties of kiloparsec-scale clumps in star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2 through multi-wavelength broadband photometry. A sample of 40 clumps is identified from Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) z-band images through auto-detection and visual inspection from 10 galaxies with 1.5 < z < 2.5 in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, where deep and high-resolution HST/WFC3 and ACS images enable us to resolve structures of z ~ 2 galaxies down to the kiloparsec scale in the rest-frame UV and optical bands and to detect clumps toward the faint end. The physical properties of clumps are measured through fitting spatially resolved seven-band (BVizYJH) spectral energy distribution to models. On average, the clumps are blue and have similar median rest-frame UV-optical color as the diffuse components of their host galaxies, but the clumps have large scatter in their colors. Although the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass relation of galaxies is dominated by the diffuse components, clumps emerge as regions with enhanced specific star formation rates, contributing individually ~10% and together ~50% of the SFR of the host galaxies. However, the contributions of clumps to the rest-frame UV/optical luminosity and stellar mass are smaller, typically a few percent individually and ~20% together. On average, clumps are younger by 0.2 dex and denser by a factor of eight than diffuse components. Clump properties have obvious radial variations in the sense that central clumps are redder, older, more extincted, denser, and less active on forming stars than outskirt clumps. Our results are broadly consistent with a widely held view that clumps are formed through gravitational instability in gas-rich turbulent disks and would eventually migrate toward galactic centers and coalesce into bulges. Roughly 40% of the galaxies in our sample contain a massive clump that could be identified as a proto-bulge, which seems qualitatively consistent with

  6. MULTI-WAVELENGTH VIEW OF KILOPARSEC-SCALE CLUMPS IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Cassata, Paolo; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2012-10-01

    This paper studies the properties of kiloparsec-scale clumps in star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2 through multi-wavelength broadband photometry. A sample of 40 clumps is identified from Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) z-band images through auto-detection and visual inspection from 10 galaxies with 1.5 < z < 2.5 in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, where deep and high-resolution HST/WFC3 and ACS images enable us to resolve structures of z {approx} 2 galaxies down to the kiloparsec scale in the rest-frame UV and optical bands and to detect clumps toward the faint end. The physical properties of clumps are measured through fitting spatially resolved seven-band (BVizYJH) spectral energy distribution to models. On average, the clumps are blue and have similar median rest-frame UV-optical color as the diffuse components of their host galaxies, but the clumps have large scatter in their colors. Although the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass relation of galaxies is dominated by the diffuse components, clumps emerge as regions with enhanced specific star formation rates, contributing individually {approx}10% and together {approx}50% of the SFR of the host galaxies. However, the contributions of clumps to the rest-frame UV/optical luminosity and stellar mass are smaller, typically a few percent individually and {approx}20% together. On average, clumps are younger by 0.2 dex and denser by a factor of eight than diffuse components. Clump properties have obvious radial variations in the sense that central clumps are redder, older, more extincted, denser, and less active on forming stars than outskirt clumps. Our results are broadly consistent with a widely held view that clumps are formed through gravitational instability in gas-rich turbulent disks and would eventually migrate toward galactic centers and coalesce into bulges. Roughly 40% of the galaxies in our sample contain a massive clump that could be identified as a proto-bulge, which

  7. NOISE AND HYSTERESIS IN CHARGED STRIPE, CHECKERBOARD, AND CLUMP FORMING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Bishop, Alan R.

    2007-05-07

    We numerically examine noise fluctuations and hysteresis phenomena in charged systems that form stripe, labyrinth or clump patterns. It is believed that charge inhomogeneities of this type arise in two-dimensional (2D) quantum hall systems and in electron crystal structures in high temperature superconductors, while related patterns appear in manganites and type-I superconductors. Recent noise and transport experiments in twodimensional electron gases and high temperature superconducting samples revealed both 1/ fα. noise signatures and hysteretic phenomena. Using numerical simulations we show that 1/ fα. noise fluctuations and hysteresis are generic features that occur in charge systems which undergo a type of phase separation that results in stripes, clumps, checkerboards, or other inhomogeneous patterns. We find that these systems exhibit 1/ fα. fluctuations with 1.2 < α < 1.8, rather than simple 1/ f or 1/ f 2 fluctuations. We also propose that the 2D metal insulator transition may be associated with a clump electron glass phase rather than a Wigner glass phase.

  8. SHORT-LIVED STAR-FORMING GIANT CLUMPS IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS OF z Almost-Equal-To 2 DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Genel, Shy; Genzel, Reinhard; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Sternberg, Amiel; Johansson, Peter H.; Dave, Romeel; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Burkert, Andreas E-mail: genzel@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: amiel@wise.tau.ac.il E-mail: oser@usm.lmu.de E-mail: phjohans@astro.helsinki.fi E-mail: oppenheimer@strw.leidenuniv.nl

    2012-01-20

    Many observed massive star-forming z Almost-Equal-To 2 galaxies are large disks that exhibit irregular morphologies, with Almost-Equal-To 1 kpc, Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10}M{sub o-dot} clumps. We present the largest sample to date of high-resolution cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations that zoom-in on the formation of individual M{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 10.5}M{sub o-dot} galaxies in Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 12}M{sub o-dot} halos at z Almost-Equal-To 2. Our code includes strong stellar feedback parameterized as momentum-driven galactic winds. This model reproduces many characteristic features of this observed class of galaxies, such as their clumpy morphologies, smooth and monotonic velocity gradients, high gas fractions (f{sub g} Almost-Equal-To 50%), and high specific star formation rates ({approx}>1 Gyr{sup -1}). In accord with recent models, giant clumps (M{sub clump} Almost-Equal-To (5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9})M{sub o-dot}) form in situ via gravitational instabilities. However, the galactic winds are critical for their subsequent evolution. The giant clumps we obtain are short-lived and are disrupted by wind-driven mass loss. They do not virialize or migrate to the galaxy centers as suggested in recent work neglecting strong winds. By phenomenologically implementing the winds that are observed from high-redshift galaxies and in particular from individual clumps, our simulations reproduce well new observational constraints on clump kinematics and clump ages. In particular, the observation that older clumps appear closer to their galaxy centers is reproduced in our simulations, as a result of inside-out formation of the disks rather than inward clump migration.

  9. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arevalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-05-20

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10–30 kpc within radii of 30–220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90–140 km s-1 on ~20–30 kpc scales and 70–100 km s-1 on smaller scales ~7–10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7–8 per cent for radii ~30–220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3–4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density–velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  10. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arévalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-07-01

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ˜10-30 kpc within radii of 30-220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90-140 km s-1 on ˜20-30 kpc scales and 70-100 km s-1 on smaller scales ˜7-10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7-8 per cent for radii ˜30-220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3-4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density-velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  11. The Kinematic and Chemical Properties of a Potential Core-forming Clump: Perseus B1-E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadavoy, S. I.; Shirley, Y.; Di Francesco, J.; Henning, Th.; Currie, M. J.; André, Ph.; Pezzuto, S.

    2015-06-01

    We present 13CO and {{C}18}O (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) maps toward the core-forming Perseus B1-E clump using observations from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, the Submillimeter Telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory, and the IRAM 30 m telescope. We find that the 13CO and {{C}18}O line emission both have very complex velocity structures, indicative of multiple velocity components within the ambient gas. The (1-0) transitions reveal a radial velocity gradient across B1-E of ˜ 1 km {{s}-1} p{{c}-1} that increases from northwest to southeast, whereas the majority of the Perseus cloud has a radial velocity gradient increasing from southwest to northeast. In contrast, we see no evidence of a velocity gradient associated with the denser Herschel-identified substructures in B1-E. Additionally, the denser substructures have much lower systemic motions than the ambient clump material, which indicates that they are likely decoupled from the large-scale gas. Nevertheless, these substructures themselves have broad line widths (˜0.4 km {{s}-1}) similar to that of the {{C}18}O gas in the clump, which suggests they inherited their kinematic properties from the larger-scale, moderately dense gas. Finally, we find evidence of {{C}18}O depletion only toward one substructure, B1-E2, which is also the only object with narrow (transonic) line widths. We suggest that as prestellar cores form, their chemical and kinematic properties are linked in evolution, such that these objects must first dissipate their turbulence before they deplete in CO.

  12. EVIDENCE FOR INFLOW IN HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING CLUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, Megan; Shirley, Yancy L.; Wu Jingwen; Brogan, Crystal; Wootten, Alwyn; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi E-mail: yshirley@as.arizona.edu E-mail: cbrogan@nrao.edu E-mail: k.tatematsu@nao.ac.jp

    2011-10-10

    We analyze the HCO{sup +} 3-2 and H{sup 13}CO{sup +} 3-2 line profiles of 27 high-mass star-forming regions to identify asymmetries that are suggestive of mass inflow. Three quantitative measures of line asymmetry are used to indicate whether a line profile is blue, red, or neither-the ratio of the temperature of the blue and red peaks, the line skew, and the dimensionless parameter {delta}v. We find nine HCO{sup +} 3-2 line profiles with a significant blue asymmetry and four with significant red asymmetric profiles. Comparing our HCO{sup +} 3-2 results to HCN 3-2 observations from Wu et al., we find that eight of the blue and three of the red have profiles with the same asymmetry in HCN. The eight sources with blue asymmetries in both tracers are considered strong candidates for inflow. Quantitative measures of the asymmetry (e.g., {delta}v) tend to be larger for HCN. This, combined with possible HCO{sup +} abundance enhancements in outflows, suggests that HCN may be a better tracer of inflow. Understanding the behavior of common molecular tracers like HCO{sup +} in clumps of different masses is important for properly analyzing the line profiles seen in a sample of sources representing a broad range of clump masses. Such studies will soon be possible with the large number of sources with possible self-absorption seen in spectroscopic follow-up observations of clumps identified in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey.

  13. Deriving Dust Properties in Star Forming Clumps: a Look Across the Perseus Molecular Cloud with Herschel and SCUBA-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michael Chun-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Herschel and JCMT surveys of nearby star-forming regions have provided excellent images of cold dust emission across several wavelengths with unprecedented dynamic range and resolutions. Here we present spectral emissivity index and temperature maps of dust in the star-forming clumps of the Perseus molecular cloud determined from fitting SEDs to the combined Herschel and JCMT observations in the 160 μm, 250 μm, 350 μm, 500 μm, and 850 μm bands, employing the technique developed by Sadavoy et al. (2013). In NGC1333, the most complex and active star-forming clump in Perseus, we demonstrate that CO line contamination in the JCMT SCUBA-2 850 μm band is typically insignificant. The derived spectral emissivity index, β, and dust temperature, T, ranges between 0.8 - 3.0 and 7 - 50 K, respectively. Throughout Perseus, we see indications of heating from B stars and embedded protostars, and smooth β variations on the smaller scales. The distribution of β values seen in each clump differs from one clump to another, and is in general different from the diffuse ISM values (i.e., ~2), suggesting that dust grain evolution is significant in star-forming clumps. We also found coincidences between low β regions and local temperature peaks as well as locations of outflows, which may provide hints to the origins of these low β value grains, and dust grain evolution in star-forming clumps in general.

  14. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. XIV. Physical Properties of Massive Starless and Star-forming Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Brian E.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Battersby, Cara; Rosolowsky, Erik W.; Ginsburg, Adam G.; Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P.; Pestalozzi, Michele R.; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J., II; Bally, John; Glenn, Jason

    2016-05-01

    We sort 4683 molecular clouds between 10° < ℓ < 65° from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey based on observational diagnostics of star formation activity: compact 70 μm sources, mid-IR color-selected YSOs, H2O and CH3OH masers, and UCH ii regions. We also present a combined NH3-derived gas kinetic temperature and H2O maser catalog for 1788 clumps from our own GBT 100 m observations and from the literature. We identify a subsample of 2223 (47.5%) starless clump candidates (SCCs), the largest and most robust sample identified from a blind survey to date. Distributions of flux density, flux concentration, solid angle, kinetic temperature, column density, radius, and mass show strong (>1 dex) progressions when sorted by star formation indicator. The median SCC is marginally subvirial (α ∼ 0.7) with >75% of clumps with known distance being gravitationally bound (α < 2). These samples show a statistically significant increase in the median clump mass of ΔM ∼ 170–370 M ⊙ from the starless candidates to clumps associated with protostars. This trend could be due to (i) mass growth of the clumps at \\dot{M}∼ 200{--}440 M ⊙ Myr‑1 for an average freefall 0.8 Myr timescale, (ii) a systematic factor of two increase in dust opacity from starless to protostellar phases, and/or (iii) a variation in the ratio of starless to protostellar clump lifetime that scales as ∼M ‑0.4. By comparing to the observed number of CH3OH maser containing clumps, we estimate the phase lifetime of massive (M > 103 M ⊙) starless clumps to be 0.37 ± 0.08 Myr (M/103 M ⊙)‑1 the majority (M < 450 M ⊙) have phase lifetimes longer than their average freefall time.

  15. Energy Budget of Forming Clumps in Numerical Simulations of Collapsing Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Vianey; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Gómez, Gilberto C.; Fall, S. Michael; Mata-Chávez, M. Dolores

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the physical properties and energy balance of density enhancements in two SPH simulations of the formation, evolution, and collapse of giant molecular clouds. In the simulations, no feedback is included, so all motions are due either to the initial decaying turbulence or to gravitational contraction. We define clumps as connected regions above a series of density thresholds. The resulting full set of clumps follows the generalized energy equipartition relation, {σ }v/{R}1/2\\propto {{{Σ }}}1/2, where {σ }v is the velocity dispersion, R is the “radius,” and Σ is the column density. We interpret this as a natural consequence of gravitational contraction at all scales rather than virial equilibrium. Nevertheless, clumps with low Σ tend to show a large scatter around equipartition. In more than half of the cases, this scatter is dominated by external turbulent compressions that assemble the clumps rather than by small-scale random motions that would disperse them. The other half does actually disperse. Moreover, clump sub-samples selected by means of different criteria exhibit different scalings. Sub-samples with narrow Σ ranges follow Larson-like relations, although characterized by their respective values of Σ. Finally, we find that (i) clumps lying in filaments tend to appear sub-virial, (ii) high-density cores (n≥slant {10}5 cm3) that exhibit moderate kinetic energy excesses often contain sink (“stellar”) particles and the excess disappears when the stellar mass is taken into account in the energy balance, and (iii) cores with kinetic energy excess but no stellar particles are truly in a state of dispersal.

  16. Kinetic temperature of massive star forming molecular clumps measured with formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. D.; Henkel, C.; Menten, K. M.; Zheng, X. W.; Esimbek, J.; Zhou, J. J.; Yeh, C. C.; König, C.; Yuan, Y.; He, Y. X.; Li, D. L.

    2017-01-01

    Context. For a general understanding of the physics involved in the star formation process, measurements of physical parameters such as temperature and density are indispensable. The chemical and physical properties of dense clumps of molecular clouds are strongly affected by the kinetic temperature. Therefore, this parameter is essential for a better understanding of the interstellar medium. Formaldehyde, a molecule which traces the entire dense molecular gas, appears to be the most reliable tracer to directly measure the gas kinetic temperature. Aims: We aim to determine the kinetic temperature with spectral lines from formaldehyde and to compare the results with those obtained from ammonia lines for a large number of massive clumps. Methods: Three 218 GHz transitions (JKAKC = 303-202, 322-221, and 321-220) of para-H2CO were observed with the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) toward 30 massive clumps of the Galactic disk at various stages of high-mass star formation. Using the RADEX non-LTE model, we derive the gas kinetic temperature modeling the measured para-H2CO 322-221/303-202 and 321-220/303-202 ratios. Results: The gas kinetic temperatures derived from the para-H2CO (321-220/303-202) line ratios range from 30 to 61 K with an average of 46 ± 9 K. A comparison of kinetic temperature derived from para-H2CO, NH3, and the dust emission indicates that in many cases para-H2CO traces a similar kinetic temperature to the NH3 (2, 2)/(1, 1) transitions and the dust associated with the HII regions. Distinctly higher temperatures are probed by para-H2CO in the clumps associated with outflows/shocks. Kinetic temperatures obtained from para-H2CO trace turbulence to a higher degree than NH3 (2, 2)/(1, 1) in the massive clumps. The non-thermal velocity dispersions of para-H2CO lines are positively correlated with the gas kinetic temperature. The massive clumps are significantly influenced by supersonic non-thermal motions. The reduced spectra (FITS files) are only

  17. Physical properties of high-mass star-forming clumps in different evolutionary stages from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Brian; Shirley, Yancy; Rosolowsky, Erik; Dunham, Miranda; Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy; Ginsburg, Adam

    2013-07-01

    High mass stars play a key role in the physical and chemical evolution of the interstellar medium, yet the evolutionary sequence for high mass star forming regions is poorly understood. Recent Galactic plane surveys are providing the first systematic view of high-mass star-forming regions in all evolutionary phases across the Milky Way. We present observations of the 22.23 GHz H2O maser transition J(Ka,Kc) = 6(1,6)→5(2,3) transition toward 1398 clumps identified in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey using the 100m Green Bank Telescope (GBT). We detect 392 H2O masers, 279 (71%) newly discovered. We show that H2O masers can identify the presence of protostars which were not previously identified by Spitzer/MSX Galactic plane IR surveys: 25% of IR-dark clumps have an H2O maser. We compare the physical properties of the clumps in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) with observations of diagnostics of star formation activity: 8 and 24 um YSO candidates, H2O and CH3OH masers, shocked H2, EGOs, and UCHII regions. We identify a sub-sample of 400 clumps with no star formation indicators representing the largest and most robust sample of pre-protocluster candidates from an unbiased survey to date. The different evolutionary stages show strong separations in HCO+ linewidth and integrated intensity, surface mass density, and kinetic temperature. Monte Carlo techniques are applied to distance probability distribution functions (DPDFs) in order to marginalize over the kinematic distance ambiguity and calculate the distribution of derived quantities for clumps in different evolutionary stages. Surface area and dust mass show weak separations above > 2 pc^2 and > 3x10^3 solar masses. An observed breakdown occurs in the size-linewidth relationship with no differentiation by evolutionary stage. Future work includes adding evolutionary indicators (MIPSGAL, HiGal, MMB) and expanding DPDF priors (HI self-absorption, Galactic structure) for more well-resolved KDAs.

  18. OT2_fwyrowsk_3: A Water survey of massive star forming clumps in the inner Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrowski, F.

    2011-09-01

    Water, as a dominant form of oxygen, the most abundant element in the universe after H and He, controls the chemistry of many other species. It is a unique diagnostic of warm gas and energetic processes taking place during star formation. We therefore propose to exploit the unique opportunity of Herschel to study water in large, statistically significant, flux limited samples of massive star forming regions detected in the recently completed ATLASGAL submm dust continuum survey of the inner Galactic plane. In the last years, our view of massive star forming regions has dramatically changed by Galactic plane surveys covering cm to IR wavelengths. These surveys enable us for the first time to study ALL evolutionary stages of massive star formation (MSF) in an unbiased way. Water, acting as a natural filter for warm, dense gas, allows to probe the chemical and physical conditions in all of these stages close to where the massive stars are forming or just have been formed. ATLASGAL observed submm dust continuum emission as best tracer of the earliest phases of MSF since it is directly probing the material from which the stars form. As a large unbiased survey it provide the statistical base to study the scarce and short-living protoclusters as the origin of the massive stars and the richest clusters in the Galaxy and supplies us with a legacy value sample of MSF regions for the water follow ups. Water is typically seen with strongly increased abundances in broad line wings, providing a new, sensitive probe of shocked outflowing gas. In addition, the envelope is probed in a combination of absorption and emission with a clear jump in abundance in the warm inner regions close to the forming massive stars. Only Herschel can provide a water survey of a large sample of ATLASGAL selected sources to study water through the evolution of massive star forming regions with a statistically significant sample size.

  19. Engineering bacteria to form a biofilm and induce clumping in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Dorado-Morales, Pedro; Iglesias, Alba; Zafrilla, Guillermo; Valero, Alejandro; Torres, Alejandro; Miravet-Verde, Samuel; de Loma, Jessica; Mañas, Marina; Ruiz, Antonio; Corman, Alba; Morales, Lucas J; Peretó, Juli; Vilanova, Cristina; Porcar, Manuel

    2014-12-19

    Bacteria are needed for a vast range of biotechnological processes, which they carry out either as pure cultures or in association with other bacteria and/or fungi. The potential of bacteria as biofactories is hampered, though, by their limited mobility in solid or semisolid media such as agricultural or domestic waste. This work represents an attempt toward overcoming this limitation by associating bacterial biotechnological properties with the transport ability of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We report here biofilm formation on C. elegans by engineered Escherichia coli expressing a Xhenorhabdus nematophila adhesion operon and induction of nematode social feeding behavior (clumping) through an E. coli-mediated iRNA blocking on the expression of FLP-21, a neuropeptide involved in worm solitary behavior.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Massive star forming molecular clumps Tkin (Tang+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. D.; Henkel, C.; Menten, K. M.; Zheng, X. W.; Esimbek, J.; Zhou, J. J.; Yeh, C. C.; Konig, C.; Yuan, Y.; He, Y. X.; Li, D. L.

    2016-10-01

    We have selected 30 massive clumps of the Galactic disk at various stages of high-mass star formation and with strong NH3 emission from the ATLASGAL survey (see Table 1). Our observations were carried out in 2015 April, July, and October with the 15m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope telescope (JCMT) on Mauna Kea. The beam size is ~23" and the main-beam efficiency is {eta}mb=Ta*/Tmb~=0.7 at 218GHz. The para-H2CO JKAKC =303-202, 322-221, and 321-220 transitions have rest frequencies of 218.222, 218.475, and 218.760GHz, respectively, which are measured simultaneously by employing the ACSIS digital autocorrelation spectrometer with the special backend configuration RxAH2CO250x3 allowing for three windows, each with a bandwidth of 250MHz. This provides a velocity resolution of 0.084km/s for para-H2CO (303-202 and 322-221) and 0.042km/s for para-H2CO (321-220); CH3OH (422-312) at 218.440GHz is also observed together with para-H2CO (322-221). (6 data files).

  1. Comparison Of Galaxies At Redshifts Z 2 With Star-forming Clumps From HST CANDELS Observations To Those From Hydrodynamical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozena, Mark; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Primack, J. R.; Dekel, A.; CANDELS Team

    2012-01-01

    Massive, star-forming clumps have been observed in z 2 galaxies. These clumps have been hypothesized to be a major contributor to the build-up of stellar mass during this epoch of high star formation and AGN activity. Using the deepest optical (ACS) and near infra-red (WFC3) observations from the HST Multi-Cycle Treasury CANDELS (Cosmic Assembly Near Infra-Red Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey - candels.ucolick.org), we compare the properties of these clumps in the rest-frame near-UV and optical to those predicted by the latest cosmologically motivated hydrodynamical simulations (Hydro-ART by Ceverino, Dekel and Primack and Eris by Guedes and Madau). We render these simulated galaxy images to mimic the observed ACS and WFC3 images in CANDELS, and include the effects of dust obscuration, and use the observed simulations to explore measurable differences between in-falling clumps and those that have formed in the disk. We will present our latest results of comparing the observations of CANDELS galaxies with those from the latest hydrodynamical models that provide new and important insights into the nature and role of clumps in the mass assembly of galaxies in the z 2 universe.

  2. Lithium Inventory of 2 Solar Mass Red Clump Stars in Open Clusters: A Test of the Helium Flash Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.

    2016-01-01

    The temperature distribution of field Li-rich red giants suggests the presence of a population of Li-rich red clump (RC) stars. One proposed explanation for this population is that all stars with masses near 2 solar mass experience a shortlived phase of Li-richness at the onset of core He-burning. Many of these stars have low C-12/C-13, a signature of deep mixing that is presumably associated with the Li regeneration. To test this purported mechanism of Li enrichment, we measured abundances in 38 RC stars and 6 red giant branch (RGB) stars in four open clusters selected to have RC masses near 2 solar mass. We find six Li-rich stars (A(Li) greater than or equal to 1.50 dex) of which only two may be RC stars. None of the RC stars have Li exceeding the levels observed in the RGB stars, but given the brevity of the suggested Li-rich phase and the modest sample size, it is probable that stars with larger Li-enrichments were missed simply by chance. However, we find very few stars in our sample with low C-12/C-13. Such low C-12/C-13, seen in many field Li-rich stars, should persist even after lithium has returned to normal low levels. Thus, if Li synthesis during the He flash occurs, it is a rare, but potentially long-lived occurrence rather than a short-lived phase for all stars. We estimate a conservative upper limit of the fraction of stars going through a Li-rich phase to be less than 47%, based on stars that have low C-12/C-13 for their observed A(Li).

  3. Lithium Inventory of 2 M ⊙ Red Clump Stars in Open Clusters: A Test of the Helium Flash Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.

    2016-08-01

    The temperature distribution of field Li-rich red giants suggests the presence of a population of Li-rich red clump (RC) stars. One proposed explanation for this population is that all stars with masses near 2 M ⊙ experience a short-lived phase of Li-richness at the onset of core He-burning. Many of these stars have low 12C/13C, a signature of deep mixing that is presumably associated with the Li regeneration. To test this purported mechanism of Li enrichment, we measured abundances in 38 RC stars and 6 red giant branch (RGB) stars in four open clusters selected to have RC masses near 2 M ⊙. We find six Li-rich stars (A(Li) ≥ 1.50 dex) of which only two may be RC stars. None of the RC stars have Li exceeding the levels observed in the RGB stars, but given the brevity of the suggested Li-rich phase and the modest sample size, it is probable that stars with larger Li-enrichments were missed simply by chance. However, we find very few stars in our sample with low 12C/13C. Such low 12C/13C, seen in many field Li-rich stars, should persist even after lithium has returned to normal low levels. Thus, if Li synthesis during the He flash occurs, it is a rare, but potentially long-lived occurrence rather than a short-lived phase for all stars. We estimate a conservative upper limit of the fraction of stars going through a Li-rich phase to be \\lt 47 % , based on stars that have low 12C/13C for their observed A(Li).

  4. Molecular clumps in the W51 giant molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, H.; Thompson, M. A.; Clark, J. S.; Chrysostomou, A.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we present a catalogue of dense molecular clumps located within the W51 giant molecular cloud (GMC). This work is based on Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme 13CO J = 3-2 observations of the W51 GMC and uses the automated CLUMPFIND algorithm to decompose the region into a total of 1575 clumps of which 1130 are associated with the W51 GMC. We clearly see the distinct structures of the W51 complex and the high-velocity stream previously reported. We find the clumps have characteristic diameters of 1.4 pc, excitation temperatures of 12 K, densities of 5.6 × 1021 cm-2, surface densities 0.02 g cm-2 and masses of 90 M⊙. We find a total mass of dense clumps within the GMC of 1.5 × 105 M⊙, with only 1 per cent of the clumps detected by number and 4 per cent by mass found to be supercritical. We find a clump-forming efficiency of 14 ± 1 per cent for the W51 GMC and a supercritical clump-forming efficiency of 0.5-0.5+2.3 per cent. Looking at the clump mass distribution, we find it is described by a single power law with a slope of α=2.4-0.1+0.2 above ˜100 M⊙. By comparing locations of supercritical clumps and young clusters, we see that any future star formation is likely to be located away from the currently active W51A region.

  5. SMOOTH(ER) STELLAR MASS MAPS IN CANDELS: CONSTRAINTS ON THE LONGEVITY OF CLUMPS IN HIGH-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wuyts, Stijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Genzel, Reinhard; Lutz, Dieter; Guo Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koo, David C.; McGrath, Elizabeth; Dekel, Avishai; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lotz, Jennifer; Hathi, Nimish P.; Huang, Kuang-Han; Newman, Jeffrey A.; and others

    2012-07-10

    We perform a detailed analysis of the resolved colors and stellar populations of a complete sample of 323 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 0.5 < z < 1.5 and 326 SFGs at 1.5 < z < 2.5 in the ERS and CANDELS-Deep region of GOODS-South. Galaxies were selected to be more massive than 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and have specific star formation rates (SFRs) above 1/t{sub H} . We model the seven-band optical ACS + near-IR WFC3 spectral energy distributions of individual bins of pixels, accounting simultaneously for the galaxy-integrated photometric constraints available over a longer wavelength range. We analyze variations in rest-frame color, stellar surface mass density, age, and extinction as a function of galactocentric radius and local surface brightness/density, and measure structural parameters on luminosity and stellar mass maps. We find evidence for redder colors, older stellar ages, and increased dust extinction in the nuclei of galaxies. Big star-forming clumps seen in star formation tracers are less prominent or even invisible in the inferred stellar mass distributions. Off-center clumps contribute up to {approx}20% to the integrated SFR, but only 7% or less to the integrated mass of all massive SFGs at z {approx} 1 and z {approx} 2, with the fractional contributions being a decreasing function of wavelength used to select the clumps. The stellar mass profiles tend to have smaller sizes and M20 coefficients, and higher concentration and Gini coefficients than the light distribution. Our results are consistent with an inside-out disk growth scenario with brief (100-200 Myr) episodic local enhancements in star formation superposed on the underlying disk. Alternatively, the young ages of off-center clumps may signal inward clump migration, provided this happens efficiently on the order of an orbital timescale.

  6. Lithopanspermia in star-forming clusters.

    PubMed

    Adams, Fred C; Spergel, David N

    2005-08-01

    This paper considers the lithopanspermia hypothesis in star-forming groups and clusters, where the chances of biological material spreading from one solar system to another is greatly enhanced (relative to action in the field) because of the close proximity of the systems and lower relative velocities. These effects more than compensate for the reduced time spent in such crowded environments. This paper uses approximately 300,000 Monte Carlo scattering calculations to determine the cross sections for rocks to be captured by binaries and provides fitting formulae for other applications. We assess the odds of transfer as a function of the ejection speed v (eject) and number N(.) of members in the birth aggregate. The odds of any given ejected meteoroid being recaptured by another solar system are relatively low, about 1:10(3)-10(6) over the expected range of ejection speeds and cluster sizes. Because the number of ejected rocks (with mass m > 10 kg) per system can be large, N (R) approximately 10(16), virtually all solar systems are likely to share rocky ejecta with all of the other solar systems in their birth cluster. The number of ejected rocks that carry living microorganisms is much smaller and less certain, but we estimate that N (B) approximately 10(7) rocks can be ejected from a biologically active solar system. For typical birth environments, the capture of life-bearing rocks is expected to occur N (bio) asymptotically equal to 10-16,000 times (per cluster), depending on the ejection speeds. Only a small fraction (f (imp) approximately 10(4)) of the captured rocks impact the surfaces of terrestrial planets, so that N (lps) asymptotically equal to 10(3)-1.6 lithopanspermia events are expected per cluster (under favorable conditions). Finally, we discuss the question of internal versus external seeding of clusters and the possibility of Earth seeding young clusters over its biologically active lifetime.

  7. Cloud Structure of Galactic OB Cluster-forming Regions from Combining Ground- and Space-based Bolometric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuxin; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Li, Di; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ginsburg, Adam; Pineda, Jaime E.; Qian, Lei; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; McLeod, Anna Faye; Rosolowsky, Erik; Dale, James E.; Immer, Katharina; Koch, Eric; Longmore, Steve; Walker, Daniel; Testi, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    We have developed an iterative procedure to systematically combine the millimeter and submillimeter images of OB cluster-forming molecular clouds, which were taken by ground-based (CSO, JCMT, APEX, and IRAM-30 m) and space telescopes (Herschel and Planck). For the seven luminous (L\\gt {10}6 L ⊙) Galactic OB cluster-forming molecular clouds selected for our analyses, namely W49A, W43-Main, W43-South, W33, G10.6-0.4, G10.2-0.3, and G10.3-0.1, we have performed single-component, modified blackbody fits to each pixel of the combined (sub)millimeter images, and the Herschel PACS and SPIRE images at shorter wavelengths. The ˜10″ resolution dust column density and temperature maps of these sources revealed dramatically different morphologies, indicating very different modes of OB cluster-formation, or parent molecular cloud structures in different evolutionary stages. The molecular clouds W49A, W33, and G10.6-0.4 show centrally concentrated massive molecular clumps that are connected with approximately radially orientated molecular gas filaments. The W43-Main and W43-South molecular cloud complexes, which are located at the intersection of the Galactic near 3 kpc (or Scutum) arm and the Galactic bar, show a widely scattered distribution of dense molecular clumps/cores over the observed ˜10 pc spatial scale. The relatively evolved sources G10.2-0.3 and G10.3-0.1 appear to be affected by stellar feedback, and show a complicated cloud morphology embedded with abundant dense molecular clumps/cores. We find that with the high angular resolution we achieved, our visual classification of cloud morphology can be linked to the systematically derived statistical quantities (i.e., the enclosed mass profile, the column density probability distribution function (N-PDF), the two-point correlation function of column density, and the probability distribution function of clump/core separations). In particular, the massive molecular gas clumps located at the center of G10.6-0.4 and

  8. Cooperation, clumping and the evolution of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Biernaskie, Jay M; West, Stuart A

    2015-08-22

    The evolution of multicellular organisms represents one of the major evolutionary transitions in the history of life. A potential advantage of forming multicellular clumps is that it provides an efficiency benefit to pre-existing cooperation, such as the production of extracellular 'public goods'. However, this is complicated by the fact that cooperation could jointly evolve with clumping, and clumping could have multiple consequences for the evolution of cooperation. We model the evolution of clumping and a cooperative public good, showing that (i) when considered separately, both clumping and public goods production gradually increase with increasing genetic relatedness; (ii) in contrast, when the traits evolve jointly, a small increase in relatedness can lead to a major shift in evolutionary outcome—from a non-clumping state with low public goods production to a cooperative clumping state with high values of both traits; (iii) high relatedness makes it easier to get to the cooperative clumping state and (iv) clumping can be inhibited when it increases the number of cells that the benefits of cooperation must be shared with, but promoted when it increases relatedness between those cells. Overall, our results suggest that public goods sharing can facilitate the formation of well-integrated cooperative clumps as a first step in the evolution of multicellularity.

  9. THE LIFE AND DEATH OF DENSE MOLECULAR CLUMPS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Seale, Jonathan P.; Looney, Leslie W.; Wong, Tony; Ott, Juergen; Klein, Uli; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2012-05-20

    We report the results of a high spatial (parsec) resolution HCO{sup +} (J = 1 {yields} 0) and HCN (J = 1 {yields} 0) emission survey toward the giant molecular clouds of the star formation regions N 105, N 113, N 159, and N 44 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The HCO{sup +} and HCN observations at 89.2 and 88.6 GHz, respectively, were conducted in the compact configuration of the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The emission is imaged into individual clumps with masses between 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} and radii of <1 pc to {approx}2 pc. Many of the clumps are coincident with indicators of current massive star formation, indicating that many of the clumps are associated with deeply embedded forming stars and star clusters. We find that massive young stellar object (YSO) bearing clumps tend to be larger ({approx}>1 pc), more massive (M {approx}> 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }), and have higher surface densities ({approx}1 g cm{sup -2}), while clumps without signs of star formation are smaller ({approx}<1 pc), less massive (M {approx}< 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }), and have lower surface densities ({approx}0.1 g cm{sup -2}). The dearth of massive (M > 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }) clumps not bearing massive YSOs suggests that the onset of star formation occurs rapidly once the clump has attained physical properties favorable to massive star formation. Using a large sample of LMC massive YSO mid-IR spectra, we estimate that {approx}2/3 of the massive YSOs for which there are Spitzer mid-IR spectra are no longer located in molecular clumps; we estimate that these young stars/clusters have destroyed their natal clumps on a timescale of at least {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} yr.

  10. Dispersal patterns and clumping behaviors in the beetle Trichoton sordidum

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Carolyne N.

    2005-01-01

    Although a significant number of behavioral studies of desert tenebrionids have been done, almost nothing is recorded of Trichoton sordidum (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), an inhabitant of the sunny, sparsely vegetated US/Mexican borderlands. For this small, flightless beetle successful predator evasion and adaptation to a desert environment has required development of complicated, quickly utilizable behavioral mechanisms for regulating exposure to extremes of heat, light, humidity, and habitat structure. In this study, T. sordidum was exposed to sudden changes in temperature, illumination, and habitat complexity, and some patterns representing its normal aggregation were recorded. Minimum Risk Distribution models (Floater 2001) predict changes in spatial distribution patterns of groups of individuals as they are exposed to environmental change. A successful species must have a large percentage of individuals adhering to changes with a set pattern of behaviors. All groups of T. sordidum tested demonstrated both rapid and cohesive dispersal patterns. They normally showed little tendency toward clustering, except clear adhesive aggregation patterns in cases of limited resources in a fragmented environment. Under conditions of extreme heat or light, aggregations in the form of clumping did occur. The formation of clumps from simple two-stacks to groups of up to ten is documented here. The sophistication, consistency of use, and rapid initiation of clumps suggest clumping might well be a highly evolved and successful mechanism for group threat evasion. The morphology of T. sordidum shows how clumping is achieved. An examination of the conditions leading to clumping gives clues to why clumps are formed. Abbreviation: MRD: Minimum Risk Distribution: A model of spatial distribution of individuals that results in the minimum number of premature deaths in a population, and leads to maximized population growth (Floater 2001). C-value: A statistical measurement used in

  11. Transient Clumps in Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, B. K.; Esposito, L. W.; Sremcevic, M.

    2011-10-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph has detected 27 statistically significant features in 101 occultations by Saturn's F ring since July 2004. Of those 27 features, 17 likely correspond to transient clumps of material. We calculate from these observations the total number and total mass of transient clumps in the F ring. Constraints from observations place an upper limit on the number and total mass of such clumps. In turn, an upper limit on mass indicates that the clumps are not solid, spherical objects, rather they are loosely-packed, triaxial ellipsoids elongated in azimuth and vertically flattened. The total mass of clumps in the F ring is thus 6.1 x 1014 kg, the equivalent of a 6.8 km icy moon with a density equivalent to that of Prometheus. The differences in optical depth and morphology of the 17 significant features considered here also lead us to believe porosity differences exist among clumps. We investigate how the size distribution of clumps of different porosities evolves and how compaction of such clumps could lead to denser states that resemble moonlets, which describes 2 of the 17 features observed. The results presented here lead to a better model of how transient clumps form, evolve, and survive.

  12. Photoevaporation of Clumps in Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Uma; Hollenbach, David; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of an investigation of the effects of Far Ultraviolet (FUV) radiation (6.0eV < hv < 13.6eV) from hot early type OB stars on clumps in star-forming molecular clouds. Clumps in FUV-illuminated regions (or photodissociation regions or PDRs) undergo external heating and photodissociation as they are exposed to the FUV field, resulting in a loss of cold, molecular lump mass as it is converted to warm atomic gas. The heating, if rapid, creates strong photoevaporative mass flows off the clump surfaces, and drives shocks into the clumps, compressing them to high densities. The clumps lose mass on relatively short timescales. The evolution of an individual clump is found to be sensitive to three dimensionless parameters: Nc0, the ratio of the initial column density of the clump to the column N(0) approx. 10(exp 21) cm(exp -2) of a warm FUV-heated surface region; upsilon, the ratio of the sound speed in the heated surface to that in the cold clump material: and t(FUV)t(c), the ratio of the "turn-on time" t(FUV) of the heating flux on a clump to its initial sound crossing-time t(c). The evolution also depends on whether a confining interclump medium exists, or whether the interclump region has negligible pressure, as is the case for turbulence-generated clumps. In this paper, we use spherical 1-D numerical hydrodynamic models as well as approximate analytical models to study the dependence of clump photoevaporation on the physical parameters of the clump, and to derive the dynamical evolution, mass loss rates and photoevaporative timescales of a clump for a variety of astrophysical situations. Turbulent clumps evolve so that their column densities are equal to a critical value determined by the local FUV field, and typically have short photo evaporation timescales, approx. 10(exp 4-5) years for a 1 M(solar mass) clump in a typical star-forming region (Nc0 = 10, upsilon = 10). Clumps with insufficient magnetic pressure support, and in strong FUV fields

  13. How did the Virgo cluster form?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, Jenny G.; Gottlöber, Stefan; Hoffman, Yehuda; Yepes, Gustavo

    2016-08-01

    While the Virgo cluster is the nearest galaxy cluster and therefore the best observed one, little is known about its formation history. In this paper, a set of cosmological simulations that resemble the Local Universe is used to shed the first light on this mystery. The initial conditions for these simulations are constrained with galaxy peculiar velocities of the second catalogue of the Cosmicflows project using algorithms developed within the Constrained Local UniversE Simulation project. Boxes of 500 h-1 Mpc on a side are set to run a series of dark matter only constrained simulations. In each simulation, a unique dark matter halo can be reliably identified as Virgo's counterpart. The properties of these Virgo haloes are in agreement at a 10-20 per cent level with the global properties of the observed Virgo cluster. Their zero-velocity masses agree at 1σ with the observational mass estimate. In all the simulations, the matter falls on to the Virgo objects along a preferential direction that corresponds to the observational filament and the slowest direction of collapse. A study of the mass accretion history of the Virgo candidates reveals the most likely formation history of the Virgo cluster, namely a quiet accretion over the last 7 Gyr.

  14. Kinetic temperature of massive star-forming molecular clumps measured with formaldehyde. II. The Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. D.; Henkel, C.; Chen, C.-H. R.; Menten, K. M.; Indebetouw, R.; Zheng, X. W.; Esimbek, J.; Zhou, J. J.; Yuan, Y.; Li, D. L.; He, Y. X.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The kinetic temperature of molecular clouds is a fundamental physical parameter affecting star formation and the initial mass function. The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is the closest star-forming galaxy with a low metallicity and provides an ideal laboratory for studying star formation in such an environment. Aims: The classical dense molecular gas thermometer NH3 is seldom available in a low-metallicity environment because of photoionization and a lack of nitrogen atoms. Our goal is to directly measure the gas kinetic temperature with formaldehyde toward six star-forming regions in the LMC. Methods: Three rotational transitions (JKAKC = 303-202, 322-221, and 321-220) of para-H2CO near 218 GHz were observed with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) 12 m telescope toward six star-forming regions in the LMC. These data are complemented by C18O 2-1 spectra. Results: Using non-local thermal equilibrium modeling with RADEX, we derive the gas kinetic temperature and spatial density, using as constraints the measured para-H2CO 321-220/303-202 and para-H2CO 303-202/C18O 2-1 ratios. Excluding the quiescent cloud N159S, where only one para-H2CO line could be detected, the gas kinetic temperatures derived from the preferred para-H2CO 321-220/303-202 line ratios range from 35 to 63 K with an average of 47 ± 5 K (errors are unweighted standard deviations of the mean). Spatial densities of the gas derived from the para-H2CO 303-202/C18O 2-1 line ratios yield 0.4-2.9 × 105 cm-3 with an average of 1.5 ± 0.4 × 105 cm-3. Temperatures derived from the para-H2CO line ratio are similar to those obtained with the same method from Galactic star-forming regions and agree with results derived from CO in the dense regions (n(H2) > 103 cm-3) of the LMC. A comparison of kinetic temperatures derived from para-H2CO with those from the dust also shows good agreement. This suggests that the dust and para-H2CO are well mixed in the studied star-forming regions. A comparison of

  15. Clumped isotope thermometry and catagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, J. M.; Clog, M. D.; Dallas, B.; Douglas, P. M.; Piasecki, A.; Sessions, A. L.; Stolper, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Clumped- and site-specific isotopic compositions of organic compounds can constrain their formation temperatures, sources, and chemical reaction histories. The large number of isotopologues of organic molecules may allow for the isotopic composition of a single compound to illuminate many processes. For example, it is possible that clumping or site specific effects in different parts of the same molecule will differ in blocking temperature, such that a molecule's full isotopic structure could simultaneously constrain conditions of biosynthesis, catagenic 'cracking', and storage in the crust. Recent innovations in high-resolution mass spectrometry and methods of IR and NMR spectroscopy make it possible to explore these questions. Methane is the first organic molecule to have its clumped isotope geochemistry analyzed in a variety of natural environments and controlled experiments. Methane generated through catagenic cracking of kerogen and other organic matter forms in equilibrium with respect to isotopic clumping, and preserves that state through later storage or migration, up to temperatures of ~250 ˚C. This kinetic behavior permits a variety of useful geological applications. But it is unexpected because the bulk stable isotope composition of thermogenic methane is thought to reflect kinetic isotope effects on irreversible reactions. Our observations imply a new interpretation of the chemical physics of catagenic methane formation. Additional instrument and methods developments are currently extending the measurement of isotopic clumping and position specific effects to larger alkanes, other hydrocarbon compounds, and amino acids. These measurements will ultimately expand our capacity to understand the formational conditions and fates of organic molecules in high- and low-temperature environments through geological time.

  16. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    PubMed Central

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  17. Characterizing the properties of cluster precursors in the MALT90 survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Yanett; Rathborne, Jill M.; Guzman, Andres; Jackson, James; Whitaker, Scott; Sanhueza, Patricio; Foster, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    In the Milky Way there are thousands of stellar clusters each harbouring from a hundred to a million stars. Although clusters are common, the initial conditions of cluster formation are still not well understood. To determine the processes involved in the formation and evolution of clusters it is key to determine the global properties of cluster-forming clumps in their earliest stages of evolution. Here, we present the physical properties of 1244 clumps identified from the MALT90 survey. Using the dust temperature of the clumps as a proxy for evolution we determined how the clump properties change at different evolutionary stages. We find that less-evolved clumps exhibiting dust temperatures lower than 20 K have higher densities and are more gravitationally bound than more-evolved clumps with higher dust temperatures. We also identified a sample of clumps in a very early stage of evolution, thus potential candidates for high-mass star-forming clumps. Only one clump in our sample has physical properties consistent with a young massive cluster progenitor, reinforcing the fact that massive protoclusters are very rare in the Galaxy.

  18. Breakup of particle clumps on liquid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurupatham, S.; Hossain, M.; Dalal, B.; Fischer, I.; Singh, P.; Joseph, D.

    2011-11-01

    In this talk we describe the mechanism by which clumps of some powdered materials breakup and disperse on a liquid surface to form a monolayer of particles. We show that a clump breaks up because when particles on its outer periphery come in contact with the liquid surface they are pulled into the interface by the vertical component of capillary force overcoming the cohesive forces which keep them attached, and then these particles move away from the clump. In some cases, the clump itself is broken into smaller pieces and then these smaller pieces break apart by the aforementioned mechanism. The newly-adsorbed particles move away from the clump, and each other, because when particles are adsorbed on a liquid surface they cause a flow on the interface away from themselves. This flow may also cause particles newly-exposed on the outer periphery of the clump to break away. Since millimeter-sized clumps can breakup and spread on a liquid surface within a few seconds, their behavior appears to be similar to that of some liquid drops which can spontaneously disperse on solid surfaces.

  19. HUBBLE SPIES HUGE CLUSTERS OF STARS FORMED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    BY ANCIENT ENCOUNTER This stunningly beautiful image [right] taken with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope shows the heart of the prototypical starburst galaxy M82. The ongoing violent star formation due to an ancient encounter with its large galactic neighbor, M81, gives this galaxy its disturbed appearance. The smaller picture at upper left shows the entire galaxy. The image was taken in December 1994 by the Kitt Peak National Observatory's 0.9-meter telescope. Hubble's view is represented by the white outline in the center. In the Hubble image, taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, the huge lanes of dust that crisscross M82's disk are another telltale sign of the flurry of star formation. Below the center and to the right, a strong galactic wind is spewing knotty filaments of hydrogen and nitrogen gas. More than 100 super star clusters -- very bright, compact groupings of about 100,000 stars -- are seen in this detailed Hubble picture as white dots sprinkled throughout M82's central region. The dark region just above the center of the picture is a huge dust cloud. A collaboration of European and American scientists used these clusters to date the ancient interaction between M82 and M81. About 600 million years ago, a region called 'M82 B' (the bright area just below and to the left of the central dust cloud) exploded with new stars. Scientists have discovered that this ancient starburst was triggered by the violent encounter with M81. M82 is a bright (eighth magnitude), nearby (12 million light-years from Earth) galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major (the Great Bear). The Hubble picture was taken Sept. 15, 1997. The natural-color composite was constructed from three Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 exposures, which were combined in chromatic order: 4,250 seconds through a blue filter (428 nm); 2,800 seconds through a green filter (520 nm); and 2,200 seconds through a red (820 nm) filter. Credits for Hubble image: NASA, ESA, R. de Grijs (Institute of

  20. Dense Molecular Clumps Associated with the Large Magellanic Cloud Supergiant Shells LMC 4 and LMC 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Kosuke; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Onishi, Toshikazu; Kawamura, Akiko; Muller, Erik; Dawson, Joanne; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Tosaki, Tomoka; Miura, Rie E.; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Ezawa, Hajime; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the effects of supergiant shells (SGSs) and their interaction on dense molecular clumps by observing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) star-forming regions N48 and N49, which are located between two SGSs, LMC 4 and LMC 5. 12CO (J = 3-2, 1-0) and 13CO(J = 1-0) observations with the ASTE and Mopra telescopes have been carried out toward these regions. A clumpy distribution of dense molecular clumps is revealed with 7 pc spatial resolution. Large velocity gradient analysis shows that the molecular hydrogen densities (n(H2)) of the clumps are distributed from low to high density (103-105 cm-3) and their kinetic temperatures (T kin) are typically high (greater than 50 K). These clumps seem to be in the early stages of star formation, as also indicated from the distribution of Hα, young stellar object candidates, and IR emission. We found that the N48 region is located in the high column density H I envelope at the interface of the two SGSs and the star formation is relatively evolved, whereas the N49 region is associated with LMC 5 alone and the star formation is quiet. The clumps in the N48 region typically show high n(H2) and T kin, which are as dense and warm as the clumps in LMC massive cluster-forming areas (30 Dor, N159). These results suggest that the large-scale structure of the SGSs, especially the interaction of two SGSs, works efficiently on the formation of dense molecular clumps and stars.

  1. Fragmentation of Molecular Clumps and Formation of Massive Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-07-01

    Massive protostars are born in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the formation of a cluster of stellar objects. The interplay among gravity, turbulence and magnetic fields affects the outcome of fragmentation. The physical condition (temperature and density) in molecular clumps limits the Jeans mass to about 1 Msun. This creates a theoretical puzzle for massive star formation since dense cores much larger than 1 Msun tend to further fragment into lower mass entities. In this talk, I will present recent high resolution observations of massive molecular clumps at very early evolutionary stages. I will discuss fragmentation, physical and chemical evolution of molecular coresand the implication of these findings to current theoretical ideas of massive star and cluster formation. I will also present measurements of dust polarization of a large sample of massive molecular clumps, which suggest that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse of molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores.

  2. Distance biases in the estimation of the physical properties of Hi-GAL compact sources - I. Clump properties and the identification of high-mass star-forming candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldeschi, Adriano; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Pezzuto, S.; Schisano, E.; Gatti, M.; Serra, A.; Merello, M.; Benedettini, M.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Liu, J. S.

    2017-04-01

    The degradation of spatial resolution in star-forming regions, observed at large distances (d ≳ 1 kpc) with Herschel, can lead to estimates of the physical parameters of the detected compact sources (clumps), which do not necessarily mirror the properties of the original population of cores. This paper aims at quantifying the bias introduced in the estimation of these parameters by the distance effect. To do so, we consider Herschel maps of nearby star-forming regions taken from the Herschel Gould Belt survey, and simulate the effect of increased distance to understand what amount of information is lost when a distant star-forming region is observed with Herschel resolution. In the maps displaced to different distances we extract compact sources, and we derive their physical parameters as if they were original Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey maps of the extracted source samples. In this way, we are able to discuss how the main physical properties change with distance. In particular, we discuss the ability of clumps to form massive stars: we estimate the fraction of distant sources that are classified as high-mass stars-forming objects due to their position in the mass versus radius diagram, that are only 'false positives'. We also give a threshold for high-mass star formation M>1282 (r/ [pc])^{1.42} M_{⊙}. In conclusion, this paper provides the astronomer dealing with Herschel maps of distant star-forming regions with a set of prescriptions to partially recover the character of the core population in unresolved clumps.

  3. IRDC G030.88+00.13: A TALE OF TWO MASSIVE CLUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qizhou; Wang Ke

    2011-05-20

    Massive stars (M {approx}>10 M{sub sun}) form from collapse of parsec-scale molecular clumps. How molecular clumps fragment to give rise to massive stars in a cluster with a distribution of masses is unclear. We search for cold cores that may lead to future formation of massive stars in a massive (>10{sup 3} M{sub sun}), low luminosity (4.6 x 10{sup 2} L{sub sun}) infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G030.88+00.13. The NH{sub 3} data from the Very Large Array (VLA) and Green Bank Telescope reveal that the extinction feature seen in the infrared consists of two distinctive clumps along the same line of sight. The C1 clump at 97 km s{sup -1} coincides with the extinction in the Spitzer 8 and 24 {mu}m. Therefore, it is responsible for the majority of the IRDC. The C2 clump at 107 km s{sup -1} is more compact and has a peak temperature of 45 K. Compact dust cores and H{sub 2}O masers revealed in the Submillimeter Array and VLA observations are mostly associated with C2, and none are within the IRDC in C1. The luminosity indicates that neither the C1 nor C2 clump has yet to form massive protostars. But C1 might be at a precluster forming stage. The simulated observations rule out 0.1 pc cold cores with masses above 8 M{sub sun} within the IRDC. The core masses in C1 and C2 and those in high-mass protostellar objects suggest an evolutionary trend that the mass of cold cores increases over time. Based on our findings, we propose an empirical picture of massive star formation that protostellar cores and the embedded protostars undergo simultaneous mass growth during the protostellar evolution.

  4. THE STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF FORMING AND EARLY STAGE STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jaehnig, Karl O.; Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C. E-mail: ndario@ufl.edu

    2015-01-10

    We study the degree of angular substructure in the stellar position distribution of young members of Galactic star-forming regions, looking for correlations with distance from cluster center, surface number density of stars, and local dynamical age. To this end we adopt the catalog of members in 18 young (∼1-3 Myr) clusters from the Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray Survey and the statistical analysis of the angular dispersion parameter, δ{sub ADP,} {sub N}. We find statistically significant correlation between δ{sub ADP,} {sub N} and physical projected distance from the center of the clusters, with the centers appearing smoother than the outskirts, consistent with more rapid dynamical processing on local dynamical, free-fall or orbital timescales. Similarly, smoother distributions are seen in regions of higher surface density, or older dynamical ages. These results indicate that dynamical processing that erases substructure is already well-advanced in young, sometimes still-forming, clusters. Such observations of the dissipation of substructure have the potential to constrain theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of young and forming clusters.

  5. Mass-density relationship in molecular cloud clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkov, Sava; Veltchev, Todor V.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2011-12-01

    We study the mass-density relationship n ∝ mx in molecular cloud condensations (clumps), considering various equipartition relations between their gravitational, kinetic, internal and magnetic energies. Clumps are described statistically, with a density distribution that reflects a lognormal probability density function in turbulent cold interstellar medium. The clump mass-density exponent x derived at different scales L varies in most of the cases within the range -2.5 ≲x≲-0.2, with a pronounced scale dependence and in consistency with observations. When derived from the global size-mass relationship ? for set of clumps, generated at all scales, the clump mass-density exponent has typical values -3.0 ≲x(γglob) ≲-0.3 that depend on the forms of energy, included in the equipartition relations, and on the velocity scaling law, whereas the description of clump geometry is important when magnetic energy is taken into account.

  6. Detailed modeling of cluster galaxies in free-form lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The main goal of the Frontier Fields is to characterize the population of high redshift galaxies that are gravitationally lensed and magnified by foreground massive galaxy clusters. The magnification received by lensed images has to be accurately quantified in order to derive the correct science results. The magnification is in turn computed from lens models, which are constructed from various constraints, most commonly the positions and redshifts of multiply-lensed galaxies.The locations and magnification of multiple images that appear near cluster galaxies are very sensitive to the mass distribution of those individual galaxies. In current free-form lens models, they are at best crudely approximated by arbitrary mass halos and are usually being completely neglected. Given sufficient free parameters and iterations, such models may be highly consistent but their predictive power would be rather limited. This shortcoming is particularly pronounced in light of the recent discovery of the first multiply-lensed supernova in the Frontier Fields cluster MACSJ1149. The proximity of its images to cluster galaxies mandates detailed modeling on galaxy-scales, where free-form methods solely based on grid solutions simply fail.We present a hybrid free-form lens model of Abell 2744, which for the first time incorporates a detailed mass component modeled by GALFIT that accurately captures the stellar light distribution of the hundred brightest cluster galaxies. The model better reproduces the image positions than a previous version, which modeled cluster galaxies with simplistic NFW halos. Curiously, this improvement is found in all but system 2, which has two radial images appearing around the BCG. Despite its complex light profile is being captured by GALFIT, the persistent discrepancies suggest considering mass distributions that may be largely offset from the stellar light distribution.

  7. Dense Molecular Clumps Associated with the LMC Supergiant Shell LMC 4 & LMC 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Minamidani, T.; Mizuno, N.; Onishi, T.; Kawamura, A.; Muller, E.; Dawson, J.; Fukui, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The 12CO(J=3-2/1-0) and 13CO(J=3-2/1-0) observations with ASTE and Mopra telescopes have been carried out toward the giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the N48/N49 regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), which are located at the boundary of two kpc-scale Supergiant Shell (SGS) LMC 4 & LMC 5. The star formation is relatively evolved in the N48 region, which is just located at the boundary of SGSs, than in the N49 region. The clumps in the N48 show higher n(H2) and Tkin than those in the N49, but their densities are not so high as the LMC cluster forming clumps. The collision of two SGSs actually enhances the star formation but further evolution seem to be necessary for subsequent cluster formation.

  8. Fragmentation of Molecular Clumps and Formation of a Protocluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Wang, Ke; Lu, Xing; Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun

    2015-05-01

    Sufficiently massive clumps of molecular gas collapse under self-gravity and fragment to spawn a cluster of stars that have a range of masses. We investigate observationally the early stages of formation of a stellar cluster in a massive filamentary infrared dark cloud, G28.34+0.06 P1, in the 1.3 mm continuum and spectral line emission using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. Sensitive continuum data reveal further fragmentation in five dusty cores at a resolution of several 103 AU. Spectral line emission from C18O, CH3OH, 13CS, H2CO, and N2D+ is detected for the first time toward these dense cores. We found that three cores are chemically more evolved as compared with the other two; interestingly, though, all of them are associated with collimated outflows as suggested by evidence from the CO, SiO, CH3OH, H2CO, and SO emission. The parsec-scale kinematics in exhibit velocity gradients along the filament, consistent with accretion flows toward the clumps and cores. The moderate luminosity and the chemical signatures indicate that the five cores harbor low- to intermediate-mass protostars that likely become massive ones at the end of the accretion. Despite the fact that the mass limit reached by the dust continuum sensitivity is 30 times lower than the thermal Jeans mass, there is a lack of a distributed low-mass protostellar population in the clump. Our observations indicate that in a protocluster, low-mass stars form at a later stage after the birth of more massive protostars.

  9. FRAGMENTATION OF MOLECULAR CLUMPS AND FORMATION OF A PROTOCLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qizhou; Lu, Xing; Wang, Ke; Jiménez-Serra, Izaskun

    2015-05-10

    Sufficiently massive clumps of molecular gas collapse under self-gravity and fragment to spawn a cluster of stars that have a range of masses. We investigate observationally the early stages of formation of a stellar cluster in a massive filamentary infrared dark cloud, G28.34+0.06 P1, in the 1.3 mm continuum and spectral line emission using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. Sensitive continuum data reveal further fragmentation in five dusty cores at a resolution of several 10{sup 3} AU. Spectral line emission from C{sup 18}O, CH{sub 3}OH, {sup 13}CS, H{sub 2}CO, and N{sub 2}D{sup +} is detected for the first time toward these dense cores. We found that three cores are chemically more evolved as compared with the other two; interestingly, though, all of them are associated with collimated outflows as suggested by evidence from the CO, SiO, CH{sub 3}OH, H{sub 2}CO, and SO emission. The parsec-scale kinematics in exhibit velocity gradients along the filament, consistent with accretion flows toward the clumps and cores. The moderate luminosity and the chemical signatures indicate that the five cores harbor low- to intermediate-mass protostars that likely become massive ones at the end of the accretion. Despite the fact that the mass limit reached by the dust continuum sensitivity is 30 times lower than the thermal Jeans mass, there is a lack of a distributed low-mass protostellar population in the clump. Our observations indicate that in a protocluster, low-mass stars form at a later stage after the birth of more massive protostars.

  10. STAR-FORMING GALAXY EVOLUTION IN NEARBY RICH CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, K. D.; Rieke, G. H.; Bai, L.

    2013-08-20

    Dense environments are known to quench star formation in galaxies, but it is still unknown what mechanism(s) are directly responsible. In this paper, we study the star formation of galaxies in A2029 and compare it to that of Coma, combining indicators at 24 {mu}m, H{alpha}, and UV down to rates of 0.03 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We show that A2029's star-forming galaxies follow the same mass-SFR relation as the field. The Coma cluster, on the other hand, has a population of galaxies with star formation rates (SFRs) significantly lower than the field mass-SFR relation, indicative of galaxies in the process of being quenched. Over half of these galaxies also host active galactic nuclei. Ram-pressure stripping and starvation/strangulation are the most likely mechanisms for suppressing the star formation in these galaxies, but we are unable to disentangle which is dominating. The differences we see between the two clusters' populations of star-forming galaxies may be related to their accretion histories, with A2029 having accreted its star-forming galaxies more recently than Coma. Additionally, many early-type galaxies in A2029 are detected at 24 {mu}m and/or in the far-UV, but this emission is not directly related to star formation. Similar galaxies have probably been classified as star forming in previous studies of dense clusters, possibly obscuring some of the effects of the cluster environment on true star-forming galaxies.

  11. Clumping in hot-star winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Wolf-Rainer; Feldmeier, Achim; Oskinova, Lidia M.

    2008-04-01

    Stellar winds play an important role for the evolution of massive stars and their cosmic environment. Multiple lines of evidence, coming from spectroscopy, polarimetry, variability, stellar ejecta, and hydrodynamic modeling, suggest that stellar winds are non-stationary and inhomogeneous. This is referred to as 'wind clumping'. The urgent need to understand this phenomenon is boosted by its far-reaching implications. Most importantly, all techniques to derive empirical mass-loss rates are more or less corrupted by wind clumping. Consequently, mass-loss rates are extremely uncertain. Within their range of uncertainty, completely different scenarios for the evolution of massive stars are obtained. Settling these questions for Galactic OB, LBV and Wolf-Rayet stars is prerequisite to understanding stellar clusters and galaxies, or predicting the properties of first-generation stars. In order to develop a consistent picture and understanding of clumped stellar winds, an international workshop on 'Clumping in Hot Star Winds' was held in Potsdam, Germany, from 18. - 22. June 2007. About 60 participants, comprising almost all leading experts in the field, gathered for one week of extensive exchange and discussion. The Scientific Organizing Committee (SOC) included John Brown (Glasgow), Joseph Cassinelli (Madison), Paul Crowther (Sheffield), Alex Fullerton (Baltimore), Wolf-Rainer Hamann (Potsdam, chair), Anthony Moffat (Montreal), Stan Owocki (Newark), and Joachim Puls (Munich). These proceedings contain the invited and contributed talks presented at the workshop, and document the extensive discussions.

  12. From gas to stars in energetic environments: dense gas clumps in the 30 Doradus region within the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Crystal N.; Meier, David S.; Ott, Jürgen; Hughes, Annie; Wong, Tony; Looney, Leslie; Henkel, Christian; Chen, Rosie; Indebetouw, Remy; Muller, Erik; Pineda, Jorge L.; Seale, Jonathan

    2014-09-20

    We present parsec-scale interferometric maps of HCN(1-0) and HCO{sup +}(1-0) emission from dense gas in the star-forming region 30 Doradus, obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This extreme star-forming region, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), is characterized by a very intense ultraviolet ionizing radiation field and sub-solar metallicity, both of which are expected to impact molecular cloud structure. We detect 13 bright, dense clumps within the 30 Doradus-10 giant molecular cloud. Some of the clumps are aligned along a filamentary structure with a characteristic spacing that is consistent with formation via varicose fluid instability. Our analysis shows that the filament is gravitationally unstable and collapsing to form stars. There is a good correlation between HCO{sup +} emission in the filament and signatures of recent star formation activity including H{sub 2}O masers and young stellar objects (YSOs). YSOs seem to continue along the same direction of the filament toward the massive compact star cluster R136 in the southwest. We present detailed comparisons of clump properties (masses, linewidths, and sizes) in 30Dor-10 to those in other star forming regions of the LMC (N159, N113, N105, and N44). Our analysis shows that the 30Dor-10 clumps have similar masses but wider linewidths and similar HCN/HCO{sup +} (1-0) line ratios as clumps detected in other LMC star-forming regions. Our results suggest that the dense molecular gas clumps in the interior of 30Dor-10 are well shielded against the intense ionizing field that is present in the 30 Doradus region.

  13. On the rotation of nuclear star clusters formed by cluster inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsatsi, Athanasia; Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; van de Ven, Glenn; Perets, Hagai B.; Bianchini, Paolo; Neumayer, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are commonly observed in the centres of most galactic nuclei, including our own Milky Way (MW). While their study can reveal important information about the build-up of the innermost regions of galaxies, the physical processes that regulate their formation are still poorly understood. NSCs might have been formed through gas infall and subsequent in situ star formation, and/or through the infall and merging of multiple star clusters into the centre of the galaxy. Here, we investigate the viability of the latter, by studying direct N-body simulations of inspiralling clusters to the centre of an MW-like nuclear bulge that hosts a massive black hole. We find that the NSC formed through this process can show both morphological and kinematical properties that make it comparable with observations of the MW NSC, including significant rotation - a fact that has so far been attributed mainly to gas infall. We explore its kinematic evolution to see if and how the merger history can imprint fossil records on its dynamical structure. Moreover, we study the effect of stellar foreground contamination in the line-of-sight kinematics of the NSC. Our study shows that no fine tuning of the orientation of the infalling globular clusters is necessary to result in a rotating NSC. We suggest that cluster inspiral is a viable mechanism for the formation of rotating NSCs.

  14. On the onset of secondary stellar generations in giant star-forming regions and massive star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Palouš, J.; Wünsch, R.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.

