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Sample records for cluster size distributions

  1. Atmospheric Ion Clusters: Properties and Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, R.; Turco, R. P.

    2002-12-01

    Ions are continuously generated in the atmosphere by the action of galactic cosmic radiation. Measured charge concentrations are of the order of 103 ~ {cm-3} throughout the troposphere, increasing to about 5 x 103 ~ {cm-3} in the lower stratosphere [Cole and Pierce, 1965; Paltridge, 1965, 1966]. The lifetimes of these ions are sufficient to allow substantial clustering with common trace constituents in air, including water, nitric and sulfuric acids, ammonia, and a variety of organic compounds [e.g., D'Auria and Turco, 2001 and references cited therein]. The populations of the resulting charged molecular clusters represent a pre-nucleation phase of particle formation, and in this regard comprise a key segment of the over-all nucleation size spectrum [e.g., Castleman and Tang, 1972]. It has been suggested that these clusters may catalyze certain heterogeneous reactions, and given their characteristic crystal-like structures may act as freezing nuclei for supercooled droplets. To investigate these possibilities, basic information on cluster thermodynamic properties and chemical kinetics is needed. Here, we present new results for several relevant atmospheric ion cluster families. In particular, predictions based on quantum mechanical simulations of cluster structure, and related thermodynamic parameters, are compared against laboratory data. We also describe a hybrid approach for modeling cluster sequences that combines laboratory measurements and quantum predictions with the classical liquid droplet (Thomson) model to treat a wider range of cluster sizes. Calculations of cluster mass distributions based on this hybrid model are illustrated, and the advantages and limitations of such an analysis are summarized. References: Castelman, A. W., Jr., and I. N. Tang, Role of small clusters in nucleation about ions, J. Chem. Phys., 57, 3629-3638, 1972. Cole, R. K., and E. T. Pierce, Electrification in the Earth's atmosphere for altitudes between 0 and 100 kilometers, J

  2. Efficient approximation of the cluster size distribution in binary condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, Dennis S.; Sidin, Ryan S. R.; Hagmeijer, Rob

    2010-05-01

    We propose a computationally efficient method for the calculation of the binary cluster size distribution. This method is based on the phase path analysis algorithm, which was originally derived for single-component condensation. We extend this method by constructing the binary general dynamic equation, which introduces clusters at a point in two component n1,n2-space. The location of this source point is determined by the Gibbs free energy of formation and the impingement rates of the two constituents. The resulting model describes the binary cluster size distribution along a line in n1,n2-space. The solution of the binary general dynamic equation is compared with the solution of formally exact binary Becker-Döring equations for a typical nucleation pulse experiment. The results show good agreement for the cluster composition and size and the integral properties of the size distribution.

  3. Changes in tropical precipitation cluster size distributions under global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelin, J. D.; Quinn, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    The total amount of precipitation integrated across a tropical storm or other precipitation feature (contiguous clusters of precipitation exceeding a minimum rain rate) is a useful measure of the aggregate size of the disturbance. To establish baseline behavior in current climate, the probability distribution of cluster sizes from multiple satellite retrievals and National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis is compared to those from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) models and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory high-resolution atmospheric model (HIRAM-360 and -180). With the caveat that a minimum rain rate threshold is important in the models (which tend to overproduce low rain rates), the models agree well with observations in leading properties. In particular, scale-free power law ranges in which the probability drops slowly with increasing cluster size are well modeled, followed by a rapid drop in probability of the largest clusters above a cutoff scale. Under the RCP 8.5 global warming scenario, the models indicate substantial increases in probability (up to an order of magnitude) of the largest clusters by the end of century. For models with continuous time series of high resolution output, there is substantial spread on when these probability increases for the largest precipitation clusters should be detectable, ranging from detectable within the observational period to statistically significant trends emerging only in the second half of the century. Examination of NCEP reanalysis and SSMI/SSMIS series of satellite retrievals from 1979 to present does not yield reliable evidence of trends at this time. The results suggest improvements in inter-satellite calibration of the SSMI/SSMIS retrievals could aid future detection.

  4. Experimental investigations of size distribution through large van der Waals cluster beam cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shenghong; Daineka, D. V.; Châtelet, M.

    2003-08-01

    Size distributions through large van der Waals cluster beam cross-section are studied with the pick-up technique. Based on our experimental results, we observed that the larger cluster is always concentrated in the center of the beam. From the center to the periphery, the cluster size gradually decreases. The size distributions through the beam cross-section depend on incoming cluster size and incoming cluster velocity. The larger the incoming cluster size or the faster the incoming cluster velocity, the flatter the size distributions through the beam cross-section are found. These experimental results are interpreted by the Mack focusing effect.

  5. INITIAL SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jihye; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Kim, Juhan

    2013-01-10

    Despite the importance of their size evolution in understanding the dynamical evolution of globular clusters (GCs) of the Milky Way, studies that focus specifically on this issue are rare. Based on the advanced, realistic Fokker-Planck (FP) approach, we theoretically predict the initial size distribution (SD) of the Galactic GCs along with their initial mass function and radial distribution. Over one thousand FP calculations in a wide parameter space have pinpointed the best-fit initial conditions for the SD, mass function, and radial distribution. Our best-fit model shows that the initial SD of the Galactic GCs is of larger dispersion than today's SD, and that the typical projected half-light radius of the initial GCs is {approx}4.6 pc, which is 1.8 times larger than that of the present-day GCs ({approx}2.5 pc). Their large size signifies greater susceptibility to the Galactic tides: the total mass of destroyed GCs reaches 3-5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M {sub Sun }, several times larger than previous estimates. Our result challenges a recent view that the Milky Way GCs were born compact on the sub-pc scale, and rather implies that (1) the initial GCs were generally larger than the typical size of the present-day GCs, (2) the initially large GCs mostly shrank and/or disrupted as a result of the galactic tides, and (3) the initially small GCs expanded by two-body relaxation, and later shrank by the galactic tides.

  6. Sample size calculation for weighted rank tests comparing survival distributions under cluster randomization: a simulation method.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2007-01-01

    We propose a sample size calculation method for rank tests comparing two survival distributions under cluster randomization with possibly variable cluster sizes. Here, sample size refers to number of clusters. Our method is based on simulation procedure generating clustered exponential survival variables whose distribution is specified by the marginal hazard rate and the intracluster correlation coefficient. Sample size is calculated given significance level, power, marginal hazard rates (or median survival times) under the alternative hypothesis, intracluster correlation coefficient, accrual rate, follow-up period, and cluster size distribution.

  7. Cluster mass fraction and size distribution determined by fs-time-resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaoming; Shim, Bonggu; Arefiev, Alexey; Tushentsov, Mikhail; Breizman, Boris; Downer, Mike

    2009-11-01

    Characterization of supersonic gas jets is important for accurate interpretation and control of laser-cluster experiments. While average size and total atomic density can be found by standard Rayleigh scatter and interferometry, cluster mass fraction and size distribution are usually difficult to measure. Here we determine the cluster fraction and the size distribution with fs-time-resolved refractive index and absorption measurements in cluster gas jets after ionization and heating by an intense pump pulse. The fs-time-resolved refractive index measured with frequency domain interferometer (FDI) shows different contributions from monomer plasma and cluster plasma in the time domain, enabling us to determine the cluster fraction. The fs-time-resolved absorption measured by a delayed probe shows the contribution from clusters of various sizes, allowing us to find the size distribution.

  8. The temperature and size distribution of large water clusters from a non-equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Gimelshein, N.; Gimelshein, S.; Pradzynski, C. C.; Zeuch, T.; Buck, U.

    2015-06-28

    A hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian approach is used to examine the properties of water clusters formed in neon-water vapor mixtures expanding through microscale conical nozzles. Experimental size distributions were reliably determined by the sodium doping technique in a molecular beam machine. The comparison of computed size distributions and experimental data shows satisfactory agreement, especially for (H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters with n larger than 50. Thus validated simulations provide size selected cluster temperature profiles in and outside the nozzle. This information is used for an in-depth analysis of the crystallization and water cluster aggregation dynamics of recently reported supersonic jet expansion experiments.

  9. Superferromagnetism in mechanically alloyed fcc Fe23Cu77 with bimodal cluster size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, N. J. O.; Amaral, J. S.; Amaral, V. S.; Costa, B. F. O.; LeCaër, G.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic measurements, x-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to characterize a nanostructured fcc Fe23Cu77 at.% alloy prepared by high-energy ball-milling, addressing in particular the effect of clustering on the nature of the interacting magnetic entities. The interpretation of magnetization measurements leads to the conclusion that grains, whose mean size is ~16 nm, contain two populations of magnetic Fe-rich nanoclusters with a bimodal size distribution. These two sets of clusters contain about 14 and 400 Fe atoms and have magnetic moments of 30 µB and 860 µB, respectively. The inter-cluster ferromagnetic interactions that lead to superferromagnetism with a Curie temperature TC~220 K can be described by a mean field determined by the smaller clusters only, which account for 90% of the magnetization.

  10. Fragmentation and reliable size distributions of large ammonia and water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbert, C.; Schütte, S.; Steinbach, C.; Buck, U.

    2002-05-01

    The interaction of large ammonia and water clusters in the size range from < n rangle = 10 to 3 400 with electrons is investigated in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The clusters are generated in adiabatic expansions through conical nozzles and are nearly fragmentation free detected by single photon ionization after they have been doped by one sodium atom. For ammonia also the (1+1) resonance enhanced two photon ionization through the tilde A state with v=6 operates similarly. In this way reliable size distributions of the neutral clusters are obtained which are analyzed in terms of a modified scaling law of the Hagena type [Surf. Sci. 106, 101 (1981)]. In contrast, using electron impact ionization, the clusters are strongly fragmented when varying the electron energy between 150 and 1 500 eV. The number of evaporated molecules depends on the cluster size and the energy dependence follows that of the stopping power of the solid material. Therefore we attribute the operating mechanism to that which is also responsible for the electronic sputtering of solid matter. The yields, however, are orders of magnitude larger for clusters than for the solid. This result is a consequence of the finite dimensions of the clusters which cannot accommodate the released energy.

  11. Self-consistent rate equation theory of cluster size distribution in aggregation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Popescu, Mihail N.; Amar, Jacques G.

    2002-04-01

    Cluster nucleation and growth by aggregation is the central feature of many physical processes, from polymerization and gelation in polymer science, flocculation and coagulation in aerosol and colloidal chemistry, percolation and coarsening in phase transitions and critical phenomena, agglutination and cell adhesion in biology, to island nucleation and thin-film growth in materials science. Detailed information about the kinetics of aggregation is provided by the time dependent cluster size-distribution, a quantity which can be measured experimentally. While the standard Smoluchowski rate-equation approach has been in general successful in predicting average quantities like the total cluster density, it fails to account for spatial fluctuations and correlations and thus predicts size distributions that are in significant disagreement with both experiments and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In this work we outline a new method which takes into account such correlations. We show that by coupling a set of evolution equations for the capture-zone distributions with a set of rate-equations for the island densities one may obtain accurate predictions for the time- and size-dependent rates of monomer capture. In particular, by using this method we obtain excellent results for the capture numbers and island-size distributions in irreversible growth on both one- and two-dimensional substrates.

  12. Exactly solvable model for cluster-size distribution in a closed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    We obtain an exact solution for the cluster-size distributions in a closed system described by nonlinear rate equations for irreversible homogeneous growth with size-linear agglomeration rates of the form Ks=D (a +s -1 ) for all s ≥1 , where D is the diffusion coefficient, s is the size, and a is a positive constant. The size spectrum is given by the Pólya distribution times a factor that normalizes the first moment of the distribution to unity and zeroes out the monomer concentration at t →∞ . We show that the a value sets a maximum mean size that equals e for large a and tends to infinity only when a →0 . The size distributions are monotonically decreasing in the initial stage, converting to different monomodal shapes with a maximum at s =2 in the course of growth. The variance of the distribution is narrower than Poissonian at large a and broader than Poissonian at small a , with the threshold occurring at a ≅1 . In most cases, the sizes present in the distributions are small and hence can hardly be described by continuum equations.

  13. Size Distribution of Star Clusters and Stellar Groups in IC2574

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, Anne; Meyer, Martin J.; Calzetti, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    We present an HST/ACS archival study of compact and dispersed star clusters and stellar groups found in the nearby galaxy IC 2574. In this work, we identified and characterized the properties of clusters with spatially unresolved stars. We combined these properties with those found in a companion work on the dispersed stellar groups in IC 2574 with spatially resolved stars. We find that the size distribution of all young stellar groups, sparse and compact together, is consistent with the hierarchical model of star formation.

  14. The size distribution of spatiotemporal extreme rainfall clusters around the globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traxl, D.; Boers, N.; Rheinwalt, A.; Goswami, B.; Kurths, J.

    2016-09-01

    The scaling behavior of rainfall has been extensively studied both in terms of event magnitudes and in terms of spatial extents of the events. Different heavy-tailed distributions have been proposed as candidates for both instances, but statistically rigorous treatments are rare. Here we combine the domains of event magnitudes and event area sizes by a spatiotemporal integration of 3-hourly rain rates corresponding to extreme events derived from the quasi-global high-resolution rainfall product Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42. A maximum likelihood evaluation reveals that the distribution of spatiotemporally integrated extreme rainfall cluster sizes over the oceans is best described by a truncated power law, calling into question previous statements about scale-free distributions. The observed subpower law behavior of the distribution's tail is evaluated with a simple generative model, which indicates that the exponential truncation of an otherwise scale-free spatiotemporal cluster size distribution over the oceans could be explained by the existence of land masses on the globe.

  15. The scaling exponent of residual nonwetting phase cluster size distributions in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglauer, Stefan; Wülling, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    During an imbibition process in two-phase subsurface flow the imbibing phase can displace the nonwetting phase up to an endpoint at which a residual saturation is reached (which cannot be reduced further by additional wetting phase flow due to the complex pore network of the rock and associated strong capillary forces which trap the nonwetting phase). The residual nonwetting phase is split into many disconnected clusters of different sizes. This size distribution is of key importance, for instance, in the context of hydrocarbon recovery, contaminant transport, or CO2 geostorage; and it is well established that this size distribution follows a power law. However, there is significant uncertainty associated with the exact value of the distribution exponent τ, which mathematically describes the size distribution. To reduce this uncertainty and to better constrain τ, we analyzed a representative experimental data set with mathematically rigorous methods, and we demonstrate that τ is substantially smaller (≈1.1) than previously suggested. This raises increasing doubt that simple percolation models can accurately predict subsurface fluid flow behavior; and this has serious consequences for subsurface flow processes: hydrocarbon recovery is easier than predicted, but CO2 geostorage dissolution trapping capacities are significantly reduced and potential remobilization of residual CO2 is more likely than previously believed.

  16. Cluster-size distributions for irreversible cooperative filling of lattices. I. Exact one-dimensional results for coalescing clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, R. S.; Hoffman, D. K.; Evans, J. W.

    1985-06-01

    We consider processes where the sites of an infinite, uniform lattice are filled irreversibly and cooperatively, with the rate of adsorption at a site depending on the state of its nearest neighbors (only). The asymmetry between empty and filled sites, associated with irreversibility, leads one to consider the closed infinite coupled hierarchies of rate equations for probabilities of connected and singly, doubly, etc., disconnected empty subconfigurations and results in an empty-site-shielding property. The latter allows exact solutions, via truncation, of these equations in one dimension and is used here to determine probabilities of filled s-tuples, fs (f1≡θ is the coverage), and thus of clusters of exactly s filled sites, ns≡fs-2fs+1+fs+2 for s<=13 and 11, respectively. When all rates are nonzero so that clusters can coalesce, the fs and ns distributions decay exponentially as s-->∞, and we can accurately estimate the asymptotic decay rate λ(θ)≡ lims-->∞ fs+1/fs≡ lims-->∞ ns+1/ns, where 0=λ(0)<=λ(θ)<=λ(1)=1. Divergent behavior of the average cluster size, as θ-->1, is also considered. In addition, we develop a novel technique to determine directly the asymptotic decay rate λ(θ) and indicate its extension to higher-dimensional irreversible cooperative filling (and to other dynamic processes on lattices).

  17. Relating the microscopic rules in coalescence-fragmentation models to the cluster-size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruszczycki, B.; Burnett, B.; Zhao, Z.; Johnson, N. F.

    2009-11-01

    Coalescence-fragmentation problems are now of great interest across the physical, biological, and social sciences. They are typically studied from the perspective of rate equations, at the heart of which are the rules used for coalescence and fragmentation. Here we discuss how changes in these microscopic rules affect the macroscopic cluster-size distribution which emerges from the solution to the rate equation. Our analysis elucidates the crucial role that the fragmentation rule can play in such dynamical grouping models. We focus our discussion on two well-known models whose fragmentation rules lie at opposite extremes. In particular, we provide a range of generalizations and new analytic results for the well-known model of social group formation developed by Eguíluz and Zimmermann, [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5659 (2000)]. We develop analytic perturbation treatments of this original model, and extend the analytic analysis to the treatment of growing and declining populations.

  18. Cluster-size distributions for irreversible cooperative filling of lattices. II. Exact one-dimensional results for noncoalescing clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. W.; Nord, R. S.

    1985-06-01

    We consider processes where the sites of an infinite, uniform, one-dimensional lattice are filled irreversibly and cooperatively, with the rates ki, depending on the number i=0,1,2 of filled nearest neighbors. Furthermore, we suppose that filling of sites with both neighbors already filled is forbidden, so k2=0. Thus, clusters can nucleate and grow, but cannot coalesce. Exact truncation solutions of the corresponding infinite hierarchy of rate equations for subconfiguration probabilities are possible. For the probabilities of filled s-tuples fs as a function of coverage, θ≡f1, we find that fs/fs+1=D(θ)s+C(θ,s), where C(θ,s)/s-->0 as s-->∞. This corresponds to faster than exponential decay. Also, if ρ≡k1/k0, then one has D(θ)~(2ρθ)-1 as θ-->0. The filled-cluster-size distribution ns has the same characteristics. Motivated by the behavior of these families of fs/fs+1-vs-s curves, we develop the natural extension of fs to s<=0. Explicit values for fs and related quantities for ``almost random'' filling, k0=k1, are obtained from a direct statistical analysis.

  19. Application of scaling and kinetic equations to helium cluster size distributions: Homogeneous nucleation of a nearly ideal gas.

    PubMed

    Chaiken, J; Goodisman, J; Kornilov, Oleg; Peter Toennies, J

    2006-08-21

    A previously published model of homogeneous nucleation [Villarica et al., J. Chem. Phys. 98, 4610 (1993)] based on the Smoluchowski [Phys. Z. 17, 557 (1916)] equations is used to simulate the experimentally measured size distributions of 4He clusters produced in free jet expansions. The model includes only binary collisions and does not consider evaporative effects, so that binary reactive collisions are rate limiting for formation of all cluster sizes despite the need for stabilization of nascent clusters. The model represents these data very well, accounting in some cases for nearly four orders of magnitude in variation in abundance over cluster sizes ranging up to nearly 100 atoms. The success of the model may be due to particularities of 4He clusters, i.e., their very low coalescence exothermicity, and to the low temperature of 6.7 K at which the data were collected.

  20. Stable Oligomeric Clusters of Gold Nanoparticles: Preparation, Size Distribution, Derivatization, and Physical and Biological Properties

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Reducing dilute aqueous HAuCl4 with NaSCN under alkaline conditions produces 2–3 nm diameter yellow nanoparticles without the addition of extraneous capping agents. We here describe two very simple methods for producing highly stable oligomeric grape-like clusters (oligoclusters) of these small nanoparticles. The oligoclusters have well-controlled diameters ranging from ∼5 to ∼30 nm, depending mainly on the number of subunits in the cluster. Our first [“delay-time”] method controls the size of the oligoclusters by varying from seconds to hours the delay time between making the HAuCl4 alkaline and adding the reducing agent, NaSCN. Our second [“add-on”] method controls size by using yellow nanoparticles as seeds onto which varying amounts of gold derived from “hydroxylated gold”, Na+[Au(OH4–x)Clx]−, are added-on catalytically in the presence of NaSCN. Possible reaction mechanisms and a simple kinetic model fitting the data are discussed. The crude oligocluster preparations have narrow size distributions, and for most purposes do not require fractionation. The oligoclusters do not aggregate after ∼300-fold centrifugal-filter concentration, and at this high concentration are easily derivatized with a variety of thiol-containing reagents. This allows rare or expensive derivatizing reagents to be used economically. Unlike conventional glutathione-capped nanoparticles of comparable gold content, large oligoclusters derivatized with glutathione do not aggregate at high concentrations in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or in the circulation when injected into mice. Mice receiving them intravenously show no visible signs of distress. Their sizes can be made small enough to allow their excretion in the urine or large enough to prevent them from crossing capillary basement membranes. They are directly visible in electron micrographs without enhancement, and can model the biological fate of protein-like macromolecules with controlled sizes and charges

  1. Stable oligomeric clusters of gold nanoparticles: preparation, size distribution, derivatization, and physical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Smithies, Oliver; Lawrence, Marlon; Testen, Anze; Horne, Lloyd P; Wilder, Jennifer; Altenburg, Michael; Bleasdale, Ben; Maeda, Nobuyo; Koklic, Tilen

    2014-11-11

    Reducing dilute aqueous HAuCl4 with NaSCN under alkaline conditions produces 2-3 nm diameter yellow nanoparticles without the addition of extraneous capping agents. We here describe two very simple methods for producing highly stable oligomeric grape-like clusters (oligoclusters) of these small nanoparticles. The oligoclusters have well-controlled diameters ranging from ∼5 to ∼30 nm, depending mainly on the number of subunits in the cluster. Our first ["delay-time"] method controls the size of the oligoclusters by varying from seconds to hours the delay time between making the HAuCl4 alkaline and adding the reducing agent, NaSCN. Our second ["add-on"] method controls size by using yellow nanoparticles as seeds onto which varying amounts of gold derived from "hydroxylated gold", Na(+)[Au(OH4-x)Clx](-), are added-on catalytically in the presence of NaSCN. Possible reaction mechanisms and a simple kinetic model fitting the data are discussed. The crude oligocluster preparations have narrow size distributions, and for most purposes do not require fractionation. The oligoclusters do not aggregate after ∼300-fold centrifugal-filter concentration, and at this high concentration are easily derivatized with a variety of thiol-containing reagents. This allows rare or expensive derivatizing reagents to be used economically. Unlike conventional glutathione-capped nanoparticles of comparable gold content, large oligoclusters derivatized with glutathione do not aggregate at high concentrations in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or in the circulation when injected into mice. Mice receiving them intravenously show no visible signs of distress. Their sizes can be made small enough to allow their excretion in the urine or large enough to prevent them from crossing capillary basement membranes. They are directly visible in electron micrographs without enhancement, and can model the biological fate of protein-like macromolecules with controlled sizes and charges. The ease of

  2. Observation of propane cluster size distributions during nucleation and growth in a Laval expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreiro, Jorge J.; Chakrabarty, Satrajit; Schläppi, Bernhard; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-12-01

    We report on molecular-level studies of the condensation of propane gas and propane/ethane gas mixtures in the uniform (constant pressure and temperature) postnozzle flow of Laval expansions using soft single-photon ionization by vacuum ultraviolet light and mass spectrometric detection. The whole process, from the nucleation to the growth to molecular aggregates of sizes of several nanometers (˜5 nm), can be monitored at the molecular level with high time-resolution (˜3 μs) for a broad range of pressures and temperatures. For each time, pressure, and temperature, a whole mass spectrum is recorded, which allows one to determine the critical cluster size range for nucleation as well as the kinetics and mechanisms of cluster-size specific growth. The detailed information about the size, composition, and population of individual molecular clusters upon condensation provides unique experimental data for comparison with future molecular-level simulations.

  3. On Microscopic Mechanisms Which Elongate the Tail of Cluster Size Distributions: An Example of Random Domino Automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowski, Zbigniew

    2015-07-01

    On the basis of simple cellular automaton, the microscopic mechanisms, which can be responsible for elongation of tails of cluster size distributions, were analyzed. It was shown that only the appropriate forms of rebound function can lead to inverse power tails if densities of the grid are small or moderate. For big densities, correlations between clusters become significant and lead to elongation of tails and flattening of the distribution to a straight line in log-log scale. The microscopic mechanism, given by the rebound function, included in simple 1D RDA can be projected on the geometric mechanism, which favours larger clusters in 2D RDA.

  4. Assessment and application of clustering techniques to atmospheric particle number size distribution for the purpose of source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi, F.; Ristovski, Z.; Mazaheri, M.; Laiman, R.; Crilley, L. R.; He, C.; Clifford, S.; Morawska, L.

    2014-11-01

    Long-term measurements of particle number size distribution (PNSD) produce a very large number of observations and their analysis requires an efficient approach in order to produce results in the least possible time and with maximum accuracy. Clustering techniques are a family of sophisticated methods that have been recently employed to analyse PNSD data; however, very little information is available comparing the performance of different clustering techniques on PNSD data. This study aims to apply several clustering techniques (i.e. K means, PAM, CLARA and SOM) to PNSD data, in order to identify and apply the optimum technique to PNSD data measured at 25 sites across Brisbane, Australia. A new method, based on the Generalised Additive Model (GAM) with a basis of penalised B-splines, was proposed to parameterise the PNSD data and the temporal weight of each cluster was also estimated using the GAM. In addition, each cluster was associated with its possible source based on the results of this parameterisation, together with the characteristics of each cluster. The performances of four clustering techniques were compared using the Dunn index and Silhouette width validation values and the K means technique was found to have the highest performance, with five clusters being the optimum. Therefore, five clusters were found within the data using the K means technique. The diurnal occurrence of each cluster was used together with other air quality parameters, temporal trends and the physical properties of each cluster, in order to attribute each cluster to its source and origin. The five clusters were attributed to three major sources and origins, including regional background particles, photochemically induced nucleated particles and vehicle generated particles. Overall, clustering was found to be an effective technique for attributing each particle size spectrum to its source and the GAM was suitable to parameterise the PNSD data. These two techniques can help

  5. Assessment and application of clustering techniques to atmospheric particle number size distribution for the purpose of source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi, F.; Ristovski, Z.; Mazaheri, M.; Laiman, R.; Crilley, L. R.; He, C.; Clifford, S.; Morawska, L.

    2014-06-01

    Long-term measurements of particle number size distribution (PNSD) produce a very large number of observations and their analysis requires an efficient approach in order to produce results in the least possible time and with maximum accuracy. Clustering techniques are a family of sophisticated methods which have been recently employed to analyse PNSD data, however, very little information is available comparing the performance of different clustering techniques on PNSD data. This study aims to apply several clustering techniques (i.e. K-means, PAM, CLARA and SOM) to PNSD data, in order to identify and apply the optimum technique to PNSD data measured at 25 sites across Brisbane, Australia. A new method, based on the Generalised Additive Model (GAM) with a basis of penalised B-splines, was proposed to parameterise the PNSD data and the temporal weight of each cluster was also estimated using the GAM. In addition, each cluster was associated with its possible source based on the results of this parameterisation, together with the characteristics of each cluster. The performances of four clustering techniques were compared using the Dunn index and silhouette width validation values and the K-means technique was found to have the highest performance, with five clusters being the optimum. Therefore, five clusters were found within the data using the K-means technique. The diurnal occurrence of each cluster was used together with other air quality parameters, temporal trends and the physical properties of each cluster, in order to attribute each cluster to its source and origin. The five clusters were attributed to three major sources and origins, including regional background particles, photochemically induced nucleated particles and vehicle generated particles. Overall, clustering was found to be an effective technique for attributing each particle size spectra to its source and the GAM was suitable to parameterise the PNSD data. These two techniques can help

  6. Para-hydrogen and helium cluster size distributions in free jet expansions based on Smoluchowski theory with kernel scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kornilov, Oleg; Toennies, J. Peter

    2015-02-21

    The size distribution of para-H{sub 2} (pH{sub 2}) clusters produced in free jet expansions at a source temperature of T{sub 0} = 29.5 K and pressures of P{sub 0} = 0.9–1.96 bars is reported and analyzed according to a cluster growth model based on the Smoluchowski theory with kernel scaling. Good overall agreement is found between the measured and predicted, N{sub k} = A k{sup a} e{sup −bk}, shape of the distribution. The fit yields values for A and b for values of a derived from simple collision models. The small remaining deviations between measured abundances and theory imply a (pH{sub 2}){sub k} magic number cluster of k = 13 as has been observed previously by Raman spectroscopy. The predicted linear dependence of b{sup −(a+1)} on source gas pressure was verified and used to determine the value of the basic effective agglomeration reaction rate constant. A comparison of the corresponding effective growth cross sections σ{sub 11} with results from a similar analysis of He cluster size distributions indicates that the latter are much larger by a factor 6-10. An analysis of the three body recombination rates, the geometric sizes and the fact that the He clusters are liquid independent of their size can explain the larger cross sections found for He.

  7. Extracting magnetic cluster size and its distributions in advanced perpendicular recording media with shrinking grain size using small angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Virat; Ikeda, Yoshihiro; Takano, Ken; Terris, Bruce D.; Hellwig, Olav; Wang, Tianhan; Wu, Benny; Graves, Catherine; Dürr, Hermann A.; Scherz, Andreas; Stöhr, Jo

    2015-05-18

    We analyze the magnetic cluster size (MCS) and magnetic cluster size distribution (MCSD) in a variety of perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) media designs using resonant small angle x-ray scattering at the Co L{sub 3} absorption edge. The different PMR media flavors considered here vary in grain size between 7.5 and 9.5 nm as well as in lateral inter-granular exchange strength, which is controlled via the segregant amount. While for high inter-granular exchange, the MCS increases rapidly for grain sizes below 8.5 nm, we show that for increased amount of segregant with less exchange the MCS remains relatively small, even for grain sizes of 7.5 and 8 nm. However, the MCSD still increases sharply when shrinking grains from 8 to 7.5 nm. We show evidence that recording performance such as signal-to-noise-ratio on the spin stand correlates well with the product of magnetic cluster size and magnetic cluster size distribution.

  8. Extracting magnetic cluster size and its distributions in advanced perpendicular recording media with shrinking grain size using small angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Virat; Wang, Tianhan; Ikeda, Yoshihiro; Takano, Ken; Terris, Bruce D.; Wu, Benny; Graves, Catherine; Dürr, Hermann A.; Scherz, Andreas; Stöhr, Jo; Hellwig, Olav

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the magnetic cluster size (MCS) and magnetic cluster size distribution (MCSD) in a variety of perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) media designs using resonant small angle x-ray scattering at the Co L3 absorption edge. The different PMR media flavors considered here vary in grain size between 7.5 and 9.5 nm as well as in lateral inter-granular exchange strength, which is controlled via the segregant amount. While for high inter-granular exchange, the MCS increases rapidly for grain sizes below 8.5 nm, we show that for increased amount of segregant with less exchange the MCS remains relatively small, even for grain sizes of 7.5 and 8 nm. However, the MCSD still increases sharply when shrinking grains from 8 to 7.5 nm. We show evidence that recording performance such as signal-to-noise-ratio on the spin stand correlates well with the product of magnetic cluster size and magnetic cluster size distribution.

  9. Comparison of residual oil cluster size distribution, morphology and saturation in oil-wet and water-wet sandstone.

    PubMed

    Iglauer, S; Fernø, M A; Shearing, P; Blunt, M J

    2012-06-01

    We imaged an oil-wet sandstone at residual oil saturation (S(or)) conditions using X-ray micro-tomography with a nominal voxel size of (9 μm)(3) and monochromatic light from a synchrotron source. The sandstone was rendered oil-wet by ageing with a North Sea crude oil to represent a typical wettability encountered in hydrocarbon reservoirs. We measured a significantly lower S(or) for the oil-wet core (18.8%) than for an analogue water-wet core (35%). We analysed the residual oil cluster size distribution and find consistency with percolation theory that predicts a power-law cluster size distribution. We measure a power-law exponent τ=2.12 for the oil-wet core which is higher than τ for the water-wet system (τ=2.05), indicating fewer large clusters in the oil-wet case. The clusters are rough and sheet-like consistent with connectivity established through layers in the pore space and occupancy of the smaller pores; in contrast the clusters for water-wet media occupy the centres of the larger pores. These results imply less trapping of oil, but with a greater surface area for dissolution. In carbon storage applications, this suggests that in CO(2)-wet systems, capillary trapping is less significant, but that there is a large surface area for dissolution and reaction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A method for parametric estimation of the number and size distribution of cell clusters from observations in a section plane.

    PubMed

    de Gunst, M C; Luebeck, E G

    1998-03-01

    The problem of finding the number and size distribution of cell clusters that grow in an organ or tissue from observations of the number and sizes of transections of such cell clusters in a planar section is considered. This problem is closely related to the well-known corpuscle or Wicksell problem in stereology, which deals with transections of spherical objects. However, for most biological applications, it is unrealistic to assume that cell clusters have spherical shapes since they may grow in various ways. We therefore propose a method that allows for more general spatial configurations of the clusters. Under the assumption that a parametric growth model is available for the number and sizes of the cell clusters, expressions are obtained for the probability distributions of the number and sizes of transections of the clusters in a section plane for each point in time. These expressions contain coefficients that are independent of the parametric growth model and time but depend on which model is chosen for the configuration of the cell clusters in space. These results enable us to perform estimation of the parameters of the growth model by maximum likelihood directly on the data instead of having to deal with the inverse problem of estimation of three-dimensional quantities based on two-dimensional data. For realistic choices of the configuration model, it will not be possible to obtain the exact values of the coefficients, but they can easily be approximated by means of computer simulations of the spatial configuration. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to approximate the coefficients for two particular spatial configuration models. For these two configuration models, the proposed method is applied to data on preneoplastic minifoci in rat liver under the assumption of a two-event model of carcinogenesis as the parametric growth model.

  11. The turbulent structures around clusters formed under a range of armoring shear stresses and grain size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, J. C.; Tan, L.

    2011-12-01

    In gravel bed rivers, low flows generate shear stresses less than what is needed to entrain the largest particles but large enough to transport the fines. During sustained low flows, fine sediment winnows from the bed surface and an armored surface layer forms. As the surface armor forms, a surface structure develops that increases bed roughness and flow resistance and can be characterized by the presence of clusters. Individual clusters are known to exert a significant influence over the spatial and temporal flow processes acting in the vicinity of the bed. A series of flume experiments investigated the turbulent structures formed around clusters naturally developed during bed armoring. The series of experiments created armored beds using four different flow rates and four different bulk grain size distributions which progressively increased in the percent sand in the bed sediment. Following an initial run segment that established equilibrium sediment transport and full bed mobility, the flow rate in the flume was reduced and the bed surface fully armored. Once armored, clusters were identified using a combination of bed DEM, vertical profile, and visual analysis. Instantaneous three-dimensional flow velocities were measured around the clusters using an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter, and these values were used to calculate Reynolds shear stresses, turbulence intensities, and turbulent kinetic energy in the flow field. Results show a significant change in the flow profiles over a cluster when compared to an open area of the armored bed. Reynolds shear stresses doubled over the cluster and turbulence intensity reached a peak value right above the single cluster. The results also suggest the effects of the single cluster on the surrounding flow dynamics are quite localized and limited to 30cm in lateral orientation. Quadrant analysis showing large ejection and sweep events around clusters indicates vortex formation at the cluster crest. The magnitude of the coherent

  12. Size distribution of associated clusters in liquid alcohols: Interpretation of simulation results in the frame of SAFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janeček, Jiří; Paricaud, Patrice

    2013-11-01

    The size distribution and topology of associated clusters for primary alcohols is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Liquid ethanol, propanol, butanol, hexanol, and octanol are simulated at pressure P = 1 bar and temperatures T = 300 K, T = 350 K, and T = 400 K. The fractions of molecules with different sets of hydrogen bonded partners, the size of associated cluster and the site-site distribution functions between atoms participating on hydrogen bonding are extracted from simulated trajectories. For all alcohols longer than ethanol, the length of the alkyl chain has only a marginal effect on the association. Consequently, related properties like coordination numbers of hydroxyl group, size distribution of associates, or fractions of differently coordinated alcohol molecules are independent on the molecular size. Although we employed a force-field without involved polarizability, we observe a positive cooperativity of hydrogen bonding simply as a consequence of steric and electrostatic interactions. The size and topology of associates is analyzed within the frame of 3B model of statistical association fluid theory. Although this approach enables good thermodynamic description of systems containing associating compounds, several insufficiencies appear in the description at molecular level.

  13. A Hierarchical Cluster end-member modeling analysis (CEMMA) for searching unmixing Grain-size Distributions in Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zhou, A.; Wang, X.; Zhao, Y.; Xie, H.; Chen, F.

    2016-12-01

    Sediments' grain-size distribution (GSD) analysis, as one of the most widely used proxies in sedimentary environmental and paleoclimatological studies, provides direct and abundant information on the process of deposition as well as sedimentary environment. Numerous studies have employed various parameters of GSD to infer including hydrodynamic condition, dust activity and deposition source of sediments, while most analytical methods just analyze parts of the distributions, hindering their wide extrapolation. End-member modeling analysis (EMMA) provides a flexible method for unmixing GSD. However, many issues still remain unresolved using existing EMMA method. Here we present a hierarchical cluster end-member modeling analysis (CEMMA) for searching unmixing GSD in sediments. Within the cluster framework, the number of end-members can be inferred by the agglomeration schedule, while end-member spectra are searched out based on the average distance of samples in the clusters. We use nonnegative constrained least-squares algorithm to calculate the scores of each end-member. To test the CEMMA method, a real-world dataset of lake sediments derived from Wulungu Lake was run. Turned out that this CEMMA method can yield geologically and mathematically meaningful output, thereby is a fast and flexible approach for GSD analysis. For the convenience of every researcher, all the algorithms of this method have been written in a package named CEM which could be edited and run in software Matlab.

  14. Examining distributional characteristics of clusters.

    PubMed

    von Eye, A

    2010-01-01

    Standard cluster analysis creates clusters based on the criterion that their members be closer to each other than to members of other clusters. In this article, it is proposed to examine empirical clusters that result from standard clustering, with the goal of assessing whether they contradict distributional assumptions. Four models are proposed. The models consider two data generation processes, the Poisson and the multinormal, as well as two convex shapes of cluster hulls, the spherical and the ellipsoidal. Based on the model, the probability of being in a cluster of a given location, size, and shape is estimated. This probability is compared with the observed proportion of cases. The observed proportion can turn out to be larger, as large, or smaller than expected. Examples are given using simulated and empirical data. The simulation showed that the size of a cluster, the data generation process, and the true distribution of data have the strongest effect on the results obtained with the proposed method. The empirical examples discuss distributional characteristics of cross-sectional and longitudinal clusters of aggressive behavior in adolescents. The examples show that clustering methods do not always yield clusters that contradict distributional assumptions. Some clusters contain even fewer cases than expected.

  15. Size and Charge Distributions of Stable Clusters Formed in Ion Sputtering of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, V. I.; Kapustin, S. N.

    2016-10-01

    A theory of ion sputtering of metals in the form of neutral and charged clusters with their subsequent fragmentation into the stable state is developed. The theory is based on simple physical assumptions and is in good agreement with experiment. Results are presented in the form of formulas convenient for practical application. As an example, calculations of the total yield of stable neutral and charged clusters of silver, indium, and niobium are carried out.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation for morphology of nanoparticles and particle size distributions: comparison of the cluster-cluster aggregation model with the sectional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Kiminori; Matsukawa, Yoshiya; Saito, Yasuhiro; Matsushita, Yohsuke; Aoki, Hideyuki; Era, Koki; Aoki, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Togo

    2015-06-01

    This study presents the validity and ability of an aggregate mean free path cluster-cluster aggregation (AMP-CCA) model, which is a direct Monte Carlo simulation, to predict the aggregate morphology with diameters form about 15-200 nm by comparing the particle size distributions (PSDs) with the results of the previous stochastic approach. The PSDs calculated by the AMP-CCA model with the calculated aggregate as a coalesced spherical particle are in reasonable agreement with the results of the previous stochastic model regardless of the initial number concentration of particles. The shape analysis using two methods, perimeter fractal dimension and the shape categories, has demonstrated that the aggregate structures become complex with increasing the initial number concentration of particles. The AMP-CCA model provides a useful tool to calculate the aggregate morphology and PSD with reasonable accuracy.

  17. Long term simulation of point defect cluster size distributions from atomic displacement cascades in Fe70Cr20Ni10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souidi, A.; Hou, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.; De Backer, A.

    2015-06-01

    We have used an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model to simulate the long term evolution of the primary damage in Fe70Cr20Ni10 alloys. The mean number of Frenkel pairs created by different Primary Knocked on Atoms (PKA) was estimated by Molecular Dynamics using a ternary EAM potential developed in the framework of the PERFORM-60 European project. This number was then used to obtain the vacancy-interstitial recombination distance required in the calculation of displacement cascades in the Binary Collision Approximation (BCA) with code MARLOWE (Robinson, 1989). The BCA cascades have been generated in the 10-100 keV range with the MARLOWE code and two different screened Coulomb potentials, namely, the Molière approximation to the Thomas-Fermi potential and the so-called "Universal" potential by Ziegler, Biersack and Littmark (ZBL). These cascades have been used as input to the OKMC code LAKIMOCA (Domain et al., 2004), with a set of parameters for describing the mobility of point defect clusters based on ab initio calculations and experimental data. The cluster size distributions have been estimated for irradiation doses of 0.1 and 1 dpa, and a dose rate of 10-7 dpa/s at 600 K. We demonstrate that, like in the case of BCC iron, cluster size distributions in the long term are independent of the cascade energy and that the recursive cascade model suggested for BCC iron in Souidi et al. (2011) also applies to FCC Fe70Cr20Ni10. The results also show that the influence of the BCA potential is sizeable but the qualitative correspondence in the predicted long term evolution is excellent.

  18. Sedimentologic Assessment of a Makran Tsunami Depsoit in Sur Lagoon Using High- Resolution Particle Size Distributions (PSDs) and Cluster Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, E. G.; Donato, S. V.; Boyce, J. I.; Pilarczyk, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    The Makran subduction zone, which conveys the Arabian plate beneath Eurasia, has a poorly understood potential to generate tsunamis that would strike Oman, Iran, Pakistan, and India. The 1945 Makran earthquake (M 8.1), which resulted from a rupture 100-150 km long, caused a tsunami that reached heights of 5-15 m and killed an estimated 3,000 people on the coast of what is now Pakistan. The possibility of a full- length Makran rupture, approx. 750 km long, remains untested. The arid coastlines of the northern Arabian Sea (including parts of Oman, Iran, Pakistan and India) have had little attention regarding paleo-tsunami research. They lack the main environments where tsumani deposits have been found on temperate shores: tidal marshes, peatlands, and coastal lakes. Instead they offer sandy lagoons and salt flats where tsunami-laid sand sheets can be removed by wind, confused with the deposits of wadi sheet floods, and obliterated by burrowing crabs. Recent research has shown that a shell bed in Oman, likely from the 1945 tsunami (Sur Lagoon - Donato et al., 2008), contained distinctive molluscan assemblages and taphonomy, showing promise as a tsunami indicator for these arid settings. However, the large size of the molluscs is problematic in cores with small sample sizes, as the taphonomic data might not be representative enough to determine a tsunami origin without the use of additional proxies. Further characterization of the shell bed in Oman utilized high-resolution (cm scale) PSDs and Q-mode cluster analysis to identify the tsunami bed in cores (n=8). Results showed that the shell bed was more poorly sorted, and heterogeneous than the background lagoonal sediments. The tsunami bed thickness correlated generally with the thickness of the shell-bed, however cluster analysis of the particle size distributions (PSDs) extended the unit several centimeters above or below the shell-bed in some cores. The use of the full PSD (94 size classes) better characterized the

  19. Hail Size Distribution Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A 3-D weather radar visualization software program was developed and implemented as part of an experimental Launch Pad 39 Hail Monitor System. 3DRadPlot, a radar plotting program, is one of several software modules that form building blocks of the hail data processing and analysis system (the complete software processing system under development). The spatial and temporal mapping algorithms were originally developed through research at the University of Central Florida, funded by NASA s Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM), where the goal was to merge National Weather Service (NWS) Next-Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) volume reflectivity data with drop size distribution data acquired from a cluster of raindrop disdrometers. In this current work, we adapted these algorithms to process data from a cluster of hail disdrometers positioned around Launch Pads 39A or 39B, along with the corresponding NWS radar data. Radar data from all NWS NEXRAD sites is archived at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). That data can be readily accessed at . 3DRadPlot plots Level III reflectivity data at four scan elevations (this software is available at Open Channel Software, ). By using spatial and temporal interpolation/extrapolation based on hydrometeor fall dynamics, we can merge the hail disdrometer array data coupled with local Weather Surveillance Radar-1988, Doppler (WSR-88D) radial velocity and reflectivity data into a 4-D (3-D space and time) picture of hail size distributions. Hail flux maps can then be generated and used for damage prediction and assessment over specific surfaces corresponding to structures within the disdrometer array volume. Immediately following a hail storm, specific damage areas and degree of damage can be identified for inspection crews.

  20. Modelling adipocytes size distribution.

    PubMed

    Soula, H A; Julienne, H; Soulage, C O; Géloën, A

    2013-09-07

    Adipocytes are cells whose task is to store excess energy as lipid droplets in their cytoplasm. Adipocytes can adapt their size according to the lipid amount to be stored. Adipocyte size variation can reach one order of magnitude inside the same organism which is unique among cells. A striking feature in adipocytes size distribution is the lack of characteristic size since typical size distributions are bimodal. Since energy can be stored and retrieved and adipocytes are responsible for these lipid fluxes, we propose a simple model of size-dependent lipid fluxes that is able to predict typical adipocytes size distribution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. EVOLUTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN GALAXY CLUSTERS. II. THE EFFECTS OF CLUSTER SIZE AND DYNAMICAL STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Collins, David C.; Li, Shengtai; Norman, Michael L. E-mail: hli@lanl.gov E-mail: sli@lanl.gov

    2011-10-01

    Theory and simulations suggest that magnetic fields from radio jets and lobes powered by their central super massive black holes can be an important source of magnetic fields in the galaxy clusters. This is Paper II in a series of studies where we present self-consistent high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement cosmological magnetohydrodynamic simulations that simultaneously follow the formation of a galaxy cluster and evolution of magnetic fields ejected by an active galactic nucleus. We studied 12 different galaxy clusters with virial masses ranging from 1 x 10{sup 14} to 2 x 10{sup 15} M{sub sun}. In this work, we examine the effects of the mass and merger history on the final magnetic properties. We find that the evolution of magnetic fields is qualitatively similar to those of previous studies. In most clusters, the injected magnetic fields can be transported throughout the cluster and be further amplified by the intracluster medium (ICM) turbulence during the cluster formation process with hierarchical mergers, while the amplification history and the magnetic field distribution depend on the cluster formation and magnetism history. This can be very different for different clusters. The total magnetic energies in these clusters are between 4 x 10{sup 57} and 10{sup 61} erg, which is mainly decided by the cluster mass, scaling approximately with the square of the total mass. Dynamically older relaxed clusters usually have more magnetic fields in their ICM. The dynamically very young clusters may be magnetized weakly since there is not enough time for magnetic fields to be amplified.

  2. Acoustic Cluster Therapy: In Vitro and Ex Vivo Measurement of Activated Bubble Size Distribution and Temporal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Healey, Andrew John; Sontum, Per Christian; Kvåle, Svein; Eriksen, Morten; Bendiksen, Ragnar; Tornes, Audun; Østensen, Jonny

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic cluster technology (ACT) is a two-component, microparticle formulation platform being developed for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. Sonazoid microbubbles, which have a negative surface charge, are mixed with micron-sized perfluoromethylcyclopentane droplets stabilized with a positively charged surface membrane to form microbubble/microdroplet clusters. On exposure to ultrasound, the oil undergoes a phase change to the gaseous state, generating 20- to 40-μm ACT bubbles. An acoustic transmission technique is used to measure absorption and velocity dispersion of the ACT bubbles. An inversion technique computes bubble size population with temporal resolution of seconds. Bubble populations are measured both in vitro and in vivo after activation within the cardiac chambers of a dog model, with catheter-based flow through an extracorporeal measurement flow chamber. Volume-weighted mean diameter in arterial blood after activation in the left ventricle was 22 μm, with no bubbles >44 μm in diameter. After intravenous administration, 24.4% of the oil is activated in the cardiac chambers. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Unexpected size distribution of Ba(H2O)n clusters: why is the intensity of the Ba(H2O)1 cluster anomalously low?

    PubMed

    Cabanillas-Vidosa, Iván; Rossa, Maximiliano; Pino, Gustavo A; Ferrero, Juan C

    2011-08-07

    An experimental and theoretical study on the reactivity of neutral Ba atoms with water clusters has been conducted to unravel the origin of the irregular intensity pattern observed in one-photon ionization mass spectra of a Ba(H(2)O)(n)/BaOH(H(2)O)(n-1) (n = 1-4) cluster distribution, which was generated in a laser vaporization-supersonic expansion source. The most remarkable irregular feature is the finding for n = 1 of a lower intensity for the Ba(+)(H(2)O)(n) peak with respect to that of BaOH(+)(H(2)O)(n-1), which is opposite to the trend for n = 2-4. Rationalization of the data required consideration of a distinct behavior of ground-state and electronically excited state Ba atoms in inelastic and reactive Ba + (H(2)O)(n) encounters that can occur in the cluster source. Within this picture, the generation of Ba(H(2)O)(n) (n > 1) association products results from stabilizing collisions with atoms of the carrier gas, which are favored by intramolecular vibrational redistribution that operates on the corresponding collision intermediates prior to stabilization; the latter is unlikely to occur for Ba + (H(2)O) encounters. Overall, this interpretation is consistent with additional in-source laser excitation and quenching experiments, which aimed to explore qualitatively the effect of perturbing the Ba atom electronic state population distribution on the observed intensity pattern, as well as with the energetics of various possible reactions for the Ba + H(2)O system that derive from high level ab initio calculations.

  4. Hierarchical modeling of cluster size in wildlife surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Clusters or groups of individuals are the fundamental unit of observation in many wildlife sampling problems, including aerial surveys of waterfowl, marine mammals, and ungulates. Explicit accounting of cluster size in models for estimating abundance is necessary because detection of individuals within clusters is not independent and detectability of clusters is likely to increase with cluster size. This induces a cluster size bias in which the average cluster size in the sample is larger than in the population at large. Thus, failure to account for the relationship between delectability and cluster size will tend to yield a positive bias in estimates of abundance or density. I describe a hierarchical modeling framework for accounting for cluster-size bias in animal sampling. The hierarchical model consists of models for the observation process conditional on the cluster size distribution and the cluster size distribution conditional on the total number of clusters. Optionally, a spatial model can be specified that describes variation in the total number of clusters per sample unit. Parameter estimation, model selection, and criticism may be carried out using conventional likelihood-based methods. An extension of the model is described for the situation where measurable covariates at the level of the sample unit are available. Several candidate models within the proposed class are evaluated for aerial survey data on mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

  5. Business size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hulst, R.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2001-10-01

    In a recent work, we introduced two models for the dynamics of customers trying to find the business that best corresponds to their expectation for the price of a commodity. In agreement with the empirical data, a power-law distribution for the business sizes was obtained, taking the number of customers of a business as a proxy for its size. Here, we extend one of our previous models in two different ways. First, we introduce a business aggregation rate that is fitness dependent, which allows us to reproduce a spread in empirical data from one country to another. Second, we allow the bankruptcy rate to take a different functional form, to be able to obtain a log-normal distribution with power-law tails for the size of the businesses.

  6. Application of cluster and discriminant analyses to diagnose lithological heterogeneity of the parent material according to its particle-size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giniyatullin, K. G.; Valeeva, A. A.; Smirnova, E. V.

    2017-08-01

    Particle-size distribution in soddy-podzolic and light gray forest soils of the Botanical Garden of Kazan Federal University has been studied. The cluster analysis of data on the samples from genetic soil horizons attests to the lithological heterogeneity of the profiles of all the studied soils. It is probable that they are developed from the two-layered sediments with the upper colluvial layer underlain by the alluvial layer. According to the discriminant analysis, the major contribution to the discrimination of colluvial and alluvial layers is that of the fraction >0.25 mm. The results of canonical analysis show that there is only one significant discriminant function that separates alluvial and colluvial sediments on the investigated territory. The discriminant function correlates with the contents of fractions 0.05-0.01, 0.25-0.05, and >0.25 mm. Classification functions making it possible to distinguish between alluvial and colluvial sediments have been calculated. Statistical assessment of particle-size distribution data obtained for the plow horizons on ten plowed fields within the garden indicates that this horizon is formed from colluvial sediments. We conclude that the contents of separate fractions and their ratios cannot be used as a universal criterion of the lithological heterogeneity. However, adequate combination of the cluster and discriminant analyses makes it possible to give a comprehensive assessment of the lithology of soil samples from data on the contents of sand and silt fractions, which considerably increases the information value and reliability of the results.

  7. Relative efficiency of unequal cluster sizes for variance component estimation in cluster randomized and multicentre trials.

    PubMed

    van Breukelen, Gerard Jp; Candel, Math Jjm; Berger, Martijn Pf

    2008-08-01

    Cluster randomized and multicentre trials evaluate the effect of a treatment on persons nested within clusters, for instance patients within clinics or pupils within schools. Although equal sample sizes per cluster are generally optimal for parameter estimation, they are rarely feasible. This paper addresses the relative efficiency (RE) of unequal versus equal cluster sizes for estimating variance components in cluster randomized trials and in multicentre trials with person randomization within centres, assuming a quantitative outcome. Starting from maximum likelihood estimation, the RE is investigated numerically for a range of cluster size distributions. An approximate formula is presented for computing the RE as a function of the mean and variance of cluster sizes and the intraclass correlation. The accuracy of this approximation is checked and found to be good. It is concluded that the loss of efficiency for variance component estimation due to variation of cluster sizes rarely exceeds 20% and can be compensated by sampling 25% more clusters.

  8. SIZES OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, Sidney

    2012-02-20

    A study is made of deviations from the mean power-law relationship between the Galactocentric distances and the half-light radii of Galactic globular clusters. Surprisingly, deviations from the mean R{sub h} versus R{sub gc} relationship do not appear to correlate with cluster luminosity, cluster metallicity, or horizontal-branch morphology. Differences in orbit shape are found to contribute to the scatter in the R{sub h} versus R{sub gc} relationship of Galactic globular clusters.

  9. Momentum distribution and non-Fermi-liquid behavior in low-doped two-orbital model: Finite-size cluster quantum Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashurnikov, Vladimir A.; Krasavin, Andrey V.; Zhumagulov, Yaroslav V.

    2016-12-01

    The two-dimensional two-orbital Hubbard model is studied with the use of a finite-size cluster world-line quantum Monte Carlo algorithm. This model is widely used for simulation of the band structure of FeAs clusters, which are structure elements of Fe-based high-temperature superconductors. The choice of a special basis set of hypersites allowed us to take into account four-fermion operator terms and to overcome partly the sign problem. Spectral functions and the density of states for various parameters of the model are obtained in the undoped and low-doped regimes. The correlated distortion of the spectral density with the change of doping is observed, and the applicability of the "hard-band" approximation in the doped regime is demonstrated. Profiles of the momentum distribution are obtained for the first Brillouin zone; they have pronounced jump near the Fermi level, which decreases with the growth of the strength of the interaction. The invariance of the Fermi surface with respect to the strength of the interaction is testified. Nesting is found in the case of electron and hole doping. Fermi-liquid parameters of the model are derived. The Z factor grows sharply with the increasing of the level of doping and monotonously decreases with the growth of the strength of the interaction. Moreover, electron-hole doping asymmetry of the Z factor is revealed. The non-Fermi-liquid behavior and the deviation from Luttinger theorem are observed.

  10. Sizes, colour gradients and resolved stellar mass distributions for the massive cluster galaxies in XMMUJ2235-2557 at z = 1.39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Jeffrey C. C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Mendel, J. Trevor; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Fossati, Matteo; Galametz, Audrey; Wegner, Michael; Wilman, David J.; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; Prichard, Laura J.; Lewis, Ian J.; Sharples, Ray; Stott, John P.

    2016-05-01

    We analyse the sizes, colour gradients and resolved stellar mass distributions for 36 massive and passive galaxies in the cluster XMMUJ2235-2557 at z = 1.39 using optical and near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging. We derive light-weighted Sérsic fits in five HST bands (i775, z850, Y105, J125, H160), and find that the size decreases by ˜20 per cent going from i775 to H160 band, consistent with recent studies. We then generate spatially resolved stellar mass maps using an empirical relationship between M_{{ast }}/L_{H_{160}} and (z850 - H160) and use these to derive mass-weighted Sérsic fits: the mass-weighted sizes are ˜41 per cent smaller than their rest-frame r-band counterparts compared with an average of ˜12 per cent at z ˜ 0. We attribute this evolution to the evolution in the M_{{ast }}/L_{H_{160}} and colour gradient. Indeed, as expected, the ratio of mass-weighted to light-weighted size is correlated with the M*/L gradient, but is also mildly correlated with the mass surface density and mass-weighted size. The colour gradients (∇z - H) are mostly negative, with a median value of ˜0.45 mag dex-1, twice the local value. The evolution is caused by an evolution in age gradients along the semimajor axis (a), with ∇age = dlog (age)/dlog (a) ˜- 0.33, while the survival of weaker colour gradients in old, local galaxies implies that metallicity gradients are also required, with ∇Z = dlog (Z)/dlog (a) ˜- 0.2. This is consistent with recent observational evidence for the inside-out growth of passive galaxies at high redshift, and favours a gradual mass growth mechanism, such as minor mergers.

  11. Size distributions in urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.

    1980-01-01

    Data on the size distributions of urban aerosols are reviewed with emphasis on the physical characteristics of the particles. Types of size distributions, the reliability of size distribution data, and factors affecting urban aerosol size distributions are considered. As examples, the grand average number aerosol distribution from the 1969 Los Angeles smog experiment is compared with a Junge power law distribution calculated with the constants of Clark and Whitby. The computer-prepared volume size distribution measured during the General Motors Sulfate Study in Milford, Mich. is presented, the median size distribution by number for the New York Summer Aerosol Study is considered, and volume concentration distributions for Denver-area aerosols are presented.

  12. Uniform deposition of size-selected clusters using Lissajous scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Beniya, Atsushi; Watanabe, Yoshihide; Hirata, Hirohito

    2016-05-15

    Size-selected clusters can be deposited on the surface using size-selected cluster ion beams. However, because of the cross-sectional intensity distribution of the ion beam, it is difficult to define the coverage of the deposited clusters. The aggregation probability of the cluster depends on coverage, whereas cluster size on the surface depends on the position, despite the size-selected clusters are deposited. It is crucial, therefore, to deposit clusters uniformly on the surface. In this study, size-selected clusters were deposited uniformly on surfaces by scanning the cluster ions in the form of Lissajous pattern. Two sets of deflector electrodes set in orthogonal directions were placed in front of the sample surface. Triangular waves were applied to the electrodes with an irrational frequency ratio to ensure that the ion trajectory filled the sample surface. The advantages of this method are simplicity and low cost of setup compared with raster scanning method. The authors further investigated CO adsorption on size-selected Pt{sub n} (n = 7, 15, 20) clusters uniformly deposited on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiAl(110) surface and demonstrated the importance of uniform deposition.

  13. Particle Size Distributions in Atmospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paoli, Roberto; Shariff, Karim

    2003-01-01

    In this note, we derive a transport equation for a spatially integrated distribution function of particles size that is suitable for sparse particle systems, such as in atmospheric clouds. This is done by integrating a Boltzmann equation for a (local) distribution function over an arbitrary but finite volume. A methodology for evolving the moments of the integrated distribution is presented. These moments can be either tracked for a finite number of discrete populations ('clusters') or treated as continuum variables.

  14. THE SIZE SCALE OF STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Madrid, Juan P.; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Sippel, Anna C.

    2012-09-10

    Direct N-body simulations of star clusters in a realistic Milky-Way-like potential are carried out using the code NBODY6. Based on these simulations, a new relationship between scale size and galactocentric distance is derived: the scale size of star clusters is proportional to the hyperbolic tangent of the galactocentric distance. The half-mass radius of star clusters increases systematically with galactocentric distance but levels off when star clusters orbit the galaxy beyond {approx}40 kpc. These simulations show that the half-mass radius of individual star clusters varies significantly as they evolve over a Hubble time, more so for clusters with shorter relaxation times, and remains constant through several relaxation times only in certain situations when expansion driven by the internal dynamics of the star cluster and the influence of the host galaxy tidal field balance each other. Indeed, the radius of a star cluster evolving within the inner 20 kpc of a realistic galactic gravitational potential is severely truncated by tidal interactions and does not remain constant over a Hubble time. Furthermore, the half-mass radius of star clusters measured with present-day observations bears no memory of the original cluster size. Stellar evolution and tidal stripping are the two competing physical mechanisms that determine the present-day size of globular clusters. These simulations also show that extended star clusters can form at large galactocentric distances while remaining fully bound to the host galaxy. There is thus no need to invoke accretion from an external galaxy to explain the presence of extended clusters at large galactocentric distances in a Milky-Way-type galaxy.

  15. Cluster Dynamics Largely Shapes Protoplanetary Disk Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincke, Kirsten; Pfalzner, Susanne

    2016-09-01

    To what degree the cluster environment influences the sizes of protoplanetary disks surrounding young stars is still an open question. This is particularly true for the short-lived clusters typical for the solar neighborhood, in which the stellar density and therefore the influence of the cluster environment change considerably over the first 10 Myr. In previous studies, the effect of the gas on the cluster dynamics has often been neglected this is remedied here. Using the code NBody6++, we study the stellar dynamics in different developmental phases—embedded, expulsion, and expansion—including the gas, and quantify the effect of fly-bys on the disk size. We concentrate on massive clusters (M cl ≥ 103-6 ∗ 104 M Sun), which are representative for clusters like the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) or NGC 6611. We find that not only the stellar density but also the duration of the embedded phase matters. The densest clusters react fastest to the gas expulsion and drop quickly in density, here 98% of relevant encounters happen before gas expulsion. By contrast, disks in sparser clusters are initially less affected, but because these clusters expand more slowly, 13% of disks are truncated after gas expulsion. For ONC-like clusters, we find that disks larger than 500 au are usually affected by the environment, which corresponds to the observation that 200 au-sized disks are common. For NGC 6611-like clusters, disk sizes are cut-down on average to roughly 100 au. A testable hypothesis would be that the disks in the center of NGC 6611 should be on average ≈20 au and therefore considerably smaller than those in the ONC.

  16. Effect Sizes in Cluster-Randomized Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    2007-01-01

    Multisite research designs involving cluster randomization are becoming increasingly important in educational and behavioral research. Researchers would like to compute effect size indexes based on the standardized mean difference to compare the results of cluster-randomized studies (and corresponding quasi-experiments) with other studies and to…

  17. Effect Sizes in Cluster-Randomized Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    2007-01-01

    Multisite research designs involving cluster randomization are becoming increasingly important in educational and behavioral research. Researchers would like to compute effect size indexes based on the standardized mean difference to compare the results of cluster-randomized studies (and corresponding quasi-experiments) with other studies and to…

  18. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Measurements of Magnetic Cluster Sizes in Magnetic Recording Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Toney, Michael F

    2003-06-17

    We describe Small Angle Neutron Scattering measurements of the magnetic cluster size distributions for several longitudinal magnetic recording media. We find that the average magnetic cluster size is slightly larger than the average physical grain size, that there is a broad distribution of cluster sizes, and that the cluster size is inversely correlated to the media signal-to-noise ratio. These results show that intergranular magnetic coupling in these media is small and they provide empirical data for the cluster-size distribution that can be incorporated into models of magnetic recording.

  19. Fundamental science of nanometer-size clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcoxon, J.P.; Newcomer, P.P.; Samara, G.A.; Venturini, E.L.; Williamson, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This research has produced a variety of monodisperse, nanometer-size clusters (nanoclusters for short), characterized their size and crystal structure and developed a scientific understanding of the size dependence of their physical properties. Of specific interest were the influence of quantum electronic confinement on the optical properties, magnetic properties, and dielectric properties. These properties were chosen both for their potential practical impact on various applications identified in the National Critical Technologies list (e.g., catalysis, information storage, sensors, environmental remediation, ...) as well as for their importance to the fundamental science of clusters. An Executive Summary provides a description of the major highlights.

  20. Size to density coupling of supported metallic clusters.

    PubMed

    Gross, Elad; Asscher, Micha

    2009-01-28

    One of the difficulties in standard growth of metallic nano-clusters on oxide substrates as model catalysts is the strong coupling between clusters size and density. Employing multiple cycles, amorphous solid water-buffer layer assisted growth (ASW-BLAG) procedure, we demonstrate how the size to density coupling can be eliminated under certain conditions. In this study, gold clusters were deposited on a SiO2/Si(100) substrate in UHV, using ASW as a buffer layer assisting aggregation and growth. The clusters were imaged ex situ by tapping mode atomic force microscope (AFM) and high-resolution scanning electron microscope (HR-SEM). In situ Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) measurements have led to independent evaluation of the gold covered area. In order to increase the clusters density we have introduced a multiple BLAG procedure, in which, a BALG cycle is repeated up to 10 times. The cluster density can be increased this way by more than five fold without changing their size. Above a specific number of cycles, however, the cluster density reaches saturation and a gradual increase in clusters size is observed. Larger clusters correlate with lower saturation density following multiple BLAG cycles. This observation is explained in terms of long range cluster-cluster attraction between clusters already on the substrate and those approaching in the next BLAG cycle. This attraction is more pronounced as the clusters become larger. We have shown that at saturation density, inter-cluster distance can not be smaller than 20 nm for clusters 4 nm in diameter or larger. Employing two consecutive BLAG cycles, characterized by different parameters (metal dosage and buffer layer thickness) result in a bi-modal size distribution. Moreover, it is demonstrated that one can prepare this way co-adsorbed bi-metallic film of e.g. Au and Pd clusters, with specific density and size on the same substrate. The ASW-BLAG procedure is thus expected to introduce a new pathway for tailor made

  1. Polymorphism in magic-sized Au144(SR)60 clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Kirsten M. O.; Juhas, Pavol; Tofanelli, Marcus A.; Heinecke, Christine L.; Vaughan, Gavin; Ackerson, Christopher J.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2016-06-14

    Ultra-small, magic-sized metal nanoclusters represent an important new class of materials with properties between molecules and particles. However, their small size challenges the conventional methods for structure characterization. We present the structure of ultra-stable Au144(SR)60 magic-sized nanoclusters obtained from atomic pair distribution function analysis of X-ray powder diffraction data. Our study reveals structural polymorphism in these archetypal nanoclusters. Additionally, in order to confirm the theoretically predicted icosahedral-cored cluster, we also find samples with a truncated decahedral core structure, with some samples exhibiting a coexistence of both cluster structures. Although the clusters are monodisperse in size, structural diversity is apparent. Finally, the discovery of polymorphism may open up a new dimension in nanoscale engineering.

  2. Polymorphism in magic-sized Au144(SR)60 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kirsten M. Ø.; Juhas, Pavol; Tofanelli, Marcus A.; Heinecke, Christine L.; Vaughan, Gavin; Ackerson, Christopher J.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-small, magic-sized metal nanoclusters represent an important new class of materials with properties between molecules and particles. However, their small size challenges the conventional methods for structure characterization. Here we present the structure of ultra-stable Au144(SR)60 magic-sized nanoclusters obtained from atomic pair distribution function analysis of X-ray powder diffraction data. The study reveals structural polymorphism in these archetypal nanoclusters. In addition to confirming the theoretically predicted icosahedral-cored cluster, we also find samples with a truncated decahedral core structure, with some samples exhibiting a coexistence of both cluster structures. Although the clusters are monodisperse in size, structural diversity is apparent. The discovery of polymorphism may open up a new dimension in nanoscale engineering.

  3. Polymorphism in magic-sized Au144(SR)60 clusters

    DOE PAGES

    Jensen, Kirsten M. O.; Juhas, Pavol; Tofanelli, Marcus A.; ...

    2016-06-14

    Ultra-small, magic-sized metal nanoclusters represent an important new class of materials with properties between molecules and particles. However, their small size challenges the conventional methods for structure characterization. We present the structure of ultra-stable Au144(SR)60 magic-sized nanoclusters obtained from atomic pair distribution function analysis of X-ray powder diffraction data. Our study reveals structural polymorphism in these archetypal nanoclusters. Additionally, in order to confirm the theoretically predicted icosahedral-cored cluster, we also find samples with a truncated decahedral core structure, with some samples exhibiting a coexistence of both cluster structures. Although the clusters are monodisperse in size, structural diversity is apparent. Finally,more » the discovery of polymorphism may open up a new dimension in nanoscale engineering.« less

  4. Polymorphism in magic-sized Au144(SR)60 clusters

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kirsten M.Ø.; Juhas, Pavol; Tofanelli, Marcus A.; Heinecke, Christine L.; Vaughan, Gavin; Ackerson, Christopher J.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-small, magic-sized metal nanoclusters represent an important new class of materials with properties between molecules and particles. However, their small size challenges the conventional methods for structure characterization. Here we present the structure of ultra-stable Au144(SR)60 magic-sized nanoclusters obtained from atomic pair distribution function analysis of X-ray powder diffraction data. The study reveals structural polymorphism in these archetypal nanoclusters. In addition to confirming the theoretically predicted icosahedral-cored cluster, we also find samples with a truncated decahedral core structure, with some samples exhibiting a coexistence of both cluster structures. Although the clusters are monodisperse in size, structural diversity is apparent. The discovery of polymorphism may open up a new dimension in nanoscale engineering. PMID:27297400

  5. Sample Size Determination for Clustered Count Data

    PubMed Central

    Amatya, A.; Bhaumik, D.; Gibbons, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of sample size determination for count data. Such data arise naturally in the context of multi-center (or cluster) randomized clinical trials, where patients are nested within research centers. We consider cluster-specific and population-average estimators (maximum likelihood based on generalized mixed-effects regression and generalized estimating equations respectively) for subject-level and cluster-level randomized designs respectively. We provide simple expressions for calculating number of clusters when comparing event rates of two groups in cross-sectional studies. The expressions we derive have closed form solutions and are based on either between-cluster variation or inter-cluster correlation for cross-sectional studies. We provide both theoretical and numerical comparisons of our methods with other existing methods. We specifically show that the performance of the proposed method is better for subject-level randomized designs, whereas the comparative performance depends on the rate ratio for the cluster-level randomized designs. We also provide a versatile method for longitudinal studies. Results are illustrated by three real data examples. PMID:23589228

  6. Centaur size distribution with DECam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, Cesar; Trilling, David E.; Schlichting, Hilke

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of the 2014 centaur search campaign on the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) in Tololo, Chile. This is the largest debiased Centaur survey to date, measuring for the first time the size distribution of small Centaurs (1-10km) and the first time the sizes of planetesimals from which the entire Solar System formed are directly detected.The theoretical model for the coagulation and collisional evolution of the outer solar system proposed in Schlichting et al. 2013 predicts a steep rise in the size distribution of TNOs smaller than 10km. These objects are below the detection limit of current TNO surveys but feasible for the Centaur population. By constraining the number of Centaurs and this feature in their size distribution we can confirm the collisional evolution of the Solar System and estimate the rate at which material is being transferred from the outer to the inner Solar System. If the shallow power law behavior from the TNO size distribution at ~40km can be extrapolated to 1km, the size of the Jupiter Family of Comets (JFC), there would not be enough small TNOs to supply the JFC population (Volk & Malhotra, 2008), debunking the link between TNOs and JFCs.We also obtain the colors of small Centaurs and TNOs, providing a signature of collisional evolution by measuring if there is in fact a relationship between color and size. If objects smaller than the break in the TNO size distribution are being ground down by collisions then their surfaces should be fresh, and then appear bluer in the optical than larger TNOs that are not experiencing collisions.

  7. Overlapping clusters for distributed computation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrokni, Vahab; Andersen, Reid; Gleich, David F.

    2010-11-01

    Scalable, distributed algorithms must address communication problems. We investigate overlapping clusters, or vertex partitions that intersect, for graph computations. This setup stores more of the graph than required but then affords the ease of implementation of vertex partitioned algorithms. Our hope is that this technique allows us to reduce communication in a computation on a distributed graph. The motivation above draws on recent work in communication avoiding algorithms. Mohiyuddin et al. (SC09) design a matrix-powers kernel that gives rise to an overlapping partition. Fritzsche et al. (CSC2009) develop an overlapping clustering for a Schwarz method. Both techniques extend an initial partitioning with overlap. Our procedure generates overlap directly. Indeed, Schwarz methods are commonly used to capitalize on overlap. Elsewhere, overlapping communities (Ahn et al, Nature 2009; Mishra et al. WAW2007) are now a popular model of structure in social networks. These have long been studied in statistics (Cole and Wishart, CompJ 1970). We present two types of results: (i) an estimated swapping probability {rho}{infinity}; and (ii) the communication volume of a parallel PageRank solution (link-following {alpha} = 0.85) using an additive Schwarz method. The volume ratio is the amount of extra storage for the overlap (2 means we store the graph twice). Below, as the ratio increases, the swapping probability and PageRank communication volume decreases.

  8. Size-dependent mobility of gold nano-clusters during growth on chemically modified graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Gavin R.; Dawson, Peter M.; Pandey, Priyanka A.; Wilson, Neil R.; Mulheran, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nano-clusters were grown on chemically modified graphene by direct sputter deposition. Transmission electron microscopy of the nano-clusters on these electron-transparent substrates reveals an unusual bimodal island size distribution (ISD). A kinetic Monte Carlo model of growth incorporating a size-dependent cluster mobility rule uniquely reproduces the bimodal ISD, providing strong evidence for the mobility of large clusters during surface growth. The cluster mobility exponent of -5/3 is consistent with cluster motion via one-dimensional diffusion of gold atoms around the edges of the nano-clusters.

  9. Size-dependent mobility of gold nano-clusters during growth on chemically modified graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Gavin R. Dawson, Peter M.; Pandey, Priyanka A.; Wilson, Neil R.; Mulheran, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nano-clusters were grown on chemically modified graphene by direct sputter deposition. Transmission electron microscopy of the nano-clusters on these electron-transparent substrates reveals an unusual bimodal island size distribution (ISD). A kinetic Monte Carlo model of growth incorporating a size-dependent cluster mobility rule uniquely reproduces the bimodal ISD, providing strong evidence for the mobility of large clusters during surface growth. The cluster mobility exponent of −5/3 is consistent with cluster motion via one-dimensional diffusion of gold atoms around the edges of the nano-clusters.

  10. Size distribution of ring polymers

    PubMed Central

    Medalion, Shlomi; Aghion, Erez; Meirovitch, Hagai; Barkai, Eli; Kessler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an exact solution for the distribution of sample averaged monomer to monomer distance of ring polymers. For non-interacting and local-interaction models these distributions correspond to the distribution of the area under the reflected Bessel bridge and the Bessel excursion respectively, and are shown to be identical in dimension d ≥ 2, albeit with pronounced finite size effects at the critical dimension, d = 2. A symmetry of the problem reveals that dimension d and 4 − d are equivalent, thus the celebrated Airy distribution describing the areal distribution of the d = 1 Brownian excursion describes also a polymer in three dimensions. For a self-avoiding polymer in dimension d we find numerically that the fluctuations of the scaled averaged distance are nearly identical in dimension d = 2, 3 and are well described to a first approximation by the non-interacting excursion model in dimension 5. PMID:27302596

  11. Inherent size effects on XANES of nanometer metal clusters: Size-selected platinum clusters on silica

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Yang; Gorey, Timothy J.; Anderson, Scott L.; Lee, Sungsik; Lee, Sungwon; Seifert, Soenke; Winans, Randall E.

    2016-12-12

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) is commonly used to probe the oxidation state of metal-containing nanomaterials, however, as the particle size in the material drops below a few nanometers, it becomes important to consider inherent size effects on the electronic structure of the materials. In this paper, we analyze a series of size-selected Ptn/SiO2 samples, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy ion scattering, grazing-incidence small angle X-ray scattering, and XANES. The oxidation state and morphology are characterized both as-deposited in UHV, and after air/O2 exposure and annealing in H2. Here, the clusters are found to be stable during deposition and upon air exposure, but sinter if heated above ~150 °C. XANES shows shifts in the Pt L3 edge, relative to bulk Pt, that increase with decreasing cluster size, and the cluster samples show high white line intensity. Reference to bulk standards would suggest that the clusters are oxidized, however, XPS shows that they are not. Instead, the XANES effects are attributable to development of a band gap and localization of empty state wavefunctions in small clusters.

  12. Inherent size effects on XANES of nanometer metal clusters: Size-selected platinum clusters on silica

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Yang; Gorey, Timothy J.; Anderson, Scott L.; ...

    2016-12-12

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) is commonly used to probe the oxidation state of metal-containing nanomaterials, however, as the particle size in the material drops below a few nanometers, it becomes important to consider inherent size effects on the electronic structure of the materials. In this paper, we analyze a series of size-selected Ptn/SiO2 samples, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy ion scattering, grazing-incidence small angle X-ray scattering, and XANES. The oxidation state and morphology are characterized both as-deposited in UHV, and after air/O2 exposure and annealing in H2. Here, the clusters are found to be stable during depositionmore » and upon air exposure, but sinter if heated above ~150 °C. XANES shows shifts in the Pt L3 edge, relative to bulk Pt, that increase with decreasing cluster size, and the cluster samples show high white line intensity. Reference to bulk standards would suggest that the clusters are oxidized, however, XPS shows that they are not. Instead, the XANES effects are attributable to development of a band gap and localization of empty state wavefunctions in small clusters.« less

  13. GEANT4 distributed computing for compact clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrawood, Brian P.; Agasthya, Greeshma A.; Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Raterman, Gretchen; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-11-01

    A new technique for distribution of GEANT4 processes is introduced to simplify running a simulation in a parallel environment such as a tightly coupled computer cluster. Using a new C++ class derived from the GEANT4 toolkit, multiple runs forming a single simulation are managed across a local network of computers with a simple inter-node communication protocol. The class is integrated with the GEANT4 toolkit and is designed to scale from a single symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) machine to compact clusters ranging in size from tens to thousands of nodes. User designed 'work tickets' are distributed to clients using a client-server work flow model to specify the parameters for each individual run of the simulation. The new g4DistributedRunManager class was developed and well tested in the course of our Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT) experiments. It will be useful for anyone running GEANT4 for large discrete data sets such as covering a range of angles in computed tomography, calculating dose delivery with multiple fractions or simply speeding the through-put of a single model.

  14. Size distributions of gold nanoclusters studied by liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    WILCOXON,JESS P.; MARTIN,JAMES E.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.

    2000-05-23

    The authors report high pressure liquid chromatography, (HPLC), and transmission electron microscopy, (TEM), studies of the size distributions of nanosize gold clusters dispersed in organic solvents. These metal clusters are synthesized in inverse micelles at room temperature and those investigated range in diameter from 1--10 nm. HPLC is sensitive enough to discern changes in hydrodynamic volume corresponding to only 2 carbon atoms of the passivating agent or metal core size changes of less than 4 {angstrom}. The authors have determined for the first time how the total cluster volume (metal core + passivating organic shell) changes with the size of the passivating agent.

  15. Modelling and analysing exchangeable binary data with random cluster sizes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian-Lun; Prorok, Philip C

    2003-08-15

    Correlated binary data occur very frequently in cluster sample surveys, dependent repeated cancer screening, teratological experiments, ophthalmologic and otolaryngologic studies, and other clinical trials. The standard methods to analyse these data include the use of beta-binomial models and generalized estimating equations with third and fourth moments specified by 'working matrices'. However, in many applications it is reasonable to assume that the data from the same cluster are exchangeable. When all sampled clusters have equal sizes, Bowman and George introduced maximum likelihood estimates (MLEs) of the population parameters such as the marginal means, moments, and correlations of order two and higher. They also extended their approach to sampled clusters with unequal sizes. It seems that their extension has a gap. This paper points out the source of this gap and shows that estimates introduced by Bowman and George are not the MLEs of the parameters which are used to identify the joint distribution of correlated binary data. We show that the MLEs of the population parameters have no closed form in general and should be calculated by numerical methods. We apply our results and a generalized estimating equation procedure to a data set from a double-blind randomized clinical trial comparing two antibiotics, cefaclor and amoxicillin, used for the treatment of acute otitis media. To see the performance of the MLEs with small or moderate sample sizes, several simulation studies are also conducted. Published in 2003 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Sample size calculation for stepped wedge and other longitudinal cluster randomised trials.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Richard; Teerenstra, Steven; de Hoop, Esther; Eldridge, Sandra

    2016-11-20

    The sample size required for a cluster randomised trial is inflated compared with an individually randomised trial because outcomes of participants from the same cluster are correlated. Sample size calculations for longitudinal cluster randomised trials (including stepped wedge trials) need to take account of at least two levels of clustering: the clusters themselves and times within clusters. We derive formulae for sample size for repeated cross-section and closed cohort cluster randomised trials with normally distributed outcome measures, under a multilevel model allowing for variation between clusters and between times within clusters. Our formulae agree with those previously described for special cases such as crossover and analysis of covariance designs, although simulation suggests that the formulae could underestimate required sample size when the number of clusters is small. Whether using a formula or simulation, a sample size calculation requires estimates of nuisance parameters, which in our model include the intracluster correlation, cluster autocorrelation, and individual autocorrelation. A cluster autocorrelation less than 1 reflects a situation where individuals sampled from the same cluster at different times have less correlated outcomes than individuals sampled from the same cluster at the same time. Nuisance parameters could be estimated from time series obtained in similarly clustered settings with the same outcome measure, using analysis of variance to estimate variance components. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Damage cluster distributions in numerical concrete at the mesoscale.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Okan; Derlet, Peter Michael; Molinari, Jean-François

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the size distribution of damage clusters in concrete under uniaxial tension loading conditions. Using the finite-element method, the concrete is modeled at the mesoscale by a random distribution of elastic spherical aggregates within an elastic mortar paste. The propagation and coalescence of damage zones are then simulated by means of dynamically inserted cohesive elements. Dynamic failure analysis shows that the size distribution of damage clusters follows a power law when a system-spanning cluster is first observed, with an exponent close to that of percolation theory. This is found for a range of selected mesostructural parameters, material defects, and applied strain rates. In all cases, the system-spanning cluster occurs prior to the onset of local decohesion, a regime of crack nucleation and propagation, and eventual material failure. The resulting fully damaged crack surfaces after failure are found to be only weakly correlated with the percolated damage region structures.

  18. Damage cluster distributions in numerical concrete at the mesoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Okan; Derlet, Peter Michael; Molinari, Jean-François

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the size distribution of damage clusters in concrete under uniaxial tension loading conditions. Using the finite-element method, the concrete is modeled at the mesoscale by a random distribution of elastic spherical aggregates within an elastic mortar paste. The propagation and coalescence of damage zones are then simulated by means of dynamically inserted cohesive elements. Dynamic failure analysis shows that the size distribution of damage clusters follows a power law when a system-spanning cluster is first observed, with an exponent close to that of percolation theory. This is found for a range of selected mesostructural parameters, material defects, and applied strain rates. In all cases, the system-spanning cluster occurs prior to the onset of local decohesion, a regime of crack nucleation and propagation, and eventual material failure. The resulting fully damaged crack surfaces after failure are found to be only weakly correlated with the percolated damage region structures.

  19. Sample size for cluster randomized trials: effect of coefficient of variation of cluster size and analysis method.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Sandra M; Ashby, Deborah; Kerry, Sally

    2006-10-01

    Cluster randomized trials are increasingly popular. In many of these trials, cluster sizes are unequal. This can affect trial power, but standard sample size formulae for these trials ignore this. Previous studies addressing this issue have mostly focused on continuous outcomes or methods that are sometimes difficult to use in practice. We show how a simple formula can be used to judge the possible effect of unequal cluster sizes for various types of analyses and both continuous and binary outcomes. We explore the practical estimation of the coefficient of variation of cluster size required in this formula and demonstrate the formula's performance for a hypothetical but typical trial randomizing UK general practices. The simple formula provides a good estimate of sample size requirements for trials analysed using cluster-level analyses weighting by cluster size and a conservative estimate for other types of analyses. For trials randomizing UK general practices the coefficient of variation of cluster size depends on variation in practice list size, variation in incidence or prevalence of the medical condition under examination, and practice and patient recruitment strategies, and for many trials is expected to be approximately 0.65. Individual-level analyses can be noticeably more efficient than some cluster-level analyses in this context. When the coefficient of variation is <0.23, the effect of adjustment for variable cluster size on sample size is negligible. Most trials randomizing UK general practices and many other cluster randomized trials should account for variable cluster size in their sample size calculations.

  20. Optical Sizing of Immunolabel Clusters through Multispectral Plasmon Coupling Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyun; Rong, Guoxin; Yan, Bo; Yang, Linglu; Reinhard, Björn M.

    2011-01-01

    The wavelength dependent scattering cross-sections of self-assembled silver nanoparticle clusters of known size (n) were measured on five different wavelength channels between 427 and 510 nm through correlation of multispectral imaging and scanning electron microscopy. A multivariate statistical analysis of the spectral response of this training set provided a correlation between spectral response and cluster size and enabled a classification of new measurements into four distinct nanoparticle association levels (I1 – I4) whose compositions were dominated by monomers (I1), dimers (I2), trimers and tetramers (I3), and larger clusters (I4), respectively. One potential application of the optical sizing approach is to map association levels of silver immunolabels on cellular surfaces. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach using silver immunolabels targeted at the epidermal growth factor receptor on A431 cells in a proof of principle experiment. The ability to measure immunolabel association levels on sub-cellular length scales in an optical microscope provides new opportunities for experimentally assessing receptor density distributions on living cells in solution. PMID:21247191

  1. Cluster-size dynamics: A phenomenological model for the interaction between coagulation and fragmentation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2015-06-01

    We present a novel phenomenological modeling approach to describe the growth of clusters as the result of the interaction between cluster coagulation and fragmentation. The cluster-size growth (CSG) model tracks the evolution of cluster-sizes rather than the concentrations of clusters with different sizes as in the Smoluchowski and Becker-Döring coagulation-fragmentation equations. Our modeling perspective allows for a description of cluster growth in realistic systems by using a significantly smaller number of differential equations to describe their dynamics. We used dynamical system tools (phase-plane analysis) and numerical simulations to investigate the CSG model dynamics and to understand how the model parameters describing the coagulation and fragmentation processes determine balances between these two processes that create non-zero stationary cluster size distributions.

  2. Low-energy collisions of helium clusters with size-selected cobalt cluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odaka, Hideho; Ichihashi, Masahiko

    2017-04-01

    Collisions of helium clusters with size-selected cobalt cluster ions, Com+ (m ≤ 5), were studied experimentally by using a merging beam technique. The product ions, Com+Hen (cluster complexes), were mass-analyzed, and this result indicates that more than 20 helium atoms can be attached onto Com+ at the relative velocities of 103 m/s. The measured size distributions of the cluster complexes indicate that there are relatively stable complexes: Co2+Hen (n = 2, 4, 6, and 12), Co3+Hen (n = 3, 6), Co4+He4, and Co5+Hen (n = 3, 6, 8, and 10). These stabilities are explained in terms of their geometric structures. The yields of the cluster complexes were also measured as a function of the relative velocity (1 × 102-4 × 103 m/s), and this result demonstrates that the main interaction in the collision process changes with the increase of the collision energy from the electrostatic interaction, which includes the induced deformation of HeN, to the hard-sphere interaction. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2017-80015-0

  3. Size controlled deposition of Cu and Si nano-clusters by an ultra-high vacuum sputtering gas aggregation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, A. N.; Krishna, R.; Das, B.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we have reported the syntheses of copper and silicon nano-clusters by a sputtering-gas-aggregation type growth technique. The process involves typical magnetron sputtering vaporization of target materials followed by an inert gas condensation to form clusters of varying sizes. The size-distributions of the clusters typically follow a normal-distribution and the peak cluster sizes of the distributions depends on several factors, which include gas-flow rate, length of the growth region, deposition pressure etc. We have observed a variation in the peak cluster size with the variation of the gas (argon) flow rates. The experimental values are compared with the existing models and the results are found to be in good agreement. The results are significant since it demonstrates that proper optimization of operation conditions can lead to desired cluster sizes as well as desired cluster-size distributions.

  4. Review of methods for handling confounding by cluster and informative cluster size in clustered data

    PubMed Central

    Seaman, Shaun; Pavlou, Menelaos; Copas, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Clustered data are common in medical research. Typically, one is interested in a regression model for the association between an outcome and covariates. Two complications that can arise when analysing clustered data are informative cluster size (ICS) and confounding by cluster (CBC). ICS and CBC mean that the outcome of a member given its covariates is associated with, respectively, the number of members in the cluster and the covariate values of other members in the cluster. Standard generalised linear mixed models for cluster-specific inference and standard generalised estimating equations for population-average inference assume, in general, the absence of ICS and CBC. Modifications of these approaches have been proposed to account for CBC or ICS. This article is a review of these methods. We express their assumptions in a common format, thus providing greater clarity about the assumptions that methods proposed for handling CBC make about ICS and vice versa, and about when different methods can be used in practice. We report relative efficiencies of methods where available, describe how methods are related, identify a previously unreported equivalence between two key methods, and propose some simple additional methods. Unnecessarily using a method that allows for ICS/CBC has an efficiency cost when ICS and CBC are absent. We review tools for identifying ICS/CBC. A strategy for analysis when CBC and ICS are suspected is demonstrated by examining the association between socio-economic deprivation and preterm neonatal death in Scotland. PMID:25087978

  5. A General Class of Signed Rank Tests for Clustered Data when the Cluster Size is Potentially Informative

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Somnath; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Oja, Hannu

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Rank based tests are alternatives to likelihood based tests popularized by their relative robustness and underlying elegant mathematical theory. There has been a serge in research activities in this area in recent years since a number of researchers are working to develop and extend rank based procedures to clustered dependent data which include situations with known correlation structures (e.g., as in mixed effects models) as well as more general form of dependence. The purpose of this paper is to test the symmetry of a marginal distribution under clustered data. However, unlike most other papers in the area, we consider the possibility that the cluster size is a random variable whose distribution is dependent on the distribution of the variable of interest within a cluster. This situation typically arises when the clusters are defined in a natural way (e.g., not controlled by the experimenter or statistician) and in which the size of the cluster may carry information about the distribution of data values within a cluster. Under the scenario of an informative cluster size, attempts to use some form of variance adjusted sign or signed rank tests would fail since they would not maintain the correct size under the distribution of marginal symmetry. To overcome this difficulty Datta and Satten (2008; Biometrics, 64, 501–507) proposed a Wilcoxon type signed rank test based on the principle of within cluster resampling. In this paper we study this problem in more generality by introducing a class of valid tests employing a general score function. Asymptotic null distribution of these tests is obtained. A simulation study shows that a more general choice of the score function can sometimes result in greater power than the Datta and Satten test; furthermore, this development offers the user a wider choice. We illustrate our tests using a real data example on spinal cord injury patients. PMID:23074359

  6. A General Class of Signed Rank Tests for Clustered Data when the Cluster Size is Potentially Informative.

    PubMed

    Datta, Somnath; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Oja, Hannu

    2012-09-01

    Rank based tests are alternatives to likelihood based tests popularized by their relative robustness and underlying elegant mathematical theory. There has been a serge in research activities in this area in recent years since a number of researchers are working to develop and extend rank based procedures to clustered dependent data which include situations with known correlation structures (e.g., as in mixed effects models) as well as more general form of dependence.The purpose of this paper is to test the symmetry of a marginal distribution under clustered data. However, unlike most other papers in the area, we consider the possibility that the cluster size is a random variable whose distribution is dependent on the distribution of the variable of interest within a cluster. This situation typically arises when the clusters are defined in a natural way (e.g., not controlled by the experimenter or statistician) and in which the size of the cluster may carry information about the distribution of data values within a cluster.Under the scenario of an informative cluster size, attempts to use some form of variance adjusted sign or signed rank tests would fail since they would not maintain the correct size under the distribution of marginal symmetry. To overcome this difficulty Datta and Satten (2008; Biometrics, 64, 501-507) proposed a Wilcoxon type signed rank test based on the principle of within cluster resampling. In this paper we study this problem in more generality by introducing a class of valid tests employing a general score function. Asymptotic null distribution of these tests is obtained. A simulation study shows that a more general choice of the score function can sometimes result in greater power than the Datta and Satten test; furthermore, this development offers the user a wider choice. We illustrate our tests using a real data example on spinal cord injury patients.

  7. Cluster analysis of rural, urban, and curbside atmospheric particle size data.

    PubMed

    Beddows, David C S; Dall'Osto, Manuel; Harrison, Roy M

    2009-07-01

    Particle size is a key determinant of the hazard posed by airborne particles. Continuous multivariate particle size data have been collected using aerosol particle size spectrometers sited at four locations within the UK: Harwell (Oxfordshire); Regents Park (London); British Telecom Tower (London); and Marylebone Road (London). These data have been analyzed using k-means cluster analysis, deduced to be the preferred cluster analysis technique, selected from an option of four partitional cluster packages, namelythe following: Fuzzy; k-means; k-median; and Model-Based clustering. Using cluster validation indices k-means clustering was shown to produce clusters with the smallest size, furthest separation, and importantly the highest degree of similarity between the elements within each partition. Using k-means clustering, the complexity of the data set is reduced allowing characterization of the data according to the temporal and spatial trends of the clusters. At Harwell, the rural background measurement site, the cluster analysis showed that the spectra may be differentiated by their modal-diameters and average temporal trends showing either high counts during the day-time or night-time hours. Likewise for the urban sites, the cluster analysis differentiated the spectra into a small number of size distributions according their modal-diameter, the location of the measurement site, and time of day. The responsible aerosol emission, formation, and dynamic processes can be inferred according to the cluster characteristics and correlation to concurrently measured meteorological, gas phase, and particle phase measurements.

  8. Size-controlled insulin-secreting cell clusters.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Adam D; Nyitray, Crystal; Sena, Mark; Desai, Tejal A

    2012-12-01

    The search for an effective cure for type I diabetes from the transplantation of encapsulated pancreatic β-cell clusters has so far produced sub-optimal clinical outcomes. Previous efforts have not controlled the size of transplanted clusters, a parameter implicated in affecting long-term viability and the secretion of therapeutically sufficient insulin. Here we demonstrate a method based on covalent attachment of patterned laminin for fabricating uniformly size-controlled insulin-secreting cell clusters. We show that cluster size within the range 40-120μm in diameter affects a variety of therapeutically relevant cellular responses including insulin expression, content and secretion. Our studies elucidate two size-dependent phenomena: (1) as the cluster size increases from 40μm to 60μm, glucose stimulation results in a greater amount of insulin produced per cell; and (2) as the cluster size increases beyond 60μm, sustained glucose stimulation results in a greater amount of insulin secreted per cell. Our study describes a method for producing uniformly sized insulin-secreting cell clusters, and since larger cluster sizes risk nutrient availability limitations, our data suggest that 100-120μm clusters may provide optimal viability and efficacy for encapsulated β-cell transplants as a treatment for type I diabetes and that further in vivo evaluation is warranted.

  9. Flare Size Distributions and Active Region Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Taeil

    2007-05-01

    Size distributions of solar flares measured by various size indicators follow a power law with a negative index of about 1.8. On the basis of general appearance of power-law distributions, Lu and his collegues proposed an avalenche model. According to this model, the power-law index should be independent of active region size, but the cutoff size above which the size distribution steepens rapidly is expected to depend on the active region size. I have analyzed the size distribution of flares, using GOES soft X-ray observations for 2004 and 2005. For flares observed by GOES during these years, their locations are almost completely identified even for C-class flares. This enable us to study the dependence of size distribution on active region type. Comparing the power-law portion of size distributions below the high-end cutoff, I have found that the size distribution index depends on active region type. Flares from prolific active regions exhibit a flatter distribution, while flares from non-prolific active regions exhibit a steeper distribution. I plan to discuss a plausible mechanism for such behavior.

  10. Variations of sediment size and size distribution along a river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, C. D.; Tsai, Y. C.; Yang, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment material of a river bed is an important factor for river morphodynamics. Typically, alluvial rivers construct their own geometries based on the sediment size and its distribution that affect the sediment transport capacity in river channel networks, involving the issues of watershed sediment yield, flood controls and the evolution of flood plain, habitats, deltas and adjacent coastline. Hence, investigating grain size and size distribution of sediment materials on riverbeds is important for practical river management and assessment of landscape evolution. In this study, we collected total 43 sediment samplings along the Koaping River in southern Taiwan to analyze the grain size and its distribution along the river. Spatial distributions of different representative grain sizes, such as D50 and D90, and the size corresponding Manning's n values are analyzed and discussed in this paper. An exponential grain size distribution (GSD) formula is used to explore the relation between the frequency and size of riverbed sediment. Results show that the grain size has a wide range distribution in the river upstream but displays a narrow-range variation in the river downstream. For example, the sediment medium size D50 ranges from 1.25 mm to 391.27 mm with an average of 49.36 mm in the upstream while it ranges from 0.135 mm to 0.625 mm with an average of 0.338 mm in the downstream. The best fitting curves of GSD with exponential scaling are analyzed with an empirical parameter Dc that is used to normalize the sediment grain size. This study finds that the empirical parameter Dc could be replaced by the sediment resentative size D65 (65% of sediment smaller than it). The results obtained herein could be useful not only in analyzing sediment transport of a river but also in river management.

  11. City-size distribution and the size of urban systems.

    PubMed

    Thomas, I

    1985-07-01

    "This paper is an analysis of the city-size distribution for thirty-five countries of the world in 1975; the purpose is to explain statistically the regularity of the rank-size distribution by the number of cities included in the urban systems. The rank-size parameters have been computed for each country and also for four large urban systems in which several population thresholds have been defined. These thresholds seem to have more influence than the number of cities included in the urban system on the regularity of the distribution." The data are from the U.N. Demographic Yearbook. excerpt

  12. Cumulative frequency fit for particle size distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhuyun; Gautam, Mridul; Mehta, Sandeep

    2002-08-01

    A cumulative frequency distribution fit method is presented for analyzing particle size distributions by minimizing the summation of the square of cumulative frequency errors. Compared to the frequency fit method, the cumulative frequency fit method yields a more accurate solution. Based upon this, a spreadsheet was developed for analyzing multi-modal particle size distribution. The motivation for the work presented in this article was the current interest in ultra-fine and nano-sized particle exhaust emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines. The new spreadsheet provides a quick and convenient way to conduct particle size distribution analysis.

  13. Mass Distribution in Galaxy Cluster Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, M. T.; McNamara, B. R.; Pulido, F.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Russell, H. R.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Edge, A. C.; Main, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    Many processes within galaxy clusters, such as those believed to govern the onset of thermally unstable cooling and active galactic nucleus feedback, are dependent upon local dynamical timescales. However, accurate mapping of the mass distribution within individual clusters is challenging, particularly toward cluster centers where the total mass budget has substantial radially dependent contributions from the stellar (M *), gas (M gas), and dark matter (M DM) components. In this paper we use a small sample of galaxy clusters with deep Chandra observations and good ancillary tracers of their gravitating mass at both large and small radii to develop a method for determining mass profiles that span a wide radial range and extend down into the central galaxy. We also consider potential observational pitfalls in understanding cooling in hot cluster atmospheres, and find tentative evidence for a relationship between the radial extent of cooling X-ray gas and nebular Hα emission in cool-core clusters. At large radii the entropy profiles of our clusters agree with the baseline power law of K ∝ r 1.1 expected from gravity alone. At smaller radii our entropy profiles become shallower but continue with a power law of the form K ∝ r 0.67 down to our resolution limit. Among this small sample of cool-core clusters we therefore find no support for the existence of a central flat “entropy floor.”