    2014-09-10

    Here we consider the strong evolution experienced by the matter reinserted by massive stars, both in giant star-forming regions driven by a constant star formation rate and in massive and coeval superstar clusters. In both cases we take into consideration the changes induced by stellar evolution on the number of massive stars, the number of ionizing photons, and the integrated mechanical luminosity of the star-forming regions. The latter is at all times compared with the critical luminosity that defines, for a given size, the lower mechanical luminosity limit above which the matter reinserted via strong winds and supernova explosions suffers frequent and recurrent thermal instabilities that reduce its temperature and pressure and inhibit its exit as part of a global wind. Instead, the unstable reinserted matter is compressed by the pervasive hot gas, and photoionization maintains its temperature at T ∼ 10{sup 4} K. As the evolution proceeds, more unstable matter accumulates and the unstable clumps grow in size. Here we evaluate the possible self-shielding of thermally unstable clumps against the UV radiation field. Self-shielding allows for a further compression of the reinserted matter, which rapidly develops a high-density neutral core able to absorb in its outer skin the incoming UV radiation. Under such conditions the cold (T ∼ 10 K) neutral cores soon surpass the Jeans limit and become gravitationally unstable, creating a new stellar generation with the matter reinserted by former massive stars. We present the results of several calculations of this positive star formation feedback scenario promoted by strong radiative cooling and mass loading.

  15. On the Onset of Secondary Stellar Generations in Giant Star-forming Regions and Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palouš, J.; Wünsch, R.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.

    2014-09-01

    Here we consider the strong evolution experienced by the matter reinserted by massive stars, both in giant star-forming regions driven by a constant star formation rate and in massive and coeval superstar clusters. In both cases we take into consideration the changes induced by stellar evolution on the number of massive stars, the number of ionizing photons, and the integrated mechanical luminosity of the star-forming regions. The latter is at all times compared with the critical luminosity that defines, for a given size, the lower mechanical luminosity limit above which the matter reinserted via strong winds and supernova explosions suffers frequent and recurrent thermal instabilities that reduce its temperature and pressure and inhibit its exit as part of a global wind. Instead, the unstable reinserted matter is compressed by the pervasive hot gas, and photoionization maintains its temperature at T ~ 104 K. As the evolution proceeds, more unstable matter accumulates and the unstable clumps grow in size. Here we evaluate the possible self-shielding of thermally unstable clumps against the UV radiation field. Self-shielding allows for a further compression of the reinserted matter, which rapidly develops a high-density neutral core able to absorb in its outer skin the incoming UV radiation. Under such conditions the cold (T ~ 10 K) neutral cores soon surpass the Jeans limit and become gravitationally unstable, creating a new stellar generation with the matter reinserted by former massive stars. We present the results of several calculations of this positive star formation feedback scenario promoted by strong radiative cooling and mass loading.

  16. Stellar Clusters Forming in the Blue Dwarf Galaxy NGC 5253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-11-01

    ; it is located at a distance of about 11 million light-years in the direction of the southern constellation Centaurus. Some time ago a group of European astronomers [1] decided to take a closer look at this object and to study star-forming processes in the primordial-like environment of this galaxy. True, NGC 5253 does contains some dust and heavier elements, but significantly less than our own Milky Way galaxy. However, it is quite extreme as a site of intense star formation, a profuse "starburst galaxy" in astronomical terminology, and a prime object for detailed studies of large-scale star formation. ESO PR Photo 31a/04 provides an impressive view of NGC 5253. This composite image is based on a near-infrared exposure obtained with the multi-mode ISAAC instrument mounted on the 8.2-m VLT Antu telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile), as well as two images in the optical waveband obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope data archive (located at ESO Garching). The VLT image (in the K-band at wavelength 2.16 μm) is coded red, the HST images are blue (V-band at 0.55 μm) and green (I-band at 0.79 μm), respectively. The enormous light-gathering capability and the fine optical quality of the VLT made it possible to obtain the very detailed near-infrared image (cf. PR Photo 31b/04) during an exposure lasting only 5 min. The excellent atmospheric conditions of Paranal at the time of the observation (seeing 0.4 arcsec) allow the combination of space- and ground-based data into a colour photo of this interesting object. A major dust lane is visible at the western (right) side of the galaxy, but patches of dust are visible all over, together with a large number of colourful stars and stellar clusters. The different colour shades are indicative of the ages of the objects and the degree of obscuration by interstellar dust. The near-infrared VLT image penetrates the dust clouds much better than the optical HST images, and some deeply embedded objects that are not

  17. Subsets in psoriatic arthritis formed by cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Koó, T; Nagy, Z; Seszták, M; Ujfalussy, I; Merétey, K; Böhm, U; Forgács, S; Szilágyi, M; Czirják, L; Farkas, V

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to create subgroups among psoriatic arthritis patients on the basis of dermatological features, clinical pattern of arthritis, and laboratory, immunological and radiological findings. Data on 100 patients were expressed in a standardised form and entered into hierarchical cluster analysis according to Ward's method. Seven subgroups were created. Fifty-six patients with mild psoriasis were sorted into a 'polyarticular group'. Two 'RA-like groups' were formed, differing from each other serologically and in axial involvement. In an 'oligoarticular group' (18 patients) serious skin disease and female gender predominancy were found to be characteristic. Eight patients with polyarticular arthritis were assigned to an 'erythrodermal group', in which polyarticular arthritis, mutilating, severe arthritis and a history of erythroderma were characteristic. Close to this group on the dendrogram eight women were sorted into a 'distal form'. Sausage fingers were frequent, and nail dystrophy was present in every case. In a 'pustular group' (three patients) the different type of skin involvement was considered and nail dystrophy was common. In the newly created subgroups not only the arthritic status, but also the type of the skin disease, played a determining role.

  18. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XVIII. Star-forming dwarf galaxies in a cluster environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Hunt, L. K.; Madden, S. C.; Hughes, T. M.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Bizzocchi, L.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Clemens, M.; Corbelli, E.; Cortese, L.; Davies, J.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fritz, J.; Pappalardo, C.; Pierini, D.; Rémy-Ruyer, A.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S.; Vlahakis, C.

    2015-02-01

    To assess the effects of the cluster environment on the different components of the interstellar medium, we analyse the far-infrared (FIR) and submillimetre (submm) properties of a sample of star-forming dwarf galaxies detected by the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). We determine dust masses and dust temperatures by fitting a modified black body function to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Stellar and gas masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and metallicities are obtained from the analysis of a set of ancillary data. Dust is detected in 49 out of a total 140 optically identified dwarfs covered by the HeViCS field; considering only dwarfs brighter than mB = 18 mag, this gives a detection rate of 43%. After evaluating different emissivity indices, we find that the FIR-submm SEDs are best-fit by β = 1.5, with a median dust temperature Td = 22.4 K. Assuming β = 1.5, 67% of the 23 galaxies detected in all five Herschel bands show emission at 500 μm in excess of the modified black-body model. The fraction of galaxies with a submillimetre excess decreases for lower values of β, while a similarly high fraction (54%) is found if a β-free SED modelling is applied. The excess is inversely correlated with SFR and stellar masses. To study the variations in the global properties of our sample that come from environmental effects, we compare the Virgo dwarfs to other Herschel surveys,such as the Key Insights into Nearby Galaxies: Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH), the Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS), and the HeViCS Bright Galaxy Catalogue (BGC). We explore the relations between stellar mass and Hi fraction, specific star formation rate, dust fraction, gas-to-dust ratio over a wide range of stellar masses (from 107 to 1011 M⊙) for both dwarfs and spirals. Highly Hi-deficient Virgo dwarf galaxies are mostly characterised by quenched star formation activity and lower dust fractions giving hints for dust stripping in cluster dwarfs. However, to explain the

  19. Mycobacteria Clumping Increase Their Capacity to Damage Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, Cecilia; Llorens-Fons, Marta; Julián, Esther; Noguera-Ortega, Estela; Tomàs-Martínez, Cristina; Pérez-Trujillo, Miriam; Byrd, Thomas F.; Alcaide, Fernando; Luquin, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The rough morphotypes of non-tuberculous mycobacteria have been associated with the most severe illnesses in humans. This idea is consistent with the fact that Mycobacterium tuberculosis presents a stable rough morphotype. Unlike smooth morphotypes, the bacilli of rough morphotypes grow close together, leaving no spaces among them and forming large aggregates (clumps). Currently, the initial interaction of macrophages with clumps remains unclear. Thus, we infected J774 macrophages with bacterial suspensions of rough morphotypes of M. abscessus containing clumps and suspensions of smooth morphotypes, primarily containing isolated bacilli. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy and electron microscopy, we observed clumps of at least five rough-morphotype bacilli inside the phagocytic vesicles of macrophages at 3 h post-infection. These clumps grew within the phagocytic vesicles, killing 100% of the macrophages at 72 h post-infection, whereas the proliferation of macrophages infected with smooth morphotypes remained unaltered at 96 h post-infection. Thus, macrophages phagocytose large clumps, exceeding the bactericidal capacities of these cells. Furthermore, proinflammatory cytokines and granuloma-like structures were only produced by macrophages infected with rough morphotypes. Thus, the present study provides a foundation for further studies that consider mycobacterial clumps as virulence factors. PMID:27757105

  20. Glass Frit Clumping And Dusting

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J. L.

    2013-09-26

    DWPF mixes a slurry of glass frit (Frit 418) and dilute (1.5 wt%) formic acid solution with high level waste in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). There would be advantages to introducing the frit in a non-slurry form to minimize water addition to the SME, however, adding completely dry frit has the potential to generate dust which could clog filters or condensers. Prior testing with another type of frit, Frit 320, and using a minimal amount of water reduced dust generation, however, the formation of hard clumps was observed. To examine options and behavior, a TTQAP [McCabe and Stone, 2013] was written to initiate tests that would address these concerns. Tests were conducted with four types of glass frit; Frit 320, DWPF Frit 418, Bekeson Frit 418 and Multi-Aspirator Frit 418. The last two frits are chemically identical to DWPF Frit 418 but smaller particles were removed by the respective vendors. Test results on Frit Clumping and Dusting are provided in this report. This report addresses the following seven questions. Short answers are provided below with more detailed answers to follow. 1. Will the addition of a small amount of water, 1.5 wt%, to dry DWPF Frit 418 greatly reduce the dust generation during handling at DWPF? a. Yes, a small scale test showed that adding a little water to the frit greatly reduced dust generation during handling. 2. Will the addition of small amounts of water to the frit cause clumping that will impair frit handling at DWPF? a. No, not with Frit 418. Although clumps were observed to form when 1.5 wt% water was mixed with DWPF Frit 418, then compressed and air-dried overnight, the clumps were easily crushed and did not form the hardened material noted when Frit 320 was tested. 3. What is the measured size distribution of dust generated when dry frit is handled? (This affects the feasibility and choice of processing equipment for removing the dust generating fraction of the frit before it is added to the SME.) a. The size distribution for

  1. HCN Hyperfine Ratio Analysis of Massive Molecular Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schap, William; Barnes, Peter; Ginsburg, Adam; Ordonez, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    The CHaMP project has identified a uniform sample of 303 massive (20-8000 M⊙), dense (200-30,000 cm-3) molecular clumps in a large sector of the southern Milky Way that includes much of the Carina Arm. These are the kinds of clumps that are likely to be the precursors to IRDCs, large stellar clusters, and massive stars. We report new results of the physical conditions in these clouds based on the J=1 -> 0 emission at 3mm from the HCN molecule. Analysis of the HCN emission from these clumps reveals that the physical conditions in the gas (i.e., the excitation temperature, optical depth, and column density) do not follow the molecular line emissivity in a straightforward way. This means that large fractions of the molecular material involved in massive cluster formation, while not completely``dark'', are under-luminous and easily missed in certain studies.

  2. Remarks on the clump theory

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.

    1986-07-01

    Further details are provided of a soon-to-be published dialog (Phys. Fluids 29 (July, 1986)) which discussed the role of the small scales in fluid clump theory. It is argued that the approximation of the clump lifetime which is compatible with exponentially rapid separation of adjacent orbits is inappropriate for the description of the dynamically important large scales. Various other remarks are made relating to the analytic treatment of strong drift-wave-like turbulence.

  3. THE STRUCTURE OF THE STAR-FORMING CLUSTER RCW 38

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, E.; Wolk, S. J.; Bourke, T. L.; Spitzbart, B.; Megeath, S. T.; Gutermuth, R.

    2011-12-20

    We present a study of the structure of the high-mass star-forming region RCW 38 and the spatial distribution of its young stellar population. Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) photometry (3-8 {mu}m) is combined with Two Micron All Sky Survey near-IR data to identify young stellar objects (YSOs) by IR-excess emission from their circumstellar material. Chandra X-ray data are used to identify class III pre-main-sequence stars lacking circumstellar material. We identify 624 YSOs: 23 class 0/I and 90 flat spectrum protostars, 437 class II stars, and 74 class III stars. We also identify 29 (27 new) O star candidates over the IRAC field. Seventy-two stars exhibit IR-variability, including 7 class 0/I and 12 flat spectrum YSOs. A further 177 tentative candidates are identified by their location in the IRAC [3.6] versus [3.6]-[5.8] color-magnitude diagram. We find strong evidence of subclustering in the region. Three subclusters were identified surrounding the central cluster, with massive and variable stars in each subcluster. The central region shows evidence of distinct spatial distributions of the protostars and pre-main-sequence stars. A previously detected IR cluster, DB2001{sub O}bj36, has been established as a subcluster of RCW 38. This suggests that star formation in RCW 38 occurs over a more extended area than previously thought. The gas-to-dust ratio is examined using the X-ray derived hydrogen column density, N{sub H} and the K-band extinction, and found to be consistent with the diffuse interstellar medium, in contrast with Serpens and NGC 1333. We posit that the high photoionizing flux of massive stars in RCW 38 affects the agglomeration of the dust grains.

  4. Fuzzy clustering of facial form for prototyping environmental protection equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D.G.

    1994-07-01

    Emphasis on the human-to-aircraft interface has magnified in importance as the performance envelope of today`s aircraft has continued to expand. A major problem is that there has been a corresponding increase in the need for better fitting protection equipment and unfortunately it has become increasingly difficult for aircrew members to find equipment that will provide this level of fit. While protection equipment has, historically had poor fit characteristics, the issue has grown tremendously with the recent increase in the numbers of minorities and women. Fundamental to this problem are the archaic methods for sizing individual equipment and the methods for establishing a sizing system. This paper documents recent investigations by the author into developing new methods to overcome these problems. Research centered on the development of a new statistically based method for describing form and the application of fuzzy clustering using the new shape descriptors. A sizing system was developed from the application of the research, prototype masks were constructed and the hardware tested under flight conditions.

  5. HUBBLE SPIES HUGE CLUSTERS OF STARS FORMED BY ANCIENT ENCOUNTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope snapped these two views of the heart of the galaxy M82. The image at left was taken in visible light; the picture at right, in infrared light. In the infrared view, the telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer peered through thick dust lanes to find some of the galaxy's more than 100 super star clusters. The clusters are the larger pink and yellow dots scattered throughout the picture. They were formed during a violent collision with the galaxy M81 about 600 million years ago. The galaxy is 12 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major. The pictures were taken Sept. 15, 1997. Credits: NASA, ESA, R. de Grijs (Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge, UK) NOTE TO EDITORS: For additional information, please contact Richard de Grijs, Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK, +44(0)1223-337528 (phone), +44(0)1223-337523 (fax), grijs@ast.cam.ac.uk (e-mail). The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA), for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). This image is issued jointly by NASA and ESA. Electronic images, animation and additional information are available at: http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2001/08 and via links in http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/latest.html http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pictures.html http://hubble.stsci.edu/go/news http://hubble.esa.int To receive STScI press releases electronically, send an Internet electronic mail message to public-request@stsci.edu. Leave the subject line blank, and type the word subscribe in the body of the message. The system will respond with a confirmation of the subscription, and you will receive new press releases as they are issued. Please subscribe using the email account

  6. Composition and topology of activity cliff clusters formed by bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-02-24

    The assessment of activity cliffs has thus far mostly focused on compound pairs, although the majority of activity cliffs are not formed in isolation but in a coordinated manner involving multiple active compounds and cliffs. However, the composition of coordinated activity cliff configurations and their topologies are unknown. Therefore, we have identified all activity cliff configurations formed by currently available bioactive compounds and analyzed them in network representations where activity cliff configurations occur as clusters. The composition, topology, frequency of occurrence, and target distribution of activity cliff clusters have been determined. A limited number of large cliff clusters with unique topologies were identified that were centers of activity cliff formation. These clusters originated from a small number of target sets. However, most clusters were of small to moderate size. Three basic topologies were sufficient to describe recurrent activity cliff cluster motifs/topologies. For example, frequently occurring clusters with star topology determined the scale-free character of the global activity cliff network and represented a characteristic activity cliff configuration. Large clusters with complex topology were often found to contain different combinations of basic topologies. Our study provides a first view of activity cliff configurations formed by currently available bioactive compounds and of the recurrent topologies of activity cliff clusters. Activity cliff clusters of defined topology can be selected, and from compounds forming the clusters, SAR information can be obtained. The SAR information of activity cliff clusters sharing a/one specific activity and topology can be compared.

  7. STAR CLUSTERS IN A NUCLEAR STAR FORMING RING: THE DISAPPEARING STRING OF PEARLS

    SciTech Connect

    Väisänen, Petri; Barway, Sudhanshu; Randriamanakoto, Zara

    2014-12-20

    An analysis of the star cluster population in a low-luminosity early-type galaxy, NGC 2328, is presented. The clusters are found in a tight star forming nuclear spiral/ring pattern and we also identify a bar from structural two-dimensional decomposition. These massive clusters are forming very efficiently in the circumnuclear environment and they are young, possibly all less than 30 Myr of age. The clusters indicate an azimuthal age gradient, consistent with a ''pearls-on-a-string'' formation scenario, suggesting bar-driven gas inflow. The cluster mass function has a robust down turn at low masses at all age bins. Assuming clusters are born with a power-law distribution, this indicates extremely rapid disruption at timescales of just several million years. If found to be typical, it means that clusters born in dense circumnuclear rings do not survive to become old globular clusters in non-interacting systems.

  8. High-Redshift Clusters form NVSS: The TexOx Cluster (TOC) Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, S; Rawlings, S; Hill, G J

    2003-02-11

    The TexOx Cluster (TOC) Survey uses overdensities of radiosources in the NVSS to trace clusters of galaxies. The links between radiosources and rich environments make this a powerful way to find clusters which may potentially be overlooked by other selection techniques. By including constraints from optical surveys, TOC is an extremely efficient way to find clusters at high redshift. One such field, TOC J0233.3+3021, contains at least one galaxy cluster (at z {approx} 1.4) and has been detected using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. Even in targeted deep optical observations, however, distinguishing the cluster galaxies from the background is difficult, especially given the tendency of TOC to select fields containing multiple structures at different redshifts.

  9. Studies of Resolved Stellar Clumps in High-Redshift Galaxy Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messa, Matteo Maria; Adamo, Angela; Östlin, Göran; Hayes, Matthew; Melinder, Jens

    2015-08-01

    The Lyman-alpha reference sample (LARS) is a sample of 14 local high-redshift analogues observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These local galaxies (z = 0.028 - 0.19) have been selected to have moderately high EW(Hα) to ensure the selection of star-forming systems and far UV luminosities ranging from log(LFUV) = 9.2 to 10.7 LSUN, comparable to those of high-redshift Lyα emitters and Lyman Break Galaxies. The survey is providing fundamental insights into Lyα emission process, allowing the investigation of Lyα radiation transport and photon escape.In this poster, we present the statistical study of the spatially resolved stellar cluster complexes and of the main star-forming regions of the LARS sample. The exquisite multiband HST coverage and the proximity of the galaxies of the sample allow us to derive the physical properties of these stellar clumps, such as ages, masses, extinction, and sizes. Using the UV fluxes, we constraint which fraction of the current star formation is condensed in these compact regions. We try to quantify their contribution to the total ionizing photon budget derived from total Hα fluxes. The properties of these cluster complexes are compared to clump properties detected in high-redshift galaxies.

  10. The Spatial Distribution of the Young Stellar Clusters in the Star-forming Galaxy NGC 628

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasha, K.; Calzetti, D.; Adamo, A.; Kim, H.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Aloisi, A.; Bright, S. N.; Christian, C.; Cignoni, M.; Dale, D. A.; Dobbs, C.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Fumagalli, M.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Grebel, E. K.; Johnson, K. E.; Lee, J. C.; Messa, M.; Smith, L. J.; Ryon, J. E.; Thilker, D.; Ubeda, L.; Wofford, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a study of the spatial distribution of the stellar cluster populations in the star-forming galaxy NGC 628. Using Hubble Space Telescope broadband WFC3/UVIS UV and optical images from the Treasury Program LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey), we have identified 1392 potential young (≲ 100 Myr) stellar clusters within the galaxy using a combination of visual inspection and automatic selection. We investigate the clustering of these young stellar clusters and quantify the strength and change of clustering strength with scale using the two-point correlation function. We also investigate how image boundary conditions and dust lanes affect the observed clustering. The distribution of the clusters is well fit by a broken power law with negative exponent α. We recover a weighted mean index of α ∼ -0.8 for all spatial scales below the break at 3.″3 (158 pc at a distance of 9.9 Mpc) and an index of α ∼ -0.18 above 158 pc for the accumulation of all cluster types. The strength of the clustering increases with decreasing age and clusters older than 40 Myr lose their clustered structure very rapidly and tend to be randomly distributed in this galaxy, whereas the mass of the star cluster has little effect on the clustering strength. This is consistent with results from other studies that the morphological hierarchy in stellar clustering resembles the same hierarchy as the turbulent interstellar medium.

  11. On the Formation of Molecular Clumps in QSO Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, A.; Scannapieco, E.

    2016-12-01

    We study the origin of the cold molecular clumps in quasar outflows, recently detected in CO and HCN emission. We first describe the physical properties of such radiation-driven outflows and show that a transition from a momentum- to an energy-driven flow must occur at a radial distance of R≈ 0.25 {kpc}. During this transition, the shell of swept-up material fragments due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, but these clumps contain little mass and are likely to be rapidly ablated by the hot gas in which they are immersed. We then explore an alternative scenario in which clumps form from thermal instabilities at R≳ 1 {kpc}, possibly containing enough dust to catalyze molecule formation. We investigate this process with 3D two-fluid (gas+dust) numerical simulations of a kpc3 patch of the outflow, including atomic and dust cooling, thermal conduction, dust sputtering, and photoionization from the QSO radiation field. In all cases, dust grains are rapidly destroyed in ≈ {10}4 years; and while some cold clumps form at later times, they are present only as transient features, which disappear as cooling becomes more widespread. In fact, we only find a stable two-phase medium with dense clumps if we artificially enhance the QSO radiation field by a factor of 100. This result, together with the complete destruction of dust grains, renders the interpretation of molecular outflows a very challenging problem.

  12. Clumped isotope thermometry of cryogenic cave carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Tobias; Affek, Hagit P.; Zhang, Yi Ge; Dublyansky, Yuri; Spötl, Christoph; Immenhauser, Adrian; Richter, Detlev K.

    2014-02-01

    Freezing of cave pool water that is increasingly oversaturated with dissolved carbonate leads to precipitation of a very specific type of speleothems known as cryogenic cave carbonates (CCC). At present, two different environments for their formation have been proposed, based on their characteristic carbon and oxygen isotope ratios. Rapidly freezing thin water films result in the fast precipitation of fine-grained carbonate powder (CCCfine). This leads to rapid physicochemical changes including CO2 degassing and CaCO3 precipitation, resulting in significantly 13C-enriched carbonates. Alternatively, slow carbonate precipitation in ice-covered cave pools results in coarse crystalline CCC (CCCcoarse) yielding strongly 18O-depleted carbonate. This is due to the formation of relatively 18O-enriched ice causing the gradual depletion of 18O in the water from which the CCC precipitates. Cryogenic carbonates from Central European caves were found to have been formed primarily during the last glacial period, specifically during times of permafrost thawing, based on the oxygen isotope ratios and U-Th dating. Information about the precise conditions of CCCcoarse formation, i.e. whether these crystals formed under equilibrium or disequilibrium conditions with the parent fluid, however, is lacking. An improved understanding of CCCcoarse formation will increase the predictive value of this paleo-permafrost archive. Here we apply clumped isotopes to investigate the formation conditions of cryogenic carbonates using well-studied CCCcoarse from five different cave systems in western Germany. Carbonate clumped isotope measurements yielded apparent temperatures between 3 and 18 °C and thus exhibit clear evidence of isotopic disequilibrium. Although the very negative carbonate δ18O values can only be explained by gradual freezing of pool water accompanied by preferential incorporation of 18O into the ice, clumped isotope-derived temperatures significantly above expected freezing

  13. Constraining the Star Forming History in Monoceros: A Study of Embedded Cluster Ages and Spatial Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinas, Naibi; Lada, Elizabeth; Ybarra, Jason; Fleming, Scott

    2010-08-01

    We propose to use FLAMINGOS multi-object spectrometer on the KPNO 4 meter telescope to complete a spectroscopic survey of 5 clusters in the Monoceros GMC. The data will be combined with existing FLAMINGOS photometry to determine the ages and masses of the stars in the clusters using the HR Diagram and PMS evolutionary models. This information, combined with the spatial distribution of clusters in the cloud, determined from previous observations, will allow us to investigate the ages and age spreads of the embedded clusters and the star forming histories of the clusters and the molecular cloud.

  14. Constraining the Star Forming History in Monoceros: A Study of Embedded Cluster Ages and Spatial Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lada, Elizabeth A.; Marinas, Naibi; Levine, Joanna L.; Ferreira, Bruno

    2009-08-01

    We propose to use FLAMINGOS multi-object spectrometer on the KPNO 4 meter telescope to complete a spectroscopic survey of 7 clusters in the Monoceros GMC. The data will be combined with existing FLAMINGOS photometry to determine the ages and masses of the stars in the clusters using the HR Diagram and PMS evolutionary models. This information, combined with the spatial distribution of clusters in the cloud, determined from previous observations, will allow us to investigate the ages and age spreads of the embedded clusters and the star forming histories of the clusters and the molecular cloud.

  15. Protogalaxy interactions in newly formed clusters - Galaxy luminosities, colors, and intergalactic gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1978-01-01

    The role of protogalaxy interactions in galactic evolution is studied during the formation of galaxy clusters. In the early stages of the collapse, coalescent encounters of protogalaxies lead to the development of a galactic luminosity function. Once galaxies acquire appreciable random motions, mutual collisions between galaxies in rich clusters will trigger the collapse of interstellar clouds to form stars. This provides both a source for enriched intracluster gas and an interpretation of the correlation between luminosity and color for cluster elliptical galaxies. Other observational consequences that are considered include optical, X-ray, and diffuse nonthermal radio emission from newly formed clusters of galaxies.

  16. Physical Properties of Sub-galactic Clumps at 0.5 ≤ Z ≤ 1.5 in the UVUDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Emmaris; de Mello, Duilia F.; Rafelski, Marc; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Teplitz, Harry I.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Ravindranath, Swara; Grogin, Norman A.; Scarlata, Claudia; Kurczynski, Peter; Gawiser, Eric

    2017-03-01

    We present an investigation of clumpy galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field at 0.5≤slant z≤slant 1.5 in the rest-frame far-ultraviolet (FUV) using Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 broadband imaging in F225W, F275W, and F336W. An analysis of 1404 galaxies yields 209 galaxies that host 403 kpc scale clumps. These host galaxies appear to be typical star-forming galaxies, with an average of 2 clumps per galaxy and reaching a maximum of 8 clumps. We measure the photometry of the clumps and determine the mass, age, and star formation rates (SFR) using the spectral energy distribution fitting code FAST. We find that clumps make an average contribution of 19% to the total rest-frame FUV flux of their host galaxy. Individually, clumps contribute a median of 5% to the host galaxy SFR and an average of ∼4% to the host galaxy mass, with total clump contributions to the host galaxy stellar mass ranging widely from lower than 1% up to 93%. Clumps in the outskirts of galaxies are typically younger, with higher SFRs, than clumps in the inner regions. The results are consistent with clump migration theories in which clumps form through violent gravitational instabilities in gas-rich turbulent disks, eventually migrate toward the center of the galaxies, and coalesce into the bulge.

  17. Connecting Clump Sizes in Turbulent Disk Galaxies to Instability Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, David B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Abraham, Roberto G.; Damjanov, Ivana; White, Heidi A.; Obreschkow, Danail; Basset, Robert; Bekiaris, Georgios; Wisnioski, Emily; Green, Andy; Bolatto, Alberto D.

    2017-04-01

    In this letter we study the mean sizes of Hα clumps in turbulent disk galaxies relative to kinematics, gas fractions, and Toomre Q. We use ∼100 pc resolution HST images, IFU kinematics, and gas fractions of a sample of rare, nearby turbulent disks with properties closely matched to z∼ 1.5{--}2 main-sequence galaxies (the DYNAMO sample). We find linear correlations of normalized mean clump sizes with both the gas fraction and the velocity dispersion-to-rotation velocity ratio of the host galaxy. We show that these correlations are consistent with predictions derived from a model of instabilities in a self-gravitating disk (the so-called “violent disk instability model”). We also observe, using a two-fluid model for Q, a correlation between the size of clumps and self-gravity-driven unstable regions. These results are most consistent with the hypothesis that massive star-forming clumps in turbulent disks are the result of instabilities in self-gravitating gas-rich disks, and therefore provide a direct connection between resolved clump sizes and this in situ mechanism.

  18. Chemical ionization of clusters formed from sulfuric acid and dimethylamine or diamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Coty N.; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2016-10-01

    Chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometers are used to study atmospheric nucleation by detecting clusters produced by reactions of sulfuric acid and various basic gases. These instruments typically use nitrate to deprotonate and thus chemically ionize the clusters. In this study, we compare cluster concentrations measured using either nitrate or acetate. Clusters were formed in a flow reactor from vapors of sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, ethylene diamine, tetramethylethylene diamine, or butanediamine (also known as putrescine). These comparisons show that nitrate is unable to chemically ionize clusters with high base content. In addition, we vary the ion-molecule reaction time to probe ion processes which include proton-transfer, ion-molecule clustering, and decomposition of ions. Ion decomposition upon deprotonation by acetate/nitrate was observed. More studies are needed to quantify to what extent ion decomposition affects observed cluster content and concentrations, especially those chemically ionized with acetate since it deprotonates more types of clusters than nitrate.Model calculations of the neutral and ion cluster formation pathways are also presented to better identify the cluster types that are not efficiently deprotonated by nitrate. Comparison of model and measured clusters indicate that sulfuric acid dimers with two diamines and sulfuric acid trimers with two or more base molecules are not efficiently chemical ionized by nitrate. We conclude that acetate CI provides better information on cluster abundancies and their base content than nitrate CI.

  19. Predicted Sizes of Pressure-supported HI Clouds in the Outskirts of the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-06-01

    Using data from the ALFALFA AGES Arecibo HI survey of galaxies and the Virgo cluster X-ray pressure profiles from XMM-Newton, we investigate the possibility that starless dark HI clumps, also known as “dark galaxies,” are supported by external pressure in the surrounding intercluster medium. We find that the starless HI clump masses, velocity dispersions, and positions allow these clumps to be in pressure equilibrium with the X-ray gas near the virial radius of the Virgo cluster. We predict the sizes of these clumps to range from 1 to 10 kpc, in agreement with the range of sizes found for spatially resolved HI starless clumps outside of Virgo. Based on the predicted HI surface density of the Virgo sources, as well as a sample of other similar resolved ALFALFA HI dark clumps with follow-up optical/radio observations, we predict that most of the HI dark clumps are on the cusp of forming stars. These HI sources therefore mark the transition between starless HI clouds and dwarf galaxies with stars.

  20. Generation of self-clusters of galectin-1 in the farnesyl-bound form

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Kazumi; Niwa, Yusuke; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu

    2016-01-01

    Ras protein is involved in a signal transduction cascade in cell growth, and cluster formation of H-Ras and human galectin-1 (Gal-1) complex is considered to be crucial to achieve its physiological roles. It is considered that the complex is formed through interactions between Gal-1 and the farnesyl group (farnesyl-dependent model), post-translationally modified to the C-terminal Cys, of H-Ras. We investigated the role of farnesyl-bound Gal-1 in the cluster formation by analyzing the structure and properties of Gal-1 bound to farnesyl thiosalicylic acid (FTS), a competitive inhibitor of the binding of H-Ras to Gal-1. Gal-1 exhibited self-cluster formation upon interaction with FTS, and small- and large-size clusters were formed depending on FTS concentration. The galactoside-binding pocket of Gal-1 in the FTS-bound form was found to play an important role in small-size cluster formation. Large-size clusters were likely formed by the interaction among the hydrophobic sites of Gal-1 in the FTS-bound form. The present results indicate that Gal-1 in the FTS-bound form has the ability to form self-clusters as well as intrinsic lectin activity. Relevance of the self-clustering of FTS-bound Gal-1 to the cluster formation of the H-Ras–Gal-1complex was discussed by taking account of the farnesyl-dependent model and another (Raf-dependent) model. PMID:27624845

  1. Long-lived "critters" formed by hydrodynamic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmotte, Blaise; Driscoll, Michelle; Youssef, Mena; Sacanna, Stefano; Donev, Aleksandar; Chaikin, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Self-assembly in colloidal systems often requires finely tuning the interactions between particles. When colloids are active, or moving due to an external drive, the assembly is even harder to achieve. Here we show that long-lived compact motile structures, called "critters", can be formed just with hydrodynamic interactions. They naturally emerge from a recently discovered fingering instability in a system of microrollers near a floor. Our 3D large-scale simulations show that these critters are a stable state of the system, move much faster than individual rollers, and quickly respond to a changing drive. The formation of critters is robust to any initial condition and our experiments suggest that similar structures are formed even in a thermal colloidal system. We believe the critters are a promising tool for microscopic transport, flow, aggregation and mixing.

  2. Size and Charge Distributions of Stable Clusters Formed in Ion Sputtering of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, V. I.; Kapustin, S. N.

    2016-10-01

    A theory of ion sputtering of metals in the form of neutral and charged clusters with their subsequent fragmentation into the stable state is developed. The theory is based on simple physical assumptions and is in good agreement with experiment. Results are presented in the form of formulas convenient for practical application. As an example, calculations of the total yield of stable neutral and charged clusters of silver, indium, and niobium are carried out.

  3. Form gene clustering method about pan-ethnic-group products based on emotional semantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dengkai; Ding, Jingjing; Gao, Minzhuo; Ma, Danping; Liu, Donghui

    2016-09-01

    The use of pan-ethnic-group products form knowledge primarily depends on a designer's subjective experience without user participation. The majority of studies primarily focus on the detection of the perceptual demands of consumers from the target product category. A pan-ethnic-group products form gene clustering method based on emotional semantic is constructed. Consumers' perceptual images of the pan-ethnic-group products are obtained by means of product form gene extraction and coding and computer aided product form clustering technology. A case of form gene clustering about the typical pan-ethnic-group products is investigated which indicates that the method is feasible. This paper opens up a new direction for the future development of product form design which improves the agility of product design process in the era of Industry 4.0.

  4. Clump Giants in the Hyades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor); Brickhouse, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    The project is entitled 'Clump Giants in the Hyades.' This observation of one of the late-type Hyades giants (Gamma Tau) has implications for understanding the formation of late-type stellar coronae as a function of the evolutionary state of the star. The Hyades giants are interesting because they are all clump giants in the Helium burning phase, similar to the cool primary of Capella. The Hyades giants show significantly more magnetic activity than expected from their state of evolution (and slowed-down rotation). Thus these systems provide an important clue to dynamo action. The data were obtained by the satellite on 13 March 2001 for a total RGS exposure of 58220 seconds. These data were delivered to the PI on 7 August 2001. The data could not be reprocessed until SAS Version 5.3.3 which became available 7 June 2002. Although the guidelines for assessing background rates suggested that half the data were contaminated, it does not appear that the spectral region of the RGS was adversely affected by unusually high background. The spectra show strong lines of Fe XVII and XVIII, O VII and VIII, Ne IX and X, along with numerous weaker lines. The emission measure distribution is highly reminiscent of Capella; if anything, the emission measure distribution is steeper at 6 million K than for Capella. Gamma Tau is the second brightest of the Hyades clump giants. Pallavicini et al. have shown that the luminosity of the brightest Hyades giant (Theta Tau) is remarkably similar to its luminosity as measured by Einstein. Short-term variability is also modest. We are addressing the variability issue now for Gamma Tau. Initial results were reported at the 2003 Seattle AAS meeting. A paper is in preparation for submission to the Astrophysical Journal.

  5. How do Super Star Clusters Form?: The Anomalous Luminosity Function of Natal Clusters in Henize 2-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, I.; Johnson, K. E.

    2005-12-01

    Super Star Clusters (SSCs) are the most extreme star forming environments in the local universe. Results from optical observations have suggested that SSCs are simply the statistical tail of a power law luminosity (mass) distribution of index ˜ -2. However, optical luminosity functions are complicated by evolution effects and extinction. Free of these constraints, centimeter wave radio observations pin down the cluster luminosity function to the first few Myrs when natal SSCs are still embedded in ultradense H II regions. We investigate the earliest stages of SSCs in the starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 using high resolution Very Large Array observations at 5, 8.3, 15, and 23 GHz. We use the Pie Town link at lower frequencies to obtain relatively well matched beams to obtain a linear resolution of ˜ 10 pc. Such a high resolution should allow us to detect natal clusters with masses ˜ 104 M⊙ as 10σ detections. The 23 GHz flux (high frequency emission is dominated by optically thin, thermal emission) indicates that all of the detected SSCs in Henize 2-10 have a mass greater than ˜ 105 M⊙. We rule out the possibility of the clusters being self gravitating from the H92α line width of ˜ 200 km s-1. The absence of the formation of lower mass clusters is inconsistent with a power law luminosity function, which we verify with a KS test. Thus, the luminosity function of natal clusters, which we dub the Initial Cluster Luminosity Function (ICLF), suggests that SSCs require a special mode of star formation. We plan follow-up radio observations to investigate the behavior of the ICLF in a variety of starburst and merger environments.

  6. Metabolic adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to oxygen stress by cell-to-cell clumping and flocculation.

    PubMed

    Bible, Amber N; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-12-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.

  7. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    PubMed Central

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists. PMID:26407887

  8. Kinematics and dynamics of the MKW/AWM poor clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Kriessler, Jeffrey R.; Bird, Christina M.; Huchra, John P.

    1995-01-01

    We report 472 new redshifts for 416 galaxies in the regions of the 23 poor clusters of galaxies originally identified by Morgan, Kayser, and White (MKW), and Albert, White, and Morgan (AWM). Eighteen of the poor clusters now have 10 or more available redshifts within 1.5/h Mpc of the central galaxy; 11 clusters have at least 20 available redshifts. Based on the 21 clusters for which we have sufficient velocity information, the median velocity scale is 336 km/s, a factor of 2 smaller than found for rich clusters. Several of the poor clusters exhibit complex velocity distributions due to the presence of nearby clumps of galaxies. We check on the velocity of the dominant galaxy in each poor cluster relative to the remaining cluster members. Significantly high relative velocities of the dominant galaxy are found in only 4 of 21 poor clusters, 3 of which we suspect are due to contamination of the parent velocity distribution. Several statistical tests indicate that the D/cD galaxies are at the kinematic centers of the parent poor cluster velocity distributions. Mass-to-light ratios for 13 of the 15 poor clusters for which we have the required data are in the range 50 less than or = M/L(sub B(0)) less than or = 200 solar mass/solar luminosity. The complex nature of the regions surrounding many of the poor clusters suggests that these groupings may represent an early epoch of cluster formation. For example, the poor clusters MKW7 and MKWS are shown to be gravitationally bound and likely to merge to form a richer cluster within the next several Gyrs. Eight of the nine other poor clusters for which simple two-body dynamical models can be carried out are consistent with being bound to other clumps in their vicinity. Additional complex systems with more than two gravitationally bound clumps are observed among the poor clusters.

  9. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF THE IRDC CLUMP G34.43+00.24 MM3: HOT CORE AND MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Takeshi; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Foster, Jonathan B.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, James M.; Kassis, Marc; Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Hirota, Tomoya

    2013-09-20

    We have observed a cluster forming clump (MM3) associated with the infrared dark cloud G34.43+00.24 in the 1.3 mm continuum and the CH{sub 3}OH, CS, {sup 13}CS, SiO, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CN, and HCOOCH{sub 3} lines with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array and in K-band with the Keck telescope. We have found a young outflow toward the center of this clump in the SiO, CS, and CH{sub 3}OH lines. This outflow is likely driven by a protostar embedded in a hot core, which is traced by the CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CN, HCOOCH{sub 3}, {sup 13}CS, and high excitation CH{sub 3}OH lines. The size of the hot core is about 800 × 300 AU in spite of its low mass (<1.1 M {sub ☉}), suggesting a high accretion rate or the presence of multiple star system harboring a few hot corinos. The outflow is highly collimated, and the dynamical timescale is estimated to be less than 740 yr. In addition, we have also detected extended emission of SiO, CS, and CH{sub 3}OH, which is not associated with the hot core and the outflow. This emission may be related to past star formation activity in the clump. Although G34.43+00.24 MM3 is surrounded by a dark feature in infrared, it has already experienced active formation of low-mass stars in an early stage of clump evolution.

  10. Cluster Formation Triggered by Filament Collisions in Serpens South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Sugitani, Koji; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Nishitani, Hiroyuki; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Kawabe, Ryohei; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Mizuno, Izumi; Kimura, Kimihiko; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kozu, Minato; Okada, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogawa, Hideo; Kameno, Seiji; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Momose, Munetake; Nakajima, Taku; Onishi, Toshikazu; Maezawa, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Tomoya; Takano, Shuro; Iono, Daisuke; Kuno, Nario; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS (JN = 43-32), HC3N (J = 5-4), N2H+ (J = 1-0), and SiO (J = 2-1, v = 0) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N2H+ abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different V LSR. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few × 105 yr because CCS is abundant only for a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is 0.4 × 105 yr, is extremely high, about 70% in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.

  11. CLUSTER FORMATION TRIGGERED BY FILAMENT COLLISIONS IN SERPENS SOUTH

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kawabe, Ryohei; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Sugitani, Koji; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Kimihiko; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kozu, Minato; Okada, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogawa, Hideo; Nishitani, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Izumi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Kameno, Seiji; Momose, Munetake; Nakajima, Taku; and others

    2014-08-20

    The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS (J{sub N} = 4{sub 3}-3{sub 2}), HC{sub 3}N (J = 5-4), N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0), and SiO (J = 2-1, v = 0) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N{sub 2}H{sup +} abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different V {sub LSR}. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few × 10{sup 5} yr because CCS is abundant only for a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is 0.4 × 10{sup 5} yr, is extremely high, about 70% in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.

  12. Giant clumps in the FIRE simulations: a case study of a massive high-redshift galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oklopčić, Antonija; Hopkins, Philip F.; Feldmann, Robert; Kereš, Dušan; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Murray, Norman

    2017-02-01

    The morphology of massive star-forming galaxies at high redshift is often dominated by giant clumps of mass ˜108-109 M⊙ and size ˜100-1000 pc. Previous studies have proposed that giant clumps might have an important role in the evolution of their host galaxy, particularly in building the central bulge. However, this depends on whether clumps live long enough to migrate from their original location in the disc or whether they get disrupted by their own stellar feedback before reaching the centre of the galaxy. We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations from the FIRE (Feedback in Realistic Environments) project which implement explicit treatments of stellar feedback and interstellar medium physics to study the properties of these clumps. We follow the evolution of giant clumps in a massive (M* ˜ 1010.8 M⊙ at z = 1), discy, gas-rich galaxy from redshift z ≳ 2 to z = 1. Even though the clumpy phase of this galaxy lasts over a gigayear, individual gas clumps are short-lived, with mean lifetime of massive clumps of ˜20 Myr. During that time, they turn between 0.1 per cent and 20 per cent of their gas into stars before being disrupted, similar to local giant molecular clouds. Clumps with M ≳ 107 M⊙ account for ˜20 per cent of the total star formation in the galaxy during the clumpy phase, producing ˜1010 M⊙ of stars. We do not find evidence for net inward migration of clumps within the galaxy. The number of giant clumps and their mass decrease at lower redshifts, following the decrease in the overall gas fraction and star formation rate.

  13. The luminosity of Population III star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSouza, Alexander L.; Basu, Shantanu

    2015-06-01

    We analyse the time evolution of the luminosity of a cluster of Population III protostars formed in the early Universe. We argue from the Jeans criterion that primordial gas can collapse to form a cluster of first stars that evolve relatively independently of one another (i.e. with negligible gravitational interaction). We model the collapse of individual protostellar clumps using non-axisymmetric numerical hydrodynamics simulations. Each collapse produces a protostar surrounded by a massive disc (i.e. Mdisc /M* ≳ 0.1), whose evolution we follow for a further 30-40 kyr. Gravitational instabilities result in the fragmentation and the formation of gravitationally bound clumps within the disc. The accretion of these fragments by the host protostar produces accretion and luminosity bursts on the order of 106 L⊙. Within the cluster, we show that a simultaneity of such events across several protostellar cluster members can elevate the cluster luminosity to 5-10 times greater than expected, and that the cluster spends ˜15 per cent of its star-forming history at these levels. This enhanced luminosity effect is particularly enabled in clusters of modest size with ≃10-20 members. In one such instance, we identify a confluence of burst events that raise the luminosity to nearly 1000 times greater than the cluster mean luminosity, resulting in L > 108 L⊙. This phenomenon arises solely through the gravitational-instability-driven episodic fragmentation and accretion that characterizes this early stage of protostellar evolution.

  14. INTER- AND INTRA-CLUSTER AGE GRADIENTS IN MASSIVE STAR FORMING REGIONS AND INDIVIDUAL NEARBY STELLAR CLUSTERS REVEALED BY MYStIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getman, Konstantin V.; Feigelson, Eric; Kuhn, Michael A.; Broos, Patrick S; Townsley, Leisa K.; Naylor, Tim; Povich, Matthew S.; Luhman, Kevin; Garmire, Gordon

    2014-08-01

    The MYStIX (Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray) project seeks to characterize 20 OB-dominated young star forming regions (SFRs) at distances <4 kpc using photometric catalogs from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, UKIRT and 2MASS surveys. As part of the MYStIX project, we developed a new stellar chronometer that employs near-infrared and X-ray photometry data, AgeJX. Computing AgeJX averaged over MYStIX (sub)clusters reveals previously unknown age gradients across most of the MYStIX regions as well as within some individual rich clusters. Within the SFRs, the inferred AgeJX ages are youngest in obscured locations in molecular clouds, intermediate in revealed stellar clusters, and oldest in distributed stellar populations. Noticeable intra-cluster gradients are seen in the NGC 2024 (Flame Nebula) star cluster and the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC): stars in cluster cores appear younger and thus were formed later than stars in cluster halos. The latter result has two important implications for the formation of young stellar clusters. Clusters likely form slowly: they do not arise from a single nearly-instantaneous burst of star formation. The simple models where clusters form inside-out are likely incorrect, and more complex models are needed. We provide several star formation scenarios that alone or in combination may lead to the observed core-halo age gradients.

  15. A Deuteration Survey of the Clump Population in the Gemini OB1 Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrici, Andrew Scott; Shirley, Yancy L.; Svoboda, Brian E.

    2017-01-01

    Recent maps of dust continuum emission from entire molecular clouds at submillimeter wavelengths have made it possible to survey and study the chemistry of entire core and clump populations within a single cloud. One very strong chemical process in star-forming regions is the fractionation of deuterium in molecules, which results in an increase in the deuterium ratio many orders of magnitude over the ISM [D]/[H] ratio and provides a chemical probe of cold, dense regions. We present a survey of DCO+ 3-2 and N2D+ 3-2 toward the clump population in the high-mass, star-forming Gemini OB1 Molecular Cloud identified from 1.1 mm continuum imaging by the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. The peak 1.1 mm continuum positions of 52 clumps in the range 188°≤ l ≤194° were observed with the 10m Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope. We find that DCO+ emission is detected toward 90% of the clumps with a median deuterium ratio of 0.01 while N2D+ emission is detected toward only 25% of the clumps. The DCO+ fractionation anti-correlates with gas kinetic temperature and linewidth, a measure of the amount of turbulence within the clumps. We compare the deuteration ratios of with physical properties of the clumps and their evolutionary stage.

  16. Combinatorial effects on clumped isotopes and their significance in biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Laurence Y.

    2016-01-01

    The arrangement of isotopes within a collection of molecules records their physical and chemical histories. Clumped-isotope analysis interrogates these arrangements, i.e., how often rare isotopes are bound together, which in many cases can be explained by equilibrium and/or kinetic isotope fractionation. However, purely combinatorial effects, rooted in the statistics of pairing atoms in a closed system, are also relevant, and not well understood. Here, I show that combinatorial isotope effects are most important when two identical atoms are neighbors on the same molecule (e.g., O2, N2, and D-D clumping in CH4). When the two halves of an atom pair are either assembled with different isotopic preferences or drawn from different reservoirs, combinatorial effects cause depletions in clumped-isotope abundance that are most likely between zero and -1‰, although they could potentially be -10‰ or larger for D-D pairs. These depletions are of similar magnitude, but of opposite sign, to low-temperature equilibrium clumped-isotope effects for many small molecules. Enzymatic isotope-pairing reactions, which can have site-specific isotopic fractionation factors and atom reservoirs, should express this class of combinatorial isotope effect, although it is not limited to biological reactions. Chemical-kinetic isotope effects, which are related to a bond-forming transition state, arise independently and express second-order combinatorial effects related to the abundance of the rare isotope. Heteronuclear moeties (e.g., Csbnd O and Csbnd H), are insensitive to direct combinatorial influences, but secondary combinatorial influences are evident. In general, both combinatorial and chemical-kinetic factors are important for calculating and interpreting clumped-isotope signatures of kinetically controlled reactions. I apply this analytical framework to isotope-pairing reactions relevant to geochemical oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen cycling that may be influenced by combinatorial

  17. The star-forming history of the young cluster NGC 2264

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. T.; Strom, K. M.; Strom, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    UBVRI H-alpha photographic photometry was obtained for a sample of low-mass stars in the young open cluster NGC 2264 in order to investigate the star-forming history of this region. A theoretical H-R diagram was constructed for the sample of probable cluster members. Isochrones and evolutionary tracks were adopted from Cohen and Kuhi (1979). Evidence for a significant age spread in the cluster was found amounting to over ten million yr. In addition, the derived star formation rate as a function of stellar mass suggests that the principal star-forming mass range in NGC 2264 has proceeded sequentially in time from the lowest to the highest masses. The low-mass cluster stars were the first cluster members to form in significant numbers, although their present birth rate is much lower now than it was about ten million yr ago. The star-formation rate has risen to a peak at successively higher masses and then declined.

  18. Rotational support of giant clumps in high-z disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, Daniel; Dekel, Avishai; Mandelker, Nir; Bournaud, Frederic; Burkert, Andreas; Genzel, Reinhard; Primack, Joel

    2012-03-01

    We address the internal support against total free-fall collapse of the giant clumps that form by violent gravitational instability in high-z disc galaxies. Guidance is provided by an analytic model, where the protoclumps are cut from a rotating disc and collapse to equilibrium while preserving angular momentum. This model predicts prograde clump rotation, which dominates the support if the clump has contracted to a surface density contrast ≳10. This is confirmed in hydro adaptive mesh refinement zoom-in simulations of galaxies in a cosmological context. In most high-z clumps, the centrifugal force dominates the support, ?, where Vrot is the rotation velocity and the circular velocity Vcirc measures the potential well. The clump spin indeed tends to be in the sense of the global disc angular momentum, but substantial tilts are frequent, reflecting the highly warped nature of the high-z discs. Most clumps are in Jeans equilibrium, with the rest of the support provided by turbulence, partly driven by the gravitational instability itself. The general agreement between model and simulations indicates that angular momentum loss or gain in most clumps is limited to a factor of 2. Simulations of isolated gas-rich discs that resolve the clump substructure reveal that the cosmological simulations may overestimate ? by ˜30 per cent, but the dominance of rotational support at high z is not a resolution artefact. In turn, isolated gas-poor disc simulations produce at z= 0 smaller gaseous non-rotating transient clouds, indicating that the difference in rotational support is associated with the fraction of cold baryons in the disc. In our current cosmological simulations, the clump rotation velocity is typically more than twice the disc dispersion, Vrot˜ 100 km s-1, but when beam smearing of ≥0.1 arcsec is imposed, the rotation signal is reduced to a small gradient of ≤30 km s-1 kpc-1 across the clump. The velocity dispersion in the simulated clumps is comparable to the

  19. A lower fragmentation mass scale for clumps in high redshift galaxies: a systematic numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburello, Valentina; Mayer, Lucio; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

    2015-08-01

    We perform a systematic study of the effect of sub-grid physics, resolution and structural parameters on the fragmentation of gas-rich galaxy discs into massive star forming clumps due to gravitational instability. We use the state-of-the-art zoom-in cosmological hydrodynamical simulation ARGO (Fiacconi et al. 2015) to set up the initial conditions of our models, and then carry out 26 high resolution controlled simulations of high-z galaxies using the GASOLINE2 code, which includes a modern, numerically robust SPH implementation.We find that when blast-wave feedback is included, the formation of long-lived, gravitationally bound clumps requires disc gas fractions of at least 50% and massive discs, which should have Vmax > 200 km/s at z ˜ 2, more massive than the typical galaxies expected at those redshifts.Less than 50 Myr after formation, clumps have stellar masses in the range 4 × 106 - 5 × 107 M⊙.Formation of clumps with mass exceeding ˜108 M⊙ is a rare occurrence, since it requires mergers between multiple massive clumps, as we verified by tracing back in time the particles belonging to such clumps. Such mergers happen after a few orbital times (˜200-300 Myr), but normally clumps migrate inward and are tidally disrupted on shorter timescales.Clump sizes are in the range 100-500 pc. We argue that giant clumps identified in observations (˜109 M⊙ and 1 kpc in size) might either have a different origin, such as minor mergers and clumpy gas accretion, or their sizes and masses may be overestimated due to resolution issues.Using an analytical model, already developed to explain the fragmentation scale in gravitationally unstable 3D protoplanetary discs, we can predict fairly accurately the characteristic gaseous masses of clumps soon after fragmentation, when standard Toome analysis becomes invalid.Due to their modest size, clumps have little effect on bulge growth as they migrate to the center. In our unstable discs a small bulge can form irrespective of

  20. On the benefits of living in clumps: a case study on Polytrichastrum formosum.

    PubMed

    Zajączkowska, U; Grabowska, K; Kokot, G; Kruk, M

    2017-03-01

    The study concerns the mechanics and water relationships of clumps of a species of endohydric moss, Polytrichastrum formosum. Anatomical and morphological studies were done using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Experiments on waterdrop capture and their distribution to adjacent shoots within a moss clump were performed with the experimental set-up for the droplet collision phenomena and ultra-high speed camera. The mechanical strength of the moss clump was tested on an electromechanical testing machine. During the process of moss clump wetting, the falling water drops were captured by the apical stem part or leaves, then flowed down while adhering to the gametophore and never lost their surface continuity. In places of contact with another leaf, the water drop stops there and joins the leaves, enabling their hydration. Mathematical analysis of anatomical images showed that moss stems have different zones with varying cell lumen and cell wall/cell radius ratios, suggesting the occurrence of a periodic component structure. Our study provides evidence that the reaction of mosses to mechanical forces depends on the size of the clump, and that small groups are clearly stronger than larger groups. The clump structure of mosses acts as a net for falling rain droplets. Clumps of Polytrichastrum having overlapping leaves, at the time of loading formed a structure similar to a lattice. The observed reaction of mosses to mechanical forces indicates that this phenomenon appears to be analogous to the 'size effect on structural strength' that is of great importance for various fields of engineering.

  1. The SUNBIRD survey: characterizing the super star cluster populations of intensely star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randriamanakoto, Zara; Väisänen, Petri

    2017-03-01

    Super star clusters (SSCs) represent the youngest and most massive form of known gravitationally bound star clusters in the Universe. They are born abundantly in environments that trigger strong and violent star formation. We investigate the properties of these massive SSCs in a sample of 42 nearby starbursts and luminous infrared galaxies. The targets form the sample of the SUperNovae and starBursts in the InfraReD (SUNBIRD) survey that were imaged using near-infrared (NIR) K-band adaptive optics mounted on the Gemini/NIRI and the VLT/NaCo instruments. Results from i) the fitted power-laws to the SSC K-band luminosity functions, ii) the NIR brightest star cluster magnitude - star formation rate (SFR) relation and iii) the star cluster age and mass distributions have shown the importance of studying SSC host galaxies with high SFR levels to determine the role of the galactic environments in the star cluster formation, evolution and disruption mechanisms.

  2. Recombination clumping factor during cosmic reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. E-mail: gnedin@fnal.gov

    2014-06-01

    We discuss the role of recombinations in the intergalactic medium, and the related concept of the clumping factor, during cosmic reionization. The clumping factor is, in general, a local quantity that depends on both the local overdensity and the scale below which the baryon density field can be assumed smooth. That scale, called the filtering scale, depends on over-density and local thermal history. We present a method for building a self-consistent analytical model of inhomogeneous reionization, assuming the linear growth rate of the density fluctuation, which simultaneously accounts for these effects. We show that taking into account the local clumping factor introduces significant corrections to the total recombination rate, compared to the model with a globally uniform clumping factor.

  3. METAL DEFICIENCY IN CLUSTER STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT Z = 2

    SciTech Connect

    Valentino, F.; Daddi, E.; Strazzullo, V.; Gobat, R.; Bournaud, F.; Juneau, S.; Zanella, A.; Renzini, A.; Arimoto, N.

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the environmental effect on the metal enrichment of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in the farthest spectroscopically confirmed and X-ray-detected cluster, CL J1449+0856 at z = 1.99. We combined Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 G141 slitless spectroscopic data, our thirteen-band photometry, and a recent Subaru/Multi-object InfraRed Camera and Spectrograph (MOIRCS) near-infrared spectroscopic follow-up to constrain the physical properties of SFGs in CL J1449+0856 and in a mass-matched field sample. After a conservative removal of active galactic nuclei, stacking individual MOIRCS spectra of 6 (31) sources in the cluster (field) in the mass range 10 ≤ log(M/M{sub ⊙}) ≤ 11, we find a ∼4σ lower [N ii]/Hα ratio in the cluster than in the field. Stacking a subsample of 16 field galaxies with Hβ and [O iii] in the observed range, we measure an [O iii]/Hβ ratio fully compatible with the cluster value. Converting these ratios into metallicities, we find that the cluster SFGs are up to 0.25 dex poorer in metals than their field counterparts, depending on the adopted calibration. The low metallicity in cluster sources is confirmed using alternative indicators. Furthermore, we observe a significantly higher Hα luminosity and equivalent width in the average cluster spectrum than in the field. This is likely due to the enhanced specific star formation rate; even if lower dust reddening and/or an uncertain environmental dependence on the continuum-to-nebular emission differential reddening may play a role. Our findings might be explained by the accretion of pristine gas around galaxies at z = 2 and from cluster-scale reservoirs, possibly connected with a phase of rapid halo mass assembly at z > 2 and of a high galaxy merging rate.

  4. Bimodal regime in young massive clusters leading to formation of subsequent stellar generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, Richard; Palous, Jan; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Ehlerova, Sona

    2015-08-01

    Massive stars in young massive clusters insert tremendous amounts of mass and energy into their surroundings in the form of stellar winds and supernova ejecta. Mutual shock-shock collisions lead to formation of hot gas, filling the volume of the cluster. The pressure of this gas then drives a powerful cluster wind. However, it has been shown that if the cluster is massive and dense enough, it can evolve in the so called bimodal regime, in which the hot gas inside the cluster becomes thermally unstable and forms dense clumps which are trapped inside the cluster by its gravity.We will review works on the bimodal regime and discuss the implications for the formation of subsequent stellar generations. The mass accumulates inside the cluster and as soon as a high enough column density is reached, the interior of the clumps becomes self-shielded against the ionising radiation of, stars and the clumps collapse and form new stars. The second stellar generation will be enriched by products of the stellar evolution of the first generation, and will be concentrated near the cluster center.

  5. Bimodal regime in young massive clusters leading to subsequent stellar generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünsch, Richard; Palouš, Jan; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Ehlerová, Soňa

    2017-03-01

    Massive stars in young massive clusters insert tremendous amounts of mass and energy into their surroundings in the form of stellar winds and supernova ejecta. Mutual shock-shock collisions lead to formation of hot gas, filling the volume of the cluster. The pressure of this gas then drives a powerful cluster wind. However, it has been shown that if the cluster is massive and dense enough, it can evolve in the so-called bimodal regime, in which the hot gas inside the cluster becomes thermally unstable and forms dense clumps which are trapped inside the cluster by its gravity. We will review works on the bimodal regime and discuss the implications for the formation of subsequent stellar generations. The mass accumulates inside the cluster and as soon as a high enough column density is reached, the interior of the clumps becomes self-shielded against the ionising radiation of stars and the clumps collapse and form new stars. The second stellar generation will be enriched by products of stellar evolution from the first generation, and will be concentrated near the cluster center.

  6. Doubly charged CO2 clusters formed by ionization of doped helium nanodroplets☆

    PubMed Central

    Daxner, Matthias; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2014-01-01

    Helium nanodroplets are doped with carbon dioxide and ionized by electrons. Doubly charged cluster ions are, for the first time, identified based on their characteristic patterns of isotopologues. Thanks to the high mass resolution, large dynamic range, and a novel method to eliminate contributions from singly charged ions from the mass spectra, we are able to observe doubly charged cluster ions that are smaller than the ones reported in the past. The likely mechanism by which doubly charged ions are formed in doped helium droplets is discussed. PMID:25844051

  7. Astrochemical Properties of Planck Cold Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatematsu, Ken’ichi; Liu, Tie; Ohashi, Satoshi; Sanhueza, Patricio; Nguyễn Lu’o’ng, Quang; Hirota, Tomoya; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Hirano, Naomi; Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Thompson, Mark A.; Fuller, Gary; Wu, Yuefang; Li, Di; Di Francesco, James; Kim, Kee-Tae; Wang, Ke; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Juvela, Mika; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Cunningham, Maria; Saito, Masao; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Tóth, L. Viktor; He, Jinhua; Sakai, Takeshi; Kim, Jungha; JCMT Large Program “SCOPE” collaboration; TRAO Key Science Program “TOP” collaboration

    2017-02-01

    We observed 13 Planck cold clumps with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope/SCUBA-2 and with the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope. The N2H+ distribution obtained with the Nobeyama telescope is quite similar to SCUBA-2 dust distribution. The 82 GHz HC3N, 82 GHz CCS, and 94 GHz CCS emission are often distributed differently with respect to the N2H+ emission. The CCS emission, which is known to be abundant in starless molecular cloud cores, is often very clumpy in the observed targets. We made deep single-pointing observations in DNC, HN13C, N2D+, and cyclic-C3H2 toward nine clumps. The detection rate of N2D+ is 50%. Furthermore, we observed the NH3 emission toward 15 Planck cold clumps to estimate the kinetic temperature, and confirmed that most targets are cold (≲20 K). In two of the starless clumps we observed, the CCS emission is distributed as it surrounds the N2H+ core (chemically evolved gas), which resembles the case of L1544, a prestellar core showing collapse. In addition, we detected both DNC and N2D+. These two clumps are most likely on the verge of star formation. We introduce the chemical evolution factor (CEF) for starless cores to describe the chemical evolutionary stage, and analyze the observed Planck cold clumps.

  8. UV-selected Young Massive Star Cluster Populations in Nearby Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Linda J.

    2015-08-01

    The Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) is an HST Treasury program aimed at the investigation of star-formation and its relationship to environment in nearby galaxies. The results of a UV-selected study of young massive star clusters in a sample of nearby galaxies (< 10 Mpc) using detections based on the WFC3/UVIS F275W filter will be presented. Previous studies have used V or I-band detections and tend to ignore clusters younger than 10 Myr old. This very young population, which represents the most recent cluster-forming event in the LEGUS galaxies will be discussed.This poster is presented on behalf of the LEGUS team (PI Daniela Calzetti).

  9. The SUNBIRD survey: characterizing the super star cluster populations of intensely star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randriamanakoto, Zara; Vaisanen, Petri; Escala, Andres

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates properties of young, massive and dense star clusters in a sample of 42 nearby starbursts and LIRGs with an average distance of 80 Mpc. The targets form the sample of the SUperNovae and starBursts in the InfraReD (SUNBIRD) survey that were imaged using near-infrared K-band adaptive optics mounted on the Gemini/NIRI and the VLT/NaCo instruments.We fitted power-laws to the SSC K-band luminosity functions and found index values ranging between 1.5 and 2.4 with a median value of α ˜ 1.86±0.24. This is shallower than the average of ≈ 2.4 associated with normal spiral galaxies indicating that SSCs hosted by star-forming galaxies are disrupted in a way depending on their mass or environment. Using simulations we found that blending effects are not significant for targets closer than ≈100Mpc. We also established the first ever near-infrared (NIR) brightest star cluster magnitude - star formation rate (SFR) relation. The correlation has a steeper slope compared to the one with optical data at lower SFRs which could indicate a simple statistical effect, though we argue that a physical truncation of the mass distribution at high masses would better explain the tight scatter of the observed relation.Finally, we combined new NIR imaging of seven LIRG targets with their optical HST archival data to derive the age, mass, and extinction distributions of optically-selected SSC candidates. Apart from having a high mass range of 10^4 - 10^8 M⊙, more than a quarter of the cluster population is younger than 30 Myr. We also derived the cluster initial mass functions and found that at least in one of the LIRGs, a mass-dependent disruption mechanism is responsible for the deficiency in low-mass star clusters. The cluster formation efficiencies Γ = 10 - 23 %, on the other hand, support the arguments that highly-pressurized environments favor SF in bound star clusters.This work has shown the importance of studying SSC host galaxies with high SFR levels to

  10. The segregation of starless and protostellar clumps in the Hi-GAL ℓ = 224° region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, L.; Cunningham, M.; Elia, D.; Jones, P.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Stars form in dense, dusty structures, which are embedded in larger clumps of molecular clouds often showing a clear filamentary structure on large scales (≳1 pc). The origin (e.g., turbulence or gravitational instabilities) and evolution of these filaments, as well as their relation to clump and core formation, are not yet fully understood. A large sample of both starless and protostellar clumps can now be found in the Herschel Infrared GALactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) key project, which also provides striking images of the filamentary structure of the parent molecular clouds. Recent results indicate that populations of clumps on and off filaments may differ. Aims: One of the best-studied regions in the Hi-GAL survey can be observed toward the ℓ = 224° field. Here, a filamentary region has been studied and it has been found that protostellar clumps are mostly located along the main filament, whereas starless clumps are detected off this filament and are instead found on secondary, less prominent filaments. We want to investigate this segregation effect and how it may affect the clumps properties. Methods: We mapped the 12CO (1-0) line and its main three isotopologues toward the two most prominent filaments observed toward the ℓ = 224° field using the Mopra radio telescope, in order to set observational constraints on the dynamics of these structures and the associated starless and protostellar clumps. Results: Compared to the starless clumps, the protostellar clumps are more luminous, more turbulent and lie in regions where the filamentary ambient gas shows larger linewidths. We see evidence of gas flowing along the main filament, but we do not find any signs of accretion flow from the filament onto the Hi-GAL clumps. We analyze the radial column density profile of the filaments and their gravitational stability. Conclusions: The more massive and highly fragmented main filament appears to be thermally supercritical and gravitationally bound

  11. GAS RESERVOIRS AND STAR FORMATION IN A FORMING GALAXY CLUSTER AT zbsime0.2

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, Yara L.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Deshev, Boris Z.; Van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.