  14. Superresolution Imaging of Aquaporin-4 Cluster Size in Antibody-Stained Paraffin Brain Sections.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alex J; Verkman, Alan S

    2015-12-15

    The water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) forms supramolecular clusters whose size is determined by the ratio of M1- and M23-AQP4 isoforms. In cultured astrocytes, differences in the subcellular localization and macromolecular interactions of small and large AQP4 clusters results in distinct physiological roles for M1- and M23-AQP4. Here, we developed quantitative superresolution optical imaging methodology to measure AQP4 cluster size in antibody-stained paraffin sections of mouse cerebral cortex and spinal cord, human postmortem brain, and glioma biopsy specimens. This methodology was used to demonstrate that large AQP4 clusters are formed in AQP4(-/-) astrocytes transfected with only M23-AQP4, but not in those expressing only M1-AQP4, both in vitro and in vivo. Native AQP4 in mouse cortex, where both isoforms are expressed, was enriched in astrocyte foot-processes adjacent to microcapillaries; clusters in perivascular regions of the cortex were larger than in parenchymal regions, demonstrating size-dependent subcellular segregation of AQP4 clusters. Two-color superresolution imaging demonstrated colocalization of Kir4.1 with AQP4 clusters in perivascular areas but not in parenchyma. Surprisingly, the subcellular distribution of AQP4 clusters was different between gray and white matter astrocytes in spinal cord, demonstrating regional specificity in cluster polarization. Changes in AQP4 subcellular distribution are associated with several neurological diseases and we demonstrate that AQP4 clustering was preserved in a postmortem human cortical brain tissue specimen, but that AQP4 was not substantially clustered in a human glioblastoma specimen despite high-level expression. Our results demonstrate the utility of superresolution optical imaging for measuring the size of AQP4 supramolecular clusters in paraffin sections of brain tissue and support AQP4 cluster size as a primary determinant of its subcellular distribution.

  15. Superresolution Imaging of Aquaporin-4 Cluster Size in Antibody-Stained Paraffin Brain Sections

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alex J.; Verkman, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    The water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) forms supramolecular clusters whose size is determined by the ratio of M1- and M23-AQP4 isoforms. In cultured astrocytes, differences in the subcellular localization and macromolecular interactions of small and large AQP4 clusters results in distinct physiological roles for M1- and M23-AQP4. Here, we developed quantitative superresolution optical imaging methodology to measure AQP4 cluster size in antibody-stained paraffin sections of mouse cerebral cortex and spinal cord, human postmortem brain, and glioma biopsy specimens. This methodology was used to demonstrate that large AQP4 clusters are formed in AQP4−/− astrocytes transfected with only M23-AQP4, but not in those expressing only M1-AQP4, both in vitro and in vivo. Native AQP4 in mouse cortex, where both isoforms are expressed, was enriched in astrocyte foot-processes adjacent to microcapillaries; clusters in perivascular regions of the cortex were larger than in parenchymal regions, demonstrating size-dependent subcellular segregation of AQP4 clusters. Two-color superresolution imaging demonstrated colocalization of Kir4.1 with AQP4 clusters in perivascular areas but not in parenchyma. Surprisingly, the subcellular distribution of AQP4 clusters was different between gray and white matter astrocytes in spinal cord, demonstrating regional specificity in cluster polarization. Changes in AQP4 subcellular distribution are associated with several neurological diseases and we demonstrate that AQP4 clustering was preserved in a postmortem human cortical brain tissue specimen, but that AQP4 was not substantially clustered in a human glioblastoma specimen despite high-level expression. Our results demonstrate the utility of superresolution optical imaging for measuring the size of AQP4 supramolecular clusters in paraffin sections of brain tissue and support AQP4 cluster size as a primary determinant of its subcellular distribution. PMID:26682810

  16. Size distribution of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvarov, Abdul; Allahverdiyev, Ahad

    2015-08-01

    Despite a very long history of investigations, the nature and origin of planetary nebulae (PNe) are not fully understood. It is obvious that the observational properties of PNe are influenced by the properties of the central star and the conditions in the environment. In this presentation in order to understand the effects of these components we have modeled the evolution of radio luminosity and the expansion of PNe in the framework of different hypothesis on the origin of these objects. In this we have used the observational data on the central stars and clustered this data into gourps with the similar parameters of the central stars. For the each of these groups of PNe we have built statistical dependences radio luminosity - diameter, number of PNe - diameter which are then compared to the modeled ones. Unfortunately, the comparison of simulations with observations did not allow us to choose between the known models of the evolution of the PN shell. However with the increase of statistics the approach considered in this presentation may become more productive.

  17. Cluster adjusted regression for displaced subject data (CARDS): Marginal inference under potentially informative temporal cluster size profiles.

    PubMed

    Bible, Joe; Beck, James D; Datta, Somnath

    2016-06-01

    Ignorance of the mechanisms responsible for the availability of information presents an unusual problem for analysts. It is often the case that the availability of information is dependent on the outcome. In the analysis of cluster data we say that a condition for informative cluster size (ICS) exists when the inference drawn from analysis of hypothetical balanced data varies from that of inference drawn on observed data. Much work has been done in order to address the analysis of clustered data with informative cluster size; examples include Inverse Probability Weighting (IPW), Cluster Weighted Generalized Estimating Equations (CWGEE), and Doubly Weighted Generalized Estimating Equations (DWGEE). When cluster size changes with time, i.e., the data set possess temporally varying cluster sizes (TVCS), these methods may produce biased inference for the underlying marginal distribution of interest. We propose a new marginalization that may be appropriate for addressing clustered longitudinal data with TVCS. The principal motivation for our present work is to analyze the periodontal data collected by Beck et al. (1997, Journal of Periodontal Research 6, 497-505). Longitudinal periodontal data often exhibits both ICS and TVCS as the number of teeth possessed by participants at the onset of study is not constant and teeth as well as individuals may be displaced throughout the study.

  18. Size-dependent reactions of ammonium bisulfate clusters with dimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Bzdek, Bryan R; Ridge, Douglas P; Johnston, Murray V

    2010-11-04

    The reaction kinetics of ammonium bisulfate clusters with dimethylamine (DMA) gas were investigated using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Clusters ranged in size from 1 to 10 bisulfate ions. Although displacement of the first several ammonium ions by DMA occurred with near unit efficiency, displacement of the final ammonium ion was cluster size dependent. For small clusters, all ammonium ions are exposed to incoming DMA molecules, allowing for facile exchange ("surface" exchange). However, with increasing cluster size, an ammonium ion can be trapped in an inaccessible region of the cluster ("core" exchange), thereby rendering exchange difficult. DMA was also observed to add onto existing dimethylaminium bisulfate clusters above a critical size, whereas ammonia did not add onto ammonium bisulfate clusters. The results suggest that as the cluster size increases, di-dimethylaminium sulfate formation becomes more favorable. The results of this study give further evidence to suggest that ambient sub-3 nm diameter particles are likely to contain aminium salts rather than ammonium salts.

  19. Cluster size dependence of high-order harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Hagmeijer, R.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Goh, S. J.; van der Slot, P. J. M.; Biedron, S. G.; Milton, S. V.; Boller, K.-J.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from noble gas clusters in a supersonic gas jet. To identify the contribution of harmonic generation from clusters versus that from gas monomers, we measure the high-order harmonic output over a broad range of the total atomic number density in the jet (from 3×1016 to 3 × 1018 {{cm}}-3) at two different reservoir temperatures (303 and 363 K). For the first time in the evaluation of the harmonic yield in such measurements, the variation of the liquid mass fraction, g, versus pressure and temperature is taken into consideration, which we determine, reliably and consistently, to be below 20% within our range of experimental parameters. By comparing the measured harmonic yield from a thin jet with the calculated corresponding yield from monomers alone, we find an increased emission of the harmonics when the average cluster size is less than 3000. Using g, under the assumption that the emission from monomers and clusters add up coherently, we calculate the ratio of the average single-atom response of an atom within a cluster to that of a monomer and find an enhancement of around 100 for very small average cluster size (∼200). We do not find any dependence of the cut-off frequency on the composition of the cluster jet. This implies that HHG in clusters is based on electrons that return to their parent ions and not to neighboring ions in the cluster. To fully employ the enhanced average single-atom response found for small average cluster sizes (∼200), the nozzle producing the cluster jet must provide a large liquid mass fraction at these small cluster sizes for increasing the harmonic yield. Moreover, cluster jets may allow for quasi-phase matching, as the higher mass of clusters allows for a higher density contrast in spatially structuring the nonlinear medium.

  20. Body size distribution of the dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, Eoin J; Hone, David W E

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of species body size is critically important for determining resource use within a group or clade. It is widely known that non-avian dinosaurs were the largest creatures to roam the Earth. There is, however, little understanding of how maximum species body size was distributed among the dinosaurs. Do they share a similar distribution to modern day vertebrate groups in spite of their large size, or did they exhibit fundamentally different distributions due to unique evolutionary pressures and adaptations? Here, we address this question by comparing the distribution of maximum species body size for dinosaurs to an extensive set of extant and extinct vertebrate groups. We also examine the body size distribution of dinosaurs by various sub-groups, time periods and formations. We find that dinosaurs exhibit a strong skew towards larger species, in direct contrast to modern day vertebrates. This pattern is not solely an artefact of bias in the fossil record, as demonstrated by contrasting distributions in two major extinct groups and supports the hypothesis that dinosaurs exhibited a fundamentally different life history strategy to other terrestrial vertebrates. A disparity in the size distribution of the herbivorous Ornithischia and Sauropodomorpha and the largely carnivorous Theropoda suggests that this pattern may have been a product of a divergence in evolutionary strategies: herbivorous dinosaurs rapidly evolved large size to escape predation by carnivores and maximise digestive efficiency; carnivores had sufficient resources among juvenile dinosaurs and non-dinosaurian prey to achieve optimal success at smaller body size.

  1. Body Size Distribution of the Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    O’Gorman, Eoin J.; Hone, David W. E.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of species body size is critically important for determining resource use within a group or clade. It is widely known that non-avian dinosaurs were the largest creatures to roam the Earth. There is, however, little understanding of how maximum species body size was distributed among the dinosaurs. Do they share a similar distribution to modern day vertebrate groups in spite of their large size, or did they exhibit fundamentally different distributions due to unique evolutionary pressures and adaptations? Here, we address this question by comparing the distribution of maximum species body size for dinosaurs to an extensive set of extant and extinct vertebrate groups. We also examine the body size distribution of dinosaurs by various sub-groups, time periods and formations. We find that dinosaurs exhibit a strong skew towards larger species, in direct contrast to modern day vertebrates. This pattern is not solely an artefact of bias in the fossil record, as demonstrated by contrasting distributions in two major extinct groups and supports the hypothesis that dinosaurs exhibited a fundamentally different life history strategy to other terrestrial vertebrates. A disparity in the size distribution of the herbivorous Ornithischia and Sauropodomorpha and the largely carnivorous Theropoda suggests that this pattern may have been a product of a divergence in evolutionary strategies: herbivorous dinosaurs rapidly evolved large size to escape predation by carnivores and maximise digestive efficiency; carnivores had sufficient resources among juvenile dinosaurs and non-dinosaurian prey to achieve optimal success at smaller body size. PMID:23284818

  2. Scaling in animal group-size distributions

    PubMed Central

    Bonabeau, Eric; Dagorn, Laurent; Fréon, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    An elementary model of animal aggregation is presented. The group-size distributions resulting from this model are truncated power laws. The predictions of the model are found to be consistent with data that describe the group-size distributions of tuna fish, sardinellas, and African buffaloes. PMID:10200286

  3. City size distributions and spatial economic change.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, E

    1982-10-01

    "The concept of the city size distribution is criticized for its lack of consideration of the effects of interurban interdependencies on the growth of cities. Theoretical justifications for the rank-size relationship have the same shortcomings, and an empirical study reveals that there is little correlation between deviations from rank-size distributions and national economic and social characteristics. Thus arguments suggesting a close correspondence between city size distributions and the level of development of a country, irrespective of intranational variations in city location and socioeconomic characteristics, seem to have little foundation." (summary in FRE, ITA, JPN, ) excerpt

  4. Particles size distribution in diluted magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerin, Constantine V.

    2017-06-01

    Changes in particles and aggregates size distribution in diluted kerosene based magnetic fluids is studied by dynamic light scattering method. It has been found that immediately after dilution in magnetic fluids the system of aggregates with sizes ranging from 100 to 250-1000 nm is formed. In 50-100 h after dilution large aggregates are peptized and in the sample stationary particles and aggregates size distribution is fixed.

  5. Distributed controller clustering in software defined networks.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Fong, Ang Tan; Gani, Abdullah; Garba, Usman; Khan, Suleman; Akhunzada, Adnan; Talebian, Hamid; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) is an emerging promising paradigm for network management because of its centralized network intelligence. However, the centralized control architecture of the software-defined networks (SDNs) brings novel challenges of reliability, scalability, fault tolerance and interoperability. In this paper, we proposed a novel clustered distributed controller architecture in the real setting of SDNs. The distributed cluster implementation comprises of multiple popular SDN controllers. The proposed mechanism is evaluated using a real world network topology running on top of an emulated SDN environment. The result shows that the proposed distributed controller clustering mechanism is able to significantly reduce the average latency from 8.1% to 1.6%, the packet loss from 5.22% to 4.15%, compared to distributed controller without clustering running on HP Virtual Application Network (VAN) SDN and Open Network Operating System (ONOS) controllers respectively. Moreover, proposed method also shows reasonable CPU utilization results. Furthermore, the proposed mechanism makes possible to handle unexpected load fluctuations while maintaining a continuous network operation, even when there is a controller failure. The paper is a potential contribution stepping towards addressing the issues of reliability, scalability, fault tolerance, and inter-operability.

  6. Distributed controller clustering in software defined networks

    PubMed Central

    Gani, Abdullah; Akhunzada, Adnan; Talebian, Hamid; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) is an emerging promising paradigm for network management because of its centralized network intelligence. However, the centralized control architecture of the software-defined networks (SDNs) brings novel challenges of reliability, scalability, fault tolerance and interoperability. In this paper, we proposed a novel clustered distributed controller architecture in the real setting of SDNs. The distributed cluster implementation comprises of multiple popular SDN controllers. The proposed mechanism is evaluated using a real world network topology running on top of an emulated SDN environment. The result shows that the proposed distributed controller clustering mechanism is able to significantly reduce the average latency from 8.1% to 1.6%, the packet loss from 5.22% to 4.15%, compared to distributed controller without clustering running on HP Virtual Application Network (VAN) SDN and Open Network Operating System (ONOS) controllers respectively. Moreover, proposed method also shows reasonable CPU utilization results. Furthermore, the proposed mechanism makes possible to handle unexpected load fluctuations while maintaining a continuous network operation, even when there is a controller failure. The paper is a potential contribution stepping towards addressing the issues of reliability, scalability, fault tolerance, and inter-operability. PMID:28384312

  7. Size distributions of solar energetic particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E.; Reames, D.; Kahler, S.; Cane, H.

    1991-01-01

    NASA particle detectors on the IMP-8 are employed to determine the size distributions of the peak fluxes of events related to solar-energetic particles including protons and electrons. The energetic proton events show a flatter size distribution which suggests that not all flares are proton flares. Both the electron and proton events are classified as either 'impulsive' or 'gradual', and the impulsive events tend to have a steeper power-law distribution.

  8. Experimental determination of size distributions: analyzing proper sample sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffo, A.; Alopaeus, V.

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of various particle size distributions is a crucial aspect for many applications in the process industry. Size distribution is often related to the final product quality, as in crystallization or polymerization. In other cases it is related to the correct evaluation of heat and mass transfer, as well as reaction rates, depending on the interfacial area between the different phases or to the assessment of yield stresses of polycrystalline metals/alloys samples. The experimental determination of such distributions often involves laborious sampling procedures and the statistical significance of the outcome is rarely investigated. In this work, we propose a novel rigorous tool, based on inferential statistics, to determine the number of samples needed to obtain reliable measurements of size distribution, according to specific requirements defined a priori. Such methodology can be adopted regardless of the measurement technique used.

  9. Pressure and size effects in endohedrally confined hydrogen clusters.

    PubMed

    Soullard, Jacques; Santamaria, Ruben; Jellinek, Julius

    2008-02-14

    Density functional theory is used to carry out a systematic study of zero-temperature structural and energy properties of endohedrally confined hydrogen clusters as a function of pressure and the cluster size. At low pressures, the most stable structural forms of (H(2))(n) possess rotational symmetry that changes from C(4) through C(5) to C(6) as the cluster grows in size from n=8 through n=12 to n=15. The equilibrium configurational energy of the clusters increases with an increase of the pressure. The rate of this increase, however, as gauged on the per atom basis is different for different clusters sizes. As a consequence, the size dependencies of the configurational energies per atom at different fixed values of pressure are nonmonotonic functions. At high pressures, the molecular (H(2))(n) clusters gradually become atomic or dominantly atomic. The pressure-induced changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap of the clusters indicate a finite-size analog of the pressure-driven metallization of the bulk hydrogen. The ionization potentials of the clusters decrease with the increase of pressure on them.

  10. Asteroid Size-Frequency Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    2001-01-01

    A total of six deep exposures (using AOT CAM01 with a 6 inch PFOV) through the ISOCAM LW10 filter (IRAS Band 1, i.e. 12 micron) were obtained on an approximately 15 arcminute square field centered on the ecliptic plane. Point sources were extracted using the technique described. Two known asteroids appear in these frames and 20 sources moving with velocities appropriate for main belt asteroids are present. Most of the asteroids detected have flux densities less than 1 mJy, i,e., between 150 and 350 times fainter than any of the asteroids observed by IRAS. These data provide the first direct measurement of the 12 pm sky-plane density for asteroids on the ecliptic equator. The median zodiacal foreground, as measured by ISOCAM during this survey, is found to be 22.1 +/- 1.5 mJy per pixel, i.e., 26.2 +/- 1.7 MJy/sr. The results presented here imply that the actual number of kilometer-sized asteroids is significantly greater than previously believed and in reasonable agreement with the Statistical Asteroid Model.

  11. Mechanism of implantation of size-selected clusters into graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benguerba, M.

    2012-08-01

    An analytical approach is proposed to investigate the mechanism of implantation of size selected clusters into graphite, in order to explain the origin of linear variation of measured penetration depth with momentum or energy of incident cluster. In agreement with experimental observations, the cluster experiences, during its penetration, a force which consists in a component proportional with cluster velocity and a constant component. Expressions of these forces were obtained in the frame work of this approach. Regardless of whether the cluster breaks down into single atoms on the surface or not, there is evidence for existence of a wave generated under impact of cluster on the surface. Under the assumption that the cluster does not break up at impact on the surface, the penetration depth depends on the cross-section between the cluster and the surface, the cluster velocity and the properties of graphite. When the cluster fragments upon the impact on the surface, the generated wave is followed by a collective motion ("collective cascade") of displaced atoms of target, including the constituents of cluster themselves, due to the transfer of cluster momentum. Thus, it is these displaced atoms which penetrate in the medium. During this collective penetration, some constituents of cluster can reach a certain depth which may be considered as the range of the deepest implanted constituents of cluster. It is shown that, the depth of penetration depends on the initial radius of cluster, its velocity and the properties of graphite. In addition, the depth varies non linearly with cluster velocity, for small clusters ( n ≤ 7), while for large clusters ( n ≥ 13), it varies (i) linearly with cluster velocity (or momentum) when the force proportional with speed of cluster is dominant. (ii) Linearly with the square of cluster velocity (or energy) if the constant force becomes dominant. It is shown that, a mechanism based on a collective motion of displaced atoms including

  12. Characterising superclusters with the galaxy cluster distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Gayoung; Böhringer, Hans; Collins, Chris A.; Krause, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Superclusters are the largest observed matter density structures in the Universe. Recently, we presented the first supercluster catalogue constructed with a well-defined selection function based on the X-ray flux-limited cluster survey, REFLEX II. To construct the sample we proposed a concept to find large objects with a minimum overdensity such that it can be expected that most of their mass will collapse in the future. The main goal is to provide support for our concept here by using simulation that we can, on the basis of our observational sample of X-ray clusters, construct a supercluster sample defined by a certain minimum overdensity. On this sample we also test how superclusters trace the underlying dark matter distribution. Our results confirm that an overdensity in the number of clusters is tightly correlated with an overdensity of the dark matter distribution. This enables us to define superclusters within which most of the mass will collapse in the future. We also obtain first-order mass estimates of superclusters on the basis of the properties of the member clusters. We also show that in this context the ratio of the cluster number density and dark matter mass density is consistent with the theoretically expected cluster bias. Our previous work provided evidence that superclusters are a special environment in which the density structures of the dark matter grow differently from those in the field, as characterised by the X-ray luminosity function. Here we confirm for the first time that this originates from a top-heavy mass function at high statistical significance that is provided by a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We also find in close agreement with observations that the superclusters only occupy a small volume of a few per cent, but contain more than half of the clusters in the present-day Universe.

  13. Effect Sizes in Three-Level Cluster-Randomized Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    2011-01-01

    Research designs involving cluster randomization are becoming increasingly important in educational and behavioral research. Many of these designs involve two levels of clustering or nesting (students within classes and classes within schools). Researchers would like to compute effect size indexes based on the standardized mean difference to…

  14. Effect Sizes in Three-Level Cluster-Randomized Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    2011-01-01

    Research designs involving cluster randomization are becoming increasingly important in educational and behavioral research. Many of these designs involve two levels of clustering or nesting (students within classes and classes within schools). Researchers would like to compute effect size indexes based on the standardized mean difference to…

  15. The range of core size of postcollapse clusters supported by primordial binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesperini, E.; Chernoff, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate how the core size of globular clusters in a postcollapse phase driven by primordial binaries depends upon the parameters of the distribution of the binary binding energy and the abundance of the binaries. We show that the variation of these quantites increases the plausible range for the core size.

  16. Preparation of regular arrays of bimetallic clusters with independent control of size and chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Marsault, M; Hamm, G; Wörz, A; Sitja, G; Barth, C; Henry, C R

    2008-01-01

    Regular arrays of bimetallic clusters have been prepared by atomic deposition, under UHV, on a nanostructured ultrathin alumina film. The alumina films are obtained by oxidation at 1000 K of a Ni3Al (111) surface. They present two regular hexagonal superstructures with lattice parameters of 2.4 and 4.1 nm. Pd clusters nucleate exclusively on the 4.1 nm superstructure forming regular arrays of clusters extending on the whole (1 cm2) substrate. Gold deposited on a previously formed Pd clusters array, condenses exclusively on the Pd clusters in forming a regular array of bimetallic AuPd clusters with a narrow size distribution. The size and the composition of the AuPd clusters can be controlled independently. Gold clusters nucleates also on the 4.1 nm superstructure but they can escape from the nucleation sites and coalesce with other gold clusters. By condensing Pd on the preformed Au clusters, PdAu clusters are formed together with pure Pd clusters nucleated on the free sites of the 4.1 nm superstructure of the alumina film.

  17. Understanding Animal Group-Size Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Griesser, Michael; Ma, Qi; Webber, Simone; Bowgen, Katharine; Sumpter, David J. T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most striking aspects of animal groups is their remarkable variation in size, both within and between species. While a number of mechanistic models have been proposed to explain this variation, there are few comprehensive datasets against which these models have been tested. In particular, we only vaguely understand how environmental factors and behavioral activities affect group-size distributions. Here we use observations of House sparrows (Passer domesticus) to investigate the factors determining group-size distribution. Over a wide range of conditions, we observed that animal group sizes followed a single parameter distribution known as the logarithmic distribution. This single parameter is the mean group size experienced by a randomly chosen individual (including the individual itself). For sparrows, the experienced mean group size, and hence the distribution, was affected by four factors: morning temperature, place, behavior and the degree of food spillage. Our results further indicate that the sparrows regulate the mean group size they experience, either by groups splitting more or merging less when local densities are high. We suggest that the mean experienced group size provides a simple but general tool for assessing the ecology and evolution of grouping. PMID:21912596

  18. Electronic Structures of Supported Nanometer-Size Clusters Using Field Emission Energy Analyzer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mong-Ea.

    The discrete energy states of a nanometer-size gold cluster have been measured using energy-resolved field emission microscopy. The clusters were prepared in a multiple expansion cluster source (MECS) which is capable of producing nanometer-size clusters with a narrow size distribution. An individual cluster was deposited on a tungsten field emission tip which was then transferred under vacuum into a UHV field emission chamber. A 127^circ differential energy analyzer with 80 meV resolution was used to measure the energy distribution of electrons emitted from the individual cluster. Several peaks are observed in the field emission energy distributions. A simple model will be presented to explain the structure observed and relate the observed peaks to discrete energy levels of the Au cluster. As a next example of such 'single cluster' experiments, we will discuss the evidence for electron emission from the first quantum charge state of a metal cluster. This charge state is located at an energy e^2 /2C above the highest filled electronic state of the neutral cluster and becomes populated at high rates of electron emission. We will also investigate the electrons emission rates of cluster and tungsten tips. The emission rates of cluster tips are not as stable as those of tungsten tip and do not obey Poisson distributions. The reduced chi^2 test shows two different geometrical structures of a small cluster and indicates quasimelting of this cluster. Another interesting topic to study is electron emission from the newly discovered C_{60 } molecule. C_{60} dust has been heated near a tungsten tip situated in an ultra high vacuum chamber. The rate of cluster deposition was found to greatly increase when the tip was biased positive with respect to the oven potential. These experiments have shown that with care, individual C_ {60} can be deposited on a field emitter and studied using field emission microscopy techniques. Size estimates of the field emission image indicate

  19. Size dependence of structural stability and magnetization of nickel clusters from real-space pseudopotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Masahiro; Souto-Casares, Jaime; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2016-07-01

    We examine the structural stability and magnetization for nickel clusters containing up to 500 atoms by performing first-principles calculations based on pseudopotential in real space computed within density-functional theory. After structural relaxation, Ni clusters in this size range favor either an fcc structure, which is a crystal structure in bulk, or an icosahedral structure, which is expected for small clusters. The calculated total magnetic moments per atom of energetically stable clusters agree well with experiment, wherein the moments decrease nonmonotonically toward the bulk value as the cluster size increases. We analyze the spatial distribution of the local magnetic moment, which explains why the magnetic moments of Ni clusters are enhanced compared to their bulk value.

  20. Self-organization of plants in a dryland ecosystem: Symmetry breaking and critical cluster size.

    PubMed

    Meyra, Ariel G; Zarragoicoechea, Guillermo J; Kuz, Victor A

    2015-05-01

    Periodical patterns of vegetation in an arid or semiarid ecosystem are described using statistical mechanics and Monte Carlo numerical simulation technique. Plants are characterized by the area that each individual occupies and a facilitation-competition pairwise interaction. Assuming that external resources (precipitation, solar radiation, nutrients, etc.) are available to the ecosystem, it is possible to obtain the persistent configurations of plants compatible with an equitable distribution of resources maximizing the Shannon entropy. Variation of vegetation patterns with density, critical cluster size, and facilitation distance are predicted. Morphological changes of clusters are shown to be a function of the external resources. As a final remark, it is proposed that an early warning of desertification could be detected from the coefficient of variation of the mean cluster size together with the distribution of cluster sizes.

  1. Self-organization of plants in a dryland ecosystem: Symmetry breaking and critical cluster size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyra, Ariel G.; Zarragoicoechea, Guillermo J.; Kuz, Victor A.

    2015-05-01

    Periodical patterns of vegetation in an arid or semiarid ecosystem are described using statistical mechanics and Monte Carlo numerical simulation technique. Plants are characterized by the area that each individual occupies and a facilitation-competition pairwise interaction. Assuming that external resources (precipitation, solar radiation, nutrients, etc.) are available to the ecosystem, it is possible to obtain the persistent configurations of plants compatible with an equitable distribution of resources maximizing the Shannon entropy. Variation of vegetation patterns with density, critical cluster size, and facilitation distance are predicted. Morphological changes of clusters are shown to be a function of the external resources. As a final remark, it is proposed that an early warning of desertification could be detected from the coefficient of variation of the mean cluster size together with the distribution of cluster sizes.

  2. The Size-Luminosity Relation of Disk Galaxies in EDisCS Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Simard, Luc; Rudnick, Gregory; Desai, Vandana

    2007-05-01

    We present the size-luminosity relation (SLR) for disk galaxies observed in eight clusters from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). These clusters, at redshifts 0.4 < z < 0.8, were observed with the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys. We describe the evolution of the size-luminosity relation with redshift. Previous studies have yielded conflicting opinions over whether or not there has been evolution in the SLR since z˜1, mostly hinging on the proper characterization of selection effects. Additionally, we compare the SLR for cluster and field galaxies to see if the cluster environment has an effect on the evolution of the average size and/or surface brightness. We also derive a theoretical SLR from a simple model of galaxy formation and empirical distribution functions for mass and angular momentum. Comparing this model to our observations provides constraints for galaxy evolution models, particularly models of star formation.

  3. The distribution of saturated clusters in wetted granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuoqi; Hanaor, Dorian; Gan, Yixiang

    2017-06-01

    The hydro-mechanical behaviour of partially saturated granular materials is greatly influenced by the spatial and temporal distribution of liquid within the media. The aim of this paper is to characterise the distribution of saturated clusters in granular materials using an optical imaging method under different water drainage conditions. A saturated cluster is formed when a liquid phase fully occupies the pore space between solid grains in a localized region. The samples considered here were prepared by vibrating mono-sized glass beads to form closely packed assemblies in a rectangular container. A range of drainage conditions were applied to the specimen by tilting the container and employing different flow rates, and the liquid pressure was recorded at different positions in the experimental cell. The formation of saturated clusters during the liquid withdrawal processes is governed by three competing mechanisms arising from viscous, capillary, and gravitational forces. When the flow rate is sufficiently large and the gravity component is sufficiently small, the viscous force tends to destabilize the liquid front leading to the formation of narrow fingers of saturated material. As the water channels along these liquid fingers break, saturated clusters are formed inside the specimen. Subsequently, a spatial and temporal distribution of saturated clusters can be observed. We investigated the resulting saturated cluster distribution as a function of flow rate and gravity to achieve a fundamental understanding of the formation and evolution of such clusters in partially saturated granular materials. This study serves as a bridge between pore-scale behavior and the overall hydro-mechanical characteristics in partially saturated soils.

  4. THE SIZE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN RED AND BLUE GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IS NOT DUE TO PROJECTION EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Harris, William E.; Sills, Alison

    2012-11-10

    Metal-rich (red) globular clusters in massive galaxies are, on average, smaller than metal-poor (blue) globular clusters. One of the possible explanations for this phenomenon is that the two populations of clusters have different spatial distributions. We test this idea by comparing clusters observed in unusually deep, high signal-to-noise images of M87 with a simulated globular cluster population in which the red and blue clusters have different spatial distributions, matching the observations. We compare the overall distribution of cluster effective radii as well as the relationship between effective radius and galactocentric distance for both the observed and simulated red and blue sub-populations. We find that the different spatial distributions does not produce a significant size difference between the red and blue sub-populations as a whole or at a given galactocentric distance. These results suggest that the size difference between red and blue globular clusters is likely due to differences during formation or later evolution.

  5. Analytic modeling of aerosol size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepack, A.; Box, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical functions commonly used for representing aerosol size distributions are studied parametrically. Methods for obtaining best fit estimates of the parameters are described. A catalog of graphical plots depicting the parametric behavior of the functions is presented along with procedures for obtaining analytical representations of size distribution data by visual matching of the data with one of the plots. Examples of fitting the same data with equal accuracy by more than one analytic model are also given.

  6. Dipole polarizabilities of medium-sized gold clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinlan; Yang, Mingli; Jellinek, Julius; Wang, Guanghou

    2006-08-01

    The dipole polarizabilities of two families of low-lying structures, cage, and space filling, of the medium-sized AuN (N=32,38,44,50,56) clusters are studied using gradient-corrected density functional theory and finite field method. Both dipole moments and polarizabilities exhibit clear shape-dependent features and the cage structures have systematically smaller dipole moments and larger polarizabilities than the space-filling isomers. The mean polarizability per atom increases with cluster size for the cage structures, but it decreases slowly and tends to approach a constant for the space-filling structures. A linearly correlation between polarizability and cluster volume is noted, complying with the jellium model prediction for spherical metal clusters. The electronic effects including HOMO-LUMO gap and ionization energy on polarizabilities are also explored. The geometric effects play a dominant role on the determination of the polarizability of the cluster over the electronic effects.

  7. Methods for sample size determination in cluster randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Rutterford, Clare; Copas, Andrew; Eldridge, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of cluster randomized trials (CRTs) is increasing, along with the variety in their design and analysis. The simplest approach for their sample size calculation is to calculate the sample size assuming individual randomization and inflate this by a design effect to account for randomization by cluster. The assumptions of a simple design effect may not always be met; alternative or more complicated approaches are required. Methods: We summarise a wide range of sample size methods available for cluster randomized trials. For those familiar with sample size calculations for individually randomized trials but with less experience in the clustered case, this manuscript provides formulae for a wide range of scenarios with associated explanation and recommendations. For those with more experience, comprehensive summaries are provided that allow quick identification of methods for a given design, outcome and analysis method. Results: We present first those methods applicable to the simplest two-arm, parallel group, completely randomized design followed by methods that incorporate deviations from this design such as: variability in cluster sizes; attrition; non-compliance; or the inclusion of baseline covariates or repeated measures. The paper concludes with methods for alternative designs. Conclusions: There is a large amount of methodology available for sample size calculations in CRTs. This paper gives the most comprehensive description of published methodology for sample size calculation and provides an important resource for those designing these trials. PMID:26174515

  8. Catalysis applications of size-selected cluster deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vajda, Stefan; White, Michael G.

    2015-10-23

    In this Perspective, we review recent studies of size-selected cluster deposition for catalysis applications performed at the U.S. DOE National Laboratories, with emphasis on work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The focus is on the preparation of model supported catalysts in which the number of atoms in the deposited clusters is precisely controlled using a combination of gas-phase cluster ion sources, mass spectrometry, and soft-landing techniques. This approach is particularly effective for investigations of small nanoclusters, 0.5-2 nm (<200 atoms), where the rapid evolution of the atomic and electronic structure makes it essential to have precise control over cluster size. Cluster deposition allows for independent control of cluster size, coverage, and stoichiometry (e.g., the metal-to-oxygen ratio in an oxide cluster) and can be used to deposit on any substrate without constraints of nucleation and growth. Examples are presented for metal, metal oxide, and metal sulfide cluster deposition on a variety of supports (metals, oxides, carbon/diamond) where the reactivity, cluster-support electronic interactions, and cluster stability and morphology are investigated. Both UHV and in situ/operando studies are presented that also make use of surface-sensitive X-ray characterization tools from synchrotron radiation facilities. Novel applications of cluster deposition to electrochemistry and batteries are also presented. This review also highlights the application of modern ab initio electronic structure calculations (density functional theory), which can essentially model the exact experimental system used in the laboratory (i.e., cluster and support) to provide insight on atomic and electronic structure, reaction energetics, and mechanisms. As amply demonstrated in this review, the powerful combination of atomically precise cluster deposition and theory is able to address fundamental aspects of size-effects, cluster

  9. Catalysis applications of size-selected cluster deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Vajda, Stefan; White, Michael G.

    2015-10-23

    In this Perspective, we review recent studies of size-selected cluster deposition for catalysis applications performed at the U.S. DOE National Laboratories, with emphasis on work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The focus is on the preparation of model supported catalysts in which the number of atoms in the deposited clusters is precisely controlled using a combination of gas-phase cluster ion sources, mass spectrometry, and soft-landing techniques. This approach is particularly effective for investigations of small nanoclusters, 0.5-2 nm (<200 atoms), where the rapid evolution of the atomic and electronic structure makes it essential to havemore » precise control over cluster size. Cluster deposition allows for independent control of cluster size, coverage, and stoichiometry (e.g., the metal-to-oxygen ratio in an oxide cluster) and can be used to deposit on any substrate without constraints of nucleation and growth. Examples are presented for metal, metal oxide, and metal sulfide cluster deposition on a variety of supports (metals, oxides, carbon/diamond) where the reactivity, cluster-support electronic interactions, and cluster stability and morphology are investigated. Both UHV and in situ/operando studies are presented that also make use of surface-sensitive X-ray characterization tools from synchrotron radiation facilities. Novel applications of cluster deposition to electrochemistry and batteries are also presented. This review also highlights the application of modern ab initio electronic structure calculations (density functional theory), which can essentially model the exact experimental system used in the laboratory (i.e., cluster and support) to provide insight on atomic and electronic structure, reaction energetics, and mechanisms. As amply demonstrated in this review, the powerful combination of atomically precise cluster deposition and theory is able to address fundamental aspects of size

  10. Catalysis applications of size-selected cluster deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Vajda, Stefan; White, Michael G.

    2015-12-01

    In this Perspective, we review recent studies of size-selected cluster deposition for catalysis applications performed at the U.S. DOE National Laboratories, with emphasis on work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The focus is on the preparation of model supported catalysts in which the number of atoms in the deposited clusters is precisely controlled using a combination of gas-phase cluster ion sources, mass spectrometry, and soft-landing techniques. This approach is particularly effective for investigations of small nanoclusters, 0.5-2 nm (<200 atoms), where the rapid evolution of the atomic and electronic structure makes it essential to have precise control over cluster size. Cluster deposition allows for independent control of cluster size, coverage, and stoichiometry (e.g., the metal-to-oxygen ratio in an oxide cluster) and can be used to deposit on any substrate without constraints of nucleation and growth. Examples are presented for metal, metal oxide, and metal sulfide cluster deposition on a variety of supports (metals, oxides, carbon/diamond) where the reactivity, cluster-support electronic interactions, and cluster stability and morphology are investigated. Both UHV and in situ/operando studies are presented that also make use of surface-sensitive X-ray characterization tools from synchrotron radiation facilities. Novel applications of cluster deposition to electrochemistry and batteries are also presented. This review also highlights the application of modern ab initio electronic structure calculations (density functional theory), which can essentially model the exact experimental system used in the laboratory (i.e., cluster and support) to provide insight on atomic and electronic structure, reaction energetics, and mechanisms. As amply demonstrated in this review, the powerful combination of atomically precise cluster deposition and theory is able to address fundamental aspects of size-effects, cluster

  11. Size-Resolved Photoelectron Anisotropy of Gas Phase Water Clusters and Predictions for Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartweg, Sebastian; Yoder, Bruce L.; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent; Signorell, Ruth

    2017-03-01

    We report the first measurements of size-resolved photoelectron angular distributions for the valence orbitals of neutral water clusters with up to 20 molecules. A systematic decrease of the photoelectron anisotropy is found for clusters with up to 5-6 molecules, and most remarkably, convergence of the anisotropy for larger clusters. We suggest the latter to be the result of a local short-range scattering potential that is fully described by a unit of 5-6 molecules. The cluster data and a detailed electron scattering model are used to predict the anisotropy of slow photoelectrons in liquid water. Reasonable agreement with experimental liquid jet data is found.

  12. Sample size calculations for cluster randomised controlled trials with a fixed number of clusters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cluster randomised controlled trials (CRCTs) are frequently used in health service evaluation. Assuming an average cluster size, required sample sizes are readily computed for both binary and continuous outcomes, by estimating a design effect or inflation factor. However, where the number of clusters are fixed in advance, but where it is possible to increase the number of individuals within each cluster, as is frequently the case in health service evaluation, sample size formulae have been less well studied. Methods We systematically outline sample size formulae (including required number of randomisation units, detectable difference and power) for CRCTs with a fixed number of clusters, to provide a concise summary for both binary and continuous outcomes. Extensions to the case of unequal cluster sizes are provided. Results For trials with a fixed number of equal sized clusters (k), the trial will be feasible provided the number of clusters is greater than the product of the number of individuals required under individual randomisation (nI) and the estimated intra-cluster correlation (ρ). So, a simple rule is that the number of clusters (k) will be sufficient provided: Where this is not the case, investigators can determine the maximum available power to detect the pre-specified difference, or the minimum detectable difference under the pre-specified value for power. Conclusions Designing a CRCT with a fixed number of clusters might mean that the study will not be feasible, leading to the notion of a minimum detectable difference (or a maximum achievable power), irrespective of how many individuals are included within each cluster. PMID:21718530

  13. Exponential Size Distribution of von Willebrand Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lippok, Svenja; Obser, Tobias; Müller, Jochen P.; Stierle, Valentin K.; Benoit, Martin; Budde, Ulrich; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2013-01-01

    Von Willebrand Factor (VWF) is a multimeric protein crucial for hemostasis. Under shear flow, it acts as a mechanosensor responding with a size-dependent globule-stretch transition to increasing shear rates. Here, we quantify for the first time, to our knowledge, the size distribution of recombinant VWF and VWF-eGFP using a multilateral approach that involves quantitative gel analysis, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We find an exponentially decaying size distribution of multimers for recombinant VWF as well as for VWF derived from blood samples in accordance with the notion of a step-growth polymerization process during VWF biosynthesis. The distribution is solely described by the extent of polymerization, which was found to be reduced in the case of the pathologically relevant mutant VWF-IIC. The VWF-specific protease ADAMTS13 systematically shifts the VWF size distribution toward smaller sizes. This dynamic evolution is monitored using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and compared to a computer simulation of a random cleavage process relating ADAMTS13 concentration to the degree of VWF breakdown. Quantitative assessment of VWF size distribution in terms of an exponential might prove to be useful both as a valuable biophysical characterization and as a possible disease indicator for clinical applications. PMID:24010664

  14. Size-selecting effect of water on fluorescent silicon clusters.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, G; Akraiam, A; von Haeften, K

    2011-08-05

    Silicon clusters were produced by gas aggregation in vacuum and co-deposited with water vapour onto a cold target where the water vapour froze. Melting of the ice yielded fluorescent silicon nanoparticles suspended in water which were investigated by photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The PL spectrum showed a prominent band at 420 nm and other, less intense bands at shorter wavelengths. No fluorescence was observed below 275 nm. The shortest wavelength observed was related to a silicon cluster diameter of 0.9 nm using a simple particle-in-a-box model. Drops of the suspension were also deposited on freshly cleaved HOPG and investigated by AFM. The images showed single and agglomerated clusters with heights of typically 0.6 up to 2 nm. The sizes displayed by our measurements are not correlated to the average sizes that result from gas aggregation, indicating a size-selecting effect of the water suspension. The cluster-cluster interaction in water is governed by repulsion due to thermal energy and attraction due to van der Waals forces. For very small clusters repulsion dominates; at 3 nm diameter the two forces are balanced. We identify this stable phase of small clusters as the origin of exceptionally stable fluorescence.

  15. Delineation of river bed-surface patches by clustering high-resolution spatial grain size data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peter A.; Bellugi, Dino; Dietrich, William E.

    2014-01-01

    The beds of gravel-bed rivers commonly display distinct sorting patterns, which at length scales of ~ 0.1 - 1 channel widths appear to form an organization of patches or facies. This paper explores alternatives to traditional visual facies mapping by investigating methods of patch delineation in which clustering analysis is applied to a high-resolution grid of spatial grain-size distributions (GSDs) collected during a flume experiment. Specifically, we examine four clustering techniques: 1) partitional clustering of grain-size distributions with the k-means algorithm (assigning each GSD to a type of patch based solely on its distribution characteristics), 2) spatially-constrained agglomerative clustering ("growing" patches by merging adjacent GSDs, thus generating a hierarchical structure of patchiness), 3) spectral clustering using Normalized Cuts (using the spatial distance between GSDs and the distribution characteristics to generate a matrix describing the similarity between all GSDs, and using the eigenvalues of this matrix to divide the bed into patches), and 4) fuzzy clustering with the fuzzy c-means algorithm (assigning each GSD a membership probability to every patch type). For each clustering method, we calculate metrics describing how well-separated cluster-average GSDs are and how patches are arranged in space. We use these metrics to compute optimal clustering parameters, to compare the clustering methods against each other, and to compare clustering results with patches mapped visually during the flume experiment.All clustering methods produced better-separated patch GSDs than the visually-delineated patches. Although they do not produce crisp cluster assignment, fuzzy algorithms provide useful information that can characterize the uncertainty of a location on the bed belonging to any particular type of patch, and they can be used to characterize zones of transition from one patch to another. The extent to which spatial information influences

  16. Spatial event cluster detection using an approximate normal distribution.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Mahmoud; Rosychuk, Rhonda J

    2008-12-12

    In geographic surveillance of disease, areas with large numbers of disease cases are to be identified so that investigations of the causes of high disease rates can be pursued. Areas with high rates are called disease clusters and statistical cluster detection tests are used to identify geographic areas with higher disease rates than expected by chance alone. Typically cluster detection tests are applied to incident or prevalent cases of disease, but surveillance of disease-related events, where an individual may have multiple events, may also be of interest. Previously, a compound Poisson approach that detects clusters of events by testing individual areas that may be combined with their neighbours has been proposed. However, the relevant probabilities from the compound Poisson distribution are obtained from a recursion relation that can be cumbersome if the number of events are large or analyses by strata are performed. We propose a simpler approach that uses an approximate normal distribution. This method is very easy to implement and is applicable to situations where the population sizes are large and the population distribution by important strata may differ by area. We demonstrate the approach on pediatric self-inflicted injury presentations to emergency departments and compare the results for probabilities based on the recursion and the normal approach. We also implement a Monte Carlo simulation to study the performance of the proposed approach. In a self-inflicted injury data example, the normal approach identifies twelve out of thirteen of the same clusters as the compound Poisson approach, noting that the compound Poisson method detects twelve significant clusters in total. Through simulation studies, the normal approach well approximates the compound Poisson approach for a variety of different population sizes and case and event thresholds. A drawback of the compound Poisson approach is that the relevant probabilities must be determined through a

  17. Clusters of circulating tumor cells traverse capillary-sized vessels.

    PubMed

    Au, Sam H; Storey, Brian D; Moore, John C; Tang, Qin; Chen, Yeng-Long; Javaid, Sarah; Sarioglu, A Fatih; Sullivan, Ryan; Madden, Marissa W; O'Keefe, Ryan; Haber, Daniel A; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Langenau, David M; Stott, Shannon L; Toner, Mehmet

    2016-05-03

    Multicellular aggregates of circulating tumor cells (CTC clusters) are potent initiators of distant organ metastasis. However, it is currently assumed that CTC clusters are too large to pass through narrow vessels to reach these organs. Here, we present evidence that challenges this assumption through the use of microfluidic devices designed to mimic human capillary constrictions and CTC clusters obtained from patient and cancer cell origins. Over 90% of clusters containing up to 20 cells successfully traversed 5- to 10-μm constrictions even in whole blood. Clusters rapidly and reversibly reorganized into single-file chain-like geometries that substantially reduced their hydrodynamic resistances. Xenotransplantation of human CTC clusters into zebrafish showed similar reorganization and transit through capillary-sized vessels in vivo. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that clusters could be disrupted during transit using drugs that affected cellular interaction energies. These findings suggest that CTC clusters may contribute a greater role to tumor dissemination than previously believed and may point to strategies for combating CTC cluster-initiated metastasis.

  18. Clusters of circulating tumor cells traverse capillary-sized vessels

    PubMed Central

    Au, Sam H.; Storey, Brian D.; Moore, John C.; Tang, Qin; Chen, Yeng-Long; Javaid, Sarah; Sarioglu, A. Fatih; Sullivan, Ryan; Madden, Marissa W.; O’Keefe, Ryan; Haber, Daniel A.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Langenau, David M.; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular aggregates of circulating tumor cells (CTC clusters) are potent initiators of distant organ metastasis. However, it is currently assumed that CTC clusters are too large to pass through narrow vessels to reach these organs. Here, we present evidence that challenges this assumption through the use of microfluidic devices designed to mimic human capillary constrictions and CTC clusters obtained from patient and cancer cell origins. Over 90% of clusters containing up to 20 cells successfully traversed 5- to 10-μm constrictions even in whole blood. Clusters rapidly and reversibly reorganized into single-file chain-like geometries that substantially reduced their hydrodynamic resistances. Xenotransplantation of human CTC clusters into zebrafish showed similar reorganization and transit through capillary-sized vessels in vivo. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that clusters could be disrupted during transit using drugs that affected cellular interaction energies. These findings suggest that CTC clusters may contribute a greater role to tumor dissemination than previously believed and may point to strategies for combating CTC cluster-initiated metastasis. PMID:27091969

  19. Small-Scale Drop-Size Variability: Empirical Models for Drop-Size-Dependent Clustering in Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Larsen, Michael L.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2005-01-01

    By analyzing aircraft measurements of individual drop sizes in clouds, it has been shown in a companion paper that the probability of finding a drop of radius r at a linear scale l decreases as l(sup D(r)), where 0 less than or equals D(r) less than or equals 1. This paper shows striking examples of the spatial distribution of large cloud drops using models that simulate the observed power laws. In contrast to currently used models that assume homogeneity and a Poisson distribution of cloud drops, these models illustrate strong drop clustering, especially with larger drops. The degree of clustering is determined by the observed exponents D(r). The strong clustering of large drops arises naturally from the observed power-law statistics. This clustering has vital consequences for rain physics, including how fast rain can form. For radiative transfer theory, clustering of large drops enhances their impact on the cloud optical path. The clustering phenomenon also helps explain why remotely sensed cloud drop size is generally larger than that measured in situ.

  20. Small-Scale Drop-Size Variability: Empirical Models for Drop-Size-Dependent Clustering in Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Larsen, Michael L.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2005-01-01

    By analyzing aircraft measurements of individual drop sizes in clouds, it has been shown in a companion paper that the probability of finding a drop of radius r at a linear scale l decreases as l(sup D(r)), where 0 less than or equals D(r) less than or equals 1. This paper shows striking examples of the spatial distribution of large cloud drops using models that simulate the observed power laws. In contrast to currently used models that assume homogeneity and a Poisson distribution of cloud drops, these models illustrate strong drop clustering, especially with larger drops. The degree of clustering is determined by the observed exponents D(r). The strong clustering of large drops arises naturally from the observed power-law statistics. This clustering has vital consequences for rain physics, including how fast rain can form. For radiative transfer theory, clustering of large drops enhances their impact on the cloud optical path. The clustering phenomenon also helps explain why remotely sensed cloud drop size is generally larger than that measured in situ.