    2012-09-10

    We present first results from the Blind Ultra-Deep H I Environmental Survey of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Our survey is the first direct imaging study of neutral atomic hydrogen gas in galaxies at a redshift where evolutionary processes begin to show. In this Letter we investigate star formation, H I content, and galaxy morphology, as a function of environment in Abell 2192 (at z = 0.1876). Using a three-dimensional visualization technique, we find that Abell 2192 is a cluster in the process of forming, with significant substructure in it. We distinguish four structures that are separated in redshift and/or space. The richest structure is the baby cluster itself, with a core of elliptical galaxies that coincides with (weak) X-ray emission, almost no H I detections, and suppressed star formation. Surrounding the cluster, we find a compact group where galaxies pre-process before falling into the cluster, and a scattered population of 'field-like' galaxies showing more star formation and H I detections. This cluster proves to be an excellent laboratory to understand the fate of the H I gas in the framework of galaxy evolution. We clearly see that the H I gas and the star formation correlate with morphology and environment at z {approx} 0.2. In particular, the fraction of H I detections is significantly affected by the environment. The effect starts to kick in in low-mass groups that pre-process the galaxies before they enter the cluster. Our results suggest that by the time the group galaxies fall into the cluster, they are already devoid of H I.

  12. The rate and latency of star formation in dense, massive clumps in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, M.; Gutermuth, R.; Urquhart, J. S.; Csengeri, T.; Wienen, M.; Leurini, S.; Menten, K.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Newborn stars form within the localized, high density regions of molecular clouds. The sequence and rate at which stars form in dense clumps and the dependence on local and global environments are key factors in developing descriptions of stellar production in galaxies. Aims: We seek to observationally constrain the rate and latency of star formation in dense massive clumps that are distributed throughout the Galaxy and to compare these results to proposed prescriptions for stellar production. Methods: A sample of 24 μm-based Class I protostars are linked to dust clumps that are embedded within molecular clouds selected from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy. We determine the fraction of star-forming clumps, f∗, that imposes a constraint on the latency of star formation in units of a clump's lifetime. Protostellar masses are estimated from models of circumstellar environments of young stellar objects from which star formation rates are derived. Physical properties of the clumps are calculated from 870 μm dust continuum emission and NH3 line emission. Results: Linear correlations are identified between the star formation rate surface density, ΣSFR, and the quantities ΣH2/τff and ΣH2/τcross, suggesting that star formation is regulated at the local scales of molecular clouds. The measured fraction of star forming clumps is 23%. Accounting for star formation within clumps that are excluded from our sample due to 24 μm saturation, this fraction can be as high as 31%, which is similar to previous results. Dense, massive clumps form primarily low mass (<1-2 M⊙) stars with emergent 24 μm fluxes below our sensitivity limit or are incapable of forming any stars for the initial 70% of their lifetimes. The low fraction of star forming clumps in the Galactic center relative to those located in the disk of the Milky Way is verified. Full Tables 2-4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130

  13. A Clumped Isotope Calibration for Lacustrine Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsunaga, B. A.; Mering, J. A.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Dunbar, R. B.; Cohen, A. S.; Liu, X.; Kaufman, D. S.; Eagle, R.; Tripati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our capacity to understand Earth's environmental history is highly dependent on the accuracy of past climate reconstructions. Unfortunately, many terrestrial proxies—tree rings, speleothems, leaf margin analyses, etc.—are influenced by the effects of both temperature and precipitation. Methods that can isolate the effects of temperature alone are needed, and clumped isotope thermometry has the potential to be a useful tool for determining terrestrial climates. Multiple studies have shown that the fraction of 13C—18O bonds in carbonates is inversely related to the temperature at which the rocks formed and may be a useful proxy for reconstructing temperatures on land. An in-depth survey of lacustrine carbonates, however, has not yet been published. Therefore we have been measuring the abundance of 13C18O16O in the CO2 produced by the dissolution of modern lake samples' carbonate minerals in phosphoric acid and comparing results to independently known estimates of lake water temperature and air temperature. Some of the sample types we have investigated include endogenic carbonates, freshwater gastropods, bivalves, microbialites, and ooids.

  14. Thermodynamic stability and structural properties of cluster crystals formed by amphiphilic dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Dominic A.; Mladek, Bianca M.; Likos, Christos N.; Blaak, Ronald

    2016-05-01

    We pursue the goal of finding real-world examples of macromolecular aggregates that form cluster crystals, which have been predicted on the basis of coarse-grained, ultrasoft pair potentials belonging to a particular mathematical class [B. M. Mladek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 46, 045701 (2006)]. For this purpose, we examine in detail the phase behavior and structural properties of model amphiphilic dendrimers of the second generation by means of monomer-resolved computer simulations. On augmenting the density of these systems, a fluid comprised of clusters that contain several overlapping and penetrating macromolecules is spontaneously formed. Upon further compression of the system, a transition to multi-occupancy crystals takes place, the thermodynamic stability of which is demonstrated by means of free-energy calculations, and where the FCC is preferred over the BCC-phase. Contrary to predictions for coarse-grained theoretical models in which the particles interact exclusively by effective pair potentials, the internal degrees of freedom of these molecules cause the lattice constant to be density-dependent. Furthermore, the mechanical stability of monodisperse BCC and FCC cluster crystals is restricted to a bounded region in the plane of cluster occupation number versus density. The structural properties of the dendrimers in the dense crystals, including their overall sizes and the distribution of monomers are also thoroughly analyzed.

  15. The Clumped Isotope Composition of Biogenic Methane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, A. L.; Douglas, P. M.; Eiler, J. M.; Stolper, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The excess or lack of 13CH3D, a doubly substituted ("clumped") isotopologue of methane, relative to that expected for a random distribution of isotopes across molecules, is a function of the processes that generated the methane. For high-temperature thermogenic methane, which typically achieves internal equilibrium, an excess of 13CH3D is expected and the amount of excess can serve as a thermometer. In contrast, biogenic methane often - though not always - has a smaller excess of clumped isotopologues, and sometimes even a deficit of clumped species ("anti-clumped"). The effect presumably arises from kinetic isotope effects accompanying enzymatic reactions in the methanogenic pathway, though the particular reaction(s) has not yet been positively identified. The decrease in clumping is also known to correlate with both the reversibility of the pathway and the methane flux. In this talk, we will present recent data bearing on the origin and utility of biologic fractionations of clumped isotopologues in methane. Preliminary data suggest that methane deriving from the fermentative pathway is enriched in D-bearing isotopologues, at the same level of clumping, relative to that derived from the CO2-reductive pathway. This property offers another potential means to distinguish biogenic methane sources in the environment. Recently, we have also begun to measure the 12CH2D2 isotopologue, for which equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects are predicted to be distinct from 13CH3D. Preliminary data suggest that the combination of both doubly-substituted isotopologues will be especially useful for disentangling mixtures containing biogenic gas.

  16. Clustered streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles, Mars: Evidence for sediment deposition during floodwater ponding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burr, D.

    2005-01-01

    A unique clustering of layered streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles is hypothesized to reflect a significant hydraulic event. The forms, interpreted as sedimentary, are attributed to extensive sediment deposition during ponding and then streamlining of this sediment behind flow obstacles during ponded water outflow. These streamlined forms are analogous to those found in depositional basins and other loci of ponding in terrestrial catastrophic flood landscapes. These terrestrial streamlined forms can provide the best opportunity for reconstructing the history of the terrestrial flooding. Likewise, the streamlined forms in Athabasca Valles may provide the best opportunity to reconstruct the recent geologic history of this young Martian outflow channel. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Clump Accretion in Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Eve; Raymer, E.; Blondin, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transients (SFXTs) are a subclass of High-Mass X-Ray Binaries that consist of a neutron star and OB supergiant donor star. These systems display short, bright x-ray flares lasting a few minutes to a few hours with luminosities reaching 1036 erg/s, several orders of magnitude larger than the quiescent luminosities of 1032 erg/s. The clumpy wind hypothesis has been proposed as a possible mechanism for these transient flares; in this model, a portion of the stellar wind from the donor star forms into clumps and is accreted onto the neutron star, inducing flares. We use high-resolution 3D hydrodynamic simulations to test the clumpy wind hypothesis, tracking the mass and angular momentum accretion rates to infer properties of the resulting x-ray flare and secular evolution of the neutron star rotation. Our results are significantly different from the predictions of Hoyle-Lyttleton Accretion (HLA) theory, which assume steady, laminar, axisymmetric flow. For example, an off-axis clump initiated with an impact parameter greater than the clump radius (for which HLA predicts no effect) produces a small spike in mass accretion and induces a long period of disk-like flow that dramatically reduces the accretion rate below the steady HLA value. The result is a brief, weak flare with a net decrease in total accreted mass compared with steady wind accretion accompanied by a substantial accretion of angular momentum.

  18. Clustering Of Radio-Selected AGN (And Star-Forming Galaxies) Up To Redshifts z = 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, Manuela; Popesso, P.; Brusa, M.; Salvato, M.

    2016-10-01

    We present the clustering properties of a complete sample of 957 radio sources detected by the VLA-COSMOS survey with radio fluxes brighter than 0.15 mJy. Based on their radio-luminosity, these objects have been furtherly divided into two populations of 642 AGN and 246 star-forming galaxies. Investigations of their clustering properties return values for the minimum masses of dark matter haloes capable to host at least one of such sources of Mmin=10^13.6 Msun for radio-selected AGN and Mmin=10^13.1 Msun for radio-emitting star-forming galaxies. Comparisons with previous works imply an independence of the clustering properties of the AGN population with respect to both radio luminosity and redshift. We also investigate the relationship between dark and luminous matter in both populations. Our results indicate a larger relative stellar content in the star-forming population with respect to AGN and also clearly show the cosmic process of star-formation build-up as one moves towards the more local universe. Comparisons between the observed space density of radio-selected AGN and that of dark matter haloes shows that about one in two haloes is associated with a black hole in its radio-active phase. This suggests that the radio-active phase is a recurrent phenomenon.

  19. Kiloparsec-Scale Simulations of Star Formation in Disk Galaxies III. Structure and Dynamics of Filaments and Clumps in Giant Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Michael J.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Van Loo, Sven

    2015-05-01

    We present hydrodynamic simulations of self-gravitating dense gas in a galactic disk, exploring scales ranging from 1 kpc down to ˜0.1 pc. Our primary goal is to understand how dense filaments form in giant molecular clouds (GMCs). These structures, often observed as infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) in the Galactic plane, are thought to be the precursors to massive stars and star clusters, so their formation may be the rate-limiting step controlling global star formation rates in galactic systems as described by the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. Our study follows on from Van Loo et al., which carried out simulations to 0.5 pc resolution and examined global aspects of the formation of dense gas clumps and the resulting star formation rate. Here, using our higher resolution, we examine the detailed structural, kinematic, and dynamical properties of dense filaments and clumps, including mass surface density (Σ) probability distribution functions, filament mass per unit length and its dispersion, lateral Σ profiles, filament fragmentation, filament velocity gradients and infall, and degree of filament and clump virialization. Where possible, these properties are compared to observations of IRDCs. By many metrics, especially too large mass fractions of high {Σ }\\gt 1 g c{{m}-2} material, too high mass per unit length dispersion due to dense clump formation, too high velocity gradients, and too high velocity dispersion for a given mass per unit length, the simulated filaments differ from observed IRDCs. We thus conclude that IRDCs do not form from global fast collapse of GMCs. Rather, we expect that IRDC formation and collapse are slowed significantly by the influence of dynamically important magnetic fields, which may thus play a crucial role in regulating galactic star formation rates.

  20. Mahalo-Subaru: The Nature Of Star Forming Disc Galaxies In Proto-Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Tadayuki

    2016-10-01

    We have been conducting Mahalo-Subaru project which targets 10 proto-clusters as well as unbiased general fields for comparison over the redshift interval of 1.5forming galaxies (e.g., Ha, [OIII]) associated to the proto-clusters or in some particular redshift slices in the field.We show that all the clusters have prominent substructures indicating the early assembly phase, and that star formation activity in the cluster cores is very high at z 2, involving a significant fraction of dusty star-bursting galaxies seen as red emitters or SCUBA2 submm sources. Such strong activities in proto-cluster cores decline sharply as time progresses as (1+z)^6, and the peak of star formation activity is shifted outwards to surrounding lower density regions, clearly indicating the "inside-out" formation of galaxy clusters.Using HST imaging, AO-assisted narrow-band imaging (Ganba-Subaru), and ALMA observations (Gracias-ALMA), we are now at the stage of resolving internal structures of individual galaxies to know the physical processes of galaxy formation in action and their environmental dependence. I will also review all these on-going projects as well as introducing the up-coming 1-sq.deg. SWIMS-18 survey using 18 filters (6 narrow-bands, 9 medium-bands, and 3 broad-bands).

  1. THE CLUSTERING AND HALO MASSES OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z < 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dolley, Tim; Brown, Michael J. I.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Palamara, David P.; Beare, Richard; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Brodwin, Mark; Kochanek, C. S.; Dey, Arjun; Atlee, David W.

    2014-12-20

    We present clustering measurements and halo masses of star-forming galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. After excluding active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we construct a sample of 22,553 24 μm sources selected from 8.42 deg{sup 2} of the Spitzer MIPS AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey of Boötes. Mid-infrared imaging allows us to observe galaxies with the highest star formation rates (SFRs), less biased by dust obscuration afflicting the optical bands. We find that the galaxies with the highest SFRs have optical colors that are redder than typical blue cloud galaxies, with many residing within the green valley. At z > 0.4 our sample is dominated by luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L {sub TIR} > 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}) and is composed entirely of LIRGs and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs, L {sub TIR} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}) at z > 0.6. We observe weak clustering of r {sub 0} ≈ 3-6 h {sup –1} Mpc for almost all of our star-forming samples. We find that the clustering and halo mass depend on L {sub TIR} at all redshifts, where galaxies with higher L {sub TIR} (hence higher SFRs) have stronger clustering. Galaxies with the highest SFRs at each redshift typically reside within dark matter halos of M {sub halo} ≈ 10{sup 12.9} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}. This is consistent with a transitional halo mass, above which star formation is largely truncated, although we cannot exclude that ULIRGs reside within higher mass halos. By modeling the clustering evolution of halos, we connect our star-forming galaxy samples to their local descendants. Most star-forming galaxies at z < 1.0 are the progenitors of L ≲ 2.5 L {sub *} blue galaxies in the local universe, but star-forming galaxies with the highest SFRs (L {sub TIR} ≳ 10{sup 11.7} L {sub ☉}) at 0.6 < z < 1.0 are the progenitors of early-type galaxies in denser group environments.

  2. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    SciTech Connect

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-09-25

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacteriumAzospirillum brasilensenavigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motileA. brasilensecells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Finally, cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilicA. brasilensecells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.

  3. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    DOE PAGES

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; ...

    2015-09-25

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacteriumAzospirillum brasilensenavigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motileA. brasilensecells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities,more » we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Finally, cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilicA. brasilensecells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.« less

  4. Early dynamical evolution of young substructured clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Julien; Boily, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Stellar clusters form with a high level of substructure, inherited from the molecular cloud and the star formation process. Evidence from observations and simulations also indicate the stars in such young clusters form a subvirial system. The subsequent dynamical evolution can cause important mass loss, ejecting a large part of the birth population in the field. It can also imprint the stellar population and still be inferred from observations of evolved clusters. Nbody simulations allow a better understanding of these early twists and turns, given realistic initial conditions. Nowadays, substructured, clumpy young clusters are usually obtained through pseudo-fractal growth and velocity inheritance. We introduce a new way to create clumpy initial conditions through a ''Hubble expansion'' which naturally produces self consistent clumps, velocity-wise. In depth analysis of the resulting clumps shows consistency with hydrodynamical simulations of young star clusters. We use these initial conditions to investigate the dynamical evolution of young subvirial clusters. We find the collapse to be soft, with hierarchical merging leading to a high level of mass segregation. The subsequent evolution is less pronounced than the equilibrium achieved from a cold collapse formation scenario.

  5. Physical and Chemical Properties of Protocluster Clumps and Massive Young Stellar Objects Associated to Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Gonzalez, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The study of high-mass stars is important not only because of the effects they produce in their environment through outflows, expanding HII regions, stellar winds, and eventually supernova shock waves, but also because they play a crucial role in estimating star formation rates in other galaxies. Although we have an accepted evolutionary scenario that explains (isolated) low-mass star formation, the processes that produce massive stars (M_star > 8 M_sol) and star clusters, especially their earliest stages, are not well understood. The newly discovered class of interstellar clouds now termed infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) represent excellent laboratories to study the earliest stages of high-mass star formation given that some of the clumps within them are known to have high masses (~100's M_sol), high densities (n > 10^5 cm^-3), and low temperatures (10-20K) as expected for the birthplaces of high-mass stars. Some questions remain unanswered: Do IRDCs harbor the very early stages of high-mass star formation, i.e., the pre-protocluster phase? If so, how do they compare with low-mass star formation sites? Is there chemical differentiation in IRDC clumps? What is the mass distribution of IRDCs? In this dissertation and for the first time, a catalog of 12529 IRDC candidates at 24 um has been created using archival data from the MIPSGAL/Spitzer survey, as a first step in searching for the massive pre-protocluster clumps. From this catalog, a sample of ~60 clumps has been selected in order to perform single-pointing observations with the IRAM 30m, Effelsberg 100m, and APEX 12m telescopes. One IRDC clump seems to be a promising candidate for being in the pre-protocluster phase. In addition, molecular line mapping observations have been performed on three clumps within IRDCs and a detailed chemical study of 10 molecular lines has been carried out. A larger difference in column densities and abundances has been found between these clumps and high-m! ass protostellar objects

  6. HIGH-RESOLUTION STUDY OF THE CLUSTER COMPLEXES IN A LENSED SPIRAL AT REDSHIFT 1.5: CONSTRAINTS ON THE BULGE FORMATION AND DISK EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Adamo, Angela; Oestlin, G.; Zackrisson, E.; Guaita, L.; Bastian, N.; Livermore, R. C.

    2013-04-01

    We analyze the clump population of the spiral galaxy Sp 1149 at redshift 1.5. Located behind the galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+2223, Sp 1149 has been significantly magnified allowing us to study the galaxy on physical scales down to {approx}100 pc. The galaxy cluster frame is among the targets of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH), an ongoing Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. We have used the publicly available multi-band imaging data set to reconstruct the spectral energy distributions of the clumps in Sp 1149, and derive, by means of stellar evolutionary models, their physical properties. We found that 40% of the clumps observed in Sp 1149 are older than 30 Myr and can be as old as 300 Myr. These are also the more massive (luminous) clumps in the galaxy. Among the complexes in the local reference sample, the star-forming knots in luminous blue compact galaxies could be considered progenitor analogs of these long-lived clumps. The remaining 60% of clumps have colors comparable to local cluster complexes, suggesting a similar young age. We observe that the Sp 1149 clumps follow the M{proportional_to}R {sup 2} relation similar to local cluster complexes, suggesting similar formation mechanisms although they may have different initial conditions (e.g., higher gas surface densities). We suggest that the galaxy is experiencing a slow decline in star formation rate and a likely transitional phase toward a more quiescent star formation mode. The older clumps have survived between 6 and 20 dynamical times and are all located at projected distances smaller than 4 kpc from the center. Their current location suggests migration toward the center and the possibility of being the building blocks of the bulge. On the other hand, the dynamical timescale of the younger clumps is significantly shorter, meaning that they are quite close to their birthplace. We show that the clumps of Sp 1149 may account for the expected metal

  7. High-resolution Study of the Cluster Complexes in a Lensed Spiral at Redshift 1.5: Constraints on the Bulge Formation and Disk Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, Angela; Östlin, G.; Bastian, N.; Zackrisson, E.; Livermore, R. C.; Guaita, L.

    2013-04-01

    We analyze the clump population of the spiral galaxy Sp 1149 at redshift 1.5. Located behind the galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+2223, Sp 1149 has been significantly magnified allowing us to study the galaxy on physical scales down to ~100 pc. The galaxy cluster frame is among the targets of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH), an ongoing Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. We have used the publicly available multi-band imaging data set to reconstruct the spectral energy distributions of the clumps in Sp 1149, and derive, by means of stellar evolutionary models, their physical properties. We found that 40% of the clumps observed in Sp 1149 are older than 30 Myr and can be as old as 300 Myr. These are also the more massive (luminous) clumps in the galaxy. Among the complexes in the local reference sample, the star-forming knots in luminous blue compact galaxies could be considered progenitor analogs of these long-lived clumps. The remaining 60% of clumps have colors comparable to local cluster complexes, suggesting a similar young age. We observe that the Sp 1149 clumps follow the MvpropR 2 relation similar to local cluster complexes, suggesting similar formation mechanisms although they may have different initial conditions (e.g., higher gas surface densities). We suggest that the galaxy is experiencing a slow decline in star formation rate and a likely transitional phase toward a more quiescent star formation mode. The older clumps have survived between 6 and 20 dynamical times and are all located at projected distances smaller than 4 kpc from the center. Their current location suggests migration toward the center and the possibility of being the building blocks of the bulge. On the other hand, the dynamical timescale of the younger clumps is significantly shorter, meaning that they are quite close to their birthplace. We show that the clumps of Sp 1149 may account for the expected metal-rich globular cluster population

  8. The Hercules Cluster Environment Impact on the Chemical History of Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, V.; VíLchez, J. M.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Papaderos, P.

    In this work we study the effects of the Hercules cluster environment on the chemical history of star-forming (SF) galaxies. For this purpose we have derived the gas metallicities, the mean stellar metallicities and ages, the masses and the luminosities of our sample of galaxies. We have found that our Hercules SF galaxies are either chemically evolved spirals with nearly flat oxygen gradients, or less metal-rich dwarf galaxies which appear to be the "newcomers" in the cluster. Most Hercules SF galaxies follow well defined mass-metallicity and luminosity-metallicity sequences; nevertheless significant outliers to these relations have been identified, illustrating how environmental effects can provide a physical source of dispersion in these fundamental relations.

  9. Clumped Isotopes in Bahamian Dolomites: A Rosetta Stone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, S.; Swart, P. K.; Arienzo, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Low temperature dolomite formation continues to be an enigmatic process. However, with the advent of the clumped isotope technique, there is an opportunity to determine the temperature of formation as well as the δ18O of the fluid (δ18Ow) from which it formed. By using samples with a well constrained geologic and thermal history, we have attempted to accurately develop a technique for the application of clumped isotopes to varying dolomite systems. Samples for this study were taken from two cores, one from the island of San Salvador and one on Great Bahama Bank (known as Clino), located on the eastern and western edges respectively of the Bahamian Archipelago. Both cores penetrate through Pleistocene to Miocene aged carbonates. The San Salvador core has a 110m section of pure, near stoichiometric dolomite, while the Clino core is of a mixed carbonate composition with varying abundances (0% - 50%) of calcian dolomite (42-46 mol % MgCO3). The water temperature profile of the Bahamas can be assumed over time due to the stable geology and no influence of higher temperature waters. Because of its location and the present burial depth, the largest influence on dolomite formation has been changes in sea level. As the dolomites from San Salvador are 100% dolomite, the Δ47 was determined directly. The Clino dolomites however were only partially dolomitized and so were treated with buffered acetic acid to remove non-dolomite carbonates. This was carried out in stages, using X-ray diffraction to determine composition, followed by the measurement of Δ47 after each leaching episode. Because the dolomite formation temperature and δ18Ow can be constrained, it becomes possible to evaluate the applicability of the multitude of clumped isotope correction schemes that have been applied to various dolomite samples. Also tested were several different equations which link temperature to the δ18O of the dolomite allowing the δ18O of the water to be calculated. This is a necessary

  10. Giant clumps in simulated high- z Galaxies: properties, evolution and dependence on feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelker, Nir; Dekel, Avishai; Ceverino, Daniel; DeGraf, Colin; Guo, Yicheng; Primack, Joel

    2017-01-01

    We study the evolution and properties of giant clumps in high-z disc galaxies using adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulations at redshifts z ˜ 6-1. Our sample consists of 34 galaxies, of halo masses 1011-1012 M⊙ at z = 2, run with and without radiation pressure (RP) feedback from young stars. While RP has little effect on the sizes and global stability of discs, it reduces the amount of star-forming gas by a factor of ˜2, leading to a similar decrease in stellar mass by z ˜ 2. Both samples undergo extended periods of violent disc instability continuously forming giant clumps of masses 107-109 M⊙ at a similar rate, though RP significantly reduces the number of long-lived clumps (LLCs). When RP is (not) included, clumps with circular velocity ≲ 40 (20) km s- 1, baryonic surface density ≲ 200 (100)M⊙ pc- 2 and baryonic mass ≲ 108.2 (107.3) M⊙ are short-lived, disrupted in a few free-fall times. More massive and dense clumps survive and migrate towards the disc centre over a few disc orbital times. In the RP simulations, the distribution of clump masses and star formation rates (SFRs) normalized to their host disc is similar at all redshifts, exhibiting a truncated power law with a slope slightly shallower than -2. The specific SFR (sSFR) of the LLCs declines with age as they migrate towards the disc centre, producing gradients in mass, stellar age, gas fraction, sSFR and metallicity that distinguish them from the short-lived clumps which tend to populate the outer disc. Ex situ mergers comprise ˜37 per cent of the mass in clumps and ˜29 per cent of the SFR. They are more massive and with older stellar ages than the in situ clumps, especially near the disc edge. Roughly half the galaxies at redshifts z = 4-1 are clumpy, with ˜3-30 per cent of their SFR and ˜0.1-3 per cent of their stellar mass in clumps.

  11. Searching for star-forming galaxies in the Fornax and Hydra clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaduvescu, O.; Kehrig, C.; Vilchez, J. M.; Unda-Sanzana, E.

    2011-09-01

    Context. The formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies is relatively difficult to understand because of their faint emission in all regimes that require large aperture telescopes. Aims: We intend to study the evolution of star-forming dwarf galaxies in clusters. We selected Fornax and Hydra clusters to complement our previous study of Virgo. On the basis of available literature data, we selected ten star-forming candidates in Fornax and another ten objects in Hydra. Methods: We used Gemini South with GMOS to acquire Hα images necessary to detect star-forming regions in the two galaxy samples. We then performed long-slit spectroscopy for the brightest six candidates, to derive their chemical properties. Finally, we employed the VLT with HAWK-I to observe all galaxies in the K' band to derive their main physical properties. Results: We studied the morphology of our two samples, finding five objects in Fornax and six in Hydra with structures consistent with those of star-forming dwarfs, i.e., dwarf irregulars (dIs) or blue compact dwarfs (BCDs). About four other objects are probably dwarf spirals, while three objects remained undetected in both visible and near infrared. On the basis of visible bright emission lines, we derived oxygen abundances for ten star-forming candidates with values between 8.00 ≤ 12+log(O/H) ≤8.78. Conclusions: Most fundamental properties of star-forming galaxies in Fornax and Hydra appear similar to corresponding properties of dIs and BCDs from Virgo and the local volume (LV). The luminosity-metallicity and metallicity-gas fraction relations in the LV and Virgo appear to be followed by Fornax and Hydra samples, suggesting that the chemical evolution of the two clusters seems consistent with the predictions from the closed box model, although larger samples are needed to investigate the role of possible environmental effects. Star-forming dwarfs (dIs and BCDs) in different environments appear to follow different mass-metallicity relations

  12. Compact star forming galaxies as the progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies: Clustering result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaozhi; Fan, Lulu; Kong, Xu; Fang, Guanwen

    2017-02-01

    We present a measurement of the spatial clustering of massive compact galaxies at 1.2 ≤ z ≤ 3 in CANDELS/3D-HST fields. We obtain the correlation length for compact quiescent galaxies (cQGs) at z ∼ 1.6 of r0 = 7.1-2.6+2.3 h-1 Mpc and compact star forming galaxies (cSFGs) at z ∼ 2.5 of r0 = 7.7-2.9+2.7 h-1 Mpc assuming a power-law slope γ = 1.8 . The characteristic dark matter halo masses MH of cQGs at z ∼ 1.6 and cSFGs at z ∼ 2.5 are ∼ 7.1 ×1012h-1M⊙ and ∼ 4.4 ×1012h-1M⊙ , respectively. Our clustering result suggests that cQGs at z ∼ 1.6 are possibly the progenitors of local luminous ETGs and the descendants of cSFGs and SMGs at z > 2. Thus an evolutionary connection involving SMGs, cSFGs, QSOs, cQGs and local luminous ETGs has been indicated by our clustering result.

  13. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry in continental tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Katharine W.; Lechler, Alex R.

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing the thermal history of minerals and fluids in continental environments is a cornerstone of tectonics research. Paleotemperature constraints from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry have provided important tests of geodynamic, structural, topographic and basin evolution models. The thermometer is based on the 13C-18O bond ordering in carbonates (mass-47 anomaly, Δ47) and provides estimates of the carbonate formation temperature independent of the δ18O value of the water from which the carbonate grew; Δ47 is measured simultaneously with conventional measurements of carbonate δ13C and δ18O values, which together constrain the isotopic composition of the parent water. Depending on the geologic setting of carbonate growth, this information can help constrain paleoenvironmental conditions or basin temperatures and fluid sources. This review examines how clumped isotope thermometry can shed new light on problems in continental tectonics, focusing on paleoaltimetry, basin evolution and structural diagenesis applications. Paleoaltimetry is inherently difficult, and the precision in carbonate growth temperature estimates is at the limit of what is useful for quantitative paleoelevation reconstruction. Nevertheless, clumped isotope analyses have enabled workers to address previously intractable problems and in many settings offer the best chance of understanding topographic change from the geologic record. The portion of the shallow crust residing at temperatures up to ca. 200 °C is important as host to economic resources and records of tectonics and climate, and clumped isotope thermometry is one of the few proxies that can access this critical range with sensitivity to temperature alone. Only a handful of studies to date have used clumped isotopes to investigate diagenesis and other sub-surface processes using carbonate crystallization temperatures or the sensitivity of Δ47 values to a sample's thermal history. However, the thermometer is

  14. Clump detections and limits on moons in Jupiter's ring system.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Mark R; Cheng, Andrew F; Weaver, Harold A; Stern, S Alan; Spencer, John R; Throop, Henry B; Birath, Emma M; Rose, Debi; Moore, Jeffrey M

    2007-10-12

    The dusty jovian ring system must be replenished continuously from embedded source bodies. The New Horizons spacecraft has performed a comprehensive search for kilometer-sized moons within the system, which might have revealed the larger members of this population. No new moons were found, however, indicating a sharp cutoff in the population of jovian bodies smaller than 8-kilometer-radius Adrastea. However, the search revealed two families of clumps in the main ring: one close pair and one cluster of three to five. All orbit within a brighter ringlet just interior to Adrastea. Their properties are very different from those of the few other clumpy rings known; the origin and nonrandom distribution of these features remain unexplained, but resonant confinement by Metis may play a role.

  15. Spectroscopic and functional characterization of iron-sulfur cluster-bound forms of Azotobacter vinelandii (Nif)IscA.

    PubMed

    Mapolelo, Daphne T; Zhang, Bo; Naik, Sunil G; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Johnson, Michael K

    2012-10-16

    The mechanism of [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly on A-type Fe-S cluster assembly proteins, in general, and the specific role of (Nif)IscA in the maturation of nitrogen fixation proteins are currently unknown. To address these questions, in vitro spectroscopic studies (UV-visible absorption/CD, resonance Raman and Mössbauer) have been used to investigate the mechanism of [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly on Azotobacter vinelandii(Nif)IscA, and the ability of (Nif)IscA to accept clusters from NifU and to donate clusters to the apo form of the nitrogenase Fe-protein. The results show that (Nif)IscA can rapidly and reversibly cycle between forms containing one [2Fe-2S](2+) and one [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster per homodimer via DTT-induced two-electron reductive coupling of two [2Fe-2S](2+) clusters and O(2)-induced [4Fe-4S](2+) oxidative cleavage. This unique type of cluster interconversion in response to cellular redox status and oxygen levels is likely to be important for the specific role of A-type proteins in the maturation of [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing proteins under aerobic growth or oxidative stress conditions. Only the [4Fe-4S](2+)-(Nif)IscA was competent for rapid activation of apo-nitrogenase Fe protein under anaerobic conditions. Apo-(Nif)IscA was shown to accept clusters from [4Fe-4S] cluster-bound NifU via rapid intact cluster transfer, indicating a potential role as a cluster carrier for delivery of clusters assembled on NifU. Overall the results support the proposal that A-type proteins can function as carrier proteins for clusters assembled on U-type proteins and suggest that they are likely to supply [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] for the maturation of [4Fe-4S] cluster-containing proteins under aerobic or oxidative stress growth conditions.

  16. THE CLUSTERED NATURE OF STAR FORMATION. PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE CLUSTERS IN THE STAR-FORMING REGION NGC 602/N90 IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Gennaro, Mario; Schmeja, Stefan; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Tognelli, Emanuele; Prada Moroni, Pier Giorgio

    2012-03-20

    Located at the tip of the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), the star-forming region NGC 602/N90 is characterized by the H II nebular ring N90 and the young cluster of pre-main-sequence (PMS) and early-type main-sequence stars NGC 602, located in the central area of the ring. We present a thorough cluster analysis of the stellar sample identified with Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys in the region. We show that apart from the central cluster low-mass PMS stars are congregated in 13 additional small, compact sub-clusters at the periphery of NGC 602, identified in terms of their higher stellar density with respect to the average background density derived from star counts. We find that the spatial distribution of the PMS stars is bimodal, with an unusually large fraction ({approx}60%) of the total population being clustered, while the remaining is diffusely distributed in the intercluster area, covering the whole central part of the region. From the corresponding color-magnitude diagrams we disentangle an age difference of {approx}2.5 Myr between NGC 602 and the compact sub-clusters, which appear younger, on the basis of comparison of the brighter PMS stars with evolutionary models, which we accurately calculated for the metal abundance of the SMC. The diffuse PMS population appears to host stars as old as those in NGC 602. Almost all detected PMS sub-clusters appear to be centrally concentrated. When the complete PMS stellar sample, including both clustered and diffused stars, is considered in our cluster analysis, it appears as a single centrally concentrated stellar agglomeration, covering the whole central area of the region. Considering also the hot massive stars of the system, we find evidence that this agglomeration is hierarchically structured. Based on our findings, we propose a scenario according to which the region NGC 602/N90 experiences an active clustered star formation for the last {approx}5 Myr. The central cluster NGC 602 was

  17. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, David T.; Gruen, Danielle S.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C.; Holden, James F.; Hristov, Alexander N.; Pohlman, John W.; Morrill, Penny L.; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; Ritter, Daniel J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Kubo, Michael D.; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M.; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply-substituted “clumped” isotopologues, e.g., 13CH3D, has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures; however, the impact of biological processes on methane’s clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on 13CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  18. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, David T.; Gruen, Danielle S.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C.; Holden, James F.; Hristov, Alexander N.; Pohlman, John W.; Morrill, Penny L.; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; Ritter, Daniel J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Kubo, Michael D.; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M.; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-04-01

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle, with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply substituted “clumped” isotopologues (for example, 13CH3D) has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures. However, the effect of biological processes on methane’s clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on 13CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation-temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  19. Do All Stars Form in Clusters?: Masses and Ages of Young Supergiants in Andromeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Zareen; Debs, C.; Kirby, E. N.; Guhathakurta, P.

    2013-01-01

    Currently it is not understood whether seemingly isolated stars formed in situ or were ejected from star clusters as runaway stars. Previous studies determined the origins of isolated stars by measuring their velocities, but past research was limited to OB stars in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds due to the difficulty of computing velocities of distant objects. This study proposed an innovative velocity test to statistically determine whether six seemingly isolated BA-type supergiants in Andromeda are runaways. We calculated the minimum relative transverse velocity needed for each supergiant to travel to its current location from the nearest open cluster. By comparing the minimum velocity with Andromeda’s known velocity dispersion, a statistical measure of the stars’ actual velocities, we determined whether the star had the necessary velocity to be a runaway. Minimum velocity was computed from the age of the star, which was calculated from its effective temperature and surface gravity. To compute effective temperature and surface gravity, we applied three new techniques based on Balmer absorption features. The results suggest that all six supergiants had the necessary velocities to be runaways. Although the proposed velocity test is a statistical assessment, it offers a valuable new tool for future investigation of isolated stars beyond the Milky Way and its satellites. This research was supported by the Science Internship Program (SIP) at UCSC, the National Science Foundation, NASA, and Palomar Observatory.

  20. A Galactic Molecular Cloud Clump Catalog from Hi-GAL Data: Method and Initial Results Comparison with BGPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetterlund, Erika; Glenn, Jason; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2017-02-01

    As the precursors to stellar clusters, it is imperative that we understand the distribution and physical properties of dense molecular gas clouds and clumps. Such a study has been done with the ground-based Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). Now the Herschel infrared GALactic plane survey (Hi-GAL) allows us to do the same with higher-quality data and complete coverage of the Galactic plane. We have made a pilot study comparing dense molecular gas clumps identified in Hi-GAL and BGPS, using six 2° × 2° regions centered at Galactic longitudes of {\\ell }=11^\\circ , 30°, 41°, 50°, 202°, and 217°. We adopted the BGPS methodology for identifying clumps and estimating distances, leading to 6198 clumps being identified in our substudy, with 995 of those having well-constrained distances. These objects were evenly distributed with Galactic longitude, a consequence of Hi-GAL being source confusion limited. These clumps range in mass from 10‑2 to 105 M⊙ and have heliocentric distances of up to 16 kpc. When clumps found in both surveys are compared, we see that distances agree within 1 kpc and ratios of masses are of the order of unity. This serves as an external validation for BGPS and instills confidence as we move forward to cataloging the clumps from the entirety of Hi-GAL. In addition to the sources that were in common with BGPS, Hi-GAL found many additional sources, primarily due to the lack of atmospheric noise. We expect Hi-GAL to yield 2 × 105 clumps, with 20% having well-constrained distances, an order of magnitude above what was found in BGPS.

  1. Glass Transitions in Monodisperse Cluster-Forming Ensembles: Vortex Matter in Type-1.5 Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Méndez, Rogelio; Mezzacapo, Fabio; Lechner, Wolfgang; Cinti, Fabio; Babaev, Egor; Pupillo, Guido

    2017-02-10

    At low enough temperatures and high densities, the equilibrium configuration of an ensemble of ultrasoft particles is a self-assembled, ordered, cluster crystal. In the present Letter, we explore the out-of-equilibrium dynamics for a two-dimensional realization, which is relevant to superconducting materials with multiscale intervortex forces. We find that, for small temperatures following a quench, the suppression of the thermally activated particle hopping hinders the ordering. This results in a glass transition for a monodispersed ensemble, for which we derive a microscopic explanation in terms of an "effective polydispersity" induced by multiscale interactions. This demonstrates that a vortex glass can form in clean systems of thin films of "type-1.5" superconductors. An additional setup to study this physics can be layered superconducting systems, where the shape of the effective vortex-vortex interactions can be engineered.

  2. Cluster-variation approximation for a network-forming lattice-fluid model.

    PubMed

    Buzano, C; De Stefanis, E; Pretti, M

    2008-07-14

    We consider a three-dimensional lattice model of a network-forming fluid, which has been recently investigated by Girardi et al. by means of Monte Carlo simulations [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 064503 (2007)], with the aim of describing water anomalies. We develop an approximate semianalytical calculation, based on a cluster-variation technique, which turns out to reproduce almost quantitatively different thermodynamic properties and phase transitions determined by the Monte Carlo method. Nevertheless, our calculation points out the existence of two different phases characterized by long-range orientational order, and of critical transitions between them and to a high-temperature orientationally disordered phase. Also, the existence of such critical lines allows us to explain certain "kinks" in the isotherms and isobars determined by the Monte Carlo analysis. The picture of the phase diagram becomes much more complex and richer, though unfortunately less suitable to describe real water.

  3. Glass Transitions in Monodisperse Cluster-Forming Ensembles: Vortex Matter in Type-1.5 Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Méndez, Rogelio; Mezzacapo, Fabio; Lechner, Wolfgang; Cinti, Fabio; Babaev, Egor; Pupillo, Guido

    2017-02-01

    At low enough temperatures and high densities, the equilibrium configuration of an ensemble of ultrasoft particles is a self-assembled, ordered, cluster crystal. In the present Letter, we explore the out-of-equilibrium dynamics for a two-dimensional realization, which is relevant to superconducting materials with multiscale intervortex forces. We find that, for small temperatures following a quench, the suppression of the thermally activated particle hopping hinders the ordering. This results in a glass transition for a monodispersed ensemble, for which we derive a microscopic explanation in terms of an "effective polydispersity" induced by multiscale interactions. This demonstrates that a vortex glass can form in clean systems of thin films of "type-1.5" superconductors. An additional setup to study this physics can be layered superconducting systems, where the shape of the effective vortex-vortex interactions can be engineered.

  4. Anionic Hydrogen Cluster Ions as a New Form of Condensed Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renzler, Michael; Kuhn, Martin; Mauracher, Andreas; Lindinger, Albrecht; Scheier, Paul; Ellis, Andrew M.

    2016-12-01

    We report the first experimental observation of negatively charged hydrogen and deuterium cluster ions, Hn- and Dn- , where n ≥5 . These anions are formed by an electron addition to liquid helium nanodroplets doped with molecular hydrogen or deuterium. The ions are stable for at least the lifetime of the experiment, which is several tens of microseconds. Only anions with odd values of n are detected, and some specific ions show anomalously high abundances. The sizes of these "magic number" ions suggest an icosahedral framework of H2 (D2 ) molecules in solvent shells around a central H- (D- ) ion. The first three shells, which contain a total of 44 H2 or D2 molecules, appear to be solidlike, but thereafter a more liquidlike arrangement of the H2 (D2 ) molecules is adopted.

  5. The sensory histidine kinases TorS and EvgS tend to form clusters in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Erik; Koler, Moriah; Frank, Vered; Sourjik, Victor; Vaknin, Ady

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms use multiple two-component sensory systems to detect changes in their environment and elicit physiological responses. Despite their wide spread and importance, the intracellular organization of two-component sensory proteins in bacteria remains little investigated. A notable exception is the well-studied clustering of the chemoreceptor-kinase complexes that mediate chemotaxis behaviour. However, these chemosensory complexes differ fundamentally from other systems, both structurally and functionally. Therefore, studying the organization of typical sensory kinases in bacteria is essential for understanding the general role of receptor clustering in bacterial sensory signalling. Here, by studying mYFP-tagged sensory kinases in Escherichia coli, we show that the tagged TorS and EvgS sensors have a clear tendency for self-association and clustering. These sensors clustered even when expressed at a level of a few hundred copies per cell. Moreover, the mYFP-tagged response regulator TorR showed clear TorS-dependent clustering, indicating that untagged TorS sensors also tend to form clusters. We also provide evidence for the functionality of these tagged sensors. Experiments with truncated TorS or EvgS proteins suggested that clustering of EvgS sensors depends on the cytoplasmic part of the protein, whereas clustering of TorS sensors can be potentially mediated by the periplasmic/transmembrane domain. Overall, these findings support the notion that sensor clustering plays a role in bacterial sensory signalling beyond chemotaxis.

  6. BLACK HOLE MERGERS AND BLUE STRAGGLERS FROM HIERARCHICAL TRIPLES FORMED IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Antonini, Fabio; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rodriguez, Carl L.; Morscher, Meagan; Pattabiraman, Bharath; Kalogera, Vicky; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2016-01-10

    Hierarchical triple-star systems are expected to form frequently via close binary–binary encounters in the dense cores of globular clusters (GCs). In a sufficiently inclined triple, gravitational interactions between the inner and outer binary can cause large-amplitude oscillations in the eccentricity of the inner orbit (“Lidov–Kozai (LK) cycles”), which can lead to a collision and merger of the two inner components. In this paper we use Monte Carlo models of dense star clusters to identify all triple systems formed dynamically and we compute their evolution using a highly accurate three-body integrator which incorporates relativistic and tidal effects. We find that a large fraction of these triples evolve through a non-secular dynamical phase which can drive the inner binary to higher eccentricities than predicted by the standard secular perturbation theory (even including octupole-order terms). We place constraints on the importance of LK-induced mergers for producing: (i) gravitational wave sources detectable by Advanced LIGO (aLIGO), for triples with an inner pair of stellar black holes (BHs); and (ii) blue straggler stars, for triples with main-sequence-star components. We find a realistic aLIGO detection rate of BH mergers due to the LK mechanism of ∼1 yr{sup −1}, with about 20% of these having a finite eccentricity when they first chirp into the aLIGO frequency band. While rare, these events are likely to dominate among eccentric compact object inspirals that are potentially detectable by aLIGO. For blue stragglers, we find that the LK mechanism can contribute up to ∼10% of their total numbers in GCs.

  7. The long lives of giant clumps and the birth of outflows in gas-rich galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Bournaud, Frédéric; Renaud, Florent; Daddi, Emanuele; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared M.; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kraljic, Katarina; Le Floch', Emeric; Dekel, Avishai; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Teyssier, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Star-forming disk galaxies at high redshift are often subject to violent disk instability, characterized by giant clumps whose fate is yet to be understood. The main question is whether the clumps disrupt within their dynamical timescale (≤50 Myr), like the molecular clouds in today's galaxies, or whether they survive stellar feedback for more than a disk orbital time (≈300 Myr) in which case they can migrate inward and help building the central bulge. We present 3.5-7 pc resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift disks including photoionization, radiation pressure, and supernovae feedback. Our modeling of radiation pressure determines the mass loading and initial velocity of winds from basic physical principles. We find that the giant clumps produce steady outflow rates comparable to and sometimes somewhat larger than their star formation rate, with velocities largely sufficient to escape the galaxy. The clumps also lose mass, especially old stars, by tidal stripping, and the stellar populations contained in the clumps hence remain relatively young (≤200 Myr), as observed. The clumps survive gaseous outflows and stellar loss, because they are wandering in gas-rich turbulent disks from which they can reaccrete gas at high rates compensating for outflows and tidal stripping, overall keeping realistic and self-regulated gaseous and stellar masses. The outflow and accretion rates have specific timescales of a few 10{sup 8} yr, as opposed to rapid and repeated dispersion and reformation of clumps. Our simulations produce gaseous outflows with velocities, densities, and mass loading consistent with observations, and at the same time suggest that the giant clumps survive for hundreds of Myr and complete their migration to the center of high-redshift galaxies. These long-lived clumps are gas-dominated and contain a moderate mass fraction of stars; they drive inside-out disk evolution, thickening, spheroid growth, and fueling of the central

  8. ATCA Survey of Ammonia in the Galactic Center: The Temperatures of Dense Gas Clumps between Sgr A* and Sgr B2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Jürgen; Weiß, Axel; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Henkel, Christian; Meier, David S.

    2014-04-01

    We present a large-scale, interferometric survey of ammonia (1, 1) and (2, 2) toward the Galactic center observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The survey covers Δl ~ 1° (~150 pc at an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc) and Δb ~ 0.°2 (~30 pc) which spans the region between the supermassive black hole Sgr A* and the massive star forming region Sgr B2. The resolution is ~20'' (~0.8 pc) and emission at scales >~ 2' (gsim 3.2 pc) is filtered out due to missing interferometric short spacings. Consequently, the data represent the denser, compact clouds and disregards the large-scale, diffuse gas. Many of the clumps align with the 100 pc dust ring and mostly anti-correlate with 1.2 cm continuum emission. We present a kinetic temperature map of the dense gas. The temperature distribution peaks at ~38 K with a width at half maximum between 18 K and 61 K (measurements sensitive within T kin ~ 10-80 K). Larger clumps are on average warmer than smaller clumps which suggests internal heating sources. Our observations indicate that the circumnuclear disk ~1.5 pc around Sgr A* is supplied with gas from the 20 km s-1 molecular cloud. This gas is substantially cooler than gas ~3-15 pc away from Sgr A*. We find a strong temperature gradient across Sgr B2. Ammonia column densities correlate well with SCUBA 850 μm fluxes, but the relation is shifted from the origin, which may indicate a requirement for a minimum amount of dust to form and shield ammonia. Around the Arches and Quintuplet clusters we find shell morphologies with UV-influenced gas in their centers, followed by ammonia and radio continuum layers.

  9. ATCA survey of ammonia in the galactic center: The temperatures of dense gas clumps between Sgr A* and Sgr B2

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Jürgen; Weiß, Axel; Henkel, Christian; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Meier, David S. E-mail: aweiss@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de E-mail: Lister.Staveley-Smith@uwa.edu.au

    2014-04-10

    We present a large-scale, interferometric survey of ammonia (1, 1) and (2, 2) toward the Galactic center observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The survey covers Δℓ ∼ 1° (∼150 pc at an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc) and Δb ∼ 0.°2 (∼30 pc) which spans the region between the supermassive black hole Sgr A* and the massive star forming region Sgr B2. The resolution is ∼20'' (∼0.8 pc) and emission at scales ≳ 2' (≳ 3.2 pc) is filtered out due to missing interferometric short spacings. Consequently, the data represent the denser, compact clouds and disregards the large-scale, diffuse gas. Many of the clumps align with the 100 pc dust ring and mostly anti-correlate with 1.2 cm continuum emission. We present a kinetic temperature map of the dense gas. The temperature distribution peaks at ∼38 K with a width at half maximum between 18 K and 61 K (measurements sensitive within T {sub kin} ∼ 10-80 K). Larger clumps are on average warmer than smaller clumps which suggests internal heating sources. Our observations indicate that the circumnuclear disk ∼1.5 pc around Sgr A* is supplied with gas from the 20 km s{sup –1} molecular cloud. This gas is substantially cooler than gas ∼3-15 pc away from Sgr A*. We find a strong temperature gradient across Sgr B2. Ammonia column densities correlate well with SCUBA 850 μm fluxes, but the relation is shifted from the origin, which may indicate a requirement for a minimum amount of dust to form and shield ammonia. Around the Arches and Quintuplet clusters we find shell morphologies with UV-influenced gas in their centers, followed by ammonia and radio continuum layers.

  10. A Multinuclear Copper(I) Cluster Forms the Dimerization Interface in Copper-Loaded Human Copper Chaperone for Superoxide Dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Stasser, J.P.; Siluvai, G.S.; Barry, A.N.; Blackburn, N.J.

    2009-06-04

    Copper binding and X-ray aborption spectroscopy studies are reported on untagged human CCS (hCCS; CCS = copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase) isolated using an intein self-cleaving vector and on single and double Cys to Ala mutants of the hCCS MTCQSC and CSC motifs of domains 1 (D1) and 3 (D3), respectively. The results on the wild-type protein confirmed earlier findings on the CCS-MBP (maltose binding protein) constructs, namely, that Cu(I) coordinates to the CXC motif, forming a cluster at the interface of two D3 polypeptides. In contrast to the single Cys to Ser mutations of the CCS-MBP protein (Stasser, J. P., Eisses, J. F., Barry, A. N., Kaplan, J. H., and Blackburn, N. J. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 3143-3152), single Cys to Ala mutations in D3 were sufficient to eliminate cluster formation and significantly reduce CCS activity. Analysis of the intensity of the Cu-Cu cluster interaction in C244A, C246A, and C244/246A variants suggested that the nuclearity of the cluster was greater than 2 and was most consistent with a Cu4S6 adamantane-type species. The relationship among cluster formation, oligomerization, and metal loading was evaluated. The results support a model in which Cu(I) binding converts the apo dimer with a D2-D2 interface to a new dimer connected by cluster formation at two D3 CSC motifs. The predominance of dimer over tetramer in the cluster-containing species strongly suggests that the D2 dimer interface remains open and available for sequestering an SOD1 monomer. This work implicates the copper cluster in the reactive form and adds detail to the cluster nuclearity and how copper loading affects the oligomerization states and reactivity of CCS for its partner SOD1.

  11. Clumped Methane Isotopologue Temperatures of Microbial Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, S.; Wang, D. T.; Gruen, D.; Delwiche, K.; Hemond, H.; Pohlman, J.

    2014-12-01

    We will report the abundance of 13CH3D, a clumped isotopologue of methane, in microbial methane sampled from natural environments. They yield some expected and some unexpected results reflecting both equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects controlling the abundance of 13CH3D in low temperature environments. The four isotopologues of methane (12CH4, 13CH4, 12CH3D and 13CH3D) were measured by a tunable infrared spectroscopy method at a precision of 0.2‰ and accuracy of 0.5‰ (Ono et al., 2014). Similar to carbonate clumped isotope thermometry, clumped isotopologues of methane become more stable at lower temperatures. The equilibrium constant for the isotope exchange reaction 13CH4 + 12CH3D ⇌ 13CH3D + 12CH4 deviates from unity by +6.3 to +3.5 ‰ for methane equilibrated between 4 and 121 °C, a range expected for microbial methanogenesis. This would be measurably-distinct from a thermogenic methane signal, which typically have apparent 13CH3D-based temperatures ranging from 150 to 220 °C (+3.0 to +2.2 ‰ clumped isotope effect; Ono et al., 2014; Stolper et al. 2014). Marine samples, such as methane clathrates and porewater methane from the Cascadia margin, have 13CH3D-based temperatures that appear to be consistent with isotopic equilibration at in situ temperatures that are reasonable for deep sedimentary environments. In contrast, methane from freshwater environments, such as a lake and a swamp, yield apparent temperatures that are much higher than the known or inferred environmental temperature. Mixing of two or more distinct sources of methane could potentially generate this high temperature bias. We suggest, however, that this high-temperature bias likely reflects a kinetic isotope fractionation intrinsic to methanogenesis in fresh water environments. In contrast, the low-temperature signals from marine methane could be related to the slow metabolic rates and reversibility of microbial methanogenesis and methanotrophy in marine sedimentary environments

  12. CHaMP: From Molecular Clouds to Massive Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter J.

    2017-03-01

    I review the major science outcomes to date of the Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP), and also report the latest observational results on this unbiased, uniform sample of massive, cluster-forming molecular clumps, based on new mm-wave and IR data. These clouds represent the vast, subthermally-excited population of clumps predicted by Narayanan et al. (2008) to dominate the molecular mass of disk galaxies. Besides confirming their existence, we have presented evidence that these massive clumps probably spend a large fraction (90-95%) of their long lives (possibly up to 100 Myr) in a mostly quiescent, low star formation rate (SFR) state. This is likely ended when a density or internal pressure threshold is crossed, after which vigorous, massive cluster formation consumes the densest gas with a high SFR, dispersing the embedding envelope. New results presented in two other posters at this Symposium include (1) the first analysis of HCN emission from the dense gas (Schap et al. 2015), and (2) the first deep photometry of clusters in this sample based on NIR AAT & CTIO data, and on MIR Warm Spitzer IRAC data (Dallilar et al. 2015).

  13. Clumps and Temporal Changes in the Jovian Ring System as Viewed by New Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Cheng, A. F.; Weaver, H. A.; Stern, S. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Throop, H.; Birath, E. M.; Rose, D.; Moore, J. M.

    2007-10-01

    New Horizons obtained 400 ring images of the Jovian ring system using the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI). This camera has a broad bandpass spanning wavelengths λ = 0.35 to 0.85 µm. The ring was imaged at phase angles 7°-159°. In addition, one sequence of near-IR spectra (λ = 1.25 to 2.5 µm) was obtained by the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) for compositional studies. Two ring rotation movies during Jupiter approach were used to search for small moons embedded within the system. These bodies might serve as source bodies for the prevalent ring dust. No moons were detected down to a threshold of 500 m radius, suggesting a sharp cutoff in the population of inner Jovian moons below 8-km Adrastea. Although this search focused on the main Jovian ring, any 1-km moons from orbital radius r = 100,000 km to beyond the orbit of Amalthea (r = 181,000 km) should have been detected multiple times. More surprisingly, the ring revealed two clusters of tiny clumps, one pair and one set of three. These are definitively not moons because they have longitudinal extents of a few tenths of a degree. Separations between clumps are 2 to 4° but are not uniform. These clump families both orbit within a brightness peak just interior to the orbit of Adrastea, at r = 128,740 km. Their origin is unknown. They are not visible at high phase angles, indicating that they are composed primarily of larger "parent” bodies, not dust. They are definitely not related to a clump detected in Cassini images of the Jovian ring from December 2000, indicating that at least some ring clumps are transient. The large quadrant asymmetries reported in earlier images from Voyager and Galileo are completely absent in the new data.

  14. The initial conditions of stellar protocluster formation - II. A catalogue of starless and protostellar clumps embedded in IRDCs in the Galactic longitude range 15° ≤ l ≤ 55°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traficante, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Peretto, N.; Pineda, J. E.; Molinari, S.

    2015-08-01

    We present a catalogue of starless and protostellar clumps associated with infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) in a 40° wide region of the inner Galactic plane (|b| ≤ 1°). We have extracted the far-infrared (FIR) counterparts of 3493 IRDCs with known distance in the Galactic longitude range 15° ≤ l ≤ 55° and searched for the young clumps using Herschel infrared Galactic plane survey, the survey of the Galactic plane carried out with the Herschel satellite. Each clump is identified as a compact source detected at 160, 250 and 350 μm. The clumps have been classified as protostellar or starless, based on their emission (or lack of emission) at 70 μm. We identify 1723 clumps, 1056 (61 per cent) of which are protostellar and 667 (39 per cent) starless. These clumps are found within 764 different IRDCs, 375 (49 per cent) of which are only associated with protostellar clumps, 178 (23 per cent) only with starless clumps, and 211 (28 per cent) with both categories of clumps. The clumps have a median mass of ˜250 M⊙ and range up to >104 M⊙ in mass and up to 105 L⊙ in luminosity. The mass-radius distribution shows that almost 30 per cent of the starless clumps identified in this survey could form high-mass stars; however these massive clumps are confined in only ≃4 per cent of the IRDCs. Assuming a minimum mass surface density threshold for the formation of high-mass stars, the comparison of the numbers of massive starless clumps and those already containing embedded sources suggests an upper limit lifetime for the starless phase of ˜105 yr for clumps with a mass M > 500 M⊙.

  15. Astrophysics. Multiple images of a highly magnified supernova formed by an early-type cluster galaxy lens.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patrick L; Rodney, Steven A; Treu, Tommaso; Foley, Ryan J; Brammer, Gabriel; Schmidt, Kasper B; Zitrin, Adi; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Graur, Or; Filippenko, Alexei V; Jha, Saurabh W; Riess, Adam G; Bradac, Marusa; Weiner, Benjamin J; Scolnic, Daniel; Malkan, Matthew A; von der Linden, Anja; Trenti, Michele; Hjorth, Jens; Gavazzi, Raphael; Fontana, Adriano; Merten, Julian C; McCully, Curtis; Jones, Tucker; Postman, Marc; Dressler, Alan; Patel, Brandon; Cenko, S Bradley; Graham, Melissa L; Tucker, Bradley E

    2015-03-06

    In 1964, Refsdal hypothesized that a supernova whose light traversed multiple paths around a strong gravitational lens could be used to measure the rate of cosmic expansion. We report the discovery of such a system. In Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we have found four images of a single supernova forming an Einstein cross configuration around a redshift z = 0.54 elliptical galaxy in the MACS J1149.6+2223 cluster. The cluster's gravitational potential also creates multiple images of the z = 1.49 spiral supernova host galaxy, and a future appearance of the supernova elsewhere in the cluster field is expected. The magnifications and staggered arrivals of the supernova images probe the cosmic expansion rate, as well as the distribution of matter in the galaxy and cluster lenses.

  16. MASSIVE CLUMPS IN LOCAL GALAXIES: COMPARISONS WITH HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Dewberry, J.; Putko, J.; Teich, Y.; Popinchalk, M.; Sanchez Almeida, J.; Munoz-Tunon, C.

    2013-09-01

    Local UV-bright galaxies in the Kiso survey include clumpy systems with kiloparsec-size star complexes that resemble clumpy young galaxies in surveys at high redshift. We compare clump masses and underlying disks in several dozen galaxies from each of these surveys to the star complexes and disks of normal spirals. Photometry and spectroscopy for the Kiso and spiral sample come from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that the largest Kiso clumpy galaxies resemble Ultra Deep Field (UDF) clumpies in terms of the star formation rates, clump masses, and clump surface densities. Clump masses and surface densities in normal spirals are smaller. If the clump masses are proportional to the turbulent Jeans mass in the interstellar medium, then for the most luminous galaxies in the sequence of normal:Kiso:UDF, the turbulent speeds and surface densities increase in the proportions 1.0:4.7:5.0 and 1.0:4.0:5.1, respectively, for fixed restframe B-band absolute magnitude. For the least luminous galaxies in the overlapping magnitude range, the turbulent speed and surface density trends are 1.0:2.7:7.4 and 1.0:1.4:3.0, respectively. We also find that while all three types have radially decreasing disk intensities when measured with ellipse-fit azimuthal averages, the average profiles are more irregular for UDF clumpies (which are viewed in their restframe UV) than for Kiso galaxies (viewed at g-band), and major axis intensity scans are even more irregular for the UDF than Kiso galaxies. Local clumpy galaxies in the Kiso survey appear to be intermediate between UDF clumpies and normal spirals.

  17. Cluster headache - a symptom of different problems or a primary form? A case report.

    PubMed

    Domitrz, Izabela; Gaweł, Małgorzata; Maj, Edyta

    2013-01-01

    Headache with severe, strictly one-sided unilateral attacks of pain in orbital, supraorbital, temporal localisation lasting 15-180 minutes occurring from once every two days to 8 times daily, typically with one or more autonomic symptoms, is recognized as cluster headache (CH). Headache with normal neurological examination and abnormal neuroimaging studies, mimicking cluster headache, is reported by several authors. We present an elderly woman with a cluster-like headache probably associated with other comorbidities. We differentiate between primary, but 'atypical' CH and symptomatic cluster headache due to frontal sinusitis, pontine venous angioma or vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve root. This headache is not so rare in the general population and its secondary causes must be ruled out before the diagnosis of a primary headache as cluster headache is made.

  18. Using red clump stars to correct the Gaia DR1 parallaxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Guy R.; Lund, Mikkel N.; Miglio, Andrea; Elsworth, Yvonne; Kuszlewicz, James S.; North, Thomas S. H.; Rendle, Ben; Chaplin, William J.; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Campante, Tiago L.; Girardi, Léo; Hale, Steven J.; Hall, Oliver; Jones, Caitlin D.; Kawaler, Steven D.; Roxburgh, Ian; Schofield, Mathew

    2017-01-01

    Recent results have suggested that there is tension between the Gaia DR1 TGAS distances and the distances obtained using luminosities determined by eclipsing binaries or asteroseismology on red giant stars. We use the Ks-band luminosities of red clump stars, identified and characterized by asteroseismology, to make independent distance estimates. Our results suggest that Gaia TGAS distances contain a systematic error that decreases with increasing distance. We propose a correction to mitigate this offset as a function of parallax that is valid for the Kepler field and values of parallax that are less than 1.6 mas. For parallaxes greater than this, we find agreement with previously published values. We note that the TGAS distances to the red clump stars of the open cluster M67 show a high level of disagreement that is difficult to correct for.

  19. Clustering of Star-forming Galaxies Near a Radio Galaxy at z=5.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overzier, Roderik A.; Miley, G. K.; Bouwens, R. J.; Cross, N. J. G.; Zirm, A. W.; Benítez, N.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Clampin, M.; Demarco, R.; Ford, H. C.; Hartig, G. F.; Illingworth, G. D.; Martel, A. R.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Venemans, B.; Ardila, D. R.; Bartko, F.; Bradley, L. D.; Broadhurst, T. J.; Coe, D.; Feldman, P. D.; Franx, M.; Golimowski, D. A.; Goto, T.; Gronwall, C.; Holden, B.; Homeier, N.; Infante, L.; Kimble, R. A.; Krist, J. E.; Mei, S.; Menanteau, F.; Meurer, G. R.; Motta, V.; Postman, M.; Rosati, P.; Sirianni, M.; Sparks, W. B.; Tran, H. D.; Tsvetanov, Z. I.; White, R. L.; Zheng, W.

    2006-01-01

    We present HST ACS observations of the most distant radio galaxy known, TN J0924-2201 at z=5.2. This radio galaxy has six spectroscopically confirmed Lyα-emitting companion galaxies and appears to lie within an overdense region. The radio galaxy is marginally resolved in i775 and z850, showing continuum emission aligned with the radio axis, similar to what is observed for lower redshift radio galaxies. Both the half-light radius and the UV star formation rate are comparable to the typical values found for Lyman break galaxies at z~4-5. The Lyα emitters are sub-L* galaxies, with deduced star formation rates of 1-10 Msolar yr-1. One of the Lyα emitters is only detected in Lyα. Based on the star formation rate of ~3 Msolar yr-1 calculated from Lyα, the lack of continuum emission could be explained if the galaxy is younger than ~2 Myr and is producing its first stars. Observations in V606i775z850 were used to identify additional Lyman break galaxies associated with this structure. In addition to the radio galaxy, there are 22 V606 break (z~5) galaxies with z850<26.5 (5 σ), two of which are also in the spectroscopic sample. We compare the surface density of ~2 arcmin-2 to that of similarly selected V606 dropouts extracted from GOODS and the UDF parallel fields. We find evidence for an overdensity to very high confidence (>99%), based on a counts-in-cells analysis applied to the control field. The excess suggests that the V606 break objects are associated with a forming cluster around the radio galaxy. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program 9291.

  20. The luminosity function of star clusters in 20 star-forming galaxies based on Hubble legacy archive photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, Bradley C.; Bowers, Ariel S.; Lindsay, Kevin; Ansari, Asna; Evans, Jessica; Chandar, Rupali; Larsen, Soeren

    2014-04-01

    Luminosity functions (LFs) have been determined for star cluster populations in 20 nearby (4-30 Mpc), star-forming galaxies based on Advanced Camera for Surveys source lists generated by the Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA). These cluster catalogs provide one of the largest sets of uniform, automatically generated cluster candidates available in the literature at present. Comparisons are made with other recently generated cluster catalogs demonstrating that the HLA-generated catalogs are of similar quality, but in general do not go as deep. A typical cluster LF can be approximated by a power law, dN/dL∝L {sup α}, with an average value for α of –2.37 and rms scatter = 0.18 when using the F814W ('I') band. A comparison of fitting results based on methods that use binned and unbinned data shows good agreement, although there may be a systematic tendency for the unbinned (maximum likelihood) method to give slightly more negative values of α for galaxies with steeper LFs. We find that galaxies with high rates of star formation (or equivalently, with the brightest or largest numbers of clusters) have a slight tendency to have shallower values of α. In particular, the Antennae galaxy (NGC 4038/39), a merging system with a relatively high star formation rate (SFR), has the second flattest LF in the sample. A tentative correlation may also be present between Hubble type and values of α, in the sense that later type galaxies (i.e., Sd and Sm) appear to have flatter LFs. Hence, while there do appear to be some weak correlations, the relative similarity in the values of α for a large number of star-forming galaxies suggests that, to first order, the LFs are fairly universal. We examine the bright end of the LFs and find evidence for a downturn, although it only pertains to about 1% of the clusters. Our uniform database results in a small scatter (≈0.4 to 0.5 mag) in the correlation between the magnitude of the brightest cluster (M {sub brightest}) and log of the number

  1. Pressure-confined clumps in magnetized molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertoldi, Frank; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1992-01-01

    A substantial fraction of the mass of a giant molecular cloud (GMC) in the Galaxy is confined to clumps which occupy a small fraction of the volume of the cloud. A majority of the clumps in several well-studied GMCs (Ophiuchus, Orion G, Rosette, Cepheus OB3) are not in gravitational virial equilibrium, but instead are confined by the pressure of the surrounding medium. These clumps thus violate one of 'Larson's (1981) laws'. Generalizing the standard virial analysis for spherical clouds to spheroidal clouds, we determine the Jeans mass and the magnetic critical mass for the clumps in these clouds. The Alfven Mach number, which is proportional to the internal velocity dispersion of the clumps divided by the Alfven velocity, is estimated to be of order unity for all the clumps. The more massive clumps, which are in gravitational virial equilibrium, are too massive to be supported by magnetic fields alone (i.e., they are magnetically supercritical). Internally generated turbulence must play a key role in supporting these clumps.

  2. The Spherically Symmetric Gravitational Collapse of a Clump of Solids in a Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, Karim; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2015-05-01

    In the subject of planetesimal formation, several mechanisms have been identified that create dense particle clumps in the solar nebula. The present work is concerned with the gravitational collapse of such clumps, idealized as being spherically symmetric. Fully nonlinear simulations using the two-fluid model are carried out (almost) up to the time when a central density singularity forms. We refer to this as the collapse time. The end result of the study is a parametrization of the collapse time, in order that it may be compared with timescales for various disruptive effects to which clumps may be subject in a particular situation. An important effect that determines the collapse time is that as the clump compresses, it also compresses the gas due to drag. This increases gas pressure, which retards particle collapse and can lead to oscillation in the size and density of the clump. In the limit of particles perfectly coupled to the gas, the characteristic ratio of gravitational force to gas pressure becomes relevant and defines a two-phase Jeans parameter, {{J}t}, which is the classical Jeans parameter with the speed of sound replaced by an effective wave speed in the coupled two-fluid medium. The parameter {{J}t} remains useful even away from the perfect coupling limit because it makes the simulation results insensitive to the initial density ratio of particles to gas (Φ0) as a separate parameter. A simple ordinary differential equation model is developed. It takes the form of two coupled non-linear oscillators and reproduces key features of the simulations. Finally, a parametric study of the time to collapse is performed and a formula (fit to the simulations) is developed. In the incompressible limit {{J}t}\\to 0, collapse time equals the self-sedimentation time, which is inversely proportional to the Stokes number. As {{J}t} increases, the collapse time decreases with {{J}t} and eventually becomes approximately equal to the dynamical time. Values of collapse

  3. Star Formation Laws in Both Galactic Massive Clumps and External Galaxies: Extensive Study with Dust Coninuum, HCN (4-3), and CS (7-6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tie; Kim, Kee-Tae; Yoo, Hyunju; Liu, Sheng-yuan; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Qin, Sheng-Li; Zhang, Qizhou; Wu, Yuefang; Wang, Ke; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Juvela, Mika; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Tóth, L. Viktor; Mardones, Diego; Garay, Guido; Bronfman, Leonardo; Cunningham, Maria R.; Li, Di; Lo, Nadia; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Schnee, Scott

    2016-10-01

    We observed 146 Galactic clumps in HCN (4-3) and CS (7-6) with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment 10 m telescope. A tight linear relationship between star formation rate and gas mass traced by dust continuum emission was found for both Galactic clumps and the high redshift (z > 1) star forming galaxies (SFGs), indicating a constant gas depletion time of ˜100 Myr for molecular gas in both Galactic clumps and high z SFGs. However, low z galaxies do not follow this relation and seem to have a longer global gas depletion time. The correlations between total infrared luminosities (L TIR) and molecular line luminosities ({L}{mol}\\prime ) of HCN (4-3) and CS (7-6) are tight and sublinear extending down to clumps with L TIR ˜ 103 L ⊙. These correlations become linear when extended to external galaxies. A bimodal behavior in the L TIR-{L}{mol}\\prime correlations was found for clumps with different dust temperature, luminosity-to-mass ratio, and σ line/σ vir. Such bimodal behavior may be due to evolutionary effects. The slopes of L TIR-L‧mol correlations become more shallow as clumps evolve. We compared our results with lower J transition lines in Wu et al. (2010). The correlations between clump masses and line luminosities are close to linear for low effective excitation density tracers but become sublinear for high effective excitation density tracers for clumps with L TIR larger than L TIR ˜ 104.5 L ⊙. High effective excitation density tracers cannot linearly trace the total clump masses, leading to a sublinear correlations for both M clump-L‧mol and L TIR-L‧mol relations.

  4. The high and low molecular weight forms of hyaluronan have distinct effects on CD44 clustering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cuixia; Cao, Manlin; Liu, Hua; He, Yiqing; Xu, Jing; Du, Yan; Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Wenjuan; Cui, Lian; Hu, Jiajie; Gao, Feng

    2012-12-14

    CD44 is a major cell surface receptor for the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA). Native high molecular weight hyaluronan (nHA) and oligosaccharides of hyaluronan (oHA) provoke distinct biological effects upon binding to CD44. Despite the importance of such interactions, however, the feature of binding with CD44 at the cell surface and the molecular basis for functional distinction between different sizes of HA is still unclear. In this study we investigated the effects of high and low molecular weight hyaluronan on CD44 clustering. For the first time, we provided direct evidence for a strong relationship between HA size and CD44 clustering in vivo. In CD44-transfected COS-7 cells, we showed that exogenous nHA stimulated CD44 clustering, which was disrupted by oHA. Moreover, naturally expressed CD44 was distributed into clusters due to abundantly expressed nHA in HK-2 cells (human renal proximal tubule cells) and BT549 cells (human breast cancer cell line) without exogenous stimulation. Our results suggest that native HA binding to CD44 selectively induces CD44 clustering, which could be inhibited by oHA. Finally, we demonstrated that HA regulates cell adhesion in a manner specifically dependent on its size. oHA promoted cell adhesion while nHA showed no effects. Our results might elucidate a molecular- and/or cellular-based mechanism for the diverse biological activities of nHA and oHA.

  5. The Influence of Kinetic Growth Factors on the Clumped Isotope Composition of Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. D.; Watkins, J. M.; Tripati, A.; Ryerson, F. J.; DePaolo, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Clumped isotope paleothermometry is based on the association of 13C and 18O within carbonate minerals. Although the influence of temperature on equilibrium 13C-18O bond ordering has been studied, recent oxygen isotope studies of inorganic calcite demonstrate that calcite grown in laboratory experiments and in many natural settings does not form in equilibrium with water. It is therefore likely that the carbon and clumped isotope composition of these calcite crystals are not representative of true thermodynamic equilibrium. To isolate kinetic clumped isotope effects that arise at the mineral-solution interface, clumped isotopic equilibrium of DIC species must be maintained. This can be accomplished by dissolving the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) into the solution, thereby reducing the time required for isotopic equilibration of DIC species by approximately two orders of magnitude between pH 7.7 and 9.3. We conduct calcite growth experiments aimed specifically at measuring the pH-dependence of kinetic clumped isotope effects during non-equilibrium precipitation of calcite. We precipitated calcite from aqueous solution at a constant pH and controlled supersaturation over the pH range 7.7-9.3 in the presence of CA. For each experiment, a gas mixture of N2 and CO2 is bubbled through a beaker of solution without seed crystals. As CO2 from the gas dissolves into solution, calcite crystals grow on the beaker walls. The pH of the solution is maintained by use of an autotitrator with NaOH as the titrant. We control the temperature, pH, the pCO2 of the gas inflow, and the gas inflow rate, and monitor the total alkalinity, the pCO2 of the gas outflow, and the amount of NaOH added. A constant crystal growth rate of ~1.6 mmol/m2/hr is maintained over all experiments. Results from these experiments are compared to predictions from a recently-developed isotopic ion-by-ion growth model of calcite. The model describes the rate, temperature and pH dependence of oxygen isotope uptake

  6. Submillimeter View of Gas and Dust in the Forming Super Star Cluster in NGC 5253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Jean L.

    2015-08-01

    Measuring the molecular gas content of young super star clusters is necessary to assess the efficiency of the birth process. Submillimeter arrays allow the detection of individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in young massive clusters in nearby galaxies to constrain star formation efficiency and feedback. We have detected CO(3-2) and dust emission toward the super star cluster and supernebula in NGC 5253 with the Submillimeter Array. The GMC associated with the supernebula, “Cloud D”, is warm (T>200K), dense (log n~4.3) and optically thin in CO(3-2). We cannot get a mass from CO. Instead we estimate the molecular gas mass by subtracting the stellar mass from the gravitational mass of Cloud D; we find a star formation efficiency of over 60%. This cloud is extremely dusty; the gas-to-dust ratio is 50, half to one-third of the Galactic value and a tenth of the ~500-700 value scaled from the metallicity of NGC 5253. We propose that the dust mass is enhanced by mass loss from Wolf-Rayet stars within the cluster, which is consistent with STARBURST99 modeling of the cluster yields. Finally, the CO linewidth is sigma~9 km/s, not much broader than predicted for quiescent Galactic GMCs from the size-linewidth relation. There is little evidence for the effects of the roughly 7000 O stars embedded within Cloud D. We seem to be catching this cluster at a special time, at an age of 3.5 to 4 Myr, before its first supernova but after mass loss has begun from the O stars.

  7. Globular cluster formation with multiple stellar populations from hierarchical star cluster complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Most old globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy are observed to have internal chemical abundance spreads in light elements. We discuss a new GC formation scenario based on hierarchical star formation within fractal molecular clouds. In the new scenario, a cluster of bound and unbound star clusters (`star cluster complex', SCC) that have a power-law cluster mass function with a slope (β) of 2 is first formed from a massive gas clump developed in a dwarf galaxy. Such cluster complexes and β = 2 are observed and expected from hierarchical star formation. The most massive star cluster (`main cluster'), which is the progenitor of a GC, can accrete gas ejected from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars initially in the cluster and other low-mass clusters before the clusters are tidally stripped or destroyed to become field stars in the dwarf. The SCC is initially embedded in a giant gas hole created by numerous supernovae of the SCC so that cold gas outside the hole can be accreted onto the main cluster later. New stars formed from the accreted gas have chemical abundances that are different from those of the original SCC. Using hydrodynamical simulations of GC formation based on this scenario, we show that the main cluster with the initial mass as large as [2 - 5] × 105M⊙ can accrete more than 105M⊙ gas from AGB stars of the SCC. We suggest that merging of hierarchical star cluster complexes can play key roles in stellar halo formation around GCs and self-enrichment processes in the early phase of GC formation.

  8. THE BLAST VIEW OF THE STAR-FORMING REGION IN AQUILA (l = 45{sup 0}, b = 0{sup 0})

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Martin, Peter G.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume

    2010-11-01

    We have carried out the first general submillimeter analysis of the field toward GRSMC 45.46+0.05, a massive star-forming region in Aquila. The deconvolved 6 deg{sup 2} (3{sup 0} x 2{sup 0}) maps provided by BLAST in 2005 at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m were used to perform a preliminary characterization of the clump population previously investigated in the infrared, radio, and molecular maps. Interferometric CORNISH data at 4.8 GHz have also been used to characterize the Ultracompact H II regions (UCHIIRs) within the main clumps. By means of the BLAST maps, we have produced an initial census of the submillimeter structures that will be observed by Herschel, several of which are known Infrared Dark Clouds. Our spectral energy distributions of the main clumps in the field, located at {approx}7 kpc, reveal an active population with temperatures of T{approx} 35-40 K and masses of {approx}10{sup 3} M{sub sun} for a dust emissivity index {beta} = 1.5. The clump evolutionary stages range from evolved sources, with extended H II regions and prominent IR stellar population, to massive young stellar objects, prior to the formation of an UCHIIR. The CORNISH data have revealed the details of the stellar content and structure of the UCHIIRs. In most cases, the ionizing stars corresponding to the brightest radio detections are capable of accounting for the clump bolometric luminosity, in most cases powered by embedded OB stellar clusters.

  9. Observational constraints on star cluster formation theory. I. The mass-radius relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfalzner, S.; Kirk, H.; Sills, A.; Urquhart, J. S.; Kauffmann, J.; Kuhn, M. A.; Bhandare, A.; Menten, K. M.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Stars form predominantly in groups usually denoted as clusters or associations. The observed stellar groups display a broad spectrum of masses, sizes, and other properties, so it is often assumed that there is no underlying structure in this diversity. Aims: Here we show that the assumption of an unstructured multitude of cluster or association types might be misleading. Current data compilations of clusters in the solar neighbourhood show correlations among cluster mass, size, age, maximum stellar mass, etc. In this first paper we take a closer look at the correlation of cluster mass and radius. Methods: We use literature data to explore relations in cluster and molecular core properties in the solar neighbourhood. Results: We show that for embedded clusters in the solar neighbourhood a clear correlation exists between cluster mass and half-mass radius of the form Mc = CRcγ with γ = 1.7 ± 0.2. This correlation holds for infrared K-band data, as well as for X-ray sources and clusters containing a hundred stars up to those consisting of a few tens of thousands of stars. The correlation is difficult to verify for clusters containing fewer than 30 stars owing to low-number statistics. Dense clumps of gas are the progenitors of the embedded clusters. We find almost the same slope for the mass-size relation of dense, massive clumps as for the embedded star clusters. This might point to a direct translation from gas to stellar mass: however, it is difficult to relate size measurements for clusters (stars) to those for gas profiles. Taking multiple paths for clump mass into cluster mass into account, we obtain an average star-formation efficiency of 18%+9.3-5.7 for the embedded clusters in the solar neighbourhood. Conclusions: The derived mass-radius relation gives constraints for the theory of clustered star formation. Analytical models and simulations of clustered star formation have to reproduce this relation in order to be realistic.

  10. IN-SPIRALING CLUMPS IN BLUE COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Zhang Hongxin; Hunter, Deidre A.

    2012-03-10

    Giant star formation clumps in dwarf irregular galaxies can have masses exceeding a few percent of the galaxy mass enclosed inside their orbital radii. They can produce sufficient torques on dark matter halo particles, halo stars, and the surrounding disk to lose their angular momentum and spiral into the central region in 1 Gyr. Pairs of giant clumps with similarly large relative masses can interact and exchange angular momentum to the same degree. The result of this angular momentum loss is a growing central concentration of old stars, gas, and star formation that can produce a long-lived starburst in the inner region, identified with the blue compact dwarf (BCD) phase. This central concentration is proposed to be analogous to the bulge in a young spiral galaxy. Observations of star complexes in five local BCDs confirm the relatively large clump masses that are expected for this process. The observed clumps also seem to contain old field stars, even after background light subtraction, in which case the clumps may be long-lived. The two examples with clumps closest to the center have the largest relative clump masses and the greatest contributions from old stars. An additional indication that the dense central regions of BCDs are like bulges is the high ratio of the inner disk scale height to the scale length, which is comparable to 1 for four of the galaxies.

  11. Quantitative characterization of clumping in Scots pine crowns

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, Pauline; Mõttus, Matti; Rautiainen, Miina; Sievänen, Risto

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Proper characterization of the clumped structure of forests is needed for calculation of the absorbed radiation and photosynthetic production by a canopy. This study examined the dependency of crown-level clumping on tree size and growth conditions in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), and determined the ability of statistical canopy radiation models to quantify the degree of self-shading within crowns as a result of the clumping effect. Methods Twelve 3-D Scots pine trees were generated using an application of the LIGNUM model, and the crown-level clumping as quantified by the crown silhouette to total needle area ratio (STARcrown) was calculated. The results were compared with those produced by the stochastic approach of modelling tree crowns as geometric shapes filled with a random medium. Key Results Crown clumping was independent of tree height, needle area and growth conditions. The results supported the capability of the stochastic approach in characterizing clumping in crowns given that the outer shell of the tree crown is well represented. Conclusions Variation in the whole-stand clumping index is induced by differences in the spatial pattern of trees as a function of, for example, stand age rather than by changes in the degree of self-shading within individual crowns as they grow bigger. PMID:24431344

  12. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. XI. TEMPERATURES AND SUBSTRUCTURE OF GALACTIC CLUMPS BASED ON 350 μM OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Merello, Manuel; Evans II, Neal J.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Ginsburg, Adam; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Dunham, Michael M.

    2015-05-15

    We present 107 maps of continuum emission at 350 μm from Galactic molecular clumps. Observed sources were mainly selected from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) catalog, with three additional maps covering star-forming regions in the outer Galaxy. The higher resolution of the SHARC-II images (8.″5 beam) compared with the 1.1 mm images from BGPS (33″ beam) allowed us to identify a large population of smaller substructures within the clumps. A catalog is presented for the 1386 sources extracted from the 350 μm maps. The color temperature distribution of clumps based on the two wavelengths has a median of 13.3 K and mean of 16.3 ± 0.4 K, assuming an opacity law index of 1.7. For the structures with good determination of color temperatures, the mean ratio of gas temperature, determined from NH{sub 3} observations, to dust color temperature is 0.88 and the median ratio is 0.76. About half the clumps have more than 2 substructures and 22 clumps have more than 10. The fraction of the mass in dense substructures seen at 350 μm compared to the mass of their parental clump is ∼0.19, and the surface densities of these substructures are, on average, 2.2 times those seen in the clumps identified at 1.1 mm. For a well-characterized sample, 88 structures (31%) exceed a surface density of 0.2 g cm{sup −2}, and 18 (6%) exceed 1.0 g cm{sup −2}, thresholds for massive star formation suggested by theorists.

  13. Star-forming Brightest Cluster Galaxies at 0.25 < z < 1.25: A Transitioning Fuel Supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Stalder, B.; Bayliss, M.; Allen, S. W.; Applegate, D. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chiu, I.; Desai, S.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Marrone, D. P.; Miller, E. D.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Stanford, S. A.; Stark, A. A.; Vieira, J. D.; Zenteno, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 90 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev Zel’dovich effect by the South Pole Telescope, utilizing data from various ground- and space-based facilities. We infer the star-formation rate (SFR) for the BCG in each cluster—based on the UV and IR continuum luminosity, as well as the [O ii]λλ3726,3729 emission line luminosity in cases where spectroscopy is available—and find seven systems with SFR > 100 M⊙ yr‑1. We find that the BCG SFR exceeds 10 M⊙ yr‑1 in 31 of 90 (34%) cases at 0.25 < z < 1.25, compared to ∼1%–5% at z ∼ 0 from the literature. At z ≳ 1, this fraction increases to {92}-31+6%, implying a steady decrease in the BCG SFR over the past ∼9 Gyr. At low-z, we find that the specific SFR in BCGs is declining more slowly with time than for field or cluster galaxies, which is most likely due to the replenishing fuel from the cooling ICM in relaxed, cool core clusters. At z ≳ 0.6, the correlation between the cluster central entropy and BCG star formation—which is well established at z ∼ 0—is not present. Instead, we find that the most star-forming BCGs at high-z are found in the cores of dynamically unrelaxed clusters. We use data from the Hubble Space Telescope to investigate the rest-frame near-UV morphology of a subsample of the most star-forming BCGs, and find complex, highly asymmetric UV morphologies on scales as large as ∼50–60 kpc. The high fraction of star-forming BCGs hosted in unrelaxed, non-cool core clusters at early times suggests that the dominant mode of fueling star formation in BCGs may have recently transitioned from galaxy–galaxy interactions to ICM cooling.

  14. Star-Forming Brightest Cluster Galaxies at 0.25 < z < 1.25: A Transitioning Fuel Supply

    DOE PAGES

    McDonald, M.; Stalder, B.; Bayliss, M.; ...

    2016-01-22

    In this paper, we present a multiwavelength study of the 90 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect by the South Pole Telescope, utilizing data from various ground- and space-based facilities. We infer the star-formation rate (SFR) for the BCG in each cluster—based on the UV and IR continuum luminosity, as well as the [O ii]λλ3726,3729 emission line luminosity in cases where spectroscopy is available—and find seven systems with SFR > 100 M⊙ yr-1. We find that the BCG SFR exceeds 10 M⊙ yr-1 in 31 of 90 (34%) cases at 0.25 < z < 1.25, compared to ~1%–5% at z ~ 0 from the literature. At z ≳ 1, this fraction increases tomore » $${92}_{-31}^{+6}$$%, implying a steady decrease in the BCG SFR over the past ~9 Gyr. At low-z, we find that the specific SFR in BCGs is declining more slowly with time than for field or cluster galaxies, which is most likely due to the replenishing fuel from the cooling ICM in relaxed, cool core clusters. At z ≳ 0.6, the correlation between the cluster central entropy and BCG star formation—which is well established at z ~ 0—is not present. Instead, we find that the most star-forming BCGs at high-z are found in the cores of dynamically unrelaxed clusters. We use data from the Hubble Space Telescope to investigate the rest-frame near-UV morphology of a subsample of the most star-forming BCGs, and find complex, highly asymmetric UV morphologies on scales as large as ~50–60 kpc. Finally, the high fraction of star-forming BCGs hosted in unrelaxed, non-cool core clusters at early times suggests that the dominant mode of fueling star formation in BCGs may have recently transitioned from galaxy–galaxy interactions to ICM cooling.« less

  15. Star-forming brightest cluster galaxies at 0.25

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; Stalder, B.; Bayliss, M.; Allen, S. W.; Applegate, D. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chiu, I.; Desai, S.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Marrone, D. P.; Miller, E. D.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Stanford, S. A.; Stark, A. A.; Vieira, J. D.; Zenteno, A.

    2016-01-22

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 90 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect by the South Pole Telescope, utilizing data from various ground- and space-based facilities. We infer the star-formation rate (SFR) for the BCG in each cluster—based on the UV and IR continuum luminosity, as well as the [O ii]λλ3726,3729 emission line luminosity in cases where spectroscopy is available—and find seven systems with SFR > 100 M⊙ yr-1. We find that the BCG SFR exceeds 10 M⊙ yr-1 in 31 of 90 (34%) cases at 0.25 < z < 1.25, compared to ~1%–5% at z ~ 0 from the literature. At z gsim 1, this fraction increases to ${92}_{-31}^{+6}$%, implying a steady decrease in the BCG SFR over the past ~9 Gyr. At low-z, we find that the specific SFR in BCGs is declining more slowly with time than for field or cluster galaxies, which is most likely due to the replenishing fuel from the cooling ICM in relaxed, cool core clusters. At z gsim 0.6, the correlation between the cluster central entropy and BCG star formation—which is well established at z ~ 0—is not present. Instead, we find that the most star-forming BCGs at high-z are found in the cores of dynamically unrelaxed clusters. We use data from the Hubble Space Telescope to investigate the rest-frame near-UV morphology of a subsample of the most star-forming BCGs, and find complex, highly asymmetric UV morphologies on scales as large as ~50–60 kpc. The high fraction of star-forming BCGs hosted in unrelaxed, non-cool core clusters at early times suggests that the dominant mode of fueling star formation in BCGs may have recently transitioned from galaxy–galaxy interactions to ICM cooling.

  16. Star-Forming Brightest Cluster Galaxies at 0.25 < z < 1.25: A Transitioning Fuel Supply

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; Stalder, B.; Bayliss, M.; Allen, S. W.; Applegate, D. E.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chiu, I.; Desai, S.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Marrone, D. P.; Miller, E. D.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Stanford, S. A.; Stark, A. A.; Vieira, J. D.; Zenteno, A.

    2016-01-22

    In this paper, we present a multiwavelength study of the 90 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of galaxy clusters selected via the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect by the South Pole Telescope, utilizing data from various ground- and space-based facilities. We infer the star-formation rate (SFR) for the BCG in each cluster—based on the UV and IR continuum luminosity, as well as the [O ii]λλ3726,3729 emission line luminosity in cases where spectroscopy is available—and find seven systems with SFR > 100 M yr-1. We find that the BCG SFR exceeds 10 M yr-1 in 31 of 90 (34%) cases at 0.25 < z < 1.25, compared to ~1%–5% at z ~ 0 from the literature. At z ≳ 1, this fraction increases to ${92}_{-31}^{+6}$%, implying a steady decrease in the BCG SFR over the past ~9 Gyr. At low-z, we find that the specific SFR in BCGs is declining more slowly with time than for field or cluster galaxies, which is most likely due to the replenishing fuel from the cooling ICM in relaxed, cool core clusters. At z ≳ 0.6, the correlation between the cluster central entropy and BCG star formation—which is well established at z ~ 0—is not present. Instead, we find that the most star-forming BCGs at high-z are found in the cores of dynamically unrelaxed clusters. We use data from the Hubble Space Telescope to investigate the rest-frame near-UV morphology of a subsample of the most star-forming BCGs, and find complex, highly asymmetric UV morphologies on scales as large as ~50–60 kpc. Finally, the high fraction of star-forming BCGs hosted in unrelaxed, non-cool core clusters at early times suggests that the dominant mode of fueling star formation in BCGs may have recently transitioned from galaxy–galaxy interactions to ICM cooling.

  17. Microlensing Optical Depth towards the Galactic Bulge Using Clump Giants from the MACHO Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Popowski, P; Griest, K; Thomas, C L; Cook, K H; Bennett, D P; Becker, A C; Alves, D R; Minniti, D; Drake, A J; Alcock, C; Allsman, R A; Axelrod, T S; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Nelson, C A; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Vandehei, T; Welch, D

    2005-07-14

    Using 7 years of MACHO survey data, we present a new determination of the optical depth to microlensing towards the Galactic bulge. We select the sample of 62 microlensing events (60 unique) on clump giant sources and perform a detailed efficiency analysis. We use only the clump giant sources because these are bright bulge stars and are not as strongly affected by blending as other events. Using a subsample of 42 clump events concentrated in an area of 4.5 deg{sup 2} with 739000 clump giant stars, we find {tau} = 2.17{sub -0.38}{sup +0.47} x 10{sup -6} at (l,b) = (1{sup o}.50, -2{sup o}.68), somewhat smaller than found in most previous MACHO studies, but in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. We also present the optical depth in each of the 19 fields in which we detected events, and find limits on optical depth for fields with no events. The errors in optical depth in individual fields are dominated by Poisson noise. We measure optical depth gradients of (1.06 {+-} 0.71) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} and (0.29 {+-} 0.43) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} in the galactic latitude b and longitude l directions, respectively. Finally, we discuss the possibility of anomalous duration distribution of events in the field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3{sup o}.11, -3{sup o}.01) as well as investigate spatial clustering of events in all fields.

  18. CLUMPY GALAXIES IN CANDELS. I. THE DEFINITION OF UV CLUMPS AND THE FRACTION OF CLUMPY GALAXIES AT 0.5 < z < 3

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Fang, Jerome J.; Bell, Eric F.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Lu, Yu; Mandelker, Nir; Dekel, Avishai; McIntosh, Daniel M.; Primack, Joel R.; Ceverino, Daniel; and others

    2015-02-10

    Although giant clumps of stars are thought to be crucial to galaxy formation and evolution, the most basic demographics of clumps are still uncertain, mainly because the definition of clumps has not been thoroughly discussed. In this paper, we carry out a study of the basic demographics of clumps in star-forming galaxies at 0.5 < z < 3, using our proposed physical definition that UV-bright clumps are discrete star-forming regions that individually contribute more than 8% of the rest-frame UV light of their galaxies. Clumps defined this way are significantly brighter than the H II regions of nearby large spiral galaxies, either individually or blended, when physical spatial resolution and cosmological dimming are considered. Under this definition, we measure the fraction of star-forming galaxies that have at least one off-center clump (f {sub clumpy}) and the contributions of clumps to the rest-frame UV light and star formation rate (SFR) of star-forming galaxies in the CANDELS/GOODS-S and UDS fields, where our mass-complete sample consists of 3239 galaxies with axial ratio q > 0.5. The redshift evolution of f {sub clumpy} changes with the stellar mass (M {sub *}) of the galaxies. Low-mass (log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) < 9.8) galaxies keep an almost constant f {sub clumpy} of ∼60% from z ∼ 3 to z ∼ 0.5. Intermediate-mass and massive galaxies drop their f {sub clumpy} from 55% at z ∼ 3 to 40% and 15%, respectively, at z ∼ 0.5. We find that (1) the trend of disk stabilization predicted by violent disk instability matches the f {sub clumpy} trend of massive galaxies; (2) minor mergers are a viable explanation of the f {sub clumpy} trend of intermediate-mass galaxies at z < 1.5, given a realistic observability timescale; and (3) major mergers are unlikely responsible for the f {sub clumpy} trend in all masses at z < 1.5. The clump contribution to the rest-frame UV light of star-forming galaxies shows a broad peak around galaxies with log (M {sub *}/M {sub

  19. The Amyloid Precursor Protein Forms Plasmalemmal Clusters via Its Pathogenic Amyloid-β Domain

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Arne; Fischer, Sebastian; Lang, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a large, ubiquitous integral membrane protein with a small amyloid-β (Aβ) domain. In the human brain, endosomal processing of APP produces neurotoxic Aβ-peptides, which are involved in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we show that the Aβ sequence exerts a physiological function when still present in the unprocessed APP molecule. From the extracellular site, Aβ concentrates APP molecules into plasmalemmal membrane protein clusters. Moreover, Aβ stabilization of clusters is a prerequisite for their targeting to endocytic clathrin structures. Therefore, we conclude that the Aβ domain directly mediates a central step in APP trafficking, driving its own conversion into neurotoxic peptides. PMID:22455924

  20. Nanopore integrated with Au clusters formed under electron beam irradiation for single molecule analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seong Soo; Park, Myoung Jin; Han, Chul Hee; Kim, Sung In; Yoo, Jung Ho; Park, Kyung Jin; Park, Nam Kyou; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2016-02-01

    Recently the single molecules such as protein and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) have been successfully characterized using a solidstate nanopore with an electrical detection technique. However, the optical plasmonic nanopore has yet to be fabricated. The optical detection technique can be better utilized as next generation ultrafast geneome sequencing devices due to the possible utilization of the current optical technique for genome sequencing. In this report, we have investigated the Au nanopore formation under the electron beam irradiation on an Au aperture. The circular-type nanoopening with ~ 5 nm diameter on the diffused membrane is fabricated by using 2 keV electron beam irradiation by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). We found the Au cluster on the periphery of the drilled aperture under a 2 keV electron beam irradiation. Immediately right after electron beam irradiation, no Au cluster and no Au crystal lattice structure on the diffused plane are observed. However, after the sample was kept for ~ 6 months under a room environment, the Au clusters are found on the diffused membrane and the Au crystal lattice structures on the diffused membrane are also found using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. These phenomena can be attributed to Ostwald ripening. In addition, the Au nano-hole on the 40 nm thick Au membrane was also drilled by using 200 keV scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  1. The Nitrogenase FeMo-Cofactor Precursor Formed by NifB Protein: A Diamagnetic Cluster Containing Eight Iron Atoms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yisong; Echavarri-Erasun, Carlos; Demuez, Marie; Jiménez-Vicente, Emilio; Bominaar, Emile L; Rubio, Luis M

    2016-10-04

    The biological activation of N2 occurs at the FeMo-cofactor, a 7Fe-9S-Mo-C-homocitrate cluster. FeMo-cofactor formation involves assembly of a Fe6-8 -SX -C core precursor, NifB-co, which occurs on the NifB protein. Characterization of NifB-co in NifB is complicated by the dynamic nature of the assembly process and the presence of a permanent [4Fe-4S] cluster associated with the radical SAM chemistry for generating the central carbide. We have used the physiological carrier protein, NifX, which has been proposed to bind NifB-co and deliver it to the NifEN protein, upon which FeMo-cofactor assembly is ultimately completed. Preparation of NifX in a fully NifB-co-loaded form provided an opportunity for Mössbauer analysis of NifB-co. The results indicate that NifB-co is a diamagnetic (S=0) 8-Fe cluster, containing two spectroscopically distinct Fe sites that appear in a 3:1 ratio. DFT analysis of the (57) Fe electric hyperfine interactions deduced from the Mössbauer analysis suggests that NifB-co is either a 4Fe(2+) -4Fe(3+) or 6Fe(2+) -2Fe(3+) cluster having valence-delocalized states.

  2. Hubble Frontier Field free-form mass mapping of the massive multiple-merging cluster MACSJ0717.5+3745

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego, Jose M.; Broadhurst, Tom; Zitrin, Adi; Lam, Daniel; Lim, Jeremy; Ford, Holland C.; Zheng, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We examine the latest data on the cluster MACSJ0717.5+3745 from the Hubble Frontier Fields campaign. The critically lensed area is the largest known of any lens and very irregular making it a challenge for parametric modelling. Using our free-form method we obtain an accurate solution, identify here many new sets of multiple images, doubling the number of constraints and improving the reconstruction of the dark matter distribution. Our reconstructed mass map shows several distinct central substructures with shallow density profiles, clarifying earlier work and defining well the relation between the dark matter distribution and the luminous and X-ray peaks within the critically lensed region. Using our free-form method, we are able to meaningfully subtract the mass contribution from cluster members to the deflection field to trace the smoothly distributed cluster dark matter distribution. We find four distinct concentrations, three of which are coincident with the luminous matter. The fourth peak has a significant offset from both the closest luminous and X-ray peaks. These findings, together with dynamical data from the motions of galaxies and gas will be important for uncovering the potentially important implications of this extremely massive and intriguing system.

  3. MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION MAPPING OF INFRARED DARK CLOUDS. II. THE STRUCTURE OF MASSIVE STARLESS CORES AND CLUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Michael J.; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2012-07-20

    radiative heating. Comparing to massive star-forming cores and clumps, there is tentative evidence for an evolution toward higher densities and steeper density profiles as star formation proceeds.

  4. Enhancing glass-forming ability via frustration of nano-clustering in alloys with a high solvent content.

    PubMed

    Li, H X; Gao, J E; Wu, Y; Jiao, Z B; Ma, D; Stoica, A D; Wang, X L; Ren, Y; Miller, M K; Lu, Z P

    2013-01-01

    The glass-forming ability (GFA) of alloys with a high-solvent content such as soft magnetic Fe-based and Al-based alloys is usually limited due to strong formation of the solvent-based solid solution phase. Herein, we report that the GFA of soft magnetic Fe-based alloys (with >70 at.% Fe to ensure large saturation magnetization) could be dramatically improved by doping with only 0.3 at.% Cu which has a positive enthalpy of mixing with Fe. It was found that an appropriate Cu addition could enhance the liquid phase stability and crystallization resistance by destabilizing the α-Fe nano-clusters due to the necessity to redistribute the Cu atoms. However, excessive Cu doping would stimulate nucleation of the α-Fe nano-clusters due to the repulsive nature between the Fe and Cu atoms, thus deteriorating the GFA. Our findings provide new insights into understanding of glass formation in general.

  5. Enhancing glass-forming ability via frustration of nano-clustering in alloys with a high solvent content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. X.; Gao, J. E.; Wu, Y.; Jiao, Z. B.; Ma, D.; Stoica, A. D.; Wang, X. L.; Ren, Y.; Miller, M. K.; Lu, Z. P.

    2013-06-01

    The glass-forming ability (GFA) of alloys with a high-solvent content such as soft magnetic Fe-based and Al-based alloys is usually limited due to strong formation of the solvent-based solid solution phase. Herein, we report that the GFA of soft magnetic Fe-based alloys (with >70 at.% Fe to ensure large saturation magnetization) could be dramatically improved by doping with only 0.3 at.% Cu which has a positive enthalpy of mixing with Fe. It was found that an appropriate Cu addition could enhance the liquid phase stability and crystallization resistance by destabilizing the α-Fe nano-clusters due to the necessity to redistribute the Cu atoms. However, excessive Cu doping would stimulate nucleation of the α-Fe nano-clusters due to the repulsive nature between the Fe and Cu atoms, thus deteriorating the GFA. Our findings provide new insights into understanding of glass formation in general.

  6. Molecular Gas Clumps from the Destruction of Icy Bodies in the beta Pictoris Debris Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dent, W. R. F.; Wyatt, M. C.; Roberge, A.; Augereau, J. -C.; Casassus, S.; Corder, S.; Greaves, J. S.; DeGregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Hales, A.; Jackson, A. P.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Lagrange, A. -M.; Matthews, B.; Wilner, D.

    2014-01-01

    Many stars are surrounded by disks of dusty debris formed in the collisions of asteroids, comets and dwarf planets. But is gas also released in such events? Observations at sub-mm wavelengths of the archetypal debris disk around ß Pictoris show that 0.3% of a Moon mass of carbon monoxide orbits in its debris belt. The gas distribution is highly asymmetric, with 30% found in a single clump 85 AU from the star, in a plane closely aligned with the orbit of the inner planet, beta Pic b. This gas clump delineates a region of enhanced collisions, either from a mean motion resonance with an unseen giant planet, or from the remnants of a collision of Mars-mass planets.

  7. The Formation and Early Evolution of Embedded Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter

    We propose to combine Spitzer, WISE, Herschel, and other archival spacecraft data with an existing ground- and space-based mm-wave to near-IR survey of molecular clouds over a large portion of the Milky Way, in order to systematically study the formation and early evolution of massive stars and star clusters, and provide new observational calibrations for a theoretical paradigm of this key astrophysical problem. Central Objectives: The Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) is a large, unbiased, uniform, and panchromatic survey of massive star and cluster formation and early evolution, covering 20°x6° of the Galactic Plane. Its uniqueness lies in the comprehensive molecular spectroscopy of 303 massive dense clumps, which have also been included in several archival spacecraft surveys. Our objective is a systematic demographic analysis of massive star and cluster formation, one which has not been possible without knowledge of our CHaMP cloud sample, including all clouds with embedded clusters as well as those that have not yet formed massive stars. For proto-clusters deeply embedded within dense molecular clouds, analysis of these space-based data will: 1. Yield a complete census of Young Stellar Objects in each cluster. 2. Allow systematic measurements of embedded cluster properties: spectral energy distributions, luminosity functions, protostellar and disk fractions, and how these vary with cluster mass, age, and density. Combined with other, similarly complete and unbiased infrared and mm data, CHaMP's goals include: 3. A detailed comparison of the embedded stellar populations with their natal dense gas to derive extinction maps, star formation efficiencies and feedback effects, and the kinematics, physics, and chemistry of the gas in and around the clusters. 4. Tying the demographics, age spreads, and timescales of the clusters, based on pre-Main Sequence evolution, to that of the dense gas clumps and Giant Molecular Clouds. 5. A

  8. An X-ray and radio study of the massive star-forming cluster IRAS 20126+4104

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Virginie; Hofner, Peter; Anderson, Crystal; Rosero, Viviana

    2015-08-01

    Two main competitive theories intent to explain massive star formation: the turbulent core model, which is an extension of the low-mass star formation model (McKee & Tan 2003), and models involving competitive accretion or stellar collisions (Bonnell & Bate 2006). The characterization of the cluster in which massive stars remain can help discriminate between the two main scenarios of their formation.Until recently it was believed that massive stars were only formed in dense molecular clouds leading to a substantial cluster. However, a previous study of the massive star forming region IRAS 20126+4104 using Spitzer observations by Qiu et al. (2008), suggested that the massive protostar was isolated, and the region was showing no obvious cluster.Here we adopt a multiwavelength technique to characterize the stellar environment of the IRAS 20126+4104 region combining Chandra X-ray ACIS-I and VLA 6cm continuum observations, and near-infrared (2MASS) data of the region. We detected 150 X-ray sources in the ACIS-I field and 13 radio sources within the 9’.2 VLA primary beam. Associating X-ray sources with their near-infrared counterparts from the 2MASS catalog and a color study of those counterparts, allow us to determine the galactic foreground/background contamination, and we conclude that 90 X-ray sources are associated with the region.This study shows an increasing surface density of X-ray sources toward the massive protostar and a number of at least 42 YSOs within 1.2 pc distance from the massive protostar. This number is consistent with typical B-type stars clusters (Lada & Lada 2003).

  9. Disc Dynamics In The Early Universe: Instabilities, Giant Clumps, Feedback & Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bournaud, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    Star-forming galaxies at high redshift (z=1-3) have irregular, clumpy morphologies. These are best explained by a violent, ubiquitous gravitational instability in gas-rich disks, causing fragmentation in giant clumps and other irregular features. The instability can rapidly redistribute the baryons within galaxies, by inward migration of the giant clumps and other rapid inflows of mass. The promotes the growth of central bulges and other galactic components, and models predict that the resulting properties may finely match those observed in today's Milky Way-like spirals. The instability-driven inflow may also feed the central black hole in a moderate but steady mode and drive a high fraction of active galaxies, promoting earlier supermassive black hole growth. At the same time, intense stellar feedback in the giant gas-rich clumps and from the active nucleus drive intense gas outflows that regulate the galaxy mass to realistic levels, but the outflows are largely decoupled from the dense gas phases, which continue to form stars continuously. Hence the high-redshift progenitors of massive galaxies evolve in a steady unstable state lasting a couple of Gyr during which they build their fondamental structural components before evolving secularly into modern, quasi-stable spiral disks and spheroids.

  10. On the applicability of density dependent effective interactions in cluster-forming systems.

    PubMed

    Montes-Saralegui, Marta; Kahl, Gerhard; Nikoubashman, Arash

    2017-02-07

    We systematically studied the validity and transferability of the force-matching algorithm for computing effective pair potentials in a system of dendritic polymers, i.e., a particular class of ultrasoft colloids. We focused on amphiphilic dendrimers, macromolecules which can aggregate into clusters of overlapping particles to minimize the contact area with the surrounding implicit solvent. Simulations were performed for both the monomeric and coarse-grained models in the liquid phase at densities ranging from infinite dilution up to values close to the freezing point. The effective pair potentials for the coarse-grained simulations were computed from the monomeric simulations both in the zero-density limit (Φeff(0)) and at each investigated finite density (Φeff). Conducting the coarse-grained simulations with Φeff(0) at higher densities is not appropriate as they failed at reproducing the structural properties of the monomeric simulations. In contrast, we found excellent agreement between the spatial dendrimer distributions obtained from the coarse-grained simulations with Φeff and the microscopically detailed simulations at low densities, where the macromolecules were distributed homogeneously in the system. However, the reliability of the coarse-grained simulations deteriorated significantly as the density was increased further and the cluster occupation became more polydisperse. Under these conditions, the effective pair potential of the coarse-grained model can no longer be computed by averaging over the whole system, but the local density needs to be taken into account instead.

  11. Size and Structure of Clusters Formed by Shear Induced Coagulation: Modeling by Discrete Element Method.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Martin; Vonka, Michal; Soos, Miroslav; Kosek, Juraj

    2015-07-21

    The coagulation process has a dramatic impact on the properties of dispersions of colloidal particles including the change of optical, rheological, as well as texture properties. We model the behavior of a colloidal dispersion with moderate particle volume fraction, that is, 5 wt %, subjected to high shear rates employing the time-dependent Discrete Element Method (DEM) in three spatial dimensions. The Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory was used to model noncontact interparticle interactions, while contact mechanics was described by the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) theory of adhesion. The obtained results demonstrate that the steady-state size of the produced clusters is a strong function of the applied shear rate, primary particle size, and the surface energy of the particles. Furthermore, it was found that the cluster size is determined by the maximum adhesion force between the primary particles and not the adhesion energy. This observation is in agreement with several simulation studies and is valid for the case when the particle-particle contact is elastic and no plastic deformation occurs. These results are of major importance, especially for the emulsion polymerization process, during which the fouling of reactors and piping causes significant financial losses.

  12. On the applicability of density dependent effective interactions in cluster-forming systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-Saralegui, Marta; Kahl, Gerhard; Nikoubashman, Arash

    2017-02-01

    We systematically studied the validity and transferability of the force-matching algorithm for computing effective pair potentials in a system of dendritic polymers, i.e., a particular class of ultrasoft colloids. We focused on amphiphilic dendrimers, macromolecules which can aggregate into clusters of overlapping particles to minimize the contact area with the surrounding implicit solvent. Simulations were performed for both the monomeric and coarse-grained models in the liquid phase at densities ranging from infinite dilution up to values close to the freezing point. The effective pair potentials for the coarse-grained simulations were computed from the monomeric simulations both in the zero-density limit (Φeff0) and at each investigated finite density (Φeff). Conducting the coarse-grained simulations with Φeff0 at higher densities is not appropriate as they failed at reproducing the structural properties of the monomeric simulations. In contrast, we found excellent agreement between the spatial dendrimer distributions obtained from the coarse-grained simulations with Φeff and the microscopically detailed simulations at low densities, where the macromolecules were distributed homogeneously in the system. However, the reliability of the coarse-grained simulations deteriorated significantly as the density was increased further and the cluster occupation became more polydisperse. Under these conditions, the effective pair potential of the coarse-grained model can no longer be computed by averaging over the whole system, but the local density needs to be taken into account instead.

  13. A CLUSTER IN THE MAKING: ALMA REVEALS THE INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR HIGH-MASS CLUSTER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rathborne, J. M.; Contreras, Y.; Longmore, S. N.; Bastian, N.; Jackson, J. M.; Alves, J. F.; Bally, J.; Foster, J. B.; Garay, G.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Testi, L.; Walsh, A. J.

    2015-04-01

    G0.253+0.016 is a molecular clump that appears to be on the verge of forming a high-mass cluster: its extremely low dust temperature, high mass, and high density, combined with its lack of prevalent star formation, make it an excellent candidate for an Arches-like cluster in a very early stage of formation. Here we present new Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array observations of its small-scale (∼0.07 pc) 3 mm dust continuum and molecular line emission from 17 different species that probe a range of distinct physical and chemical conditions. The data reveal a complex network of emission features with a complicated velocity structure: there is emission on all spatial scales, the morphology of which ranges from small, compact regions to extended, filamentary structures that are seen in both emission and absorption. The dust column density is well traced by molecules with higher excitation energies and critical densities, consistent with a clump that has a denser interior. A statistical analysis supports the idea that turbulence shapes the observed gas structure within G0.253+0.016. We find a clear break in the turbulent power spectrum derived from the optically thin dust continuum emission at a spatial scale of ∼0.1 pc, which may correspond to the spatial scale at which gravity has overcome the thermal pressure. We suggest that G0.253+0.016 is on the verge of forming a cluster from hierarchical, filamentary structures that arise from a highly turbulent medium. Although the stellar distribution within high-mass Arches-like clusters is compact, centrally condensed, and smooth, the observed gas distribution within G0.253+0.016 is extended, with no high-mass central concentration, and has a complex, hierarchical structure. If this clump gives rise to a high-mass cluster and its stars are formed from this initially hierarchical gas structure, then the resulting cluster must evolve into a centrally condensed structure via a dynamical process.

  14. RESONANT CLUMPING AND SUBSTRUCTURE IN GALACTIC DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, Matthew; Smith, Martin C.; Shen, Juntai; Evans, N. Wyn E-mail: msmith@shao.ac.cn E-mail: nwe@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2015-05-10

    We describe a method to extract resonant orbits from N-body simulations, exploiting the fact that they close in frames rotating with a constant pattern speed. Our method is applied to the N-body simulation of the Milky Way by Shen et al. This simulation hosts a massive bar, which drives strong resonances and persistent angular momentum exchange. Resonant orbits are found throughout the disk, both close to the bar and out to the very edges of the disk. Using Fourier spectrograms, we demonstrate that the bar is driving kinematic substructure even in the very outer parts of the disk. We identify two major orbit families in the outskirts of the disk, one of which makes significant contributions to the kinematic landscape, namely, the m:l = 3:−2 family, resonating with the bar. A mechanism is described that produces bimodal distributions of Galactocentric radial velocities at selected azimuths in the outer disk. It occurs as a result of the temporal coherence of particles on the 3:−2 resonant orbits, which causes them to arrive simultaneously at pericenter or apocenter. This resonant clumping, due to the in-phase motion of the particles through their epicycle, leads to both inward and outward moving groups that belong to the same orbital family and consequently produce bimodal radial velocity distributions. This is a possible explanation of the bimodal velocity distributions observed toward the Galactic anticenter by Liu et al. Another consequence is that transient overdensities appear and dissipate (in a symmetric fashion), resulting in a periodic pulsing of the disk’s surface density.

  15. Preparation and hydriding behavior of magnesium metal clusters formed in low-temperature cocondensation: application of magnesium for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, H.; Nobunaga, T.; Kawahigashi, M.; Tsuchiya, S.

    1984-08-01

    Magnesium metal clusters formed in low-temperature matrices were investigated with a view to forming the metal hydride. In practice, magnesium readily absorbed large amounts of hydrogen under more moderate conditions (P/sub H/sub 2// = 460 torr, T = 200-250/sup 0/C) when it had been transformed into tetrahydrofuran- (THF-) solvated small particles formed by the cocondensation reaction of magnesium atoms with THF molecules at -196/sup 0/C. To elucidate the characteristics of hydrogen sorption of Mg-THF, a comparative study with pure magnesium powder was carried out. It is believed from the H/sub 2/-D/sub 2/ isotope scrambling measurements that the high activity of the present Mg-THF system for hydrogen absorption is due to a rapid surface process in comparison with the case of the pure magnesium. This identification is reinforced by the employment of surface modification. 19 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  16. Clumped isotope calibration data for lacustrine carbonates: A progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, A.

    2015-12-01

    Our capacity to understand Earth's environmental history is highly dependent on the accuracy of reconstructions of past climates. Lake sediments provide important archives of terrestrial climate change, and represent an important tool for reconstructing paleohydrology, paleoclimate, paleoenvironment, and paleoaltimetry. Unfortunately, while multiple methods for constraining marine temperature exist, quantitative terrestrial proxies are scarcer - tree rings, speleothems, and leaf margin analyses have all been used with varying degrees of accuracy. Clumped isotope thermometry has the potential to be a useful instrument for determining terrestrial climates: multiple studies have shown the fraction of 13C—18O bonds in carbonates is inversely related to the temperature at which the rocks formed. We have been measuring the abundance of 13C18O16O in the CO2 produced by the dissolution of carbonate minerals in phosphoric acid in modern lake samples and comparing results to independently known estimates of lake water temperature. Here we discuss an extensive calibration dataset comprised of 132 analyses of 97 samples from 44 localities, including microbialites, tufas, and micrites endogenic carbonates, freshwater gastropods, bivalves, microbialites, and ooids.

  17. Nucleosynthesis and Clump Formation in a Core-Collapse Supernova.

    PubMed

    Kifonidis; Plewa; Janka; Müller

    2000-03-10

    High-resolution two-dimensional simulations were performed for the first 5 minutes of the evolution of a core-collapse supernova explosion in a 15 M middle dot in circle blue supergiant progenitor. The computations start shortly after bounce and include neutrino-matter interactions by using a lightbulb approximation for the neutrinos and a treatment of the nucleosynthesis due to explosive silicon and oxygen burning. We find that newly formed iron-group elements are distributed throughout the inner half of the helium core by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the (Ni + Si)/O and (C + O)/He interfaces, seeded by convective overturn during the early stages of the explosion. Fast-moving nickel mushrooms with velocities up to approximately 4000 km s-1 are observed. This offers a natural explanation for the mixing required in light-curve and spectral synthesis studies of Type Ib explosions. A continuation of the calculations to later times, however, indicates that the iron velocities observed in SN 1987A cannot be reproduced because of a strong deceleration of the clumps in the dense shell left behind by the shock at the He/H interface.

  18. Nucleosynthesis and Clump Formation in a Core-Collapse Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kifonidis, K.; Plewa, T.; Janka, H.-Th.; Müller, E.

    2000-03-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional simulations were performed for the first 5 minutes of the evolution of a core-collapse supernova explosion in a 15 Msolar blue supergiant progenitor. The computations start shortly after bounce and include neutrino-matter interactions by using a lightbulb approximation for the neutrinos and a treatment of the nucleosynthesis due to explosive silicon and oxygen burning. We find that newly formed iron-group elements are distributed throughout the inner half of the helium core by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the (Ni + Si)/O and (C + O)/He interfaces, seeded by convective overturn during the early stages of the explosion. Fast-moving nickel mushrooms with velocities up to ~4000 km s-1 are observed. This offers a natural explanation for the mixing required in light-curve and spectral synthesis studies of Type Ib explosions. A continuation of the calculations to later times, however, indicates that the iron velocities observed in SN 1987A cannot be reproduced because of a strong deceleration of the clumps in the dense shell left behind by the shock at the He/H interface.

  19. Stars and Star Clusters: A Look at Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Michael J.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Lau, Ryan M.

    2017-01-01

    Star-forming regions hosting intermediate-mass stars straddle the boundary separating the the low- and high-mass regimes. These intermediate-mass star-forming regions can be used to probe this transition from low- to high-mass star formation. Our team has assembled an all-sky catalog of 616 candidate intermediate-mass star forming regions (IMSFRs) selected by IRAS colors and refined by visual inspection of WISE imagery. We present here two outer-Galaxy star-forming regions, IRAS22451+6154 and IRAS23448+6010, that despite having similar IRAS colors and mid-infrared morphologies, have vastly different stellar content. We combine Gemini and IRTF NIR spectroscopy with WIYN and SOFIA imaging for a thorough look at the stellar content of these two regions.

  20. Initial conditions of formation of starburst clusters: constraints from stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    Recent high resolution observations of dense regions of molecular clouds and massive gaseous clumps with instruments like Herschel and ALMA have revealed intricate and filamentary overdensity structures in them. Such progenitors of massive starburst clusters are in contrast with smooth, centrally-pronounced profiles of the latter. In this work, we intend to constrain massive, substructured stellar distributions that would evolve to cluster-like profiles at very young ages (~Myr), as seen in starburst clusters. Taking the well observed NGC3603 Young Cluster (NYC) as an example, we compute the infall and final merger of filament-like compact (0.1-0.3 pc) subclusters, totalling 10000 M_sun, from a range of spatial scales and modes of sub-clustering, using direct N-body calculations. These calculations infer an allowable span of approx. 2.5 pc from which the subclusters can fall in a gas potential and merge to form a single centrally-dense structure in near dynamical equilibrium, within the young age of NYC (1-2 Myr). However, these merged clusters are too compact and centrally overdense compared to typical young clusters. Our N-body calculations, beginning from such compact initial conditions, show that even stellar wind and supernova mass loss, dynamical heating from retaining black holes, external tidal field and heating due to tight O-star binaries together cannot expand these clusters to their observed sizes, even in 100 Myr. Hence an explosive gas dispersal phase seems essential for forming starburst and other young clusters observed in the Milky Way and in the Local Group which can expand the clusters to their observed sizes and concentrations; including that for NYC with approx. 30% clump star formation efficiency. However, some observed massive but highly extended (>10 pc) , >10 Myr old clusters better fit a slow (several Myr timescale) gas dispersal from parsec-scale initial profiles, which can be the future of embedded systems like W3 Main.

  1. Search for OB stars running away from young star clusters. II. The NGC 6357 star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Kroupa, P.; Oh, S.

    2011-11-01

    Dynamical few-body encounters in the dense cores of young massive star clusters are responsible for the loss of a significant fraction of their massive stellar content. Some of the escaping (runaway) stars move through the ambient medium supersonically and can be revealed via detection of their bow shocks (visible in the infrared, optical or radio). In this paper, which is the second of a series of papers devoted to the search for OB stars running away from young ( ≲ several Myr) Galactic clusters and OB associations, we present the results of the search for bow shocks around the star-forming region NGC 6357. Using the archival data of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite and the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the preliminary data release of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we discovered seven bow shocks, whose geometry is consistent with the possibility that they are generated by stars expelled from the young (~1-2 Myr) star clusters, Pismis 24 and AH03 J1725-34.4, associated with NGC 6357. Two of the seven bow shocks are driven by the already known OB stars, HD 319881 and [N78] 34. Follow-up spectroscopy of three other bow-shock-producing stars showed that they are massive (O-type) stars as well, while the 2MASS photometry of the remaining two stars suggests that they could be B0 V stars, provided that both are located at the same distance as NGC 6357. Detection of numerous massive stars ejected from the very young clusters is consistent with the theoretical expectation that star clusters can effectively lose massive stars at the very beginning of their dynamical evolution (long before the second mechanism for production of runaway stars, based on a supernova explosion in a massive tight binary system, begins to operate) and lends strong support to the idea that probably all field OB stars have been dynamically ejected from their birth clusters. A by-product of our search for bow shocks around NGC 6357 is the detection of three circular

  2. The SCUBA-2 cosmology legacy survey: Ultraluminous star-forming galaxies in a z = 1.6 cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Edge, A. C.; Simpson, J. M.; Geach, J. E.; Tadaki, K.; Arumugam, V.; Dunlop, J. S.; Ivison, R. J.; Hartley, W.; Almaini, O.; Conselice, C.; Bremer, M. N.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S. C.; Scott, D.; Simpson, C. J.; Karim, A.; Kodama, T.; and others

    2014-02-10

    We analyze new SCUBA-2 submillimeter and archival SPIRE far-infrared imaging of a z = 1.62 cluster, Cl 0218.3–0510, which lies in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey/Ultra-Deep Survey field of the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. Combining these tracers of obscured star-formation activity with the extensive photometric and spectroscopic information available for this field, we identify 31 far-infrared/submillimeter-detected probable cluster members with bolometric luminosities ≳10{sup 12} L {sub ☉} and show that by virtue of their dust content and activity, these represent some of the reddest and brightest galaxies in this structure. We exploit ALMA submillimeter continuum observations, which cover one of these sources, to confirm the identification of a SCUBA-2-detected ultraluminous star-forming galaxy in this structure. Integrating the total star-formation activity in the central region of the structure, we estimate that it is an order of magnitude higher (in a mass-normalized sense) than clusters at z ∼ 0.5-1. However, we also find that the most active cluster members do not reside in the densest regions of the structure, which instead host a population of passive and massive, red galaxies. We suggest that while the passive and active populations have comparable near-infrared luminosities at z = 1.6, M{sub H} ∼ –23, the subsequent stronger fading of the more active galaxies means that they will evolve into passive systems at the present day that are less luminous than the descendants of those galaxies that were already passive at z ∼ 1.6 (M{sub H} ∼ –20.5 and M{sub H} ∼ –21.5, respectively, at z ∼ 0). We conclude that the massive galaxy population in the dense cores of present-day clusters were already in place at z = 1.6 and that in Cl 0218.3–0510 we are seeing continuing infall of less extreme, but still ultraluminous, star-forming galaxies onto a pre-existing structure.

  3. Physical properties of high-mass clumps in different stages of evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetti, A.; Brand, J.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Fontani, F.; Cesaroni, R.; Beltrán, M. T.; Molinari, S.; Dodson, R.; Rioja, M. J.

    2013-08-01

    Context. The details of the process of massive star formation are still elusive. A complete characterization of the first stages of the process from an observational point of view is needed to constrain theories on the subject. In the past 20 years we have made a thorough investigation of colour-selected IRAS sources over the whole sky. The sources in the northern hemisphere were studied in detail and used to derive an evolutionary sequence based on their spectral energy distribution. Aims: To investigate the first stages of the process of high-mass star formation, we selected a sample of massive clumps previously observed with the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope at 1.2 mm and with the ATNF Australia Telescope Compact Array at 1.3 cm. We want to characterize the physical conditions in such sources, and test whether their properties depend on the evolutionary stage of the clump. Methods: With ATCA we observed the selected sources in the NH3(1, 1) and (2, 2) transitions and in the H2O(616-523) maser line. Ammonia lines are a very good temperature probe that allow us to accurately determine the mass and the column, volume, and surface densities of the clumps. We also collected all data available to construct the spectral energy distribution of the individual clumps and to determine if star formation is already occurring through observations of its most common signposts, thus putting constraints on the evolutionary stage of the source. We fitted the spectral energy distribution between 1.2 mm and 70 μm with a modified black body to derive the dust temperature and independently determine the mass. Results: We find that the clumps are cold (T ~ 10-30 K), massive (M ~ 102-103 M⊙), and dense (n(H2) ≳ 105 cm-3) and that they have high column densities (N(H2) ~ 1023 cm-2). All clumps appear to be potentially able to form high-mass stars. The most massive clumps appear to be gravitationally unstable, if the only sources of support against collapse are turbulence and

  4. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy and Chemical History of Star-forming Galaxies in the Hercules Cluster: The Effects of the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, V.; Vílchez, J.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Papaderos, P.; Magrini, L.; Cedrés, B.; Reverte, D.

    2011-06-01

    Spatially resolved spectroscopy has been obtained for a sample of 27 star-forming (SF) galaxies selected from our deep Hα survey of the Hercules cluster. We have applied spectral synthesis models to all emission-line spectra of this sample using the population synthesis code STARLIGHT and have obtained fundamental parameters of stellar components such as mean metallicity and age. The emission-line spectra were corrected for underlying stellar absorption using these spectral synthesis models. Line fluxes were measured and O/H and N/O gas chemical abundances were obtained using the latest empirical calibrations. We have derived the masses and total luminosities of the galaxies using available Sloan Digital Sky Survey broadband photometry. The effects of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of galaxies and on their mass-metallicity (MZ) and luminosity-metallicity (LZ) relations were studied by combining the derived gas metallicities, the mean stellar metallicities and ages, the masses and luminosities of the galaxies, and their existing H I data. Our Hercules SF galaxies are divided into three main subgroups: (1) chemically evolved spirals with truncated ionized-gas disks and nearly flat oxygen gradients, demonstrating the effect of ram-pressure stripping; (2) chemically evolved dwarfs/irregulars populating the highest local densities, possible products of tidal interactions in preprocessing events; and (3) less metallic dwarf galaxies that appear to be "newcomers" to the cluster and are experiencing pressure-triggered star formation. Most Hercules SF galaxies follow well-defined MZ and LZ sequences (for both O/H and N/O), though the dwarf/irregular galaxies located at the densest regions appear to be outliers to these global relations, suggesting a physical reason for the dispersion in these fundamental relations. The Hercules cluster appears to be currently assembling via the merger of smaller substructures, providing an ideal laboratory where the local

  5. Systematic assessment of coordinated activity cliffs formed by kinase inhibitors and detailed characterization of activity cliff clusters and associated SAR information.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-27

    From currently available kinase inhibitors and their activity data, clusters of coordinated activity cliffs were systematically derived and subjected to cluster index and index map analysis. Type I-like inhibitors with well-defined IC50 measurements were found to provide a large knowledge base of activity cliff clusters for 266 targets from nine kinase groups. On the basis of index map analysis, these clusters were systematically organized according to structural similarity of inhibitors and activity cliff diversity and prioritized for structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis. From prioritized clusters, interpretable SAR information can be extracted. It is also shown that activity cliff clusters formed by ATP site-directed inhibitors often represent local SAR environments of rather different complexity and interpretability. In addition, activity cliff clusters including promiscuous kinase inhibitors have been determined. Only a small subset of inhibitors was found to change activity cliff roles in different clusters. The activity cliff clusters described herein and their index map organization substantially enrich SAR information associated with kinase inhibitors in compound subsets of limited size. The cluster and index map information is made available upon request to provide opportunities for further SAR exploration. On the basis of our analysis and the data provided, activity cliff clusters and corresponding inhibitor series for kinase targets of interest can be readily selected.

  6. How to form asteroids from mm-sized grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, D.; Johansen, A.; Davies, M. B.

    2015-10-01

    The size distribution of asteroids in the solar system suggests that they formed top-down, with 100-1000 km bodies forming from the gravitational collapse of dense clumps of small solid particles. We investigate the conditions under which solid particles can form dense clumps in a protoplanetary disc. We used a hydrodynamic code to model the solid-gas interaction in disc. We found that particles down to millimeter size can form dense clumps, but only in regions where solids make ˜8% of the local surface density. More generally, we mapped the range of particle sizes and concentrations that is consistent with the formation of particle clumps.