  1. Pinning control of clustered complex networks with different size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chenbo; Wang, Jinbao; Xiang, Yun; Wu, Zhefu; Yu, Li; Xuan, Qi

    2017-08-01

    In pinning control of complex networks, it is found that, with the same pinning effort, the network can be better controlled by pinning the large-degree nodes. But in the clustered complex networks, this preferential pinning (PP) strategy is losing its effectiveness. In this paper, we demonstrate that in the clustered complex networks, especially when the clusters have different size, the random pinning (RP) strategy performs much better than the PP strategy. Then, we propose a new pinning strategy based on cluster degree. It is revealed that the new cluster pinning strategy behaves better than RP strategy when there are only a smaller number of pinning nodes. The mechanism is studied by using eigenvalue and eigenvector analysis, and the simulations of coupled chaotic oscillators are given to verify the theoretical results. These findings could be beneficial for the design of control schemes in some practical systems.

  2. Binary nucleation kinetics. I. Self-consistent size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Wilemski, G.; Wyslouzil, B.E. ||

    1995-07-15

    Using the principle of detailed balance, we derive a new self-consistency requirement, termed the kinetic product rule, relating the evaporation coefficients and equilibrium cluster distribution for a binary system. We use this result to demonstrate and resolve an inconsistency for an idealized Kelvin model of nucleation in a simple binary mixture. We next examine several common forms for the equilibrium distribution of binary clusters based on the capillarity approximation and ideal vapor behavior. We point out fundamental deficiencies for each expression. We also show that each distribution yields evaporation coefficients that formally satisfy the new kinetic product rule but are physically unsatisfactory because they depend on the monomer vapor concentrations. We then propose a new form of the binary distribution function that is free of the deficiencies of the previous functions except for its reliance on the capillarity approximation. This new self-consistent classical (SCC) size distribution for binary clusters has the following properties: It satisfies the law of mass action; it reduces to an SCC unary distribution for clusters of a single component; and it produces physically acceptable evaporation rate coefficients that also satisfy the new kinetic product rule. Since it is possible to construct other examples of similarly well-behaved distributions, our result is not unique in this respect, but it does give reasonable predictions. As an illustration, we calculate binary nucleation rates and vapor activities for the ethanol--hexanol system at 260 K using the new SCC distribution and compare them to experimental results. The theoretical rates are uniformly higher than the experimental values over the entire vapor composition range. Although the predicted activities are lower, we find good agreement between the measured and theoretical slope of the critical vapor activity curve at a constant nucleation rate of 10{sup 7} cm{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}2}.

  3. Size dependent pore size distribution of shales by gas physisorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, Hamid; Andersen, Martin S.; Yu, Lu; Masoumi, Hossein; Arandian, Hamid

    2017-04-01

    Gas physisorption, in particular nitrogen adsorption-desorption, is a traditional technique for characterization of geomaterials including the organic rich shales. The low pressure nitrogen is used together with adsorption-desorption physical models to study the pore size distribution (PSD) and porosity of the porous samples. The samples are usually crushed to a certain fragment size to measure these properties however there is not yet a consistent standard size proposed for sample crushing. Crushing significantly increases the surface area of the fragments e.g. the created surface area is differentiated from that of pores using BET technique. In this study, we show that the smaller fragment sizes lead to higher cumulative pore volume and smaller pore diameters. It is also shown that some of the micro-pores are left unaccounted because of the correction of the external surface area. In order to illustrate this, the nitrogen physisorption is first conducted on the identical organic rich shale samples with different sizes: 20-25, 45-50 and 63-71 µm. We then show that such effects are not only a function of pore structure changes induced by crushing, but is linked to the inability of the physical models in differentiating between the external surface area (BET) and micro-pores for different crushing sizes at relatively low nitrogen pressure. We also discuss models currently used in nano-technology such as t-method to address this issue and their advantages and shortcoming for shale rock characterization.

  4. The Italian primary school-size distribution and the city-size: a complex nexus

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Alessandro; Di Clemente, Riccardo; Buldyrev, Sergey V.

    2014-01-01

    We characterize the statistical law according to which Italian primary school-size distributes. We find that the school-size can be approximated by a log-normal distribution, with a fat lower tail that collects a large number of very small schools. The upper tail of the school-size distribution decreases exponentially and the growth rates are distributed with a Laplace PDF. These distributions are similar to those observed for firms and are consistent with a Bose-Einstein preferential attachment process. The body of the distribution features a bimodal shape suggesting some source of heterogeneity in the school organization that we uncover by an in-depth analysis of the relation between schools-size and city-size. We propose a novel cluster methodology and a new spatial interaction approach among schools which outline the variety of policies implemented in Italy. Different regional policies are also discussed shedding lights on the relation between policy and geographical features. PMID:24954714

  5. Activity size distribution of some natural radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Mohery, M; Abdallah, A M; Al-Amoudi, Z M; Baz, S S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the results concerning the activity size distribution of the long-lived ((210)Pb) radon decay product aerosols and the thoron decay product aerosols ((212)Pb) and ((7)Be) of the outdoor atmosphere are presented. Also, the mass size distribution of the aerosol particles is determined. The low-pressure Berner cascade impactor Model 20/0.015 was used as a sampling device. The activity size distribution of these radionuclides was determined by one log-normal distribution (accumulation mode) whereas the mass size distribution was by two log-normal distributions (accumulation and coarse mode). The activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of (212)Pb was found to be 305 nm with a geometric standard deviation (σg) of 2.41. The specific air activity concentration of (212)Pb was found to be 0.14 ± 0.012 Bq m(-3). An AMAD of (210)Pb of 610 nm with σg of 1.8 was determined, whereas that of 550 nm with σg of 1.97 was determined for (7)Be. The specific air activity concentration of (210)Pb and (7)Be was found to be 0.0016±2.5×10(-4) and 0.00348 ± 4×10(-4) Bq m(-3), respectively. Using a dosimetric model, the total deposition fraction as well as the total equivalent dose has been evaluated considering the observed parameters of the activity size distribution of (212)Pb. At a total deposition fraction of ∼21 %, the total equivalent dose was found to be 0.41 µSv.

  6. Martian crater size distributions and terrain age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, N. G.; Strom, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The crater size/frequency distributions of large ( 8 km) craters on the Moon and terrestrial planets display two very different curves representing two crater populations. The heavily cratered regions of the Moon, Mercury, and Mars show the same highly structured curve which cannot be represented by a single slope distribution function. In contrast, the lunar post mare crater population has a size/frequency distribution which differs significantly from that in the highlands over the same diameter range, and can be represented by a single-slope distribution function of -2.8 differential. On areas of martian lightly cratered northern plains, the crater population is essentially identical to that of the post mare population. This indicates that the same two families of impacting objects were responsible for the cratering records on both Moon and Mars. The thickness of mantling material varies among the various plains units, and can be calculated from the depth/diameter scaling relations for martian craters.

  7. Aerosol and air pollution size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shani, Gad; Haccoun, A.; Kushelevsky, A.

    The size distribution of aerosols was measured in a moderately industrial city, in a semi-arid zone on the Negev desert border. The aerosols in the city of Beer Sheva are from two sources: the dust coming from the desert and urban pollution. The size measurements were done with a cascade impactor. The elemental content of the aerosols was investigated by neutron activation analysis and X-ray fluorescence. The main elements of the dust are: Ca, Si, Fe, Na and the trace elements are: Sc, Se, La, Sm, Hf and others. The main elements of the urban pollution are S, Br, Pb, Cl, Hg and others. It was found that the elements belonging to each group can easily be classified by the size distribution. The analytical consideration of the aerosol size distribution of each group are discussed and two corresponding analytical expressions are suggested. It is shown that aerosols originating in the dust have a hump shape distribution around ~ 4μm, and those originating in urban pollution have a distribution decreasing with increasing aerosol diameter. Many examples are given to prove the conclusions.

  8. Comparison of drop size distributions from two droplet sizing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, John R.; Ide, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison between the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and the combined measurements from Particle Measuring Systems' Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe and the Optical Array Probe was conducted in an icing wind tunnel using NASA Icing Research Tunnel spray nozzles to produce the supercooled water droplet cloud. Clouds having a range of volume median diameters from 10 to greater than 50 microns were used for the instrument comparisons. A volume median diameter was calculated from combining the droplet distributions of the Optical Array Probe and the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe. A comparison of the combined volume median diameters and the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer volume median diameters showed agreement from 10 microns up to 30 microns. Typical drop size distributions from the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer, the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe, and Optical Array Probe are presented for several median volume diameters. A comparison of the distributions illustrates regions of the distributions where there is good agreement and other regions where there are discrepancies between the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and the Particle Measuring Systems' droplet size instruments.

  9. Size distributions in two porous chondritic micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1993-06-01

    Quantitative size measurements of granular units (GUs), and nm-sized minerals in these units, in two porous chondritic micrometeorites are investigated. The matrix of these micrometeorites consist of loosely packed, 0.1 micron-sized, GUs. These objects were a major component of the solar nebula dust that accreted into protoplanets. The matrix in micrometeorite W7010*A2 has a fractal dimension with a small coefficient that supports efficient sticking of carbon-rich GUs during accretion. The fractal nature of the matrix provides a way to calculate the density using the aggregate size. The resulting very low density for porous chondritic micrometeorites is 0.08-0.14 g/cu cm, which supports the view that they are the solid debris from unconsolidated solar system bodies. Chondritic GUs contain ultrafine olivines, pyroxenes, and sulfides, embedded in hydrocarbons and amorphous carbons. Nanocrystals in the micrometeorites W7010*A2 and U2015*B show log normal size distributions. The high incidence of disk-shaped grains, a changeover from disk-shaped to euhedral grains, the unevolved nature of the size distributions, and multiple populations for grains less than 127 nm in size, are consistent with continuous postaccretion nucleation and growth in amorphous GUs, including coarsening via Ostwald ripening.

  10. Hierarchical gold-decorated magnetic nanoparticle clusters with controlled size.

    PubMed

    Meledandri, Carla J; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Brougham, Dermot F

    2011-03-22

    We present a new route to stable magnetic-plasmonic nanocomposite materials with exceptional control over composite size and very high monodispersity. The method involves the assembly of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, of any size in the superparamagnetic size range, whose steric repulsion is gradually reduced by competitive stabilizer desorption arising from the presence of a tertiary silica phase. Subsequent addition of gold nanoparticles results in hierarchical assemblies in the form of gold-decorated magnetic nanoparticle clusters, in a range of possible sizes from 20 to 150 nm, selected by the timing of the addition. This approach adds plasmonic and chemical functionality to the magnetic clusters and improves the physical robustness and processability of the suspensions. Most critically, detailed NMR relaxation analysis demonstrates that the effect of the gold NPs on the interaction between bulk solvent and the magnetic moments of the cluster is minimal and that the clusters remain superparamagnetic in nature. These advantages enhance the potential of the materials as size-selected contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The possibility of generalizing the approach for the production of hierarchical assemblies of variable composition is also demonstrated.

  11. Global Patterns of City Size Distributions and Their Fundamental Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Ethan H.; Kerkhoff, Andrew J.; Moses, Melanie E.

    2007-01-01

    Urban areas and their voracious appetites are increasingly dominating the flows of energy and materials around the globe. Understanding the size distribution and dynamics of urban areas is vital if we are to manage their growth and mitigate their negative impacts on global ecosystems. For over 50 years, city size distributions have been assumed to universally follow a power function, and many theories have been put forth to explain what has become known as Zipf's law (the instance where the exponent of the power function equals unity). Most previous studies, however, only include the largest cities that comprise the tail of the distribution. Here we show that national, regional and continental city size distributions, whether based on census data or inferred from cluster areas of remotely-sensed nighttime lights, are in fact lognormally distributed through the majority of cities and only approach power functions for the largest cities in the distribution tails. To explore generating processes, we use a simple model incorporating only two basic human dynamics, migration and reproduction, that nonetheless generates distributions very similar to those found empirically. Our results suggest that macroscopic patterns of human settlements may be far more constrained by fundamental ecological principles than more fine-scale socioeconomic factors. PMID:17895975

  12. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR AN OFFICE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses an evaluation of the effect of percent outdoor air supplied and occupation level on the particle size distributions and mass concentrations for a typical office building. (NOTE: As attention has become focused on indoor air pollution control, it has become i...

  13. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR AN OFFICE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses an evaluation of the effect of percent outdoor air supplied and occupation level on the particle size distributions and mass concentrations for a typical office building. (NOTE: As attention has become focused on indoor air pollution control, it has become i...

  14. Monte Carlo predictions of DNA fragment-size distributions for large sizes after HZE particle irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Sachs, R. K.; Brenner, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    DSBs (double-strand breaks) produced by densely ionizing space radiation are not located randomly in the genome: recent data indicate DSB clustering along chromosomes. DSB clustering at large scales, from >100 Mbp down to approximately 2 kbp, is modeled using a Monte-Carlo algorithm. A random-walk model of chromatin is combined with a track model, that predicts the radial distribution of energy from an ion, and the RLC (randomly-located-clusters) formalism, in software called DNAbreak. This model generalizes the random-breakage model, whose broken-stick fragment-size distribution is applicable to low-LET radiation. DSB induction due to track interaction with the DNA volume depends on the radiation quality parameter Q. This dose-independent parameter depends only weakly on LET. Multi-track, high-dose effects depend on the cluster intensity parameter lambda, proportional to fluence as defined by the RLC formalism. After lambda is determined by a numerical experiment, the model reduces to one adjustable parameter Q. The best numerical fits to the experimental data, determining Q, are obtained. The knowledge of lambda and Q allows us to give biophysically based extrapolations of high-dose DNA fragment-size data to low doses or to high LETs.

  15. Monte Carlo predictions of DNA fragment-size distributions for large sizes after HZE particle irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Sachs, R. K.; Brenner, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    DSBs (double-strand breaks) produced by densely ionizing space radiation are not located randomly in the genome: recent data indicate DSB clustering along chromosomes. DSB clustering at large scales, from >100 Mbp down to approximately 2 kbp, is modeled using a Monte-Carlo algorithm. A random-walk model of chromatin is combined with a track model, that predicts the radial distribution of energy from an ion, and the RLC (randomly-located-clusters) formalism, in software called DNAbreak. This model generalizes the random-breakage model, whose broken-stick fragment-size distribution is applicable to low-LET radiation. DSB induction due to track interaction with the DNA volume depends on the radiation quality parameter Q. This dose-independent parameter depends only weakly on LET. Multi-track, high-dose effects depend on the cluster intensity parameter lambda, proportional to fluence as defined by the RLC formalism. After lambda is determined by a numerical experiment, the model reduces to one adjustable parameter Q. The best numerical fits to the experimental data, determining Q, are obtained. The knowledge of lambda and Q allows us to give biophysically based extrapolations of high-dose DNA fragment-size data to low doses or to high LETs.

  16. Raindrop Size Distribution Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; Bashor, Paul G.; Habib, Emad; Kasparis, Takis

    2008-01-01

    Characteristics of the raindrop size distribution in seven tropical cyclones have been studied through impact-type disdrometer measurements at three different sites during the 2004-06 Atlantic hurricane seasons. One of the cyclones has been observed at two different sites. High concentrations of small and/or midsize drops were observed in the presence or absence of large drops. Even in the presence of large drops, the maximum drop diameter rarely exceeded 4 mm. These characteristics of raindrop size distribution were observed in all stages of tropical cyclones, unless the storm was in the extratropical stage where the tropical cyclone and a midlatitude frontal system had merged. The presence of relatively high concentrations of large drops in extratropical cyclones resembled the size distribution in continental thunderstorms. The integral rain parameters of drop concentration, liquid water content, and rain rate at fixed reflectivity were therefore lower in extratropical cyclones than in tropical cyclones. In tropical cyclones, at a disdrometercalculated reflectivity of 40 dBZ, the number concentration was 700 plus or minus 100 drops m(sup -3), while the liquid water content and rain rate were 0.90 plus or minus 0.05 g m(sup -3) and 18.5 plus or minus 0.5 mm h(sup -1), respectively. The mean mass diameter, on the other hand, was 1.67 plus or minus 0.3 mm. The comparison of raindrop size distributions between Atlantic tropical cyclones and storms that occurred in the central tropical Pacific island of Roi-Namur revealed that the number density is slightly shifted toward smaller drops, resulting in higher-integral rain parameters and lower mean mass and maximum drop diameters at the latter site. Considering parameterization of the raindrop size distribution in tropical cyclones, characteristics of the normalized gamma distribution parameters were examined with respect to reflectivity. The mean mass diameter increased rapidly with reflectivity, while the normalized

  17. Raindrop Size Distribution Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; Bashor, Paul G.; Habib, Emad; Kasparis, Takis

    2008-01-01

    Characteristics of the raindrop size distribution in seven tropical cyclones have been studied through impact-type disdrometer measurements at three different sites during the 2004-06 Atlantic hurricane seasons. One of the cyclones has been observed at two different sites. High concentrations of small and/or midsize drops were observed in the presence or absence of large drops. Even in the presence of large drops, the maximum drop diameter rarely exceeded 4 mm. These characteristics of raindrop size distribution were observed in all stages of tropical cyclones, unless the storm was in the extratropical stage where the tropical cyclone and a midlatitude frontal system had merged. The presence of relatively high concentrations of large drops in extratropical cyclones resembled the size distribution in continental thunderstorms. The integral rain parameters of drop concentration, liquid water content, and rain rate at fixed reflectivity were therefore lower in extratropical cyclones than in tropical cyclones. In tropical cyclones, at a disdrometercalculated reflectivity of 40 dBZ, the number concentration was 700 plus or minus 100 drops m(sup -3), while the liquid water content and rain rate were 0.90 plus or minus 0.05 g m(sup -3) and 18.5 plus or minus 0.5 mm h(sup -1), respectively. The mean mass diameter, on the other hand, was 1.67 plus or minus 0.3 mm. The comparison of raindrop size distributions between Atlantic tropical cyclones and storms that occurred in the central tropical Pacific island of Roi-Namur revealed that the number density is slightly shifted toward smaller drops, resulting in higher-integral rain parameters and lower mean mass and maximum drop diameters at the latter site. Considering parameterization of the raindrop size distribution in tropical cyclones, characteristics of the normalized gamma distribution parameters were examined with respect to reflectivity. The mean mass diameter increased rapidly with reflectivity, while the normalized

  18. Size Effect in the Ionization Energy of PAH Clusters

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report the first experimental measurement of the near-threshold photoionization spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon clusters made of pyrene C16H10 and coronene C24H12, obtained using imaging photoelectron–photoion coincidence spectrometry with a VUV synchrotron beamline. The experimental results of the ionization energy are compared to calculated ones obtained from simulations using dedicated electronic structure treatment for large ionized molecular clusters. Experiment and theory consistently find a decrease of the ionization energy with cluster size. The inclusion of temperature effects in the simulations leads to a lowering of this energy and to quantitative agreement with the experiment. In the case of pyrene, both theory and experiment show a discontinuity in the IE trend for the hexamer. This work demonstrates the ability of the models to describe the electronic structure of PAH clusters and suggests that these species are ionized in astronomical environments where they are thought to be present. PMID:28742357

  19. Infrared photodissociation of size-selected methanol clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, U.; Gu, X. J.; Lauenstein, Ch.; Rudolph, A.

    1990-05-01

    Size-selective IR photodissociation spectra of (CH3OH)n clusters from n = 2 to n = 9 near the absorption band of the C-O stretching mode of the monomer at 1033.5/cm were measured using an experimental apparatus with a CW CO2 laser collinear to the size-selected cluster beam. The observed spectral features vary from dimer to octamer, with a special transition from the pentamer to the hexamer. An intermolecular model potential is used to derive a correlation between the observed spectra and the cluster configuration of minimum energy. The results show that only internally excited dimers and trimers can be dissociated with one or two CO2 laser photons, respectively.

  20. Copper cluster size effect in methanol synthesis from CO2

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Bing; Liu, Cong; Halder, Avik; ...

    2017-05-08

    Here, size-selected Cun catalysts (n = 3, 4, 20) were synthesized on Al2O3 thin films using mass-selected cluster deposition. A systematic study of size and support effects was carried out for CO2 hydrogenation at atmospheric pressure using a combination of in situ grazing incidence X-ray absorption spectroscopy, catalytic activity measurement, and first-principles calculations. The catalytic activity for methanol synthesis is found to strongly vary as a function of the cluster size; the Cu4/Al2O3 catalyst shows the highest turnover rate for CH3OH production. With only one atom less than Cu4, Cu3 showed less than 50% activity. Density functional theory calculations predictmore » that the activities of the gas-phase Cu clusters increase as the cluster size decreases; however, the stronger charge transfer interaction with Al2O3 support for Cu3 than for Cu4 leads to remarkably reduced binding strength between the adsorbed intermediates and supported Cu3, which subsequently results in a less favorable energetic pathway to transform carbon dioxide to methanol.« less

  1. Stability of Phosphine-Ligated Gold Cluster Ions toward Dissociation: Effect of Ligand and Cluster Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Julia

    2015-03-01

    Precise control of the composition of phosphine-ligated gold clusters is of interest to their applications in catalysis, sensing, and drug delivery. Reduction synthesis in solution typically generates a distribution of ligated clusters containing different number of gold atoms and capping ligands. Ligand binding energy is an important factor determining the kinetics of cluster nucleation and growth in solution and hence the resulting cluster distribution. Phosphines are popular capping ligands with tunable electronic and steric properties that affect their binding to the gold core. We examined the effect of the number of gold atoms in the cluster and the properties of the phosphine ligand on the ligand binding energy to the gold core using surface-induced dissociation (SID) of mass selected cluster cations produced through electrospray ionization. SID of vibrationally excited ions is ideally suited for studying gas-phase fragmentation of complex ions such as ligated gold clusters. The energetics, dynamics, and mechanisms of cluster ion fragmentation in the absence of solvent are determined through RRKM modeling of time and kinetic energy dependent SID spectra. This approach provides quantitative information on the ligand binding energies in phosphine-ligated gold clusters important for understanding their formation in solution. Furthermore, ligand binding energies derived from SID data provide the first benchmark values for comparison with electronic structure calculations. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

  2. Size distributions of submicrometer aerosols from cooking

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.S.; Lin, W.H.; Jeng, F.T. )

    1993-01-01

    Although gas stove usage varies from country to country, it is still one of the major indoor combustion sources. In order to assess the health effects of using gas stoves, the physical characteristics of the particle emissions from cooking were conducted in a first-floor apartment in the Taipei area. The particle size distributions from scrambling eggs, frying chicken, and cooking soup were measured in the kitchen by a high resolution particle sizer, which could measure the particles in the size range of 0.01 [mu]m to 1 [mu]m. The concentrations of the submicrometer particles increased significantly from 15,000 cm[sup [minus]3] to 150,000 cm[sup [minus]3] during cooking. Additionally, the ultrafine particles constituted 60%--70% of the total submicron aerosols. The changes in the size distributions and the concentrations of the submicrometer aerosols before, during, and after the aerosol generations were compared. On the average, the median diameters of scrambling eggs, frying chicken, cooking soup, and of the background conditions were 40 nm, 50 nm, 30 nm, and 70 nm, respectively. Regarding the surface area-weighted size distributions, the surface median diameters of the four situations were 180 nm, 300 nm, 150 nm, and 220 nm, respectively. Furthermore, the volume median diameters in the conditions mentioned above were almost similar, namely 300--350 nm. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Large Data Visualization on Distributed Memory Mulit-GPU Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Henry R.

    2010-03-01

    Data sets of immense size are regularly generated on large scale computing resources. Even among more traditional methods for acquisition of volume data, such as MRI and CT scanners, data which is too large to be effectively visualization on standard workstations is now commonplace. One solution to this problem is to employ a 'visualization cluster,' a small to medium scale cluster dedicated to performing visualization and analysis of massive data sets generated on larger scale supercomputers. These clusters are designed to fit a different need than traditional supercomputers, and therefore their design mandates different hardware choices, such as increased memory, and more recently, graphics processing units (GPUs). While there has been much previous work on distributed memory visualization as well as GPU visualization, there is a relative dearth of algorithms which effectively use GPUs at a large scale in a distributed memory environment. In this work, we study a common visualization technique in a GPU-accelerated, distributed memory setting, and present performance characteristics when scaling to extremely large data sets.

  4. The Detection and Measurement of the Activity Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthi, Mukund

    The infiltration of radon into the indoor environment may cause the exposure of the public to excessive amounts of radioactivity and has spurred renewed research interest over the past several years into the occurrence and properties of radon and its decay products in indoor air. The public health risks posed by the inhalation and subsequent lung deposition of the decay products of Rn-222 have particularly warranted the study of their diffusivity and attachment to molecular cluster aerosols in the ultrafine particle size range (0.5-5 nm) and to accumulation mode aerosols. In this research, a system for the detection and measurement of the activity size distributions and concentration levels of radon decay products in indoor environments has been developed. The system is microcomputer-controlled and involves a combination of multiple wire screen sampler -detector units operated in parallel. The detection of the radioactivity attached to the aerosol sampled in these units permits the determination of the radon daughter activity -weighted size distributions and concentration levels in indoor air on a semi-continuous basis. The development of the system involved the design of the detection and measurement system, its experimental characterization and testing in a radon-aerosol chamber, and numerical studies for the optimization of the design and operating parameters of the system. Several concepts of utility to aerosol size distribution measurement methods sampling the ultrafine cluster size range evolved from this study, and are discussed in various chapters of this dissertation. The optimized multiple wire screen (Graded Screen Array) system described in this dissertation is based on these concepts. The principal facet of the system is its ability to make unattended measurements of activity size distributions and concentration levels of radon decay products on a semi-continuous basis. Thus, the capability of monitoring changes in the activity concentrations and size

  5. Company size distribution in different countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsden, J. J.; Kiss-Haypál, Gy.

    2000-03-01

    The distribution of companies in a country, ranked in order of size (annual net revenue) s, follows the simplified canonical law s r∼(r+ρ) -1/θ remarkably well, where r is the rank, and θ and ρ are the parameters of the distribution. These parameters have been determined for 20 countries in America, Asia and Europe. Significant differences between countries are found. Neither θ nor ρ appears to correlate well with traditional economic indicators; indeed some countries often thought to be economically and politically, but not necessarily socially, similar show surprising differences, suggesting that wealth and prosperity are influenced by hidden layers hitherto inaccessible through standard economic theory.

  6. Asymmetric competition causes multimodal size distributions in spatially structured populations.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Jorge; Allen, Robert B; Coomes, David A; Eichhorn, Markus P

    2016-01-27

    Plant sizes within populations often exhibit multimodal distributions, even when all individuals are the same age and have experienced identical conditions. To establish the causes of this, we created an individual-based model simulating the growth of trees in a spatially explicit framework, which was parametrized using data from a long-term study of forest stands in New Zealand. First, we demonstrate that asymmetric resource competition is a necessary condition for the formation of multimodal size distributions within cohorts. By contrast, the legacy of small-scale clustering during recruitment is transient and quickly overwhelmed by density-dependent mortality. Complex multi-layered size distributions are generated when established individuals are restricted in the spatial domain within which they can capture resources. The number of modes reveals the effective number of direct competitors, while the separation and spread of modes are influenced by distances among established individuals. Asymmetric competition within local neighbourhoods can therefore generate a range of complex size distributions within even-aged cohorts. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Asymmetric competition causes multimodal size distributions in spatially structured populations

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez, Jorge; Allen, Robert B.; Coomes, David A.; Eichhorn, Markus P.

    2016-01-01

    Plant sizes within populations often exhibit multimodal distributions, even when all individuals are the same age and have experienced identical conditions. To establish the causes of this, we created an individual-based model simulating the growth of trees in a spatially explicit framework, which was parametrized using data from a long-term study of forest stands in New Zealand. First, we demonstrate that asymmetric resource competition is a necessary condition for the formation of multimodal size distributions within cohorts. By contrast, the legacy of small-scale clustering during recruitment is transient and quickly overwhelmed by density-dependent mortality. Complex multi-layered size distributions are generated when established individuals are restricted in the spatial domain within which they can capture resources. The number of modes reveals the effective number of direct competitors, while the separation and spread of modes are influenced by distances among established individuals. Asymmetric competition within local neighbourhoods can therefore generate a range of complex size distributions within even-aged cohorts. PMID:26817778

  8. Lack of Dependence of the Sizes of the Mesoscopic Protein Clusters on Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Vorontsova, Maria A.; Chan, Ho Yin; Lubchenko, Vassiliy; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-rich clusters of steady submicron size and narrow size distribution exist in protein solutions in apparent violation of the classical laws of phase equilibrium. Even though they contain a minor fraction of the total protein, evidence suggests that they may serve as essential precursors for the nucleation of ordered solids such as crystals, sickle-cell hemoglobin polymers, and amyloid fibrils. The cluster formation mechanism remains elusive. We use the highly basic protein lysozyme at nearly neutral and lower pH as a model and explore the response of the cluster population to the electrostatic forces, which govern numerous biophysical phenomena, including crystallization and fibrillization. We tune the strength of intermolecular electrostatic forces by varying the solution ionic strength I and pH and find that despite the weaker repulsion at higher I and pH, the cluster size remains constant. Cluster responses to the presence of urea and ethanol demonstrate that cluster formation is controlled by hydrophobic interactions between the peptide backbones, exposed to the solvent after partial protein unfolding that may lead to transient protein oligomers. These findings reveal that the mechanism of the mesoscopic clusters is fundamentally different from those underlying the two main classes of ordered protein solid phases, crystals and amyloid fibrils, and partial unfolding of the protein chain may play a significant role. PMID:26536272

  9. Lack of Dependence of the Sizes of the Mesoscopic Protein Clusters on Electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Vorontsova, Maria A; Chan, Ho Yin; Lubchenko, Vassiliy; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-11-03

    Protein-rich clusters of steady submicron size and narrow size distribution exist in protein solutions in apparent violation of the classical laws of phase equilibrium. Even though they contain a minor fraction of the total protein, evidence suggests that they may serve as essential precursors for the nucleation of ordered solids such as crystals, sickle-cell hemoglobin polymers, and amyloid fibrils. The cluster formation mechanism remains elusive. We use the highly basic protein lysozyme at nearly neutral and lower pH as a model and explore the response of the cluster population to the electrostatic forces, which govern numerous biophysical phenomena, including crystallization and fibrillization. We tune the strength of intermolecular electrostatic forces by varying the solution ionic strength I and pH and find that despite the weaker repulsion at higher I and pH, the cluster size remains constant. Cluster responses to the presence of urea and ethanol demonstrate that cluster formation is controlled by hydrophobic interactions between the peptide backbones, exposed to the solvent after partial protein unfolding that may lead to transient protein oligomers. These findings reveal that the mechanism of the mesoscopic clusters is fundamentally different from those underlying the two main classes of ordered protein solid phases, crystals and amyloid fibrils, and partial unfolding of the protein chain may play a significant role. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Oscillator clustering in a resource distribution chain.

    PubMed

    Postnov, Dmitry E; Sosnovtseva, Olga V; Mosekilde, Erik

    2005-03-01

    The paper investigates the special clustering phenomena that one can observe in systems of nonlinear oscillators that are coupled via a shared flow of primary resources (or a common power supply). This type of coupling, which appears to be quite frequent in nature, implies that one can no longer separate the inherent dynamics of the individual oscillator from the properties of the coupling network. Illustrated by examples from microbiological population dynamics, renal physiology, and electronic oscillator theory, we show how competition for primary resources in a resource distribution chain leads to a number of new generic phenomena, including partial synchronization, sliding of the synchronization region with the resource supply, and coupling-induced inhomogeneity.

  11. Modeling the Freezing of Molten Copper Nanoclusters: The Effect of Quenching Temperature and Cluster Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Fan, Qinna

    2013-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted to study structural changes of Cu clusters during quenching processes. It is shown that quenching temperature greatly affects atom motions and structural formation of these clusters. Simulation results establish the following pathway of the structural changes by using mean square displacements (MSDs), a pair analysis (PA) technique, pair distribution functions (PDFs) as well as atom packing. With decreasing the quenching temperature, more atoms are bound into the cages formed by their neighbor atoms. Accompanying with continuous interchange positions among atoms, local structures of the clusters are changed. The scenario of cluster structures at these quenching temperatures is greatly different on increasing the cluster size. Atom diffusive behavior is helpful to form the stable icosahedral structures. Too low quenching temperature limits growth of small local structures.

  12. Digital Doping in Magic-Sized CdSe Clusters.

    PubMed

    Muckel, Franziska; Yang, Jiwoong; Lorenz, Severin; Baek, Woonhyuk; Chang, Hogeun; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Bacher, Gerd; Fainblat, Rachel

    2016-07-26

    Magic-sized semiconductor clusters represent an exciting class of materials located at the boundary between quantum dots and molecules. It is expected that replacing single atoms of the host crystal with individual dopants in a one-by-one fashion can lead to unique modifications of the material properties. Here, we demonstrate the dependence of the magneto-optical response of (CdSe)13 clusters on the discrete number of Mn(2+) ion dopants. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we are able to distinguish undoped, monodoped, and bidoped cluster species, allowing for an extraction of the relative amount of each species for a specific average doping concentration. A giant magneto-optical response is observed up to room temperature with clear evidence that exclusively monodoped clusters are magneto-optically active, whereas the Mn(2+) ions in bidoped clusters couple antiferromagnetically and are magneto-optically passive. Mn(2+)-doped clusters therefore represent a system where magneto-optical functionality is caused by solitary dopants, which might be beneficial for future solotronic applications.

  13. Particle Size Distributions in Atmospheric Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Center for Turbulence Research 39 Annual Research Briefs 2003 Particle size distributions in atmospheric clouds By Roberto Paoli & Karim...atmospheric turbulence is an important, though complex, problem in cloud physics ( Shaw 2003). From a computational point of view, two major factors...contribute to this complexity. First is the very high turbulence Reynolds number and the large range of spatial scales (Vaillancourt & Yau 2000; Shaw 2003

  14. Tests for informative cluster size using a novel balanced bootstrap scheme.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, Jaakko; Oja, Hannu; Datta, Somnath

    2017-07-20

    Clustered data are often encountered in biomedical studies, and to date, a number of approaches have been proposed to analyze such data. However, the phenomenon of informative cluster size (ICS) is a challenging problem, and its presence has an impact on the choice of a correct analysis methodology. For example, Dutta and Datta (2015, Biometrics) presented a number of marginal distributions that could be tested. Depending on the nature and degree of informativeness of the cluster size, these marginal distributions may differ, as do the choices of the appropriate test. In particular, they applied their new test to a periodontal data set where the plausibility of the informativeness was mentioned, but no formal test for the same was conducted. We propose bootstrap tests for testing the presence of ICS. A balanced bootstrap method is developed to successfully estimate the null distribution by merging the re-sampled observations with closely matching counterparts. Relying on the assumption of exchangeability within clusters, the proposed procedure performs well in simulations even with a small number of clusters, at different distributions and against different alternative hypotheses, thus making it an omnibus test. We also explain how to extend the ICS test to a regression setting and thereby enhancing its practical utility. The methodologies are illustrated using the periodontal data set mentioned earlier. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Genome Sizes and the Benford Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Friar, James L.; Goldman, Terrance; Pérez–Mercader, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Background Data on the number of Open Reading Frames (ORFs) coded by genomes from the 3 domains of Life show the presence of some notable general features. These include essential differences between the Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes, with the number of ORFs growing linearly with total genome size for the former, but only logarithmically for the latter. Results Simply by assuming that the (protein) coding and non-coding fractions of the genome must have different dynamics and that the non-coding fraction must be particularly versatile and therefore be controlled by a variety of (unspecified) probability distribution functions (pdf’s), we are able to predict that the number of ORFs for Eukaryotes follows a Benford distribution and must therefore have a specific logarithmic form. Using the data for the 1000+ genomes available to us in early 2010, we find that the Benford distribution provides excellent fits to the data over several orders of magnitude. Conclusions In its linear regime the Benford distribution produces excellent fits to the Prokaryote data, while the full non-linear form of the distribution similarly provides an excellent fit to the Eukaryote data. Furthermore, in their region of overlap the salient features are statistically congruent. This allows us to interpret the difference between Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes as the manifestation of the increased demand in the biological functions required for the larger Eukaryotes, to estimate some minimal genome sizes, and to predict a maximal Prokaryote genome size on the order of 8–12 megabasepairs.These results naturally allow a mathematical interpretation in terms of maximal entropy and, therefore, most efficient information transmission. PMID:22629319

  16. Cluster Size Optimization in Sensor Networks with Decentralized Cluster-Based Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Navid; Vahdatpour, Alireza; Xu, Wenyao; Gerla, Mario; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2011-01-01

    Network lifetime and energy-efficiency are viewed as the dominating considerations in designing cluster-based communication protocols for wireless sensor networks. This paper analytically provides the optimal cluster size that minimizes the total energy expenditure in such networks, where all sensors communicate data through their elected cluster heads to the base station in a decentralized fashion. LEACH, LEACH-Coverage, and DBS comprise three cluster-based protocols investigated in this paper that do not require any centralized support from a certain node. The analytical outcomes are given in the form of closed-form expressions for various widely-used network configurations. Extensive simulations on different networks are used to confirm the expectations based on the analytical results. To obtain a thorough understanding of the results, cluster number variability problem is identified and inspected from the energy consumption point of view. PMID:22267882

  17. Size distribution of ions in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivácsy, Z.; Molnár, Á.

    The aim of this paper is to present data about the concentration and size distribution of ions in atmospheric aerosol under slightly polluted urban conditions in Hungary. Concentration of inorganic cations (ammonium, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium), inorganic anions (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, carbonate) and organic acids (oxalic, malonic, succinic, formic and acetic acid) for 8 particle size range between 0.0625 and 16 μm were determined. As was the case for ammonium, sulfate and nitrate, the organic acids were mostly found in the fine particle size range. Potassium and chloride were rather uniformly distributed between fine and coarse particles. Sodium, calcium, magnesium and carbonate were practically observed in the coarse mode. The results obtained for the summer and the winter half-year were also compared. The mass concentrations were recalculated in equivalents, and the ion balance was found to be reasonable in most cases. Measurement of the pH of the aerosol extracts indicates that the aerosol is acidic in the fine mode, but alkaline in the coarse particle size range.

  18. Single-size thermometric measurements on a size distribution of neutral fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Cauchy, C; Bakker, J M; Huismans, Y; Rouzée, A; Redlich, B; van der Meer, A F G; Bordas, C; Vrakking, M J J; Lépine, F

    2013-05-10

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of electrons emitted from mass-selected neutral fullerenes, performed at the intracavity free electron laser FELICE. We make use of mass-specific vibrational resonances in the infrared domain to selectively heat up one out of a distribution of several fullerene species. Efficient energy redistribution leads to decay via thermionic emission. Time-resolved electron kinetic energy distributions measured give information on the decay rate of the selected fullerene. This method is generally applicable to all neutral species that exhibit thermionic emission and provides a unique tool to study the stability of mass-selected neutral clusters and molecules that are only available as part of a size distribution.

  19. The invariances of power law size distributions.

    PubMed

    Frank, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Size varies. Small things are typically more frequent than large things. The logarithm of frequency often declines linearly with the logarithm of size. That power law relation forms one of the common patterns of nature. Why does the complexity of nature reduce to such a simple pattern? Why do things as different as tree size and enzyme rate follow similarly simple patterns? Here I analyze such patterns by their invariant properties. For example, a common pattern should not change when adding a constant value to all observations. That shift is essentially the renumbering of the points on a ruler without changing the metric information provided by the ruler. A ruler is shift invariant only when its scale is properly calibrated to the pattern being measured. Stretch invariance corresponds to the conservation of the total amount of something, such as the total biomass and consequently the average size. Rotational invariance corresponds to pattern that does not depend on the order in which underlying processes occur, for example, a scale that additively combines the component processes leading to observed values. I use tree size as an example to illustrate how the key invariances shape pattern. A simple interpretation of common pattern follows. That simple interpretation connects the normal distribution to a wide variety of other common patterns through the transformations of scale set by the fundamental invariances.

  20. The invariances of power law size distributions

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Size varies. Small things are typically more frequent than large things. The logarithm of frequency often declines linearly with the logarithm of size. That power law relation forms one of the common patterns of nature. Why does the complexity of nature reduce to such a simple pattern? Why do things as different as tree size and enzyme rate follow similarly simple patterns? Here I analyze such patterns by their invariant properties. For example, a common pattern should not change when adding a constant value to all observations. That shift is essentially the renumbering of the points on a ruler without changing the metric information provided by the ruler. A ruler is shift invariant only when its scale is properly calibrated to the pattern being measured. Stretch invariance corresponds to the conservation of the total amount of something, such as the total biomass and consequently the average size. Rotational invariance corresponds to pattern that does not depend on the order in which underlying processes occur, for example, a scale that additively combines the component processes leading to observed values. I use tree size as an example to illustrate how the key invariances shape pattern. A simple interpretation of common pattern follows. That simple interpretation connects the normal distribution to a wide variety of other common patterns through the transformations of scale set by the fundamental invariances. PMID:27928497

  1. HST Imaging of the Globular Clusters in the Formax Cluster: Color and Luminosity Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillmair, C. J.; Forbes, D. A.; Brodie, J.; Elson, R.

    1998-01-01

    We examine the luminosity and B - I color distribution of globular clusters for three early-type galaxies in the Fornax cluster using imaging data from the Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope.

  2. Remote Laser Diffraction Particle Size Distribution Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Huestis, Gary Michael; Bolton, Steven Michael

    2001-03-01

    In support of a radioactive slurry sampling and physical characterization task, an “off-the-shelf” laser diffraction (classical light scattering) particle size analyzer was utilized for remote particle size distribution (PSD) analysis. Spent nuclear fuel was previously reprocessed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC—formerly recognized as the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) which is on DOE’s INEEL site. The acidic, radioactive aqueous raffinate streams from these processes were transferred to 300,000 gallon stainless steel storage vessels located in the INTEC Tank Farm area. Due to the transfer piping configuration in these vessels, complete removal of the liquid can not be achieved. Consequently, a “heel” slurry remains at the bottom of an “emptied” vessel. Particle size distribution characterization of the settled solids in this remaining heel slurry, as well as suspended solids in the tank liquid, is the goal of this remote PSD analyzer task. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model LA-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a “hot cell” (gamma radiation) environment. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not previously achievable—making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  3. Raindrop Size Distribution Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokay, A.; Bashor, P. G.; Habib, E.; Kasparis, T. C.

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of the raindrop size distribution (RSD) have been collected in tropical cyclones and hurricanes with an impact type disdrometer during the past three Atlantic hurricane seasons. The measurements were taken at Wallops Island, Virginia, Lafayette, Louisiana, and Orlando, Florida. The RSDs from the remnants of tropical cyclones or hurricanes at 40 dBZ agreed well with each other where the mean mass diameter was 1.65-1.7 mm, and the total concentration had a range of 600 to 800 drops/m3. Assuming the normalized gamma size distribution, the shape parameter will be 5-8 to satisfy the observed rain rate of 18-20 mm/hr. If the observations were taken during the extratropical phase of the storm where the tropical cyclone merges with a frontal system, the composite spectra at 40 dBZ include more large drops and less small to mid-size drops, typical for continental thunderstorms. Thus, the mean mass diameter was larger, while total concentration, and rain rate was less in extratropical cyclones than in tropical cyclones.

  4. Model catalysis by size-selected cluster deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Scott

    2015-11-20

    This report summarizes the accomplishments during the last four years of the subject grant. Results are presented for experiments in which size-selected model catalysts were studied under surface science and aqueous electrochemical conditions. Strong effects of cluster size were found, and by correlating the size effects with size-dependent physical properties of the samples measured by surface science methods, it was possible to deduce mechanistic insights, such as the factors that control the rate-limiting step in the reactions. Results are presented for CO oxidation, CO binding energetics and geometries, and electronic effects under surface science conditions, and for the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction, ethanol oxidation reaction, and for oxidation of carbon by water.

  5. The Hierarchical Distribution of Young Stellar Clusters in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasha, Kathryn; Calzetti, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the spatial distributions of young stellar clusters in six nearby galaxies to trace the large scale hierarchical star-forming structures. The six galaxies are drawn from the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS). We quantify the strength of the clustering among stellar clusters as a function of spatial scale and age to establish the survival timescale of the substructures. We separate the clusters into different classes, compact (bound) clusters and associations (unbound), and compare the clustering among them. We find that younger star clusters are more strongly clustered over small spatial scales and that the clustering disappears rapidly for ages as young as a few tens of Myr, consistent with clusters slowly losing the fractal dimension inherited at birth from their natal molecular clouds.

  6. Particle size distribution of indoor aerosol sources

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, K.B.

    1990-10-24

    As concern about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has grown in recent years, it has become necessary to determine the nature of particles produced by different indoor aerosol sources and the typical concentration that these sources tend to produce. These data are important in predicting the dose of particles to people exposed to these sources and it will also enable us to take effective mitigation procedures. Further, it will also help in designing appropriate air cleaners. A new state of the art technique, DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer) System is used to determine the particle size distributions of a number of sources. This system employs the electrical mobility characteristics of these particles and is very effective in the 0.01--1.0 {mu}m size range. A modified system that can measure particle sizes in the lower size range down to 3 nm was also used. Experimental results for various aerosol sources is presented in the ensuing chapters. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Particle Size Distribution in Aluminum Manufacturing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sa; Noth, Elizabeth M.; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Eisen, Ellen A.; Cullen, Mark R.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2015-01-01

    As part of exposure assessment for an ongoing epidemiologic study of heart disease and fine particle exposures in aluminum industry, area particle samples were collected in production facilities to assess instrument reliability and particle size distribution at different process areas. Personal modular impactors (PMI) and Minimicro-orifice uniform deposition impactors (MiniMOUDI) were used. The coefficient of variation (CV) of co-located samples was used to evaluate the reproducibility of the samplers. PM2.5 measured by PMI was compared to PM2.5 calculated from MiniMOUDI data. Mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and concentrations of sub-micrometer (PM1.0) and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.56) particles were evaluated to characterize particle size distribution. Most of CVs were less than 30%. The slope of the linear regression of PMI_PM2.5 versus MiniMOUDI_PM2.5 was 1.03 mg/m3 per mg/m3 (± 0.05), with correlation coefficient of 0.97 (± 0.01). Particle size distribution varied substantively in smelters, whereas it was less variable in fabrication units with significantly smaller MMADs (arithmetic mean of MMADs: 2.59 μm in smelters vs. 1.31 μm in fabrication units, p = 0.001). Although the total particle concentration was more than two times higher in the smelters than in the fabrication units, the fraction of PM10 which was PM1.0 or PM0.56 was significantly lower in the smelters than in the fabrication units (p < 0.001). Consequently, the concentrations of sub-micrometer and quasi-ultrafine particles were similar in these two types of facilities. It would appear, studies evaluating ultrafine particle exposure in aluminum industry should focus on not only the smelters, but also the fabrication facilities. PMID:26478760

  8. Particle Size Distribution in Aluminum Manufacturing Facilities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sa; Noth, Elizabeth M; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Eisen, Ellen A; Cullen, Mark R; Hammond, S Katharine

    2014-10-01

    As part of exposure assessment for an ongoing epidemiologic study of heart disease and fine particle exposures in aluminum industry, area particle samples were collected in production facilities to assess instrument reliability and particle size distribution at different process areas. Personal modular impactors (PMI) and Minimicro-orifice uniform deposition impactors (MiniMOUDI) were used. The coefficient of variation (CV) of co-located samples was used to evaluate the reproducibility of the samplers. PM2.5 measured by PMI was compared to PM2.5 calculated from MiniMOUDI data. Mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and concentrations of sub-micrometer (PM1.0) and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.56) particles were evaluated to characterize particle size distribution. Most of CVs were less than 30%. The slope of the linear regression of PMI_PM2.5 versus MiniMOUDI_PM2.5 was 1.03 mg/m(3) per mg/m(3) (± 0.05), with correlation coefficient of 0.97 (± 0.01). Particle size distribution varied substantively in smelters, whereas it was less variable in fabrication units with significantly smaller MMADs (arithmetic mean of MMADs: 2.59 μm in smelters vs. 1.31 μm in fabrication units, p = 0.001). Although the total particle concentration was more than two times higher in the smelters than in the fabrication units, the fraction of PM10 which was PM1.0 or PM0.56 was significantly lower in the smelters than in the fabrication units (p < 0.001). Consequently, the concentrations of sub-micrometer and quasi-ultrafine particles were similar in these two types of facilities. It would appear, studies evaluating ultrafine particle exposure in aluminum industry should focus on not only the smelters, but also the fabrication facilities.

  9. Electronic cigarette aerosol particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Ingebrethsen, Bradley J; Cole, Stephen K; Alderman, Steven L

    2012-12-01

    The particle size distribution of aerosols produced by electronic cigarettes was measured in an undiluted state by a spectral transmission procedure and after high dilution with an electrical mobility analyzer. The undiluted e-cigarette aerosols were found to have particle diameters of average mass in the 250-450 nm range and particle number concentrations in the 10(9) particles/cm(3) range. These measurements are comparable to those observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke in prior studies and also measured in the current study with the spectral transmission method and with the electrical mobility procedure. Total particulate mass for the e-cigarettes calculated from the size distribution parameters measured by spectral transmission were in good agreement with replicate determinations of total particulate mass by gravimetric filter collection. In contrast, average particle diameters determined for e-cigarettes by the electrical mobility method are in the 50 nm range and total particulate masses calculated based on the suggested diameters are orders of magnitude smaller than those determined gravimetrically. This latter discrepancy, and the very small particle diameters observed, are believed to result from almost complete e-cigarette aerosol particle evaporation at the dilution levels and conditions of the electrical mobility analysis. A much smaller degree, ~20% by mass, of apparent particle evaporation was observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke. The spectral transmission method is validated in the current study against measurements on tobacco burning cigarette smoke, which has been well characterized in prior studies, and is supported as yielding an accurate characterization of the e-cigarette aerosol particle size distribution.

  10. Measurement of nonvolatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the nonvolatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a nonvolatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol (OA; 40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a nonvolatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type of OA

  11. Landslide size distribution in seismic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valagussa, Andrea; Frattini, Paolo; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2015-04-01

    In seismic areas, the analysis of the landslides size distribution with the distance from the seismic source is very important for hazard zoning and land planning. From numerical modelling (Bourdeau et al., 2004), it has been observed that the area of the sliding mass tends to increase with the ground-motion amplitude up to a certain threshold input acceleration. This has been also observed empirically for the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake (Keefer and Manson, 1998) and 1999 Chi Chi earthquake (Khazai and Sitar, 2003). Based on this, it possible to assume that the landslide size decreases with the increase of the distance from the seismic source. In this research, we analysed six earthquakes-induced landslides inventories (Papua New Guinea Earthquake, 1993; Northridge Earthquake, 1994; Niigata-Chuetsu Earthquake 2004; Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake, 2008; Wenchuan Earthquake, 2008; Tohoku Earthquake, 2011) with a magnitude ranging between 6.6 and 9.0 Mw. For each earthquake, we first analysed the size of landslides as a function of different factors such as the lithology, the PGA, the relief, the distance from the seismic sources (both fault and epicentre). Then, we analysed the magnitude frequency curves for different distances from the source area and for each lithology. We found that a clear relationship between the size distribution and the distance from the seismic source is not evident, probably due to the combined effect of the different influencing factors and to the non-linear relationship between the ground-motion intensity and the distance from the seismic source.

  12. Aerosol Size Distribution in the marine regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuszewski, Piotr; Petelski, Tomasz; Zielinski, Tymon; Pakszys, Paulina; Strzalkowska, Agata; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Kowalczyk, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    We would like to present the data obtained during the regular research cruises of the S/Y Oceania over a period of time between 2009 - 2012. The Baltic Sea is a very interesting polygon for aerosol measurements, however, also difficult due to the fact that mostly cases of a mixture of continental and marine aerosols are observed. It is possible to measure clear marine aerosol, but also advections of dust from southern Europe or even Africa. This variability of data allows to compare different conditions. The data is also compared with our measurements from the Arctic Seas, which have been made during the ARctic EXperiment (AREX). The Arctic Seas are very suitable for marine aerosol investigations since continental advections of aerosols are far less frequent than in other European sea regions. The aerosol size distribution was measured using the TSI Laser Aerosol Spectrometer model 3340 (99 channels, measurement range 0.09 μm to 7 μm), condensation particle counter (range 0.01 μm to 3 μm) and laser particle counter PMS CSASP-100-HV-SP (range 0.5 μm to 47 μm in 45 channels). Studies of marine aerosol production and transport are important for many Earth sciences such as cloud physics, atmospheric optics, environmental pollution studies and interaction between ocean and atmosphere. All equipment was placed on one of the masts of S/Y Oceania. Measurements using the laser aerosol spectrometer and condensation particle counter were made on one level (8 meters above sea level). Measurements with the laser particle counter were performed at five different levels above the sea level (8, 11, 14, 17 and 20 m). Based on aerosol size distribution the parameterizations with a Log-Normal and a Power-Law distributions were made. The aerosol source functions, characteristic for the region were also determined. Additionally, poor precision of the sea spray emission determination was confirmed while using only the aerosol concentration data. The emission of sea spray depends

  13. Measurement of the aerosol size distribution with NRL's mobility analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppel, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    The size distribution was measured in the size range between 0.0057 and 0.57 micrometer radius. A description of the instrumentation and data analysis is given, together with the measured size distributions calculated for 23 experiments.

  14. Particle size distribution from a GTL engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinling; Huang, Zhen; Wang, Jiasong; Zhang, Wugao

    2007-09-01

    Measurements of exhaust particle number concentration and size distribution from an engine fueled with GTL at different engine loads and speeds were carried out by using a two-stage dilution system. The results for GTL were compared with those from the original engine fueled with diesel. The fuel composition and engine operation condition had significant effects on the exhaust particle size distribution, the total exhaust particle number and volume concentrations. For both fuels, the load had no significant influence on the total exhaust particle number concentration at middle speed, while the total exhaust particle number concentration increased with the increase of the load at high speed. At 1400 rpm and 2200 rpm, the total exhaust particle volume concentration increased as the load increased for both fuels. GTL was found to be a "cleaner" fuel. Compared with diesel, under the same operation conditions, the total exhaust particle number concentrations decreased 18-92%, and the total exhaust particle volume concentrations for GTL decreased 21-59%.

  15. A comparison of queueing, cluster and distributed computing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Joseph A.; Nelson, Michael L.

    1993-01-01

    Using workstation clusters for distributed computing has become popular with the proliferation of inexpensive, powerful workstations. Workstation clusters offer both a cost effective alternative to batch processing and an easy entry into parallel computing. However, a number of workstations on a network does not constitute a cluster. Cluster management software is necessary to harness the collective computing power. A variety of cluster management and queuing systems are compared: Distributed Queueing Systems (DQS), Condor, Load Leveler, Load Balancer, Load Sharing Facility (LSF - formerly Utopia), Distributed Job Manager (DJM), Computing in Distributed Networked Environments (CODINE), and NQS/Exec. The systems differ in their design philosophy and implementation. Based on published reports on the different systems and conversations with the system's developers and vendors, a comparison of the systems are made on the integral issues of clustered computing.

  16. 7 CFR 52.1851 - Sizes of raisins with seeds-layer or cluster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sizes of raisins with seeds-layer or cluster. 52.1851...-Raisins with Seeds § 52.1851 Sizes of raisins with seeds—layer or cluster. The size of Layer or Cluster Raisins with Seeds is incorporated in the grades of the finished product. The size designation and...

  17. 7 CFR 52.1851 - Sizes of raisins with seeds-layer or cluster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sizes of raisins with seeds-layer or cluster. 52.1851...-Raisins with Seeds § 52.1851 Sizes of raisins with seeds—layer or cluster. The size of Layer or Cluster Raisins with Seeds is incorporated in the grades of the finished product. The size designation and...

  18. 7 CFR 52.1851 - Sizes of raisins with seeds-layer or cluster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sizes of raisins with seeds-layer or cluster. 52.1851...-Raisins with Seeds § 52.1851 Sizes of raisins with seeds—layer or cluster. The size of Layer or Cluster Raisins with Seeds is incorporated in the grades of the finished product. The size designation and...

  19. Thermal and log-normal distributions of plasma in laser driven Coulomb explosions of deuterium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarino, M.; Warrens, M.; Bonasera, A.; Lattuada, D.; Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Consoli, F.; de Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Kimura, S.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Hagel, K.; Barbui, M.; Schmidt, K.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Natowitz, J. B.; Ditmire, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we explore the possibility that the motion of the deuterium ions emitted from Coulomb cluster explosions is highly disordered enough to resemble thermalization. We analyze the process of nuclear fusion reactions driven by laser-cluster interactions in experiments conducted at the Texas Petawatt laser facility using a mixture of D2+3He and CD4+3He cluster targets. When clusters explode by Coulomb repulsion, the emission of the energetic ions is “nearly” isotropic. In the framework of cluster Coulomb explosions, we analyze the energy distributions of the ions using a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution, a shifted MB distribution (sMB), and the energy distribution derived from a log-normal (LN) size distribution of clusters. We show that the first two distributions reproduce well the experimentally measured ion energy distributions and the number of fusions from d-d and d-3He reactions. The LN distribution is a good representation of the ion kinetic energy distribution well up to high momenta where the noise becomes dominant, but overestimates both the neutron and the proton yields. If the parameters of the LN distributions are chosen to reproduce the fusion yields correctly, the experimentally measured high energy ion spectrum is not well represented. We conclude that the ion kinetic energy distribution is highly disordered and practically not distinguishable from a thermalized one.

  20. Modeling The Size Distribution Of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Nicole; Esposito, L. W.

    2007-10-01

    Spatial structures such as density and bending waves, self-gravity and moonlet wakes are among the better known pieces in the puzzle of the formation and evolution of Saturn's main rings. But also the actual sizes of ring particles are very important to understand the long-term behavior or the system. The Cassini mission is continuing to provide a wealth of new observations. Among those are the transient features, bright clumps, and brightness fluctuations in the rather mysterious F ring that are partially attributed to a population of moonlets hidden well within the bright core of the structure. Detections of opaque features during stellar occultations of the UVIS and VIMS instruments strongly support this idea. Further, the discovery of embedded moonlets in Saturn's A ring raises questions about the origin of these objects; not to forget about the km-sized moons, Pan and Daphnis, orbiting within the A ring. Are they remnants of a shattered moon or is it possible to accrete these objects from the surrounding ring material? Currently, the theory still lags behind the observations. Here, we employ a generalized kinetic approach aiming at the long-term evolution of the size distribution that cannot be achieved by current N-body simulations and discuss its implications for the evolution and origin of Saturn's rings.

  1. On scaling properties of cluster distributions in Ising models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruge, C.; Wagner, F.

    1992-01-01

    Scaling relations of cluster distributions for the Wolff algorithm are derived. We found them to be well satisfied for the Ising model in d=3 dimensions. Using scaling and a parametrization of the cluster distribution, we determine the critical exponent β/ν=0.516(6) with moderate effort in computing time.

  2. Spatial distribution of particles sputtered from single crystals by gas cluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, A. V.; Chernysh, V. S.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Zhao, J.

    2017-09-01

    The results of molecular dynamics simulations of the bombardment of the Cu (100) and Mo (100) single-crystals by 10 keV Ar cluster ions of different sizes are presented in this paper. Spatial distributions of sputtered material were calculated. The anisotropy of the angular distributions of sputtered atoms was revealed. It was found that the character of the anisotropy is different for Cu and Mo targets. The reasons leading to this anisotropy are discussed according to the dependences of the angular distributions on the cluster size and on the target material.

  3. ClusterControl: a web interface for distributing and monitoring bioinformatics applications on a Linux cluster.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Gernot; Rieder, Dietmar; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2004-03-22

    ClusterControl is a web interface to simplify distributing and monitoring bioinformatics applications on Linux cluster systems. We have developed a modular concept that enables integration of command line oriented program into the application framework of ClusterControl. The systems facilitate integration of different applications accessed through one interface and executed on a distributed cluster system. The package is based on freely available technologies like Apache as web server, PHP as server-side scripting language and OpenPBS as queuing system and is available free of charge for academic and non-profit institutions. http://genome.tugraz.at/Software/ClusterControl

  4. The Size Distribution of Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, P. R.; Lowry, S. C.

    2001-11-01

    We are conducting a program of ground-based CCD photometry of distant cometary nuclei, in order to estimate their sizes, shapes, rotation periods and axial ratios. We have combined our data with that reported in the literature by other observers to obtain an estimate of the size distribution of observed Jupiter-family and Halley-type comets. The catalog consists of 79 measurements of 52 JF and HT comets using a variety of techniques, including CCD photometry, IR photometry, and HST imaging. The data has been normalized to an assumed albedo of 0.04 except in cases where the albedo was directly measured. We find that the cumulative number of comets at or larger than a given radius can be described by a power law function with a slope of --1.40 +/- 0.03. This corresponds to a slope of --0.28 +/- 0.01 for the cumulative luminosity function, close to the slope of --0.32 +/- 0.02 found by Lowry (2001), derived from a homogeneously reduced CCD survey of distant JF comets. Both values are considerably less than the slope of --0.53 +/- 0.05 found by Fernández et al. (1999). This inconsistency is most likely attributed to the inhomogeneous nature of the Fernández et al. dataset, and the inclusion of active comets within their sample. Typical values of the CLF slope for Kuiper belt objects are --0.64 to --0.69 (Gladman et al. 2001; Trujillo et al. 2001). The shallower slope of the JF and HT comets, which are considerably smaller than the measured Kuiper belt objects, may be due to intrinsic differences in the KBO size distribution at the different size ranges (Weissman & Levison 1998) or to the physical evolution of JF and HT comets as they lose mass through sublimation and fragmentation (Lowry 2001). This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy and Planetary Geology & Geophysics Programs. Support from the National Research Council is also gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Comparing simulated and experimental molecular cluster distributions.

    PubMed

    Olenius, Tinja; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Franchin, Alessandro; Junninen, Heikki; Ortega, Ismael K; Kurtén, Theo; Loukonen, Ville; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Formation of secondary atmospheric aerosol particles starts with gas phase molecules forming small molecular clusters. High-resolution mass spectrometry enables the detection and chemical characterization of electrically charged clusters from the molecular scale upward, whereas the experimental detection of electrically neutral clusters, especially as a chemical composition measurement, down to 1 nm in diameter and beyond still remains challenging. In this work we simulated a set of both electrically neutral and charged small molecular clusters, consisting of sulfuric acid and ammonia molecules, with a dynamic collision and evaporation model. Collision frequencies between the clusters were calculated according to classical kinetics, and evaporation rates were derived from first principles quantum chemical calculations with no fitting parameters. We found a good agreement between the modeled steady-state concentrations of negative cluster ions and experimental results measured with the state-of-the-art Atmospheric Pressure interface Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometer (APi-TOF) in the CLOUD chamber experiments at CERN. The model can be used to interpret experimental results and give information on neutral clusters that cannot be directly measured.

  6. Aggregate size distribution of the soil loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Judit Alexandra; Jakab, Gergely; Szabó, Boglárka; Józsa, Sándor; Szalai, Zoltán; Centeri, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    aggregate size distribution which is led to nutrient and organic matter redistribution is one of a key questions to improve erosion estimation. G. Jakab was supported by the János Bolyai fellowship of the HAS.

  7. Power laws, discontinuities and regional city size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garmestani, A.S.; Allen, C.R.; Gallagher, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Urban systems are manifestations of human adaptation to the natural environment. City size distributions are the expression of hierarchical processes acting upon urban systems. In this paper, we test the entire city size distributions for the southeastern and southwestern United States (1990), as well as the size classes in these regions for power law behavior. We interpret the differences in the size of the regional city size distributions as the manifestation of variable growth dynamics dependent upon city size. Size classes in the city size distributions are snapshots of stable states within urban systems in flux. ?? 2008.

  8. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice

  9. Numerical investigation on the growth process and size distribution of nanoparticles obtained through electrical explosion of aluminum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jun; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli

    2017-02-01

    Numerical investigations on the formation process and the final size distribution of nanoparticles during electrical explosion of Al wire are carried out. Firstly, the formation of the atomic vapor clusters is investigated. It indicates that the Al wire does not reach its atomization conditions. The size of the atomic vapor clusters is obtained, and it increases with the temperature at explosion. Then the growth process of Al nanoparticles from the formed atomic vapor clusters is modeled and the size distribution is predicted. The size distribution at different temperatures indicates that the growth process of Al nanoparticles becomes inactive gradually as the temperature decreases. The investigation of the size distribution under different cooling rates indicates that the bigger cooling rate is favorable for the formation of Al nanoparticles with smaller size dispersion and lower average dimension. The size distribution of Al nanoparticles obtained by the model is qualitatively consistent with the experimental data, which demonstrates the feasibility of this model.

  10. A new method to prepare colloids of size-controlled clusters from a matrix assembly cluster source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rongsheng; Jian, Nan; Murphy, Shane; Bauer, Karl; Palmer, Richard E.

    2017-05-01

    A new method for the production of colloidal suspensions of physically deposited clusters is demonstrated. A cluster source has been used to deposit size-controlled clusters onto water-soluble polymer films, which are then dissolved to produce colloidal suspensions of clusters encapsulated with polymer molecules. This process has been demonstrated using different cluster materials (Au and Ag) and polymers (polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyvinyl alcohol, and polyethylene glycol). Scanning transmission electron microscopy of the clusters before and after colloidal dispersion confirms that the polymers act as stabilizing agents. We propose that this method is suitable for the production of biocompatible colloids of ultraprecise clusters.

  11. 7 CFR 52.1850 - Sizes of raisins with seeds-except layer or cluster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sizes of raisins with seeds-except layer or cluster... Raisins 1 Type III-Raisins with Seeds § 52.1850 Sizes of raisins with seeds—except layer or cluster. The sizes of Raisins with Seeds—except for Layer or Cluster Raisins with Seeds, are not incorporated in...

  12. 7 CFR 52.1850 - Sizes of raisins with seeds-except layer or cluster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sizes of raisins with seeds-except layer or cluster... Raisins 1 Type III-Raisins with Seeds § 52.1850 Sizes of raisins with seeds—except layer or cluster. The sizes of Raisins with Seeds—except for Layer or Cluster Raisins with Seeds, are not incorporated in the...

  13. 7 CFR 52.1851 - Sizes of raisins with seeds-layer or cluster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sizes of raisins with seeds-layer or cluster. 52.1851... of Processed Raisins 1 Type III-Raisins with Seeds § 52.1851 Sizes of raisins with seeds—layer or cluster. The size of Layer or Cluster Raisins with Seeds is incorporated in the grades of the finished...

  14. 7 CFR 52.1851 - Sizes of raisins with seeds-layer or cluster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sizes of raisins with seeds-layer or cluster. 52.1851... of Processed Raisins 1 Type III-Raisins with Seeds § 52.1851 Sizes of raisins with seeds—layer or cluster. The size of Layer or Cluster Raisins with Seeds is incorporated in the grades of the finished...

  15. 7 CFR 52.1850 - Sizes of raisins with seeds-except layer or cluster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sizes of raisins with seeds-except layer or cluster... Standards for Grades of Processed Raisins 1 Type III-Raisins with Seeds § 52.1850 Sizes of raisins with seeds—except layer or cluster. The sizes of Raisins with Seeds—except for Layer or Cluster Raisins with...

  16. 7 CFR 52.1850 - Sizes of raisins with seeds-except layer or cluster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sizes of raisins with seeds-except layer or cluster... Standards for Grades of Processed Raisins 1 Type III-Raisins with Seeds § 52.1850 Sizes of raisins with seeds—except layer or cluster. The sizes of Raisins with Seeds—except for Layer or Cluster Raisins with...

  17. 7 CFR 52.1850 - Sizes of raisins with seeds-except layer or cluster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sizes of raisins with seeds-except layer or cluster... Raisins 1 Type III-Raisins with Seeds § 52.1850 Sizes of raisins with seeds—except layer or cluster. The sizes of Raisins with Seeds—except for Layer or Cluster Raisins with Seeds, are not incorporated in the...

  18. Sensing Size through Clustering in Non-Equilibrium Membranes and the Control of Membrane-Bound Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Vagne, Quentin; Turner, Matthew S; Sens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The formation of dynamical clusters of proteins is ubiquitous in cellular membranes and is in part regulated by the recycling of membrane components. We show, using stochastic simulations and analytic modeling, that the out-of-equilibrium cluster size distribution of membrane components undergoing continuous recycling is strongly influenced by lateral confinement. This result has significant implications for the clustering of plasma membrane proteins whose mobility is hindered by cytoskeletal "corrals" and for protein clustering in cellular organelles of limited size that generically support material fluxes. We show how the confinement size can be sensed through its effect on the size distribution of clusters of membrane heterogeneities and propose that this could be regulated to control the efficiency of membrane-bound reactions. To illustrate this, we study a chain of enzymatic reactions sensitive to membrane protein clustering. The reaction efficiency is found to be a non-monotonic function of the system size, and can be optimal for sizes comparable to those of cellular organelles.

  19. Sensing Size through Clustering in Non-Equilibrium Membranes and the Control of Membrane-Bound Enzymatic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Vagne, Quentin; Turner, Matthew S.; Sens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The formation of dynamical clusters of proteins is ubiquitous in cellular membranes and is in part regulated by the recycling of membrane components. We show, using stochastic simulations and analytic modeling, that the out-of-equilibrium cluster size distribution of membrane components undergoing continuous recycling is strongly influenced by lateral confinement. This result has significant implications for the clustering of plasma membrane proteins whose mobility is hindered by cytoskeletal “corrals” and for protein clustering in cellular organelles of limited size that generically support material fluxes. We show how the confinement size can be sensed through its effect on the size distribution of clusters of membrane heterogeneities and propose that this could be regulated to control the efficiency of membrane-bound reactions. To illustrate this, we study a chain of enzymatic reactions sensitive to membrane protein clustering. The reaction efficiency is found to be a non-monotonic function of the system size, and can be optimal for sizes comparable to those of cellular organelles. PMID:26656912

  20. A fractal-based approach to lake size-distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seekell, David A.; Pace, Michael L.; Tranvik, Lars J.; Verpoorter, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The abundance and size distribution of lakes is critical to assessing the role of lakes in regional and global biogeochemical processes. Lakes are fractal but do not always conform to the power law size-distribution typically associated with fractal geographical features. Here, we evaluate the fractal geometry of lakes with the goal of explaining apparently inconsistent observations of power law and non-power law lake size-distributions. The power law size-distribution is a special case for lakes near the mean elevation. Lakes in flat regions are power law distributed, while lakes in mountainous regions deviate from power law distributions. Empirical analyses of lake size data sets from the Adirondack Mountains in New York and the flat island of Gotland in Sweden support this finding. Our approach provides a unifying framework for lake size-distributions, indicates that small lakes cannot dominate total lake surface area, and underscores the importance of regional hypsometry in influencing lake size-distributions.

  1. Tritium discrimination using cluster size information from a DGEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surette, R. A.; Dubeau, J.

    2005-02-01

    Measurement of tritium-in-air concentrations is complicated by the presence of gamma radiation, 14C, and noble gas radionuclides. In most cases the signal from tritium, in conventional ion chamber-based monitors, is much smaller than that from equal concentrations of interfering radioactive gases. The lack of discrimination between tritium and other radioactive interferences frequently results in an overestimation of the tritium hazard. This report describes a method to effectively discriminate between tritium and other interfering airborne radioactive gases using ionization cluster size information from a double gas electron multiplier (DGEM) and a suitable readout array. The readout array consists of 121 pads (an 11×11 matrix of 4×4 mm pads on 6 mm centres) on a printed circuit board, each connected to a charge sensitive amplifier. The prototype-automated discriminating monitor typically indicated a spillover fraction, in the tritium channel, in the order of ±5% for binary mixtures of tritium and 14C, 85Kr, 133Xe or 41Ar. A custom-made dynamic cluster-fitting algorithm gives results in real-time with very good accuracy under extreme conditions.

  2. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Size and Size Distribution of Chitosan-Electrosprayed Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Abyadeh, Morteza; Karimi Zarchi, Ali Akbar; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Amani, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Size and size distribution of polymeric nanoparticles have important effect on their properties for pharmaceutical application. In this study, Chitosan nanoparticles were prepared by electrospray method (electrohydrodynamic atomization) and parameters that simultaneously affect size and/or size distribution of chitosan nanoparticles were optimized. Effect of formulation/processing three independent formulation/processing parameters, namely concentration, flow rate and applied voltage was investigated on particle size and size distribution of generated nanoparticles using a Box-Behnken experimental design. All the studied factors showed important effects on average size and size distribution of nanoparticles. A decrease in size and size distribution was obtainable with decreasing flow rate and concentration and increasing applied voltage. Eventually, a sample with minimum size and polydispersity was obtained with polymer concentration, flow rate and applied voltage values of 0.5 %w/v, 0.05 ml/hr and 15 kV, respectively. The experimentally prepared nanoparticles, expected having lowest size and size distribution values had a size of 105 nm, size distribution of 36 and Zeta potential of 59.3 mV. Results showed that optimum condition for production of chitosan nanoparticles with the minimum size and narrow size distribution was a minimum value for flow rate and highest value for applied voltage along with an optimum chitosan concentration.

  3. MEASURING THE MASS DISTRIBUTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Rines, Kenneth J.; Serra, Ana Laura E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it E-mail: serra@to.infn.it

    2013-02-10

    Cluster mass profiles are tests of models of structure formation. Only two current observational methods of determining the mass profile, gravitational lensing, and the caustic technique are independent of the assumption of dynamical equilibrium. Both techniques enable the determination of the extended mass profile at radii beyond the virial radius. For 19 clusters, we compare the mass profile based on the caustic technique with weak lensing measurements taken from the literature. This comparison offers a test of systematic issues in both techniques. Around the virial radius, the two methods of mass estimation agree to within {approx}30%, consistent with the expected errors in the individual techniques. At small radii, the caustic technique overestimates the mass as expected from numerical simulations. The ratio between the lensing profile and the caustic mass profile at these radii suggests that the weak lensing profiles are a good representation of the true mass profile. At radii larger than the virial radius, the extrapolated Navarro, Frenk and White fit to the lensing mass profile exceeds the caustic mass profile. Contamination of the lensing profile by unrelated structures within the lensing kernel may be an issue in some cases; we highlight the clusters MS0906+11 and A750, superposed along the line of sight, to illustrate the potential seriousness of contamination of the weak lensing signal by these unrelated structures.

  4. The kinetic evolution and velocity distribution of gravitational galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saslaw, William C.; Chitre, S. M.; Itoh, Makoto; Inagaki, Shogo

    1990-12-01

    The spatial statistical distribution function for quasi-equilibrium gravitational clustering in an expanding universe is derived from more general assumptions than before, without needing an earlier Ansatz. Then, it is shown how this statistical distribution is related to the kinetic development of the BBGKY hierarchy and how to obtain an analytic descriptioin for the time evolution of an initial Poisson distribution. From general principles, an analytic velocity distribution function for quasi-equilibrium gravitational clustering is also derived. It has no free parameters. Comparison with N-body experiments shows excellent agreement.

  5. Identification, mapping and size distribution of double and multiple craters on satellites of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. J.; Neukum, G.; Schmedemann, N.

    2012-04-01

    Double and multiple craters can be identified on the terrestrial planets as well as on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, originating from the nearly simultaneous impacts of two or more projectiles [1][2][3]. Doublet craters, chains and clusters can form in the following cases: (a) impacts of projectiles created by the break-up of a weak body by tidal forces when encountering a planet, or (b) impacts of mutually orbiting bodies of similar sizes, or of a larger body orbited by a smaller one (e.g., an asteroid moon) [1][2][3]. Double or multiple craters are identified by two characteristic features [4]: common rims of individual craters in a group of two or more craters, indicating they may have been formed by a cluster of projectiles, and similar morphology and degradational state of craters in a cluster. Crater clusters identified in Cassini ISS images of the Saturnian satellites may be grouped into the following classes [4]: (1) doublet craters, (2) linear crater chains, and (3) multiple craters. Assuming that crater clusters originated from a cluster of impactors derived from a former unsplit projectile, we investigate how measuring craters in a cluster as if each crater was formed in a separate impact event could influence the shape of a distribution and possibly the determination of surface ages in a given geologic unit. Areas with multiple craters are mapped and the craters in each cluster are counted individually. Then, a scaling law [5, and ref's therein] is applied to each crater in a specific cluster to derive the projectile mass and diameter of the unsplit projectile and to recalculate the crater diameter as it would have been formed by un unsplit impactor. These diameters are included in the size distribution of the craters measured outside the clusters and compared to a measurement where all craters are counted regardless if they are members of a cluster or not. For a specific densely cratered test area on Saturn's moon Enceladus and impact

  6. A new nanomaterial synthesized from size-selected, ligand-free metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Wepasnick, K.; Tang, X.; Fairbrother, D. H.; Bowen, K. H.; Dollinger, A.; Strobel, C. H.; Huber, J.; Mangler, T.; Luo, Y.; Proch, S.; Gantefoer, G.

    2014-03-01

    Thins films are synthesized by deposition of size-selected Mon- cluster anions on an inert substrate. Scanning tunneling microscopy pictures indicate that the deposited material consists of individual particles with diameters corresponding to the size of the preformed clusters from the gas phase. Previous attempts to manufacture cluster materials from metals failed since these clusters coalesced at room temperature. Our data suggest the possibility to synthesize new nanomaterials from clusters of high fusing metals. This may prove to be the key to harness size-dependent and tuneable properties of clusters for creating novel classes of functional tailor-made materials.

  7. LMC clusters - Age calibration and age distribution revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elson, Rebecca A.; Fall, S. Michael

    1988-01-01

    The empirical age relation for star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud presented by Elson and Fall (1985) are reexamined using ages based only on main-sequence turnoffs. The present sample includes 57 clusters, 24 of which have color-magnitude diagrams published since 1985. The new calibration is very similar to that found previously, and the scatter in the relation corresponds to uncertainties of about a factor of 2 in age. The age distribution derived from the new calibration does not differ significantly from that derived in earlier work. It is compared with age distributions estimated by other authors for different samples of clusters, and the results are discussed.

  8. Gravitational lensing by clusters of galaxies - Constraining the mass distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miralda-Escude, Jordi

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of placing constraints on the mass distribution of a cluster of galaxies by analyzing the cluster's gravitational lensing effect on the images of more distant galaxies is investigated theoretically in the limit of weak distortion. The steps in the proposed analysis are examined in detail, and it is concluded that detectable distortion can be produced by clusters with line-of-sight velocity dispersions of over 500 km/sec. Hence it should be possible to determine (1) the cluster center position (with accuracy equal to the mean separation of the background galaxies), (2) the cluster-potential quadrupole moment (to within about 20 percent of the total potential if velocity dispersion is 1000 km/sec), and (3) the power law for the outer-cluster density profile (if enough background galaxies in the surrounding region are observed).

  9. Effects of particle size distribution in thick film conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of particle size distribution in thick film conductors are discussed. The distribution of particle sizes does have an effect on fired film density but the effect is not always positive. A proper distribution of sizes is necessary, and while the theoretical models can serve as guides to selecting this proper distribution, improved densities can be achieved by empirical variations from the predictions of the models.

  10. Improved Root Normal Size Distributions for Liquid Atomization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    Improved Root Normal Size Distributions for Liquid Atomization Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited... Atomization Culbert B. Laney1 Engility Corp., 8211 Terminal Rd, Lorton, VA 22079 U.S.A. Abstract: This paper identifies two issues with traditional...root normal size distributions, which are commonly fitted to experimental results for liquid atomization and sprays. First, while root normal size

  11. Manipulating cluster size of polyanion-stabilized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle clusters via electrostatic-mediated assembly for tunable magnetophoresis behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeap, Swee Pin; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Ooi, Boon Seng; Lim, JitKang

    2015-10-01

    We report in this article an approach for manipulating the size of magnetic nanoparticle clusters (MNCs) via electrostatic-mediated assembly technique using an electrolyte as a clustering agent. The clusters were surface-tethered with poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) through electrostatic compensation to enhance their colloidal stability. Dynamic light scattering was employed to trace the evolution of cluster size. Simultaneously, electrophoretic mobility and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses were conducted to investigate the possible schemes involved in both cluster formation and PSS grafting. Results showed that the average hydrodynamic cluster size of the PSS/MNCs and their corresponding size distributions were successfully shifted by means of manipulating the suspension pH, the ionic nature of the electrolyte, and the electrolyte concentration. More specifically, the electrokinetic behavior of the particles upon interaction with the electrolyte plays a profound role in the formation of the PSS/MNCs. Nonetheless, the solubility of the polymer in electrolyte solution and the purification of the particles from residual ions should not be omitted in determining the effectiveness of this clustering approach. The PSS adlayer makes the resultant entities highly water-dispersible and provides electrosteric stabilization to shield the PSS/MNCs from aggregation. In this study, the experimental observations were analyzed and discussed on the basis of existing fundamental colloidal theories. The strategy of cluster size manipulation proposed here is simple and convenient to implement. Furthermore, manipulating the size of the MNCs also facilitates the tuning of magnetophoresis kinetics on exposure to low magnetic field gradient, which makes this nano-entity useful for engineering applications, specifically in separation processes.

  12. MSurvPow: a FORTRAN program to calculate the sample size and power for cluster-randomized clinical trials with survival outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Manatunga, Amita K; Chen, Shande

    2005-04-01

    Manatunga and Chen [A.K. Manatunga, S. Chen, Sample size estimation for survival outcomes in cluster-randomized studies with small cluster sizes, Biometrics 56 (2000) 616-621] proposed a method to estimate sample size and power for cluster-randomized studies where the primary outcome variable was survival time. The sample size formula was constructed by considering a bivariate marginal distribution (Clayton-Oakes model) with univariate exponential marginal distributions. In this paper, a user-friendly FORTRAN 90 program was provided to implement this method and a simple example was used to illustrate the features of the program.

  13. Evolution of grain size distribution during deformation of superplastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Glaser, R.; Syn, C.K.

    1997-10-28

    Grain size distribution and its evolution during superplastic deformation has been studied for two materials- ultrahigh carbon steel, which has a two phase microstructure, and a copper alloy, which has a quasi-single phase microstructure. For both materials the distribution of initial grain size is very accurately represented by a lognormal throughout the deformation history. The evolution of the parameters characterizing the log normal distribution have also been studied and found to vary in a systematic manner results. Results can be used to specify the grain size distribution as a function of strain during superplastic deformation and thus should prove useful for computational studies in which grain size distribution is evaluated.

  14. [The fractal characteristics of particle size distribution and conservation relationship].

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng-kang; Wang, Xiao-chang

    2004-01-01

    Using a microscopic technique, the characteristics of particle size distribution of Al-humic flocs were studied. The results showed that Al-humic floc size followed a lognormal distribution. By introducing the lognormal distribution and fractal dimension into the fundamental kinetic equation of flocculation, a conservation relationship was obtained between the total number of particles, average floc volume and standard deviation of floc size distribution. Significance of the relation can greatly simplify the complicated procedure of kinetic analysis and enable a more accurate evaluation of floc size distribution.

  15. The determination and optimization of (rutile) pigment particle size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    A light scattering particle size test which can be used with materials having a broad particle size distribution is described. This test is useful for pigments. The relation between the particle size distribution of a rutile pigment and its optical performance in a gray tint test at low pigment concentration is calculated and compared with experimental data.

  16. The determination and optimization of (rutile) pigment particle size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    A light scattering particle size test which can be used with materials having a broad particle size distribution is described. This test is useful for pigments. The relation between the particle size distribution of a rutile pigment and its optical performance in a gray tint test at low pigment concentration is calculated and compared with experimental data.

  17. Cluster evolution and critical cluster sizes for the square and triangular lattice Ising models using lattice animals and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eising, G.; Kooi, B. J.

    2012-06-01

    Growth and decay of clusters at temperatures below Tc have been studied for a two-dimensional Ising model for both square and triangular lattices using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and the enumeration of lattice animals. For the lattice animals, all unique cluster configurations with their internal bonds were identified up to 25 spins for the triangular lattice and up to 29 spins for the square lattice. From these configurations, the critical cluster sizes for nucleation have been determined based on two (thermodynamic) definitions. From the Monte Carlo simulations, the critical cluster size is also obtained by studying the decay and growth of inserted, most compact clusters of different sizes. A good agreement is found between the results from the MC simulations and one of the definitions of critical size used for the lattice animals at temperatures T > ˜0.4 Tc for the square lattice and T > ˜0.2 Tc for the triangular lattice (for the range of external fields H considered). At low temperatures (T ≈ 0.2 Tc for the square lattice and T ≈ 0.1 Tc for the triangular lattice), magic numbers are found in the size distributions during the MC simulations. However, these numbers are not present in the critical cluster sizes based on the MC simulations, as they are present for the lattice animal data. In order to achieve these magic numbers in the critical cluster sizes based on the MC simulation, the temperature has to be reduced further to T ≈ 0.15 Tc for the square lattice. The observed evolution of magic numbers as a function of temperature is rationalized in the present work.

  18. A new method for measuring ion clusters produced by charged particles in nanometre track sections of DNA size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pszona, S.; Kula, J.; Marjanska, S.

    2000-06-01

    A new method is presented for measuring the frequency distribution of ion clusters, formed in nanometre sections of track, by charged particles. The simulated nanometer-size sites are produced in a device, called the Jet Counter. It consists of a pulse-operated valve which injects an expanding jet of nitrogen gas into an interaction chamber. The resulting distributions of ion clusters produced by alpha particle tracks (from 241Am) in sections ranging from 2 to around 10 nm at unit density in nitrogen gas have been measured. Analysis of the experimental results confirm that the primary ionisation distributions produced in the nanometer sections comply with the Poisson distribution. The ionisation cluster distributions produced in the 2-10 nm track-segments are the first ever to be determined experimentally.

  19. A Distributed Flocking Approach for Information Stream Clustering Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E

    2006-01-01

    Intelligence analysts are currently overwhelmed with the amount of information streams generated everyday. There is a lack of comprehensive tool that can real-time analyze the information streams. Document clustering analysis plays an important role in improving the accuracy of information retrieval. However, most clustering technologies can only be applied for analyzing the static document collection because they normally require a large amount of computation resource and long time to get accurate result. It is very difficult to cluster a dynamic changed text information streams on an individual computer. Our early research has resulted in a dynamic reactive flock clustering algorithm which can continually refine the clustering result and quickly react to the change of document contents. This character makes the algorithm suitable for cluster analyzing dynamic changed document information, such as text information stream. Because of the decentralized character of this algorithm, a distributed approach is a very natural way to increase the clustering speed of the algorithm. In this paper, we present a distributed multi-agent flocking approach for the text information stream clustering and discuss the decentralized architectures and communication schemes for load balance and status information synchronization in this approach.

  20. How Sample Size Affects a Sampling Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulekar, Madhuri S.; Siegel, Murray H.

    2009-01-01

    If students are to understand inferential statistics successfully, they must have a profound understanding of the nature of the sampling distribution. Specifically, they must comprehend the determination of the expected value and standard error of a sampling distribution as well as the meaning of the central limit theorem. Many students in a high…

  1. How Sample Size Affects a Sampling Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulekar, Madhuri S.; Siegel, Murray H.

    2009-01-01

    If students are to understand inferential statistics successfully, they must have a profound understanding of the nature of the sampling distribution. Specifically, they must comprehend the determination of the expected value and standard error of a sampling distribution as well as the meaning of the central limit theorem. Many students in a high…

  2. The abundance and spatial distribution of ultra-diffuse galaxies in nearby galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Burg, Remco F. J.; Muzzin, Adam; Hoekstra, Henk

    2016-05-01

    Recent observations have highlighted a significant population of faint but large (reff> 1.5 kpc) galaxies in the Coma cluster. The origin of these ultra diffuse galaxies (UDGs) remains puzzling, as the interpretation of these observational results has been hindered by the (partly) subjective selection of UDGs, and the limited study of only the Coma (and some examples in the Virgo-) cluster. In this paper we extend the study of UDGs using eight clusters in the redshift range 0.044 cluster mass, reaching ~200 in typical haloes of M200 ≃ 1015M⊙. For the ensemble cluster we measure the size distribution of UDGs, their colour-magnitude distribution, and their completeness-corrected radial density distribution within the clusters. The morphologically-selected cluster UDGs have colours consistent with the cluster red sequence, and have a steep size distribution that, at a given surface brightness, declines as n [ dex-1 ] ∝ reff-3.4 ± 0.2. Their radial distribution is significantly steeper than NFW in the outskirts, and is significantly shallower in the inner parts. We find them to follow the same radial distribution as the more massive quiescent galaxies in the clusters, except within the core region of r ≲ 0.15 × R200 (or ≲ 300 kpc). Within this region the number density of UDGs drops and is consistent with zero. These diffuse galaxies can only resist tidal forces down to this cluster-centric distance if they are highly centrally dark-matter dominated. The observation that the radial distribution of more compact dwarf galaxies (reff< 1.0 kpc) with similar luminosities follows the same distribution as the UDGs, but exist down to a smaller distance of 100 kpc from the

  3. Evaluation of droplet size distributions using univariate and multivariate approaches.

    PubMed

    Gaunø, Mette Høg; Larsen, Crilles Casper; Vilhelmsen, Thomas; Møller-Sonnergaard, Jørn; Wittendorff, Jørgen; Rantanen, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutically relevant material characteristics are often analyzed based on univariate descriptors instead of utilizing the whole information available in the full distribution. One example is droplet size distribution, which is often described by the median droplet size and the width of the distribution. The current study was aiming to compare univariate and multivariate approach in evaluating droplet size distributions. As a model system, the atomization of a coating solution from a two-fluid nozzle was investigated. The effect of three process parameters (concentration of ethyl cellulose in ethanol, atomizing air pressure, and flow rate of coating solution) on the droplet size and droplet size distribution using a full mixed factorial design was used. The droplet size produced by a two-fluid nozzle was measured by laser diffraction and reported as volume based size distribution. Investigation of loading and score plots from principal component analysis (PCA) revealed additional information on the droplet size distributions and it was possible to identify univariate statistics (volume median droplet size), which were similar, however, originating from varying droplet size distributions. The multivariate data analysis was proven to be an efficient tool for evaluating the full information contained in a distribution.

  4. The efficiency of star formation in clustered and distributed regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnell, Ian A.; Smith, Rowan J.; Clark, Paul C.; Bate, Matthew R.

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the formation of both clustered and distributed populations of young stars in a single molecular cloud. We present a numerical simulation of a 104 M⊙ elongated, turbulent, molecular cloud and the formation of over 2500 stars. The stars form both in stellar clusters and in a distributed mode, which is determined by the local gravitational binding of the cloud. A density gradient along the major axis of the cloud produces bound regions that form stellar clusters and unbound regions that form a more distributed population. The initial mass function (IMF) also depends on the local gravitational binding of the cloud with bound regions forming full IMFs whereas in the unbound, distributed regions the stellar masses cluster around the local Jeans mass and lack both the high-mass and the low-mass stars. The overall efficiency of star formation is ≈ 15 per cent in the cloud when the calculation is terminated, but varies from less than 1 per cent in the regions of distributed star formation to ≈ 40 per cent in regions containing large stellar clusters. Considering that large-scale surveys are likely to catch clouds at all evolutionary stages, estimates of the (time-averaged) star formation efficiency (SFE) for the giant molecular cloud reported here is only ≈ 4 per cent. This would lead to the erroneous conclusion of slow star formation when in fact it is occurring on a dynamical time-scale.

  5. Statistical sampling of the distribution of uranium deposits using geologic/geographic clusters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finch, W.I.; Grundy, W.D.; Pierson, C.T.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of geologic/geographic clusters was developed particularly to study grade and tonnage models for sandstone-type uranium deposits. A cluster is a grouping of mined as well as unmined uranium occurrences within an arbitrary area about 8 km across. A cluster is a statistical sample that will reflect accurately the distribution of uranium in large regions relative to various geologic and geographic features. The example of the Colorado Plateau Uranium Province reveals that only 3 percent of the total number of clusters is in the largest tonnage-size category, greater than 10,000 short tons U3O8, and that 80 percent of the clusters are hosted by Triassic and Jurassic rocks. The distributions of grade and tonnage for clusters in the Powder River Basin show a wide variation; the grade distribution is highly variable, reflecting a difference between roll-front deposits and concretionary deposits, and the Basin contains about half the number in the greater-than-10,000 tonnage-size class as does the Colorado Plateau, even though it is much smaller. The grade and tonnage models should prove useful in finding the richest and largest uranium deposits. ?? 1992 Oxford University Press.

  6. Determination of the cumulus size distribution from LANDSAT pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karg, E.; Mueller, H.; Quenzel, H.

    1983-01-01

    Varying insolation causes undesirable thermic stress to the receiver of a solar power plant. The rapid change of insolation depends on the size distribution of the clouds; in order to measure these changes, it is suitable to determine typical cumulus size distributions. For this purpose, LANDSAT-images are adequate. Several examples of cumulus size distributions will be presented and their effects on the operation of a solar power plant are discussed.

  7. How dense can one pack spheres of arbitrary size distribution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, S. D. S.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first systematic algorithm to estimate the maximum packing density of spheres when the grain sizes are drawn from an arbitrary size distribution. With an Apollonian filling rule, we implement our technique for disks in 2d and spheres in 3d. As expected, the densest packing is achieved with power-law size distributions. We also test the method on homogeneous and on empirical real distributions, and we propose a scheme to obtain experimentally accessible distributions of grain sizes with low porosity. Our method should be helpful in the development of ultra-strong ceramics and high-performance concrete.

  8. Ion beam irradiation of embedded nanoparticles: Toward an in situ control of size and spatial distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Rizza, G.; Cheverry, H.; Gacoin, T.; Lamasson, A.; Henry, S.

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation of chemically synthesized Au nanoparticles embedded in a dielectric matrix promotes the formation of a halo of satellites around the original cluster. We show that the complete dissolution of the nanoparticles (NC) results in the formation of a narrow size distribution of small precipitates with a mean size of 2 nm and a standard deviation of 0.4 nm. By combining the chemical synthesis of the nanoparticles and the irradiation to induce their dissolution and precipitation, we give a guideline method for overcoming the difficulty of controlling the size and spatial distribution of the embedded NC associated with ion implantation technique. In particular, we showed that the irradiation can be used to tailor the size of the already formed NC. Moreover, we establish that the satellites cluster evolution under irradiation can be described by a two step process. These two steps are discussed in terms of classical and inverse Ostwald ripening mechanisms.

  9. Sizing and Discovery of Nanosized Polyoxometalate Clusters by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is a powerful technique for structural characterization, e.g., sizing and conformation, particularly when combined with quantitative modeling and comparison to theoretical values. Traveling wave IM-MS (TW-IM-MS) has recently become commercially available to nonspecialist groups and has been exploited in the structural study of large biomolecules, however reliable calibrants for large anions have not been available. Polyoxometalate (POM) species—nanoscale inorganic anions—share many of the facets of large biomolecules, however, the full potential of IM-MS in their study has yet to be realized due to a lack of suitable calibration data or validated theoretical models. Herein we address these limitations by reporting DT-IM (drift tube) data for a set of POM clusters {M12} Keggin 1, {M18} Dawson 2, and two {M7} Anderson derivatives 3 and 4 which demonstrate their use as a TW-IM-MS calibrant set to facilitate characterization of very large (ca. 1–4 nm) anionic species. The data was also used to assess the validity of standard techniques to model the collision cross sections of large inorganic anions using the nanoscale family of compounds based upon the {Se2W29} unit including the trimer, {Se8W86O299} A, tetramer, {Se8W116O408} B, and hexamer {Se12W174O612} C, including their relative sizing in solution. Furthermore, using this data set, we demonstrated how IM-MS can be used to conveniently characterize and identify the synthesis of two new, i.e., previously unreported POM species, {P8W116}, unknown D, and {Te8W116}, unknown E, which are not amenable to analysis by other means with the approximate formulation of [H34W118X8M2O416]44–, where X = P and M = Co for D and X = Te and M = Mn for E. This work establishes a new type of inorganic calibrant for IM-MS allowing sizing, structural analysis, and discovery of molecular nanostructures directly from solution. PMID:26906879

  10. Ejected Particle Size Distributions from Shocked Metal Surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Schauer, M. M.; Buttler, W. T.; Frayer, D. K.; ...

    2017-04-12

    Here, we present size distributions for particles ejected from features machined onto the surface of shocked Sn targets. The functional form of the size distributions is assumed to be log-normal, and the characteristic parameters of the distribution are extracted from the measured angular distribution of light scattered from a laser beam incident on the ejected particles. We also found strong evidence for a bimodal distribution of particle sizes with smaller particles evolved from features machined into the target surface and larger particles being produced at the edges of these features.

  11. Pareto tails and lognormal body of US cities size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckstead, Jeff; Devadoss, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    We consider a distribution, which consists of lower tail Pareto, lognormal body, and upper tail Pareto, to estimate the size distribution of all US cities. This distribution fits the data more accurately than a distribution that comprises of only lognormal and the upper tail Pareto.

  12. Changes of firm size distribution: The case of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Jiang, Zhuhua; Cheong, Chongcheul; Yoon, Seong-Min

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the distribution and inequality of firm sizes is evaluated for the Korean firms listed on the stock markets. Using the amount of sales, total assets, capital, and the number of employees, respectively, as a proxy for firm sizes, we find that the upper tail of the Korean firm size distribution can be described by power-law distributions rather than lognormal distributions. Then, we estimate the Zipf parameters of the firm sizes and assess the changes in the magnitude of the exponents. The results show that the calculated Zipf exponents over time increased prior to the financial crisis, but decreased after the crisis. This pattern implies that the degree of inequality in Korean firm sizes had severely deepened prior to the crisis, but lessened after the crisis. Overall, the distribution of Korean firm sizes changes over time, and Zipf’s law is not universal but does hold as a special case.

  13. Hierarchy, cities size distribution and Zipf's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semboloni, F.

    2008-06-01

    We show that a hierarchical cities structure can be generated by a self-organized process which grows with a bottom-up mechanism, and that the resulting distribution is power law. First we analytically prove that the power law distribution satisfies the balance between the offer of the city and the demand of its basin of attraction, and that the exponent in the Zipf's law corresponds to the multiplier linking the population of the central city to the population of its basin of attraction. Moreover, the corresponding hierarchical structure shows a variable spanning factor, and the population of the cities linked to the same city up in the hierarchy is variable as well. Second a stochastic dynamic spatial model is proposed, whose numerical results confirm the analytical findings. In this model, inhabitants minimize the transportation cost, so that the greater the importance of this cost, the more stable is the system in its microscopic aspect. After a comparison with the existent methods for the generation of a power law distribution, conclusions are drawn on the connection of hierarchical structure, and power law distribution, with the functioning of the system of cities.

  14. The age distribution of stellar clusters in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Villa, E.; Adamo, A.; Bastian, N.; Fouesneau, M.; Zackrisson, E.

    2014-05-01

    In order to empirically determine the time-scale and environmental dependence of stellar cluster disruption, we have undertaken an analysis of the unprecedented multipointing (seven), multiwavelength (U, B, V, Hα, and I) Hubble Space Telescope imaging survey of the nearby, face-on spiral galaxy M83. The images are used to locate stellar clusters and stellar associations throughout the galaxy. Estimation of cluster properties (age, mass, and extinction) was done through a comparison of their spectral energy distributions with simple stellar population models. We constructed the largest catalogue of stellar clusters and associations in this galaxy to-date, with ˜1800 sources with masses above ˜5000 M⊙ and ages younger than ˜300 Myr. In this Letter, we focus on the age distribution of the resulting clusters and associations. In particular, we explicitly test whether the age distributions are related with the ambient environment. Our results are in excellent agreement with previous studies of age distributions in the centre of the galaxy, which gives us confidence to expand out to search for similarities or differences in the other fields which sample different environments. We find that the age distribution of the clusters inside M83 varies strongly as a function of position within the galaxy, indicating a strong correlation with the galactic environment. If the age distributions are approximated as a power law of the form {d N/dt}∝ t^{ζ }, we find ζ values between 0 and -0.62 (ζ ˜ -0.40 for the whole galaxy), in good agreement with previous results and theoretical predictions. L101

  15. The distribution of ejected brown dwarfs in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, S. P.; Hubber, D. A.; Moraux, E.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2005-12-01

    We examine the spatial distribution of brown dwarfs produced by the decay of small-N stellar systems as expected from the embryo ejection scenario. We model a cluster of several hundred stars grouped into 'cores' of a few stars/brown dwarfs. These cores decay, preferentially ejecting their lowest-mass members. Brown dwarfs are found to have a wider spatial distribution than stars, however once the effects of limited survey areas and unresolved binaries are taken into account it can be difficult to distinguish between clusters with many or no ejections. A large difference between the distributions probably indicates that ejections have occurred, however similar distributions sometimes arise even with ejections. Thus the spatial distribution of brown dwarfs is not necessarily a good discriminator between ejection and non-ejection scenarios.