  7. Radiation Pressure on Bacterial Clumps in the Solar Vicinity and Their Survival Between Interstellar Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Wickramasinghe, J. T.

    Radiation pressure cross-sections for clumps of hollow bacterial grains with thin coatings of graphite are calculated using rigorous Guttler formulae. The carbonized skins are expected to form through exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation, but a limiting thickness of about 0.03 μm is determined by opacity effects. The ratios of radiation pressure to gravity P/G are calculated for varying sizes of the clumps and for varying thickness of the graphite coatings. Bacterial clumps and individual desiccated bacteria without coatings of radii in the range 0.3-8 μm have P/G ratios less than unity, whereas particles with coatings of 0.02 μm thickness have ratios in excess of unity. Such coatings also provide protection from damaging ultraviolet radiation. Putative cometary bacteria, such as have been recently collected in the stratosphere, are thus not gravitationally bound in the solar system provided they possess carbonised exterior coatings. They are rapidly expelled from the solar system reaching nearby protosolar nebulae in timescales of a few million years. Even with the most pessimistic assumptions galactic cosmic rays are unable to diminish viability to an extent that vitiates the continuity of panspermia.

  8. Properties of Starless Clumps through Protoclusters from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Brian E.; Shirley, Yancy

    2014-07-01

    High mass stars play a key role in the physical and chemical evolution of the interstellar medium, yet the evolution of physical properties for high-mass star-forming regions remains unclear. We sort a sample of ~4668 molecular cloud clumps from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) into different evolutionary stages by combining the BGPS 1.1 mm continuum and observational diagnostics of star-formation activity from a variety of Galactic plane surveys: 70 um compact sources, mid-IR color-selected YSOs, H2O and CH3OH masers, EGOs, and UCHII regions. We apply Monte Carlo techniques to distance probability distribution functions (DPDFs) in order to marginalize over the kinematic distance ambiguity and calculate distributions for derived quantities of clumps in different evolutionary stages. We also present a combined NH3 and H2O maser catalog for ~1590 clumps from the literature and our own GBT 100m observations. We identify a sub-sample of 440 dense clumps with no star-formation indicators, representing the largest and most robust sample of pre-protocluster candidates from a blind survey to date. Distributions of I(HCO+), I(N2H+), dv(HCO+), dv(N2H+), mass surface density, and kinetic temperature show strong progressions when separated by evolutionary stage. No progressions are found in size or dust mass; however, weak progressions are observed in area > 2 pc^2 and dust mass > 3 10^3 Msun. An observed breakdown occurs in the size-linewidth relationship and we find no improvement when sampling by evolutionary stage.

  9. H-ATLAS: a candidate high redshift cluster/protocluster of star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, D. L.; Braglia, F.; Petitpas, G.; Greenslade, J.; Cooray, A.; Valiante, E.; De Zotti, G.; O'Halloran, B.; Holdship, J.; Morris, B.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Herranz, D.; Riechers, D.; Baes, M.; Bremer, M.; Bourne, N.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dariush, A.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Leeuw, L. L.; Maddox, S.; Michałowski, M. J.; Negrello, M.; Omont, A.; Oteo, I.; Serjeant, S.; Valtchanov, I.; Vieira, J. D.; Wardlow, J.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the region around the Planck-detected z = 3.26 gravitationally lensed galaxy HATLAS J114637.9-001132 (hereinafter HATLAS12-00) using both archival Herschel data from the H-ATLAS survey and using submm data obtained with both LABOCA and SCUBA2. The lensed source is found to be surrounded by a strong overdensity of both Herschel-SPIRE sources and submm sources. We detect 17 bright (S870 > ˜7 mJy) sources at >4σ closer than 5 arcmin to the lensed object at 850/870 μm. 10 of these sources have good cross-identifications with objects detected by Herschel-SPIRE which have redder colours than other sources in the field, with 350 μm flux >250 μm flux, suggesting that they lie at high redshift. Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations localise one of these companions to ˜1 arcsec, allowing unambiguous cross identification with a 3.6 and 4.5 μm Spitzer source. The optical/near-IR spectral energy distribution of this source is measured by further observations and found to be consistent with z > 2, but incompatible with lower redshifts. We conclude that this system may be a galaxy cluster/protocluster or larger scale structure that contains a number of galaxies undergoing starbursts at the same time.

  10. North African Jewish and non-Jewish populations form distinctive, orthogonal clusters

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christopher L.; Palamara, Pier F.; Dubrovsky, Maya; Botigué, Laura R.; Fellous, Marc; Atzmon, Gil; Oddoux, Carole; Pearlman, Alexander; Hao, Li; Henn, Brenna M.; Burns, Edward; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Comas, David; Friedman, Eitan; Pe'er, Itsik; Ostrer, Harry

    2012-01-01

    North African Jews constitute the second largest Jewish Diaspora group. However, their relatedness to each other; to European, Middle Eastern, and other Jewish Diaspora groups; and to their former North African non-Jewish neighbors has not been well defined. Here, genome-wide analysis of five North African Jewish groups (Moroccan, Algerian, Tunisian, Djerban, and Libyan) and comparison with other Jewish and non-Jewish groups demonstrated distinctive North African Jewish population clusters with proximity to other Jewish populations and variable degrees of Middle Eastern, European, and North African admixture. Two major subgroups were identified by principal component, neighbor joining tree, and identity-by-descent analysis—Moroccan/Algerian and Djerban/Libyan—that varied in their degree of European admixture. These populations showed a high degree of endogamy and were part of a larger Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jewish group. By principal component analysis, these North African groups were orthogonal to contemporary populations from North and South Morocco, Western Sahara, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. Thus, this study is compatible with the history of North African Jews—founding during Classical Antiquity with proselytism of local populations, followed by genetic isolation with the rise of Christianity and then Islam, and admixture following the emigration of Sephardic Jews during the Inquisition. PMID:22869716

  11. The clustering properties of radio-selected AGN and star-forming galaxies up to redshifts z ˜ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Popesso, P.; Brusa, M.; Salvato, M.; Laigle, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Ilbert, O.

    2017-01-01

    We present the clustering properties of a complete sample of 968 radio sources detected at 1.4 GHz by the Very Large Array (VLA)-COSMOS survey with radio fluxes brighter than 0.15 mJy. 92 per cent have redshift determinations from the Laigle et al. catalogue. Based on their radio luminosity, these objects have been divided into 644 AGN and 247 star-forming galaxies. By fixing the slope of the autocorrelation function to γ = 2, we find r_0=11.7^{+1.0}_{-1.1} Mpc for the clustering length of the whole sample, while r_0=11.2^{+2.5}_{-3.3} Mpc and r_0=7.8^{+1.6}_{-2.1} Mpc (r_0=6.8^{+1.4}_{-1.8} Mpc for z ≤ 0.9) are, respectively, obtained for AGN and star-forming galaxies. These values correspond to minimum masses for dark matter haloes of M_min=10^{13.6^{+0.3}_{-0.6}} M⊙ for radio-selected AGN and M_min=10^{13.1^{+0.4}_{-1.6}} M⊙ for radio-emitting star-forming galaxies (M_min=10^{12.7^{+0.7}_{-2.2}} M⊙ for z ≤ 0.9). Comparisons with previous works imply an independence of the clustering properties of the AGN population with respect to both radio luminosity and redshift. We also investigate the relationship between dark and luminous matter in both populations. We obtain /Mhalo ≲ 10- 2.7 for AGN, and /Mhalo ≲ 10- 2.4 in the case of star-forming galaxies. Furthermore, if we restrict to z ≲ 0.9 star-forming galaxies, we derive /Mhalo ≲ 10- 2.1, result that clearly shows the cosmic process of stellar build-up as one moves towards the more local universe. Comparisons between the observed space density of radio-selected AGN and that of dark matter haloes show that about one in two haloes is associated with a black hole in its radio-active phase. This suggests that the radio-active phase is a recurrent phenomenon.

  12. From Gas to Stars in Energetic Environments: Chemistry of Clumps in Giant Molecular Clouds Within the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Crystal N.; Meier, David S.; Ott, Juergen; Hughes, Annie; Wong, Tony H.

    2015-01-01

    We present parsec scale interferometric maps of HCN and HCO^{+} emission from dense gas in the star-forming region 30 Doradus, obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). This extreme star-forming region, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), is characterized by a very intense ultraviolet ionizing radiation field and sub-solar metallicity, both of which are expected to impact molecular cloud structure. We detect 13 bright, dense clumps within the 30 Doradus-10 giant molecular cloud. Some of the clumps are aligned along a filamentary structure with a characteristic spacing that is consistent with formation via the varicose fluid instability. Our analysis shows that the filament is gravitationally unstable and collapsing to form stars. There is a good correlation between HCO^{+} emission in the filament and signatures of recent star formation activity including H_{2}O masers and young stellar objects (YSOs). We present detailed comparisons of clump properties (masses, linewidths, sizes) in 30Dor-10 to those in other star forming regions of the LMC (N159, N113, N105, N44). Our analysis shows that the 30 Doradus-10 clumps have similar mass but wider linewidths and similar HCN/HCO^{+} (1-0) line ratios as clumps detected in other LMC star-forming regions. Our results suggest that the dense molecular gas clumps in the interior of 30Dor-10 are well-shielded against the intense ionizing field that is present in the 30 Doradus region. We also present preliminary results from follow up observations with the ATCA of a several molecular lines detected from the brightest clumps in 30 Doradus-10, N113 and N159W. The maps cover the following dense gas, photo-dominated regions (PDRs), and shock tracers: HCN, HCO^{+}, C_{2}H, SiO, HNCO, SiS, N_{2}H^{+}, CS, CH_{3}H, CH_{3}CN, {13}^CS, OCS, H_{2}, {34}^CS. These giant molecular clouds have varying radiation fields and energetics. We compare the chemistry within these giant molecular clouds to one another to

  13. Clump formation through colliding stellar winds in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón, Diego

    2016-07-01

    The gas cloud G2 is currently being tidally disrupted by the Galactic Center super-massive black hole, Sgr A*. The region around the black hole is populated by ˜30 Wolf-Rayet stars, which produce strong outflows. Following an analytical approach, we explore the possibility that gas clumps, such as G2, originate from the collision of identical stellar winds via the Non-Linear Thin Shell Instability. We have found that the collision of relatively slow (<750 km s^{-1}) and strong (˜10^{-5} M_{⊙} yr^{-1}) stellar winds from stars at short separations (<2000 AU) is a process that indeed could produce clumps of G2's mass and above. Such short separation encounters of single stars along their orbits are not common in the Galactic Centre, however close binaries, such as IRS 16SW, are promising clump sources (see Calderón et al. 2016). We also present the first results of 2D models of colliding wind systems using the hydrodynamics adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES, aiming to obtain a clump mass function, and the rate of clump formation and ejection to the ISM. We study the effect of parameters such as wind properties, stellar separation and orbital motion, in order to understand how likely the formation of G2 is in this context.

  14. Equilibrium temperature in a clump of bacteria heated in fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, K R

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical model was developed and used to estimate quantitatively the "worst case", i.e., the longest, time to reach equilibrium temperature in the center of a clump of bacteria heated in fluid. For clumps with 10 to 10(6) cells heated in vapor, such as dry and moist air, and liquid fluids such as purees and juices, predictions show that temperature equilibrium will occur with sterilization temperatures up to 130 degrees C in under 0.02 s. Model development highlighted that the controlling influence on time for heating up the clump is the surface convection thermal resistance and that the internal conduction resistance of the clump mass is negligible by comparison. The time for a clump to reach equilibrium sterilization temperature was therefore decreased with relative turbulence (velocity) of the heating fluid, such as occurs in many process operations. These results confirm widely held suppositions that the heat-up time of bacteria in vapor or liquid is not significant with usual sterilization times. PMID:2306095

  15. PARTICLE CLUMPING AND PLANETESIMAL FORMATION DEPEND STRONGLY ON METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, Anders; Youdin, Andrew; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2009-10-20

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of particle clumping and planetesimal formation in protoplanetary disks with varying amounts of solid material. As centimeter-size pebbles settle to the mid-plane, turbulence develops through vertical shearing and streaming instabilities. We find that when the pebble-to-gas column density ratio is 0.01, corresponding roughly to solar metallicity, clumping is weak, so the pebble density rarely exceeds the gas density. Doubling the column density ratio leads to a dramatic increase in clumping, with characteristic particle densities more than 10 times the gas density and maximum densities reaching several thousand times the gas density. This is consistent with unstratified simulations of the streaming instability that show strong clumping in particle-dominated flows. The clumps readily contract gravitationally into interacting planetesimals on the order of 100 km in radius. Our results suggest that the correlation between host star metallicity and exoplanets may reflect the early stages of planet formation. We further speculate that initially low-metallicity disks can be particle enriched during the gas dispersal phase, leading to a late burst of planetesimal formation.

  16. Numerical experiments on galaxy clustering in open universes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical studies were performed on the dynamical effects on the evolution of clumps, filaments, voids, and galaxy clusters by various final Omega values. The final Omega values examined ranged from 0.03-1, and attention was given to defining observations of superclusters which would aid in determining an actual value for Omega. The numerical trials consisted of n-body integration programs governed by the total expansion and final Omega value and included comparisons between results for open and closed universes. All runs started from the same initial conditions. The dispersion trajectories of particles and the final galactic cluster forms were found to be equivalent, regardless of the final Omega value. The possibility of deriving a value for Omega from velocity data on galaxies which have not yet joined clusters is discussed.

  17. Calibration of the carbonate `clumped isotope' paleotemperature proxy using mollusc shells and benthic foraminiferal tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Came, R. E.; Curry, W. B.; Weidman, C. R.; Eiler, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    It has recently been shown that the carbonate `clumped isotope' thermometer can provide temperature constraints that depend only on the isotopic composition of carbonate (in particular, on the proportion of 13C and 18O that form bonds with each other), and that do not require assumptions about the isotopic composition of the water in which the carbonate formed (Ghosh et al., 2006). Furthermore, this novel method permits the calculation of seawater δ18O based on the clumped isotope temperature estimates and the simultaneously obtained δ18O of carbonate, thereby enabling the extraction of global ice volume estimates for both the recent and distant geologic past. Here we present clumped isotope analyses of several naturally occurring marine carbonates that calcified at known temperatures in the modern ocean. First, we analyzed benthic foraminiferal tests from six high-quality multicore tops collected in the Florida Strait, spanning a temperature range of 9.3-20.2 degrees C. Second, we analyzed shallow-water mollusc shells from a variety of different climate regimes, spanning a temperature range of 2.5-26.0 degrees C. We find that the calcitic foraminiferal species Cibicidoides spp. agrees well with the inorganic calcite precipitation experiments of Ghosh et al. (2006), while the aragonitic species Hoeglundina elegans is significantly offset. Similarly, clumped isotope results obtained from aragonitic mollusc shells also reveal an offset from the Ghosh et al. (2006) trend, although the offset observed in mollusc aragonite is quite different in nature from that observed in foraminiferal aragonite. Assuming our estimates of the growth temperatures of these naturally occurring organisms are correct, these results suggest that there are vital effects associated with the stable isotope compositions of the aragonite-precipitating organisms examined in this study; further work will be required to determine their cause. Nevertheless, the internal coherence of trends for

  18. Clumped isotope geochemistry of mid-Cretaceous (Barremian-Aptian) rudist shells: paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, S.; Steuber, T.; Bernasconi, S.; Weissert, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Cretaceous period is generally considered to have been a time of climate warmth, but there is an ongoing dispute about the existence of Cretaceous cool episodes - including the short-termed installation of polar ice caps. The Late Barremian-Early Aptian represents a Cretaceous key interval in terms of paleoclimate and paleoceanography, as it provides evidence for (i) a cooler climate (Pucéat et al., 2003) and (ii) a considerable seasonality of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) at low latitudes (Steuber et al., 2005). The timing and significance of these cool episodes, however, are not well constrained. Recently published TEX86 data, in contrast to oxygen isotope paleotemperature estimates, now are in support of a climate scenario with equable hot (~30° C) tropical SSTs from the Early Cretaceous onwards. The aim of this project is to reconstruct the evolution of Barremian-Aptian sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the tropical Tethyan realm by use of a combined geochemical approach including oxygen isotope analysis and carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry. Paleotemperature proxies are based on the isotope geochemistry of low-Mg calcite of pristine rudist bivalve shells (Toucasia, Requienia) collected from different carbonate platform settings, including the Provence platform in SE France and the Adriatic Carbonate platform in Croatia. Carbonate clumped-isotope geochemistry deals with the state of ordering of rare isotopes in molecules, in particular with their tendency to form bonds with other rare isotopes (13C-18O) rather than with the most abundant ones. Carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry has been shown to allow for reconstructing (i) the temperature of carbonate mineral formation and calculating (ii) the isotopic composition of the water from which carbonate minerals were formed (by using the δ18O of the analysed carbonate sample). Our approach seeks to provide insights into possible biases in temperature estimates of different paleothermometers

  19. Methane cycling. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane.

    PubMed

    Wang, David T; Gruen, Danielle S; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C; Holden, James F; Hristov, Alexander N; Pohlman, John W; Morrill, Penny L; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B; Reeves, Eoghan P; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N; Ritter, Daniel J; Seewald, Jeffrey S; McIntosh, Jennifer C; Hemond, Harold F; Kubo, Michael D; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-04-24

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle, with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply substituted "clumped" isotopologues (for example, (13)CH3D) has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures. However, the effect of biological processes on methane's clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on (13)CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation-temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  20. COSMIC REIONIZATION ON COMPUTERS. III. THE CLUMPING FACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. E-mail: gnedin@fnal.gov

    2015-09-10

    We use fully self-consistent numerical simulations of cosmic reionization, completed under the Cosmic Reionization On Computers project, to explore how well the recombinations in the ionized intergalactic medium (IGM) can be quantified by the effective “clumping factor.” The density distribution in the simulations (and, presumably, in a real universe) is highly inhomogeneous and more-or-less smoothly varying in space. However, even in highly complex and dynamic environments, the concept of the IGM remains reasonably well-defined; the largest ambiguity comes from the unvirialized regions around galaxies that are over-ionized by the local enhancement in the radiation field (“proximity zones”). That ambiguity precludes computing the IGM clumping factor to better than about 20%. We also discuss a “local clumping factor,” defined over a particular spatial scale, and quantify its scatter on a given scale and its variation as a function of scale.

  1. Cosmic Reionization On Computers III. The Clumping Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2015-09-09

    We use fully self-consistent numerical simulations of cosmic reionization, completed under the Cosmic Reionization On Computers project, to explore how well the recombinations in the ionized intergalactic medium (IGM) can be quantified by the effective "clumping factor." The density distribution in the simulations (and, presumably, in a real universe) is highly inhomogeneous and more-or-less smoothly varying in space. However, even in highly complex and dynamic environments, the concept of the IGM remains reasonably well-defined; the largest ambiguity comes from the unvirialized regions around galaxies that are over-ionized by the local enhancement in the radiation field ("proximity zones"). This ambiguity precludes computing the IGM clumping factor to better than about 20%. Furthermore, we discuss a "local clumping factor," defined over a particular spatial scale, and quantify its scatter on a given scale and its variation as a function of scale.

  2. Cosmic Reionization On Computers III. The Clumping Factor

    DOE PAGES

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2015-09-09

    We use fully self-consistent numerical simulations of cosmic reionization, completed under the Cosmic Reionization On Computers project, to explore how well the recombinations in the ionized intergalactic medium (IGM) can be quantified by the effective "clumping factor." The density distribution in the simulations (and, presumably, in a real universe) is highly inhomogeneous and more-or-less smoothly varying in space. However, even in highly complex and dynamic environments, the concept of the IGM remains reasonably well-defined; the largest ambiguity comes from the unvirialized regions around galaxies that are over-ionized by the local enhancement in the radiation field ("proximity zones"). This ambiguity precludesmore » computing the IGM clumping factor to better than about 20%. Furthermore, we discuss a "local clumping factor," defined over a particular spatial scale, and quantify its scatter on a given scale and its variation as a function of scale.« less

  3. Isotope geochemistry. Biological signatures in clumped isotopes of O₂.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Laurence Y; Ash, Jeanine L; Young, Edward D

    2015-04-24

    The abundances of molecules containing more than one rare isotope have been applied broadly to determine formation temperatures of natural materials. These applications of "clumped" isotopes rely on the assumption that isotope-exchange equilibrium is reached, or at least approached, during the formation of those materials. In a closed-system terrarium experiment, we demonstrate that biological oxygen (O2) cycling drives the clumped-isotope composition of O2 away from isotopic equilibrium. Our model of the system suggests that unique biological signatures are present in clumped isotopes of O2—and not formation temperatures. Photosynthetic O2 is depleted in (18)O(18)O and (17)O(18)O relative to a stochastic distribution of isotopes, unlike at equilibrium, where heavy-isotope pairs are enriched. Similar signatures may be widespread in nature, offering new tracers of biological and geochemical cycling.

  4. STAR-FORMING REGION Sh 2-233IR. I. DEEP NEAR-INFRARED OBSERVATIONS TOWARD THE EMBEDDED STELLAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Chi-Hung; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Su, Yu-Nang; Minh, Y. C.; Ginsburg, Adam

    2010-09-01

    We observed the Sh 2-233IR (S233IR) region with better sensitivity in the near-infrared than in previous studies of this region. By applying statistical subtraction of the background stars, we identified member sources and derived the age and mass of three distinguishable sub-groups in this region: Sh 2-233IR NE, Sh 2-233IR SW, and the 'distributed stars' over the whole cloud. Star formation may occur sequentially with a relatively small age difference ({approx}0.2-0.3 Myr) between subclusters. We found that the slopes for the initial mass function ({Gamma} {approx} -0.5) of two subclusters are flatter than those of Salpeter, which suggests that more massive stars were preferentially formed in those clusters compared to other Galactic star-forming regions. These subclusters may not result from the overall collapse of the whole cloud, but have formed by triggering before the previous star formation activities disturbed the natal molecular cloud. Additionally, high star formation efficiency ({approx}>40%) of the subclusters may also suggest that stars form very efficiently in the center of the northeast.

  5. The Application of Methane Clumped Isotope Measurements to Determine the Source of Large Methane Seeps in Alaskan Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, P. M.; Stolper, D. A.; Eiler, J. M.; Sessions, A. L.; Walter Anthony, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Natural methane emissions from the Arctic present an important potential feedback to global warming. Arctic methane emissions may come from either active microbial sources or from deep fossil reservoirs released by the thawing of permafrost and melting of glaciers. It is often difficult to distinguish between and quantify contributions from these methane sources based on stable isotope data. Analyses of methane clumped isotopes (isotopologues with two or more rare isotopes such as 13CH3D) can complement traditional stable isotope-based classifications of methane sources. This is because clumped isotope abundances (for isotopically equilibrated systems) are a function of temperature and can be used to identify pathways of methane generation. Additionally, distinctive effects of mixing on clumped isotope abundances make this analysis valuable for determining the origins of mixed gasses. We find large variability in clumped isotope compositions of methane from seeps in several lakes, including thermokarst lakes, across Alaska. At Lake Sukok in northern Alaska we observe the emission of dominantly thermogenic methane, with a formation temperature of at least 100° C. At several other lakes we find evidence for mixing between thermogenic methane and biogenic methane that forms in low-temperature isotopic equilibrium. For example, at Eyak Lake in southeastern Alaska, analysis of three methane samples results in a distinctive isotopic mixing line between a high-temperature end-member that formed between 100-170° C, and a biogenic end-member that formed in isotopic equilibrium between 0-20° C. In this respect, biogenic methane in these lakes resembles observations from marine gas seeps, oil degradation, and sub-surface aquifers. Interestingly, at Goldstream Lake in interior Alaska, methane with strongly depleted clumped-isotope abundances, indicative of disequilibrium gas formation, is found, similar to observations from methanogen culture experiments.

  6. Multiple clusters of release sites formed by individual thalamic afferents onto cortical interneurons ensure reliable transmission.

    PubMed

    Bagnall, Martha W; Hull, Court; Bushong, Eric A; Ellisman, Mark H; Scanziani, Massimo

    2011-07-14

    Thalamic afferents supply the cortex with sensory information by contacting both excitatory neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Interestingly, thalamic contacts with interneurons constitute such a powerful synapse that even one afferent can fire interneurons, thereby driving feedforward inhibition. However, the spatial representation of this potent synapse on interneuron dendrites is poorly understood. Using Ca imaging and electron microscopy we show that an individual thalamic afferent forms multiple contacts with the interneuronal proximal dendritic arbor, preferentially near branch points. More contacts are correlated with larger amplitude synaptic responses. Each contact, consisting of a single bouton, can release up to seven vesicles simultaneously, resulting in graded and reliable Ca transients. Computational modeling indicates that the release of multiple vesicles at each contact minimally reduces the efficiency of the thalamic afferent in exciting the interneuron. This strategy preserves the spatial representation of thalamocortical inputs across the dendritic arbor over a wide range of release conditions.

  7. Preparing transition-metal clusters in known structural forms: The mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectrum of V3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Mark S.; Mackenzie, Stuart R.

    2005-08-01

    The first results are presented of a new experiment designed both to generate and characterize spectroscopically individual isomers of transition-metal cluster cations. As a proof of concept the one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectrum of V3 has been recorded in the region of 44000-45000cm-1. This study extends the range of a previous zero-kinetic-energy (ZEKE) photoelectron study of Yang et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 231, 177 (1994)] with which the current results are compared. The MATI spectra reported here exhibit surprisingly high resolution (0.2cm-1) for this technique despite the use of large discrimination and extraction fields. Analysis of the rotational profile of the origin band allows assignment of the V3 ground state as A1'2 and the V3+ ground state as A2'3, both with D3h geometry, in agreement with the density-functional theory study of the V3 ZEKE spectrum by Calaminici et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 4036 (2001)]. There is also some evidence in the spectrum of transitions to the low-lying A1'1 excited state of the ion. The vibrational structure observed in the MATI spectrum is, however, significantly different to and less extensive than that predicted in the density-functional theory study. Possible reasons for the discrepancies are discussed and an alternative assignment is proposed which results in revised values for the vibrational wave numbers of both the neutral and ionic states. These studies demonstrate the efficient generation of cluster ions in known structural (isomeric) forms and pave the way for the study of cluster reactivity as a function of geometrical structure.

  8. Gaps in globular cluster streams: giant molecular clouds can cause them too

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorisco, Nicola C.; Gómez, Facundo A.; Vegetti, Simona; White, Simon D. M.

    2016-11-01

    As a result of their internal dynamical coherence, thin stellar streams formed by disrupting globular clusters (GCs) can act as detectors of dark matter (DM) substructure in the Galactic halo. Perturbations induced by close flybys amplify into detectable density gaps, providing a probe both of the abundance and of the masses of DM subhaloes. Here, we use N-body simulations to show that the Galactic population of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) can also produce gaps (and clumps) in GC streams, and so may confuse the detection of DM subhaloes. We explore the cases of streams analogous to the observed Palomar 5 and GD1 systems, quantifying the expected incidence of structure caused by GMC perturbations. Deep observations should detect such disturbances regardless of the substructure content of the Milky Way's halo. Detailed modelling will be needed to demonstrate that any detected gaps or clumps were produced by DM subhaloes rather than by molecular clouds.

  9. Formation and evolution of clumpy tidal tails in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, P.; Miocchi, P.; Capuzzo Dolcetta, R.

    2004-05-01

    Numerical simulations of a globular cluster orbiting in the central region of a triaxial galaxy have been performed, in order to study the formation and subsequent evolution of tidal tails and their main features. Tails begin to form after about a quarter of the cluster orbital period and tend to lie along its orbit, with a leading tail that precedes the cluster and an outer tail that trails behind it. Tails show clumpy substructures; the most prominent ones (for a globular cluster moving on a quasi-circular orbit around the galaxy) are located at a distance from the cluster center between 50 pc and 80 pc and, after 3 orbital periods, contain about 10% of the cluster mass at that epoch. The morphology of tails and clumps will be compared with available observational data, in particular with that concerning Palomar 5, for which evident clumps in the tails have been detected. Kinematical properties of stars in the tails (line-of-sight velocities and velocity dispersion profiles) will be presented and compared to kinematical data of M15 and ω Centauri, two galactic globular clusters for which there is evidence that the velocity dispersion remains constant at large radii. All the simulations have been performed with our own implementation of a tree-code, that uses a multipolar expansion of the potential truncated at the quadrupole moment and that ran on high performance computers employing an original parallelization approach implemented via MPI routines. The time-integration of the `particles' trajectories is performed by a 2nd order leap-frog algorithm, using individual and variable time-steps. Part of this work has been done using the IBM SP4 platform located at CINECA (Bologna, Italy) thanks to the grant inarm007 obtained in the framework of INAF-CINECA agreements.

  10. Clumped-isotope thermometry of magnesium carbonates in ultramafic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García del Real, Pablo; Maher, Kate; Kluge, Tobias; Bird, Dennis K.; Brown, Gordon E.; John, Cédric M.

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium carbonate minerals produced by reaction of H2O-CO2 with ultramafic rocks occur in a wide range of paragenetic and tectonic settings and can thus provide insights into a variety of geologic processes, including (1) deposition of ore-grade, massive-vein cryptocrystalline magnesite; (2) formation of hydrous magnesium carbonates in weathering environments; and (3) metamorphic carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks. However, the application of traditional geochemical and isotopic methods to infer temperatures of mineralization, the nature of mineralizing fluids, and the mechanisms controlling the transformation of dissolved CO2 into magnesium carbonates in these settings is difficult because the fluids are usually not preserved. Clumped-isotope compositions of magnesium carbonates provide a means to determine primary mineralization or (re)equilibration temperature, which permits the reconstruction of geologic processes that govern magnesium carbonate formation. We first provide an evaluation of the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates using synthetic magnesite and hydromagnesite, along with natural metamorphic magnesite and low-temperature hydromagnesite precipitated within a mine adit. We show that the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates is virtually indistinguishable from other carbonate acid fractionation corrections given current mass spectrometer resolution and error. In addition, we employ carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry on natural magnesium carbonates from various geologic environments and tectonic settings. Cryptocrystalline magnesite vein deposits from California (Red Mountain magnesite mine), Austria (Kraubath locality), Turkey (Tutluca mine, Eskişehir district) and Iran (Derakht-Senjed deposit) exhibit broadly uniform Δ47 compositions that yield apparent clumped-isotope temperatures that average 23.7 ± 5.0 °C. Based on oxygen isotope thermometry, these clumped-isotope temperatures suggest

  11. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. V. Star-forming dwarf galaxies - dust in metal-poor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, M.; Hunt, L. K.; Madden, S.; Vlahakis, C.; Bomans, D. J.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Boselli, A.; Clemens, M.; Corbelli, E.; Cortese, L.; Dariush, A.; Davies, J. I.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fadda, D.; Fritz, J.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Giovanardi, C.; Hughes, T. M.; Jones, A. P.; Pierini, D.; Pohlen, M.; Sabatini, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Xilouris, E. M.; Zibetti, S.

    2010-07-01

    We present the dust properties of a small sample of Virgo cluster dwarf galaxies drawn from the science demonstration phase data set of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. These galaxies have low metallicities (7.8 < 12 + log(O/H) < 8.3) and star-formation rates ≲10-1 M⊙ yr-1. We measure the spectral energy distribution (SED) from 100 to 500 μm and derive dust temperatures and dust masses. The SEDs are fitted by a cool component of temperature T ≲ 20 K, implying dust masses around 105 M⊙ and dust-to-gas ratios D within the range 10-3-10-2. The completion of the full survey will yield a larger set of galaxies, which will provide more stringent constraints on the dust content of star-forming dwarf galaxies. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  12. Enhancing glass-forming ability via frustration of nano-clustering in alloys with a high solvent content

    PubMed Central

    Li, H. X.; Gao, J. E.; Wu, Y.; Jiao, Z. B.; Ma, D.; Stoica, A. D.; Wang, X. L.; Ren, Y.; Miller, M. K.; Lu, Z. P.

    2013-01-01

    The glass-forming ability (GFA) of alloys with a high-solvent content such as soft magnetic Fe-based and Al-based alloys is usually limited due to strong formation of the solvent-based solid solution phase. Herein, we report that the GFA of soft magnetic Fe-based alloys (with >70 at.% Fe to ensure large saturation magnetization) could be dramatically improved by doping with only 0.3 at.% Cu which has a positive enthalpy of mixing with Fe. It was found that an appropriate Cu addition could enhance the liquid phase stability and crystallization resistance by destabilizing the α-Fe nano-clusters due to the necessity to redistribute the Cu atoms. However, excessive Cu doping would stimulate nucleation of the α-Fe nano-clusters due to the repulsive nature between the Fe and Cu atoms, thus deteriorating the GFA. Our findings provide new insights into understanding of glass formation in general. PMID:23760427

  13. THE HIGH-VELOCITY MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN MASSIVE CLUSTER-FORMING REGION G10.6-0.4

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hauyu Baobab; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang Qizhou E-mail: pho@asiaa.sinica.edu.t

    2010-12-20

    We report the arcsecond resolution Submillimeter Array observations of the {sup 12}CO (2-1) transition in the massive cluster-forming region G10.6-0.4. In these observations, the high-velocity {sup 12}CO emission is resolved into individual outflow systems, which have a typical size scale of a few arcseconds. These molecular outflows are energetic and are interacting with the ambient molecular gas. By inspecting the shock signatures traced by CH{sub 3}OH, SiO, and HCN emissions, we suggest that abundant star formation activities are distributed over the entire 0.5 pc scale dense molecular envelope. The star formation efficiency over one global free-fall timescale (of the 0.5 pc molecular envelope, {approx}10{sup 5} years) is about a few percent. The total energy feedback of these high-velocity outflows is higher than 10{sup 47} erg, which is comparable to the total kinetic energy in the rotational motion of the dense molecular envelope. From order-of-magnitude estimations, we suggest that the energy injected from the protostellar outflows is capable of balancing the turbulent energy dissipation. No high-velocity bipolar molecular outflow associated with the central OB cluster is directly detected, which can be due to the photoionization.

  14. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN FORMING STARS AND DENSE GAS IN THE SMALL LOW-MASS CLUSTER CEDERBLAD 110

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, E. F.; Wong, T.; Bourke, T. L.; Thompson, K. L.

    2011-12-20

    We present observations of dense gas and outflow activity in the Cederblad 110 region of the Chamaeleon I dark cloud complex. The region contains nine forming low-mass stars in evolutionary stages ranging from Class 0 to Class II/III crowded into a 0.2 pc region with high surface density ({Sigma}{sub YSO} {approx} 150 pc{sup -2}). The analysis of our N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1{yields}0) maps indicates the presence of 13 {+-} 3 solar masses of dense (n {approx} 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}) gas in this region, much of which is unstable against gravitational collapse. The most unstable material is located near the Class 0 source MMS-1, which is almost certainly actively accreting material from its dense core. Smaller column densities of more stable dense gas are found toward the region's Class I sources, IRS 4, 11, and 6. Little or no dense gas is colocated with the Class II and III sources in the region. The outflow from IRS 4 is interacting with the dense core associated with MMS-1. The molecular component of the outflow, measured in the (J = 1{yields}0) line of {sup 12}CO, appears to be deflected by the densest part of the core, after which it appears to plow through some of the lower column density portions of the core. The working surface between the head of the outflow lobe and the dense core material can be seen in the enhanced velocity dispersion of the dense gas. IRS 2, the Class III source that produces the optical reflection nebula that gives the Cederblad 110 region its name, may also be influencing the dense gas in the region. A dust temperature gradient across the MMS-1 dense core is consistent with warming from IRS 2, and a sharp gradient in dense gas column density may be caused by winds from this source. Taken together, our data indicate that this region has been producing several young stars in the recent past, and that sources which began forming first are interacting with the remaining dense gas in the region, thereby influencing current and future star

  15. Extinction in young massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Up to ages of ~100 Myr, massive clusters are still swamped in large amounts of gas and dust, causing considerable and uneven levels of extinction. At the same time, large grains (ices?) produced by type II supernovae profoundly alter the interstellar medium (ISM), thus resulting in extinction properties very different from those of the diffuse ISM. To obtain physically meaningful parameters of stars (luminosities, effective temperatures, masses, ages, etc.) we must understand and measure the local extinction law. We have developed a powerful method to unambiguously determine the extinction law everywhere across a cluster field, using multi-band photometry of red giant stars belonging to the red clump (RC) and are applying it to young massive clusters in the Local Group. In the Large Magellanic Cloud, with about 20 RC stars per arcmin2, for each field we can easily derive an accurate extinction curve over the entire wavelength range of the photometry. As an example, we present the extinction law of the Tarantula nebula (30 Dor) based on thousands of stars observed as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. We discuss how the incautious adoption of the Milky Way extinction law in the analysis of massive star forming regions may lead to serious underestimates of the fluxes and of the star formation rates by factors of 2 or more.

  16. EVOLUTION OF SUPER STAR CLUSTER WINDS WITH STRONG COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    Wuensch, Richard; Palous, Jan; Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana

    2011-10-20

    We study the evolution of super star cluster winds driven by stellar winds and supernova explosions. Time-dependent rates at which mass and energy are deposited into the cluster volume, as well as the time-dependent chemical composition of the re-inserted gas, are obtained from the population synthesis code Starburst99. These results are used as input for a semi-analytic code which determines the hydrodynamic properties of the cluster wind as a function of cluster age. Two types of winds are detected in the calculations. For the quasi-adiabatic solution, all of the inserted gas leaves the cluster in the form of a stationary wind. For the bimodal solution, some of the inserted gas becomes thermally unstable and forms dense warm clumps which accumulate inside the cluster. We calculate the evolution of the wind velocity and energy flux and integrate the amount of accumulated mass for clusters of different mass, radius, and initial metallicity. We also consider conditions with low heating efficiency of the re-inserted gas or mass loading of the hot thermalized plasma with the gas left over from star formation. We find that the bimodal regime and the related mass accumulation occur if at least one of the two conditions above is fulfilled.

  17. Shear heating and clumped isotope reordering in carbonate faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siman-Tov, Shalev; Affek, Hagit P.; Matthews, Alan; Aharonov, Einat; Reches, Ze'ev

    2016-07-01

    Natural faults are expected to heat rapidly during seismic slip and to cool quite quickly after the slip event. Here we examine clumped isotope thermometry for its ability to identify such short duration elevated temperature events along frictionally heated carbonate faults. Our approach is based on measured Δ47 values that reflect the distribution of oxygen and carbon isotopes in the calcite lattice, measuring the abundance of 13Csbnd 18O bonds, which is affected by temperature. We examine three types of calcite rock samples: (1) crushed limestone grains that were rapidly heated and then cooled in static laboratory experiments, simulating the temperature cycle experienced by fault rock during an earthquake slip; (2) limestone samples that were experimentally sheared to simulate earthquake slip events; and (3) samples from Fault Mirrors (FMs) collected from principle slip surfaces of three natural carbonate faults. Extensive FM surfaces are believed to form during earthquake slip. Our experimental results show that Δ47 values decrease rapidly (in the course of seconds) with increasing temperature and shear velocity. On the other hand, carbonate shear zones from natural faults do not show such Δ47 decrease. We suggest that the Δ47 response may be controlled by nano-size grains, the high abundance of defects, and highly stressed/strained grain boundaries within the carbonate fault zone that can reduce the activation energy for diffusion, and thus lead to an increased rate of isotopic disordering during shear experiments. In our laboratory experiments the high stress and strain on grain contacts and the presence of nanograins thus allows for rapid disordering so that a change in Δ47 occurs in a very short and relatively low intensity heating events. In natural faults it may also lead to isotopic ordering after the cessation of frictional heating thus erasing the high temperature signature of Δ47.

  18. An automated method for 'clumped-isotope' measurements on small carbonate samples.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Thomas W; Bernasconi, Stefano M

    2010-07-30

    Clumped-isotope geochemistry deals with the state of ordering of rare isotopes in molecules, in particular with their tendency to form bonds with other rare isotopes rather than with the most abundant ones. Among its possible applications, carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry is the one that has gained most attention because of the wide potential of applications in many disciplines of earth sciences. Clumped-isotope thermometry allows reconstructing the temperature of formation of carbonate minerals without knowing the isotopic composition of the water from which they were formed. This feature enables new approaches in paleothermometry. The currently published method is, however, limited by sample weight requirements of 10-15 mg and because measurements are performed manually. In this paper we present a new method using an automated sample preparation device coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The method is based on the repeated analysis (n = 6-8) of 200 microg aliquots of sample material and completely automated measurements. In addition, we propose to use precisely calibrated carbonates spanning a wide range in Delta(47) instead of heated gases to correct for isotope effects caused by the source of the mass spectrometer, following the principle of equal treatment of the samples and standards. We present data for international standards (NBS 19 and LSVEC) and different carbonates formed at temperatures exceeding 600 degrees C to show that precisions in the range of 10 to 15 ppm (1 SE) can be reached for repeated analyses of a single sample. Finally, we discuss and validate the correction procedure based on high-temperature carbonates instead of heated gases.

  19. Investigating the origin of discrepancies in clumped isotope calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagle, R.

    2015-12-01

    The abundance of 13C-18O 'clumps' in calcite or aragonite of corals skeletons are a potentially valuable tool for reconstructing past ocean temperatures. However, corals are known to exhibit significant "vital effects" (i.e., non-equilibrium mineral compositions) in δ18O, which complicates its application in paleoclimate studies, and may also exhibit clumped isotope disequilibrium. Here we determined mass 47 anomalies (Δ47) in CO2 derived from cultured shallow water and live-collected deep-sea coral. In a species of cultured surface water coral, we find disequilibrium Δ47 and δ18O values that are consistent with a pH effect driving disequilibrium isotopic signatures. We go on to show that culturing specimens at elevated CO2 conditions drives changes in both Δ47 and δ18O that follows the same relationship defined for pH effects in inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments. This suggests that dissolved inorganic carbon speciation at the site of calcification and therefore fluid pH can effect the clumped isotope composition of biogenic minerals. In two different live-collected deep-sea coral taxa, we find distinct clumped isotope signatures and Δ47-temperature calibration relationships.

  20. Chemistry of dense clumps near moving Herbig-Haro objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, H.; Viti, S.; Williams, D. A.; Girart, J. M.; Morata, O.

    2011-09-01

    Localized regions of enhanced emission from HCO+, NH3 and other species near Herbig-Haro objects (HHOs) have been interpreted as arising in a photochemistry stimulated by the HHO radiation on high-density quiescent clumps in molecular clouds. Static models of this process have been successful in accounting for the variety of molecular species arising ahead of the jet; however, recent observations show that the enhanced molecular emission is widespread along the jet as well as ahead. Hence, a realistic model must take into account the movement of the radiation field past the clump. It was previously unclear as to whether the short interaction time between the clump and the HHO in a moving source model would allow molecules such as HCO+ to reach high enough levels, and to survive for long enough to be observed. In this work we model a moving radiation source that approaches and passes a clump. The chemical picture is qualitatively unchanged by the addition of the moving source, strengthening the idea that enhancements are due to evaporation of molecules from dust grains. In addition, in the case of several molecules, the enhanced emission regions are longer lived. Some photochemically induced species, including methanol, are expected to maintain high abundances for ˜104 yr.

  1. A DELAUNAY TRIANGULATION APPROACH FOR SEGMENTING CLUMPS OF NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Quan; Chang, Hang; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-05-07

    Cell-based fluorescence imaging assays have the potential to generate massive amount of data, which requires detailed quantitative analysis. Often, as a result of fixation, labeled nuclei overlap and create a clump of cells. However, it is important to quantify phenotypic read out on a cell-by-cell basis. In this paper, we propose a novel method for decomposing clumps of nuclei using high-level geometric constraints that are derived from low-level features of maximum curvature computed along the contour of each clump. Points of maximum curvature are used as vertices for Delaunay triangulation (DT), which provides a setof edge hypotheses for decomposing a clump of nuclei. Each hypothesis is subsequently tested against a constraint satisfaction network for a near optimum decomposition. The proposed method is compared with other traditional techniques such as the watershed method with/without markers. The experimental results show that our approach can overcome the deficiencies of the traditional methods and is very effective in separating severely touching nuclei.

  2. Clustering of Pre-Main-Sequence Stars in the Orion, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Vela, and Lupus Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Yasushi; Tachihara, Kengo; Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Nakano, Makoto

    1998-04-01

    We study clustering of pre-main-sequence stars in the Orion, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Vela, and Lupus star-forming regions. We calculate the average surface density of companions, Σ(θ), as a function of angular distance, θ, from each star. We employ the method developed by Larson in a 1995 study for the calculation. In most of the regions studied, the function can be fitted by two power laws (Σ ~ θγ) with a break as found by Larson for the Taurus star-forming region. The power index, γ, is smaller at small separations than at large separations. The power index at large separations shows significant variation from region to region (-0.8 < γ < -0.1), while the power index at small separations does not (γ ~ -2). The power index at large separations relates to the distribution of the nearest-neighbor distance. When the latter can be fitted by the Poisson distribution, the power index is close to 0. When the latter is broader than the Poisson distribution, the power index is negatively large. This correlation can be interpreted as the result of the variation in the surface density within the region. At large separations, the power-law fit may indicate star formation history in the region and not the spatial structure like the self-similar hierarchical, or fractal, one. Because of the velocity dispersion, stars move from their birthplaces, and the surface density of coeval stars decreases with their age. When a star-forming region contains several groups of stars with different ages, a power law may fit the average surface density of companions for it. The break of the power law is located around 0.01-0.1 pc. There is a clear correlation between the break position and the mean nearest-neighbor distance. The break position may reflect dispersal of newly formed stars.

  3. Effects of Water on Carbonate Clumped Isotope Bond Reordering Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, D. C.; Passey, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope geothermometry is a powerful tool for reconstructing past temperatures, both in surface environments and in the shallow crust. The method is based on heavy isotope "clumps" within single carbonate groups (e.g., 13C18O16O2-2), whose overabundance beyond levels predicted by chance is determined by mineralization temperature. The degree of clumped isotope overabundance can change at elevated temperatures (ca. >100ºC) owing to solid-state diffusion of C and O through the mineral lattice. Understanding the kinetics of this clumped isotope reordering process is a prerequisite for application to geological questions involving samples that have been heated in the subsurface. Thus far, the effect of water on reordering kinetics has not been explored. The presence of water dramatically increases rates of oxygen self-diffusion in calcite, but whether this water-enhanced diffusion is limited to the mineral surface or extends into the bulk crystal lattice is not clear. Here we present experimentally determined Arrhenius parameters for reordering rates in optical calcite heated under aqueous high pressure (100 MPa) conditions. We observe only marginal increases in reordering rates under these wet, high pressure conditions relative to rates observed for the same material reacted under dry, low pressure conditions. The near identical clumped isotope reordering rates for wet and dry conditions contrasts with the orders of magnitude increase in oxygen diffusivity at the mineral surface when water is present. This suggests the latter effect arises from surface reactions that have minimal influence on the diffusivity of C or O in the bulk mineral. Our results also imply that previously published reordering kinetics determined under dry, low pressure experimental conditions are applicable to geological samples that have been heated in the presence of water.

  4. Gas of 96 Planck Cold Clumps in the Second Quadrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianwei; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Tie; Meng, Fanyi

    2016-06-01

    Ninety-six Planck cold dust clumps in the second quadrant were mapped with 12CO (1-0), 13CO (1-0), and C18O (1-0) lines at the 13.7 m telescope of Purple Mountain Observatory. 12CO (1-0) and 13CO (1-0) emissions were detected for all 96 clumps, while C18O (1-0) emissions were detected in 81 of them. Fifteen clumps have more than one velocity component. In the 115 mapped velocity components, 225 cores were obtained. We found that 23.1% of the cores have non-Gaussian profiles. We acquired the V lsr, FWHM, and T A of the lines. Distances, T ex, velocity dispersions, {N}{{{H}}2}, and masses were also derived. Generally, turbulence may dominant the cores because {σ }{NT}/{σ }{Therm}\\gt 1 in almost all of the cores and Larson’s relationship is not apparent in our massive cores. Virial parameters are adopted to test the gravitational stability of cores and 51% of the cores are likely collapsing. The core mass function of the cores in the range 0-1 kpc suggests a low core-to-star conversional efficiency (0.62%). Only 14 of 225 cores (6.2%) have associated stellar objects at their centers, while the others are starless. The morphologies of clumps are mainly filamentary structures. Seven clumps may be located on an extension of the new spiral arm in the second quadrant while three are on the known outer arm.

  5. Nuclear receptors, nuclear-receptor factors, and nuclear-receptor-like orphans form a large paralog cluster in Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Vallvé, S; Palau, J

    1998-06-01

    We studied a human protein paralog cluster formed by 38 nonredundant sequences taken from the Swiss-Prot database and its supplement, TrEMBL. These sequences include nuclear receptors, nuclear-receptor factors and nuclear-receptor-like orphans. Working separately with both the central cysteine-rich DNA-binding domain and the carboxy-terminal ligand-binding domain, we performed multialignment analyses that included drawings of paralog trees. Our results show that the cluster is highly multibranched, with considerable differences in the amino acid sequence in the ligand-binding domain (LBD), and 17 proximal subbranches which are identifiable and fully coincident when independent trees from both domains are compared. We identified the six recently proposed subfamilies as groups of neighboring clusters in the LBD paralog tree. We found similarities of 80%-100% for the N-terminal transactivation domain among mammalian ortholog receptors, as well as some paralog resemblances within diverse subbranches. Our studies suggest that during the evolutionary process, the three domains were assembled in a modular fashion with a nonshuffled modular fusion of the LBD. We used the EMBL server PredictProtein to make secondary-structure predictions for all 38 LBD subsequences. Amino acid residues in the multialigned homologous domains--taking the beginning of helix H3 of the human retinoic acid receptor-gamma as the initial point of reference--were substituted with H or E, which identify residues predicted to be helical or extended, respectively. The result was a secondary structure multialignment with the surprising feature that the prediction follows a canonical pattern of alignable alpha-helices with some short extended elements in between, despite the fact that a number of subsequences resemble each other by less than 25% in terms of the similarity index. We also identified the presence of a binary patterning in all of the predicted helices that were conserved throughout the 38

  6. The Staphylococcus aureus Global Regulator MgrA Modulates Clumping and Virulence by Controlling Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Heidi A.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Merriman, Joseph A.; King, Jessica M.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen that causes devastating infections in a wide range of locations within the body. One of the defining characteristics of S. aureus is its ability to form clumps in the presence of soluble fibrinogen, which likely has a protective benefit and facilitates adhesion to host tissue. We have previously shown that the ArlRS two-component regulatory system controls clumping, in part by repressing production of the large surface protein Ebh. In this work we show that ArlRS does not directly regulate Ebh, but instead ArlRS activates expression of the global regulator MgrA. Strains lacking mgrA fail to clump in the presence of fibrinogen, and clumping can be restored to an arlRS mutant by overexpressing either arlRS or mgrA, indicating that ArlRS and MgrA constitute a regulatory pathway. We used RNA-seq to show that MgrA represses ebh, as well as seven cell wall-associated proteins (SraP, Spa, FnbB, SasG, SasC, FmtB, and SdrD). EMSA analysis showed that MgrA directly represses expression of ebh and sraP. Clumping can be restored to an mgrA mutant by deleting the genes for Ebh, SraP and SasG, suggesting that increased expression of these proteins blocks clumping by steric hindrance. We show that mgrA mutants are less virulent in a rabbit model of endocarditis, and virulence can be partially restored by deleting the genes for the surface proteins ebh, sraP, and sasG. While mgrA mutants are unable to clump, they are known to have enhanced biofilm capacity. We demonstrate that this increase in biofilm formation is partially due to up-regulation of SasG, a surface protein known to promote intercellular interactions. These results confirm that ArlRS and MgrA constitute a regulatory cascade, and that they control expression of a number of genes important for virulence, including those for eight large surface proteins. PMID:27144398

  7. ION AND NEUTRAL MOLECULES IN THE W43-MM1(G30.79 FIR 10) INFALLING CLUMP

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes, Paulo C.

    2011-12-20

    The high-mass star-forming clump W43-MM1 has been mapped in N{sub 2}H{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), C{sup 18}O(3 {yields} 2), SiO(8 {yields} 7), and in a single pointing in DCO{sup +}(5 {yields} 4) toward the center of the clump. Column densities from these observations as well as previous HCO{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), HCN(4 {yields} 3), H{sup 13}CN(4 {yields} 3), and CS(7 {yields} 6) data have been derived using the RADEX code; results later have been used to derive chemical abundances at selected points in the MM1 main axis. We compare with chemical models to estimate an evolutionary age of 10{sup 4} years for a remarkable warm hot core inside MM1. We also proposed that the dust temperature derived from the spectral energy distribution fitting in MM1 is not representative of the gas temperature deep inside the clump because dust emission may have become optically thick. By deriving a deuterium fractionation of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, we estimate an electron fraction of X(e) = 6.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}. Thus, the coupling between the neutral gas and the magnetic field is estimated by computing the ambipolar diffusion Reynolds number R{sub m} = 18 and the wave coupling number W = 110. Considering that the infalling speed is slightly supersonic (M = 1.1) but sub-Alfvenic, we conclude that the MM1 clump has recently been or is in the process of decoupling the field from the neutral fluid. Thus, the MM1 clump appears to be in an intermediate stage of evolution in which a hot core has developed while the envelope is still infalling and not fully decoupled from the ambient magnetic field.

  8. The cluster of galaxies Abell 376

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proust, D.; Capelato, H. V.; Hickel, G.; Sodré, L., Jr.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Cuevas, H.

    2003-08-01

    We present a dynamical analysis of the galaxy cluster Abell 376 based on a set of 73 velocities, most of them measured at Pic du Midi and Haute-Provence observatories and completed with data from the literature. Data on individual galaxies are presented and the accuracy of the determined velocities is discussed as well as some properties of the cluster. We obtained an improved mean redshift value z = 0.0478+0.005-0.006 and velocity dispersion sigma = 852+120-76 km s-1. Our analysis indicates that inside a radius of ~ 900 h70-1 kpc ( ~ 15 arcmin) the cluster is well relaxed without any remarkable features and the X-ray emission traces fairly well the galaxy distribution. A possible substructure is seen at 20 arcmin from the centre towards the Southwest direction, but is not confirmed by the velocity field. This SW clump is, however, kinematically bound to the main structure of Abell 376. A dense condensation of galaxies is detected at 46 arcmin (projected distance 2.6 h70-1 Mpc) from the centre towards the Northwest and analysis of the apparent luminosity distribution of its galaxies suggests that this clump is part of the large scale structure of Abell 376. X-ray spectroscopic analysis of ASCA data resulted in a temperature kT = 4.3 +/- 0.4 keV and metal abundance Z = 0.32 +/- 0.08 Zsun. The velocity dispersion corresponding to this temperature using the TX-sigma scaling relation is in agreement with the measured galaxies velocities. Based on observations made Haute-Provence and Pic du Midi Observatories (France). Table 1 is also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/407/31

  9. Early dynamical evolution of substructured stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Julien; Boily, Christian

    2015-08-01

    It is now widely accepted that stellar clusters form with a high level of substructure (Kuhn et al. 2014, Bate 2009), inherited from the molecular cloud and the star formation process. Evidence from observations and simulations also indicate the stars in such young clusters form a subvirial system (Kirk et al. 2007, Maschberger et al. 2010). The subsequent dynamical evolution can cause important mass loss, ejecting a large part of the birth population in the field. It can also imprint the stellar population and still be inferred from observations of evolved clusters. Nbody simulations allow a better understanding of these early twists and turns, given realistic initial conditions. Nowadays, substructured, clumpy young clusters are usually obtained through pseudo-fractal growth (Goodwin et al. 2004) and velocity inheritance. Such models are visually realistics and are very useful, they are however somewhat artificial in their velocity distribution. I introduce a new way to create clumpy initial conditions through a "Hubble expansion" which naturally produces self consistent clumps, velocity-wise. A velocity distribution analysis shows the new method produces realistic models, consistent with the dynamical state of the newly created cores in hydrodynamic simulation of cluster formation (Klessen & Burkert 2000). I use these initial conditions to investigate the dynamical evolution of young subvirial clusters, up to 80000 stars. I find an overall soft evolution, with hierarchical merging leading to a high level of mass segregation. I investigate the influence of the mass function on the fate of the cluster, specifically on the amount of mass loss induced by the early violent relaxation. Using a new binary detection algorithm, I also find a strong processing of the native binary population.

  10. Far-infrared Dust Temperatures and Column Densities of the MALT90 Molecular Clump Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Contreras, Yanett; Smith, Howard A.; Jackson, James M.; Hoq, Sadia; Rathborne, Jill M.

    2015-12-01

    We present dust column densities and dust temperatures for ˜3000 young, high-mass molecular clumps from the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz survey, derived from adjusting single-temperature dust emission models to the far-infrared intensity maps measured between 160 and 870 μm from the Herschel/Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-Gal) and APEX/APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) surveys. We discuss the methodology employed in analyzing the data, calculating physical parameters, and estimating their uncertainties. The population average dust temperature of the clumps are 16.8 ± 0.2 K for the clumps that do not exhibit mid-infrared signatures of star formation (quiescent clumps), 18.6 ± 0.2 K for the clumps that display mid-infrared signatures of ongoing star formation but have not yet developed an H ii region (protostellar clumps), and 23.7 ± 0.2 and 28.1 ± 0.3 K for clumps associated with H ii and photo-dissociation regions, respectively. These four groups exhibit large overlaps in their temperature distributions, with dispersions ranging between 4 and 6 K. The median of the peak column densities of the protostellar clump population is 0.20 ± 0.02 g cm-2, which is about 50% higher compared to the median of the peak column densities associated with clumps in the other evolutionary stages. We compare the dust temperatures and column densities measured toward the center of the clumps with the mean values of each clump. We find that in the quiescent clumps, the dust temperature increases toward the outer regions and that these clumps are associated with the shallowest column density profiles. In contrast, molecular clumps in the protostellar or H ii region phase have dust temperature gradients more consistent with internal heating and are associated with steeper column density profiles compared with the quiescent clumps.

  11. CANDIDATE TIDAL DWARF GALAXIES IN Arp 305: LESSONS ON DWARF DETACHMENT AND GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, Mark; Smith, Beverly J.; Giroux, Mark L.; Hurlock, Sabrina; Struck, Curtis E-mail: smithbj@etsu.edu E-mail: zshh7@goldmail.etsu.edu

    2009-06-15

    To search for Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs) and to study star formation (SF) in tidal features, we are conducting a large UV imaging survey of interacting galaxies selected from the Arp (1996) Atlas using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) telescope. As part of that study, we present a GALEX UV and Sloan Digital Sky Survey and SARA optical study of the gas-rich interacting galaxy pair Arp 305 (NGC 4016/7). The GALEX UV data reveal much extended diffuse UV emission and SF outside the disks. This includes a luminous star-forming region between the two galaxies, and a number of such regions in tidal tails. We have identified 45 young star-forming clumps in Arp 305, including several TDG candidates. By comparing the UV and optical colors to population synthesis models, we determined that the clumps are very young, with several having ages {approx}6 Myr. We do not find many intermediate age clumps in spite of the fact that the last closest encounter was about 300 Myr ago. We have used a smooth particle hydrodynamics code to model the interaction and determine the fate of the star clusters and candidate TDGs.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Young clumps embedded in IRDC (Traficante+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traficante, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Peretto, N.; Pineda, J. E.; Molinari, S.

    2015-06-01

    Photometric parameters for 667 starless clumps (sources identified at 160um with a counterpart at 250 and 350um) and 1056 protostellar clumps (sources identified at 160um with a counterpart at 70, 250 and 350um). Photometric parameters obtained with Hyper photometry code (2015A&A...574A.119T). The photometry is corrected for aperture and colour corrections. The parameter list is the standard Hyper output (see description below). SED fit parameters for 650 starless clumps and 1034 protostellar clumps (all clumps with good SED fitting: Chi2<10, Temperature<40K. See the paper for details) (4 data files).

  13. Clumping in Massive Star Winds and Its Possible Connection to the B[e] Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubátová, B.; Kubát, J.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L.

    2017-02-01

    It has been observationally established that winds of hot massive stars have highly variable characteristics. The variability evident in the winds is believed to be caused by structures on a broad range of spatial scales. Small-scale structures (clumping) in stellar winds of hot stars are possible consequence of an instability appearing in their radiation hydrodynamics. To understand how clumping may influence calculation of theoretical spectra, different clumping properties and their 3D nature have to be taken into account. Properties of clumping have been examined using our 3D radiative transfer calculations. Effects of clumping for the case of the B[e] phenomenon are discussed.

  14. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Classification of Ge hut clusters in arrays formed by molecular beam epitaxy at low temperatures on the Si(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arapkina, Larisa V.; Yuryev, Vladimir A.

    2010-06-01

    Ge hut clusters forming quantum dot arrays on the Si(001) surface in the process of low-temperature ultrahigh-vacuum molecular beam epitaxy are morphologically investigated and classified using in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy. It is found that two main Ge hut cluster types—pyramidal and wedge-shaped—have different atomic structures, and it is concluded that shape transitions between the two are impossible. Derivative cluster species — obelisks (or truncated wedges) and accreted wedges — are revealed and investigated for the first time and shown to start dominating at high Ge coverages. The uniformity of cluster arrays is shown to be controlled by the scatter in the lengths of wedge-like clusters. At low growth temperatures (360 °C), cluster nucleation during the growth of the array is observed for all values of Ge coverage except for a particular point at which the arrays are more uniform than at higher or lower coverages. At higher temperatures (530 °C), no cluster nucleation is observed after the initial formation of the array.

  15. "Anticlumping" and Other Combinatorial Effects on Clumped Isotopes: Implications for Tracing Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, L.

    2015-12-01

    I present a mode of isotopic ordering that has purely combinatorial origins. It can be important when identical rare isotopes are paired by coincidence (e.g., they are neighbors on the same molecule), or when extrinsic factors govern the isotopic composition of the two atoms that share a chemical bond. By itself, combinatorial isotope pairing yields products with isotopes either randomly distributed or with a deficit relative to a random distribution of isotopes. These systematics arise because of an unconventional coupling between the formation of singly- and multiply-substituted isotopic moieties. In a random distribution, rare isotopes are symmetrically distributed: Single isotopic substitutions (e.g., H‒D and D‒H in H2) occur with equal probability, and double isotopic substitutions (e.g., D2) occur according to random chance. The absence of symmetry in a bond-making complex can yield unequal numbers of singly-substituted molecules (e.g., more H‒D than D‒H in H2), which is recorded in the product molecule as a deficit in doubly-substituted moieties and an "anticlumped" isotope distribution (i.e., Δn < 0). Enzymatic isotope pairing reactions, which can have site-specific isotopic fractionation factors and atom reservoirs, should express this class of combinatorial isotope effect. Chemical-kinetic isotope effects, which are related to the bond-forming transition state, arise independently and express second-order combinatorial effects. In general, both combinatorial and chemical factors are important for calculating and interpreting clumped-isotope signatures of individual reactions. In many reactions relevant to geochemical oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen cycling, combinatorial isotope pairing likely plays a strong role in the clumped isotope distribution of the products. These isotopic signatures, manifest as either directly bound isotope clumps or as features of a molecule's isotopic anatomy, could be exploited as tracers of biogeochemistry that can

  16. Clumping in the Cassini Division and C Ring: Constraints from Stellar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, J. E.; Jerousek, R. G.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-12-01

    Particles in Saturn's rings are engaged in a constant tug-of-war between interparticle gravitational and adhesive forces that lead to clumping, on the one hand, and Keplerian shear that inhibits accretion on the other. Depending on the surface mass density of the rings and the local orbital velocity, ephemeral clumps or self-gravity wakes can form, giving the rings granularity on the scale of the most-unstable length scale against gravitational collapse. The A ring and many regions of the B ring are dominated by self-gravity wakes with a typical radial wavelength of ~50-100 m. A characteristic of self-gravity wakes is that they can effectively shadow the relatively empty spaces in between them, depending on viewing geometry. This leads to geometry-dependent measurements of optical depth in occultations of the rings. The C ring and Cassini Division have significantly lower surface mass densities than the A and B ring such that in most of these regions the most-unstable wavelength is comparable to the size of the ring particles (~1 m) so that self-gravity wake formation is not expected nor have its characteristics in various measurements been observed. Here we present measurements of the optical depth of the C ring and Cassini Division with the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) showing variations with viewing geometry in the "ramp" regions and the Cassini Division "triple band". These variations are characteristic of self-gravity wakes. We place limits on clumping in other regions of the C ring and Cassini Division.

  17. Bonding energetics in clusters formed by cesium salts: a study by collision-induced dissociation and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Maria, Pierre-Charles; Massi, Lionel; Box, Natzaret Sindreu; Gal, Jean-François; Burk, Peeter; Tammiku-Taul, Jaana; Kutsar, Martin

    2006-01-01

    In relation to the interaction between (137)Cs and soil organic matter, electrospray mass spectrometry experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out on the dissociation of positively charged adducts formed by cesium nitrate and cesium organic salts attached to a cesium cation [Cs(CsNO(3))(CsA)](+) (A = benzoate, salicylate, hydrogen phthalate, hydrogen maleate, hydrogen fumarate, hydrogen oxalate, and hydrogen malonate ion). These mixed clusters were generated by electrospray from methanol solutions containing cesium nitrate and an organic acid. Collision-induced dissociation of [Cs(CsNO(3))(CsA)](+) in a quadrupole ion trap gave [Cs(CsNO(3))](+) and [Cs(CsA)](+) as major product ions. Loss of HNO(3) was observed, and also CO(2) loss in the case of A = hydrogen malonate. Branching ratios for the dissociation into [Cs(CsNO(3))](+) and [Cs(CsA)](+) were treated by the Cooks' kinetic method to obtain a quantitative order of bonding energetics (enthalpies and Gibbs free energies) between Cs(+) and the molecular salt (ion pair) CsA, and were correlated with the corresponding values calculated using DFT. The kinetic method leads to relative scales of Cs(+) affinities and basicities that are consistent with the DFT-calculated values. This study brings new data on the strong interaction between the cesium cation and molecular salts CsA.

  18. Dissociation and Re-Aggregation of Multicell-Ensheathed Fragments Responsible for Rapid Production of Massive Clumps of Leptothrix Sheaths.

    PubMed

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; McFarlane, Ian R; Tamura, Katsunori; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Species of the Fe/Mn-oxidizing bacteria Leptothrix produce tremendous amounts of microtubular, Fe/Mn-encrusted sheaths within a few days in outwells of groundwater that can rapidly clog water systems. To understand this mode of rapid sheath production and define the timescales involved, behaviors of sheath-forming Leptothrix sp. strain OUMS1 were examined using time-lapse video at the initial stage of sheath formation. OUMS1 formed clumps of tangled sheaths. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of a thin layer of bacterial exopolymer fibrils around catenulate cells (corresponding to the immature sheath). In time-lapse videos, numerous sheath filaments that extended from the periphery of sheath clumps repeatedly fragmented at the apex of the same fragment, the fragments then aggregated and again elongated, eventually forming a large sheath clump comprising tangled sheaths within two days. In this study, we found that fast microscopic fragmentation, dissociation, re-aggregation and re-elongation events are the basis of the rapid, massive production of Leptothrix sheaths typically observed at macroscopic scales.

  19. Dissociation and Re-Aggregation of Multicell-Ensheathed Fragments Responsible for Rapid Production of Massive Clumps of Leptothrix Sheaths

    PubMed Central

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; McFarlane, Ian R.; Tamura, Katsunori; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Species of the Fe/Mn-oxidizing bacteria Leptothrix produce tremendous amounts of microtubular, Fe/Mn-encrusted sheaths within a few days in outwells of groundwater that can rapidly clog water systems. To understand this mode of rapid sheath production and define the timescales involved, behaviors of sheath-forming Leptothrix sp. strain OUMS1 were examined using time-lapse video at the initial stage of sheath formation. OUMS1 formed clumps of tangled sheaths. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of a thin layer of bacterial exopolymer fibrils around catenulate cells (corresponding to the immature sheath). In time-lapse videos, numerous sheath filaments that extended from the periphery of sheath clumps repeatedly fragmented at the apex of the same fragment, the fragments then aggregated and again elongated, eventually forming a large sheath clump comprising tangled sheaths within two days. In this study, we found that fast microscopic fragmentation, dissociation, re-aggregation and re-elongation events are the basis of the rapid, massive production of Leptothrix sheaths typically observed at macroscopic scales. PMID:27490579

  20. THE PREPARATION OF CURRICULUM MATERIALS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS FOR AN EXPERIMENTAL APPLICATION OF THE CLUSTER CONCEPT OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AT THE SECONDARY SCHOOL LEVEL. VOLUME III, INSTRUCTIONAL PLANS FOR THE METAL FORMING AND FABRICATION CLUSTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MALEY, DONALD

    DESIGNED FOR USE WITH 11TH AND 12TH GRADE STUDENTS, THIS CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR THE OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER IN METAL FORMING AND FABRICATION WAS DEVELOPED BY PARTICIPATING TEACHERS FROM RESULTS OF THE RESEARCH PROCEDURES DESCRIBED IN VOLUME I (VT 004 162). THE COURSE DESCRIPTION, NEED FOR THE COURSE, COURSE OBJECTIVES, PROCEDURES AND INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN…

  1. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND DARK SATELLITE GALAXIES THROUGH THE STREAM VELOCITY

    SciTech Connect

    Naoz, Smadar; Narayan, Ramesh

    2014-08-10

    The formation of purely baryonic globular clusters with no gravitationally bound dark matter is still a theoretical challenge. We show that these objects might form naturally whenever there is a relative stream velocity between baryons and dark matter. The stream velocity causes a phase shift between linear modes of baryonic and dark matter perturbations, which translates to a spatial offset between the two components when they collapse. For a 2σ (3σ) density fluctuation, baryonic clumps with masses in the range 10{sup 5}-2.5 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} (10{sup 5}-4 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}) collapse outside the virial radii of their counterpart dark matter halos. These objects could survive as long-lived, dark-matter-free objects and might conceivably become globular clusters. In addition, their dark matter counterparts, which were deprived of gas, might become dark satellite galaxies.

  2. HCN hyperfine ratio analysis of massive molecular clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schap, W. J.; Barnes, P. J.; Ordoñez, A.; Ginsburg, A.; Yonekura, Y.; Fukui, Y.

    2017-03-01

    We report a new analysis protocol for HCN hyperfine data, based on the PYSPECKIT package, and results of using this new protocol to analyse a sample area of seven massive molecular clumps from the Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) survey, in order to derive maps of column density for this species. There is a strong correlation between the HCN integrated intensity, IHCN, and previously reported I_HCO+ in the clumps, but I_N_{2H+} is not well correlated with either of these other two 'dense gas tracers'. The four fitted parameters from PYSPECKIT in this region fall in the range of VLSR = 8-10 km s-1, σV = 1.2-2.2 km s-1, Tex = 4-15 K, and τ = 0.2-2.5. These parameters allow us to derive a column density map of these clouds, without limiting assumptions about the excitation or opacity. A more traditional (linear) method of converting IHCN to total mass column gives much lower clump masses than our results based on the hyperfine analysis. This is primarily due to areas in the sample region of low I, low Tex, and high τ. We conclude that there may be more dense gas in these massive clumps not engaged in massive star formation than previously recognized. If this result holds for other clouds in the CHaMP sample, it would have dramatic consequences for the calibration of the Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation laws, including a large increase in the gas depletion time-scale in such regions.

  3. OT1_mrubio_1: Clumping in OB-star winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, M.

    2010-07-01

    Massive stars, their nature and evolution, play a important role at all stages of the Universe. Through their radiatively driven winds they influence on the dynamics and energetics of the interstellar medium. The winds of OB stars are the most studied case. Commonly, the mass-loss rates of luminous OB stars are inferred from several types of measurements, the strengths of UV P Cygni lines, H-alpha emission and radio and FIR continuum emission. Recent evidence indicates that currently accepted mass-loss rates may need to be revised downwards when small-scale density inhomogeneities (clumping) are taken into account. We argue that only a consistent treatment of ALL possible diagnostics, scanning different parts of the winds, and analyzed by means of state of the art model atmospheres, will permit the determination of true mass-loss rates. To this end we have assembled a variety of multi-wavelength data, but one crucial observational set is missing: far-IR diagnostics of free-free emission, which uniquely constrain the clumping properties of the wind at intermediate heights. We propose, therefore, to use PACS photometric mode to fill this crucial gap, studying the 70 and 110 micron fluxes of a carefully selected sample of 29 O4-B8 stars. These observations will provide the missing information to derive the clumping properties of the entire outflow, to understand the wind physics, and to obtain reliable massloss rates.

  4. OT2_mrubio_2: Clumping in OB-star winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, M.

    2011-09-01

    Massive stars, their nature and evolution, play a important role at all stages of the Universe. Through their radiatively driven winds they influence on the dynamics and energetics of the interstellar medium. The winds of OB stars are the most studied case. Commonly, the mass-loss rates of luminous OB stars are inferred from several types of measurements, the strengths of UV P Cygni lines, H-alpha emission and radio and FIR continuum emission. Recent evidence indicates that currently accepted mass-loss rates may need to be revised downwards when small-scale density inhomogeneities (clumping) are taken into account. We argue that only a consistent treatment of ALL possible diagnostics, scanning different parts of the winds, and analyzed by means of state of the art model atmospheres, will permit the determination of true mass-loss rates. To this end we have assembled a variety of multi-wavelength data, but one crucial observational set is missing: far-IR diagnostics of free-free emission, which uniquely constrain the clumping properties of the wind at intermediate heights. We propose, therefore, to use PACS photometric mode to fill this crucial gap, studying the 70 and 110 micron fluxes of a carefully selected sample of 29 O4-B8 stars. These observations will provide the missing information to derive the clumping properties of the entire outflow, to understand the wind physics, and to obtain reliable massloss rates.

  5. The galactic census of high- and medium-mass protostars. II. Luminosities and evolutionary states of a complete sample of dense gas clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Bo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Barnes, Peter J.

    2013-12-10

    The Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) is the first large-scale (280° < l < 300°, –4° < b < 2°), unbiased, subparsec resolution survey of Galactic molecular clumps and their embedded stars. Barnes et al. presented the source catalog of ∼300 clumps based on HCO{sup +}(1-0) emission, used to estimate masses M. Here we use archival midinfrared-to-millimeter continuum data to construct spectral energy distributions. Fitting two-temperature gray-body models, we derive bolometric luminosities, L. We find that the clumps have 10 ≲ L/L {sub ☉} ≲ 10{sup 6.5} and 0.1 ≲ L/M/[L {sub ☉}/M {sub ☉}] ≲ 10{sup 3}, consistent with a clump population spanning a range of instantaneous star-formation efficiencies from 0 to ∼50%. We thus expect L/M to be a useful, strongly varying indicator of clump evolution during the star cluster formation process. We find correlations of the ratio of warm-to-cold component fluxes and of cold component temperature with L/M. We also find a near-linear relation between L/M and Spitzer-IRAC specific intensity (surface brightness); thus, this relation may also be useful as a star-formation efficiency indicator. The lower bound of the clump L/M distribution suggests that the star-formation efficiency per free-fall time is ε{sub ff} < 0.2. We do not find strong correlations of L/M with mass surface density, velocity dispersion, or virial parameter. We find a linear relation between L and L{sub HCO{sup +}(1--0)}, although with large scatter for any given individual clump. Fitting together with extragalactic systems, the linear relation still holds, extending over 10 orders of magnitude in luminosity. The complete nature of the CHaMP survey over a several kiloparsec-scale region allows us to derive a measurement at an intermediate scale, bridging those of individual clumps and whole galaxies.

  6. First Detection of a Cluster-scale Gradient in the ISM metallicity of the Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anshu; Yuan, Tiantian; Tran, Kim-Vy; Martizzi, Davide; Taylor, Philip; Kewley, Lisa J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the effect of cluster environment on galaxy formation and evolution is a central topic in extragalactic astronomy. The interstellar medium (ISM) metallicity provides a powerful constraint on the complex interplay of star formation and the galactic inflow/outflow. Disentangling the effect of internal (stellar mass) and external (environment) processes on galaxy evolution is difficult because high mass galaxies tend to exist in dense environments. For the past decade, the difference between mass-metallicity relations in the cluster and field environment have been used to disentangle the effect of internal/external processes. Current observations of the mass-metallicity relation show minimal dependence on the large-scale environment. In this talk, I will present the radial distribution of ISM metallicity in galaxy clusters as an alternative method to study the impact of environment on galaxy evolution. I will present the first observation of cluster-scale negative abundance gradients in two CLASH clusters at z~0.35: MACS1115+0129 and RXJ1532+3021. Our observation presents the highest metallicity enhancement observed in a galaxy cluster on the mass-metallicity relation to date. Most strikingly, we discover that neither the radial metallicity gradient nor the offset on the mass-metallicity relation show any obvious dependence on the stellar mass of cluster members. I will discuss the different physical processes in the cluster environment such as disk truncation due to ram-pressure stripping and self-enrichment due to strangulation that can lead to the observed cluster-scale negative abundance gradient in ISM metallicity.In our follow-up work, we have performed simulations of the disk-truncation in cluster environment using a sample of CALIFA galaxies. Our analytical model of disk-truncation is based on the ram-pressure stripping of the cold gas component of the infalling galaxy in the cluster environment. I will present the simulated radial metallicity

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hi-GAL cluster candidates physical properties (Beuret+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuret, M.; Billot, N.; Cambresy, L.; Eden, D. J.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Pezzuto, S.; Schisano, E.

    2016-11-01

    Physical properties for 1633 Hi-GAL cluster candidates in the inner part of the Galactic Plane are presented. The 1633 cluster candidates are splitted into two tables : 496 reliable cluster candidates and 1137 potential cluster candidates. For each of the 1633 cluster candidates central positions, angular minor and major axis, position angles of the ellipses, the total number of clumps and the ratio of number of pre-stellar clumps over proto-stellar clumps are given. Besides these properties, for each reliable cluster candidates heliocentric distances, galactocentric distances, scale heights, linear minor and major axis, surface densities and closest HII regions are given. For each potential cluster candidates angular surface density and a flag that determines their classifications as potential cluster candidates are given. (2 data files).

  8. A Chandra Study of the Rosette Star-forming Complex. III. The NGC 2237 Cluster and the Region's Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Feigelson, Eric D.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Lada, Elizabeth; Garmire, Gordon

    2010-06-01

    We present high spatial resolution Chandra X-ray images of the NGC 2237 young stellar cluster on the periphery of the Rosette Nebula. We detect 168 X-ray sources, 80% of which have stellar counterparts in USNO, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and deep FLAMINGOS images. These constitute the first census of the cluster members with 0.2 <~ M <~ 2 M sun. Star locations in near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams indicate a cluster age around 2 Myr with a visual extinction of 1 <~ AV <~ 3 at 1.4 kpc, the distance of the Rosette Nebula's main cluster NGC 2244. We derive the K-band luminosity function and the X-ray luminosity function of the cluster, which indicate a population ~400-600 stars. The X-ray-selected sample shows a K-excess disk frequency of 13%. The young Class II counterparts are aligned in an arc ~3 pc long suggestive of a triggered formation process induced by the O stars in NGC 2244. The diskless Class III sources are more dispersed. Several X-ray emitting stars are located inside the molecular cloud and around gaseous pillars projecting from the cloud. These stars, together with a previously unreported optical outflow originating inside the cloud, indicate that star formation is continuing at a low level and the cluster is still growing. This X-ray view of young stars on the western side of the Rosette Nebula complements our earlier studies of the central cluster NGC 2244 and the embedded clusters on the eastern side of the Nebula. The large-scale distribution of the clusters and molecular material is consistent with a scenario in which the rich central NGC 2244 cluster formed first, and its expanding H II region triggered the formation of the now-unobscured satellite clusters Rosette Molecular Cloud (RMC) XA and NGC 2237. A large swept-up shell material around the H II region is now in a second phase of collect-and-collapse fragmentation, leading to the recent formation of subclusters. Other clusters deeper in the molecular cloud appear unaffected by the

  9. A CHANDRA STUDY OF THE ROSETTE STAR-FORMING COMPLEX. III. THE NGC 2237 CLUSTER AND THE REGION'S STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junfeng; Feigelson, Eric D.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Garmire, Gordon; Roman-Zuniga, Carlos G.; Lada, Elizabeth

    2010-06-10

    We present high spatial resolution Chandra X-ray images of the NGC 2237 young stellar cluster on the periphery of the Rosette Nebula. We detect 168 X-ray sources, 80% of which have stellar counterparts in USNO, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and deep FLAMINGOS images. These constitute the first census of the cluster members with 0.2 {approx}< M {approx}< 2 M {sub sun}. Star locations in near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams indicate a cluster age around 2 Myr with a visual extinction of 1 {approx}< A{sub V} {approx}< 3 at 1.4 kpc, the distance of the Rosette Nebula's main cluster NGC 2244. We derive the K-band luminosity function and the X-ray luminosity function of the cluster, which indicate a population {approx}400-600 stars. The X-ray-selected sample shows a K-excess disk frequency of 13%. The young Class II counterparts are aligned in an arc {approx}3 pc long suggestive of a triggered formation process induced by the O stars in NGC 2244. The diskless Class III sources are more dispersed. Several X-ray emitting stars are located inside the molecular cloud and around gaseous pillars projecting from the cloud. These stars, together with a previously unreported optical outflow originating inside the cloud, indicate that star formation is continuing at a low level and the cluster is still growing. This X-ray view of young stars on the western side of the Rosette Nebula complements our earlier studies of the central cluster NGC 2244 and the embedded clusters on the eastern side of the Nebula. The large-scale distribution of the clusters and molecular material is consistent with a scenario in which the rich central NGC 2244 cluster formed first, and its expanding H II region triggered the formation of the now-unobscured satellite clusters Rosette Molecular Cloud (RMC) XA and NGC 2237. A large swept-up shell material around the H II region is now in a second phase of collect-and-collapse fragmentation, leading to the recent formation of subclusters. Other clusters deeper

  10. The complete genomes of subgenotype IA hepatitis A virus strains from four different islands in Indonesia form a phylogenetic cluster.

    PubMed

    Mulyanto; Wibawa, I Dewa Nyoman; Suparyatmo, Joseph Benedictus; Amirudin, Rifai; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masaharu; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    Despite the high endemicity of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in Indonesia, genetic information on those HAV strains is limited. Serum samples obtained from 76 individuals during outbreaks of hepatitis A in Jember (East Java) in 2006 and Tangerang (West Java) in 2007 and those from 82 patients with acute hepatitis in Solo (Central Java), Denpasar on Bali Island, Mataram on Lombok Island, and Makassar on Sulawesi Island in 2003 or 2007 were tested for the presence of HAV RNA by reverse transcription PCR with primers targeting the VP1-2B region (481 nucleotides, primer sequences at both ends excluded). Overall, 34 serum samples had detectable HAV RNA, including at least one viremic sample from each of the six regions. These 34 strains were 96.3-100 % identical to each other and formed a phylogenetic cluster within genotype IA. Six representative HAV isolates from each region shared 98.3-98.9 % identity over the entire genome and constituted a IA sublineage with a bootstrap value of 100 %, consisting of only Indonesian strains. HAV strains recovered from Japanese patients who were presumed to have contracted HAV infection while visiting Indonesia were closest to the Indonesian IA HAV strains obtained in the present study, with a high identity of 99.5-99.7 %, supporting the Indonesian origin of the imported strains. These results indicate that genetic analysis of HAV strains indigenous to HAV-endemic countries, including Indonesia, are useful for tracing infectious sources in imported cases of acute hepatitis A and for defining the epidemiological features of HAV infection in that country.

  11. Importance of clustered 2'-O-(2-aminoethyl) residues for the gene targeting activity of triple helix-forming oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Puri, Nitin; Majumdar, Alokes; Cuenoud, Bernard; Miller, Paul S; Seidman, Michael M

    2004-02-10

    We are developing triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as gene targeting reagents in living mammalian cells. We have described psoralen-linked TFOs with 2'-O-methyl and 2'-O-(2-aminoethyl) (2'-AE) substitutions that are active in a gene knockout assay in cultured cells. The assay is based on mutagenesis by psoralen, a photoactive DNA cross-linker. Previous work showed that TFOs with three or four 2'-AE residues were disproportionately more active than those with one or two substitutions. Here we demonstrate that for optimal bioactivity the 2'-AE residues must be clustered rather than dispersed. We have further characterized bioactive and inactive TFOs in an effort to identify biochemical and biophysical correlates of biological activity. While thermal stability is a standard monitor of TFO biophysical activity, we find that T(m) values do not distinguish bioactive and inactive TFOs. In contrast, measurements of TFO association rates appear to correlate well with bioactivity, in that triplex formation occurs disproportionately faster with the TFOs containing three or four 2'-AE residues. We asked if extending the incubation time prior to photoactivation would enhance the bioactivity of a TFO with a slow on rate relative to the TFO with a faster association rate. However, there was no change in bioactivity differential. These results are compatible with a model in which TFO binding in vivo is followed by relatively rapid elution by cellular functions, similar to that described for transcription factors. Under these circumstances, TFOs with faster on rates would be favored because they would be more likely to be in triplexes at the time of photoactivation.

  12. Structural evolutions and hereditary characteristics of icosahedral nano-clusters formed in Mg70Zn30 alloys during rapid solidification processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yong-Chao; Liu, Rang-Su; Xie, Quan; Tian, Ze-An; Mo, Yun-Fei; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Liu, Hai-Rong; Hou, Zhao-Yang; Zhou, Li-Li; Peng, Ping

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the structural evolution and hereditary mechanism of icosahedral nano-clusters formed during rapid solidification, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study has been performed for a system consisting of 107 atoms of liquid Mg70Zn30 alloy. Adopting Honeycutt-Anderson (HA) bond-type index method and cluster type index method (CTIM-3) to analyse the microstructures in the system it is found that for all the nano-clusters including 2~8 icosahedral clusters in the system, there are 62 kinds of geometrical structures, and those can be classified, by the configurations of the central atoms of basic clusters they contained, into four types: chain-like, triangle-tailed, quadrilateral-tailed and pyramidal-tailed. The evolution of icosahedral nano-clusters can be conducted by perfect heredity and replacement heredity, and the perfect heredity emerges when temperature is slightly less than Tm then increase rapidly and far exceeds the replacement heredity at Tg; while for the replacement heredity, there are three major modes: replaced by triangle (3-atoms), quadrangle (4-atoms) and pentagonal pyramid (6-atoms), rather than by single atom step by step during rapid solidification processes.

  13. Structural evolutions and hereditary characteristics of icosahedral nano-clusters formed in Mg70Zn30 alloys during rapid solidification processes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yong-Chao; Liu, Rang-Su; Xie, Quan; Tian, Ze-An; Mo, Yun-Fei; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Liu, Hai-Rong; Hou, Zhao-Yang; Zhou, Li-Li; Peng, Ping

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the structural evolution and hereditary mechanism of icosahedral nano-clusters formed during rapid solidification, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study has been performed for a system consisting of 107 atoms of liquid Mg70Zn30 alloy. Adopting Honeycutt-Anderson (HA) bond-type index method and cluster type index method (CTIM-3) to analyse the microstructures in the system it is found that for all the nano-clusters including 2~8 icosahedral clusters in the system, there are 62 kinds of geometrical structures, and those can be classified, by the configurations of the central atoms of basic clusters they contained, into four types: chain-like, triangle-tailed, quadrilateral-tailed and pyramidal-tailed. The evolution of icosahedral nano-clusters can be conducted by perfect heredity and replacement heredity, and the perfect heredity emerges when temperature is slightly less than Tm then increase rapidly and far exceeds the replacement heredity at Tg; while for the replacement heredity, there are three major modes: replaced by triangle (3-atoms), quadrangle (4-atoms) and pentagonal pyramid (6-atoms), rather than by single atom step by step during rapid solidification processes. PMID:28230068

  14. Structural evolutions and hereditary characteristics of icosahedral nano-clusters formed in Mg70Zn30 alloys during rapid solidification processes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yong-Chao; Liu, Rang-Su; Xie, Quan; Tian, Ze-An; Mo, Yun-Fei; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Liu, Hai-Rong; Hou, Zhao-Yang; Zhou, Li-Li; Peng, Ping

    2017-02-23

    To investigate the structural evolution and hereditary mechanism of icosahedral nano-clusters formed during rapid solidification, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study has been performed for a system consisting of 10(7) atoms of liquid Mg70Zn30 alloy. Adopting Honeycutt-Anderson (HA) bond-type index method and cluster type index method (CTIM-3) to analyse the microstructures in the system it is found that for all the nano-clusters including 2~8 icosahedral clusters in the system, there are 62 kinds of geometrical structures, and those can be classified, by the configurations of the central atoms of basic clusters they contained, into four types: chain-like, triangle-tailed, quadrilateral-tailed and pyramidal-tailed. The evolution of icosahedral nano-clusters can be conducted by perfect heredity and replacement heredity, and the perfect heredity emerges when temperature is slightly less than Tm then increase rapidly and far exceeds the replacement heredity at Tg; while for the replacement heredity, there are three major modes: replaced by triangle (3-atoms), quadrangle (4-atoms) and pentagonal pyramid (6-atoms), rather than by single atom step by step during rapid solidification processes.

  15. Formation of clumps and patches in self-aggregation of finite-size particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Darryl D.; Putkaradze, Vakhtang

    2006-08-01

    New model equations are derived for the dynamics of self-aggregation of finite-size particles. Differences from standard Debye-Hückel [P. Debye, E. Hückel, Zur Theorie der Elektrolyte: (2): Das Grenzgesetz für die Elektrische Leiftfahrigkeit (On the theory of electrolytes 2: limiting law of electrical conductivity), Phys. Z. 24 (1923) 305-325] and Keller-Segel [E.F. Keller, L.A. Segel, J. Theoret. Biol. 26 (1970) 399-415; E.F. Keller, L.A. Segel, J. Theoret. Biol. 30 (1971) 225-234] models are: (a) the mobility μ of particles depends on the locally averaged particle density and (b) linear diffusion acts on that locally averaged particle density. The cases both with and without diffusion are considered here. Surprisingly, these simple modifications of standard models allow progress in the analytical description of evolution as well as the complete analysis of stationary states. When μ remains positive, the evolution of collapsed states in our model reduces exactly to finite-dimensional dynamics of interacting particle clumps. Simulations show these collapsed (clumped) states emerging from smooth initial conditions, even in one spatial dimension. If μ vanishes for some averaged density, the evolution leads to the spontaneous formation of jammed patches (a weak solution with the density having compact support). Simulations confirm that a combination of these patches forms the final state for the system.

  16. Cluster X-Ray Substructure and Radio Galaxy Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledlow, M. J.; Burns, J. O.

    1994-12-01

    Current wisdom suggests that X-ray substructure in the intracluster medium (ICM) is fairly common in galaxy clusters. This substructure takes the form of elongations, isophotal twisting, asymmetries, and sub-clumping. Substructure is also frequently present in kinematical analysis of the galaxy velocity and spatial distributions. These features include bimodality, kurtosis or skewness, and non-Gaussian velocity distributions. Consistent with the observations, Hydro/N-Body simulations suggest that cluster-subcluster mergers may be the culprit to explain these features in the ICM gas distribution, and would indicate that many clusters, even at the present epoch, are still undergoing significant dynamical evolution. From a sample of X-ray images from the Einstein satellite and, more recently, the ROSAT mission, Burns et al. (1994) found a significant correlation between the positions of radio galaxies and subclumps within the cluster-scale X-ray emission. Burns et al. have suggested that radio galaxies reside in the residue of cluster/sub-cluster merging sites, and may therefore act as pointers to clusters with ongoing and intersting dynamical activity. We are following up these ideas with a detailed substructure analysis, and a comparison to a sample of clusters without radio galaxies. In order to determine the signficance of substructure, we have reanalyzed the X-ray images using a Bootstrap-Resampling Monte-Carlo technique. In this method, asymmetries, elongations, and other forms of substructure are evaluated using a moment-analysis similar to M{o}hr et al. (1994), with the advantage that we need not assume apriori any specific substructure-free model for the source (\\ie\\ a Beta-model). The significance of individual features is determined solely from a comparison to statistical fluctuations (including noise) of the actual data. Using this technique, we place limits on the fraction of clusters with significant substructure and test the radio galaxy

  17. HIERARCHICAL FRAGMENTATION AND JET-LIKE OUTFLOWS IN IRDC G28.34+0.06: A GROWING MASSIVE PROTOSTAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ke; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei; Zhang Qizhou E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-07-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) {lambda} = 0.88 mm observations of an infrared dark cloud G28.34+0.06. Located in the quiescent southern part of the G28.34 cloud, the region of interest is a massive (>10{sup 3} M{sub sun}) molecular clump P1 with a luminosity of {approx}10{sup 3} L{sub sun}, where our previous SMA observations at 1.3 mm have revealed a string of five dust cores of 22-64 M{sub sun} along the 1 pc IR-dark filament. The cores are well aligned at a position angle (P.A.) of 48 deg. and regularly spaced at an average projected separation of 0.16 pc. The new high-resolution, high-sensitivity 0.88 mm image further resolves the five cores into 10 compact condensations of 1.4-10.6 M{sub sun}, with sizes of a few thousand AU. The spatial structure at clump ({approx}1 pc) and core ({approx}0.1 pc) scales indicates a hierarchical fragmentation. While the clump fragmentation is consistent with a cylindrical collapse, the observed fragment masses are much larger than the expected thermal Jeans masses. All the cores are driving CO (3-2) outflows up to 38 km s{sup -1}, the majority of which are bipolar, jet-like outflows. The moderate luminosity of the P1 clump sets a limit on the mass of protostars of 3-7 M{sub sun}. Because of the large reservoir of dense molecular gas in the immediate medium and ongoing accretion as evident by the jet-like outflows, we speculate that P1 will grow and eventually form a massive star cluster. This study provides a first glimpse of massive, clustered star formation that currently undergoes through an intermediate-mass stage.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Formation of Molecular Clouds toward the Stellar Cluster Westerlund 2: Interaction of a Jet with a Clumpy Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahina, Yuta; Kawashima, Tomohisa; Furukawa, Naoko; Enokiya, Rei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2017-02-01

    The formation mechanism of CO clouds observed with the NANTEN2 and Mopra telescopes toward the stellar cluster Westerlund 2 is studied by 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations, taking into account the interstellar cooling. These molecular clouds show a peculiar shape composed of an arc-shaped cloud on one side of the TeV γ-ray source HESS J1023-575 and a linear distribution of clouds (jet clouds) on the other side. We propose that these clouds are formed by the interaction of a jet with clumps of interstellar neutral hydrogen (H i). By studying the dependence of the shape of dense cold clouds formed by shock compression and cooling on the filling factor of H i clumps, we found that the density distribution of H i clumps determines the shape of molecular clouds formed by the jet–cloud interaction: arc clouds are formed when the filling factor is large. On the other hand, when the filling factor is small, molecular clouds align with the jet. The jet propagates faster in models with small filling factors.

  19. LBT/LUCIFER view of star-forming galaxies in the cluster 7C 1756+6520 at z ˜ 1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Sommariva, Veronica; Cresci, Giovanni; Sani, Eleonora; Galametz, Audrey; Mannucci, Filippo; Petropoulou, Vasiliki; Fumana, Marco

    2012-10-01

    Galaxy clusters are key places to study the contribution of nature (i.e. mass and morphology) and nurture (i.e. environment) in the formation and evolution of galaxies. Recently, a number of clusters at z > 1, i.e. corresponding to the first epochs of the cluster formation, have been discovered and confirmed spectroscopically. We present new observations obtained with the LBT Near Infrared Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCIFER) spectrograph at Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) of a sample of star-forming galaxies associated with a large-scale structure around the radio galaxy 7C 1756+6520 at z = 1.42. Combining our spectroscopic data and the literature photometric data, we derived some of the properties of these galaxies: star formation rate, metallicity and stellar mass. With the aim of analysing the effect of the cluster environment on galaxy evolution, we have located the galaxies in the plane of the so-called fundamental metallicity relation (FMR), which is known not to evolve with redshift up to z = 2.5 for field galaxies, but it is still unexplored in rich environments at low and high redshifts. We found that the properties of the galaxies in the cluster 7C 1756+6520 are compatible with the FMR which suggests that the effect of the environment on galaxy metallicity at this early epoch of cluster formation is marginal. As a side study, we also report the spectroscopic analysis of a bright active galactic nucleus, belonging to the cluster, which shows a significant outflow of gas.

  20. Clustering effects and decay analysis of the light-mass N =Z and N ≠Z composite systems formed in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, BirBikram; Patra, S. K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the clustering effects in light mass N =Z and N ≠Z composite systems *20Ne, *28Si, *40Ca and Ne,22*21, *39K, respectively, formed in low-energy heavy ion reactions at different excitation energies, within the collective clusterization approach of the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) of Gupta and collaborators based on quantum-mechanical fragmentation theory (QMFT). Considering quadrupole deformed and compact orientated nuclei, a comparative decay analysis of these systems has been undertaken for the emission of different intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) or clusters, specifically the IMFs having Z =3 , 4, and 5 (or Z =7 , 6, and 5 complimentary fragments from the *20Ne and Ne,22*21 composite systems) which are having the experimental data available for their Z distribution. Quite interestingly, the QMFT supports clustering in N =Z (*20Ne and *28Si) and N ≠Z (*21Ne and *22Ne) nuclear systems at excitation energies corresponding to their respective decay threshold or resonant-state energies for the 4 α , 16O cluster and non-α cluster 14C (more so in *22NeN ≠Z composite system), supported by the Ikeda diagrams, taking into account the proper pairing strength in the temperature-dependent liquid drop energies. Within the DCM, we notice that at higher excitation energies in addition to x α -type (where x is an integer) clusters from N =Z composite systems and x n -x α -type clusters from N ≠Z composite systems, n p -x α -type clusters are relatively quite dominant, with larger preformation probability due to the decreased pairing strength at higher temperatures in the liquid drop energies. Also, the study reveals the presence of competing reaction mechanisms of compound nucleus (fusion-fission, FF) and of noncompound nucleus origin (deep inelastic orbiting, DIO) in the decay of very-light-mass composite systems *20,21,22Ne and *28Si at different excitation energies. The DIO contribution in the IMF cross section σIMF is extracted for these

  1. MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND CLUMPS IN THE BOSTON UNIVERSITY-FIVE COLLEGE RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GALACTIC RING SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Rathborne, J. M.; Johnson, A. M.; Jackson, J. M.; Shah, R. Y.; Simon, R. E-mail: alexj@bu.edu E-mail: ronak@bu.edu

    2009-05-15

    The Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (BU-FCRAO) Galactic Ring Survey (GRS) of {sup 13}CO J = 1 {yields} 0 emission covers Galactic longitudes 18{sup 0} < l < 55.{sup 0}7 and Galactic latitudes |b| {<=} 1{sup 0}. Using the SEQUOIA array on the FCRAO 14 m telescope, the GRS fully sampled the {sup 13}CO Galactic emission (46'' angular resolution on a 22'' grid) and achieved a spectral resolution of 0.21 km s{sup -1}. Because the GRS uses {sup 13}CO, an optically thin tracer, rather than {sup 12}CO, an optically thick tracer, the GRS allows a much better determination of column density and also a cleaner separation of velocity components along a line of sight. With this homogeneous, fully sampled survey of {sup 13}CO emission, we have identified 829 molecular clouds and 6124 clumps throughout the inner Galaxy using the CLUMPFIND algorithm. Here we present details of the catalog and a preliminary analysis of the properties of the molecular clouds and their clumps. Moreover, we compare clouds inside and outside of the 5 kpc ring and find that clouds within the ring typically have warmer temperatures, higher column densities, larger areas, and more clumps compared with clouds located outside the ring. This is expected if these clouds are actively forming stars. This catalog provides a useful tool for the study of molecular clouds and their embedded young stellar objects.

  2. Captive female gorilla agonistic relationships with clumped defendable food resources.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jennifer; Lockard, Joan S

    2006-07-01

    Minimal feeding competition among female mountain gorillas (Gorilla gorilla beringei) has resulted in egalitarian social relationships with poorly defined agonistic dominance hierarchies. Thus, gorillas are generally viewed as non-competitive egalitarian folivores that have had little need to develop effective competitive strategies to access food resources. However, this generalization is inconsistent with more recent research indicating that most gorillas are frugivorous, feeding on patchily distributed food resources. The current study at Howletts Wild Animal Park, Kent, England, explores the effects of clumped and defendable foods on female gorilla agonistic relationships among three groups of western lowland gorillas (G. g. gorilla), conditions that are predicted to lead to well-differentiated agonistic dominance hierarchies among female primates. The Howletts gorillas foraged all day on low-energy/-nutrient, high-fiber foods widely distributed around their enclosure by the keepers. However, they also had periodic access to high-energy foods (e.g., nuts, raisins, strawberries, etc.) that the keepers would spread in a clumped and defendable patch. Frequencies of agonistic and submissive behaviors between females and proximity data were gathered. High-status females were found to monopolize the food patch and kept the low-status females at bay with cough-grunt threat vocalizations or by chasing them away. Agonistic interactions were initiated mostly by females of high status; these were directed towards females of low status and were generally not reciprocal. In addition, females of low status engaged in submissive behaviors the most often, which they directed primarily at females of high status, especially in response to aggression by the latter. Agonistic interactions between high- and low-status females had decided outcomes more often than not, with low-status females the losers. Competition over highly desirable foods distributed in defendable clumps at

  3. HIC1 and miR-23~27~24 clusters form a double-negative feedback loop in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanbo; Liang, Hongwei; Zhou, Geyu; Hu, Xiuting; Liu, Zhengya; Jin, Fangfang; Yu, Mengchao; Sang, Jianfeng; Zhou, Yong; Fu, Zheng; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zhang, Weijie; Zen, Ke; Chen, Xi

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as a major regulator of the initiation and progression of human cancers, including breast cancer. However, the cooperative effects and transcriptional regulation of multiple miRNAs, especially miRNAs that are present in clusters, remain largely undiscovered. Here we showed that all members of the miR-23~27~24 clusters are upregulated and function as oncogenes in breast cancer and simultaneously target HIC1. Furthermore, we found that HIC1 functions as a transcriptional repressor to negatively control the expression of miR-23~27~24 clusters and forms a double-negative (overall positive) feedback loop. This feedback regulatory pathway is important because overexpression of miR-23~27~24 clusters can remarkably accelerate tumor growth, whereas restoration of HIC1 significantly blocks tumor growth in vivo. A mathematical model was created to quantitatively illustrate the regulatory circuit. Our finding highlights the cooperative effects of miRNAs in a cluster and adds another layer of complexity to the miRNA regulatory network. This study may also provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of breast cancer progression. PMID:28009350

  4. Methods and limitations of 'clumped' CO2 isotope (Delta47) analysis by gas-source isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huntington, K W; Eiler, J M; Affek, H P; Guo, W; Bonifacie, M; Yeung, L Y; Thiagarajan, N; Passey, B; Tripati, A; Daëron, M; Came, R

    2009-09-01

    The geochemistry of multiply substituted isotopologues ('clumped-isotope' geochemistry) examines the abundances in natural materials of molecules, formula units or moieties that contain more than one rare isotope (e.g. (13)C(18)O(16)O, (18)O(18)O, (15)N(2), (13)C(18)O(16)O(2) (2-)). Such species form the basis of carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry and undergo distinctive fractionations during a variety of natural processes, but initial reports have provided few details of their analysis. In this study, we present detailed data and arguments regarding the theoretical and practical limits of precision, methods of standardization, instrument linearity and related issues for clumped-isotope analysis by dual-inlet gas-source isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We demonstrate long-term stability and subtenth per mil precision in 47/44 ratios for counting systems consisting of a Faraday cup registered through a 10(12) ohm resistor on three Thermo-Finnigan 253 IRMS systems. Based on the analyses of heated CO(2) gases, which have a stochastic distribution of isotopes among possible isotopologues, we document and correct for (1) isotopic exchange among analyte CO(2) molecules and (2) subtle nonlinearity in the relationship between actual and measured 47/44 ratios. External precisions of approximately 0.01 per thousand are routinely achieved for measurements of the mass-47 anomaly (a measure mostly of the abundance anomaly of (13)C-(18)O bonds) and follow counting statistics. The present technical limit to precision intrinsic to our methods and instrumentation is approximately 5 parts per million (ppm), whereas precisions of measurements of heterogeneous natural materials are more typically approximately 10 ppm (both 1 s.e.). These correspond to errors in carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry of +/-1.2 degrees C and +/-2.4 degrees C, respectively.

  5. Clumped isotope effects during OH and Cl oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehill, Andrew R.; Joelsson, Lars Magnus T.; Schmidt, Johan A.; Wang, David T.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Ono, Shuhei

    2017-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to determine the clumped (13CH3D) methane kinetic isotope effects during oxidation of methane by OH and Cl radicals, the major sink reactions for atmospheric methane. Experiments were performed in a 100 L quartz photochemical reactor, in which OH was produced from the reaction of O(1D) (from O3 photolysis) with H2O, and Cl was from photolysis of Cl2. Samples were taken from the reaction cell and analyzed for methane (12CH4, 12CH3D, 13CH4, 13CH3D) isotopologue ratios using tunable infrared laser direct absorption spectroscopy. Measured kinetic isotope effects for singly substituted species were consistent with previous experimental studies. For doubly substituted methane, 13CH3D, the observed kinetic isotope effects closely follow the product of the kinetic isotope effects for the 13C and deuterium substituted species (i.e., 13,2KIE = 13KIE × 2KIE). The deviation from this relationship is 0.3‰ ± 1.2‰ and 3.5‰ ± 0.7‰ for OH and Cl oxidation, respectively. This is consistent with model calculations performed using quantum chemistry and transition state theory. The OH and Cl reactions enrich the residual methane in the clumped isotopologue in open system reactions. In a closed system, however, this effect is overtaken by the large D/H isotope effect, which causes the residual methane to become anti-clumped relative to the initial methane. Based on these results, we demonstrate that oxidation of methane by OH, the predominant oxidant for tropospheric methane, will only have a minor (∼0.3‰) impact on the clumped isotope signature (Δ13CH3D, measured as a deviation from a stochastic distribution of isotopes) of tropospheric methane. This paper shows that Δ13CH3D will provide constraints on methane source strengths, and predicts that Δ12CH2D2 can provide information on methane sink strengths.

  6. The Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps : PGCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montier, L.

    The Planck satellite has provided an unprecedented view of the submm sky, allowing us to search for the dust emission of Galactic cold sources. Combining Planck-HFI all-sky maps in the high frequency channels with the IRAS map at 100um, we built the Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC, Planck 2015 results. XXVIII), counting 13188 sources distributed over the whole sky, and following mainly the Galactic structures at low and intermediate latitudes. This is the first all-sky catalogue of Galactic cold sources obtained with a single instrument at this resolution and sensitivity, which opens a new window on star-formation processes in our Galaxy.

  7. Carbon nanotube growth from catalytic nano-clusters formed by hot-ion-implantation into the SiO2/Si interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Yasushi; Arima, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Ai; Saito, Yasunao; Nakata, Jyoji

    2012-07-01

    We have studied growth of chirality-controlled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from hot-implantation-formed catalytic nano-clusters in a thermally grown SiO2/Si substrate. This procedure has the advantage of high controllability of the diameter and the number of clusters by optimizing the conditions of the ion implantation. In the present study, Co+ ions with ion dose of 8 × 1016 cm-2 are implanted in the vicinity of the SiO2/Si interface at 300 °C temperature. The implanted Co atoms located in the SiO2 layer has an amorphous-like structure with a cluster diameter of several nm. In contrast, implanted Co atoms in the Si substrate are found to take a cobalt silicide structure, confirmed by the high-resolution image of transmission electron microscope. CNTs are grown by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. We have confirmed a large amount of vertically-aligned multi-walled CNTs from the Co nano-clusters formed by the hot-ion-implantation near the SiO2/Si interface.

  8. Clumped isotope thermometry of modern and early Cretaceous molluscan carbonate from high-latitude seas (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, G. A.; Price, G. D.; Ambrose, W. G.; Carroll, M. L.; Passey, B. H.

    2010-12-01

    The carbonate clumped isotope thermometer is based on the temperature sensitivity of the relative abundance of carbonate ion groups containing 13C-18O bonds. One application of clumped isotope thermometry is to determine the temperature of ancient seawater from the skeletal material of calcium carbonate-secreting marine organisms. The relationship between Δ47, a parameter describing isotopic clumping, and the temperature of carbonate biomineralization has been well-defined for fish otoliths, corals, foraminifera, and coccolithophore tests, but few data have been published for brachiopods and bivalve mollusks. A comprehensive evaluation of the Δ47-temperature relationship for mollusks is required for paleotemperature interpretations from the marine fossil record. Here we present a more comprehensive calibration for modern mollusks, including bivalves, cephalopods, and gastropods. Further, we focus on a subset of cold water, high-latitude species collected in the northern Barents Sea. The observed Δ47-temperature relationship is similar to the theoretical relationship presented by Guo et al. (2009) but deviates at low temperatures from the original Ghosh et al. (2007) calibration curve. This divergence could be related to methodological differences or unaccounted differences in the biomineralization of mollusks versus that of other carbonate-secreting organisms at low temperature. One advantage of clumped isotope thermometry over traditional oxygen isotope thermometry is that it does not require assumptions about the isotopic composition of the water in which the carbonate formed. This may be particularly useful in Mesozoic paleoceanography where the oxygen isotope value of seawater is uncertain. Using clumped isotope thermometry applied to early Cretaceous (Valangian) belemnite carbonate from the Yatria River, sub-polar Urals, Siberia, we find shell growth temperatures of 20-26°C at a paleolatitude of ~60-65°N. Our data imply average seawater δ18O values of 0

  9. Inter- and intra-annual variations of clumping index derived from the MODIS BRDF product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Liming; Liu, Jane; Chen, Jing M.; Croft, Holly; Wang, Rong; Sprintsin, Michael; Zheng, Ting; Ryu, Youngryel; Pisek, Jan; Gonsamo, Alemu; Deng, Feng; Zhang, Yongqin

    2016-02-01

    Clumping index quantifies the level of foliage aggregation, relative to a random distribution, and is a key structural parameter of plant canopies and is widely used in ecological and meteorological models. In this study, the inter- and intra-annual variations in clumping index values, derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF product, are investigated at six forest sites, including conifer forests, a mixed deciduous forest and an oak-savanna system. We find that the clumping index displays large seasonal variation, particularly for the deciduous sites, with the magnitude in clumping index values at each site comparable on an intra-annual basis, and the seasonality of clumping index well captured after noise removal. For broadleaved and mixed forest sites, minimum clumping index values are usually found during the season when leaf area index is at its maximum. The magnitude of MODIS clumping index is validated by ground data collected from 17 sites. Validation shows that the MODIS clumping index can explain 75% of variance in measured values (bias = 0.03 and rmse = 0.08), although with a narrower amplitude in variation. This study suggests that the MODIS BRDF product has the potential to produce good seasonal trajectories of clumping index values, but with an improved estimation of background reflectance.

  10. Analysis of Clumps in Saturn’s F Ring from Voyager and Cassini Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Robert S.; Hicks, S. K.; Showalter, M. R.; Antonsen, A. K.; Packard, D. R.

    2013-10-01

    Saturn's F ring is well known for its unique and dynamic features that change on timescales from hours to months. Among these features are clumps, localized bright areas spanning ~3-30 degrees in longitude. 34 clumps tracked in Voyager images (Showalter 2004, Icarus, 171, 356-371) were found to live for several months and have a ~100 km spread in semi-major axis around the F ring core. Several clumps appeared to "split" during their lifetimes. Unfortunately, the poor resolution of the Voyager images and limited temporal and longitudinal coverage prevented a more detailed analysis. In this study, we performed a similar analysis using six years' worth of images from the Cassini Orbiter. We tracked 96 clumps and found similar angular widths, lifetimes, and semi-major axes to those observed by Voyager. However, the number of clumps present at one time appears to have decreased and the clumps are generally less bright; there are also many fewer extremely bright clumps. The better quality images allowed us to investigate five "splitting" clumps and we found that the apparent splits were often caused by the passage of the inner shepherd moon Prometheus. We further found that the birth and death of clumps appears uncorrelated with the position of Prometheus or with other features such as "mini-jets" or "jets" often found in the ring. We speculate on the changes in the population of embedded moonlets that may have resulted in these changes.

  11. Galaxies Unveiled: Rest-frame UV Clumps at 0.5 < z < 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Emmaris; de Mello, Duilia F.; Rafelski, Marc A.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2017-03-01

    Studies of high redshift galaxies reveal compact sub-galactic regions of star formation, known as `clumps'. These `clumpy' galaxies are useful for the study of galactic outskirts by enabling us to examine the radial progression of clumps over large time scales. We use the first deep high resolution NUV image from the Hubble Space Telescope covering intermediate redshifts to explore the implications this radial progression may have on galaxy evolution. From the analysis of 209 clumpy galaxies, we find that higher redshift clumps dominate the outer regions of galactic outskirts. This indicates that clumps may be migrating from the outskirts inward toward their galactic centers.

  12. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-10-01

    "Clumped-isotope" thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope "clumps"). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals. We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect. Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3- and CO32-. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many natural systems. The two

  13. Use of density functional theory method to calculate structures of neutral carbon clusters Cn (3 ≤ n ≤ 24) and study their variability of structural forms.

    PubMed

    Yen, T W; Lai, S K

    2015-02-28

    In this work, we present modifications to the well-known basin hopping (BH) optimization algorithm [D. J. Wales and J. P. Doye, J. Phys. Chem. A 101, 5111 (1997)] by incorporating in it the unique and specific nature of interactions among valence electrons and ions in carbon atoms through calculating the cluster's total energy by the density functional tight-binding (DFTB) theory, using it to find the lowest energy structures of carbon clusters and, from these optimized atomic and electronic structures, studying their varied forms of topological transitions, which include a linear chain, a monocyclic to a polycyclic ring, and a fullerene/cage-like geometry. In this modified BH (MBH) algorithm, we define a spatial volume within which the cluster's lowest energy structure is to be searched, and introduce in addition a cut-and-splice genetic operator to increase the searching performance of the energy minimum than the original BH technique. The present MBH/DFTB algorithm is, therefore, characteristically distinguishable from the original BH technique commonly applied to nonmetallic and metallic clusters, technically more thorough and natural in describing the intricate couplings between valence electrons and ions in a carbon cluster, and thus theoretically sound in putting these two charged components on an equal footing. The proposed modified minimization algorithm should be more appropriate, accurate, and precise in the description of a carbon cluster. We evaluate the present algorithm, its energy-minimum searching in particular, by its optimization robustness. Specifically, we first check the MBH/DFTB technique for two representative carbon clusters of larger size, i.e., C60 and C72 against the popular cut-and-splice approach [D. M. Deaven and K. M. Ho, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 288 (1995)] that normally is combined with the genetic algorithm method for finding the cluster's energy minimum, before employing it to investigate carbon clusters in the size range C3-C24

  14. Gravitational Vortices And Clump Formation In Saturn's F ring During An Encounter With Prometheus

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.

    2013-01-01

    Saturn rings are most beautiful and dynamic places in the solar system, consisting of ice particles in a constant battle between the gravitational forces of Saturn and its many moons. Fan, spiral, propellers, moonlets and streamer-channels observed by CASSINI in the F-ring have been attributed to encounters by Prometheus on the F ring, with investigations of optical thickness revealing large populations of transient moonlets. Taking into account gravitational interaction between particles and a multi-stranded F-ring structure we show that Prometheus' encounters create rotational flows, like atmospheric vortices and the self-gravity enhances the accelerated growth and size of moonlets. Vortex patches form caustics, which is a primary cause of the transient particle density clumps of 20 km width and 100 km length, and they are elongated to cover an area of 1600 km by 150 km, which may eventually combine into a vortex sheet. PMID:23429480

  15. Gravitational Vortices And Clump Formation In Saturn's F ring During An Encounter With Prometheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.

    2013-02-01

    Saturn rings are most beautiful and dynamic places in the solar system, consisting of ice particles in a constant battle between the gravitational forces of Saturn and its many moons. Fan, spiral, propellers, moonlets and streamer-channels observed by CASSINI in the F-ring have been attributed to encounters by Prometheus on the F ring, with investigations of optical thickness revealing large populations of transient moonlets. Taking into account gravitational interaction between particles and a multi-stranded F-ring structure we show that Prometheus' encounters create rotational flows, like atmospheric vortices and the self-gravity enhances the accelerated growth and size of moonlets. Vortex patches form caustics, which is a primary cause of the transient particle density clumps of 20 km width and 100 km length, and they are elongated to cover an area of 1600 km by 150 km, which may eventually combine into a vortex sheet.

  16. Gravitational vortices and clump formation in Saturn's F ring during an encounter with Prometheus.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Phil J; Kusmartsev, Feodor V

    2013-01-01

    Saturn rings are most beautiful and dynamic places in the solar system, consisting of ice particles in a constant battle between the gravitational forces of Saturn and its many moons. Fan, spiral, propellers, moonlets and streamer-channels observed by CASSINI in the F-ring have been attributed to encounters by Prometheus on the F ring, with investigations of optical thickness revealing large populations of transient moonlets. Taking into account gravitational interaction between particles and a multi-stranded F-ring structure we show that Prometheus' encounters create rotational flows, like atmospheric vortices and the self-gravity enhances the accelerated growth and size of moonlets. Vortex patches form caustics, which is a primary cause of the transient particle density clumps of 20 km width and 100 km length, and they are elongated to cover an area of 1600 km by 150 km, which may eventually combine into a vortex sheet.

  17. Low star formation efficiencies in z=1.62 star-forming proto-cluster galaxies as seen in CO(1-0).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    I will present JVLA CO imaging in the 1-0 transition of a z=1.62 galaxy cluster located in the UKIDSS/UDS and covered by the 3D-HST data. These are the deepest existing data in CO(1-0), corresponding to nearly 100 hours of JVLA observations, and are giving us the powerful ability to study the molecular gas contents of massive cluster galaxies when they were in the last throes of their star formation. The 3D-HST data are crucial to this endeavor as they 1) give us accurate redshifts with which to confirm membership, 2) give us the ability to reject cluster interlopers, and 3) serve as a strong redshift prior to search for weak CO lines. We securely detect two cluster members in CO(1-0) at the expected frequency given the grism redshifts. This nearly doubles the number of published CO(1-0) detections of normal star-forming galaxies at high redshift. These two galaxies are massive, with log(Mstar~11) and extremely gas rich (Mgas/Mbaryon~0.5-0.6). Despite their very large gas reservoirs they are forming stars at a sedate pace for their stellar mass and lie on or below the main star formation sequence. I will discuss potential reasons for the apparent high CO luminosities (and correspondingly low star formation efficiencies) of these objects, e.g. stablization of the gas by a compact stellar configuration or abnormally low conversion factors from CO to molecular hydrogen. I will also comment on the implications of this interesting finding for understanding the truncation of gas accretion onto distant cluster galaxies.

  18. Aggregated Clumps of Lithistid Sponges: A Singular, Reef-Like Bathyal Habitat with Relevant Paleontological Connections

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Manuel; Aguilar, Ricardo; Blanco, Jorge; García, Silvia; Serrano, Alberto; Punzón, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The advent of deep-sea exploration using video cameras has uncovered extensive sponge aggregations in virtually all oceans. Yet, a distinct type is herein reported from the Mediterranean: a monospecific reef-like formation built by the lithistid demosponge Leiodermatium pfeifferae. Erect, plate-like individuals (up to 80 cm) form bulky clumps, making up to 1.8 m high mounds (1.14 m on average) on the bottom, at a 760 m-deep seamount named SSS. The siliceous skeletal frameworks of the lithistids persist after sponge death, serving as a complex 3D substratum where new lithistids recruit, along with a varied fauna of other sessile and vagile organisms. The intricate aggregation of lithistid mounds functions as a “reef” formation, architecturally different from the archetypal "demosponge gardens" with disaggregating siliceous skeletons. Leiodermatium pfeifferae also occurred at two additional, close seamounts (EBJ and EBS), but, unlike at SSS, the isolated individuals never formed accretive clumps. The general oceanographic variables (temperature, salinity, dissolved nutrients, chlorophyll, and oxygen) revealed only minimal between-seamount differences, which cannot explain why sponge abundance at SSS is about two orders of magnitude higher than at EBJ or EBS. Large areas of the dense SSS aggregation were damaged, with detached and broken sponges and a few tangled fishing lines. Satellite vessel monitoring revealed low fishing activity around these seamounts. In contrast, international plans for gas and oil extraction at those locations raise serious concerns over the need for protecting urgently this unique, vulnerable habitat to avoid further alteration. Modern lithistids are a relict fauna from Jurassic and Cretaceous reefs and the roots of the very genus Leiodermatium can be traced back to those fossil formations. Therefore, understanding the causes behind the discovered lithistid aggregation is critical not only to its preservation, but also to elucidate how

  19. Evaluation of meteoric calcite cements as a proxy material for mass-47 clumped isotope thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defliese, William F.; Lohmann, Kyger C.

    2016-01-01

    Meteoric diagenetic cements are ubiquitous throughout geologic history, affecting most carbonate exposures worldwide. They can often be difficult to interpret, as it is usually difficult to separate the influences of water δ18O and temperature on isotopic signals contained within the carbonate rock body. Despite this difficulty in interpretation, meteoric phreatic cements can potentially be a useful proxy material, as they form slowly in equilibrium at mean annual temperature and are not affected by any biogenic effects that can bias other proxy materials. We applied the mass-47 clumped isotope paleothermometer to Pleistocene and Holocene carbonates from Bermuda and Barbados in order to investigate the effects of meteoric diagenesis on Δ47 signals, and to determine their suitability as a paleotemperature proxy. Phreatic calcite cements are found to record the same temperatures as unaltered carbonate sediments, while any sample exhibiting vadose characteristics is biased towards unreasonably hot apparent formation temperatures. Burial heating and re-equilibration are not geologically viable explanations for the anomalously hot temperatures recorded in vadose cements, as neither Bermuda or Barbados has any burial history. Instead, it is likely that precipitation in the vadose zone occurs on timescales quicker than isotopic equilibrium can be achieved, driven by a combination of CO2 degassing and evaporation, which have been previously shown to cause problems in speleothems and pedogenic carbonates. We conclude by suggesting that meteoric phreatic calcites may be an ideal phase for paleotemperature reconstruction, as they accurately record mean annual temperatures and form under equilibrium conditions, while also being resistant to further mineral driven diagenesis. Vadose cements, and any sample likely affected by processes similar to vadose diagenesis, should be avoided for climate reconstructions using the mass-47 clumped isotope thermometer.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamical simulation of the formation of clumps and filaments in quiescent diffuse medium by thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareing, C. J.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Van Loo, S.

    2016-06-01

    We have used the adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic code, MG, to perform idealized 3D magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the formation of clumpy and filamentary structure in a thermally unstable medium without turbulence. A stationary thermally unstable spherical diffuse atomic cloud with uniform density in pressure equilibrium with low density surroundings was seeded with random density variations and allowed to evolve. A range of magnetic field strengths threading the cloud have been explored, from β = 0.1 to 1.0 to the zero magnetic field case (β = ∞), where β is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. Once the density inhomogeneities had developed to the point where gravity started to become important, self-gravity was introduced to the simulation. With no magnetic field, clouds and clumps form within the cloud with aspect ratios of around unity, whereas in the presence of a relatively strong field (β = 0.1) these become filaments, then evolve into interconnected corrugated sheets that are predominantly perpendicular to the magnetic field. With magnetic and thermal pressure equality (β = 1.0), filaments, clouds and clumps are formed. At any particular instant, the projection of the 3D structure on to a plane parallel to the magnetic field, i.e. a line of sight perpendicular to the magnetic field, resembles the appearance of filamentary molecular clouds. The filament densities, widths, velocity dispersions and temperatures resemble those observed in molecular clouds. In contrast, in the strong field case β = 0.1, projection of the 3D structure along a line of sight parallel to the magnetic field reveals a remarkably uniform structure.

  1. Aggregated clumps of lithistid sponges: a singular, reef-like bathyal habitat with relevant paleontological connections.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Manuel; Aguilar, Ricardo; Blanco, Jorge; García, Silvia; Serrano, Alberto; Punzón, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The advent of deep-sea exploration using video cameras has uncovered extensive sponge aggregations in virtually all oceans. Yet, a distinct type is herein reported from the Mediterranean: a monospecific reef-like formation built by the lithistid demosponge Leiodermatium pfeifferae. Erect, plate-like individuals (up to 80 cm) form bulky clumps, making up to 1.8 m high mounds (1.14 m on average) on the bottom, at a 760 m-deep seamount named SSS. The siliceous skeletal frameworks of the lithistids persist after sponge death, serving as a complex 3D substratum where new lithistids recruit, along with a varied fauna of other sessile and vagile organisms. The intricate aggregation of lithistid mounds functions as a "reef" formation, architecturally different from the archetypal "demosponge gardens" with disaggregating siliceous skeletons. Leiodermatium pfeifferae also occurred at two additional, close seamounts (EBJ and EBS), but, unlike at SSS, the isolated individuals never formed accretive clumps. The general oceanographic variables (temperature, salinity, dissolved nutrients, chlorophyll, and oxygen) revealed only minimal between-seamount differences, which cannot explain why sponge abundance at SSS is about two orders of magnitude higher than at EBJ or EBS. Large areas of the dense SSS aggregation were damaged, with detached and broken sponges and a few tangled fishing lines. Satellite vessel monitoring revealed low fishing activity around these seamounts. In contrast, international plans for gas and oil extraction at those locations raise serious concerns over the need for protecting urgently this unique, vulnerable habitat to avoid further alteration. Modern lithistids are a relict fauna from Jurassic and Cretaceous reefs and the roots of the very genus Leiodermatium can be traced back to those fossil formations. Therefore, understanding the causes behind the discovered lithistid aggregation is critical not only to its preservation, but also to elucidate how the

  2. Photoevaporation of Disks and Clumps by Nearby Massive Stars: Application to Disk Destruction in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Doug; Hollenbach, David; Bally, John

    1998-05-01

    We present a model for the photoevaporation of circumstellar disks or dense clumps of gas by an external source of ultraviolet radiation. Our model includes the thermal and dynamic effects of 6-13.6 eV far-ultraviolet (FUV) photons and Lyman continuum EUV photons incident upon disks or clumps idealized as spheres of radius rd and enclosed mass M*. For sufficiently large values of rd/M*, the radiation field evaporates the surface gas and dust. Analytical and numerical approximations to the resulting flows are presented; the model depends on rd, M*, the flux of FUV and EUV photons, and the column density of neutral gas heated by FUV photons to high temperatures. Application of this model shows that the circumstellar disks (rd ~ 1014-1015 cm) in the Orion Nebula (``proplyds'') are rapidly destroyed by the external UV radiation field. Close (d <~ 1017 cm) to θ1 Ori C, the ionizing EUV photon flux controls the mass-loss rate, and the ionization front (IF) is approximately coincident with the disk surface. Gas evaporated from the cold disk moves subsonically through a relatively thin photodissociation region (PDR) dominated by FUV photons and heated to ~1000 K. As the distance from θ1 Ori C increases, the Lyman continuum flux declines, the PDR thickens, and the IF moves away from the disk surface. At d ~ 3 × 1017 cm, the thickness of the PDR becomes comparable to the disk radius. Between 3 × 1017 cm <~ d <~ 1018 cm, spherical divergence and the resultant pressure gradient in the 103 K PDR forms a mildly supersonic (~3-6 km s-1) but neutral Parker wind. This wind flows outward until it passes through a shock, beyond which gas moves subsonically through a stationary D-type IF. The IF is moved away from the disk surface to a standoff distance rIF >~ 2.5rd. In this regime, the mass-loss rate is determined by the incident FUV photon flux and not the ionizing flux. However, at very large distances, d >~ 1018 cm, the FUV photon flux drops to values that cannot maintain the

  3. FAR-INFRARED DUST TEMPERATURES AND COLUMN DENSITIES OF THE MALT90 MOLECULAR CLUMP SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Smith, Howard A.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Contreras, Yanett; Rathborne, Jill M.; Jackson, James M.; Hoq, Sadia

    2015-12-20

    We present dust column densities and dust temperatures for ∼3000 young, high-mass molecular clumps from the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz survey, derived from adjusting single-temperature dust emission models to the far-infrared intensity maps measured between 160 and 870 μm from the Herschel/Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-Gal) and APEX/APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) surveys. We discuss the methodology employed in analyzing the data, calculating physical parameters, and estimating their uncertainties. The population average dust temperature of the clumps are 16.8 ± 0.2 K for the clumps that do not exhibit mid-infrared signatures of star formation (quiescent clumps), 18.6 ± 0.2 K for the clumps that display mid-infrared signatures of ongoing star formation but have not yet developed an H ii region (protostellar clumps), and 23.7 ± 0.2 and 28.1 ± 0.3 K for clumps associated with H ii and photo-dissociation regions, respectively. These four groups exhibit large overlaps in their temperature distributions, with dispersions ranging between 4 and 6 K. The median of the peak column densities of the protostellar clump population is 0.20 ± 0.02 g cm{sup −2}, which is about 50% higher compared to the median of the peak column densities associated with clumps in the other evolutionary stages. We compare the dust temperatures and column densities measured toward the center of the clumps with the mean values of each clump. We find that in the quiescent clumps, the dust temperature increases toward the outer regions and that these clumps are associated with the shallowest column density profiles. In contrast, molecular clumps in the protostellar or H ii region phase have dust temperature gradients more consistent with internal heating and are associated with steeper column density profiles compared with the quiescent clumps.

  4. Molecular Line Emission Towards High-Mass Clumps: The MALT90 Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Whitaker, J. S.; Jackson, J. M.; Foster, J. B.; Contreras, Y.; Stephens, I. W.; Guzmán, A. E.; Longmore, S. N.; Sanhueza, P.; Schuller, F.; Wyrowski, F.; Urquhart, J. S.

    2016-07-01

    The Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz survey aims to characterise the physical and chemical evolution of high-mass clumps. Recently completed, it mapped 90 GHz line emission towards 3 246 high-mass clumps identified from the ATLASGAL 870 μm Galactic plane survey. By utilising the broad frequency coverage of the Mopra telescope's spectrometer, maps in 16 different emission lines were simultaneously obtained. Here, we describe the first catalogue of the detected line emission, generated by Gaussian profile fitting to spectra extracted towards each clumps' 870 μm dust continuum peak. Synthetic spectra show that the catalogue has a completeness of > 95%, a probability of a false-positive detection of < 0.3%, and a relative uncertainty in the measured quantities of < 20% over the range of detection criteria. The detection rates are highest for the (1-0) transitions of HCO+, HNC, N2H+, and HCN (~77-89%). Almost all clumps (~95%) are detected in at least one of the molecular transitions, just over half of the clumps (~53%) are detected in four or more of the transitions, while only one clump is detected in 13 transitions. We find several striking trends in the ensemble of properties for the different molecular transitions when plotted as a function of the clumps' evolutionary state as estimated from Spitzer mid-IR images, including (1) HNC is relatively brighter in colder, less evolved clumps than those that show active star formation, (2) N2H+ is relatively brighter in the earlier stages, (3) that the observed optical depth decreases as the clumps evolve, and (4) the optically thickest HCO+ emission shows a `blue-red asymmetry' indicating overall collapse that monotonically decreases as the clumps evolve. This catalogue represents the largest compiled database of line emission towards high-mass clumps and is a valuable data set for detailed studies of these objects.