  16. The distribution of bubble sizes during reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yin; Oh, S. Peng; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Sutter, P. M.

    2016-09-01

    A key physical quantity during reionization is the size of H II regions. Previous studies found a characteristic bubble size which increases rapidly during reionization, with apparent agreement between simulations and analytic excursion set theory. Using four different methods, we critically examine this claim. In particular, we introduce the use of the watershed algorithm - widely used for void finding in galaxy surveys - which we show to be an unbiased method with the lowest dispersion and best performance on Monte Carlo realizations of a known bubble size probability density function (PDF). We find that a friends-of-friends algorithm declares most of the ionized volume to be occupied by a network of volume-filling regions connected by narrow tunnels. For methods tuned to detect the volume-filling regions, previous apparent agreement between simulations and theory is spurious, and due to a failure to correctly account for the window function of measurement schemes. The discrepancy is already obvious from visual inspection. Instead, H II regions in simulations are significantly larger (by factors of 10-1000 in volume) than analytic predictions. The size PDF is narrower, and evolves more slowly with time, than predicted. It becomes more sharply peaked as reionization progresses. These effects are likely caused by bubble mergers, which are inadequately modelled by analytic theory. Our results have important consequences for high-redshift 21 cm observations, the mean free path of ionizing photons, and the visibility of Lyα emitters, and point to a fundamental failure in our understanding of the characteristic scales of the reionization process.

  17. Electron emission from nanometer-size metallic clusters: Electronic states and structural stability of supported Au clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.E.; Ramachandra, A.; Andres, R.P.; Reifenberger, R.

    1992-12-31

    Techniques developed to measure the thermodynamic and electronic properties of a single metallic cluster with nanometer-size dimensions are described. Using these techniques, experiments that resolve the quantized energy spectrum of electrons in a nanometer-size cluster of metallic atoms at room temperature have been performed. Studies on the stability of the electron emission current from an individual nanometer-size cluster supported on a tungsten tip have been performed to learn more about the intrinsic stability of these nanometer-size objects. The data show abrupt jumps between different emission states that are revisited as time progresses. This phenomenon is attributed to a rearrangement of the duster structure and/or orientation on the substrate and provides new evidence of multiple `isomeric` structures for small clusters of metallic atoms.

  18. Synapse clusters are preferentially formed by synapses with large recycling pool sizes.

    PubMed

    Welzel, Oliver; Tischbirek, Carsten H; Jung, Jasmin; Kohler, Eva M; Svetlitchny, Alexei; Henkel, Andreas W; Kornhuber, Johannes; Groemer, Teja W

    2010-10-20

    Synapses are distributed heterogeneously in neural networks. The relationship between the spatial arrangement of synapses and an individual synapse's structural and functional features remains to be elucidated. Here, we examined the influence of the number of adjacent synapses on individual synaptic recycling pool sizes. When measuring the discharge of the styryl dye FM1-43 from electrically stimulated synapses in rat hippocampal tissue cultures, a strong positive correlation between the number of neighbouring synapses and recycling vesicle pool sizes was observed. Accordingly, vesicle-rich synapses were found to preferentially reside next to neighbours with large recycling pool sizes. Although these synapses with large recycling pool sizes were rare, they were densely arranged and thus exhibited a high amount of release per volume. To consolidate these findings, functional terminals were marked by live-cell antibody staining with anti-synaptotagmin-1-cypHer or overexpression of synaptopHluorin. Analysis of synapse distributions in these systems confirmed the results obtained with FM 1-43. Our findings support the idea that clustering of synapses with large recycling pool sizes is a distinct developmental feature of newly formed neural networks and may contribute to functional plasticity.

  19. Estimating the abundance of clustered animal population by using adaptive cluster sampling and negative binomial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Yizhou; Shifa, Naima

    2013-09-01

    An estimator for finding the abundance of a rare, clustered and mobile population has been introduced. This model is based on adaptive cluster sampling (ACS) to identify the location of the population and negative binomial distribution to estimate the total in each site. To identify the location of the population we consider both sampling with replacement (WR) and sampling without replacement (WOR). Some mathematical properties of the model are also developed.

  20. Lunar soil: Size distribution and mineralogical constituents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duke, M.B.; Woo, C.C.; Bird, M.L.; Sellers, G.A.; Finkelman, R.B.

    1970-01-01

    The lunar soil collected by Apollo 11 consists primarily of submillimeter material and is finer in grain size than soil previously recorded photographically by Surveyor experiments. The main constituents are fine-grained to glassy rocks of basaltic affinity and coherent breccia of undetermined origin. Dark glass, containing abundant nickel-iron spheres, coats many rocks, mineral, and breccia fragments. Several types of homogeneous glass occur as fragments and spheres. Colorless spheres, probably an exotic component, are abundant in the fraction finer than 20 microns.

  1. Ductility of metal alloys with grain size distribution in a wide range of strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Skripnyak, Nataliya V.; Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.

    Ductility of ultrafine grained (UFG) metal alloys with a distribution of grain size was investigated in wide loading conditions by numerical simulation. The multiscale models with a unimodal and a bimodal grain size distributions were developed using the data of structure research of hexagonal close packed and face center cubic UFG alloys. Macroscopic fracture is considered as a result of the formation of percolation clusters of damage at the mesoscopic level. The critical fracture strain of UFG alloys on the mesoscale level depends on the relative volumes of coarse grains. The nucleation of damages at quasi-static and dynamic loading is associated with strain localization in UFG partial volumes with bimodal grain size distribution. The concentration of damages arise in the vicinity of the boundaries of coarse and ultrafine grains. The occurrence of a bimodal grain size distributions causes the increase of UFG alloys' ductility, but decrease of their tensile strength. Linkoping University, Sweden.

  2. The size distribution of inhabited planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Fergus

    2016-02-01

    Earth-like planets are expected to provide the greatest opportunity for the detection of life beyond the Solar system. However, our planet cannot be considered a fair sample, especially if intelligent life exists elsewhere. Just as a person's country of origin is a biased sample among countries, so too their planet of origin may be a biased sample among planets. The magnitude of this effect can be substantial: over 98 per cent of the world's population live in a country larger than the median. In the context of a simple model where the mean population density is invariant to planet size, we infer that a given inhabited planet (such as our nearest neighbour) has a radius r < 1.2r⊕ (95 per cent confidence bound). We show that this result is likely to hold not only for planets hosting advanced life, but also for those which harbour primitive life forms. Further, inferences may be drawn for any variable which influences population size. For example, since population density is widely observed to decline with increasing body mass, we conclude that most intelligent species are expected to exceed 300 kg.

  3. Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle size distributions.

    PubMed

    Bitra, Venkata S P; Womac, Alvin R; Yang, Yuechuan T; Igathinathane, C; Miu, Petre I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2009-11-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle size distributions created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle distributions were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen size largely determined particle size of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle size, though to a lesser degree than screen size. The Rosin-Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass size distribution data with an R(2)>0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle size distribution. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced 'strongly fine skewed mesokurtic' particles with 12.7-25.4 mm screens and 'fine skewed mesokurtic' particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle sizes can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

  4. Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bitra, V.S.P.; Womac, A.R.; Yang, Y.T.; Igathinathane, C.; Miu, P.I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-06-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle size distributions created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle distributions were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen size largely determined particle size of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle size, though to a lesser degree than screen size. The Rosin Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass size distribution data with an R2 > 0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle size distribution. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced strongly fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 12.7 25.4 mm screens and fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle sizes can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

  5. Learning the Distribution Preserving Semantic Subspace for Clustering.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jinyu; Zhang, Taiping; Qin, Anyong; Shang, Zhaowei; Tang, Yuan Yan

    2017-09-04

    This work proposes a new clustering method for images called Distribution Preserving Indexing (DPI). It aims to find a lower-dimensional semantic space approximating the original image space in the sense of preserving the distribution of the data. In the theory, the intrinsic structure of the data clusters can be described by the distribution of the data effectively. Therefore, the cluster structure of the data in a lower-dimensional semantic space derived by DPI becomes clear. Unlike these distance based clustering methods which reveal the intrinsic Euclidean structure of data, our method attempts to discover the intrinsic cluster structure of the data space that actually is the union of some sub-manifolds. Moreover, we propose a revised Kernel Density Estimator for the case of high-dimensional data, which is a crucial step in DPI. Also, we provide a theoretical analysis of the bound of our method. Finally, the extensive experiments compared with other algorithms, on COIL20, CBCL, and MNIST demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed approach.

  6. Accounting for One-Group Clustering in Effect-Size Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citkowicz, Martyna; Hedges, Larry V.

    2013-01-01

    In some instances, intentionally or not, study designs are such that there is clustering in one group but not in the other. This paper describes methods for computing effect size estimates and their variances when there is clustering in only one group and the analysis has not taken that clustering into account. The authors provide the effect size…

  7. Optical heterodyne measurement of cloud droplet size distributions.

    PubMed

    Gollub, J P; Chabay, L; Flygare, W H

    1973-12-01

    Optical heterodyne spectra of laser light quasi-elastically scattered by falling water droplets (1-10-micro radius) in a diffusion cloud chamber were used to determine the droplet size distribution. The rate of fall depends on radius in a known way, thus yielding a heterodyne spectrum manifesting a distribution of Doppler shifts. This spectrum, in conjunction with the calculated Mie scattering intensity as a function of droplet radius, provides a direct measure of the droplet size distribution for droplets large enough that Brownian motion is negligible. The experiments described in this paper demonstrate the technique and establish the potential for further more quantitative studies of size distributions.

  8. The equilibrium size distribution of rouleaux.

    PubMed Central

    Perelson, A S; Wiegel, F W

    1982-01-01

    Rouleaux are formed by the aggregation of red blood cells in the presence of macromolecules that bridge the membranes of adherent erythrocytes. We compute the size and degree of branching of rouleaux for macroscopic systems in thermal equilibrium in the absence of fluid flow. Using techniques from statistical mechanics, analytical expressions are derived for (a) the average number of rouleaux consisting of n cells and having m branch points; (b) the average number of cells per rouleau; (c) the average number of branch points per rouleau; and (d) the number of rouleaux with n cells, n = 1, 2, ..., in a system containing a total of N cells. We also present the results of numerical evaluations to establish the validity of asymptotic expressions that simplify our formal analytic results. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7059653

  9. ACS imaging of star clusters in M 51. I. Identification and radius distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheepmaker, R. A.; Haas, M. R.; Gieles, M.; Bastian, N.; Larsen, S. S.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.

    2007-07-01

    Context: Size measurements of young star clusters are valuable tools to put constraints on the formation and early dynamical evolution of star clusters. Aims: We use HST/ACS observations of the spiral galaxy M 51 in F435W, F555W and F814W to select a large sample of star clusters with accurate effective radius measurements in an area covering the complete disc of M 51. We present the dataset and study the radius distribution and relations between radius, colour, arm/interarm region, galactocentric distance, mass and age. Methods: We select a sample of 7698 (F435W), 6846 (F555W) and 5024 (F814W) slightly resolved clusters and derive their effective radii (R_eff) by fitting the spatial profiles with analytical models convolved with the point spread function. The radii of 1284 clusters are studied in detail. Results: We find cluster radii between 0.5 and ~10 pc, and one exceptionally large cluster candidate with R_eff = 21.6 pc. The median R_eff is 2.1 pc. We find 70 clusters in our sample which have colours consistent with being old GC candidates and we find 6 new “faint fuzzy” clusters in, or projected onto, the disc of M 51. The radius distribution can not be fitted with a power law similar to the one for star-forming clouds. We find an increase in R_eff with colour as well as a higher fraction of clusters with B-V ⪆ 0.05 in the interarm regions. We find a correlation between R_eff and galactocentric distance (RG) of the form R_eff∝ RG0.12±0.02, which is considerably weaker than the observed correlation for old Milky Way GCs. We find weak relations between cluster luminosity and radius: R_eff∝ L0.15±0.02 for the interarm regions and R_eff∝ L-0.11±0.01 for the spiral arm regions, but we do not observe a correlation between cluster mass and radius. Conclusions: The observed radius distribution indicates that shortly after the formation of the clusters from a fractal gas, the radii of the clusters have changed in a non-uniform way. We find tentative

  10. Estimating Flaw Size Distributions From Service Inspection Results (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    equivalent initial flaw size model...the adequacy of the model, only whether or not the parameters are equal to 0. One reason the model did not fit well is that the equivalent initial flaw size (EIFS...curve model was used along with a lognormal equivalent initial flaw size distribution. The parameter values were chosen to approximate the real

  11. Powder Size and Distribution in Ultrasonic Gas Atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, G.; Lavernia, E.; Grant, N. J.

    1985-08-01

    Ultrasonic gas atomization (USGA) produces powder sizes dependent on the ratio of the nozzle jet diameter to the distance of spread dt/R, Powder size distribution is attributed to the spread of atomizing gas jets during travel from the nozzle exit to the metal stream. The spread diminishes at higher gas atomization pressures. In this paper, calculated powder sizes and distribution are compared with experimentally determined values.

  12. Unravelling the size distribution of social groups with information theory in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando, A.; Villuendas, D.; Vesperinas, C.; Abad, M.; Plastino, A.

    2010-07-01

    The minimization of Fisher’s information (MFI) approach of Frieden et al. [Phys. Rev. E 60, 48 (1999)] is applied to the study of size distributions in social groups on the basis of a recently established analogy between scale invariant systems and classical gases [Phys. A 389, 490 (2010)]. Going beyond the ideal gas scenario is seen to be tantamount to simulating the interactions taking place, for a competitive cluster growth process, in a scale-free ideal network - a non-correlated network with a connection-degree’s distribution that mimics the scale-free ideal gas density distribution. We use a scaling rule that allows one to classify the final cluster-size distributions using only one parameter that we call the competitiveness, which can be seen as a measure of the strength of the interactions. We find that both empirical city-size distributions and electoral results can be thus reproduced and classified according to this competitiveness-parameter, that also allow us to infer the maximum number of stable social relationships that one person can maintain, known as the Dunbar number, together with its standard deviation. We discuss the importance of this number in connection with the empirical phenomenon known as “six-degrees of separation”. Finally, we show that scaled city-size distributions of large countries follow, in general, the same universal distribution.

  13. Empirical power and sample size calculations for cluster-randomized and cluster-randomized crossover studies.

    PubMed

    Reich, Nicholas G; Myers, Jessica A; Obeng, Daniel; Milstone, Aaron M; Perl, Trish M

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the number of studies using a cluster-randomized design has grown dramatically. In addition, the cluster-randomized crossover design has been touted as a methodological advance that can increase efficiency of cluster-randomized studies in certain situations. While the cluster-randomized crossover trial has become a popular tool, standards of design, analysis, reporting and implementation have not been established for this emergent design. We address one particular aspect of cluster-randomized and cluster-randomized crossover trial design: estimating statistical power. We present a general framework for estimating power via simulation in cluster-randomized studies with or without one or more crossover periods. We have implemented this framework in the clusterPower software package for R, freely available online from the Comprehensive R Archive Network. Our simulation framework is easy to implement and users may customize the methods used for data analysis. We give four examples of using the software in practice. The clusterPower package could play an important role in the design of future cluster-randomized and cluster-randomized crossover studies. This work is the first to establish a universal method for calculating power for both cluster-randomized and cluster-randomized clinical trials. More research is needed to develop standardized and recommended methodology for cluster-randomized crossover studies.

  14. Optimizing the maximum reported cluster size in the spatial scan statistic for ordinal data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sehwi; Jung, Inkyung

    2017-01-01

    The spatial scan statistic is an important tool for spatial cluster detection. There have been numerous studies on scanning window shapes. However, little research has been done on the maximum scanning window size or maximum reported cluster size. Recently, Han et al. proposed to use the Gini coefficient to optimize the maximum reported cluster size. However, the method has been developed and evaluated only for the Poisson model. We adopt the Gini coefficient to be applicable to the spatial scan statistic for ordinal data to determine the optimal maximum reported cluster size. Through a simulation study and application to a real data example, we evaluate the performance of the proposed approach. With some sophisticated modification, the Gini coefficient can be effectively employed for the ordinal model. The Gini coefficient most often picked the optimal maximum reported cluster sizes that were the same as or smaller than the true cluster sizes with very high accuracy. It seems that we can obtain a more refined collection of clusters by using the Gini coefficient. The Gini coefficient developed specifically for the ordinal model can be useful for optimizing the maximum reported cluster size for ordinal data and helpful for properly and informatively discovering cluster patterns.

  15. Formation of bimetallic nanoalloys by Au coating of size-selected Cu clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Feng; Wang, Zhi Wei; Palmer, Richard E.

    2012-10-01

    Bimetallic clusters display new characteristics that could not be obtained by varying either the size of pure metallic systems or the composition of bulk bimetals alone. Coating of pre-deposited clusters by vapour deposition is a typical synthesis process of bimetallic clusters. Here, we have demonstrated that hierarchical, gold cluster-decorated copper clusters as well as both heterogeneous and homogeneous Cu-Au bimetallic clusters (4.6 to 10.7 nm) can be prepared by coating pre-deposited, size-selected Cu5000 (4.6 ± 0.2 nm) with Au evaporation at various temperatures. These bimetallic clusters were analyzed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and associated electron energy loss spectroscopy. The results indicate that the growth of bimetallic clusters is controlled by a competition between nucleation and diffusion of the coating Au atoms.

  16. Tidal Densities of Globular Clusters and the Galactic Mass Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyung Mok

    1990-12-01

    The tidal radii of globular clusters reflect the tidal field of the Galaxy. The mass distribution of the Galaxy thus may be obtained if the tidal fields of clusters are well known. Although large amounts of uncertainties in the determination of tidal radii have been obstacles in utilizing this method, analysis of tidal density could give independent check for the Galactic mass distribution. Recent theoretical modeling of dynamical evolution including steady Galactic tidal field shows that the observationally determined tidal radii could be systematically larger by about a factor of 1.5 compared to the theoretical values. From the analysis of entire sample of 148 globular clusters and 7 dwarf spheroidal systems compiled by Webbink(1985), we find that such reduction from observed values would make the tidal density(the mean density within the tidal radius) distribution consistent with the flat rotation curve of our Galaxy out to large distances if the velocity distribution of clusters and dwarf spheroidals with respect to the Galactic center is isotropic.

  17. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Finishing and Distribution Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in occupations in the finishing and distribution cluster. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards…

  18. DCPVP: Distributed Clustering Protocol Using Voting and Priority for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hematkhah, Hooman; Kavian, Yousef S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new clustering protocol for designing energy-efficient hierarchical wireless sensor networks (WSNs) by dividing the distributed sensor network into virtual sensor groups to satisfy the scalability and prolong the network lifetime in large-scale applications. The proposed approach is a distributed clustering protocol called DCPVP, which is based on voting and priority ideas. In the DCPVP protocol, the size of clusters is based on the distance of nodes from the data link such as base station (BS) and the local node density. The cluster heads are elected based on the mean distance from neighbors, remaining energy and the times of being elected as cluster head. The performance of the DCPVP protocol is compared with some well-known clustering protocols in literature such as the LEACH, HEED, WCA, GCMRA and TCAC protocols. The simulation results confirm that the prioritizing- and voting-based election ideas decrease the construction time and the energy consumption of clustering progress in sensor networks and consequently improve the lifetime of networks with limited resources and battery powered nodes in harsh and inaccessible environments. PMID:25763646

  19. DCPVP: distributed clustering protocol using voting and priority for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Hematkhah, Hooman; Kavian, Yousef S

    2015-03-10

    This paper presents a new clustering protocol for designing energy-efficient hierarchical wireless sensor networks (WSNs) by dividing the distributed sensor network into virtual sensor groups to satisfy the scalability and prolong the network lifetime in large-scale applications. The proposed approach is a distributed clustering protocol called DCPVP, which is based on voting and priority ideas. In the DCPVP protocol, the size of clusters is based on the distance of nodes from the data link such as base station (BS) and the local node density. The cluster heads are elected based on the mean distance from neighbors, remaining energy and the times of being elected as cluster head. The performance of the DCPVP protocol is compared with some well-known clustering protocols in literature such as the LEACH, HEED, WCA, GCMRA and TCAC protocols. The simulation results confirm that the prioritizing- and voting-based election ideas decrease the construction time and the energy consumption of clustering progress in sensor networks and consequently improve the lifetime of networks with limited resources and battery powered nodes in harsh and inaccessible environments.

  20. Size distribution of Amazon River bed sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordin, C.F.; Meade, R.H.; Curtis, W.F.; Bosio, N.J.; Landim, P.M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The first recorded observations of bed material of the Amazon River were made in 1843 by Lt William Lewis Herndon of the US Navy, when he travelled the river from its headwaters to its mouth, sounding its depths, and noting the nature of particles caught in a heavy grease smeared to the bottom of his sounding weight1. He reported the bed material of the river to be mostly sand and fine gravel. Oltman and Ames took samples at a few locations in 1963 and 1964, and reported the bed material at O??bidos, Brazil, to be fine sands, with median diameters ranging from 0.15 to 0.25 mm (ref. 2). We present here a summary of particle-size analyses of samples of streambed material collected from the Amazon River and its major tributaries along a reach of the river from Iquitos in Peru, ???3,500 km above Macapa?? Brazil, to a point 220 km above Macapa??3. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  1. Field-emission spectrum of a nanometer-size supported gold cluster: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.E.; Reifenberger, R. ); Andres, R.P. )

    1992-12-15

    The electron-energy spectrum of a single 1-nm-diam Au cluster supported on a W substrate has been studied by measuring the distribution of electrons field emitted from the cluster. A resonance-tunneling theory is described that reproduces the salient features of the experimental spectrum and relates it to the electronic structure of the supported cluster.

  2. Initial size distributions and hygroscopicity of indoor combustion aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Hopke, P.K.

    1993-10-01

    Cigarette smoke, incense smoke, natural gas flames, propane fuel flames, and candle flames are contributors of indoor aerosol particles. To provide a quantitative basis for the modeling of inhaled aerosol deposition pattern, the hygroscopic growth of particles from these five sources as well as the source size distributions were measured. Because the experiments were performed on the bases of particles of single size, it provided not only the averaged particle`s hygroscopic growth of each source, but also the detailed size change for particles of different sizes within the whole size spectrum. The source particle size distribution measurements found that cigarette smoke and incense smoke contained particles in the size range of 100-700 nm, while the natural gas, propane, and candle flames generated particles between 10 and 100 nm. The hygroscopic growth experiments showed that these combustion aerosol particles could grow 10% to 120%, depending on the particle sizes and origins. 18 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Measuring Complementary Electronic Structure Properties of both Deposited and Gas Phase Clusters using STM, UPS, and PES: Size-Selected Clusters on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Kit H.

    2014-03-05

    In this project, we studied size-selected cluster interactions with surfaces, with other clusters on surfaces, and with external stimuli. These studies focused on mobility as a function of cluster size, surface morphologies as a function of composition and coverage, ion-induced modification and reactivity of clusters as a function of composition, the structural evolution of cluster cuboids culminating in the characterization of theoretically-predicted “baby crystal” clusters, and unusual fractal pattern formation due to deposition.

  4. Assortativity coefficient-based estimation of population patterns of sexual mixing when cluster size is informative.

    PubMed

    Young, Siobhan K; Lyles, Robert H; Kupper, Lawrence L; Keys, Jessica R; Martin, Sandra L; Costenbader, Elizabeth C

    2014-06-01

    Population sexual mixing patterns can be quantified using Newman's assortativity coefficient (r). Suggested methods for estimating the SE for r may lead to inappropriate statistical conclusions in situations where intracluster correlation is ignored and/or when cluster size is predictive of the response. We describe a computer-intensive, but highly accessible, within-cluster resampling approach for providing a valid large-sample estimated SE for r and an associated 95% CI. We introduce needed statistical notation and describe the within-cluster resampling approach. Sexual network data and a simulation study were employed to compare within-cluster resampling with standard methods when cluster size is informative. For the analysis of network data when cluster size is informative, the simulation study demonstrates that within-cluster resampling produces valid statistical inferences about Newman's assortativity coefficient, a popular statistic used to quantify the strength of mixing patterns. In contrast, commonly used methods are biased with attendant extremely poor CI coverage. Within-cluster resampling is recommended when cluster size is informative and/or when there is within-cluster response correlation. Within-cluster resampling is recommended for providing valid statistical inferences when applying Newman's assortativity coefficient r to network data. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Size distributions of quantum islands on stepped substrates.

    PubMed

    Liang, S; Zhu, H L; Wang, W

    2009-10-21

    The size distributions of self-assembled quantum islands on stepped substrates are studied using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the energy barrier E(SW) between the step and the terrace region is the key factor in affecting the size distribution of islands. With small E(SW) (< or = 0.1 eV), lines of uniform islands can be obtained at relative low surface coverage. As the surface coverage is increased, wirelike islands can be obtained. Scaling behavior is obeyed for the size distributions of the wirelike islands. When the size distributions are separated into their width and length components, however, scaling is only observed in the length distribution of the wirelike islands. With larger E(SW), the size distribution of islands shows a clear bimodal size distribution and anomalous growth temperature dependent island size evolutions are observed. The simulation results reproduce qualitatively the phenomena observed in the cases of InAs islands grown on stepped GaAs substrates.

  6. Body size distributions signal a regime shift in a lake ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Communities of organisms, from mammals to microorganisms, have discontinuous distributions of body size. This pattern of size structuring is a conservative trait of community organization and is a product of processes that occur at multiple spatial and temporal scales. In this study, we assessed whether body size patterns serve as an indicator of a threshold between alternative regimes. Over the past 7000 years, the biological communities of Foy Lake (Montana,USA) have undergone a major regime shift owing to climate change. We used a palaeoecological record of diatom communities to estimate diatom sizes, and then analysed the discontinuous distribution of organism sizes over time. We used Bayesian classification and regression tree models to determine that all time intervals exhibited aggregations of sizes separated by gaps in the distribution and found a significant change in diatom body size distributions approximately 150 years before the identified ecosystem regime shift. We suggest that discontinuity analysis is a useful addition to the suite of tools for the detection of early warning signals of regime shifts. Communities of organisms from mammals to microorganisms have discontinuous distributions of body size. This pattern of size structuring is a conservative trait of community organization and is a product of processes that occur at discrete spatial and temporal scales within ecosystems. Here, a paleoecological record of diatom community change is use

  7. THE COLLISIONAL DIVOT IN THE KUIPER BELT SIZE DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Wesley C.

    2009-11-20

    This paper presents the results of collisional evolution calculations for the Kuiper Belt starting from an initial size distribution similar to that produced by accretion simulations of that region-a steep power-law large object size distribution that breaks to a shallower slope at r approx 1-2 km, with collisional equilibrium achieved for objects r approx< 0.5 km. We find that the break from the steep large object power law causes a divot, or depletion of objects at r approx 10-20 km, which, in turn, greatly reduces the disruption rate of objects with r approx> 25-50 km, preserving the steep power-law behavior for objects at this size. Our calculations demonstrate that the roll-over observed in the Kuiper Belt size distribution is naturally explained as an edge of a divot in the size distribution; the radius at which the size distribution transitions away from the power law, and the shape of the divot from our simulations are consistent with the size of the observed roll-over, and size distribution for smaller bodies. Both the kink radius and the radius of the divot center depend on the strength scaling law in the gravity regime for Kuiper Belt objects. These simulations suggest that the sky density of r approx 1 km objects is approx10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} objects per square degree. A detection of the divot in the size distribution would provide a measure of the strength of large Kuiper Belt objects, and constrain the shape of the size distribution at the end of accretion in the Kuiper Belt.

  8. Kinetic energy distribution of multiply charged ions in Coulomb explosion of Xe clusters.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Andreas; Jortner, Joshua

    2011-02-21

    We report on the calculations of kinetic energy distribution (KED) functions of multiply charged, high-energy ions in Coulomb explosion (CE) of an assembly of elemental Xe(n) clusters (average size (n) = 200-2171) driven by ultra-intense, near-infrared, Gaussian laser fields (peak intensities 10(15) - 4 × 10(16) W cm(-2), pulse lengths 65-230 fs). In this cluster size and pulse parameter domain, outer ionization is incomplete∕vertical, incomplete∕nonvertical, or complete∕nonvertical, with CE occurring in the presence of nanoplasma electrons. The KEDs were obtained from double averaging of single-trajectory molecular dynamics simulation ion kinetic energies. The KEDs were doubly averaged over a log-normal cluster size distribution and over the laser intensity distribution of a spatial Gaussian beam, which constitutes either a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) profile, with the 3D profile (when the cluster beam radius is larger than the Rayleigh length) usually being experimentally realized. The general features of the doubly averaged KEDs manifest the smearing out of the structure corresponding to the distribution of ion charges, a marked increase of the KEDs at very low energies due to the contribution from the persistent nanoplasma, a distortion of the KEDs and of the average energies toward lower energy values, and the appearance of long low-intensity high-energy tails caused by the admixture of contributions from large clusters by size averaging. The doubly averaged simulation results account reasonably well (within 30%) for the experimental data for the cluster-size dependence of the CE energetics and for its dependence on the laser pulse parameters, as well as for the anisotropy in the angular distribution of the energies of the Xe(q+) ions. Possible applications of this computational study include a control of the ion kinetic energies by the choice of the laser intensity profile (2D∕3D) in the laser-cluster interaction volume.

  9. Intercomparison of 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS 3321): uncertainties in particle sizing and number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, S.; Müller, T.; Weinhold, K.; Zikova, N.; Santos, S.; Marinoni, A.; Bischof, O. F.; Kykal, C.; Ries, L.; Meinhardt, F.; Aalto, P.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamic particle size spectrometers are a well-established method to measure number size distributions of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere. Quality assurance is essential for atmospheric observational aerosol networks to obtain comparable results with known uncertainties. In a laboratory study within the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network), 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) were compared with a focus on flow rates accuracy, particle sizing, and unit-to-unit variability of the particle number size distribution. Flow rate deviations were relatively small (within a few percent), while the sizing accuracy was found to be within 10 % compared to polystyrene latex (PSL) reference particles. The unit-to-unit variability in terms of the particle number size distribution during this study was within 10-20 % for particles in the range of 0.9 up to 3 μm, which is acceptable for atmospheric measurements. For particles smaller than that, the variability increased up to 60 %, probably caused by differences in the counting efficiencies of individual units. Number size distribution data for particles smaller than 0.9 μm in aerodynamic diameter should be only used with caution. For particles larger than 3 μm, the unit-to-unit variability increased as well. A possible reason is an insufficient sizing accuracy in combination with a steeply sloping particle number size distribution and the increasing uncertainty due to decreasing counting. This uncertainty of the particle number size distribution has especially to be considered if higher moments of the size distribution such as the particle volume or mass are calculated, which require the conversion of the aerodynamic diameter measured to a volume equivalent diameter. In order to perform a quantitative quality assurance, a traceable reference method for the particle number concentration in the size range 0.5-3

  10. Intercomparison of 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS 3321): uncertainties in particle sizing and number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Sascha; Müller, Thomas; Weinhold, Kay; Zikova, Nadezda; Martins dos Santos, Sebastiao; Marinoni, Angela; Bischof, Oliver F.; Kykal, Carsten; Ries, Ludwig; Meinhardt, Frank; Aalto, Pasi; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic particle size spectrometers are a well-established method to measure number size distributions of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere. Quality assurance is essential for atmospheric observational aerosol networks to obtain comparable results with known uncertainties. In a laboratory study within the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network), 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) were compared with a focus on flow rates, particle sizing, and the unit-to-unit variability of the particle number size distribution. Flow rate deviations were relatively small (within a few percent), while the sizing accuracy was found to be within 10 % compared to polystyrene latex (PSL) reference particles. The unit-to-unit variability in terms of the particle number size distribution during this study was within 10 % to 20 % for particles in the range of 0.9 up to 3 µm, which is acceptable for atmospheric measurements. For particles smaller than that, the variability increased up to 60 %, probably caused by differences in the counting efficiencies of individual units. Number size distribution data for particles smaller than 0.9 µm in aerodynamic diameter should only be used with caution. For particles larger than 3 µm, the unit-to-unit variability increased as well. A possible reason is an insufficient sizing accuracy in combination with a steeply sloping particle number size distribution and the increasing uncertainty due to decreasing counting. Particularly this uncertainty of the particle number size distribution must be considered if higher moments of the size distribution such as the particle volume or mass are calculated, which require the conversion of the aerodynamic diameter measured to a volume equivalent diameter. In order to perform a quantitative quality assurance, a traceable reference method for the particle number concentration in the size range 0.5-3 µm

  11. Cluster-size entropy in the Axelrod model of social influence: Small-world networks and mass media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandica, Y.; Charmell, A.; Villegas-Febres, J.; Bonalde, I.

    2011-10-01

    We study the Axelrod's cultural adaptation model using the concept of cluster-size entropy Sc, which gives information on the variability of the cultural cluster size present in the system. Using networks of different topologies, from regular to random, we find that the critical point of the well-known nonequilibrium monocultural-multicultural (order-disorder) transition of the Axelrod model is given by the maximum of the Sc(q) distributions. The width of the cluster entropy distributions can be used to qualitatively determine whether the transition is first or second order. By scaling the cluster entropy distributions we were able to obtain a relationship between the critical cultural trait qc and the number F of cultural features in two-dimensional regular networks. We also analyze the effect of the mass media (external field) on social systems within the Axelrod model in a square network. We find a partially ordered phase whose largest cultural cluster is not aligned with the external field, in contrast with a recent suggestion that this type of phase cannot be formed in regular networks. We draw a q-B phase diagram for the Axelrod model in regular networks.

  12. Cluster-size entropy in the Axelrod model of social influence: small-world networks and mass media.

    PubMed

    Gandica, Y; Charmell, A; Villegas-Febres, J; Bonalde, I

    2011-10-01

    We study the Axelrod's cultural adaptation model using the concept of cluster-size entropy S(c), which gives information on the variability of the cultural cluster size present in the system. Using networks of different topologies, from regular to random, we find that the critical point of the well-known nonequilibrium monocultural-multicultural (order-disorder) transition of the Axelrod model is given by the maximum of the S(c)(q) distributions. The width of the cluster entropy distributions can be used to qualitatively determine whether the transition is first or second order. By scaling the cluster entropy distributions we were able to obtain a relationship between the critical cultural trait q(c) and the number F of cultural features in two-dimensional regular networks. We also analyze the effect of the mass media (external field) on social systems within the Axelrod model in a square network. We find a partially ordered phase whose largest cultural cluster is not aligned with the external field, in contrast with a recent suggestion that this type of phase cannot be formed in regular networks. We draw a q-B phase diagram for the Axelrod model in regular networks.

  13. The Size Distribution of Jupiter-Family Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Lowry, Stephen C.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: We are continuing our program to determine the size distribution of cometary nuclei. We have compiled a catalog of 105 measurements of 57 cometary nuclei, drawn from the general literature, from our own program of CCD photometry of distant cometary nuclei (Lowry and Weissman), and from unpublished observations by colleagues. We model the cumulative size distribution of the nuclei as a power law. Previous determinations of the size distribution slope do not agree. Fernandez et al. found a slope of alpha = 2.65+/-0.25 whereas Lowry et al. and Weissman and Lowry each found a slope of alpha = 1.60+/-0.10.

  14. Free Volume Size Distribution in Some Natural Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrashekara, M. N.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2011-07-01

    Positron lifetime technique was used to determine the size distribution of free volume holes in some natural polymers-animal hair, feather, cotton and silk. The effect of fiber swelling on the nature of size distribution was also monitored. The obtained positron lifetime spectra were analyzed by using the computer program CONTIN (PALS-2). Significant differences in the size distribution were observed for these biological polymers (and even among the different animal hair types), possibly due to the structural differences, which have not been investigated hitherto.

  15. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga`s mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  16. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga's mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  17. The Size Distribution of Jupiter-Family Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Lowry, Stephen C.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: We are continuing our program to determine the size distribution of cometary nuclei. We have compiled a catalog of 105 measurements of 57 cometary nuclei, drawn from the general literature, from our own program of CCD photometry of distant cometary nuclei (Lowry and Weissman), and from unpublished observations by colleagues. We model the cumulative size distribution of the nuclei as a power law. Previous determinations of the size distribution slope do not agree. Fernandez et al. found a slope of alpha = 2.65+/-0.25 whereas Lowry et al. and Weissman and Lowry each found a slope of alpha = 1.60+/-0.10.

  18. Knitting distributed cluster-state ladders with spin chains

    SciTech Connect

    Ronke, R.; D'Amico, I.; Spiller, T. P.

    2011-09-15

    Recently there has been much study on the application of spin chains to quantum state transfer and communication. Here we discuss the utilization of spin chains (set up for perfect quantum state transfer) for the knitting of distributed cluster-state structures, between spin qubits repeatedly injected and extracted at the ends of the chain. The cluster states emerge from the natural evolution of the system across different excitation number sectors. We discuss the decohering effects of errors in the injection and extraction process as well as the effects of fabrication and random errors.

  19. Impact of microphysical processes on ice crystal size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüttmer, Tim; Spichtinger, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Cirrus clouds affect the Earth's radiation budget significantly. Their radiative properties depend on the microphysical properties and ice crystal size distribution. Microphysical processes affect the type and structure of ice crystal distributions strongly. However, bulk microphysics schemes are not able to represent changes in distribution type; thus, effects concerning changes in the distribution cannot be investigated using such simplified parameterizations. A size-resolved bin model was developed to study the influence of microphysical processes on ice crystal size distributions of cirrus clouds. The model is based on a consistent treatment of the relevant processes and ice crystal properties. Results of 1-D simulations investigating the temporal and spatial evolution of cirrus ice distributions under various idealized environmental conditions are presented. Emphasis is placed on the effects of sedimentation and depositional growth, but other processes such as ice nucleation are also considered in the simulations.

  20. The effects of the cluster environment on the galaxy mass-size relation in MACS J1206.2-0847

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchner, U.; Ziegler, B.; Verdugo, M.; Bamford, S.; Häußler, B.

    2017-08-01

    The dense environment of galaxy clusters strongly influences the nature of galaxies. Their abundance and diversity is imprinted on the stellar-mass-size plane. Here, we study the cause of the size distribution of a sample of 560 spectroscopic members spanning a wide dynamical range down to 108.5M⊙ (log (M)-2) in the massive CLASH cluster MACSJ1206.2-0847 at z = 0.44. We use Subaru SuprimeCam imaging covering the highest-density core out to the infall regions (3 virial radii) to look for cluster-specific effects on a global scale. We also compare our measurements to a compatible large field study in order to span extreme environmental densities. This paper presents the trends we identified for cluster galaxies divided by their colors into star forming and quiescent galaxies and into distinct morphological types (using Sérsic index and bulge/disk decompositions). We observed larger sizes for early-type galaxies and smaller sizes for massive late-type galaxies in clusters in comparison to the field. We attribute this to longer quenching timescales of more massive galaxies in the cluster. Our analysis further revealed an increasing importance of recently quenched transition objects ("red disks"), where the correspondence between galaxy morphology and color is out of sync. This is a virialized population with sizes similar to the quiescent, spheroid-dominated population of the cluster center, but with disks still in-tact, and found at higher cluster-centric radii. The mass-size relation of cluster galaxies may therefore be understood as the consequence of a mix of progenitors formed at different quenching epochs. We also investigate the stellar-mass-size relation as a representation of galaxy sizes smoothly decreasing as a function of bulge fraction. We find that at an identical bulge-to-total ratio and identical stellar mass, quiescent galaxies are smaller than star forming galaxies. This is likely because of a fading of the outskirts of the disk, which we saw in

  1. Sample Size Calculation for Clustered Binary Data with Sign Tests Using Different Weighting Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chul; Hu, Fan; Schucany, William R.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a sample size calculation approach for testing a proportion using the weighted sign test when binary observations are dependent within a cluster. Sample size formulas are derived with nonparametric methods using three weighting schemes: equal weights to observations, equal weights to clusters, and optimal weights that minimize the variance of the estimator. Sample size formulas are derived incorporating intracluster correlation and the variability in cluster sizes. Simulation studies are conducted to evaluate a finite sample performance of the proposed sample size formulas. Empirical powers are generally close to nominal levels. The number of clusters required increases as the imbalance in cluster size increases and the intracluster correlation increases. The estimator using optimal weights yields the smallest sample size estimate among three estimators. For small values of intracluster correlation the sample size estimates derived from the optimal weight estimator are close to that derived from the estimator assigning equal weights to observations. For large values of intracluster correlation, the optimal weight sample size estimate is close to the sample size estimate assigning equal weights to clusters. PMID:21339864

  2. Sample Size Calculation for Clustered Binary Data with Sign Tests Using Different Weighting Schemes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chul; Hu, Fan; Schucany, William R

    2011-02-01

    We propose a sample size calculation approach for testing a proportion using the weighted sign test when binary observations are dependent within a cluster. Sample size formulas are derived with nonparametric methods using three weighting schemes: equal weights to observations, equal weights to clusters, and optimal weights that minimize the variance of the estimator. Sample size formulas are derived incorporating intracluster correlation and the variability in cluster sizes. Simulation studies are conducted to evaluate a finite sample performance of the proposed sample size formulas. Empirical powers are generally close to nominal levels. The number of clusters required increases as the imbalance in cluster size increases and the intracluster correlation increases. The estimator using optimal weights yields the smallest sample size estimate among three estimators. For small values of intracluster correlation the sample size estimates derived from the optimal weight estimator are close to that derived from the estimator assigning equal weights to observations. For large values of intracluster correlation, the optimal weight sample size estimate is close to the sample size estimate assigning equal weights to clusters.

  3. Gephyrin expression and clustering affects the size of glutamatergic synaptic contacts

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wendou; De Blas, Angel L.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that disrupting the expression and postsynaptic clustering of gephyrin in cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells, by either gephyrin RNAi (RNA interference) or overexpression of a dominant negative gephyrin-EGFP fusion protein, leads to decreased number of postsynaptic gephyrin and GABAA receptor clusters and to reduced GABAergic innervation of these cells. On the other hand, increasing gephyrin expression led to a small increase in the number of gephyrin and GABAA receptor clusters and to little or no effect on GABAergic innervation. We are now reporting that altering gephyrin expression and clustering affects the size but not the density of glutamatergic synaptic contacts. Knocking down gephyrin with gephyrin RNAi, or preventing gephyrin clustering by overexpression of the dominant negative gephyrin-EGFP fusion protein, leads to larger postsynaptic PSD-95 clusters and larger presynaptic glutamatergic terminals. On the other hand, overexpression of gephyrin leads to slightly smaller PSD-95 clusters and presynaptic glutamatergic terminals. The change in size of PSD-95 clusters were accompanied by a parallel change in the size of NR2-NMDA receptor clusters. It is concluded that the levels of expression and clustering of gephyrin, a protein that concentrates at the postsynaptic complex of the inhibitory synapses, not only has homotypic effects on GABAergic synaptic contacts, but also has heterotypic effects on glutamatergic synaptic contacts. We are proposing that gephyrin is a counterpart of the postsynaptic glutamatergic scaffold protein PSD-95 in regulating the number and/or size of the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic contacts. PMID:18199120

  4. Partially oxidized iridium clusters within dendrimers: size-controlled synthesis and selective hydrogenation of 2-nitrobenzaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, Tatsuya; Kitazawa, Hirokazu; Yamazoe, Seiji; Tsukuda, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Iridium clusters nominally composed of 15, 30 or 60 atoms were size-selectively synthesized within OH-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 6. Spectroscopic characterization revealed that the Ir clusters were partially oxidized. All the Ir clusters efficiently converted 2-nitrobenzaldehyde to anthranil and 2-aminobenzaldehyde under atmospheric hydrogen at room temperature in toluene via selective hydrogenation of the NO2 group. The selectivity toward 2-aminobenzaldehyde over anthranil was improved with the reduction of the cluster size. The improved selectivity is ascribed to more efficient reduction than intramolecular heterocyclization of a hydroxylamine intermediate on smaller clusters that have a higher Ir(0)-phase population on the surface.Iridium clusters nominally composed of 15, 30 or 60 atoms were size-selectively synthesized within OH-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 6. Spectroscopic characterization revealed that the Ir clusters were partially oxidized. All the Ir clusters efficiently converted 2-nitrobenzaldehyde to anthranil and 2-aminobenzaldehyde under atmospheric hydrogen at room temperature in toluene via selective hydrogenation of the NO2 group. The selectivity toward 2-aminobenzaldehyde over anthranil was improved with the reduction of the cluster size. The improved selectivity is ascribed to more efficient reduction than intramolecular heterocyclization of a hydroxylamine intermediate on smaller clusters that have a higher Ir(0)-phase population on the surface. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01460g

  5. Environmental control of natural gap size distribution in tropical forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulamoussène, Youven; Bedeau, Caroline; Descroix, Laurent; Linguet, Laurent; Hérault, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Natural disturbances are the dominant form of forest regeneration and dynamics in unmanaged tropical forests. Monitoring the size distribution of treefall gaps is important to better understand and predict the carbon budget in response to land use and other global changes. In this study, we model the size frequency distribution of natural canopy gaps with a discrete power law distribution. We use a Bayesian framework to introduce and test, using Monte Carlo Markov chain and Kuo-Mallick algorithms, the effect of local physical environment on gap size distribution. We apply our methodological framework to an original light detecting and ranging dataset in which natural forest gaps were delineated over 30 000 ha of unmanaged forest. We highlight strong links between gap size distribution and environment, primarily hydrological conditions and topography, with large gaps being more frequent on floodplains and in wind-exposed areas. In the future, we plan to apply our methodological framework on a larger scale using satellite data. Additionally, although gap size distribution variation is clearly under environmental control, variation in gap size distribution in time should be tested against climate variability.

  6. What We Can Learn From Supernova Remnant Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwood, Benjamin; Murphy, Jeremiah; Diaz, Mariangelly

    2016-01-01

    Previous literature regarding size distributions of supernova remnants generally discuss a uniform distribution for the radius, occasionally considering a Gaussian alternative. We indeed show that these distributions are consistent with log-normal, which can be considered a natural consequence of the Central Limit Theorem and Sedov expansion. Modeling explosion energy, remnant age, and ambient density as independent, random distributions, we show, using simple Monte Carlo simulations, that the size distribution is indistinguishable from log-normal when the SNR sample size is of order three hundred. This implies that these SNR distributions provide only information on the mean and variance, yielding additional information only when the sample size grows large. We then proceed to Bayesian statistical inference to characterize the information provided by the size distributions. In particular, we use the mean and variance of sizes and explosion energies to subsequently estimate the mean and variance of the ambient medium surrounding SNR progenitors. This in turn allows us to characterize potential bias in studies involving samples of supernova remnants.

  7. Effects of Mixtures on Liquid and Solid Fragment Size Distributions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    treated steel ; 67.0/ mn Table 11 gives examples of size distributions taken from the research literature on atomization and sprays where mn...impact (0.5–2.0 km/s) on thin steel plates.” More specifically, he studied “spherical porous aluminum projectiles 2.51 cm in diameter … cut from a...Effects of Mixtures on Liquid and Solid Fragment Size Distributions Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  8. Phenotype Clustering of Breast Epithelial Cells in Confocal Imagesbased on Nuclear Protein Distribution Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Fuhui; Peng, Hanchuan; Sudar, Damir; Levievre, Sophie A.; Knowles, David W.

    2006-09-05

    Background: The distribution of the chromatin-associatedproteins plays a key role in directing nuclear function. Previously, wedeveloped an image-based method to quantify the nuclear distributions ofproteins and showed that these distributions depended on the phenotype ofhuman mammary epithelial cells. Here we describe a method that creates ahierarchical tree of the given cell phenotypes and calculates thestatistical significance between them, based on the clustering analysisof nuclear protein distributions. Results: Nuclear distributions ofnuclear mitotic apparatus protein were previously obtained fornon-neoplastic S1 and malignant T4-2 human mammary epithelial cellscultured for up to 12 days. Cell phenotype was defined as S1 or T4-2 andthe number of days in cultured. A probabilistic ensemble approach wasused to define a set of consensus clusters from the results of multipletraditional cluster analysis techniques applied to the nucleardistribution data. Cluster histograms were constructed to show how cellsin any one phenotype were distributed across the consensus clusters.Grouping various phenotypes allowed us to build phenotype trees andcalculate the statistical difference between each group. The resultsshowed that non-neoplastic S1 cells could be distinguished from malignantT4-2 cells with 94.19 percent accuracy; that proliferating S1 cells couldbe distinguished from differentiated S1 cells with 92.86 percentaccuracy; and showed no significant difference between the variousphenotypes of T4-2 cells corresponding to increasing tumor sizes.Conclusion: This work presents a cluster analysis method that canidentify significant cell phenotypes, based on the nuclear distributionof specific proteins, with high accuracy.

  9. Self-consistent Size and Velocity Distributions of Collisional Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Margaret; Schlichting, Hilke E.

    2012-03-01

    The standard theoretical treatment of collisional cascades derives a steady-state size distribution assuming a single constant velocity dispersion for all bodies regardless of size. Here we relax this assumption and solve self-consistently for the bodies' steady-state size and size-dependent velocity distributions. Specifically, we account for viscous stirring, dynamical friction, and collisional damping of the bodies' random velocities in addition to the mass conservation requirement typically applied to find the size distribution in a steady-state cascade. The resulting size distributions are significantly steeper than those derived without velocity evolution. For example, accounting self-consistently for the velocities can change the standard q = 3.5 power-law index of the Dohnanyi differential size spectrum to an index as large as q = 4. Similarly, for bodies held together by their own gravity, the corresponding power-law index range 2.88 < q < 3.14 of Pan & Sari can steepen to values as large as q = 3.26. Our velocity results allow quantitative predictions of the bodies' scale heights as a function of size. Together with our predictions, observations of the scale heights for different-sized bodies for the Kuiper belt, the asteroid belt, and extrasolar debris disks may constrain the mass and number of large bodies stirring the cascade as well as the colliding bodies' internal strengths.