  5. Structure and hydration of the C4H4●+ ion formed by electron impact ionization of acetylene clusters.

    PubMed

    Momoh, Paul O; Hamid, Ahmed M; Abrash, Samuel A; El-Shall, M Samy

    2011-05-28

    Here we report ion mobility experiments and theoretical studies aimed at elucidating the identity of the acetylene dimer cation and its hydrated structures. The mobility measurement indicates the presence of more than one isomer for the C(4)H(4)(●+) ion in the cluster beam. The measured average collision cross section of the C(4)H(4)(●+) isomers in helium (38.9 ± 1 Å(2)) is consistent with the calculated cross sections of the four most stable covalent structures calculated for the C(4)H(4)(●+) ion [methylenecyclopropene (39.9 Å(2)), 1,2,3-butatriene (41.1 Å(2)), cyclobutadiene (38.6 Å(2)), and vinyl acetylene (41.1 Å(2))]. However, none of the single isomers is able to reproduce the experimental arrival time distribution of the C(4)H(4)(●+) ion. Combinations of cyclobutadiene and vinyl acetylene isomers show excellent agreement with the experimental mobility profile and the measured collision cross section. The fragment ions obtained by the dissociation of the C(4)H(4)(●+) ion are consistent with the cyclobutadiene structure in agreement with the vibrational predissociation spectrum of the acetylene dimer cation (C(2)H(2))(2)(●+) [R. A. Relph, J. C. Bopp, J. R. Roscioli, and M. A. Johnson, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 114305 (2009)]. The stepwise hydration experiments show that dissociative proton transfer reactions occur within the C(4)H(4)(●+)(H(2)O)(n) clusters with n ≥ 3 resulting in the formation of protonated water clusters. The measured binding energy of the C(4)H(4)(●+)H(2)O cluster, 38.7 ± 4 kJ/mol, is in excellent agreement with the G3(MP2) calculated binding energy of cyclobutadiene(●+)·H(2)O cluster (41 kJ/mol). The binding energies of the C(4)H(4)(●+)(H(2)O)(n) clusters change little from n = 1 to 5 (39-48 kJ/mol) suggesting the presence of multiple binding sites with comparable energies for the water-C(4)H(4)(●+) and water-water interactions. A significant entropy loss is measured for the addition of the fifth water

  6. Hydrogen-bonded clusters of 1, 1'-ferrocenedicarboxylic acid on Au(111) are initially formed in solution.

    PubMed

    Quardokus, Rebecca C; Wasio, Natalie A; Brown, Ryan D; Christie, John A; Henderson, Kenneth W; Forrest, Ryan P; Lent, Craig S; Corcelli, Steven A; Kandel, S Alex

    2015-03-14

    Low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy is used to observe self-assembled structures of ferrocenedicarboxylic acid (Fc(COOH)2) on the Au(111) surface. The surface is prepared by pulse-deposition of Fc(COOH)2 dissolved in methanol, and the solvent is evaporated before imaging. While the rows of hydrogen-bonded dimers that are common for carboxylic acid species are observed, the majority of adsorbed Fc(COOH)2 is instead found in six-molecule clusters with a well-defined and chiral geometry. The coverage and distribution of these clusters are consistent with a random sequential adsorption model, showing that solution-phase species are determinative of adsorbate distribution for this system under these reaction conditions.

  7. Structure and hydration of the C4H4•+ ion formed by electron impact ionization of acetylene clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momoh, Paul O.; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Abrash, Samuel A.; Samy El-Shall, M.

    2011-05-01

    Here we report ion mobility experiments and theoretical studies aimed at elucidating the identity of the acetylene dimer cation and its hydrated structures. The mobility measurement indicates the presence of more than one isomer for the C4H4•+ ion in the cluster beam. The measured average collision cross section of the C4H4•+ isomers in helium (38.9 ± 1 Å2) is consistent with the calculated cross sections of the four most stable covalent structures calculated for the C4H4•+ ion [methylenecyclopropene (39.9 Å2), 1,2,3-butatriene (41.1 Å2), cyclobutadiene (38.6 Å2), and vinyl acetylene (41.1 Å2)]. However, none of the single isomers is able to reproduce the experimental arrival time distribution of the C4H4•+ ion. Combinations of cyclobutadiene and vinyl acetylene isomers show excellent agreement with the experimental mobility profile and the measured collision cross section. The fragment ions obtained by the dissociation of the C4H4•+ ion are consistent with the cyclobutadiene structure in agreement with the vibrational predissociation spectrum of the acetylene dimer cation (C2H2)2•+ [R. A. Relph, J. C. Bopp, J. R. Roscioli, and M. A. Johnson, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 114305 (2009)], 10.1063/1.3212595. The stepwise hydration experiments show that dissociative proton transfer reactions occur within the C4H4•+(H2O)n clusters with n ≥ 3 resulting in the formation of protonated water clusters. The measured binding energy of the C4H4•+H2O cluster, 38.7 ± 4 kJ/mol, is in excellent agreement with the G3(MP2) calculated binding energy of cyclobutadiene•+.H2O cluster (41 kJ/mol). The binding energies of the C4H4•+(H2O)n clusters change little from n = 1 to 5 (39-48 kJ/mol) suggesting the presence of multiple binding sites with comparable energies for the water-C4H4•+ and water-water interactions. A significant entropy loss is measured for the addition of the fifth water molecule suggesting a structure with restrained water molecules, probably a

  8. NEXAFS study on the local structures of DLC thin films formed by Ar cluster ion beam assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Teruyuki; Shimizugawa, Yutaka; Tsubakino, Harushige; Yamada, Isao; Matsui, Shinji

    2003-08-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra were measured for the optimization of synthesis conditions on the production of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films by the Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) assisted deposition of fullerene. The sp2 contents of DLC films were estimated from the analysis of the peak corresponding to the transition of the excitation electron from a carbon 1s orbital to a π* orbital in the NEXAFS spectrum of the carbon K-edge over the excitation energy range 275-320 eV. Substrate temperature and Ar cluster ion acceleration voltage in the synthesis conditions of DLC films were optimized to make the sp2 content minimum.

  9. A CHANDRA STUDY OF THE ROSETTE STAR-FORMING COMPLEX. II. CLUSTERS IN THE ROSETTE MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junfeng; Feigelson, Eric D.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Garmire, Gordon; Roman-Zuniga, Carlos G.; Lada, Elizabeth E-mail: edf@astro.psu.edu

    2009-05-01

    We explore here the young stellar populations in the Rosette Molecular Cloud (RMC) region with high spatial resolution X-ray images from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which are effective in locating weak-lined T Tauri stars as well as disk-bearing young stars. A total of 395 X-ray point sources are detected, 299 of which (76%) have an optical or near-infrared (NIR) counterpart identified from deep FLAMINGOS images. From X-ray and mass sensitivity limits, we infer a total population of {approx}1700 young stars in the survey region. Based on smoothed stellar surface density maps, we investigate the spatial distribution of the X-ray sources and define three distinctive structures and substructures within them. Structures B and C are associated with previously known embedded IR clusters, while structure A is a new X-ray-identified unobscured cluster. A high-mass protostar RMCX no. 89 = IRAS 06306+0437 and its associated sparse cluster are studied. The different subregions are not coeval but do not show a simple spatial-age pattern. Disk fractions vary between subregions and are generally {approx}<20% of the total stellar population inferred from the X-ray survey. The data are consistent with speculations that triggered star formation around the H II region is present in the RMC, but do not support a simple sequential triggering process through the cloud interior. While a significant fraction of young stars are located in a distributed population throughout the RMC region, it is not clear if they originated in clustered environments.

  10. A Chandra Study of the Rosette Star-Forming Complex. II. Clusters in the Rosette Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Feigelson, Eric D.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Lada, Elizabeth; Garmire, Gordon

    2009-05-01

    We explore here the young stellar populations in the Rosette Molecular Cloud (RMC) region with high spatial resolution X-ray images from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which are effective in locating weak-lined T Tauri stars as well as disk-bearing young stars. A total of 395 X-ray point sources are detected, 299 of which (76%) have an optical or near-infrared (NIR) counterpart identified from deep FLAMINGOS images. From X-ray and mass sensitivity limits, we infer a total population of ~1700 young stars in the survey region. Based on smoothed stellar surface density maps, we investigate the spatial distribution of the X-ray sources and define three distinctive structures and substructures within them. Structures B and C are associated with previously known embedded IR clusters, while structure A is a new X-ray-identified unobscured cluster. A high-mass protostar RMCX #89 = IRAS 06306+0437 and its associated sparse cluster are studied. The different subregions are not coeval but do not show a simple spatial-age pattern. Disk fractions vary between subregions and are generally lsim20% of the total stellar population inferred from the X-ray survey. The data are consistent with speculations that triggered star formation around the H II region is present in the RMC, but do not support a simple sequential triggering process through the cloud interior. While a significant fraction of young stars are located in a distributed population throughout the RMC region, it is not clear if they originated in clustered environments.

  11. Bacillus cereus Fnr binds a [4Fe-4S] cluster and forms a ternary complex with ResD and PlcR

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacillus cereus is a facultative anaerobe that causes diarrheal disease in humans. Diarrheal syndrome may result from the secretion of various virulence factors including hemolysin BL and nonhemolytic enterotoxin Nhe. Expression of genes encoding Hbl and Nhe is regulated by the two redox systems, ResDE and Fnr, and the virulence regulator PlcR. B. cereus Fnr is a member of the Crp/Fnr family of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) proteins. Only its apo-form has so far been studied. A major goal in deciphering the Fnr-dependent regulation of enterotoxin genes is thus to obtain and characterize holoFnr. Results Fnr has been subjected to in vitro Fe-S cluster reconstitution under anoxic conditions. UV-visible and EPR spectroscopic analyses together with the chemical estimation of the iron content indicated that Fnr binds one [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster per monomer. Atmospheric O2 causes disassembly of the Fe-S cluster, which exhibited a half-life of 15 min in air. Holo- and apoFnr have similar affinities for the nhe and hbl promoter regions, while holoFnr has a higher affinity for fnr promoter region than apoFnr. Both the apo- and holo-form of Fnr interact with ResD and PlcR to form a ternary complex. Conclusions Overall, this work shows that incorporation of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster is not required for DNA binding of Fnr to promoter regions of hbl and nhe enterotoxin genes or for the formation of a ternary complex with ResD and PlcR. This points to some new unusual properties of Fnr that may have physiological relevance in the redox regulation of enterotoxin gene regulation. PMID:22731107

  12. Angular clustering of z ˜ 2 star-forming and passive galaxies in 2.5 square degrees of deep CFHT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Taro; Sawicki, Marcin; Arcila-Osejo, Liz

    2014-09-01

    We study the angular clustering of z ˜ 2 galaxies using ˜40 000 star-forming (SF) and ˜5000 passively evolving (PE) galaxies selected from ˜2.5 deg2 of deep (Klim = 23-24 AB) Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope imaging. For both populations, the clustering is stronger for galaxies brighter in rest-frame optical and the trend is particularly strong for PE galaxies, indicating that passive galaxies with larger stellar masses reside in more massive haloes. In contrast, at rest-frame ultraviolet we find that while the clustering of SF galaxies increases with increasing luminosity, it decreases for PE galaxies; a possible explanation lies in quenching of star formation in the most massive haloes. Furthermore, we find two components in the correlation functions for both SF and PE galaxies, attributable to one- and two-halo terms. The presence of one-halo terms for both PE and SF galaxies suggests that environmental effects were producing passive galaxies in virtualized environments already by z ˜ 2. Finally, we find notable clustering differences between the four widely separated fields in our study; the popular COSMOS field is the most discrepant (as is also the case for number counts and luminosity functions), highlighting the need for very large areas and multiple sightlines in galaxy evolution statistical studies.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galactic CHaMP. II. Dense gas clumps. (Ma+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, B.; Tan, J. C.; Barnes, P. J.

    2015-04-01

    A total of 303 dense gas clumps have been detected using the HCO+(1-0) line in the CHaMP survey (Paper I, Barnes et al. 2011, J/ApJS/196/12). In this article we have derived the SED for these clumps using Spitzer, MSX, and IRAS data. The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) was launched in 1996 April. It conducted a Galactic plane survey (0clumps. The four MSX band wavelengths are centered at 8.28, 12.13, 14.65, and 21.3um. The best image resolution is ~18" in the 8.28um band, with positional accuracy of about 2". Calibrated images of the Galactic plane were obtained from the online MSX image server at the IPAC website. The IRAS performed an all-sky survey at 12, 25, 60, and 100um. The nominal resolution is about 4' at 60um. High Resolution Image Restoration (HIRES) uses the maximum correlation method to produce higher resolution images, better than 1' at 60um. Sources chosen for processing with HIRES were processed at all four IRAS bands with 20 iterations. The Spitzer InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) is a four-channel camera that provides simultaneous 5.2"x5.2" images at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8um with an angular resolution of about 2" at 8um. We searched the Spitzer archive at IPAC. Most of these data are from two large survey programs: PID 189 (Churchwell, E., "The SIRTF Galactic Plane Survey") and PID 40791 (Majewski, S., "Galactic Structure and Star Formation in Vela-Carina"). Hill et al. (2005, J/MNRAS/363/405) carried out a 1.2mm continuum emission survey toward 131 star-forming complexes using the Swedish ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) IMaging Bolometer Array (SIMBA). Hill et al. list the 1.2mm flux for 404 sources, 15 of which are in our sample. (2 data files).

  14. A process-based model for non-equilibrium clumped isotope effects in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. M.; Hunt, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The equilibrium clumped isotope composition of carbonate minerals is independent of the composition of the aqueous solution. However, many carbonate minerals grow at rates that place them in a non-equilibrium regime with respect to carbon and oxygen isotopes with unknown consequences for clumped isotopes. We develop a process-based model that allows one to calculate the oxygen, carbon, and clumped isotope composition of calcite as a function of temperature, crystal growth rate, and solution pH. In the model, carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation occurs through the mass-dependent attachment/detachment kinetics of the isotopologues of HCO-3 and CO2-3 to and from the calcite surface, which in turn, influence the clumped isotope composition of calcite. At experimental and biogenic growth rates, the mineral is expected to inherit a clumped isotopic composition that is similar to that of the DIC pool, which helps to explain (1) why different organisms share the same clumped isotope versus temperature calibration curves, (2) why many inorganic calibration curves are slightly different from one another, and (3) why foraminifera, coccoliths, and deep sea corals can have near-equilibrium clumped isotope compositions but far-from-equilibrium carbon and oxygen isotope compositions. Some aspects of the model can be generalized to other mineral systems and should serve as a useful reference in future efforts to quantify kinetic clumped isotope effects.

  15. Pseudothrombocytopenia due to Platelet Clumping: A Case Report and Brief Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Geok Chin; Stalling, Melissa; Dennis, Gretchen; Nunez, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Platelet clumping is a common laboratory phenomenon that complicates or precludes reporting of platelet count. It is often, but not always, a phenomenon commonly caused by the anticoagulant EDTA. Herein, we discuss a case of a 14-year-old girl who was found to have platelet clumping and discuss the work-up she underwent to investigate her pseudothrombocytopenia. PMID:28044112

  16. WFC3 GRISM CONFIRMATION OF THE DISTANT CLUSTER Cl J1449+0856 AT (z) = 2.00: QUIESCENT AND STAR-FORMING GALAXY POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gobat, R.; Strazzullo, V.; Daddi, E.; Renzini, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Cimatti, A.; Scarlata, C.; Arimoto, N.

    2013-10-10

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) slitless spectroscopic observations of the distant cluster Cl J1449+0856. These cover a single pointing with 18 orbits of G141 spectroscopy and F140W imaging, allowing us to derive secure redshifts down to M{sub 140} ∼ 25.5 AB and 3σ line fluxes of ∼5 × 10{sup –18} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. In particular, we were able to spectroscopically confirm 12 early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the field up to z ∼ 3, 6 of which are in the cluster core, which represents the first direct spectroscopic confirmation of quiescent galaxies in a z = 2 cluster environment. With 140 redshifts in a ∼6 arcmin{sup 2} field, we can trace the spatial and redshift galaxy distribution in the cluster core and background field. We find two strong peaks at z = 2.00 and z = 2.07, where only one was seen in our previously published ground-based data. Due to the spectroscopic confirmation of the cluster ETGs, we can now reevaluate the redshift of Cl J1449+0856 at z = 2.00, rather than z = 2.07, with the background overdensity being revealed to be sparse and {sup s}heet{sup -}like. This presents an interesting case of chance alignment of two close yet unrelated structures, each one preferentially selected by different observing strategies. With 6 quiescent or early-type spectroscopic members and 20 star-forming ones, Cl J1449+0856 is now reliably confirmed to be at z = 2.00. The identified members can now allow for a detailed study of galaxy properties in the densest environment at z = 2.

  17. Infrared Spectra of Protonated Water Clusters, H(+)(H2O)4, in Eigen and Zundel Forms Studied by Vibrational Quasi-Degenerate Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kiyoshi; Thomsen, Bo

    2017-03-09

    The infrared spectrum of H+(H2O)4 recently observed in a wide spectral range has shown a series of bands in a range of 1700-2500 cm-1, which can not be understood by the standard harmonic normal mode analysis. Here, we theoretically investigate the origin of these bands with a focus on (1) the possibility of co-existence of multiple isomers in the Eigen [H3O+(H2O)3] and Zundel [H5O2+(H2O)2] forms and (2) the effect of anharmonic coupling that gives rise to non-zero intensities for overtones and combination tones. Anharmonic vibrational calculations are carried out for the Eigen and Zundel clusters by the second-order vibrational quasi-degenerate perturbation theory (VQDPT2) based on optimized coordinates. The anharmonic potential energy surface and the dipole moment surfaces are generated by a multiresolution approach combining one-dimensional (1D) grid potential functions derived from CCSD(T)-F12, 2D and 3D grid potential functions derived from B3LYP for important coupling terms, and a quartic force field derived from B3LYP for less important terms. The spectrum calculated for the Eigen cluster is in excellent agreement with the experiment, assigning the bands in the range of 1700-2500 cm-1 to overtones and combination tones of a H3O+ moiety in line with recent reports [J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, 119, 9425; Science 2016, 354, 1131]. On the other hand, characteristic OH stretching bands of the Zundel cluster is found to be absent in the experimental spectrum. We therefore conclude that the experimental spectrum originates solely from the Eigen cluster. Nonetheless, the present calculation for the Eigen cluster poorly reproduces a band observed at 1765 cm-1. A possible nature of this band is discussed.

  18. The Yeast Iron Regulatory Proteins Grx3/4 and Fra2 Form Heterodimeric Complexes Containing a [2Fe-2S] Cluster with Cysteinyl and Histidyl Ligation†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haoran; Mapolelo, Daphne T.; Dingra, Nin N.; Naik, Sunil G.; Lees, Nicolas S.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Riggs-Gelasco, Pamela J.; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Johnson, Michael K.; Outten, Caryn E.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription of iron uptake and storage genes in S. cerevisiae is primarily regulated by the transcription factor Aft1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Aft1 is dependent upon mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biosynthesis via a signaling pathway that includes the cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3 and Grx4) and the BolA homologue Fra2. However the interactions between these proteins and the iron-dependent mechanism by which they control Aft1 localization are unclear. To reconstitute and characterize components of this signaling pathway in vitro, we have overexpressed yeast Fra2 and Grx3/4 in E. coli. We have shown that co-expression of recombinant Fra2 with Grx3 or Grx4 allows purification of a stable [2Fe-2S]2+ cluster-containing Fra2-Grx3 or Fra2-Grx4 heterodimeric complex. Reconstitution of a [2Fe-2S] cluster on Grx3 or Grx4 without Fra2 produces a [2Fe-2S]-bridged homodimer. UV-visible absorption and CD, resonance Raman, EPR, ENDOR, Mössbauer, and EXAFS studies of [2Fe-2S] Grx3/4 homodimers and the [2Fe-2S] Fra2-Grx3/4 heterodimers indicate that inclusion of Fra2 in the Grx3/4 Fe-S complex causes a change in the cluster stability and coordination environment. Taken together, our analytical, spectroscopic, and mutagenesis data indicate that Grx3/4 and Fra2 form a Fe-S-bridged heterodimeric complex with Fe ligands provided by the active site cysteine of Grx3/4, glutathione, and a histidine residue. Overall, these results suggest that the ability of the Fra2-Grx3/4 complex to assemble a [2Fe-2S] cluster may act as a signal to control the iron regulon in response to cellular iron status in yeast. PMID:19715344

  19. U-Pb Dating of Carbonates: A Complement to Clumped Isotope Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasbury, T.; Suarez, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonates are ubiquitous in nature, forming in a variety of settings at the surface and through burial. The field and petrographic relationships of carbonate phases can often be linked to the depositional setting and burial path(s) that the sedimentary pile has experienced. Clumped isotopes are taking on an important role of testing the temperature of formation of the carbonates, and combined with other approaches such as fluid inclusion analyses offers tremendous potential for testing basin evolution models. However, while the relative ages of carbonates are often fairly easily elucidated, the absolute ages of the events recorded in carbonates are not. U-Pb dating of carbonates offers the best potential for constraining the ages. However, not all fluids have favorable U/Ca ratios. U-Pb dated groundwater carbonates from the Late Triassic New Haven Arkose give an age of 211 +/- 2 Ma, consistent with the known age of deposition. Late bright luminescent calcite from the same formation gives an age of 81+/-11 Ma, constraining the age (both primary and secondary) of carbonate formation. Clumped isotope analyses of primary carbonate phases show somewhat elevated temperatures between 50-60o C, some 30 degrees hotter than other estimates for this Triassic equatorial setting, and are more likely the result of re-ordering of 13C-18O bonds at depth. Apparently the primary calcite, appears to have preserved its depositional U-Pb systematics, however bond re-ordering or recrystallization of these carbonates appear to reflect values closer to thermal equilibrium with the last phase of carbonate formation (bright luminescent calcite, 81 ± 11 Ma). Further work on these samples will target these younger calcites to determine if this later calcite phase records similar temperatures.

  20. The Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps : Looking at the early stages of star-formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montier, Ludovic

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite has provided an unprecedented view of the submm sky, allowing us to search for the dust emission of Galactic cold sources. Combining Planck-HFI all-sky maps in the high frequency channels with the IRAS map at 100um, we built the Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC, Planck 2015 results XXVIII 2015), counting 13188 sources distributed over the whole sky, and following mainly the Galactic structures at low and intermediate latitudes. This is the first all-sky catalogue of Galactic cold sources obtained with a single instrument at this resolution and sensitivity, which opens a new window on star-formation processes in our Galaxy.I will briefly describe the colour detection method used to extract the Galactic cold sources, i.e., the Cold Core Colour Detection Tool (CoCoCoDeT, Montier et al. 2010), and its application to the Planck data. I will discuss the statistical distribution of the properties of the PGCC sources (in terms of dust temperature, distance, mass, density and luminosity), which illustrates that the PGCC catalogue spans a large variety of environments and objects, from molecular clouds to cold cores, and covers various stages of evolution. The Planck catalogue is a very powerful tool to study the formation and the evolution of prestellar objects and star-forming regions.I will finally present an overview of the Herschel Key Program Galactic Cold Cores (PI. M.Juvela), which allowed us to follow-up about 350 Planck Galactic Cold Clumps, in various stages of evolution and environments. With this program, the nature and the composition of the 5' Planck sources have been revealed at a sub-arcmin resolution, showing very different configurations, such as starless cold cores or multiple Young Stellar objects still embedded in their cold envelope.

  1. The most massive gas clumps in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahorecz, Sarolta; Beuther, Henrik; Henning, Thomas; Linz, Hendrik; Tackenberg, Jochen; Schmiedeke, Anika; Schuller, Frederic; Urquhart, James; Wienen, Marion; Wyrowski, Friedrich

    2013-07-01

    In the recent years significant progress has been made in the understanding of high-mass star formation, although there are still open questions. Only a systematic survey can provide statistical data for unbiased studies. The APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL, Schuller et al. 2009, A&A, 605, 415) surveyed the southern sky at submillimeter wavelengths in dust continuum emission. We searched for the most massive dense gas condensations in the ATLASGAL survey within -60 < l < 60 degree and |b| < 1.5 degrees. We investigated the most luminous clumps and with the use of the Herschel Hi-GAL (Molinari et. al 2010, PASP, 122, 314) data we studied their basic physical parameters: distances, galactic distributions, temperatures, luminosites, masses.

  2. Towards Understanding Artifacts in the Clumped Isotope System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swart, P. K.; Staudigel, P. T.; Murray, S.

    2015-12-01

    The clumped isotope system in carbonates (Δ47) relies on the extraction of CO2 from the carbonate minerals using phosphoric acid. Despite the fact that this method dates back to the original stable isotopic work in the 1950s, there are significant aspects of the fractionation of the 18O/16O (and by inference the ratio of mass 47 to 44) which are not understood. We believe that subtle variations in the isotopic fractionation as a function of temperature, acid density (and acid preparation method), and extraction line design cause variation between the clumped isotope data produced by different laboratories. One of the most obvious of these is difference in reaction temperatures. While most laboratories employ temperatures of between 75 and 90oC, the original method employed a temperature of 25oC. Although various estimate of the difference in fractionation of Δ47 between 25 and 90oC have been made, we have measured significantly different values for dolomites compared to published data. In order to understand this we have performed experiments in sealed Pyrex vessels to measure the exchange between CO2 and 103% phosphoric acid. We have determined there to be significant and measurable changes in the Δ47 of CO2 when exposed to phosphoric acid. This exchange is a function of temperature, time, acid strength, and the surface area of the acid exposed to the CO2. We postulate that, perhaps as a result of the lower reaction rate of dolomite, compared to calcite, that there is greater opportunity for CO2 to exchange with the phosphoric acid as bubbles of CO2 are retained within the acid for longer periods of time. Such a mechanism would predict that well-ordered dolomites will have different fractionation compared to protodolomite. Similar differences might account for different fractionation for other carbonate minerals.

  3. DENSE CLUMPS AND CANDIDATES FOR MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN W40

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Hara, Chihomi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Shimajiri, Yoshito

    2015-06-20

    We report the results of the {sup 12}CO (J = 3−2) and HCO{sup +} (J = 4−3) observations of the W40 H ii region with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) 10 m telescope (HPBW ≃ 22″) to search for molecular outflows and dense clumps. We found that the velocity field in the region is highly complex, consisting of at least four distinct velocity components at V{sub LSR} ≃ 3, 5, 7, and 10 km s{sup −1}. The ∼7 km s{sup −1} component represents the systemic velocity of cold gas surrounding the entire region, and causes heavy absorption in the {sup 12}CO spectra over the velocity range 6 ≲ V{sub LSR} ≲ 9 km s{sup −1}. The ∼5 and ∼10 km s{sup −1} components exhibit high {sup 12}CO temperature (≳40 K) and are found mostly around the H ii region, suggesting that these components are likely to be tracing dense gas interacting with the expanding shell around the H ii region. Based on the {sup 12}CO data, we identified 13 regions of high velocity gas, which we interpret as candidate outflow lobes. Using the HCO{sup +} data, we also identified six clumps and estimated their physical parameters. On the basis of the ASTE data and near-infrared images from 2MASS, we present an updated three-dimensional model of this region. In order to investigate molecular outflows in W40, the SiO (J = 1−0, v = 0) emission line and some other emission lines at 40 GHz were also observed with the 45 m telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory, but they were not detected at the present sensitivity.

  4. Highly Variable Young Massive Stars in ATLASGAL Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. S. N.; Contreras Peña, C.; Lucas, P. W.; Thompson, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    High-amplitude variability in young stellar objects (YSOs) is usually associated with episodic accretion events. It has not been observed so far in massive YSOs. Here, the high-amplitude variable star sample of Contreras Peña et al. has been used to search for highly variable (ΔK ≥ 1 mag) sources coinciding with dense clumps mapped using the 850 μm continuum emission by the ATLASGAL survey. A total of 18 variable sources are centered on the submillimeter clump peaks and coincide (<1″) with a 24 μm point or compact (<10″) source. Of these 18 sources, 13 can be fit by YSO models. The 13 variable YSOs (VYSOs) have luminosities of ∼103 L ⊙, an average mass of 8 M ⊙, and a range of ages up to 106 yr. A total of 11 of these 13 VYSOs are located in the midst of infrared dark clouds. Nine of the 13 sources have ΔK > 2 mag, significantly higher compared to the mean variability of the entire VVV sample. The light curves of these objects sampled between 2010 and 2015 display rising, declining, or quasi-periodic behavior but no clear periodicity. Light-curve analysis using the Plavchan method shows that the most prominent phased signals have periods of a few hundred days. The nature and timescale of variations found in 6.7 Ghz methanol maser emission in massive stars are similar to that of the VYSO light curves. We argue that the origin of the observed variability is episodic accretion. We suggest that the timescale of a few hundred days may represent the frequency at which a spiraling disk feeds dense gas to the young massive star.

  5. The 3D-tomography of the nano-clusters formed by Fe-coating and annealing of diamond films for enhancing their surface electron field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huang-Chin; Lo, Shen-Chuan; Lin, Li-Jiaun; Huang, Pin-Chang; Shih, Wen-Ching; Lin, I.-Nan; Lee, Chi-Young

    2012-09-01

    The Fe-coating and H2-annealed processes markedly increased the conductivity and enhanced the surface electron field emission (s-EFE) properties for the diamond films. The enhancement on the s-EFE properties for the diamond films is presumably owing to the formation of nano-graphite clusters on the surface of the films via the Fe-to-diamond interaction. However, the extent of enhancement varied with the granular structure of the diamond films. For the microcrystalline (MCD) films, the s-EFE process can be turned on at (E0)MCD = 1.9 V/μm, achieving a large s-EFE current density of (Je)MCD = 315 μA/cm2 at an applied field of 8.8 V/μm. These s-EFE properties are markedly better than those for Fe-coated/annealed ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films with (E0)UNCD = 2.0 V/μm and (Je)UNCD = 120 μA/cm2. The transmission electron microscopy showed that the nano-graphite clusters formed an interconnected network for MCD films that facilitated the electron transport more markedly, as compared with the isolated nano-graphitic clusters formed at the surface of the UNCD films. Therefore, the Fe-coating/annealing processes improved the s-EFE properties for the MCD films more markedly than that for the UNCD films. The understanding on the distribution of the nano-clusters is of critical importance in elucidating the authentic factor that influences the s-EFE properties of the diamond films. Such an understanding is possible only through the 3D-tomographic investigations.

  6. THE SPATIAL STRUCTURE OF YOUNG STELLAR CLUSTERS. III. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND EVOLUTIONARY STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Michael A.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Sills, Alison; Bate, Matthew R.; Borissova, Jordanka

    2015-10-20

    We analyze the physical properties of stellar clusters that are detected in massive star-forming regions in the MYStIX project—a comparative, multiwavelength study of young stellar clusters within 3.6 kpc that contain at least one O-type star. Tabulated properties of subclusters in these regions include physical sizes and shapes, intrinsic numbers of stars, absorptions by the molecular clouds, and median subcluster ages. Physical signs of dynamical evolution are present in the relations of these properties, including statistically significant correlations between subcluster size, central density, and age, which are likely the result of cluster expansion after gas removal. We argue that many of the subclusters identified in Paper I are gravitationally bound because their radii are significantly less than what would be expected from freely expanding clumps of stars with a typical initial stellar velocity dispersion of ∼3 km s{sup −1} for star-forming regions. We explore a model for cluster formation in which structurally simpler clusters are built up hierarchically through the mergers of subclusters—subcluster mergers are indicated by an inverse relation between the numbers of stars in a subcluster and their central densities (also seen as a density versus radius relation that is less steep than would be expected from pure expansion). We discuss implications of these effects for the dynamical relaxation of young stellar clusters.

  7. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multicomponent metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamical aspects of a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulations with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (self diffusion coefficient, self relaxation time, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx˜1300 K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs well above the melting point of the system (Tm˜900 K) in the equilibrium liquid state; and the crossover temperature Tx is roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature of the system (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a nonparametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter α2 and the four-point correlation function χ4.

  8. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    DOE PAGES

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature ismore » roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.« less

  9. Ribosomal genes in focus: new transcripts label the dense fibrillar components and form clusters indicative of "Christmas trees" in situ.

    PubMed

    Koberna, Karel; Malínský, Jan; Pliss, Artem; Masata, Martin; Vecerova, Jaromíra; Fialová, Markéta; Bednár, Jan; Raska, Ivan

    2002-05-27

    T he organization of transcriptionally active ribosomal genes in animal cell nucleoli is investigated in this study in order to address the long-standing controversy with regard to the intranucleolar localization of these genes. Detailed analyses of HeLa cell nucleoli include direct localization of ribosomal genes by in situ hybridization and their indirect localization via nascent ribosomal transcript mappings. On the light microscopy (LM) level, ribosomal genes map in 10-40 fluorescence foci per nucleus, and transcription activity is associated with most foci. We demonstrate that each nucleolar focus observed by LM corresponds, on the EM level, to an individual fibrillar center (FC) and surrounding dense fibrillar components (DFCs). The EM data identify the DFC as the nucleolar subcompartment in which rRNA synthesis takes place, consistent with detection of rDNA within the DFC. The highly sensitive method for mapping nascent transcripts in permeabilized cells on ultrastructural level provides intense and unambiguous clustered immunogold signal over the DFC, whereas very little to no label is detected over the FC. This signal is strongly indicative of nascent "Christmas trees" of rRNA associated with individual rDNA genes, sampled on the surface of thin sections. Stereological analysis of the clustered transcription signal further suggests that these Christmas trees may be contorted in space and exhibit a DNA compaction ratio on the order of 4-5.5.

  10. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-01-01

    Clumped-isotope” thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope “clumps”). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals.We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect.Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3− and CO32−. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many

  11. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature is roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.

  12. Formation of compact clusters from high resolution hybrid cosmological simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Gray, William J.

    2013-11-20

    The early universe hosted a large population of small dark matter 'minihalos' that were too small to cool and form stars on their own. These existed as static objects around larger galaxies until acted upon by some outside influence. Outflows, which have been observed around a variety of galaxies, can provide this influence in such a way as to collapse, rather than disperse, the minihalo gas. Gray and Scannapieco performed an investigation in which idealized spherically symmetric minihalos were struck by enriched outflows. Here we perform high-resolution cosmological simulations that form realistic minihalos, which we then extract to perform a large suite of simulations of outflow-minihalo interactions including non-equilibrium chemical reactions. In all models, the shocked minihalo forms molecules through non-equilibrium reaction, and then cools to form dense, chemically homogenous clumps of star-forming gas. The formation of these high-redshift clusters may be observable with the next generation of telescopes and the largest of them should survive to the present-day, having properties similar to halo globular clusters.

  13. Disordering of the electronic structure of YBaCuO amorphous films upon incorporation of crystalline clusters formed in laser-induced plasma into their composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunev, V. D.; Lewandowski, S. J.; D'yachenko, T. A.; Abal'oshev, A.; Gierłowski, P.; Isaev, V. A.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of crystalline clusters formed in a laser-induced plasma on the optical properties of YBa2Cu3O6 + x amorphous films prepared by pulsed laser deposition has been investigated. It has been demonstrated that an increase in the number of clusters leads to a gradual disappearance of interference fringes inherent in optically homogeneous media. Simultaneously, the incorporation of metallic and insulating clusters into the amorphous medium results in a decrease in the optical band gap E 0 of the YBaCuO amorphous matrix from 1.28 to 1.06 eV and a considerable decrease in the probability of interband optical transitions with charge transfer O 2 p → Cu 3 d due to the loosening of the structure and generation of local stresses. It has been revealed that there is an additional band gap E 1, which decreases from 0.25-0.30 eV to zero values with a decrease in the optical band gap E 0. The additional gap has been interpreted as an energy gap between localized states that belong to the valence and conduction bands. A decrease in the density of electronic states in the narrow 3 d band leads to the overlap of tails of the density of states, so that the band gap E 1 becomes negative.

  14. Comparison of clumped isotope signatures of dolomite cements to fluid inclusion thermometry in the temperature range of 74-180 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Came, R. E.; Azmy, K.; Tripati, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Widespread application of the novel clumped isotope paleothermometer (Δ47) using carbonate samples from shallow crustal settings has been hindered by a lack of knowledge about clumped isotope systematics in carbonate minerals forming at temperatures greater than 50ºC. Furthermore, the utility of the Δ47 proxy in the mineral dolomite is limited because calibration data for dolomites that formed at any temperature are lacking. Consequently, applications involving diagenetic temperatures have required extrapolations beyond the range of most Δ47-temperature calibrations. Here we compare Δ47 values in dolomite cements to temperatures independently determined using fluid-inclusion microthermometry, and compare this rock-based "calibration" to previously published laboratory-derived calibrations for synthetic carbonates. This combination of approaches yields results that are consistent with the shallow calibration slope that has been reported from some laboratory experiments.

  15. Formation and internal structure of superdense dark matter clumps and ultracompact minihaloes

    SciTech Connect

    Berezinsky, V.S.; Dokuchaev, V.I.; Eroshenko, Yu.N. E-mail: dokuchaev@lngs.infn.it

    2013-11-01

    We discuss the formation mechanisms and structure of the superdense dark matter clumps (SDMC) and ultracompact minihaloes (UCMH), outlining the differences between these types of DM objects. We define as SDMC the gravitationally bounded DM objects which have come into virial equilibrium at the radiation-dominated (RD) stage of the universe evolution. Such objects can be formed from the isocurvature (entropy) density perturbations or from the peaks in the spectrum of curvature (adiabatic) perturbation. The axion miniclusters (Kolb and Tkachev 1994) are the example of the former model. The system of central compact mass (e.g. in the form of SDMC or primordial black hole (PBH)) with the outer DM envelope formed in the process of secondary accretion we refer to as UCMH. Therefore, the SDMC can serve as the seed for the UCMH in some scenarios. Recently, the SDMC and UCMH were considered in the many works, and we try to systematize them here. We consider also the effect of asphericity of the initial density perturbation in the gravitational evolution, which decreases the SDMC amount and, as the result, suppresses the gamma-ray signal from DM annihilation.

  16. Clumped isotope composition of cold-water corals: A role for vital effects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, Peter T.; Guo, Weifu; Robinson, Laura F.; Thiagarajan, Nivedita; Hendry, Katharine R.; Rosenheim, Brad E.; Leng, Melanie J.

    2016-04-01

    The carbonate clumped isotope thermometer is a promising tool for determining past ocean temperatures. It is based on the temperature dependence of rare isotopes 'clumping' into the same carbonate ion group in the carbonate mineral lattice. The extent of this clumping effect is independent of the isotope composition of the water from which carbonate precipitates, providing unique advantages over many other paleotemperature proxies. Existing calibrations of this thermometer in cold-water and warm-water corals suggest clumped isotope 'vital effects' are negligible in cold-water corals but may be significant in warm-water corals. Here, we test the calibration of the carbonate clumped isotope thermometer in cold-water corals with a recently collected and well characterised sample set spanning a range of coral genera (Balanophyllia, Caryophyllia, Dasmosmilia, Desmophyllum, Enallopsammia and Javania). The clumped isotope compositions (Δ47) of these corals exhibit systematic dependences on their growth temperatures, confirming the basis of the carbonate clumped isotope thermometer. However, some cold-water coral genera show Δ47 values that are higher than the expected equilibrium values by up to 0.05‰ (equivalent to underestimating temperature by ∼9 °C) similar to previous findings for some warm-water corals. This finding suggests that the vital effects affecting corals Δ47 are common to both warm- and cold-water corals. By comparison with models of the coral calcification process we suggest that the clumped isotope offsets in these genera are related to the kinetic isotope effects associated with CO2 hydration/hydroxylation reactions in the corals' calcifying fluid. Our findings complicate the use of the carbonate clumped isotope thermometer in corals, but suggest that species- or genus-specific calibrations could be useful for the future application of this paleotemperature proxy.

  17. Comparative analysis of stable ultrahigh power-density 248 nm channels formed in Kr and Xe cluster targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Alex B.; McCorkindale, John C.; Poopalasingam, Sankar; Longworth, James W.; Rhodes, Charles K.

    2013-09-01

    Comparative single-pulse studies of self-trapped plasma channel formation in Xe and Kr cluster targets produced with 1-2 TW femtosecond 248 nm pulses reveal energy efficient channel formation (>90%) and highly robust stability for the channeled propagation in both materials. Images of the channel morphology produced by Thomson scattering from the electron density and direct visualization of the Xe(M) and Kr(L) x-ray emission from radiating ions illustrate the (1) channel formation, (2) the narrow region of confined trapped propagation, (3) the abrupt termination of the channel that occurs at the point the power falls below the critical power Pcr, and, in the case of Xe channels, (4) the presence of saturated absorption of Xe(M) radiation that generates an extended peripheral zone of ionization. The measured rates for energy deposition per unit length are ˜ 1.46 J cm-1 and ˜ 0.82 J cm-1 for Xe and Kr targets, respectively, and the single pulse Xe(M) energy yield is estimated to be > 50 mJ, a value indicating an efficiency >20% for ˜ 1 keV x-ray production from the incident 248 nm pulse.

  18. How Escherichia coli lands and forms cell clusters on a surface: a new role of surface topography

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huan; Chen, Aaron; Song, Xinran; Brasch, Megan E.; Henderson, James H.; Ren, Dacheng

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial response to surface topography during biofilm formation was studied using 5 μm tall line patterns of poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Escherichia coli cells attached on top of protruding line patterns were found to align more perpendicularly to the orientation of line patterns when the pattern narrowed. Consistently, cell cluster formation per unit area on 5 μm wide line patterns was reduced by 14-fold compared to flat PDMS. Contrasting the reduced colony formation, cells attached on narrow patterns were longer and had higher transcriptional activities, suggesting that such unfavorable topography may present a stress to attached cells. Results of mutant studies indicate that flagellar motility is involved in the observed preference in cell orientation on narrow patterns, which was corroborated by the changes in cell rotation pattern before settling on different surface topographies. These findings led to a set of new design principles for creating antifouling topographies, which was validated using 10 μm tall hexagonal patterns. PMID:27412365

  19. Free-form lensing implications for the collision of dark matter and gas in the frontier fields cluster MACS J0416.1-2403

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego, Jose M.; Broadhurst, Tom; Molnar, Sandor M.; Lam, Daniel; Lim, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    We present a free-form mass reconstruction of the massive lensing cluster MACS J0416.1-2403 using the latest Hubble Frontier Fields data. Our free-form method finds that the extended lensing pattern is generated by two elongated, closely projected clusters of similar mass. Our lens model identifies new lensed images with which we improve the accuracy of the dark matter distribution. We find that the bimodal mass distribution is nearly coincident with the bimodal X-ray emission, but with the two dark matter peaks lying closer together than the centroids of the X-ray emission. We can reproduce this behaviour with our hydrodynamical model, concluding that the clusters are significantly deflected around each other with the plane of the collision lying close to the line of sight. The projected mass profiles of both subclusters are well constrained in the region 30-165 kpc because of the many interior lensed images, leading to surprisingly flat mass profiles of both components at distances 30-100 kpc from the centre, in agreement with recent simulations of self-interacting dark matter. Using N-body simulations, we discuss the extent to which this may be generated by projection effects in our model as the cores graze each other. The relative velocity between the two cores is estimated to be about 1200 km s-1 and mostly along the line of sight so that our simulation is consistent with the relative redshift difference between the two cD galaxies (δz ≈ 0.04).

  20. Molecular Gas in the Inner 500 pc of the Milky Way: Violating Star Formation Relations and on the Verge of Forming Extreme Stellar Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmore, Steven N.

    With the HOPS, MALT90 and HiGAL Galactic plane surveys we are mapping a significant fraction of the dense, star-forming, molecular gas in the Galaxy. I present results from two projects based on this combined dataset, namely, (i) looking for variations in the star formation (SF) rate across the Galaxy as a function of environment, and (ii) searching for molecular cloud progenitors of the most extreme (massive and dense) stellar clusters. We find the SF rate per unit mass of dense gas in the inner 500 pc of the Galaxy is at least an order of magnitude lower than that in the disk, directly challenging the predictions of proposed universal column/volume density relations. In particular, the region 1∘ < l < 3. 5∘, | b | < 0. 5∘ contains ˜ 107 M⊙ of dense molecular gas—enough to form 1,000 Orion-like clusters—but the present-day star formation rate within this gas is only equivalent to that in Orion. I present follow up studies of one molecular cloud we have studied as part of project (ii) which also lies in the inner 500 pc of the Galaxy and is clearly extreme compared to the rest of the Galactic population. With a mass of 105 Msun, a radius of only ˜ 3 pc and almost no signs of star formation it appears to be the progenitor of an Arches-like stellar cluster. Despite detailed observational follow-up searches, this object still appears to be unique in the Galaxy, making it extremely important for testing massive cluster formation models.

  1. Weighing the local dark matter with RAVE red clump stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienaymé, O.; Famaey, B.; Siebert, A.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Kordopatis, G.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zwitter, T.

    2014-11-01

    We determine the Galactic potential in the solar neigbourhood from RAVE observations. We select red clump stars for which accurate distances, radial velocities, and metallicities have been measured. Combined with data from the 2MASS and UCAC catalogues, we build a sample of ~4600 red clump stars within a cylinder of 500 pc radius oriented in the direction of the South Galactic Pole, in the range of 200 pc to 2000 pc distances. We deduce the vertical force and the total mass density distribution up to 2 kpc away from the Galactic plane by fitting a distribution function depending explicitly on three isolating integrals of the motion in a separable potential locally representing the Galactic one with four free parameters. Because of the deep extension of our sample, we can determine nearly independently the dark matter mass density and the baryonic disc surface mass density. We find (i) at 1 kpc Kz/ (2πG) = 68.5 ± 1.0 M⊙ pc-2; and (ii) at 2 kpc Kz/ (2πG) = 96.9 ± 2.2 M⊙ pc-2. Assuming the solar Galactic radius at R0 = 8.5 kpc, we deduce the local dark matter density ρDM(z = 0) = 0.0143 ± 0.0011 M⊙pc-3 = 0.542 ± 0.042 Gev cm-3 and the baryonic surface mass density Σbar = 44.4 ± 4.1 M⊙pc-2. Our results are in agreement with previously published Kz determinations up to 1 kpc, while the extension to 2 kpc shows some evidence for an unexpectedly large amount of dark matter. A flattening of the dark halo of order 0.8 can produce such a high local density in combination with a circular velocity of 240 km s-1. It could also be consistent with a spherical cored dark matter profile whose density does not drop sharply with radius. Another explanation, allowing for a lower circular velocity, could be the presence of a secondary dark component, a very thick disc resulting either from the deposit of dark matter from the accretion of multiple small dwarf galaxies, or from the presence of an effective "phantom" thick disc in the context of effective galactic

  2. Fluorescence Self-Quenching from Reporter Dyes Informs on the Structural Properties of Amyloid Clusters Formed in Vitro and in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of the aggregation kinetics of protein amyloids and the structural properties of the ensuing aggregates are vital in the study of the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases and the discovery of therapeutic targets. In this article, we show that the fluorescence lifetime of synthetic dyes covalently attached to amyloid proteins informs on the structural properties of amyloid clusters formed both in vitro and in cells. We demonstrate that the mechanism behind such a “lifetime sensor” of protein aggregation is based on fluorescence self-quenching and that it offers a good dynamic range to report on various stages of aggregation without significantly perturbing the process under investigation. We show that the sensor informs on the structural density of amyloid clusters in a high-throughput and quantitative manner and in these aspects the sensor outperforms super-resolution imaging techniques. We demonstrate the power and speed of the method, offering capabilities, for example, in therapeutic screenings that monitor biological self-assembly. We investigate the mechanism and advantages of the lifetime sensor in studies of the K18 protein fragment of the Alzheimer’s disease related protein tau and its amyloid aggregates formed in vitro. Finally, we demonstrate the sensor in the study of aggregates of polyglutamine protein, a model used in studies related to Huntington’s disease, by performing correlative fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and structured-illumination microscopy experiments in cells. PMID:28073262

  3. Cluster assembly in hierarchically collapsing molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    I will discuss the mechanism of cluster formation in hierarchically collapsing molecular clouds. Recent evidence, both observational and numerical, suggests that molecular clouds (MCs) may be undergoing global, hierarchical gravitational collapse. The "hierarchical" regime consists of small-scale collapses within larger-scale ones. The former occur in a more scattered fashion and at slightly earlier times, and are themselves falling into the larger potential well of the still-ongoing large-scale collapse. Instead, the large-scale collapse culminates a few Myr later, in a highly focused region, of higher density, mass, and velocity dispersion. The stars formed in the early, small-scale collapses share the infall velocity of their parent clumps towards the larger potential trough, while those formed later, in the aforementioned trough, form from gas that has already dissipated some of its kinetic energy, and thus have a lower velocity dispersion. This leads to a radial age gradient in the stellar population, in agreement with recent observations.

  4. Properties of compact HII regions and their host clumps in the inner vs outer Galaxy - early results from SASSy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, Julie; Thompson, Mark; Urquhart, James S.

    2017-01-01

    We present a catalog of compact and ultracompact HII regions for all Galactocentric radii. Previous catalogs focus on the inner Galaxy (Rgal ≤ 8 kpc) but the recent SASSy 870 µm survey allows us to identify regions out to ~20 kpc. Early samples are also filled with false classifications leading to uncertainty when deriving star formation efficiencies in Galactic models. These objects have similar mid-IR colours to HII regions. Urquhart et al. (2013) found that they could use mid-IR, submm, and radio data to identify the genuine compact HII regions, avoiding confusion. They used this method on a small portion of the Galaxy (10 < l < 60), identifying 213 HII regions embedded in 170 clumps. We use ATLASGAL and SASSy, crossmatched with RMS, to sample the remaining galactic longitudes out to Rgal = 20 kpc. We derive the properties of the identified compact HII regions and their host clumps while addressing the implications for recent massive star formation in the outer Galaxy. Observations towards nearby galaxies are biased towards massive stars, affecting simulations and overestimating models for galactic evolution and star formation rates. The Milky Way provides the ideal template for studying factors affecting massive star formation rates and efficiencies at high resolution, thus fine-tuning those models. We find that there is no significant change in the rate of massive star formation in the outer vs inner Galaxy. Despite some peaks in known complexes and possible correlation with spiral arms, the outer Galaxy appears to produce massive stars as efficiently as the inner regions. However, many of the potential star forming SASSy clumps have no available radio counterpart to confirm the presence of an HII region or other star formation tracer. Follow-up observations will be required to verify this conclusion and are currently in progress.

  5. Inverse dynamical population synthesis. Constraining the initial conditions of young stellar clusters by studying their binary populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, M.; Kroupa, P.

    2012-07-01

    Binary populations in young star clusters show multiplicity fractions both lower and up to twice as high as those observed in the Galactic field. We follow the evolution of a population of binary stars in dense and loose star clusters starting with an invariant initial binary population and a formal multiplicity fraction of unity, and demonstrate that these models can explain the observed binary properties in Taurus, ρ Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Orion, IC 348, Upper Scorpius A, Praesepe, and the Pleiades. The model needs to consider solely different birth densities for these regions. The evolved theoretical orbital-parameter distributions are highly probable parent distributions for the observed ones. We constrain the birth conditions (stellar mass, Mecl, and half-mass radius, rh) for the derived progenitors of the star clusters and the overall present-day binary fractions allowed by the present model. The results compare very well with properties of molecular cloud clumps on the verge of star formation. Combining these with previously and independently obtained constraints on the birth densities of globular clusters, we identify a weak stellar mass - half-mass radius correlation for cluster-forming cloud clumps, rh/pc ∝ (Mecl/M⊙)0.13 ± 0.04. The ability of the model to reproduce the binary properties in all the investigated young objects, covering present-day densities from 1-10 stars pc-3 (Taurus) to 2 × 104 stars pc-3 (Orion), suggests that environment-dependent dynamical evolution plays an important role in shaping the present-day properties of binary populations in star clusters, and that the initial binary properties may not vary dramatically between different environments.

  6. Probing Planck Cold Clump Sightlines through HST STIS UV Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirks, Cody; Meyer, David M.

    2017-01-01

    The Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC) has provided a wealth of information about the cold, dusty ISM across the entire sky, identifying regions ranging from relatively diffuse cold clouds to pre-stellar cores in giant molecular clouds. This catalogue uses sub-millimeter emission arising from cold dust to determine the physical properties, morphology, and temperature of these regions. Combining this information with the diagnostic capabilities of UV absorption line spectroscopy allows us to better characterize the interstellar gas associated with these dusty regions. We have identified numerous target stars with STIS high-resolution UV spectra in the Hubble Space Telescope data archive whose sightlines lie in the sky vicinity of PGCC objects. By analyzing select interstellar absorption lines along these target sightlines, we can investigate several important cloud properties. Here we investigate the gas thermal pressure using C I fine structure excitation, and find a similar distribution to previous studies of the broader diffuse ISM. We also investigate the potential destruction of dust grains by shock processing by determining abundance ratios of heavily depleted elements to those that are typically lightly depleted.

  7. MYStIX: Dynamical evolution of young clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Michael A.

    2014-08-01

    The spatial structure of young stellar clusters in Galactic star-forming regions provides insight into these clusters’ dynamical evolution---a topic with implications for open questions in star-formation and cluster survival. The Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray (MYStIX) provides a sample of >30,000 young stars in star-forming regions (d<3.6 kpc) that contain at least one O-type star. We use the finite mixture model analysis to identify subclusters of stars and determine their properties: including subcluster radii, intrinsic numbers of stars, central density, ellipticity, obscuration, and age. In 17 MYStIX regions we find 142 subclusters, with a diverse radii and densities and age spreads of up to ~1 Myr in a region. There is a strong negative correlation between subcluster radius and density, which indicates that embedded subclusters expand but also gain stars as they age. Subcluster expansion is also shown by a positive radius--age correlation, which indicates that subclusters are expanding at <1 km/s. The subcluster ellipticity distribution and number--density relation show signs of a hierarchical merger scenario, whereby young stellar clusters are built up through mergers of smaller clumps, causing evolution from a clumpy spatial distribution of stars (seen in some regions) to a simpler distribution of stars (seen in other regions). Many of the simple young stellar clusters show signs of dynamically relaxation, even though they are not old enough for this to have occurred through two-body interactions. However, this apparent contradiction might be explained if small subcluster, which have shorter dynamical relaxation times, can produce dynamically relaxed clusters through hierarchical mergers.

  8. BLAST: CORRELATIONS IN THE COSMIC FAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND AT 250, 350, AND 500 mum REVEAL CLUSTERING OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Viero, Marco P.; Martin, Peter G.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeff; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; MacTavish, Carrie J.; Negrello, Mattia; Olmi, Luca

    2009-12-20

    We detect correlations in the cosmic far-infrared background due to the clustering of star-forming galaxies in observations made with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope, at 250, 350, and 500 mum. We perform jackknife and other tests to confirm the reality of the signal. The measured correlations are well fitted by a power law over scales of 5'-25', with DELTAI/I = 15.1% +- 1.7%. We adopt a specific model for submillimeter sources in which the contribution to clustering comes from sources in the redshift ranges 1.3 <= z <= 2.2, 1.5 <= z <= 2.7, and 1.7 <= z <= 3.2, at 250, 350, and 500 mum, respectively. With these distributions, our measurement of the power spectrum, P(k{sub t}heta), corresponds to linear bias parameters, b = 3.8 +- 0.6, 3.9 +- 0.6, and 4.4 +- 0.7, respectively. We further interpret the results in terms of the halo model, and find that at the smaller scales, the simplest halo model fails to fit our results. One way to improve the fit is to increase the radius at which dark matter halos are artificially truncated in the model, which is equivalent to having some star-forming galaxies at z >= 1 located in the outskirts of groups and clusters. In the context of this model, we find a minimum halo mass required to host a galaxy is log(M{sub min}/M{sub sun}) = 11.5{sup +0.4}{sub -0.1}, and we derive effective biases b{sub eff} = 2.2 +- 0.2, 2.4 +- 0.2, and 2.6 +- 0.2, and effective masses log(M{sub eff}/M{sub odot})=12.9+-0.3, 12.8 +- 0.2, and 12.7 +- 0.2, at 250, 350 and 500 mum, corresponding to spatial correlation lengths of r{sub 0} = 4.9, 5.0, and 5.2+-0.7 h{sup -1}Mpc, respectively. Finally, we discuss implications for clustering measurement strategies with Herschel and Planck.

  9. A MALT90 study of the chemical properties of massive clumps and filaments of infrared dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miettinen, O.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) provide a useful testbed in which to investigate the genuine initial conditions and early stages of massive-star formation. Aims: We attempt to characterise the chemical properties of a sample of 35 massive clumps of IRDCs through multi-molecular line observations. We also search for possible evolutionary trends among the derived chemical parameters. Methods: The clumps are studied using the MALT90 (Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz) line survey data obtained with the Mopra 22 m telescope. The survey covers 16 different transitions near 90 GHz. The spectral-line data are used in concert with our previous LABOCA (Large APEX BOlometer CAmera) 870 μm dust emission data. Results: Eleven MALT90 transitions are detected towards the clumps at least at the 3σ level. Most of the detected species (SiO, C2H, HNCO, HCN, HCO+, HNC, HC3N, and N2H+) show spatially extended emission towards many of the sources. Most of the fractional abundances of the molecules with respect to H2 are found to be comparable to those determined in other recent similar studies of IRDC clumps. We found that the abundances of SiO, HNCO, and HCO+ are higher in IR-bright clumps than in IR-dark sources, reflecting a possible evolutionary trend. A hint of this trend is also seen for HNC and HC3N. An opposite trend is seen for the C2H and N2H+ abundances. Moreover, a positive correlation is found between the abundances of HCO+ and HNC, and between those of HNC and HCN. The HCN and HNC abundances also appear to increase as a function of the N2H+ abundance. The HNC/HCN and N2H+/HNC abundance ratios are derived to be near unity on average, while that of HC3N/HCN is ~10%. The N2H+/HNC ratio appears to increase as the clump evolves, while the HNC/HCO+ ratio shows the opposite behaviour. Conclusions: The detected SiO emission is probably caused by shocks driven by outflows in most cases, although shocks resulting from the cloud formation process could also play a role

  10. Shaping a high-mass star-forming cluster through stellar feedback. The case of the NGC 7538 IRS 1-3 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frau, P.; Girart, J. M.; Zhang, Q.; Rao, R.

    2014-07-01

    Context. NGC 7538 IRS 1-3 is a high-mass star-forming cluster with several detected dust cores, infrared sources, (ultra)compact H II regions, molecular outflows, and masers. In such a complex environment, interactions and feedback among the embedded objects are expected to play a major role in the evolution of the region. Aims: We study the dust, kinematic, and polarimetric properties of the NGC 7538 IRS 1-3 region to investigate the role of the different forces in the formation and evolution of high-mass star-forming clusters. Methods: We performed SMA high angular resolution observations at 880 μm with the compact configuration. We developed the RATPACKS code to generate synthetic velocity cubes from models of choice to be compared to the observational data. To quantify the stability against gravitational collapse we developed the "mass balance" analysis that accounts for all the energetics on core scales. Results: We detect 14 dust cores from 3.5 M⊙ to 37 M⊙ arranged in two larger scale structures: a central bar and a filamentary spiral arm. The spiral arm presents large-scale velocity gradients in H13CO+ 4-3 and C17O 3-2, and magnetic field segments aligned well to the dust main axis. The velocity gradient is reproduced well by a spiral arm expanding at 9 km s-1 with respect to the central core MM1, which is known to power a large precessing outflow. The energy of the outflow is comparable to the spiral-arm kinetic energy, which dominates gravitational and magnetic energies. In addition, the dynamical ages of the outflow and spiral arm are comparable. On core scales, those embedded in the central bar seem to be unstable against gravitational collapse and prone to forming high-mass stars, while those in the spiral arm have lower masses that seem to be supported by non-thermal motions and magnetic fields. Conclusions: The NGC 7538 IRS 1-3 cluster seems to be dominated by protostellar feedback. The dusty spiral arm appears to be formed in a snowplow fashion

  11. Clumped-Isotope Thermometry of Carbonate Veins from the SAFOD Borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luetkemeyer, P. B.; Kirschner, D. L.; Huntington, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    We present clumped-isotope and stable-isotope data from carbonate veins obtained from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) borehole. A number of models proposed to explain the apparent weakness of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) require fluids to be present in the fault zone. However, little is known about the presence, source(s), temperature, and migration pathways of these fluids. We investigate spatial trends in isotopic composition of veins within meters of two actively deforming strands of the SAF - the southern deformation zone (SDZ) and central deformation zone (CDZ). Two populations of veins are present based on the isotopic data. The first group of veins with calcite δ18O values < +15 ‰ (VSMOW) and δ 13C values > +1 ‰ (VPDB) are present in foliated siltstone and shale cataclasites from 3186 to 3194 meters MD and in sheared siltstones and sandstones of the CDZ from 3297 to 3301 meters MD. Clumped-isotope analyses for a subset of samples from this vein set indicate temperatures between 72 and 99 °C and calculated pore fluid δ18O values of -3.4 to +0.1‰ (VSMOW). A second group of veins with δ18O values between +17 and +25 ‰ (VSMOW) and δ13C values between +1 and -18 (VPDB) is present in the serpentinite-bearing SDZ from 3196 to 3197 meters MD and in siltstones from 3302 to 3310 meters MD. Veins in the SDZ record temperatures from 80 to 118 °C and calculated pore fluid δ18O values of -0.3 to +3.1‰ (VSMOW). Both vein populations record temperatures less than or within uncertainty of present-day borehole temperature of ca. 120 °C. We propose the first group of veins formed by precipitating from fluids charged with soil CO2 or biogenic methane that flowed along preexisting diagenetic fracture networks or fractures formed early in the evolution of the SAF. The second group of veins precipitated from fluids charged with thermogenic methane near present-day ambient temperatures and localized in a ~50 meter wide zone of damage along the

  12. ATLASGAL-selected massive clumps in the inner Galaxy. III. Dust continuum characterization of an evolutionary sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, C.; Urquhart, J. S.; Csengeri, T.; Leurini, S.; Wyrowski, F.; Giannetti, A.; Wienen, M.; Pillai, T.; Kauffmann, J.; Menten, K. M.; Schuller, F.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Massive-star formation and the processes involved are still poorly understood. The ATLASGAL survey provides an ideal basis for detailed studies of large numbers of massive-star forming clumps covering the whole range of evolutionary stages. The ATLASGAL Top100 is a sample of clumps selected by their infrared and radio properties to be representative for the whole range of evolutionary stages. Aims: The ATLASGAL Top100 sources are the focus of a number of detailed follow-up studies that will be presented in a series of papers. In the present work we use the dust continuum emission to constrain the physical properties of this sample and identify trends as a function of source evolution. Methods: We determine flux densities from mid-infrared to submillimeter wavelength (8-870 μm) images and use these values to fit their spectral energy distributions and determine their dust temperature and flux. Combining these with recent distances from the literature including maser parallax measurements we determine clump masses, luminosities and column densities. Results: We define four distinct source classes from the available continuum data and arrange these into an evolutionary sequence. This begins with sources found to be dark at 70 μm, followed by 24 μm weak sources with an embedded 70 μm source, continues through mid-infrared bright sources and ends with infrared bright sources associated with radio emission (i.e., H ii regions). We find trends for increasing temperature, luminosity, and column density with the proposed evolution sequence, confirming that this sample is representative of different evolutionary stages of massive star formation. Our sources span temperatures from approximately 11 to 41 K, with bolometric luminosities in the range 57 L⊙-3.8 × 106L⊙. The highest masses reach 4.3 × 104M⊙ and peak column densities up to 1.1 × 1024 cm-1, and therefore have the potential to form the most massive O-type stars. We show that at least 93 sources

  13. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  14. Data Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    particular application involves considerations of the kind of data being analyzed, algorithm runtime efficiency, and how much prior knowledge is available about the problem domain, which can dictate the nature of clusters sought. Fundamentally, the clustering method and its representations of clusters carries with it a definition of what a cluster is, and it is important that this be aligned with the analysis goals for the problem at hand. In this chapter, I emphasize this point by identifying for each algorithm the cluster representation as a model, m_j , even for algorithms that are not typically thought of as creating a “model.” This chapter surveys a basic collection of clustering methods useful to any practitioner who is interested in applying clustering to a new data set. The algorithms include k-means (Section 25.2), EM (Section 25.3), agglomerative (Section 25.4), and spectral (Section 25.5) clustering, with side mentions of variants such as kernel k-means and divisive clustering. The chapter also discusses each algorithm’s strengths and limitations and provides pointers to additional in-depth reading for each subject. Section 25.6 discusses methods for incorporating domain knowledge into the clustering process. This chapter concludes with a brief survey of interesting applications of clustering methods to astronomy data (Section 25.7). The chapter begins with k-means because it is both generally accessible and so widely used that understanding it can be considered a necessary prerequisite for further work in the field. EM can be viewed as a more sophisticated version of k-means that uses a generative model for each cluster and probabilistic item assignments. Agglomerative clustering is the most basic form of hierarchical clustering and provides a basis for further exploration of algorithms in that vein. Spectral clustering permits a departure from feature-vector-based clustering and can operate on data sets instead represented as affinity, or similarity

  15. Isolation of dihydrocurcuminoids from cell clumps and their distribution in various parts of turmeric (Curcuma longa).

    PubMed

    Kita, Tomoko; Imai, Shinsuke; Sawada, Hiroshi; Seto, Haruo

    2009-05-01

    In addition to well-known curcuminoids, three colored metabolites were isolated from cultured cell clumps that had been induced from buds on turmeric rhizomes. The isolated compounds were identified as dihydro derivatives of curcuminoids, dihydrocurcumin (dihydroCurc), dihydrodesmethoxycurcumin-a (dihydroDMC-a), and dihydrobisdesmethoxycurcumin (dihydroBDMC). The cell clumps did not contain dihydroDMC-b, an isomer of dihydroDMC-a. A comparison of the distribution profiles of curcuminoids and dihydrocurcuminoids in the cell clumps with those in the rhizomes, leaves, and roots revealed the following differences: Unlike rhizomes, the cell clumps, leaves, and roots contained dihydrocurcuminoids as the major colored constituents. Whereas dimethoxy compounds, curcumin and dihydrocurcumin, respectively, were most abundant in the rhizomes and leaves, one of the monomethoxy derivatives, dihydroDMC-a, was found most abundantly in the cell clumps and roots. While both dihydroDMC-a and b were detected in the rhizomes, dihydroDMC-b was not detectable in the cell clumps, leaves, or roots. The occurrence of only one of the two possible isomers of dihydroDMC suggests biosynthetic formation of dihydrocurcuminoids in turmeric.