  10. SELF-CONSISTENT SIZE AND VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS OF COLLISIONAL CASCADES

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Margaret; Schlichting, Hilke E. E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu

    2012-03-10

    The standard theoretical treatment of collisional cascades derives a steady-state size distribution assuming a single constant velocity dispersion for all bodies regardless of size. Here we relax this assumption and solve self-consistently for the bodies' steady-state size and size-dependent velocity distributions. Specifically, we account for viscous stirring, dynamical friction, and collisional damping of the bodies' random velocities in addition to the mass conservation requirement typically applied to find the size distribution in a steady-state cascade. The resulting size distributions are significantly steeper than those derived without velocity evolution. For example, accounting self-consistently for the velocities can change the standard q = 3.5 power-law index of the Dohnanyi differential size spectrum to an index as large as q = 4. Similarly, for bodies held together by their own gravity, the corresponding power-law index range 2.88 < q < 3.14 of Pan and Sari can steepen to values as large as q = 3.26. Our velocity results allow quantitative predictions of the bodies' scale heights as a function of size. Together with our predictions, observations of the scale heights for different-sized bodies for the Kuiper belt, the asteroid belt, and extrasolar debris disks may constrain the mass and number of large bodies stirring the cascade as well as the colliding bodies' internal strengths.

  11. The distribution of dark matter in the A2256 cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, J. Patrick; Briel, Ulrich G.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.

    1993-01-01

    Using spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy, it was determined that the X-ray emitting gas in the rich cluster A2256 is nearly isothermal to a radius of at least 0.76/h Mpc, or about three core radii. These data can be used to measure the distribution of the dark matter in the cluster. It was found that the total mass interior to 0.76/h Mpc and 1.5/h Mpc is (0.5 +/- 0.1 and 1.0 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp 15)/h of the solar mass respectively where the errors encompass the full range allowed by all models used. Thus, the mass appropriate to the region where spectral information was obtained is well determined, but the uncertainties become large upon extrapolating beyond that region. It is shown that the galaxy orbits are midly anisotropic which may cause the beta discrepancy in this cluster.

  12. The distribution of dark matter in the A2256 cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, J. Patrick; Briel, Ulrich G.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.

    1993-01-01

    Using spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy, it was determined that the X-ray emitting gas in the rich cluster A2256 is nearly isothermal to a radius of at least 0.76/h Mpc, or about three core radii. These data can be used to measure the distribution of the dark matter in the cluster. It was found that the total mass interior to 0.76/h Mpc and 1.5/h Mpc is (0.5 +/- 0.1 and 1.0 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp 15)/h of the solar mass respectively where the errors encompass the full range allowed by all models used. Thus, the mass appropriate to the region where spectral information was obtained is well determined, but the uncertainties become large upon extrapolating beyond that region. It is shown that the galaxy orbits are midly anisotropic which may cause the beta discrepancy in this cluster.

  13. A statistical analysis of North East Atlantic (submicron) aerosol size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Monahan, C.; Greaney, R.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Harrison, R. M.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Global Atmospheric Watch research station at Mace Head (Ireland) offers the possibility to sample some of the cleanest air masses being imported into Europe as well as some of the most polluted being exported out of Europe. We present a statistical cluster analysis of the physical characteristics of aerosol size distributions in air ranging from the cleanest to the most polluted for the year 2008. Data coverage achieved was 75% throughout the year. By applying the Hartigan-Wong k-Means method, 12 clusters were identified as systematically occurring. These 12 clusters could be further combined into 4 categories with similar characteristics, namely: coastal nucleation category (occurring 21.3 % of the time), open ocean nucleation category (occurring 32.6% of the time), background clean marine category (occurring 26.1% of the time) and anthropogenic category (occurring 20% of the time) aerosol size distributions. The coastal nucleation category is characterised by a clear and dominant nucleation mode at sizes less than 10 nm while the open ocean nucleation category is characterised by a dominant Aitken mode between 15 nm and 50 nm. The background clean marine aerosol exhibited a clear bimodality in the sub-micron size distribution, with although it should be noted that either the Aitken mode or the accumulation mode may dominate the number concentration. However, peculiar background clean marine size distributions with coarser accumulation modes are also observed during winter months. By contrast, the continentally-influenced size distributions are generally more monomodal (accumulation), albeit with traces of bimodality. The open ocean category occurs more often during May, June and July, corresponding with the North East (NE) Atlantic high biological period. Combined with the relatively high percentage frequency of occurrence (32.6%), this suggests that the marine biota is an important source of new nano aerosol particles in NE Atlantic Air.

  14. Galaxy Evolution & The Mass-Size Relation In Z 1 Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matharu, Jasleen; Muzzin, Adam; Hewett, Paul; Auger, Matt

    2017-06-01

    Galaxies residing in high-density environments are preferentially red with early-type morphology. This has long since implied differences in the way cluster and field galaxies evolve. Nevertheless, there remains disagreement in the literature on how the cluster environment influences the structural evolution of galaxies. The stellar mass-size relation for galaxies has proven to be a powerful tool in understanding how galaxies grow. Recent results in the field environment show two distinct relations star-forming and quiescent galaxies follow for a broad range of redshifts. Clusters provide an opportunity to measure this mass-size relation in a much higher density environment, allowing us to probe environmental influences on galaxy evolution. For example, it is hypothesised that minor mergers drive the evolution of the mass-size relation; however, such mergers are uncommon in clusters, making them a key region to test this hypothesis. I will present some of the first results on the cluster mass-size relation from HST follow up to GCLASS. GCLASS is the largest spectroscopic survey conducted on 10 clusters at z 1. Our data has increased the sample of cluster galaxies with accurate size measurements, allowing us to find the first clear distinctions between the cluster and field mass-size relations at z 1.

  15. [Electronic and structural properties of individual nanometer-size supported metallic clusters]. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Reifenberger, R.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under contract DOE-FCO2-84ER45162. During the past ten years, our study of electron emission from laser-illuminated field emission tips has taken on a broader scope by addressing problems of direct interest to those concerned with the unique physical and chemical properties of nanometer-size clusters. The work performed has demonstrated that much needed data can be obtained on individual nanometer-size clusters supported on a wide-variety of different substrates. The work was performed in collaboration with R.P. Andres in the School of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University. The Multiple Expansion Cluster Source developed by Andres and his students was essential for producing the nanometer-size clusters studied. The following report features a discussion of these results. This report provides a motivation for studying the properties of nanometer-size clusters and summarizes the results obtained.

  16. Using design effects from previous cluster surveys to guide sample size calculation in emergency settings.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Reinhard; Woodruff, Bradley A; Bilukha, Oleg; Spiegel, Paul B; Salama, Peter

    2006-06-01

    A good estimate of the design effect is critical for calculating the most efficient sample size for cluster surveys. We reviewed the design effects for seven nutrition and health outcomes from nine population-based cluster surveys conducted in emergency settings. Most of the design effects for outcomes in children, and one-half of the design effects for crude mortality, were below two. A reassessment of mortality data from Kosovo and Badghis, Afghanistan revealed that, given the same number of clusters, changing sample size had a relatively small impact on the precision of the estimate of mortality. We concluded that, in most surveys, assuming a design effect of 1.5 for acute malnutrition in children and two or less for crude mortality would produce a more efficient sample size. In addition, enhancing the sample size in cluster surveys without increasing the number of clusters may not result in substantial improvements in precision.

  17. The Gas Distribution in the Outer Regions of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Lau, E. T.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We present our analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We have exploited the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius, We stacked the density profiles to detect a signal beyond T200 and measured the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also computed the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compared our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to some recent Suzaku results, and confirming previous evidence from ROSAT and Chandra, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict density profiles that are too steep, whereas runs including additional physics and/ or treating gas clumping agree better with the observed gas distribution. We report high-confidence detection of a systematic difference between cool-core and non cool-core clusters beyond approximately 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond approximately r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only small differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the ENZO simulations. Conclusions. Comparing our results with numerical simulations, we find that non-radiative simulations fail to reproduce the gas distribution, even well outside

  18. The Gas Distribution in Galaxy Cluster Outer Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Ettori, S.; Molendi, S.; Nagai, D.; Laue, E. T.; Roncarelli, M.; Rossetti, M.; Snowden, S. L.; Gastaldello, F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We present the analysis of a local (z = 0.04 - 0.2) sample of 31 galaxy clusters with the aim of measuring the density of the X-ray emitting gas in cluster outskirts. We compare our results with numerical simulations to set constraints on the azimuthal symmetry and gas clumping in the outer regions of galaxy clusters. Methods. We exploit the large field-of-view and low instrumental background of ROSAT/PSPC to trace the density of the intracluster gas out to the virial radius. We perform a stacking of the density profiles to detect a signal beyond r200 and measure the typical density and scatter in cluster outskirts. We also compute the azimuthal scatter of the profiles with respect to the mean value to look for deviations from spherical symmetry. Finally, we compare our average density and scatter profiles with the results of numerical simulations. Results. As opposed to some recent Suzaku results, and confirming previous evidence from ROSAT and Chandra, we observe a steepening of the density profiles beyond approximately r(sub 500). Comparing our density profiles with simulations, we find that non-radiative runs predict too steep density profiles, whereas runs including additional physics and/or treating gas clumping are in better agreement with the observed gas distribution. We report for the first time the high-confidence detection of a systematic difference between cool-core and non-cool core clusters beyond 0.3r(sub 200), which we explain by a different distribution of the gas in the two classes. Beyond r(sub 500), galaxy clusters deviate significantly from spherical symmetry, with only little differences between relaxed and disturbed systems. We find good agreement between the observed and predicted scatter profiles, but only when the 1% densest clumps are filtered out in the simulations. Conclusions. Comparing our results with numerical simulations, we find that non-radiative simulations fail to reproduce the gas distribution, even well outside cluster

  19. Appendix B: Summary of TEM Particle Size Distribution Datasets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As discussed in the main text (see Section 5.3.2), calculation of the concentration of asbestos fibers in each of the bins of potential interest requires particle size distribution data derived using transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  20. Grain Size Distribution in the Matrix of Primitive Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, E.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Starkey, N. A.; Franchi, I. A.; Russell, S. S.

    2015-07-01

    We describe the abundances and size distribution of discrete grains of different phases observed within the matrix of: Acfer 094, ALHA77307, MIL 07687 and QUE 99177 and discuss how the observed differences may be evidence of parent body processes.

  1. A model for predicting fog aerosol size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudiger, Joshua J.; Book, Kevin; Baker, Brooke; deGrassie, John Stephen; Hammel, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    An accurate model and parameterization of fog is needed to increase the reliability and usefulness of electro-optical systems in all relevant environments. Current models vary widely in their ability to accurately predict the size distribution and subsequent optical properties of fog. The Advanced Navy Aerosol Model (ANAM), developed to model the distribution of aerosols in the maritime environment, does not currently include a model for fog. One of the more prevalent methods for modeling particle size spectra consists of fitting a modified gamma function to fog measurement data. This limits the fog distribution to a single mode. Here we establish an empirical model for predicting complicated multimodal fog droplet size spectra using machine learning techniques. This is accomplished through careful measurements of fog in a controlled laboratory environment and measuring fog particle size distributions during outdoor fog events.

  2. The best nanoparticle size distribution for minimum thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Minnich, Austin J

    2015-03-11

    Which sizes of nanoparticles embedded in a crystalline solid yield the lowest thermal conductivity? Nanoparticles have long been demonstrated to reduce the thermal conductivity of crystals by scattering phonons, but most previous works assumed the nanoparticles to have a single size. Here, we use optimization methods to show that the best nanoparticle size distribution to scatter the broad thermal phonon spectrum is not a similarly broad distribution but rather several discrete peaks at well-chosen nanoparticle radii. For SiGe, the best size distribution yields a thermal conductivity below that of amorphous silicon. Further, we demonstrate that a simplified distribution yields nearly the same low thermal conductivity and can be readily fabricated. Our work provides important insights into how to manipulate the full spectrum of phonons and will guide the design of more efficient thermoelectric materials.

  3. The best nanoparticle size distribution for minimum thermal conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Minnich, Austin J.

    2015-01-01

    Which sizes of nanoparticles embedded in a crystalline solid yield the lowest thermal conductivity? Nanoparticles have long been demonstrated to reduce the thermal conductivity of crystals by scattering phonons, but most previous works assumed the nanoparticles to have a single size. Here, we use optimization methods to show that the best nanoparticle size distribution to scatter the broad thermal phonon spectrum is not a similarly broad distribution but rather several discrete peaks at well-chosen nanoparticle radii. For SiGe, the best size distribution yields a thermal conductivity below that of amorphous silicon. Further, we demonstrate that a simplified distribution yields nearly the same low thermal conductivity and can be readily fabricated. Our work provides important insights into how to manipulate the full spectrum of phonons and will guide the design of more efficient thermoelectric materials. PMID:25757414

  4. Super-resolution Imaging Reveals the Internal Architecture of Nano-sized Syntaxin Clusters*

    PubMed Central

    Bar-On, Dana; Wolter, Steve; van de Linde, Sebastian; Heilemann, Mike; Nudelman, German; Nachliel, Esther; Gutman, Menachem; Sauer, Markus; Ashery, Uri

    2012-01-01

    Key synaptic proteins from the soluble SNARE (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) family, among many others, are organized at the plasma membrane of cells as clusters containing dozens to hundreds of protein copies. However, the exact membranal distribution of proteins into clusters or as single molecules, the organization of molecules inside the clusters, and the clustering mechanisms are unclear due to limitations of the imaging and analytical tools. Focusing on syntaxin 1 and SNAP-25, we implemented direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy together with quantitative clustering algorithms to demonstrate a novel approach to explore the distribution of clustered and nonclustered molecules at the membrane of PC12 cells with single-molecule precision. Direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images reveal, for the first time, solitary syntaxin/SNAP-25 molecules and small clusters as well as larger clusters. The nonclustered syntaxin or SNAP-25 molecules are mostly concentrated in areas adjacent to their own clusters. In the clusters, the density of the molecules gradually decreases from the dense cluster core to the periphery. We further detected large clusters that contain several density gradients. This suggests that some of the clusters are formed by unification of several clusters that preserve their original organization or reorganize into a single unit. Although syntaxin and SNAP-25 share some common distributional features, their clusters differ markedly from each other. SNAP-25 clusters are significantly larger, more elliptical, and less dense. Finally, this study establishes methodological tools for the analysis of single-molecule-based super-resolution imaging data and paves the way for revealing new levels of membranal protein organization. PMID:22700970

  5. The cluster distribution as a test of dark matter models - I. Clustering properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgani, Stefano; Plionis, Manolis; Coles, Peter; Moscardini, Lauro

    1995-12-01

    We present extended simulations of the large-scale distribution of galaxy clusters in several dark matter models, using an optimized version of the truncated Zel'dovich approximation (TZA). In order to test the reliability of our simulations, we compare them with N-body-based cluster simulations. We find that the TZA provides a very accurate description of the cluster distribution as long as fluctuations on the cluster mass-scale are in the mildly non-linear regime (sigma_8<~1). The low computational cost of this simulation technique allows us to run a large ensemble of 50 realizations for each model, so we are able to quantify accurately the effects of cosmic variance. Six different dark matter models are studied in this work: standard CDM (SCDM), tilted CDM (TCDM) with primordial spectral index n=0.7, cold+hot DM (CHDM) with Omega_hot=0.3, low Hubble constant (h=0.3) CDM (LOWH), and two spatially flat low-density CDM models with Omega_0=0.2 and Omega_Lambda=0.8, having two different normalizations, sigma_8=0.8 (LambdaCDM_1) and sigma_8=1.3 (LambdaCDM_2). We compare the cluster simulations with an extended redshift sample of Abell/ACO clusters, using various statistical measures, such as the integral of the two-point correlation function, J_3, and the probability density function (pdf). We find that the models that best reproduce the clustering of the Abell/ACO cluster sample are the CHDM and the LambdaCDM_1 models. The LambdaCDM_2 model is too strongly clustered, and this clustering is probably overestimated in our simulations as a result of the large sigma_8-value of this model. All of the other models are ruled out at a high confidence level. The pdfs of all models are well approximated by a lognormal distribution, consistent with similar findings for Abell/ACO clusters. The low-order moments of all the pdfs are found to obey a variance-skewness relation of the form gamma~=S_3sigma^4, with S_3~=1.9, independent of the primordial spectral shape and consistent

  6. Minimal mass size of a stable {sup 3}He cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Guardiola, R.; Navarro, J.

    2005-03-01

    The minimal number of {sup 3}He atoms required to form a bound cluster has been estimated by means of a diffusion Monte Carlo procedure within the fixed-node approximation. Several importance sampling wave functions have been employed in order to consider different shell-model configurations. The resulting upper bound for the minimal number is 32 atoms.

  7. General Framework for Effect Sizes in Cluster Randomized Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanHoudnos, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Cluster randomized experiments are ubiquitous in modern education research. Although a variety of modeling approaches are used to analyze these data, perhaps the most common methodology is a normal mixed effects model where some effects, such as the treatment effect, are regarded as fixed, and others, such as the effect of group random assignment…

  8. INITIAL PLANETESIMAL SIZES AND THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichting, Hilke E.; Fuentes, Cesar I.; Trilling, David E.

    2013-08-01

    The Kuiper Belt is a remnant from the early solar system and its size distribution contains many important constraints that can be used to test models of planet formation and collisional evolution. We show, by comparing observations with theoretical models, that the observed Kuiper Belt size distribution is well matched by coagulation models, which start with an initial planetesimal population with radii of about 1 km, and subsequent collisional evolution. We find that the observed size distribution above R {approx} 30 km is primordial, i.e., it has not been modified by collisional evolution over the age of the solar system, and that the size distribution below R {approx} 30 km has been modified by collisions and that its slope is well matched by collisional evolution models that use published strength laws. We investigate in detail the resulting size distribution of bodies ranging from 0.01 km to 30 km and find that its slope changes several times as a function of radius before approaching the expected value for an equilibrium collisional cascade of material strength dominated bodies for R {approx}< 0.1 km. Compared to a single power-law size distribution that would span the whole range from 0.01 km to 30 km, we find in general a strong deficit of bodies around R {approx} 10 km and a strong excess of bodies around 2 km in radius. This deficit and excess of bodies are caused by the planetesimal size distribution left over from the runaway growth phase, which left most of the initial mass in small planetesimals while only a small fraction of the total mass is converted into large protoplanets. This excess mass in small planetesimals leaves a permanent signature in the size distribution of small bodies that is not erased after 4.5 Gyr of collisional evolution. Observations of the small Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) size distribution can therefore test if large KBOs grew as a result of runaway growth and constrained the initial planetesimal sizes. We find that results from

  9. A statistical approach to estimate the 3D size distribution of spheres from 2D size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kong, M.; Bhattacharya, R.N.; James, C.; Basu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Size distribution of rigidly embedded spheres in a groundmass is usually determined from measurements of the radii of the two-dimensional (2D) circular cross sections of the spheres in random flat planes of a sample, such as in thin sections or polished slabs. Several methods have been devised to find a simple factor to convert the mean of such 2D size distributions to the actual 3D mean size of the spheres without a consensus. We derive an entirely theoretical solution based on well-established probability laws and not constrained by limitations of absolute size, which indicates that the ratio of the means of measured 2D and estimated 3D grain size distribution should be r/4 (=.785). Actual 2D size distribution of the radii of submicron sized, pure Fe0 globules in lunar agglutinitic glass, determined from backscattered electron images, is tested to fit the gamma size distribution model better than the log-normal model. Numerical analysis of 2D size distributions of Fe0 globules in 9 lunar soils shows that the average mean of 2D/3D ratio is 0.84, which is very close to the theoretical value. These results converge with the ratio 0.8 that Hughes (1978) determined for millimeter-sized chondrules from empirical measurements. We recommend that a factor of 1.273 (reciprocal of 0.785) be used to convert the determined 2D mean size (radius or diameter) of a population of spheres to estimate their actual 3D size. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  10. Surface chemistry of cadmium sulfide magic-sized clusters: a window into ligand-nanoparticle interactions.

    PubMed

    Nevers, Douglas R; Williamson, Curtis B; Hanrath, Tobias; Robinson, Richard D

    2017-03-02

    Optoelectronic properties of nanoparticles are intimately coupled to the complex physiochemical interplay between the inorganic core and the organic ligand shell. Magic-sized clusters, which are predominately surface atoms, provide a promising avenue to clarify these critical surface interactions. Whereas these interactions impact the surface of both nanoparticles and magic-sized clusters, we show here that only clusters manifest a shift in the excitonic peak by up to 0.4 eV upon solvent or ligand treatment. These results highlight the utility of the clusters as a probe of ligand-surface interactions.

  11. Remote sensing of floe size distribution and surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, D. A.; Thorndike, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    Floe size can be measured by several properties p- for instance, area or mean caliper diameter. Two definitions of floe size distribution seem particularly useful. F(p), the fraction of area covered by floes no smaller than p; and N(p), the number of floes per unit area no smaller than p. Several summertime distributions measured are a graph, their slopes range from -1.7 to -2.5. The variance of an estimate is also calculated.

  12. Size-biased distributions in the generalized beta distribution family, with applications to forestry

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Ducey; Jeffrey H. Gove

    2015-01-01

    Size-biased distributions arise in many forestry applications, as well as other environmental, econometric, and biomedical sampling problems. We examine the size-biased versions of the generalized beta of the first kind, generalized beta of the second kind and generalized gamma distributions. These distributions include, as special cases, the Dagum (Burr Type III),...

  13. Using size-selected gold clusters on graphene oxide films to aid cryo-transmission electron tomography alignment

    PubMed Central

    Arkill, Kenton P.; Mantell, Judith M.; Plant, Simon R.; Verkade, Paul; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional reconstruction of a nano-scale aqueous object can be achieved by taking a series of transmission electron micrographs tilted at different angles in vitreous ice: cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography. Presented here is a novel method of fine alignment for the tilt series. Size-selected gold clusters of ~2.7 nm (Au561 ± 14), ~3.2 nm (Au923 ± 22), and ~4.3 nm (Au2057 ± 45) in diameter were deposited onto separate graphene oxide films overlaying holes on amorphous carbon grids. After plunge freezing and subsequent transfer to cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography, the resulting tomograms have excellent (de-)focus and alignment properties during automatic acquisition. Fine alignment is accurate when the evenly distributed 3.2 nm gold particles are used as fiducial markers, demonstrated with a reconstruction of a tobacco mosaic virus. Using a graphene oxide film means the fiducial markers are not interfering with the ice bound sample and that automated collection is consistent. The use of pre-deposited size-selected clusters means there is no aggregation and a user defined concentration. The size-selected clusters are mono-dispersed and can be produced in a wide size range including 2–5 nm in diameter. The use of size-selected clusters on a graphene oxide films represents a significant technical advance for 3D cryo-electron microscopy. PMID:25783049

  14. Using size-selected gold clusters on graphene oxide films to aid cryo-transmission electron tomography alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkill, Kenton P.; Mantell, Judith M.; Plant, Simon R.; Verkade, Paul; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-03-01

    A three-dimensional reconstruction of a nano-scale aqueous object can be achieved by taking a series of transmission electron micrographs tilted at different angles in vitreous ice: cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography. Presented here is a novel method of fine alignment for the tilt series. Size-selected gold clusters of ~2.7 nm (Au561 +/- 14), ~3.2 nm (Au923 +/- 22), and ~4.3 nm (Au2057 +/- 45) in diameter were deposited onto separate graphene oxide films overlaying holes on amorphous carbon grids. After plunge freezing and subsequent transfer to cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography, the resulting tomograms have excellent (de-)focus and alignment properties during automatic acquisition. Fine alignment is accurate when the evenly distributed 3.2 nm gold particles are used as fiducial markers, demonstrated with a reconstruction of a tobacco mosaic virus. Using a graphene oxide film means the fiducial markers are not interfering with the ice bound sample and that automated collection is consistent. The use of pre-deposited size-selected clusters means there is no aggregation and a user defined concentration. The size-selected clusters are mono-dispersed and can be produced in a wide size range including 2-5 nm in diameter. The use of size-selected clusters on a graphene oxide films represents a significant technical advance for 3D cryo-electron microscopy.

  15. Estimation and applications of size-biased distributions in forestry

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey H. Gove

    2003-01-01

    Size-biased distributions arise naturally in several contexts in forestry and ecology. Simple power relationships (e.g. basal area and diameter at breast height) between variables are one such area of interest arising from a modelling perspective. Another, probability proportional to size PPS) sampling, is found in the most widely used methods for sampling standing or...

  16. Estimation and applications of size-based distributions in forestry

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey H. Gove

    2003-01-01

    Size-based distributions arise in several contexts in forestry and ecology. Simple power relationships (e.g., basal area and diameter at breast height) between variables are one such area of interest arising from a modeling perspective. Another, probability proportional to size sampline (PPS), is found in the most widely used methods for sampling standing or dead and...

  17. Modelling complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates of particle-size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberson, Sam; Weltje, Gert Jan

    2014-05-01

    Estimates of particle-size made by operators in the field and laboratory represent a vast and relatively untapped data archive. The wide spatial distribution of particle-size estimates makes them ideal for constructing geological models and soil maps. This study uses a large data set from the Netherlands (n = 4837) containing both operator estimates of particle size and complete particle-size distributions measured by laser granulometry. This study introduces a logit-based constrained-cubic-spline (CCS) algorithm to interpolate complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates. The CCS model is compared to four other models: (i) a linear interpolation; (ii) a log-hyperbolic interpolation; (iii) an empirical logistic function; and (iv) an empirical arctan function. Operator estimates were found to be both inaccurate and imprecise; only 14% of samples were successfully classified using the Dutch classification scheme for fine sediment. Operator estimates of sediment particle-size encompass the same range of values as particle-size distributions measured by laser analysis. However, the distributions measured by laser analysis show that most of the sand percentage values lie between zero and one, so the majority of the variability in the data is lost because operator estimates are made to the nearest 1% at best, and more frequently to the nearest 5%. A method for constructing complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates of sediment texture using a logit constrained cubit spline (CCS) interpolation algorithm is presented. This model and four other previously published methods are compared to establish the best approach to modelling particle-size distributions. The logit-CCS model is the most accurate method, although both logit-linear and log-linear interpolation models provide reasonable alternatives. Models based on empirical distribution functions are less accurate than interpolation algorithms for modelling particle-size distributions in

  18. Phase-transfer based size refining of metal nanoparticles from arbitrary particle size distributions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Qu, Jianglan; Ye, Feng; Wang, Caixia; Yang, Jun

    2013-02-01

    The size-dependent phase-transfer property of metal nanoparticles is used to develop a simple experimental procedure that can effectively refine the particle size from colloidal solutions prepared by wet-chemistry. The protocol calls for firstly the mixing of the metal hydrosol with an ethanol solution of dodecylamine, and then the extraction of the dodecylamine-stabilized metal nanoparticles into toluene. This method offers an effective approach to prepare metal nanoparticles with narrow size distribution from an arbitrary particle size distribution.

  19. Sample sizes and model comparison metrics for species distribution models

    Treesearch

    B.B. Hanberry; H.S. He; D.C. Dey

    2012-01-01

    Species distribution models use small samples to produce continuous distribution maps. The question of how small a sample can be to produce an accurate model generally has been answered based on comparisons to maximum sample sizes of 200 observations or fewer. In addition, model comparisons often are made with the kappa statistic, which has become controversial....

  20. Method of preparing size-selected metal clusters

    DOEpatents

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stair, Peter C.

    2010-05-11

    The invention provides a method for depositing catalytic clusters on a surface, the method comprising confining the surface to a controlled atmosphere; contacting the surface with catalyst containing vapor for a first period of time; removing the vapor from the controlled atmosphere; and contacting the surface with a reducing agent for a second period of time so as to produce catalyst-containing nucleation sites.

  1. The next generation Virgo cluster survey. VIII. The spatial distribution of globular clusters in the Virgo cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Durrell, Patrick R.; Accetta, Katharine; Côté, Patrick; Blakeslee, John P.; Ferrarese, Laura; McConnachie, Alan; Gwyn, Stephen; Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hongxin; Mihos, J. Christopher; Puzia, Thomas H.; Jordán, Andrés; Lançon, Ariane; Liu, Chengze; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Boissier, Samuel; Boselli, Alessandro; Courteau, Stéphane; Duc, Pierre-Alain; and others

    2014-10-20

    We report on a large-scale study of the distribution of globular clusters (GCs) throughout the Virgo cluster, based on photometry from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), a large imaging survey covering Virgo's primary subclusters (Virgo A = M87 and Virgo B = M49) out to their virial radii. Using the g{sub o}{sup ′}, (g' – i') {sub o} color-magnitude diagram of unresolved and marginally resolved sources within the NGVS, we have constructed two-dimensional maps of the (irregular) GC distribution over 100 deg{sup 2} to a depth of g{sub o}{sup ′} = 24. We present the clearest evidence to date showing the difference in concentration between red and blue GCs over the full extent of the cluster, where the red (more metal-rich) GCs are largely located around the massive early-type galaxies in Virgo, while the blue (metal-poor) GCs have a much more extended spatial distribution with significant populations still present beyond 83' (∼215 kpc) along the major axes of both M49 and M87. A comparison of our GC maps to the diffuse light in the outermost regions of M49 and M87 show remarkable agreement in the shape, ellipticity, and boxiness of both luminous systems. We also find evidence for spatial enhancements of GCs surrounding M87 that may be indicative of recent interactions or an ongoing merger history. We compare the GC map to that of the locations of Virgo galaxies and the X-ray intracluster gas, and find generally good agreement between these various baryonic structures. We calculate the Virgo cluster contains a total population of N {sub GC} = 67, 300 ± 14, 400, of which 35% are located in M87 and M49 alone. For the first time, we compute a cluster-wide specific frequency S {sub N,} {sub CL} = 2.8 ± 0.7, after correcting for Virgo's diffuse light. We also find a GC-to-baryonic mass fraction ε {sub b} = 5.7 ± 1.1 × 10{sup –4} and a GC-to-total cluster mass formation efficiency ε {sub t} = 2.9 ± 0.5 × 10{sup –5}, the latter values

  2. Globular Cluster Systems in Brightest Cluster Galaxies: Bimodal Metallicity Distributions and the Nature of the High-Luminosity Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William E.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Karakla, Diane; Okoń, Waldemar; Baum, William A.; Hanes, David A.; Kavelaars, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    We present new (B, I) photometry for the globular cluster systems in eight brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), obtained with the ACS/WFC camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. In the very rich cluster systems that reside within these giant galaxies, we find that all have strongly bimodal color distributions that are clearly resolved by the metallicity-sensitive (B-I) index. Furthermore, the mean colors and internal color range of the blue subpopulation are remarkably similar from one galaxy to the next, to well within the +/-0.02-0.03 mag uncertainties in the foreground reddenings and photometric zero points. By contrast, the mean color and internal color range for the red subpopulation differ from one galaxy to the next by twice as much as the blue population. All the BCGs show population gradients, with much higher relative numbers of red clusters within 5 kpc of their centers, consistent with their having formed at later times than the blue, metal-poor population. A striking new feature of the color distributions emerging from our data is that for the brightest clusters (MI<-10.5) the color distribution becomes broad and less obviously bimodal. This effect was first noticed by Ostrov et al. and Dirsch et al. for the Fornax giant NGC 1399; our data suggest that it may be a characteristic of many BCGs and perhaps other large galaxies. Our data indicate that the blue (metal-poor) clusters brighter than MI~=-10 become progressively redder with increasing luminosity, following a mass/metallicity scaling relation Z~M0.55. A basically similar relation has been found for M87 by Strader et al. (2005). We argue that these GCS characteristics are consistent with a hierarchical-merging galaxy formation picture in which the metal-poor clusters formed in protogalactic clouds or dense starburst complexes with gas masses in the range 107-1010 Msolar, but where the more massive clusters on average formed in bigger clouds with deeper potential wells where more preenrichment could

  3. Solvation Effects on Structure and Charge Distribution in Anionic Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. Mathias

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of ions with solvent molecules modifies the properties of both solvent and solute. Solvation generally stabilizes compact charge distributions compared to more diffuse ones. In the most extreme cases, solvation will alter the very composition of the ion itself. We use infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected ions to probe how solvation affects the structures and charge distributions of metal-CO2 cluster anions. We gratefully acknowledge the National Science Foundation for funding through Grant CHE-0845618 (for graduate student support) and for instrumentation funding through Grant PHY-1125844.

  4. The Seasonal Evolution of Sea Ice Floe Size Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. “The Seasonal Evolution of Sea Ice Floe Size Distribution...This work was motivated by the desire to improve the understanding of processes governing the evolution of the marginal ice zone that forms...seasonally in the southern Beaufort and Chukchi Seas region. OBJECTIVES The objective of this work was to determine the seasonal evolution of the

  5. Airborne Particle Size Distribution Measurements at USDOE Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Chittaporn, P.; Heikkinen, M.; Medora, R.; Merrill, R.

    2003-03-27

    There are no long term measurements of the particle size distribution and concentration of airborne radionuclides at any USDOE facility except Fernald. Yet the determinant of lung dose is the particle size, determining the airway and lower lung deposition. Beginning in 2000, continuous (6 to 8 weeks) measurements of the aerosol particle size distribution have been made with a miniature sampler developed under EMSP. Radon gas decays to a chain of four short lived solid radionuclides that attach immediately to the resident atmospheric aerosol. These in turn decay to long lived polonium 210. Alpha emitting polonium is a tracer for any atmospheric aerosol. Six samplers at Fernald and four at QC sites in New Jersey show a difference in both polonium concentration and size distribution with the winter measurements being higher/larger than summer by almost a factor of two at all locations. EMSP USDOE Contract DE FG07 97ER62522.

  6. Particle size and shape distributions of hammer milled pine

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, Tyler Lott; Matthews, Austin Colter; Williams, Christopher Luke; Ryan, John Chadron Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Particle size and shape distributions impact particle heating rates and diffusion of volatized gases out of particles during fast pyrolysis conversion, and consequently must be modeled accurately in order for computational pyrolysis models to produce reliable results for bulk solid materials. For this milestone, lodge pole pine chips were ground using a Thomas-Wiley #4 mill using two screen sizes in order to produce two representative materials that are suitable for fast pyrolysis. For the first material, a 6 mm screen was employed in the mill and for the second material, a 3 mm screen was employed in the mill. Both materials were subjected to RoTap sieve analysis, and the distributions of the particle sizes and shapes were determined using digital image analysis. The results of the physical analysis will be fed into computational pyrolysis simulations to create models of materials with realistic particle size and shape distributions. This milestone was met on schedule.

  7. Bubble size distribution in a laboratory-scale electroflotation study.

    PubMed

    Alam, Raquibul; Shang, Julie Q; Khan, Adnan Hossain

    2017-04-01

    The performance of electroflotation (EF) is strongly influenced by the size of O2 and H2 bubbles. Therefore, in this study, the bubble sizes are measured in a lab-scale EF cell using a high-speed camera. The mean bubble size is found to vary in the range of 32.7-68.6 μm under different operating conditions. This study shows that the electrode material, current density, water pH, ionic strength, and frother (Tennafroth 250) concentration are important factors in controlling the bubble size. Furthermore, four mathematical distributions (normal, log-normal, Weibull, and gamma distributions) are fitted to the experimental data, among which the log-normal distribution is found to be the best fit based on the lower Anderson-Darling (AD) value.

  8. Size distribution of microbubbles as a function of shell composition.

    PubMed

    Dicker, Stephen; Mleczko, Michał; Schmitz, Georg; Wrenn, Steven P

    2013-09-01

    The effect of modifying the shell composition of a population of microbubbles on their size demonstrated through experiment. Specifically, these variations include altering both the mole fraction and molecular weight of functionalized polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the microbubble phospholipid monolayer shell (1-15 mol% PEG, and 1000-5000 g/mole, respectively). The size distribution is measured with an unbiased image segmentation program written in MATLAB which identifies and sizes bubbles from micrographs. For a population of microbubbles with a shell composition of 5 mol% PEG2000, the mean diameter is 1.42 μm with a variance of 0.244 μm. For the remainder of the shell compositions studied herein, we find that the size distributions do not show a statistically significant correlation to either PEG molecular weight or mole fraction. All the measured distributions are nearly Gaussian in shape and have a monomodal peak.

  9. Characterizations of particle size distribution in Guangzhou during dry season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei

    2017-04-01

    The relationship of ambient aerosol and visibility deterioration over Pearl River Delta(PRD) have attached more and more attentions in recent years. The extinction coefficient of ambient aerosol can be calculated with the Mie theory(N. Ma, 2014), which is based on a set of measured dry aerosol number size distribution, ambient relative humidity, aerosol hygroscopic growth factor, and the assumption of no activation. Using the parameters that can be easily measured would make the extinction coefficient of ambient aerosol calculation more widely available. PM2.5 (total mass concentration of dry aerosols with the aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5μm) measurements are widely applied in PRD, the aerosol concentrations could be estimated based on PM2.5 measurements and used to calculate the extinction. However, with different size distributions, aerosol with the same mass concentration may have different extinction coefficients. Ignoring the variations of the shapes of aerosol size distributions may introduce an uncertainty in the calculation of aerosol extinction coefficient. In order to quantify this uncertainty, the historical data of aerosol size distribution need to be analyzed. In this paper, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and PM2.5 were simultaneously performed at Guangzhou urban site from Nov. 2014 to Jan. 2015. The temporal and diurnal statistical results of dry seasons would be used in the calculation of aerosol extinction coefficient, and the extinction coefficients corresponding to a certain aerosol volume concentration and relative humidity are given in the form of probability distribution.

  10. Variability in body size and shape of UK offshore workers: A cluster analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Arthur; Ledingham, Robert; Williams, Hector

    2017-01-01

    Male UK offshore workers have enlarged dimensions compared with UK norms and knowledge of specific sizes and shapes typifying their physiques will assist a range of functions related to health and ergonomics. A representative sample of the UK offshore workforce (n = 588) underwent 3D photonic scanning, from which 19 extracted dimensional measures were used in k-means cluster analysis to characterise physique groups. Of the 11 resulting clusters four somatotype groups were expressed: one cluster was muscular and lean, four had greater muscularity than adiposity, three had equal adiposity and muscularity and three had greater adiposity than muscularity. Some clusters appeared constitutionally similar to others, differing only in absolute size. These cluster centroids represent an evidence-base for future designs in apparel and other applications where body size and proportions affect functional performance. They also constitute phenotypic evidence providing insight into the 'offshore culture' which may underpin the enlarged dimensions of offshore workers.

  11. Packing fraction of particles with lognormal size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2014-05-01

    This paper addresses the packing and void fraction of polydisperse particles with a lognormal size distribution. It is demonstrated that a binomial particle size distribution can be transformed into a continuous particle-size distribution of the lognormal type. Furthermore, an original and exact expression is derived that predicts the packing fraction of mixtures of particles with a lognormal distribution, which is governed by the standard deviation, mode of packing, and particle shape only. For a number of particle shapes and their packing modes (close, loose) the applicable values are given. This closed-form analytical expression governing the packing fraction is thoroughly compared with empirical and computational data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found.

  12. Inferring Past Effective Population Size from Distributions of Coalescent Times

    PubMed Central

    Gattepaille, Lucie; Günther, Torsten; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    Inferring and understanding changes in effective population size over time is a major challenge for population genetics. Here we investigate some theoretical properties of random-mating populations with varying size over time. In particular, we present an exact solution to compute the population size as a function of time, Ne(t), based on distributions of coalescent times of samples of any size. This result reduces the problem of population size inference to a problem of estimating coalescent time distributions. To illustrate the analytic results, we design a heuristic method using a tree-inference algorithm and investigate simulated and empirical population-genetic data. We investigate the effects of a range of conditions associated with empirical data, for instance number of loci, sample size, mutation rate, and cryptic recombination. We show that our approach performs well with genomic data (≥ 10,000 loci) and that increasing the sample size from 2 to 10 greatly improves the inference of Ne(t) whereas further increase in sample size results in modest improvements, even under a scenario of exponential growth. We also investigate the impact of recombination and characterize the potential biases in inference of Ne(t). The approach can handle large sample sizes and the computations are fast. We apply our method to human genomes from four populations and reconstruct population size profiles that are coherent with previous finds, including the Out-of-Africa bottleneck. Additionally, we uncover a potential difference in population size between African and non-African populations as early as 400 KYA. In summary, we provide an analytic relationship between distributions of coalescent times and Ne(t), which can be incorporated into powerful approaches for inferring past population sizes from population-genomic data. PMID:27638421

  13. Controlling Size of Gold Clusters in Polyaniline from Top-Down and from Bottom-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Saheb, Amir H.; Smith, Jon A.; Josowicz, Mira A.; Janata, Jiri; Baer, Donald R.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2008-09-15

    Polyaniline forms a strong complex with chloroaurate at the protonated imine sites. Here we report on electrochemical procedure that allows preparation of gold clusters by adding gold atoms one-by-one (“bottom up” approach). It is contrasted with the “top down” approach in which the growth of multi-atom Au clusters was also controlled electrochemically. Our results confirm that both the amount and the size of gold clusters affects the properties of the composite material.

  14. One-pot synthesis and characterization of subnanometre-size benzotriazolate protected copper clusters.

    PubMed

    Salorinne, Kirsi; Chen, Xi; Troff, Ralf W; Nissinen, Maija; Häkkinen, Hannu

    2012-07-21

    A simple one-pot method for the preparation of subnanometre-size benzotriazolate (BTA) protected copper clusters, Cu(n)BTA(m), is reported. The clusters were analyzed by optical and infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy together with computational methods. We suggest a structural motif where the copper core of the Cu(n)BTA(m) clusters is protected by BTA-Cu(i)-BTA units.

  15. Cell-size distribution in epithelial tissue formation and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Puliafito, Alberto; Primo, Luca; Celani, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    How cell growth and proliferation are orchestrated in living tissues to achieve a given biological function is a central problem in biology. During development, tissue regeneration and homeostasis, cell proliferation must be coordinated by spatial cues in order for cells to attain the correct size and shape. Biological tissues also feature a notable homogeneity of cell size, which, in specific cases, represents a physiological need. Here, we study the temporal evolution of the cell-size distribution by applying the theory of kinetic fragmentation to tissue development and homeostasis. Our theory predicts self-similar probability density function (PDF) of cell size and explains how division times and redistribution ensure cell size homogeneity across the tissue. Theoretical predictions and numerical simulations of confluent non-homeostatic tissue cultures show that cell size distribution is self-similar. Our experimental data confirm predictions and reveal that, as assumed in the theory, cell division times scale like a power-law of the cell size. We find that in homeostatic conditions there is a stationary distribution with lognormal tails, consistently with our experimental data. Our theoretical predictions and numerical simulations show that the shape of the PDF depends on how the space inherited by apoptotic cells is redistributed and that apoptotic cell rates might also depend on size. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Spitzer IR Colors and ISM Distributions of Virgo Cluster Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, Jeffrey D.; Wong, I.; Kenney, Z.; Murphy, E.; Helou, G.; Howell, J.

    2012-01-01

    IRAC infrared images of 44 spiral and peculiar galaxies from the Spitzer Survey of the Virgo Cluster help reveal the interactions which transform galaxies in clusters. We explore how the location of galaxies in the IR 3.6-8μm color-magnitude diagram is related to the spatial distributions of ISM/star formation, as traced by PAH emission in the 8μm band. Based on their 8μm/PAH radial distributions, we divide the galaxies into 4 groups: normal, truncated, truncated/compact, and anemic. Normal galaxies have relatively normal PAH distributions. They are the "bluest" galaxies, with the largest 8/3.6μm ratios. They are relatively unaffected by the cluster environment, and have probably never passed through the cluster core. Truncated galaxies have a relatively normal 8μm/PAH surface brightness in the inner disk, but are abruptly truncated with little or no emission in the outer disk. They have intermediate ("green") colors, while those which are more severely truncated are "redder". Most truncated galaxies have undisturbed stellar disks and many show direct evidence of active ram pressure stripping. Truncated/compact galaxies have high 8μm/PAH surface brightness in the very inner disk (central 1 kpc) but are abruptly truncated close to center with little or no emission in the outer disk. They have intermediate global colors, similar to the other truncated galaxies. While they have the most extreme ISM truncation, they have vigorous circumnuclear star formation. Most of these have disturbed stellar disks, and they are probably produced by a combination of gravitational interaction plus ram pressure stripping. Anemic galaxies have a low 8μm/PAH surface brightness even in the inner disk. These are the "reddest" galaxies, with the smallest 8/3.6μm ratios. The origin of the anemics seems to a combination of starvation, gravitational interactions, and long-ago ram pressure stripping.

  17. Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance properties of copper nano-clusters: A theoretical study of size dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziashahabi, A.; Ghodselahi, T.; Heidari saani, M.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are carried out to study the electronic, structural stability and Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) properties of copper nano-clusters. These nano-clusters consisted of 14, 38, 62 and 116 atoms. We studied surface charge density and interband-transitions effects on damping and broadening of the surface plasmon resonance absorption spectra. An enhancement in interband-transition energy and a reduction in surface charge density with decrease in the size of clusters are observed. These features result in the damping and broadening of the LSPR absorption spectra. We also study the structural stability and HOMO-LUMO energy gap of copper clusters. The structural stability of nano-clusters reduces by decreasing the size of the clusters. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap is not zero for the clusters with size less than 2 nm which indicates the lack of conduction electrons which are necessary for LSPR absorption. The calculated interband transition energies are in agreement with LSPR absorption data. We also discuss the difference between size dependent LSPR in copper and gold nano-clusters in the experiment based on calculated surface charge density.

  18. Crater size distributions on Ganymede and Callisto: fundamental issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Roland; Schmedemann, Nico; Werner, Stefanie; Ivanov, Boris; Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Crater size distributions on the two largest Jovian satellites Ganymede and Callisto and the origin of impactors are subject of intense and controversial debates. In this paper, we reinvestigate crater size distributions measured in surface units derived from a recently published global geologic map, based on Voyager and Galileo SSI images at a scale of 1 km/pxl (Collins G. C. et al. (2013), U. S. Geol. Surv., Sci. Inv. Map 3237). These units are used as a context to units mapped in more detail at higher resolution in Galileo SSI images. We focus on the following fundamental issues: (1) Similarity between shapes of crater distributions on the Galilean satellites and on inner solar system bodies; (2) production versus equilibrium distributions; (3) apex/antapex variations in crater distributions. First, our results show a strong similarity in shape between the crater distributions on the most densely cratered regions on Ganymede and Callisto with those in the lunar highlands. We conclude that the shape of the crater distributions on these two Jovian satellites implies the craters were preferentially formed from members of a collisionally evolved projectile family, derived either from Main Belt asteroids as candidates of impactors on the Jovian satellites, or from projectiles stemming from the outer solar system which have undergone collisional evolution, resulting in a size distribution similar to those of Main Belt asteroids. Second, the complex shape of the crater distributions on Ganymede and Callisto indicates they are mostly production distributions and can be used to infer the underlying shape of the projectile size distribution. Locally, equilibrium distributions occur, especially at smaller sub-kilometer diameters. Third, the most densely cratered regions on both satellites do not show apex-antapex variations in crater frequency, as inferred for bodies from heliocentric orbits (e.g., Zahnle K. et al. (2003), Icarus 163, 263-289). This indicates that these

  19. Online particle size distribution estimation of a mixture of similar sized particles with acoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nsugbe, Ejay; Starr, Andrew; Jennions, Ian; Ruiz Carcel, Cristobal

    2017-08-01

    Particle processing plants regard the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) as a key quality factor as it influences the bulk and flow properties of the particles. In this work, Acoustic Emission (AE) is used to estimate the PSD of a mixture that comprise of similar sized particles. The experiments involved the use of regular sized particles (glass beads) and with the aid of a time domain based threshold analysis of the particle impacts the PSD of the mixtures could be estimated.

  20. Size Distributions of Solar Proton Events: Methodological and Physical Restrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, L. I.; Yanke, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    Based on the new catalogue of solar proton events (SPEs) for the period of 1997 - 2009 (Solar Cycle 23) we revisit the long-studied problem of the event-size distributions in the context of those constructed for other solar-flare parameters. Recent results on the problem of size distributions of solar flares and proton events are briefly reviewed. Even a cursory acquaintance with this research field reveals a rather mixed and controversial picture. We concentrate on three main issues: i) SPE size distribution for {>} 10 MeV protons in Solar Cycle 23; ii) size distribution of {>} 1 GV proton events in 1942 - 2014; iii) variations of annual numbers for {>} 10 MeV proton events on long time scales (1955 - 2015). Different results are critically compared; most of the studies in this field are shown to suffer from vastly different input datasets as well as from insufficient knowledge of underlying physical processes in the SPEs under consideration. New studies in this field should be made on more distinct physical and methodological bases. It is important to note the evident similarity in size distributions of solar flares and superflares in Sun-like stars.

  1. Extension of discrete tribocharging models to continuous size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Dylan; Hartzell, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Triboelectric charging, the phenomenon by which electrical charge is exchanged during contact between two surfaces, has been known to cause significant charge separation in granular mixtures, even between chemically identical grains. This charging is a stochastic size-dependent process resulting from random collisions between grains. The prevailing models and experimental results suggest that, in most cases, larger grains in a mixture of dielectric grains acquire a positive charge, while smaller grains charge negatively. These models are typically restricted to mixtures of two discrete grain sizes, which are not representative of most naturally occurring granular mixtures, and neglect the effect of grain size on individual charging events. We have developed a model that predicts the average charge distribution in a granular mixture, for any continuous size distribution of dielectric grains of a single material. Expanding to continuous size distributions enables the prediction of charge separation in many natural granular phenomena, including terrestrial dust storms and industrial powder handling operations. The expanded model makes predictions about the charge distribution, including specific conditions under which the usual size-dependent polarity is reversed such that larger grains charge negatively.

  2. Determining Size Distribution at the Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, E. L.; Lemmon, M. T.

    2016-12-01

    Dust aerosols play a crucial role in determining atmospheric radiative heating on Mars through absorption and scattering of sunlight. How dust scatters and absorbs light is dependent on size, shape, composition, and quantity. Optical properties of the dust have been well constrained in the visible and near infrared wavelengths using various methods [Wolff et al. 2009, Lemmon et al. 2004]. In addition, the dust is nonspherical, and irregular shapes have shown to work well in determining effective particle size [Pollack et al. 1977]. Variance of the size distribution is less constrained but constitutes an important parameter in fully describing the dust. The Phoenix Lander's Surface Stereo Imager performed several cross-sky brightness surveys to determine the size distribution and scattering properties of dust in the wavelength range of 400 to 1000 nm. In combination with a single-layer radiative transfer model, these surveys can be used to help constrain variance of the size distribution. We will present a discussion of seasonal size distribution as it pertains to the Phoenix landing site.