  16. A free-form mass model of the Hubble Frontier Fields cluster AS1063 (RXC J2248.7-4431) with over one hundred constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego, Jose M.; Broadhurst, Tom; Wong, Jess; Silk, Joseph; Lim, Jeremy; Zheng, Wei; Lam, Daniel; Ford, Holland

    2016-07-01

    We derive a free-form mass distribution for the massive cluster AS1063 (z = 0.348) using the completed optical imaging from the Hubble Frontier Fields programmme. Based on a subset of 11 multiply lensed systems with spectroscopic redshift, we produce a lens model that is accurate enough to secure new multiply lensed systems, totalling over a 100 arclets, and to estimate their redshifts geometrically. Consistency is found between this precise model and that obtained using only the subset of lensed sources with spectroscopically measured redshifts. Although a relatively large elongation of the mass distribution is apparent relative to the X-ray map, no significant offset is found between the centroid of our mass distribution and that of the X-ray emission map, suggesting a relatively relaxed state for this cluster. For the well-resolved lensed images, we provide detailed model comparisons to illustrate the precision of our model and hence the reliability of our de-lensed sources. A clear linear structure is associated with one such source extending 23 kpc in length, that could be an example of jet-induced star formation, at redshift z ≈ 3.1.

  17. Variations in soil carbonate formation and seasonal bias over >4 km of relief in the western Andes (30°S) revealed by clumped isotope thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgener, Landon; Huntington, Katharine W.; Hoke, Gregory D.; Schauer, Andrew; Ringham, Mallory C.; Latorre, Claudio; Díaz, Francisca P.

    2016-05-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry provides a new method for investigating long-standing questions regarding seasonal biases in soil carbonate formation and the relationship between soil carbonate formation temperatures recorded by clumped isotopes (T (Δ47)) and surface temperatures. We address these questions by comparing C, O, and clumped isotope data from Holocene soil carbonates to meteorological and in situ soil monitoring data along a 170 km transect with >4 km of relief in Chile (30°S). This arid transect experiences a winter wet season, and a >20 °C range in mean annual air temperature. We test the hypothesis that, regardless of soil moisture conditions, soil carbonates from arid regions record warm season biases and form in isotopic equilibrium with soil water and soil CO2. Below 3200 m, precipitation falls as rain and soil carbonate T (Δ47) values at depths >40 cm resemble summer soil temperatures. Above 3200 m, precipitation falls as snow and T (Δ47) values resemble mean annual soil temperatures. Soil carbonates from the highest site yield anomalous δ18 O, δ13 C, and T (Δ47) values indicative of kinetic isotope effects consistent with cryogenic carbonate formation. Our findings (1) demonstrate that soil carbonate T (Δ47) values from shallow (<40 cm) depths can be affected by short-term temperature changes following precipitation events; (2) suggest that only the largest precipitation events affect soil moisture at depths >40 cm; (3) highlight the role of the soil moisture regime in modulating the timing of soil carbonate formation, which affects the resulting carbonate T (Δ47) values; and (4) show that soil carbonates from high elevation or high latitude sites may form under non-equilibrium conditions. These findings underscore the importance of understanding past soil moisture conditions when attempting to reconstruct paleotemperatures using carbonate clumped isotope thermometry.

  18. IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS AT HIGH RESOLUTION. V. [Ne ii], MULTIPLE CLUSTERS, HIGH EFFICIENCY STAR FORMATION, AND BLUE FLOWS IN HE 2–10

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Sara; Turner, Jean; Lacy, John; Greathouse, Thomas

    2015-11-20

    We measured the 12.8 μm [Ne ii] line in the dwarf starburst galaxy He 2–10 with the high-resolution spectrometer TEXES on the NASA IRTF. The data cube has a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of ∼1″ and a total velocity resolution, including thermal broadening, of ∼5 km s{sup −1}. This makes it possible to compare the kinematics of individual star-forming clumps and molecular clouds in the three dimensions of space and velocity, and allows us to determine star formation efficiencies. The kinematics of the ionized gas confirm that the starburst contains multiple dense clusters. From the M/R of the clusters and the ≃30%–40% star formation efficiencies, the clusters are likely to be bound and long lived, like globulars. Non-gravitational features in the line profiles show how the ionized gas flows through the ambient molecular material, as well as a narrow velocity feature, which we identify with the interface of the H ii region and a cold dense clump. These data offer an unprecedented view of the interaction of embedded H ii regions with their environment.

  19. A STARBURSTING PROTO-CLUSTER IN MAKING ASSOCIATED WITH A RADIO GALAXY AT z = 2.53 DISCOVERED BY H{alpha} IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Masao; Kodama, Tadayuki; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Koyama, Yusei; Tanaka, Ichi

    2012-09-20

    We report a discovery of a proto-cluster in vigorous assembly and hosting strong star-forming activities, associated with a radio galaxy USS 1558-003 at z = 2.53, as traced by wide-field narrow-band H{alpha} imaging with MOIRCS on the Subaru Telescope. We find 68 H{alpha} emitters with dust-uncorrected star formation rates (SFRs) down to 8.6 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Their spatial distribution indicates that there are three prominent clumps of H{alpha} emitters: one surrounding the radio galaxy, the second located at {approx}1.5 Mpc away to the southwest, and the third located between the two. These contiguous three systems are very likely to merge together in the near future and may grow to a single more massive cluster at a later time. While most H{alpha} emitters reside in the 'blue cloud' on the color-magnitude diagram, some emitters have very red colors with J - K{sub s} > 1.38(AB). Interestingly, such red H{alpha} emitters are located toward the faint end of the red sequence, and they tend to be located in high density clumps. We do not see any statistically significant difference in the distributions of individual SFRs or stellar masses of the H{alpha} emitters between the dense clumps and the other regions, suggesting that this is one of the notable sites where the progenitors of massive galaxies in the present-day clusters were in their vigorous formation phase. Finally, we find that H{alpha} emission of the radio galaxy is fairly extended spatially over {approx}4.''5. However, it is not as widespread as its Ly{alpha} halo, meaning that the Ly{alpha} emission is indeed severely extended by resonant scattering.

  20. Molecular gas and a new young stellar cluster in the far outer Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, J. L.; Elia, D.; Palmeirim, P. M.; Gomes, J. I.; Martins, A. M.

    2009-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the star-formation ocurring in the region towards IRAS 07527-3446 in the molecular cloud [MAB97]250.63-3.63, in the far outer Galaxy. We report the discovery of a new young stellar cluster, and describe its properties and those of its parent molecular cloud. Methods: Near-infrared JHKS images were obtained with VLT/ISAAC, and millimetre line CO spectra were obtained with the SEST telescope. VLA archive date were also used. Results: The cloud and cluster are located at a distance of 10.3 kpc and a Galactocentric distance of 15.4 kpc, in the far outer Galaxy. Morphologically, IRAS 07527-3446 appears as a young embedded cluster of a few hundred stars seen towards the position of the IRAS source, extending for about 2-4 pc and exhibiting sub-clustering. The cluster contains low and intermediate-mass young reddened stars, a large fraction having cleared the inner regions of their circumstellar discs responsible for (H-K_S) colour excess. The observations are compatible with a ≤5 Myr cluster with variable spatial extinction of between A_V=5 and A_V=11. Decomposition of CO emission in clumps, reveals a clump clearly associated with the cluster position, of mass 3.3 × 103 M_⊙. Estimates of the slopes of the K_S-band luminosity function and of the star-formation efficiency yield values similar to those seen in nearby star-formation sites. These findings reinforce previous results that the distant outer Galaxy continues to be active in the production of new and rich stellar clusters, with the physical conditions required for the formation of rich clusters continuing to be met in the very distant environment of the outer Galactic disc. Based on observations collected at the ESO 8.2-m VLT-UT1 Antu telescope (program 66.C-0015A). Table 2 is only available in electonic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. ATLASGAL-selected massive clumps in the inner Galaxy. II. Characterisation of different evolutionary stages and their SiO emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csengeri, T.; Leurini, S.; Wyrowski, F.; Urquhart, J. S.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, M.; Bontemps, S.; Wienen, M.; Beuther, H.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Schilke, P.; Schuller, F.; Zavagno, A.; Sanna, C.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The processes leading to the birth of high-mass stars are poorly understood. The key first step to reveal their formation processes is characterising the clumps and cores from which they form. Aims: We define a representative sample of massive clumps in different evolutionary stages selected from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL), from which we aim to establish a census of molecular tracers of their evolution. As a first step, we study the shock tracer, SiO, mainly associated with shocks from jets probing accretion processes. In low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs), outflow and jet activity decreases with time during the star formation processes. Recently, a similar scenario was suggested for massive clumps based on SiO observations. Here we analyse observations of the SiO (2-1) and (5-4) lines in a statistically significant sample to constrain the change of SiO abundance and the excitation conditions as a function of evolutionary stage of massive star-forming clumps. Methods: We performed an unbiased spectral line survey covering the 3-mm atmospheric window between 84-117 GHz with the IRAM 30 m telescope of a sample of 430 sources of the ATLASGAL survey, covering various evolutionary stages of massive clumps. A smaller sample of 128 clumps has been observed in the SiO (5-4) transition with the APEX telescope to complement the (2-1) line and probe the excitation conditions of the emitting gas. We derived detection rates to assess the star formation activity of the sample, and we estimated the column density and abundance using both an LTE approximation and non-LTE calculations for a smaller subsample, where both transitions have been observed. Results: We characterise the physical properties of the selected sources, which greatly supersedes the largest samples studied so far, and show that they are representative of different evolutionary stages. We report a high detection rate of >75% of the SiO (2-1) line and a >90% detection

  2. BLUE STRAGGLERS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER 47 TUCANAE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The core of globular cluster 47 Tucanae is home to many blue stragglers, rejuvenated stars that glow with the blue light of young stars. A ground-based telescope image (on the left) shows the entire crowded core of 47 Tucanae, located 15,000 light-years away in the constellation Tucana. Peering into the heart of the globular cluster's bright core, the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 separated the dense clump of stars into many individual stars (image on right). Some of these stars shine with the light of old stars; others with the blue light of blue stragglers. The yellow circles in the Hubble telescope image highlight several of the cluster's blue stragglers. Analysis for this observation centered on one massive blue straggler. Astronomers theorize that blue stragglers are formed either by the slow merger of stars in a double-star system or by the collision of two unrelated stars. For the blue straggler in 47 Tucanae, astronomers favor the slow merger scenario. This image is a 3-color composite of archival Hubble Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 images in the ultraviolet (blue), blue (green), and violet (red) filters. Color tables were assigned and scaled so that the red giant stars appear orange, main-sequence stars are white/green, and blue stragglers are appropriately blue. The ultraviolet images were taken on Oct. 25, 1995, and the blue and violet images were taken on Sept. 1, 1995. Credit: Rex Saffer (Villanova University) and Dave Zurek (STScI), and NASA

  3. Clumped Isotope Composition of Cold-Water Corals: A Role for Vital Effects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, P.; Guo, W.; Robinson, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements on a set of cold-water corals (mainly Desmophyllum dianthus) have suggested that their clumped isotope composition could serve as a promising proxy for reconstructing paleocean temperatures. Such measurements have also offered support for certain isotope models of coral calcification. However, there are differences in the clumped isotope compositions between warm-water and cold-water corals, suggesting that different kinds of corals could have differences in their biocalcification processes. In order to understand the systematics of clumped isotope variations in cold-water corals more fully, we present clumped isotope data from a range of cold-water coral species from the tropical Atlantic and the Southern Ocean.Our samples were either collected live or recently dead (14C ages < 1,000 yrs) with associated temperature data. They include a total of 11 solitary corals and 1 colonial coral from the Atlantic, and 8 solitary corals from the Southern Ocean. The data indicate that coral clumped isotope systematics may be more complicated than previously thought. For example, for the genus Caryophyllia we observe significant variations in clumped isotope compositions for corals which grew at the same temperature with an apparent negative correlation between Δ47 and δ18O, different to patterns previously observed in Desmophyllum. These results indicate that existing isotope models of biocalcification may not apply equally well to all corals. Clumped isotope vital effects may be present in certain cold-water corals as they are in warm-water corals, complicating the use of this paleoclimate proxy.

  4. Applying clumped isotopes of O2 to atmospheric and biogeochemical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Laurence

    2016-04-01

    I will describe recent measurements of isotopic "clumps" in diatomic molecules, e.g., 18O18O in O2, which are being utilized to constrain atmospheric circulation on glacial-interglacial timescales and biogeochemical cycling in the oceans. While our understanding of these tracers is still evolving, several features of their geochemistry are apparent: (1) the proportional abundance of these isotopic "clumps" is governed by traditional chemical effects as well as combinatorial effects unique to clumped isotopes, and (2) when isotopic exchange reactions are disfavoured, chemical-kinetic and/or reservoir effects, rather than thermodynamic equilibrium, determine their clumped-isotope composition. Combinatorial clumped-isotope signatures imparted during photosynthesis are being developed as endmember signatures of gross primary productivity in the oceans. In addition, clumped-isotope measurements of O2 in the atmosphere (i.e., Δ36 values) suggest that isotopic clumping in O2 is continuously being altered by ozone photochemistry in the troposphere and stratosphere. Yet, the contrast in isotope-exchange rates between the stratosphere (where exchange is fast) and the troposphere (where exchange is slow) results in a gradient in Δ36 values with altitude, wherein stratospheric intrusions are detectable as elevated Δ36 values. Moreover, global chemical-transport model simulations suggest that ozone photochemistry in the troposphere re-orders the O2 reservoir in the troposphere on annual timescales. The Δ36 value at the surface is therefore sensitive to the tropospheric residence time of O2 with respect to stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Consequently, Δ36 values at the surface likely respond to changes in the strength of the global overturning circulation.

  5. DENSE GAS IN MOLECULAR CORES ASSOCIATED WITH PLANCK GALACTIC COLD CLUMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Jinghua; Li, Jin Zeng; Liu, Hong-Li; Wu, Yuefang; Chen, Ping; Hu, Runjie; Liu, Tie; Zhang, Tianwei; Meng, Fanyi; Wang, Ke

    2016-03-20

    We present the first survey of dense gas toward Planck Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCCs). Observations in the J = 1–0 transitions of HCO{sup +} and HCN toward 621 molecular cores associated with PGCCs were performed using the Purple Mountain Observatory’s 13.7 m telescope. Among them, 250 sources were detected, including 230 cores detected in HCO{sup +} and 158 in HCN. Spectra of the J = 1–0 transitions from {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O at the centers of the 250 cores were extracted from previous mapping observations to construct a multi-line data set. The significantly low detection rate of asymmetric double-peaked profiles, together with the good consistency among central velocities of CO, HCO{sup +}, and HCN spectra, suggests that the CO-selected Planck cores are more quiescent than classical star-forming regions. The small difference between line widths of C{sup 18}O and HCN indicates that the inner regions of CO-selected Planck cores are no more turbulent than the exterior. The velocity-integrated intensities and abundances of HCO{sup +} are positively correlated with those of HCN, suggesting that these two species are well coupled and chemically connected. The detected abundances of both HCO{sup +} and HCN are significantly lower than values in other low- to high-mass star-forming regions. The low abundances may be due to beam dilution. On the basis of an inspection of the parameters given in the PGCC catalog, we suggest that there may be about 1000 PGCC objects that have a sufficient reservoir of dense gas to form stars.

  6. Comparison of clumped isotope signatures of dolomite cements to fluid inclusion thermometry in the temperature range of 73-176 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Came, Rosemarie E.; Azmy, Karem; Tripati, Aradhna; Olanipekun, Babatunde-John

    2017-02-01

    Widespread application of the novel clumped isotope paleothermometer (Δ47) using dolomite samples from shallow crustal settings has been hindered by a lack of adequate constraints on clumped isotope systematics in dolomites that formed at temperatures greater than 50 °C. Consequently, many high-temperature applications involving diagenetic dolomites have required an assumption that the relationship between temperature and Δ47 in diagenetic dolomite resembles the theoretical temperature dependence for calcite. Here we present Δ47 results from dolomite cements for which precipitation temperatures were determined independently using fluid inclusion microthermometry. We compare a rock-based ;calibration; for samples from the temperature range of ∼73 to 176 °C to previously published laboratory-derived calibrations for synthetic calcites. This novel combination of approaches yields results that are broadly consistent with results reported from controlled laboratory experiments, providing an important confirmation of the utility of clumped isotopes in real-world systems. Our results suggest that the Δ47 of dolomite cements may provide key information in the reconstruction of burial and thermal histories and also in the recognition of potential petroleum reservoirs.

  7. THE ORIGIN OF OB CLUSTERS: FROM 10 pc TO 0.1 pc

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hauyu Baobab; Wang Ke; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang Qizhou; Quintana-Lacaci, Guillermo; Li Zhiyun; Zhang Zhiyu E-mail: kwang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: quintana@iram.es E-mail: zl4h@virginia.edu

    2012-01-20

    We observe the 1.2 mm continuum emission around the OB cluster-forming region G10.6-0.4, using the MAMBO-2 bolometer array of the IRAM 30 m telescope and the Submillimeter Array (SMA). Comparison of the Spitzer 24 {mu}m and 8 {mu}m images with our 1.2 mm continuum maps reveal an ionization front of an H II region, the photon-dominated layer, and several 5 pc scale filaments that follow the outer edge of the photon-dominated layer. The filaments, which are resolved in the MAMBO-2 observations, show regularly spaced parsec-scale molecular clumps, embedded with a cluster of dense molecular cores as shown in the SMA 0.87 mm observations. Toward the center of the G10.6-0.4 region, the combined SMA+IRAM 30 m continuum image reveals several parsec-scale protrusions. They may continue down to within 0.1 pc of the geometric center of a dense 3 pc scale structure, where a 200 M{sub Sun} OB cluster resides. The observed filaments may facilitate mass accretion onto the central cluster-forming region in the presence of strong radiative and mechanical stellar feedback. Their filamentary geometry may also facilitate fragmentation. We did not detect any significant polarized emission at 0.87 mm in the inner 1 pc region with SMA.

  8. Clustering of CdSe/CdS Quantum Dot/Quantum Rods into Micelles Can Form Bright, Non-blinking, Stable, and Biocompatible Probes.

    PubMed

    Rafipoor, Mona; Schmidtke, Christian; Wolter, Christopher; Strelow, Christian; Weller, Horst; Lange, Holger

    2015-09-01

    We investigate clustered CdSe/CdS quantum dots/quantum rods, ranging from single to multiple encapsulated rods within amphiphilic diblock copolymer micelles, by time-resolved optical spectroscopy. The effect of the clustering and the cluster size on the optical properties is addressed. The clusters are bright and stable and show no blinking while retaining the fundamental optical properties of the individual quantum dots/quantum rods. Cell studies show neither unspecific uptake nor morphological changes of the cells, despite the increased sizes of the clusters.

  9. Genes Involved in Degradation of para-Nitrophenol Are Differentially Arranged in Form of Non-Contiguous Gene Clusters in Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98

    PubMed Central

    Vikram, Surendra; Pandey, Janmejay; Kumar, Shailesh; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradation of para-Nitrophenol (PNP) proceeds via two distinct pathways, having 1,2,3-benzenetriol (BT) and hydroquinone (HQ) as their respective terminal aromatic intermediates. Genes involved in these pathways have already been studied in different PNP degrading bacteria. Burkholderia sp. strain SJ98 degrades PNP via both the pathways. Earlier, we have sequenced and analyzed a ~41 kb fragment from the genomic library of strain SJ98. This DNA fragment was found to harbor all the lower pathway genes; however, genes responsible for the initial transformation of PNP could not be identified within this fragment. Now, we have sequenced and annotated the whole genome of strain SJ98 and found two ORFs (viz., pnpA and pnpB) showing maximum identity at amino acid level with p-nitrophenol 4-monooxygenase (PnpM) and p-benzoquinone reductase (BqR). Unlike the other PNP gene clusters reported earlier in different bacteria, these two ORFs in SJ98 genome are physically separated from the other genes of PNP degradation pathway. In order to ascertain the identity of ORFs pnpA and pnpB, we have performed in-vitro assays using recombinant proteins heterologously expressed and purified to homogeneity. Purified PnpA was found to be a functional PnpM and transformed PNP into benzoquinone (BQ), while PnpB was found to be a functional BqR which catalyzed the transformation of BQ into hydroquinone (HQ). Noticeably, PnpM from strain SJ98 could also transform a number of PNP analogues. Based on the above observations, we propose that the genes for PNP degradation in strain SJ98 are arranged differentially in form of non-contiguous gene clusters. This is the first report for such arrangement for gene clusters involved in PNP degradation. Therefore, we propose that PNP degradation in strain SJ98 could be an important model system for further studies on differential evolution of PNP degradation functions. PMID:24376843

  10. 3D cluster members and near-infrared distance of open cluster NGC 6819

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin-Hua; Xu, Shou-Kun; Chen, Li

    2015-12-01

    In order to obtain clean members of the open cluster NGC 6819, the proper motions and radial velocities of 1691 stars are used to construct a three-dimensional (3D) velocity space. Based on the DBSCAN clustering algorithm, 537 3D cluster members are obtained. From the 537 3D cluster members, the average radial velocity and absolute proper motion of the cluster are Vr = +2.30 ± 0.04 km s-1 and (PMRA, PMDec) = (-2.5 ± 0.5, -4.3 ± 0.5) mas yr-1, respectively. The proper motions, radial velocities, spatial positions and color-magnitude diagram of the 537 3D members indicate that our membership determination is effective. Among the 537 3D cluster members, 15 red clump giants can be easily identified by eye and are used as reliable standard candles for the distance estimate of the cluster. The distance modulus of the cluster is determined to be (m - M)0 = 11.86 ± 0.05 mag (2355 ± 54 pc), which is quite consistent with published values. The uncertainty of our distance modulus is dominated by the intrinsic dispersion in the luminosities of red clump giants (˜ 0.04 mag).

  11. A Predator-Prey Model for Moon-Triggered Clumping in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Albers, N.; Meinke, B. K.; Sremcevic, M.; Madhusudhanan, P.; Colwell, J. E.; Jerousek, R. E.

    2011-10-01

    UVIS occultation data show clumping in Saturn's F ring and at the B ring outer edge, indicating aggregation and disaggregation at these locations that are perturbed by Mimas and by Prometheus. Timescales range from hours to months. Structure near the B ring edge is seen in power spectral analysis at scales 200m - 2000m. We quantify this sub-km structure using wavelet analysis that estimates the statistical significance of the features. Similar structure is also seen at the strongest density waves, with significance increasing with resonance strength (FIGURE 1). For the B ring outer edge, the strongest structure is seen at longitudes 90° and 270° relative to Mimas. This indicates a direct relation between the moon and the ring clumping. We propose that the collective behavior of the ring particles resembles a predatorprey system: the mean aggregate size is the prey, which feeds the velocity dispersion; conversely, increasing dispersion breaks up the aggregates. Moons may trigger clumping by streamline crowding, which reduces the relative velocity, leading to more aggregation and more clumping. Disaggregation may follow from disruptive collisions or tidal shedding as the clumps stir the relative velocity. For realistic values of the parameters this yields a limit cycle behavior, as for the ecology of foxes and hares or the "boom-bust" economic cycle. Solving for the longterm behavior of this forced system gives a periodic response at the perturbing frequency, with a phase lag roughly consistent with the UVIS occultation measurements (FIGURE 2).

  12. Siderite 'clumped' isotope thermometry: A new paleoclimate proxy for humid continental environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Alvaro; Tang, Jianwu; Rosenheim, Brad E.

    2014-02-01

    Clumped isotope measurements can be used to exploit the paleoclimatic potential of pedogenic siderite (FeCO3); however, the applicability of this method is held back by the lack of clumped isotope calibrations of mineralogies other than calcite and aragonite. Here we present an inorganic calibration of siderites grown in the laboratory between 21 and 51 °C. Linear regression of Δ47 values and temperature (106/T2, K) yields the following relationship (r2 = 0.997): Δ={(0.0356±0.0018)×106}/{T}+(0.172±0.019) We demonstrate that this calibration is indistinguishable from calcite at current levels of analytical precision. Our observations suggest that there is likely no large systematic bias in the clumped isotope acid fractionation factors between the two different carbonate minerals. We also present clumped isotope measurements of a natural siderite collected from Holocene sediments of the Mississippi River Delta. We find that siderites record warm season marsh water temperatures instead of mean annual temperatures as it has long been presumed. This finding has important implications for the accuracy of siderite stable isotope and clumped isotope based climate reconstructions.

  13. Spitzer Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, Kessica

    This proposal is a specific response to the strategic goal of NASA's research program to "discover how the universe works and explore how the universe evolved into its present form." Towards this goal, we propose to mine the Spitzer archive for all observations of galaxy groups and clusters for the purpose of studying galaxy evolution in clusters, contamination rates for Sunyaev Zeldovich cluster surveys, and to provide a database of Spitzer observed clusters to the broader community. Funding from this proposal will go towards two years of support for a Postdoc to do this work. After searching the Spitzer Heritage Archive, we have found 194 unique galaxy groups and clusters that have data from both the Infrared array camera (IRAC; Fazio et al. 2004) at 3.6 - 8 microns and the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; Rieke et al. 2004) at 24microns. This large sample will add value beyond the individual datasets because it will be a larger sample of IR clusters than ever before and will have sufficient diversity in mass, redshift, and dynamical state to allow us to differentiate amongst the effects of these cluster properties. An infrared sample is important because it is unaffected by dust extinction while at the same time is an excellent measure of both stellar mass (IRAC wavelengths) and star formation rate (MIPS wavelengths). Additionally, IRAC can be used to differentiate star forming galaxies (SFG) from active galactic nuclei (AGN), due to their different spectral shapes in this wavelength regime. Specifically, we intend to identify SFG and AGN in galaxy groups and clusters. Groups and clusters differ from the field because the galaxy densities are higher, there is a large potential well due mainly to the mass of the dark matter, and there is hot X-ray gas (the intracluster medium; ICM). We will examine the impact of these differences in environment on galaxy formation by comparing cluster properties of AGN and SFG to those in the field. Also, we will

  14. Clumped Isotope Thermometry of Geologic Methane (13CH3D) using Tunable Laser Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, S.; Zahniser, M. S.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Methane is both an alternative energy source as well as a significant greenhouse gas, and holds the potential for rapid release to the atmosphere, possibly triggering abrupt climate change in the past and in the future. The majority of methane on the Earth is biogenic, originating from microbial methanogenesis, or thermogenic sourced from previously formed biogenic organic materials. Methane can be also produced abiogenically during serpentinization and even mantle-sourced methane has been implicated. Carbon (13C/12C) and hydrogen (D/H) isotope ratios of methane and associated short chain hydrocarbons provide critical information about the abiogenic/biogenic origin of methane but data can be inconclusive. We have developed and tested a Tunable Infrared Laser Direct Absorption Spectroscopy (TILDAS) Instrument to be used for precise measurements of the abundance of doubly isotope-substituted methane (13CH3D). The TILDAS instrument measures direct absorption in the mid-infrared (~ 8 μm) region using continuous wave quantum cascade laser combined with a 76 m pathlength astigmatic absorption cell. Initial test result indicates the precision for 13CH4, 12CH3D and 13CH3D for 0.2 ‰ or better for comparison between two reference gases. Accuracy of the methods for δ13C and δD is evaluated by comparing measurements by conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Calibration of clumped isotope scale (δ13CH3D) is underway using methane produced at various temperatures. Following an isotope exchange reaction (13CH4 + 12CH3D ↔ 13CH3D + 12CH4), precise measurements of 13CH3D abundance is expected to provide new and critical information about the temperature at which methane was formed (or thermally equilibrated). Biogenic origin becomes highly unlikely, for example, if the estimated temperature is higher than 120°C, i.e., current high-temperature limit of microbial methanogenesis. Although significant questions remain regarding isotope exchange kinetics, and clumped

  15. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The balance between heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We study the long-term evolution of an idealized cool-core galaxy cluster under the influence of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback using three-dimensional high-resolution (60 pc) adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The feedback is modeled with a pair of precessing jets whose power is calculated based on the accretion rate of the cold gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH). The intracluster medium first cools into clumps along the propagation direction of the jets. As the jet power increases, gas condensation occurs isotropically, forming spatially extended structures that resemble the observed Hα filaments in Perseus and many other cool-core clusters. Jet heating elevates the gas entropy, halting clump formation. The cold gas that is not accreted onto the SMBH settles into a rotating disk of ∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The hot gas cools directly onto the disk while the SMBH accretes from its innermost region, powering the AGN that maintains a thermally balanced state for a few Gyr. The mass cooling rate averaged over 7 Gyr is ∼30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, an order of magnitude lower than the classic cooling flow value. Medium resolution simulations produce similar results, while in low resolution runs, the cluster experiences cycles of gas condensation and AGN outbursts. Owing to its self-regulating mechanism, AGN feedback can successfully balance cooling with a wide range of model parameters. Our model also produces cold structures in early stages that are in good agreement with the observations. However, the long-lived massive cold disk is unrealistic, suggesting that additional physical processes are still needed.

  16. SOFIA follow-ups of massive clumps from the ATLASGAL galactic plane survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrowski, F.; Güsten, R.; Menten, K. M.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Csengeri, T.; König, C.; Urquhart, J. S.

    2016-05-01

    With the GREAT receiver at the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) we started a concerted observing effort towards a well selected sample of clumps with high masses covering a range of evolutionary stages based on their infrared properties. The sources were selected from the ATLASGAL sub-millimeter dust continuum survey of our Galaxy. The goal is threefold: (i) SOFIA/GREAT allows to study the cooling budget of the clumps, in particular with observations of the CII and OI cooling lines. (ii) With SOFIA/GREAT high-J CO lines can be observed to measure in combination with ground based data the CO SEDs of the sources. (iii) Using rotational transitions of ammonia at THz frequencies the kinematics of the clumps can be probed with absorption spectroscopy to search for infall. Here we will describe these efforts and in particular report new results from the ammonia 32+ - 22- (1.8 THz) observing program.

  17. Paired stable isotopes (O, C) and clumped isotope thermometry of magnesite and silica veins in the New Caledonia Peridotite Nappe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesnel, Benoît; Boulvais, Philippe; Gautier, Pierre; Cathelineau, Michel; John, Cédric M.; Dierick, Malorie; Agrinier, Pierre; Drouillet, Maxime

    2016-06-01

    The stable isotope compositions of veins provide information on the conditions of fluid-rock interaction and on the origin of fluids and temperatures. In New Caledonia, magnesite and silica veins occur throughout the Peridotite Nappe. In this work, we present stable isotope and clumped isotope data in order to constrain the conditions of fluid circulation and the relationship between fluid circulation and nickel ore-forming laterization focusing on the Koniambo Massif. For magnesite veins occurring at the base of the nappe, the high δ18O values between 27.8‰ and 29.5‰ attest to a low temperature formation. Clumped isotope analyses on magnesite give temperatures between 26 °C and 42 °C that are consistent with amorphous silica-magnesite oxygen isotope equilibrium. The meteoric origin of the fluid is indicated by calculated δ18Owater values between -3.4‰ to +1.5‰. Amorphous silica associated with magnesite or occurring in the coarse saprolite level displays a narrow range of δ18O values between 29.7‰ and 35.3‰. For quartz veins occurring at the top of the bedrock and at the saprolite level, commonly in association with Ni-talc-like minerals, the δ18O values are lower, between 21.8‰ and 29.0‰ and suggest low-temperature hydrothermal conditions (∼40-95 °C). Thermal equilibration of the fluid along the geothermic gradient before upward flow through the nappe and/or influence of exothermic reactions of serpentinization could be the source(s) of heat needed to form quartz veins under such conditions.

  18. Equilibrium clumped-isotope effects in doubly substituted isotopologues of ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Michael A.; Wang, Yimin; Braams, Bastiaan J.; Bowman, Joel M.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    We combine path-integral Monte Carlo methods with a new intramolecular potential energy surface to quantify the equilibrium enrichment of doubly substituted ethane isotopologues due to clumped-isotope effects. Ethane represents the simplest molecule to simultaneously exhibit 13C-13C, 13C-D, and D-D clumped-isotope effects, and the analysis of corresponding signatures may provide useful geochemical and biogeochemical proxies of formation temperatures or reaction pathways. Utilizing path-integral statistical mechanics, we predict equilibrium fractionation factors that fully incorporate nuclear quantum effects, such as anharmonicity and rotational-vibrational coupling which are typically neglected by the widely used Urey model. The magnitude of the calculated fractionation factors for the doubly substituted ethane isotopologues indicates that isotopic clumping can be observed if rare-isotope substitutions are separated by up to three chemical bonds, but the diminishing strength of these effects suggests that enrichment at further separations will be negligible. The Urey model systematically underestimates enrichment due to 13C-D and D-D clumped-isotope effects in ethane, leading to small relative errors in the apparent equilibrium temperature, ranging from 5 K at 273.15 K to 30 K at 873.15 K. We additionally note that the rotameric dependence of isotopologue enrichment must be carefully considered when using the Urey model, whereas the path-integral calculations automatically account for such effects due to configurational sampling. These findings are of direct relevance to future clumped-isotope studies of ethane, as well as studies of 13C-13C, 13C-D, and D-D clumped-isotope effects in other hydrocarbons.

  19. Effects of foliage clumping on the estimation of global terrestrial gross primary productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing M.; Mo, Gang; Pisek, Jan; Liu, Jane; Deng, Feng; Ishizawa, Misa; Chan, Douglas

    2012-03-01

    Sunlit and shaded leaf separation proposed by Norman (1982) is an effective way to upscale from leaf to canopy in modeling vegetation photosynthesis. The Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS) makes use of this methodology, and has been shown to be reliable in modeling the gross primary productivity (GPP) derived from CO2flux and tree ring measurements. In this study, we use BEPS to investigate the effect of canopy architecture on the global distribution of GPP. For this purpose, we use not only leaf area index (LAI) but also the first ever global map of the foliage clumping index derived from the multiangle satellite sensor POLDER at 6 km resolution. The clumping index, which characterizes the degree of the deviation of 3-dimensional leaf spatial distributions from the random case, is used to separate sunlit and shaded LAI values for a given LAI. Our model results show that global GPP in 2003 was 132 ± 22 Pg C. Relative to this baseline case, our results also show: (1) global GPP is overestimated by 12% when accurate LAI is available but clumping is ignored, and (2) global GPP is underestimated by 9% when the effective LAI is available and clumping is ignored. The clumping effects in both cases are statistically significant (p < 0.001). The effective LAI is often derived from remote sensing by inverting the measured canopy gap fraction to LAI without considering the clumping. Global GPP would therefore be generally underestimated when remotely sensed LAI (actually effective LAI by our definition) is used. This is due to the underestimation of the shaded LAI and therefore the contribution of shaded leaves to GPP. We found that shaded leaves contribute 50%, 38%, 37%, 39%, 26%, 29% and 21% to the total GPP for broadleaf evergreen forest, broadleaf deciduous forest, evergreen conifer forest, deciduous conifer forest, shrub, C4 vegetation, and other vegetation, respectively. The global average of this ratio is 35%.

  20. Intercomparison of clumping index estimates from POLDER, MODIS, and MISR satellite data over reference sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisek, Jan; Govind, Ajit; Arndt, Stefan K.; Hocking, Darren; Wardlaw, Timothy J.; Fang, Hongliang; Matteucci, Giorgio; Longdoz, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Clumping index is the measure of foliage grouping relative to a random distribution of leaves in space. It is a key structural parameter of plant canopies that influences canopy radiation regimes and controls canopy photosynthesis and other land-atmosphere interactions. The Normalized Difference between Hotspot and Darkspot (NDHD) index has been previously used to retrieve global clumping index maps from POLarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER) data at ∼6 km resolution and the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) product from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) at 500 m resolution. Most recently the algorithm was also applied with Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) data at 275 m resolution over selected areas. In this study for the first time we characterized and compared the three products over a set of sites representing diverse biomes and different canopy structures. The products were also directly validated with both in-situ vertical profiles and available seasonal trajectories of clumping index over several sites. We demonstrated that the vertical distribution of foliage and especially the effect of understory need to be taken into account while validating foliage clumping products from remote sensing products with values measured in the field. Satellite measurements responded to the structural effects near the top of canopies, while ground measurements may be biased by the lower vegetation layers. Additionally, caution should be taken regarding the misclassification in land cover maps as their errors can propagate into the foliage clumping maps. Our results indicate that MODIS data and MISR data, with 275 m in particular, can provide good quality clumping index estimates at spatial scales pertinent for modeling local carbon and energy fluxes.

  1. Record of seasonal body fluid composition in Black Clam (Bivalve) using clumped isotope thermometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, H.; Naidu, P. K.; Ghosh, P.

    2012-12-01

    Application of clumped isotope thermometry (Ghosh et al., 2006) is highly debated while resolving the issue of kinetic effect during biogenic carbonate precipitation. Mollusks are particularly attractive target to study the kinetic effect (Eiler, 2011) in the biological system owing to its incremental growth ring patterns. This allows understanding the role of environmental parameters other than temperature driving the distribution of heavier isotopologues. Guo et al., (2010) indicated role of pH in driving the distribution of heavier isotopolgues in the carbonates. We investigated here clumped isotopic composition of Black Calm (bivalve shell) caught live from a location in Southern Indian Estuary. The region experiences large change in seasonal condition. The physical environmental parameters at that location were monitored for last 3 years at monthly interval. The salinity, temperature, pH information are available for all the months when mollusc growth bands are deposited. The bottom water of estuary, where bivalve thrives experience maximum temperature of 32°C during November and December, while temperature during Monsoon months (July, August) drops lows to 26°C. Initial results on clumped isotope thermometry on the growth bands precipitated suggests that during the time in a year when pH level is alkaline i.e. 8.0±0.2 there is large consistency between actual temperature and estimated temperature using clumped isotope based thermometry. While the pH drops towards acidic i.e. 6.8±0.1 lower temperature estimates compared to actual was recorded. The effect of metabolic rate and body temperature variability is not been investigated as suggested in case of land snails based clumped isotope thermometry (Zaarur et al., 2011). Mollusc shell can be used to trace the composition of environmental water while pH variation is minimal. In this presentation analyses of more shell specimen and explore the role of pH and osmo-regulation in mollusc determining the clumped

  2. A Computational Study of the Factors Influencing the PVC-Triggering Ability of a Cluster of Early Afterdepolarization-Capable Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Zimik, Soling; Nayak, Alok Ranjan; Pandit, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Premature ventricular complexes (PVCs), which are abnormal impulse propagations in cardiac tissue, can develop because of various reasons including early afterdepolarizations (EADs). We show how a cluster of EAD-generating cells (EAD clump) can lead to PVCs in a model of cardiac tissue, and also investigate the factors that assist such clumps in triggering PVCs. In particular, we study, through computer simulations, the effects of the following factors on the PVC-triggering ability of an EAD clump: (1) the repolarization reserve (RR) of the EAD cells; (2) the size of the EAD clump; (3) the coupling strength between the EAD cells in the clump; and (4) the presence of fibroblasts in the EAD clump. We find that, although a low value of RR is necessary to generate EADs and hence PVCs, a very low value of RR leads to low-amplitude EAD oscillations that decay with time and do not lead to PVCs. We demonstrate that a certain threshold size of the EAD clump, or a reduction in the coupling strength between the EAD cells, in the clump, is required to trigger PVCs. We illustrate how randomly distributed inexcitable obstacles, which we use to model collagen deposits, affect PVC-triggering by an EAD clump. We show that the gap-junctional coupling of fibroblasts with myocytes can either assist or impede the PVC-triggering ability of an EAD clump, depending on the resting membrane potential of the fibroblasts and the coupling strength between the myocyte and fibroblasts. We also find that the triggering of PVCs by an EAD clump depends sensitively on factors like the pacing cycle length and the distribution pattern of the fibroblasts.

  3. A Computational Study of the Factors Influencing the PVC-Triggering Ability of a Cluster of Early Afterdepolarization-Capable Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zimik, Soling; Nayak, Alok Ranjan; Pandit, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Premature ventricular complexes (PVCs), which are abnormal impulse propagations in cardiac tissue, can develop because of various reasons including early afterdepolarizations (EADs). We show how a cluster of EAD-generating cells (EAD clump) can lead to PVCs in a model of cardiac tissue, and also investigate the factors that assist such clumps in triggering PVCs. In particular, we study, through computer simulations, the effects of the following factors on the PVC-triggering ability of an EAD clump: (1) the repolarization reserve (RR) of the EAD cells; (2) the size of the EAD clump; (3) the coupling strength between the EAD cells in the clump; and (4) the presence of fibroblasts in the EAD clump. We find that, although a low value of RR is necessary to generate EADs and hence PVCs, a very low value of RR leads to low-amplitude EAD oscillations that decay with time and do not lead to PVCs. We demonstrate that a certain threshold size of the EAD clump, or a reduction in the coupling strength between the EAD cells, in the clump, is required to trigger PVCs. We illustrate how randomly distributed inexcitable obstacles, which we use to model collagen deposits, affect PVC-triggering by an EAD clump. We show that the gap-junctional coupling of fibroblasts with myocytes can either assist or impede the PVC-triggering ability of an EAD clump, depending on the resting membrane potential of the fibroblasts and the coupling strength between the myocyte and fibroblasts. We also find that the triggering of PVCs by an EAD clump depends sensitively on factors like the pacing cycle length and the distribution pattern of the fibroblasts. PMID:26675670

  4. A free-form prediction for the reappearance of supernova Refsdal in the Hubble Frontier Fields cluster MACSJ1149.5+2223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego, Jose M.; Broadhurst, Tom; Chen, Cuncheng; Lim, Jeremy; Zitrin, Adi; Chan, Brian; Coe, Dan; Ford, Holland C.; Lam, Daniel; Zheng, Wei

    2016-02-01

    The massive cluster MACSJ1149.5+2223(z = 0.544) displays five very large lensed images of a well-resolved spiral galaxy at zspect = 1.491. It is within one of these images that the first example of a multiply lensed supernova (SN) has been detected recently as part of the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space. The depth of this data also reveals many H II regions within the lensed spiral galaxy which we identify between the five counter-images. Here, we expand the capability of our free-form method to incorporate these H II regions locally, with other reliable lensed galaxies added for a global solution. This improved accuracy allows us to estimate when the Refsdal SN will appear within the other lensed images of the spiral galaxy to an accuracy of ˜7 per cent. We predict this SN will reappear in one of the counter-images (RA = 11:49:36.025, Dec. = +22:23:48.11, J2000) and on 2015 November 1 (with an estimated error of ±25 d) it will be at the same phase as it was when it was originally discovered, offering a unique opportunity to study the early phases of this SN and to examine the consistency of the mass model and the cosmological model that have an impact on the time delay prediction.

  5. Intricate interactions between the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and foreign genetic elements, revealed by diversified clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) signatures.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Sotaro; Yoshida, Takashi; Kaneko, Takakazu; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2012-08-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) confer sequence-dependent, adaptive resistance in prokaryotes against viruses and plasmids via incorporation of short sequences, called spacers, derived from foreign genetic elements. CRISPR loci are thus considered to provide records of past infections. To describe the host-parasite (i.e., cyanophages and plasmids) interactions involving the bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, we investigated CRISPR in four M. aeruginosa strains and in two previously sequenced genomes. The number of spacers in each locus was larger than the average among prokaryotes. All spacers were strain specific, except for a string of 11 spacers shared in two closely related strains, suggesting diversification of the loci. Using CRISPR repeat-based PCR, 24 CRISPR genotypes were identified in a natural cyanobacterial community. Among 995 unique spacers obtained, only 10 sequences showed similarity to M. aeruginosa phage Ma-LMM01. Of these, six spacers showed only silent or conservative nucleotide mutations compared to Ma-LMM01 sequences, suggesting a strategy by the cyanophage to avert CRISPR immunity dependent on nucleotide identity. These results imply that host-phage interactions can be divided into M. aeruginosa-cyanophage combinations rather than pandemics of population-wide infectious cyanophages. Spacer similarity also showed frequent exposure of M. aeruginosa to small cryptic plasmids that were observed only in a few strains. Thus, the diversification of CRISPR implies that M. aeruginosa has been challenged by diverse communities (almost entirely uncharacterized) of cyanophages and plasmids.

  6. A multifrequency study of the active star-forming complex NGC 6357 - I. Interstellar structures linked to the open cluster Pis 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. E.; Barbá, R.; Duronea, N. U.; Vasquez, J.; Arnal, E. M.; Goss, W. M.; Fernández Lajús, E.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the distribution of gas (ionized, neutral atomic and molecular) and interstellar dust in the complex star-forming region NGC 6357 with the goal of studying the interplay between the massive stars in the open cluster Pis 24 and the surrounding interstellar matter. Our study of the distribution of the ionized gas is based on narrow-band Hα, [S II]and [O III] images obtained with the Curtis-Schmidt Camera at CTIO, Chile, and on radio continuum observations at 1465 MHz taken with the VLA with a synthesized beam of 40 arcsec. The distribution of the molecular gas is analysed using 12CO(1-0) data obtained with the NANTEN radiotelescope, Chile (angular resolution = 2.7 arcmin). The interstellar dust distribution was studied using mid-infrared data from the GLIMPSE survey and far-infrared observations from IRAS. NGC 6357 consists of a large ionized shell and a number of smaller optical nebulosities. The optical, radio continuum, and near- and mid-IR images delineate the distributions of the ionized gas and interstellar dust in the H II regions and in previously unknown wind-blown bubbles linked to the massive stars in Pis 24 revealing surrounding photodissociation regions. The CO line observations allowed us to identify the molecular counterparts of the ionized structures in the complex and to confirm the presence of photodissociation regions. The action of the WR star HD 157504 on the surrounding gas was also investigated. The molecular mass in the complex is estimated to be (4 ± 2) × 105 M⊙. The mean electron densities derived from the radio data suggest electron densities >200 cm-3, indicating that NGC 6357 is a complex formed in a region of high ambient density. The known massive stars in Pis 24 and a number of newly inferred massive stars are mainly responsible for the excitation and photodissociation of the parental molecular cloud.

  7. The very wide-field gzK galaxy survey - I. Details of the clustering properties of star-forming galaxies at z ˜ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Shogo; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Toshikawa, Jun; Onoue, Masafusa

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of clustering analysis on z ˜ 2 star-forming galaxies. By combining our data with data from publicly available archives, we collect g-, zB/z- and K-band imaging data over 5.2 deg2, which represents the largest area BzK/gzK survey. We apply colour corrections to translate our filter set to those used in the original BzK selection for the gzK selection. Because of the wide survey area, we obtain a sample of 41 112 star-forming gzK galaxies at z ˜ 2 (sgzK galaxies) down to KAB < 23.0, and we determine high-quality two-point angular correlation functions (ACFs). Our ACFs show an apparent excess from power-law behaviour at small angular scale (θ ≲ 0.01°), which corresponds to the virial radius of a dark halo at z ˜ 2 with a mass of ˜1013 M⊙. We find that the correlation lengths are consistent with the previous estimates over the whole magnitude range; however, our results are evaluated with a smaller margin of error than that in previous studies. The large amount of data enables us to determine ACFs differentially depending on the luminosity of the subset of the data. The mean halo mass of faint sgzK galaxies (22.0 < K ≤ 23.0) was found to be < M_h > = (1.32^{+0.09}_{-0.12}) × 10^{12} h^{-1} M⊙, whereas bright sgzK galaxies (18.0 ≤ K ≤ 21.0) were found to reside in dark haloes with a mass of < M_h > = (3.26^{+1.23}_{-1.02}) × 10^{13} h^{-1} M⊙.

  8. The population of giant clumps in simulated high-z galaxies: in situ and ex situ migration and survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelker, Nir; Dekel, Avishai; Ceverino, Daniel; Tweed, Dylan; Moody, Christopher E.; Primack, Joel

    2014-10-01

    We study the properties of giant clumps and their radial gradients in high-z disc galaxies using AMR cosmological simulations. Our sample consists of 770 snapshots in the redshift range z = 4-1 from 29 galaxies that at z = 2 span the stellar mass range (0.2-3) × 1011 M⊙. Extended gas discs exist in 83 per cent of the snapshots. Clumps are identified by gas density in 3D and their stellar and dark matter components are considered thereafter. While most of the overdensities are diffuse and elongated, 91 per cent of their mass and 83 per cent of their star formation rate (SFR) are in compact round clumps. Nearly all galaxies have a central, massive bulge clump, while 70 per cent of the discs show off-centre clumps, 3-4 per galaxy. The fraction of clumpy discs peaks at intermediate disc masses. Clumps are divided based on dark matter content into in situ and ex situ originating from violent disc instability (VDI) and minor mergers, respectively. 60 per cent of the discs are in a VDI phase showing off-centre in situ clumps, which contribute 1-7 per cent of the disc mass and 5-45 per cent of its SFR. The in situ clumps constitute 75 per cent of the off-centre clumps in terms of number and SFR but only half the mass, each clump containing on average 1 per cent of the disc mass and 6 per cent of its SFR. They have young stellar ages, 100-400 Myr, and high specific SFR (sSFR), 1-10 Gyr-1. They exhibit gradients resulting from inward clump migration, where the inner clumps are somewhat more massive and older, with lower gas fraction and sSFR and higher metallicity. Similar observed gradients indicate that clumps survive outflows. The ex situ clumps have stellar ages 0.5-3 Gyr and sSFR ˜0.1-2 Gyr-1, and they exhibit weaker gradients. Massive clumps of old stars at large radii are likely ex situ mergers, though half of them share the disc rotation.

  9. MOLECULAR ENVIRONMENTS OF 51 PLANCK COLD CLUMPS IN THE ORION COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn

    2012-09-15

    A mapping survey of 51 Planck cold clumps projected on the Orion complex was performed with J = 1-0 lines of {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO with the 13.7 m telescope at the Purple Mountain Observatory. The mean column densities of the Planck gas clumps range from 0.5 to 9.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, with an average value of (2.9 {+-} 1.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. The mean excitation temperatures of these clumps range from 7.4 to 21.1 K, with an average value of 12.1 {+-} 3.0 K and the average three-dimensional velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub 3D} in these molecular clumps is 0.66 {+-} 0.24 km s{sup -1}. Most of the clumps have {sigma}{sub NT} larger than or comparable to {sigma}{sub Therm}. The H{sub 2} column density of the molecular clumps calculated from molecular lines correlates with the aperture flux at 857 GHz of the dust emission. By analyzing the distributions of the physical parameters, we suggest that turbulent flows can shape the clump structure and dominate their density distribution on large scales, but not function on small scales due to local fluctuations. Eighty-two dense cores are identified in the molecular clumps. The dense cores have an average radius and local thermal equilibrium (LTE) mass of 0.34 {+-} 0.14 pc and 38{sup +5}{sub -30} M{sub Sun }, respectively. The structures of low column density cores are more affected by turbulence, while the structures of high column density cores are more affected by other factors, especially by gravity. The correlation of velocity dispersion versus core size is very weak for the dense cores. The dense cores are found to be most likely gravitationally bounded rather than pressure confined. The relationship between M{sub vir} and M{sub LTE} can be well fitted with a power law. The core mass function here is much flatter than the stellar initial mass function. The lognormal behavior of the core mass distribution is most likely determined by internal turbulence.

  10. On the formation and evolution of clumps of galaxies in an expanding universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, C. A.; Silk, J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are derived for the development of phase-space clumps of mass points in a background spectrum of gravitational-potential fluctuations. The Vlasov equation and the pair correlation equation (in the weak coupling limit) are solved exactly in an Einstein-de Sitter cosmology, and the plasma-clumping theory is used to identify terms that yield important collective effects. Various astrophysical implications are discussed, including the formation of large-scale inhomogeneity and the enhanced generation of correlations in the distribution of galaxies.

  11. The formation of NGC 3603 young starburst cluster: `prompt' hierarchical assembly or monolithic starburst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-02-01

    The formation of very young massive clusters or `starburst' clusters is currently one of the most widely debated topic in astronomy. The classical notion dictates that a star cluster is formed in situ in a dense molecular gas clump. The stellar radiative and mechanical feedback to the residual gas energizes the latter until it escapes the system. The newly born gas-free young cluster eventually readjusts with the corresponding mass-loss. Based on the observed substructured morphologies of many young stellar associations, it is alternatively suggested that even the smooth-profiled massive clusters are also assembled from migrating less massive subclusters. A very young (age ≈ 1 Myr), massive (>104 M⊙) star cluster like the Galactic NGC 3603 young cluster (HD 97950) is an appropriate testbed for distinguishing between the above `monolithic' and `hierarchical' formation scenarios. A recent study by Banerjee & Kroupa demonstrates that the monolithic scenario remarkably reproduces the HD 97950 cluster. In particular, its shape, internal motion and the mass distribution of stars are found to follow naturally and consistently from a single model calculation undergoing ≈70 per cent by mass gas dispersal. In this work, we explore the possibility of the formation of the above cluster via hierarchical assembly of subclusters. These subclusters are initially distributed over a wide range of spatial volumes and have various modes of subclustering in both absence and presence of a background gas potential. Unlike the above monolithic initial system that reproduces HD 97950 very well, the same is found to be prohibitive with hierarchical assembly alone (with/without a gas potential). Only those systems which assemble promptly into a single cluster (in ≲1 Myr) from a close separation (all within ≲2 pc) could match the observed density profile of HD 97950 after a similar gas removal. These results therefore suggest that the NGC 3603 young cluster has formed essentially

  12. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  13. Deuterium Fractionation in Massive Clumps in Early Evolutionary Stages of High-Mass Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, T.; Sakai, N.; Furuya, K.; Aikawa, Y.; Hirota, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    2011-05-01

    To understand the initial conditions of star formation, it is useful to observe deuterated species, because the deuterium fractionation can be enhanced in cold starless phase. We have observed the HN13C J=1--0 and DNC J=1--0 lines toward 18 massive clumps, including infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) and high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs), by using the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. We have found that the HN13C emission is stronger than the DNC emission toward all the observed sources. The averaged DNC/HNC ratio of the observed sources is found to be 0.007, which is lower than that of the low-mass cores. The DNC/HNC ratio is found to be roughly anti-correlated with the kinetic temperature derived from NH_3 (J, K) = (1, 1) and (2, 2). We have also found that the DNC/HNC ratio of some IRDCs is lower than that of HMPOs, although the kinetic temperature of the IRDCs is lower than that of the HMPOs. With the aid of chemical model simulations, we discuss how the deuterium fractionation decreases after the onset of star formation. We suggest that the DNC/HNC ratio of star forming cores may reflect the timescale of starless phase. In addition to the above results, we report the current status of some instruments, which we have developed for observations of deuterated species. We have developed the 70 GHz receiver for the Nobeyama Radio Observatory (NRO) 45 m telescope. By using this receiver, we can observe the J=1-0 lines of various fundamental deuterated species such as DCN, DCO^+, and C_2D. For observations of the H_2D^+ line at 372 GHz, we have improved the 350 GHz receiver for the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) 10 m telescope. We will also report the observation plans of deuterated species with these receivers.

  14. The mass distribution of clumps within infrared dark clouds. A Large APEX Bolometer Camera study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, L.; Wyrowski, F.; Schuller, F.; Menten, K. M.; Ballesteros-Paredes, J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We present an analysis of the dust continuum emission at 870 μm in order to investigate the mass distribution of clumps within infrared dark clouds (IRDCs). Methods: We map six IRDCs with the Large APEX BOlometer CAmera (LABOCA) at APEX, reaching an rms noise level of σrms = 28-44 mJy beam-1. The dust continuum emission coming from these IRDCs was decomposed by using two automated algorithms, Gaussclumps and Clumpfind. Moreover, we carried out single-pointing observations of the N2H+ (3-2) line toward selected positions to obtain kinematic information. Results: The mapped IRDCs are located in the range of kinematic distances of 2.7-3.2 kpc. We identify 510 and 352 sources with Gaussclumps and Clumpfind, respectively, and estimate masses and other physical properties assuming a uniform dust temperature. The mass ranges are 6-2692 M⊙ (Gaussclumps) and 7-4254 M⊙ (Clumpfind), and the ranges in effective radius are ~0.10-0.74 pc (Gaussclumps) and 0.16-0.99 pc (Clumpfind). The mass distribution, independent of the decomposition method used, is fitted by a power law, dN/dM ∝ Mα, with an index (α) of -1.60 ± 0.06, consistent with the CO mass distribution and other high-mass star-forming regions. Based on data acquired with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). APEX is a collaboration between the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, the European Southern Observatory, and the Onsala Space Observatory.Full Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/561/A148

  15. Formation of a protocluster: A virialized structure from gravoturbulent collapse. I. Simulation of cluster formation in a collapsing molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Context. Stars are often observed to form in clusters and it is therefore important to understand how such a region of concentrated mass is assembled out of the diffuse medium. The properties of such a region eventually prescribe the important physical mechanisms and determine the characteristics of the stellar cluster. Aims: We study the formation of a gaseous protocluster inside a molecular cloud and associate its internal properties with those of the parent cloud by varying the level of the initial turbulence of the cloud with a view to better characterize the subsequent stellar cluster formation. Methods: We performed high resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of gaseous protoclusters forming in molecular clouds collapsing under self-gravity. We determined ellipsoidal cluster regions via gas kinematics and sink particle distribution, permitting us to determine the mass, size, and aspect ratio of the cluster. We studied the cluster properties, such as kinetic and gravitational energy, and made links to the parent cloud. Results: The gaseous protocluster is formed out of global collapse of a molecular cloud and has non-negligible rotation owing to angular momentum conservation during the collapse of the object. Most of the star formation occurs in this region, which occupies only a small volume fraction of the whole cloud. This dense entity is a result of the interplay between turbulence and gravity. We identify such regions in simulations and compare the gas and sink particles to observed star-forming clumps and embedded clusters, respectively. The gaseous protocluster inferred from simulation results presents a mass-size relation that is compatible with observations. We stress that the stellar cluster radius, although clearly correlated with the gas cluster radius, depends sensitively on its definition. Energy analysis is performed to confirm that the gaseous protocluster is a product of gravoturbulent reprocessing and that the support of turbulent

  16. NEARBY CLUMPY, GAS RICH, STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: LOCAL ANALOGS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUMPY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, C. A.; Pisano, D. J.; Rabidoux, K.; Low, M.-M. Mac; Kreckel, K.; Guzmán, R. E-mail: djpisano@mail.wvu.edu E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org E-mail: guzman@astro.ufl.edu

    2015-07-10

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) have enhanced star formation rates (SFRs) and compact morphologies. We combine Sloan Digital Sky Survey data with H i data of 29 LCBGs at redshift z ∼ 0 to understand their nature. We find that local LCBGs have high atomic gas fractions (∼50%) and SFRs per stellar mass consistent with some high-redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs). Many local LCBGs also have clumpy morphologies, with clumps distributed across their disks. Although rare, these galaxies appear to be similar to the clumpy SFGs commonly observed at z ∼ 1–3. Local LCBGs separate into three groups: (1) interacting galaxies (∼20%); (2) clumpy spirals (∼40%); and (3) non-clumpy, non-spirals with regular shapes and smaller effective radii and stellar masses (∼40%). It seems that the method of building up a high gas fraction, which then triggers star formation, is not the same for all local LCBGs. This may lead to a dichotomy in galaxy characteristics. We consider possible gas delivery scenarios and suggest that clumpy spirals, preferentially located in clusters and with companions, are smoothly accreting gas from tidally disrupted companions and/or intracluster gas enriched by stripped satellites. Conversely, as non-clumpy galaxies are preferentially located in the field and tend to be isolated, we suggest clumpy, cold streams, which destroy galaxy disks and prevent clump formation, as a likely gas delivery mechanism for these systems. Other possibilities include smooth cold streams, a series of minor mergers, or major interactions.

  17. ­­A Clumped Isotope Calibration for Terrestrial Microbial Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryshyn, V. A.; Mering, J. A.; Mitsunaga, B. A.; Eagle, R.; Dunbar, R. B.; Bhattacharya, A.; Tripati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate terrestrial paleotemperature records are key pieces of information in the paleoenvironmental reconstruction of Earth history. These records aid in building reliable climate models and help scientists understand the links between continental and oceanic climate data. Many different types of analyses are used to estimate terrestrial climate shifts, including leaf margin analysis, palynology, glacial deposits, elemental ratios, organic geochemistry, and stable isotopes of lacustrine deposits. Here we report a carbonate clumped isotope calibration for microbial carbonates. Application of the clumped isotope paleothermometer can potentially provide a direct temperature measurement of the water at the time of carbonate formation. Although different calibrations of the paleothermometer have been published for both inorganic and biotic carbonate minerals, the effects of clumping in microbialites (structures built under the influence of microbial activity) have not yet been quantified. Lacustrine microbialites present a potentially large, untapped archive of terrestrial climate data, however they are not strictly biotic or abiotic, but bio-induced carbonate, meaning that organisms (such as photosynthetic bacteria) influence but do not directly control precipitation. We have measured modern microbialites from multiple lacustrine sites and will report a comparison of these results to known water temperatures. Additionally we will compare lacustrine samples to marine microbialites (e.g., samples from Shark Bay) to assess potential differences between lacustrine and marine intertidal environments on clumped isotope compositions.

  18. MLAOS: a multi-point linear array of optical sensors for coniferous foliage clumping index measurement.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yonghua; Fu, Lizhe; Han, Wenchao; Zhu, Yeqing; Wang, Jindi

    2014-05-23

    The canopy foliage clumping effect is primarily caused by the non-random distribution of canopy foliage. Currently, measurements of clumping index (CI) by handheld instruments is typically time- and labor-intensive. We propose a low-cost and low-power automatic measurement system called Multi-point Linear Array of Optical Sensors (MLAOS), which consists of three above-canopy and nine below-canopy optical sensors that capture plant transmittance at different times of the day. Data communication between the MLAOS node is facilitated by using a ZigBee network, and the data are transmitted from the field MLAOS to a remote data server using the Internet. The choice of the electronic element and design of the MLAOS software is aimed at reducing costs and power consumption. A power consumption test showed that, when a 4000 mAH Li-ion battery is used, a maximum of 8-10 months of work can be achieved. A field experiment on a coniferous forest revealed that the CI of MLAOS may reveal a clumping effect that occurs within the canopy. In further work, measurement of the multi-scale clumping effect can be achieved by utilizing a greater number of MLAOS devices to capture the heterogeneity of the plant canopy.

  19. Using red clump stars to decompose the galactic magnetic field with distance

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, Michael D.

    2014-09-01

    A new method for measuring the large-scale structure of the Galactic magnetic field is presented. The Galactic magnetic field has been probed through the Galactic disk with near-infrared starlight polarimetry; however, the distance to each background star is unknown. Using red clump stars as near-infrared standard candles, this work presents the first attempt to decompose the line-of-sight structure of the sky-projected Galactic magnetic field. Two example lines of sight are decomposed: toward a field with many red clump stars and toward a field with few red clump stars. A continuous estimate of magnetic field orientation over several kiloparsecs of distance is possible in the field with many red clump stars, while only discrete estimates are possible in the sparse example. Toward the outer Galaxy, there is a continuous field orientation with distance that shows evidence of perturbation by the Galactic warp. Toward the inner Galaxy, evidence for a large-scale change in the magnetic field geometry is consistent with models of magnetic field reversals, independently derived from Faraday rotation studies. A photo-polarimetric method for identifying candidate intrinsically polarized stars is also presented. The future application of this method to large regions of the sky will begin the process of mapping the Galactic magnetic field in a way never before possible.

  20. Estimation of intervention effect using paired interval-censored data with clumping below lower detection limit.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Lam, K F; Cowling, Benjamin J; Cheung, Yin Bun

    2015-01-30

    Outcome variables that are semicontinuous with clumping at zero are commonly seen in biomedical research. In addition, the outcome measurement is sometimes subject to interval censoring and a lower detection limit (LDL). This gives rise to interval-censored observations with clumping below the LDL. Level of antibody against influenza virus measured by the hemagglutination inhibition assay is an example. The interval censoring is due to the assay's technical procedure. The clumping below LDL is likely a result of the lack of prior exposure in some individuals such that they either have zero level of antibodies or do not have detectable level of antibodies. Given a pair of such measurements from the same subject at two time points, a binary 'fold-increase' endpoint can be defined according to the ratio of these two measurements, as it often is in vaccine clinical trials. The intervention effect or vaccine immunogenicity can be assessed by comparing the binary endpoint between groups of subjects given different vaccines or placebos. We introduce a two-part random effects model for modeling the paired interval-censored data with clumping below the LDL. Based on the estimated model parameters, we propose to use Monte Carlo approximation for estimation of the 'fold-increase' endpoint and the intervention effect. Bootstrapping is used for variance estimation. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated by simulation. We analyze antibody data from an influenza vaccine trial for illustration.

  1. MLAOS: A Multi-Point Linear Array of Optical Sensors for Coniferous Foliage Clumping Index Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yonghua; Fu, Lizhe; Han, Wenchao; Zhu, Yeqing; Wang, Jindi

    2014-01-01

    The canopy foliage clumping effect is primarily caused by the non-random distribution of canopy foliage. Currently, measurements of clumping index (CI) by handheld instruments is typically time- and labor-intensive. We propose a low-cost and low-power automatic measurement system called Multi-point Linear Array of Optical Sensors (MLAOS), which consists of three above-canopy and nine below-canopy optical sensors that capture plant transmittance at different times of the day. Data communication between the MLAOS node is facilitated by using a ZigBee network, and the data are transmitted from the field MLAOS to a remote data server using the Internet. The choice of the electronic element and design of the MLAOS software is aimed at reducing costs and power consumption. A power consumption test showed that, when a 4000 mAH Li-ion battery is used, a maximum of 8–10 months of work can be achieved. A field experiment on a coniferous forest revealed that the CI of MLAOS may reveal a clumping effect that occurs within the canopy. In further work, measurement of the multi-scale clumping effect can be achieved by utilizing a greater number of MLAOS devices to capture the heterogeneity of the plant canopy. PMID:24859029

  2. Spectral-luminescent properties of silver molecular clusters and nanoparticles formed by ion exchange in antimony-doped photo-thermo-refractive glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgibnev, E. M.; Nikonorov, N. V.; Ignat'ev, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    The formation of silver molecular clusters and nanoparticles in photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glasses with different antimony contents h