  3. Modelling and validation of particle size distributions of supported nanoparticles using the pair distribution function technique

    DOE PAGES

    Gamez-Mendoza, Liliana; Terban, Maxwell W.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; ...

    2017-04-13

    The particle size of supported catalysts is a key characteristic for determining structure–property relationships. It is a challenge to obtain this information accurately and in situ using crystallographic methods owing to the small size of such particles (<5 nm) and the fact that they are supported. In this work, the pair distribution function (PDF) technique was used to obtain the particle size distribution of supported Pt catalysts as they grow under typical synthesis conditions. The PDF of Pt nanoparticles grown on zeolite X was isolated and refined using two models: a monodisperse spherical model (single particle size) and a lognormalmore » size distribution. The results were compared and validated using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) results. Both models describe the same trends in average particle size with temperature, but the results of the number-weighted lognormal size distributions can also accurately describe the mean size and the width of the size distributions obtained from STEM. Since the PDF yields crystallite sizes, these results suggest that the grown Pt nanoparticles are monocrystalline. As a result, this work shows that refinement of the PDF of small supported monocrystalline nanoparticles can yield accurate mean particle sizes and distributions.« less

  4. Cluster Monte Carlo distributions in fractal dimensions between two and three: Scaling properties and dynamical aspects for the Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monceau, Pascal; Hsiao, Pai-Yi

    2002-09-01

    We study the Wolff cluster size distributions obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of the Ising phase transition on Sierpinski fractals with Hausdorff dimensions Df between 2 and 3. These distributions are shown to be invariant when going from an iteration step of the fractal to the next under a scaling of the cluster sizes involving the exponent (β/ν)+(γ/ν). Moreover, the decay of the autocorrelation functions at the critical points enables us to calculate the Wolff dynamical critical exponents z for three different values of Df. The Wolff algorithm is more efficient in reducing the critical slowing down when Df is lowered.

  5. Thresholded Power law Size Distributions of Instabilities in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2015-11-01

    Power-law-like size distributions are ubiquitous in astrophysical instabilities. There are at least four natural effects that cause deviations from ideal power law size distributions, which we model here in a generalized way: (1) a physical threshold of an instability; (2) incomplete sampling of the smallest events below a threshold x0; (3) contamination by an event-unrelated background xb; and (4) truncation effects at the largest events due to a finite system size. These effects can be modeled in the simplest terms with a “thresholded power law” distribution function (also called generalized Pareto [type II] or Lomax distribution), N(x){dx}\\propto {(x+{x}0)}-a{dx}, where x0 > 0 is positive for a threshold effect, while x0 < 0 is negative for background contamination. We analytically derive the functional shape of this thresholded power law distribution function from an exponential growth evolution model, which produces avalanches only when a disturbance exceeds a critical threshold x0. We apply the thresholded power law distribution function to terrestrial, solar (HXRBS, BATSE, RHESSI), and stellar flare (Kepler) data sets. We find that the thresholded power law model provides an adequate fit to most of the observed data. Major advantages of this model are the automated choice of the power law fitting range, diagnostics of background contamination, physical instability thresholds, instrumental detection thresholds, and finite system size limits. When testing self-organized criticality models that predict ideal power laws, we suggest including these natural truncation effects.

  6. Lognormal Behavior of the Size Distributions of Animation Characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Ken

    This study investigates the statistical property of the character sizes of animation, superhero series, and video game. By using online databases of Pokémon (video game) and Power Rangers (superhero series), the height and weight distributions are constructed, and we find that the weight distributions of Pokémon and Zords (robots in Power Rangers) follow the lognormal distribution in common. For the theoretical mechanism of this lognormal behavior, the combination of the normal distribution and the Weber-Fechner law is proposed.

  7. Mass size distribution of particle-bound water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepari, S.; Simonetti, G.; Perrino, C.

    2017-09-01

    The thermal-ramp Karl-Fisher method (tr-KF) for the determination of PM-bound water has been applied to size-segregated PM samples collected in areas subjected to different environmental conditions (protracted atmospheric stability, desert dust intrusion, urban atmosphere). This method, based on the use of a thermal ramp for the desorption of water from PM samples and the subsequent analysis by the coulometric KF technique, had been previously shown to differentiate water contributes retained with different strength and associated to different chemical components in the atmospheric aerosol. The application of the method to size-segregated samples has revealed that water showed a typical mass size distribution in each one of the three environmental situations that were taken into consideration. A very similar size distribution was shown by the chemical PM components that prevailed during each event: ammonium nitrate in the case of atmospheric stability, crustal species in the case of desert dust, road-dust components in the case of urban sites. The shape of the tr-KF curve varied according to the size of the collected particles. Considering the size ranges that better characterize the event (fine fraction for atmospheric stability, coarse fraction for dust intrusion, bi-modal distribution for urban dust), this shape is coherent with the typical tr-KF shape shown by water bound to the chemical species that predominate in the same PM size range (ammonium nitrate, crustal species, secondary/combustion species - road dust components).

  8. Formation and size distribution of self-assembled vesicles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Changjin; Quinn, David; Sadovsky, Yoel; Suresh, Subra; Hsia, K Jimmy

    2017-03-14

    When detergents and phospholipid membranes are dispersed in aqueous solutions, they tend to self-assemble into vesicles of various shapes and sizes by virtue of their hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. A clearer understanding of such vesiculation processes holds promise for better elucidation of human physiology and disease, and paves the way to improved diagnostics, drug development, and drug delivery. Here we present a detailed analysis of the energetics and thermodynamics of vesiculation by recourse to nonlinear elasticity, taking into account large deformation that may arise during the vesiculation process. The effects of membrane size, spontaneous curvature, and membrane stiffness on vesiculation and vesicle size distribution were investigated, and the critical size for vesicle formation was determined and found to compare favorably with available experimental evidence. Our analysis also showed that the critical membrane size for spontaneous vesiculation was correlated with membrane thickness, and further illustrated how the combined effects of membrane thickness and physical properties influenced the size, shape, and distribution of vesicles. These findings shed light on the formation of physiological extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes. The findings also suggest pathways for manipulating the size, shape, distribution, and physical properties of synthetic vesicles, with potential applications in vesicle physiology, the pathobiology of cancer and other diseases, diagnostics using in vivo liquid biopsy, and drug delivery methods.

  9. Formation and size distribution of self-assembled vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Changjin; Quinn, David; Suresh, Subra

    2017-01-01

    When detergents and phospholipid membranes are dispersed in aqueous solutions, they tend to self-assemble into vesicles of various shapes and sizes by virtue of their hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. A clearer understanding of such vesiculation processes holds promise for better elucidation of human physiology and disease, and paves the way to improved diagnostics, drug development, and drug delivery. Here we present a detailed analysis of the energetics and thermodynamics of vesiculation by recourse to nonlinear elasticity, taking into account large deformation that may arise during the vesiculation process. The effects of membrane size, spontaneous curvature, and membrane stiffness on vesiculation and vesicle size distribution were investigated, and the critical size for vesicle formation was determined and found to compare favorably with available experimental evidence. Our analysis also showed that the critical membrane size for spontaneous vesiculation was correlated with membrane thickness, and further illustrated how the combined effects of membrane thickness and physical properties influenced the size, shape, and distribution of vesicles. These findings shed light on the formation of physiological extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes. The findings also suggest pathways for manipulating the size, shape, distribution, and physical properties of synthetic vesicles, with potential applications in vesicle physiology, the pathobiology of cancer and other diseases, diagnostics using in vivo liquid biopsy, and drug delivery methods. PMID:28265065

  10. Rank-Size Distribution of Notes in Harmonic Music: Hierarchic Shuffling of Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Río, Manuel Beltrán; Cocho, Germinal

    We trace the rank size distribution of notes in harmonic music, which on previous works we suggested was much better represented by the Two-parameter, first class Beta distribution than the customary power law, to the ranked mixing of distributions dictated by the harmonic and instrumental nature of the piece. The same representation is shown to arise in other fields by the same type of ranked shuffling of distributions. We include the codon content of intergenic DNA sequences and the ranked distribution of sizes of trees in a determined area as examples. We show that the fittings proposed increase their accuracy with the number of distributions that are mixed and ranked.

  11. Molecular theory of size exclusion chromatography for wide pore size distributions.

    PubMed

    Sepsey, Annamária; Bacskay, Ivett; Felinger, Attila

    2014-02-28

    Chromatographic processes can conveniently be modeled at a microscopic level using the molecular theory of chromatography. This molecular or microscopic theory is completely general; therefore it can be used for any chromatographic process such as adsorption, partition, ion-exchange or size exclusion chromatography. The molecular theory of chromatography allows taking into account the kinetics of the pore ingress and egress processes, the heterogeneity of the pore sizes and polymer polydispersion. In this work, we assume that the pore size in the stationary phase of chromatographic columns is governed by a wide lognormal distribution. This property is integrated into the molecular model of size exclusion chromatography and the moments of the elution profiles were calculated for several kinds of pore structure. Our results demonstrate that wide pore size distributions have strong influence on the retention properties (retention time, peak width, and peak shape) of macromolecules. The novel model allows us to estimate the real pore size distribution of commonly used HPLC stationary phases, and the effect of this distribution on the size exclusion process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Production, depreciation and the size distribution of firms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qi; Chen, Yongwang; Tong, Hui; Di, Zengru

    2008-05-01

    Many empirical researches indicate that firm size distributions in different industries or countries exhibit some similar characters. Among them the fact that many firm size distributions obey power-law especially for the upper end has been mostly discussed. Here we present an agent-based model to describe the evolution of manufacturing firms. Some basic economic behaviors are taken into account, which are production with decreasing marginal returns, preferential allocation of investments, and stochastic depreciation. The model gives a steady size distribution of firms which obey power-law. The effect of parameters on the power exponent is analyzed. The theoretical results are given based on both the Fokker-Planck equation and the Kesten process. They are well consistent with the numerical results.

  13. Initial drop size and velocity distributions for airblast coaxial atomizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eroglu, H.; Chigier, N.

    1991-01-01

    Phase Doppler measurements were used to determine initial drop size and velocity distributions after a complete disintegration of coaxial liquid jets. The Sauter mean diameter (SMD) distribution was found to be strongly affected by the structure and behavior of the preceding liquid intact jet. The axial measurement stations were determined from the photographs of the coaxial liquid jet at very short distances (1-2 mm) downstream of the observed break-up locations. Minimum droplet mean velocities were found at the center, and maximum velocities were near the spray boundary. Size-velocity correlations show that the velocity of larger drops did not change with drop size. Drop rms velocity distributions have double peaks whose radial positions coincide with the maximum mean velocity gradients.

  14. Aerosol size distribution at Nansen Ice Sheet Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belosi, F.; Contini, D.; Donateo, A.; Santachiara, G.; Prodi, F.

    2012-04-01

    During austral summer 2006, in the framework of the XXII Italian Antarctic expedition of PNRA (Italian National Program for Research in Antarctica), aerosol particle number size distribution measurements were performed in the 10-500 range nm over the Nansen Ice Sheet glacier (NIS, 74°30' S, 163°27' E; 85 m a.s.l), a permanently iced branch of the Ross Sea. Observed total particle number concentrations varied between 169 and 1385 cm- 3. A monomodal number size distribution, peaking at about 70 nm with no variation during the day, was observed for continental air mass, high wind speed and low relative humidity. Trimodal number size distributions were also observed, in agreement with measurements performed at Aboa station, which is located on the opposite side of the Antarctic continent to the NIS. In this case new particle formation, with subsequent particle growth up to about 30 nm, was observed even if not associated with maritime air masses.

  15. Recovering 3D particle size distributions from 2D sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Olson, Daniel M.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss different ways to convert observed, apparent particle size distributions from 2D sections (thin sections, SEM maps on planar surfaces, etc.) into true 3D particle size distributions. We give a simple, flexible, and practical method to do this; show which of these techniques gives the most faithful conversions; and provide (online) short computer codes to calculate both 2D-3D recoveries and simulations of 2D observations by random sectioning. The most important systematic bias of 2D sectioning, from the standpoint of most chondrite studies, is an overestimate of the abundance of the larger particles. We show that fairly good recoveries can be achieved from observed size distributions containing 100-300 individual measurements of apparent particle diameter.

  16. Initial drop size and velocity distributions for airblast coaxial atomizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eroglu, H.; Chigier, N.

    1991-01-01

    Phase Doppler measurements were used to determine initial drop size and velocity distributions after a complete disintegration of coaxial liquid jets. The Sauter mean diameter (SMD) distribution was found to be strongly affected by the structure and behavior of the preceding liquid intact jet. The axial measurement stations were determined from the photographs of the coaxial liquid jet at very short distances (1-2 mm) downstream of the observed break-up locations. Minimum droplet mean velocities were found at the center, and maximum velocities were near the spray boundary. Size-velocity correlations show that the velocity of larger drops did not change with drop size. Drop rms velocity distributions have double peaks whose radial positions coincide with the maximum mean velocity gradients.

  17. Measurement of the (212)Pb particle size distribution indoors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Guo, Q; Zhuo, W

    2010-10-01

    A new device has been developed for the measurement of the (212)Pb particle size distribution indoors. This device consists of two wire screens and a back-up filter with a diameter of 2.0 cm. The sampling flow rate is typically 3.0 l min(-1). After 3-h sampling time and 6-h waiting time, a CR-39 detector is used for the registration of the alpha particles from the (212)Pb, deposited on the wire screens and the filter, respectively. It appears clear from field measurements that there are no appreciable differences among the particle size distributions from different dwellings within the same location and under the same climate conditions. However, the (212)Pb particle size distributions from the countryside dwellings have different results from those of the city dwellings.

  18. Dynamic Scaling of Island-size Distribution on Anisotropic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maozhi; Wang, E. G.; Liu, Banggui; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2002-03-01

    Dynamic scaling of island-size distribution on isotropic and anisotropic surfaces in submonolayer growth is systematically studied using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the island-size distribution in anisotropic submonolayer growth exhibits a general dynamic scaling behavior. An analytic expression is proposed for the scaling function, and is compared with the simulation results. This scaling function not only improves previous results for the isotropic growth (1), but also describes the scaling behavior of the island-size distribution in anisotropic submonolayer growth very well (2). 1. J. G. Amar and F. Family, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2066 (1995). 2. M. Z. Li, E. G. Wang, B. G. Liu, and Z. Y. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. (submitted).

  19. The Size Frequency Distribution of Small Main-Belt Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Brian J.; Trilling, David E.; Hines, Dean C.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Fuentes, Cesar I.; Hulsebus, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The asteroid size distribution informs us about the formation and composition of the Solar System. We build on our previous work in which we harvest serendipitously observed data of the Taurus region and measure the brightness and size distributions of Main-belt asteroids. This is accomplished with the highly sensitive MIPS 24 micron channel. We expect to catalog 104 asteroids, giving us a statistically significant data set. Results from this investigation will allow us to characterize the total population of small, Main-belt asteroids. Here we will present new results on the completeness of our study; on the presence of size distribution variations with inclination and radial distance in the belt; and early result on other archival fields.

  20. Endogenic craters on basaltic lava flows - Size frequency distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Gault, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Circular crater forms, termed collapse depressions, which occur on many basalt flows on the earth have also been detected on the moon and Mars and possibly on Mercury and Io. The admixture of collapse craters with impact craters would affect age determinations of planetary surface units based on impact crater statistics by making them appear anomalously old. In the work described in the present paper, the techniques conventionally used in planetary crater counting were applied to the determination of the size range and size frequency distribution of collapse craters on lava flows in Idaho, California, and New Mexico. Collapse depressions range in size from 3 to 80 m in diameter; their cumulative size distributions are similar to those of small impact craters on the moon.

  1. Size specific emission in peptide capped gold quantum clusters with tunable photoswitching behavior.

    PubMed

    Baral, Abhishek; Basu, Kingshuk; Ghosh, Sirshendu; Bhattacharyya, Kalishankar; Roy, Subhasish; Datta, Ayan; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-03-16

    Three different types of fluorescent gold clusters (namely blue, green and red emitting) have been prepared from a gold precursor (chloroauric acid) under moderate conditions in aqueous medium. A cysteine containing dipeptide has been used for the formation of these quantum clusters as this peptide molecule contains a thiol group in the side chain to cap these nascently formed clusters and the free amino and carboxylic moieties assist in water solubility. Thus, the clusters are also environmentally friendly as the capped peptide is made up of only naturally occurring protein amino acids. These clusters have been well characterized by using UV-visible, fluorescence, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and ultrahigh resolution field emission gun-transmission electron microscopy (UHR-FEG-TEM). Arrangements of gold atoms and their interaction with the corresponding ligands in three different fluorescent clusters have been predicted computationally. The excited state behavior of three different clusters has also been studied using time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) and computational studies suggest intersystem crossing (S1 → T1) in the case of red-emitting Au23 clusters. Interestingly, these gold clusters exhibit semiconducting and photoswitching properties (Ion/Ioff), which are shown to be controlled by varying the size of these clusters. This holds future promise of using these gold cluster based nanomaterials for optoelectronic applications.

  2. The Size-Luminosity Relation of Disk Galaxies in EDisCS Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Simard, L.; Rudnick, G.; Desai, V.; EDisCS Collaboration

    2006-12-01

    We present the size-luminosity relation (SLR) for disk galaxies observed in eight clusters from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). These clusters, at redshifts 0.4 < z < 0.8, were observed with the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys. While we observe a change in the SLR with redshift, namely that there is an absence of low surface brightness galaxies at high redshift, we demonstrate that this could be a product of selection effects and thus is not a confirmation of evolution. We also compare the SLR for cluster and field galaxies in each redshift bin and see no significant effects of environment on the SLR.

  3. Fast distributed large-pixel-count hologram computation using a GPU cluster.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuechao; Xu, Xuewu; Liang, Xinan

    2013-09-10

    Large-pixel-count holograms are one essential part for big size holographic three-dimensional (3D) display, but the generation of such holograms is computationally demanding. In order to address this issue, we have built a graphics processing unit (GPU) cluster with 32.5 Tflop/s computing power and implemented distributed hologram computation on it with speed improvement techniques, such as shared memory on GPU, GPU level adaptive load balancing, and node level load distribution. Using these speed improvement techniques on the GPU cluster, we have achieved 71.4 times computation speed increase for 186M-pixel holograms. Furthermore, we have used the approaches of diffraction limits and subdivision of holograms to overcome the GPU memory limit in computing large-pixel-count holograms. 745M-pixel and 1.80G-pixel holograms were computed in 343 and 3326 s, respectively, for more than 2 million object points with RGB colors. Color 3D objects with 1.02M points were successfully reconstructed from 186M-pixel hologram computed in 8.82 s with all the above three speed improvement techniques. It is shown that distributed hologram computation using a GPU cluster is a promising approach to increase the computation speed of large-pixel-count holograms for large size holographic display.

  4. Evaluation of availability of cluster distributed disaster tolerant systems for control and information processing based on a cluster quorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarev, R. Yu; Gruzenkin, D. V.; Kovalev, I. V.; Prokopenko, A. V.; Knyazkov, A. N.

    2016-11-01

    Control and information processing systems, which often executes critical functions, must satisfy requirements not only of fault tolerance, but also of disaster tolerance. Cluster architecture is reasonable to be applied to provide disaster tolerance of these systems. In this case clusters are separate control and information processing centers united by means of communication channels. Thus, clusters are a single hardware resource interacting with each other to achieve system objectives. Remote cluster positioning allows ensuring system availability and disaster tolerance even in case of some units’ failures or a whole cluster crash. A technique for evaluation of availability of cluster distributed systems for control and information processing based on a cluster quorum is presented in the paper. This technique can be applied to different cluster distributed control and information processing systems, claimed to be based on the disaster tolerance principles. In the article we discuss a communications satellite system as an example of a cluster distributed disaster tolerant control and information processing system. Evaluation of availability of the communications satellite system is provided. Possible scenarios of communications satellite system cluster-based components failures were analyzed. The analysis made it possible to choose the best way to implement the cluster structure for a distributed control and information processing system.

  5. Particle size distribution and particle size-related crystalline silica content in granite quarry dust.

    PubMed

    Sirianni, Greg; Hosgood, Howard Dean; Slade, Martin D; Borak, Jonathan

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies indicate that the relationship between empirically derived particle counts, particle mass determinations, and particle size-related silica content are not constant within mines or across mine work tasks. To better understand the variability of particle size distributions and variations in silica content by particle size in a granite quarry, exposure surveys were conducted with side-by-side arrays of four closed face cassettes, four cyclones, four personal environmental monitors, and a real-time particle counter. In general, the proportion of silica increased as collected particulate size increased, but samples varied in an inconstant way. Significant differences in particle size distributions were seen depending on the extent of ventilation and the nature and activity of work performed. Such variability raises concerns about the adequacy of silica exposure assessments based on only limited numbers of samples or short-term samples.

  6. Coarsening of protein clusters on subcellular drops exhibits strong and sudden size selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Aidan; Rutenberg, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Autophagy is an important process for the degradation of cellular components, with receptor proteins targeting substrates to downstream autophagy machinery. An important question is how receptor protein interactions lead to their selective accumulation on autophagy substrates. Receptor proteins have recently been observed in clusters, raising the possibility that clustering could affect autophagy selectivity. We investigate the clustering dynamics of the autophagy receptor protein NBR1. In addition to standard receptor protein domains, NBR1 has a ``J'' domain that anchors it to membranes, and a coiled-coil domain that enhances self-interaction. We model coarsening clusters of NBR1 on the surfaces of a polydisperse collection of drops, representing organelles. Despite the disconnected nature of the drop surfaces, we recover dynamical scaling of cluster sizes. Significantly, we find that at a well-defined time after coarsening begins, clusters evaporate from smaller drops and grow on larger drops. Thus, coarsening-driven size selection will localize protein clusters to larger substrates, leaving smaller substrates without clusters. This provides a possible physical mechanism for autophagy selectivity, and can explain reports of size selection during peroxisome degradation.

  7. Influence of multidroplet size distribution on icing collection efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H.-P.; Kimble, K. R.; Frost, W.; Shaw, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Calculation of collection efficiencies of two-dimensional airfoils for a monodispersed droplet icing cloud and a multidispersed droplet is carried out. Comparison is made with the experimental results reported in the NACA Technical Note series. The results of the study show considerably improved agreement with experiment when multidroplet size distributions are employed. The study then investigates the effect of collection efficiency on airborne particle droplet size sampling instruments. The biased effect introduced due to sampling from different collection volumes is predicted.

  8. The Size Distribution of Jupiter-Family Comet Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Snodgrass, C.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Lowry, S. C.

    2009-09-01

    We present an updated size distribution for the nuclei of Jupiter-Family Comets, based on observations of nuclei at large heliocentric distances. The data set used includes our own recently published work and that of others published since the comprehensive review by Lamy et al. (2004, in Comets II), in addition to older measurements from the refereed literature that were included in that compilation. We apply a new approach to make a rigorous assessment of the uncertainty on the size distribution power law slope, taking into account all unknown factors and sources of uncertainty. We include: 1) the uncertainty on the original photometry; 2) the difference between the measured effective radius from snap-shot observations and the mean effective radius for observations at unknown rotational phase of a nucleus with unknown pole orientation and axial ratio; 3) the unknown solar phase function; and 4) the unknown albedo. We use a Monte Carlo technique to look at how the size distribution changes when allowing individual size measurements to vary within these uncertainties. We find the cumulative size distribution can be fit by a power law, N( > r) r^{-a}, where r is the radius and the slope, a = 1.86 ± 0.15. This work was funded in part by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program and was performed in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under contract with NASA.

  9. Three optical methods for remotely measuring aerosol size distributions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, J. A.; Herman, B. M.

    1971-01-01

    Three optical probing methods for remotely measuring atmospheric aerosol size distributions are discussed and contrasted. The particular detection methods which are considered make use of monostatic lidar (laser radar), bistatic lidar, and solar radiometer sensing techniques. The theory of each of these measurement techniques is discussed briefly, and the necessary constraints which must be applied to obtain aerosol size distribution information from such measurements are pointed out. Theoretical and/or experimental results are also presented which demonstrate the utility of the three proposed probing methods.

  10. Sample size calculations for stepped wedge and cluster randomised trials: a unified approach

    PubMed Central

    Hemming, Karla; Taljaard, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To clarify and illustrate sample size calculations for the cross-sectional stepped wedge cluster randomized trial (SW-CRT) and to present a simple approach for comparing the efficiencies of competing designs within a unified framework. Study Design and Setting We summarize design effects for the SW-CRT, the parallel cluster randomized trial (CRT), and the parallel cluster randomized trial with before and after observations (CRT-BA), assuming cross-sectional samples are selected over time. We present new formulas that enable trialists to determine the required cluster size for a given number of clusters. We illustrate by example how to implement the presented design effects and give practical guidance on the design of stepped wedge studies. Results For a fixed total cluster size, the choice of study design that provides the greatest power depends on the intracluster correlation coefficient (ICC) and the cluster size. When the ICC is small, the CRT tends to be more efficient; when the ICC is large, the SW-CRT tends to be more efficient and can serve as an alternative design when the CRT is an infeasible design. Conclusion Our unified approach allows trialists to easily compare the efficiencies of three competing designs to inform the decision about the most efficient design in a given scenario. PMID:26344808

  11. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into pancreatic endoderm in patterned size-controlled clusters.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Dennis; Mendelsohn, Adam D; Seerke, Rina; Desai, Tejal A; German, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Pancreatic β-cells function optimally when clustered in islet-like structures. However, nutrient and oxygen deprivation limits the viability of cells at the core of excessively large clusters. Hence, production of functional β-cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) for patients with diabetes would benefit from the growth and differentiation of these cells in size-controlled aggregates. In this study, we controlled cluster size by seeding hESCs onto glass cover slips patterned by the covalent microcontact-printing of laminin in circular patches of 120 μm in diameter. These were used as substrates to grow and differentiate hESCs first into SOX17-positive/SOX7-negative definitive endoderm, after which many clusters released and formed uniformly sized three-dimensional clusters. Both released clusters and those that remained attached differentiated into HNF1β-positive primitive gut tube-like cells with high efficiency. Further differentiation yielded pancreatic endoderm-like cells that co-expressed PDX1 and NKX6.1. Controlling aggregate size allows efficient production of uniformly-clustered pancreatic endocrine precursors for in vivo engraftment or further in vitro maturation.

  12. Size distribution of Portuguese firms between 2006 and 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoal, Rui; Augusto, Mário; Monteiro, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to describe the size distribution of Portuguese firms, as measured by annual sales and total assets, between 2006 and 2012, giving an economic interpretation for the evolution of the distribution along the time. Three distributions are fitted to data: the lognormal, the Pareto (and as a particular case Zipf) and the Simplified Canonical Law (SCL). We present the main arguments found in literature to justify the use of distributions and emphasize the interpretation of SCL coefficients. Methods of estimation include Maximum Likelihood, modified Ordinary Least Squares in log-log scale and Nonlinear Least Squares considering the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. When applying these approaches to Portuguese's firms data, we analyze if the evolution of estimated parameters in both lognormal power and SCL is in accordance with the known existence of a recession period after 2008. This is confirmed for sales but not for assets, leading to the conclusion that the first variable is a best proxy for firm size.

  13. Consistent patterns of the size distribution of thermokarst lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, A. S.; Kapralova, V. N.; Orlov, T. V.; Trapeznikova, O. N.; Arkhipova, M. V.; Berezin, P. V.; Zverev, A. V.; Panchenko, E. N.; Sadkov, S. A.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to study empirically the patterns of size distribution of thermokarst lakes within lacustrine thermokarst plains. Investigations were performed at 16 sites with various geomorphological, geocryological, and physical geographical conditions (Kolyma Lowland, Western Siberia, Lena River valley, Alaska). The accordance of the distribution area with the lognormal and exponential laws, and the accordance of the average diameter distribution with the normal law have been tested; the tested laws of distribution resulted from previous investigations. The results have shown that the lognormal law of distribution of thermokarst lake areas is valid for the vast majority of cases, and the other types of distribution are inconsistent with empirical data. This evidence favors the development pattern for lacustrine thermokarst plains, when thermokarst processes started simultaneously and the rate of lake growth was proportional to the density of heat loss through the side surface.

  14. Effective scatterer diameter estimates for broad scatterer size distributions.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, Eric P; Hall, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic form factors have been used to model the frequency dependence of acoustic scattering in phantoms and tissues. This work demonstrates that a broad range of scatterer sizes, individually well represented by Faran theory or a Gaussian form factor, is not accurately described by a single effective scatterer from either of these models. Contributions from a distribution of discrete scatterer sizes for two different form factor functions (Gaussian form factors and scattering functions from Faran's theory) were calculated and linearly combined. Composite form factors created from Gaussian distributions of scatterer sizes centered at 50 µm with standard deviations of up to σ = 40 µm were fit to each scattering model between 2 and 12 MHz. Scatterer distributions were generated using one of two assumptions: the number density of the scatterer diameter distribution was Gaussian distributed, or the volume fraction of each scatterer diameter in the distribution was Gaussian distributed. Each simulated form factor was fit to a single-diameter form factor model for Gaussian and exponential form factors. The mean-squared error (MSE) between the composite simulated data and the best-fit single-diameter model was smaller with an exponential form factor model, compared with a Gaussian model, for distributions with standard deviations larger than 30% of the centroid value. In addition, exponential models were shown to have better ability to distinguish between Faran scattering model-based distributions with varying center diameters than the Gaussian form factor model. The evidence suggests that when little is known about the scattering medium, an exponential scattering model provides a better first approximation to the scattering correlation function for a broad distribution of spherically symmetric scatterers than when a Gaussian form factor model is assumed.

  15. Particle size distributions of several commonly used seeding aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswy, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    During the course of experimentation, no solid particle powder could be found which produced an aerosol with a narrow particle size distribution when fluidization was the only flow process used in producing the aerosol. The complication of adding particle size fractionation processes to the aerosol generation effort appears to be avoidable. In this regard, a simple sonic orifice is found to be effective in reducing the percentage of agglomerates in the several metal oxide powders tested. Marginally beneficial results are obtained for a 0.5/99.5 percent by weight mixture of the flow agent and metal oxide powder. However, agglomeration is observed to be enhanced when the flow agent percentage is increased to 5 percent. Liquid atomization using the Collison nebulizer as well as a version of the Laskin nozzle resulted in polydispersed aerosols with particle size distributions heavily weighted by the small particle end of the size spectrum. The aerosol particle size distributions produced by the vaporization/condensation seeder are closer to the ideal monodispersed aerosol than any of the other aerosols tested. In addition, this seeding approach affords a measure of control over particle size and particle production rate.

  16. Sample size calculations for the design of cluster randomized trials: A summary of methodology.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Earnest, Arul; Matchar, David B; Campbell, Michael J; Machin, David

    2015-05-01

    Cluster randomized trial designs are growing in popularity in, for example, cardiovascular medicine research and other clinical areas and parallel statistical developments concerned with the design and analysis of these trials have been stimulated. Nevertheless, reviews suggest that design issues associated with cluster randomized trials are often poorly appreciated and there remain inadequacies in, for example, describing how the trial size is determined and the associated results are presented. In this paper, our aim is to provide pragmatic guidance for researchers on the methods of calculating sample sizes. We focus attention on designs with the primary purpose of comparing two interventions with respect to continuous, binary, ordered categorical, incidence rate and time-to-event outcome variables. Issues of aggregate and non-aggregate cluster trials, adjustment for variation in cluster size and the effect size are detailed. The problem of establishing the anticipated magnitude of between- and within-cluster variation to enable planning values of the intra-cluster correlation coefficient and the coefficient of variation are also described. Illustrative examples of calculations of trial sizes for each endpoint type are included.

  17. Size Evolution and Stochastic Models: Explaining Ostracod Size through Probabilistic Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, M.; Decker, S.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    The biovolume of animals has functioned as an important benchmark for measuring evolution throughout geologic time. In our project, we examined the observed average body size of ostracods over time in order to understand the mechanism of size evolution in these marine organisms. The body size of ostracods has varied since the beginning of the Ordovician, where the first true ostracods appeared. We created a stochastic branching model to create possible evolutionary trees of ostracod size. Using stratigraphic ranges for ostracods compiled from over 750 genera in the Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, we calculated overall speciation and extinction rates for our model. At each timestep in our model, new lineages can evolve or existing lineages can become extinct. Newly evolved lineages are assigned sizes based on their parent genera. We parameterized our model to generate neutral and directional changes in ostracod size to compare with the observed data. New sizes were chosen via a normal distribution, and the neutral model selected new sizes differentials centered on zero, allowing for an equal chance of larger or smaller ostracods at each speciation. Conversely, the directional model centered the distribution on a negative value, giving a larger chance of smaller ostracods. Our data strongly suggests that the overall direction of ostracod evolution has been following a model that directionally pushes mean ostracod size down, shying away from a neutral model. Our model was able to match the magnitude of size decrease. Our models had a constant linear decrease while the actual data had a much more rapid initial rate followed by a constant size. The nuance of the observed trends ultimately suggests a more complex method of size evolution. In conclusion, probabilistic methods can provide valuable insight into possible evolutionary mechanisms determining size evolution in ostracods.

  18. Endohedral clusterfullerenes--playing with cluster and cage sizes.

    PubMed

    Dunsch, Lothar; Yang, Shangfeng

    2007-06-28

    The family of endohedral fullerenes was significantly enlarged within the past six years by the clusterfullerenes containing structures like the M(2)C(2) carbides and the M(3)N nitrides. While the carbide clusters are generated under the standard arc burning conditions according to the stabilisation energy the nitride clusterfullerene type is formed by varying the composition of the cooling gas atmosphere in the arc burning process. The special situation in nitride clusterfullerene synthesis is described in detail and the optimum conditions for the production of nitride clusterfullerenes as the main product in fullerene synthesis are discussed. A review of new nitride clusterfullerenes reported recently is given summarizing the structures, properties and the stability of metal nitride clusterfullerenes. It is shown that all cages with even carbon atoms of C(68) and beyond are available as endohedral nitride clusterstructures. Furthermore the nitride clusterfullerenes are that class of endohedral fullerenes forming the largest number of non-IPR structures. Finally the prospects of this evolving field are briefly discussed taking the superior stability of these endohedral clusterfullerenes into account.

  19. Application of bag sampling technique for particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, M; Johnson, G R; Morawska, L

    2009-11-01

    Bag sampling techniques can be used to temporarily store the aerosol and therefore provide sufficient time to utilize sensitive but slow instrumental techniques for recording detailed particle size distributions. Laboratory based assessment of the method was conducted to examine size dependant deposition loss coefficients for aerosols held in Velostat bags conforming to a horizontal cylindrical geometry. Deposition losses of NaCl particles in the range of 10 nm to 160 nm were analysed in relation to the bag size, storage time, and sampling flow rate. Results of this study suggest that the bag sampling method is most useful for moderately short sampling periods of about 5 minutes.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Three-Dimensional Distribution and Clustering of Intramuscular Fat in Muscles of the Rotator Cuff.

    PubMed

    Santago, Anthony C; Vidt, Meghan E; Tuohy, Christopher J; Poehling, Gary G; Freehill, Michael T; Jordan, Jennifer H; Kraft, Robert A; Saul, Katherine R

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to (1) develop and present a technique to quantitatively assess three-dimensional distribution and clustering of intramuscular fat and (2) use the technique to compare spatial characteristics of intramuscular fat in rotator cuff muscles of older adults with and without a supraspinatus tear. Moran's Index (I), an existing quantitative measure of clustering, was extended for use with MRI to allow comparisons across individuals with different size muscles. Sixteen older adults (>60 years) with (N = 6) and without (N = 10) a degenerative supraspinatus tear participated. Following 3D Dixon MRIs of the shoulder, which separates fat from water, rotator cuff muscles were segmented and sectioned and fat% and Moran's I were calculated to assess distribution and clustering, respectively. Moran's I ranged was 0.40-0.92 and 0.39-0.76 for the tear and control subjects, respectively. Compared to uninjured controls, tear subjects demonstrated increased fat distribution (p = 0.036) and clustering (p = 0.020) distally in the supraspinatus. Tear subjects had more pronounced distribution (p < 0.001) and clustering distally (p < 0.001) than proximally. Other rotator cuff muscles exhibited different patterns of fat clustering and distribution. This technique, which we applied to quantify spatial characteristics of intramuscular fat, can be applied to assess clustering of fat in other pathologies and tissues.

  1. The size-distribution of Earth’s lakes

    PubMed Central

    Cael, B. B.; Seekell, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, there are millions of small lakes, but a small number of large lakes. Most key ecosystem patterns and processes scale with lake size, thus this asymmetry between area and abundance is a fundamental constraint on broad-scale patterns in lake ecology. Nonetheless, descriptions of lake size-distributions are scarce and empirical distributions are rarely evaluated relative to theoretical predictions. Here we develop expectations for Earth’s lake area-distribution based on percolation theory and evaluate these expectations with data from a global lake census. Lake surface areas ≥8.5 km2 are power-law distributed with a tail exponent (τ = 1.97) and fractal dimension (d = 1.38), similar to theoretical expectations (τ = 2.05; d = 4/3). Lakes <8.5 km2 are not power-law distributed. An independently developed regional lake census exhibits a similar transition and consistency with theoretical predictions. Small lakes deviate from the power-law distribution because smaller lakes are more susceptible to dynamical change and topographic behavior at sub-kilometer scales is not self-similar. Our results provide a robust characterization and theoretical explanation for the lake size-abundance relationship, and form a fundamental basis for understanding and predicting patterns in lake ecology at broad scales. PMID:27388607

  2. Forty-seven Milky Way-sized, Extremely Diffuse Galaxies in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Abraham, Roberto; Merritt, Allison; Zhang, Jielai; Geha, Marla; Conroy, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of 47 low surface brightness objects in deep images of a 3° × 3° field centered on the Coma cluster, obtained with the Dragonfly Telephoto Array. The objects have central surface brightness μ(g, 0) ranging from 24-26 mag arcsec-2 and effective radii r eff = 3''-10'', as measured from archival Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope images. From their spatial distribution we infer that most or all of the objects are galaxies in the Coma cluster. This relatively large distance is surprising as it implies that the galaxies are very large: with r eff = 1.5-4.6 kpc their sizes are similar to those of L * galaxies even though their median stellar mass is only ~6 × 107 M ⊙. The galaxies are relatively red and round, with langg - irang = 0.8 and langb/arang = 0.74. One of the 47 galaxies is fortuitously covered by a deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) observation. The ACS imaging shows a large spheroidal object with a central surface brightness μ475 = 25.8 mag arcsec-2, a Sérsic index n = 0.6, and an effective radius of 7'', corresponding to 3.4 kpc at the distance of Coma. The galaxy is not resolved into stars, consistent with expectations for a Coma cluster object. We speculate that these "ultra-diffuse galaxies" may have lost their gas supply at early times, possibly resulting in very high dark matter fractions.

  3. "Quantized" Doping of Individual Colloidal Nanocrystals Using Size-Focused Metal Quantum Clusters.

    PubMed

    Santiago-González, Beatriz; Monguzzi, Angelo; Pinchetti, Valerio; Casu, Alberto; Prato, Mirko; Lorenzi, Roberto; Campione, Marcello; Chiodini, Norberto; Santambrogio, Carlo; Meinardi, Francesco; Manna, Liberato; Brovelli, Sergio

    2017-06-27

    The insertion of intentional impurities, commonly referred to as doping, into colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is a powerful paradigm for tailoring their electronic, optical, and magnetic behaviors beyond what is obtained with size-control and heterostructuring motifs. Advancements in colloidal chemistry have led to nearly atomic precision of the doping level in both lightly and heavily doped QDs. The doping strategies currently available, however, operate at the ensemble level, resulting in a Poisson distribution of impurities across the QD population. To date, the synthesis of monodisperse ensembles of QDs individually doped with an identical number of impurity atoms is still an open challenge, and its achievement would enable the realization of advanced QD devices, such as optically/electrically controlled magnetic memories and intragap state transistors and solar cells, that rely on the precise tuning of the impurity states (i.e., number of unpaired spins, energy and width of impurity levels) within the QD host. The only approach reported to date relies on QD seeding with organometallic precursors that are intrinsically unstable and strongly affected by chemical or environmental degradation, which prevents the concept from reaching its full potential and makes the method unsuitable for aqueous synthesis routes. Here, we overcome these issues by demonstrating a doping strategy that bridges two traditionally orthogonal nanostructured material systems, namely, QDs and metal quantum clusters composed of a "magic number" of atoms held together by stable metal-to-metal bonds. Specifically, we use clusters composed of four copper atoms (Cu4) capped with d-penicillamine to seed the growth of CdS QDs in water at room temperature. The elemental analysis, performed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, side by side with optical spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy

  4. FORTY-SEVEN MILKY WAY-SIZED, EXTREMELY DIFFUSE GALAXIES IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Merritt, Allison; Geha, Marla; Abraham, Roberto; Zhang, Jielai; Conroy, Charlie

    2015-01-10

    We report the discovery of 47 low surface brightness objects in deep images of a 3° × 3° field centered on the Coma cluster, obtained with the Dragonfly Telephoto Array. The objects have central surface brightness μ(g, 0) ranging from 24-26 mag arcsec{sup –2} and effective radii r {sub eff} = 3''-10'', as measured from archival Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope images. From their spatial distribution we infer that most or all of the objects are galaxies in the Coma cluster. This relatively large distance is surprising as it implies that the galaxies are very large: with r {sub eff} = 1.5-4.6 kpc their sizes are similar to those of L {sub *} galaxies even though their median stellar mass is only ∼6 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}. The galaxies are relatively red and round, with (g – i) = 0.8 and (b/a) = 0.74. One of the 47 galaxies is fortuitously covered by a deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) observation. The ACS imaging shows a large spheroidal object with a central surface brightness μ{sub 475} = 25.8 mag arcsec{sup –2}, a Sérsic index n = 0.6, and an effective radius of 7'', corresponding to 3.4 kpc at the distance of Coma. The galaxy is not resolved into stars, consistent with expectations for a Coma cluster object. We speculate that these ''ultra-diffuse galaxies'' may have lost their gas supply at early times, possibly resulting in very high dark matter fractions.

  5. Aerosol mobility imaging for rapid size distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Hering, Susanne Vera; Spielman, Steven Russel; Kuang, Chongai

    2016-07-19

    A parallel plate dimensional electrical mobility separator and laminar flow water condensation provide rapid, mobility-based particle sizing at concentrations typical of the remote atmosphere. Particles are separated spatially within the electrical mobility separator, enlarged through water condensation, and imaged onto a CCD array. The mobility separation distributes particles in accordance with their size. The condensation enlarges size-separated particles by water condensation while they are still within the gap of the mobility drift tube. Once enlarged the particles are illuminated by a laser. At a pre-selected frequency, typically 10 Hz, the position of all of the individual particles illuminated by the laser are captured by CCD camera. This instantly records the particle number concentration at each position. Because the position is directly related to the particle size (or mobility), the particle size spectra is derived from the images recorded by the CCD.

  6. Quantifying the PAH Size Distribution in H II-Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allamandola, Louis

    We propose to determine the astronomical PAH size distribution for 20 compact H II-regions from the ISO H II-regions spectroscopic archive (catalog). The selected sample includes H IIregions at a range of distances, all with angular sizes captured by the ISO aperture. This is the first time that the PAH size distribution will be put on an accurate, quantitative footing and that a breakdown of the overall PAH population into different size bins is possible. Since the PAH properties that influence the astronomical environment are PAH-size dependent, this new knowledge will provide a deeper understanding of the specific, and sometimes critical, roles that PAHs play in different astronomical environments. This research will be carried out using the PAH spectra and tools that are available through the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database (www.astrochemistry.org/pahdb/). The ISO compact, H II-regions spectroscopic catalog contains the 2.3 196 µm spectra from some 45 H II-regions. Of these, 20 capture the PAH spectrum with high enough quality between 2.5 15 µm to carry out the proposed work. From the outset of the PAH hypothesis it has been thought that the 3.3/11.2 µm PAH band strength ratio is a qualitative proxy for PAH size and a rough measure of variations in the astronomical PAH size distribution between objects or within extended objects. However, because of the intrinsic uncertainties for most of the observational data available for these two bands, and the very limited spectroscopic data available for PAHs representative of the astronomical PAH population, only very crude estimates of the astronomical PAH size distribution have been possible up to now. The work proposed here overcomes these two limitations, allowing astronomers to quantitatively and accurately determine the astronomical PAH size distribution for the first time. The spectra and tools from the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database will be used to determine the astronomical PAH size

  7. Particle Size Distribution in Saturn’s Ring C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, Essam A.; Wong, K.; French, R.; Rappaport, N.

    2012-10-01

    Information about particle sizes in Saturn’s rings is provided by two complementary types of Cassini radio occultation measurements. The first is differential extinction of three coherent sinusoidal signals transmitted by Cassini through the rings back to Earth (wavelength = 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm, respectively). The differential measurements strongly constraint three parameters of an assumed power-law size distribution n(a) = n0 (a/a0)q, amin ≤ a ≤ amax: namely, the power law index q, the minimum radius amin, and reference abundance n0 at reference radius a0. The differential measurements are particularly sensitive to radii in the range 0.1 mm < a < 1 m. Complementing this capability, is a second type of measurements that is particularly sensitive to the larger radii 1 m < a < 20 m and their abundance. Signature of the collective near-forward scattering by these particles is captured in power spectrum measurements as broadened component of width, shape, and strength that depend on ring particle sizes, their spatial distribution, and observation geometry. Contributions of ring features of width as small several hundred kilometers can be identified and isolated in the measured spectra for a small subset of Cassini orbits of favorable geometry. We use three inverse scattering algorithms (Bayes, constrained linear inversion, generalized singular-value-decomposition) to recover the size distribution of particles of resolved ring features over the size range 1 m < a < 20 m without assuming an explicit size distribution model. We also investigate consistency of the results with a single power-law model extending over 0.1 mm < a < 20 m and implications to the spatial distribution of ring particles normal to the ring plane (vertical ring thickness). We present example results for selected features across Saturn’s Ring C where little evidence for gravitational wakes is present, hence the approaches above are applicable.

  8. THE SIZE-LUMINOSITY DISTRIBUTIONS OF LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuang-Han; CANDELS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) comprise the largest sample of star-forming galaxies at z>3 and are crucial to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Their luminosity functions allow us to calculate the cosmic star formation history, and their sizes also provide valuable information about the angular momentum content of the galaxies and dark matter halos. However, due to surface brightness dimming effects, galaxies at high redshifts are especially susceptible to selection effects; it is important to understand the selection effects before we can draw conclusions from the statistics of LBG properties. In this work we will investigate the size--luminosity distribution of LBGs between 3 and 6 with careful modeling of selection effects and measurement errors of size and magnitude. Our modeling is more careful than previous studies because it is performed in the two-dimensional size--magnitude space. The results of this work show that (1) the effective radii of star-forming galaxies likely evolve as H(z)^{-2/3} at a fixed luminosity, (2) the widths of the LBG size distribution are larger than expected from the spin parameter distribution of dark matter halos, and (3) the size--luminosity relation slopes of LBGs are similar to those for late-type disk galaxies in the local universe. These results favor the disk formation theory put forward by Fall & Efstathiou (1980) if the majority of LBGs are disks, but more observational evidence is needed to confirm the kinematical structure of LBGs as well as to explain the widths of the size distribution.

  9. The Lunar Rock Size Frequency Distribution from Diviner Infrared Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, C. M.; Hayne, P. O.; Piqueux, S.; Bandfield, J.; Williams, J. P.; Ghent, R. R.; Paige, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the rock size frequency distribution on a planetary body is important for understanding its geologic history and for selecting landing sites. The rock size frequency distribution can be estimated by counting rocks in high resolution images, but most bodies in the solar system have limited areas with adequate coverage. We propose an alternative method to derive and map rock size frequency distributions using multispectral thermal infrared data acquired at multiple times during the night. We demonstrate this new technique for the Moon using data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Diviner radiometer in conjunction with three dimensional thermal modeling, leveraging the differential cooling rates of different rock sizes. We assume an exponential rock size frequency distribution, which has been shown to yield a good fit to rock populations in various locations on the Moon, Mars, and Earth [2, 3] and solve for the best radiance fits as a function of local time and wavelength. This method presents several advantages: 1) unlike other thermally derived rock abundance techniques, it is sensitive to rocks smaller than the diurnal skin depth; 2) it does not result in apparent decrease in rock abundance at night; and 3) it can be validated using images taken at the lunar surface. This method yields both the fraction of the surface covered in rocks of all sizes and the exponential factor, which defines the rate of drop-off in the exponential function at large rock sizes. We will present maps of both these parameters for the Moon, and provide a geological interpretation. In particular, this method reveals rocks in the lunar highlands that are smaller than previous thermal methods could detect. [1] Bandfield J. L. et al. (2011) JGR, 116, E00H02. [2] Golombek and Rapp (1997) JGR, 102, E2, 4117-4129. [3] Cintala, M.J. and K.M. McBride (1995) NASA Technical Memorandum 104804.

  10. Particle size distribution: a key factor in estimating powder dustiness.

    PubMed

    López-Lilao, Ana; Sanfélix, Forner Vicenta; Mallol, Gasch Gustavo; Monfort, Gimeno Eliseo

    2017-08-01

    ASTRACT A wide variety of raw materials, involving more than twenty samples of quartzes, feldspars, nephelines, carbonates, dolomites, sands, zircons, and alumina, were selected and characterised. Dustiness, i.e. a materials' tendency to generate dust on handling, was determined using the continuous drop method. These raw materials were selected to encompass a wide range of particle sizes (1.6-294 µm) and true densities (2650-4680 kg/m(3)). The dustiness of the raw materials, i.e. their tendency to generate dust on handling, was determined using the continuous drop method. The influence of some key material parameters (particle size distribution, flowability and specific surface area) on dustiness was assessed. In this regard, dustiness was found to be significantly affected by particle size distribution. Data analysis enabled development of a model for predicting the dustiness of the studied materials, assuming that dustiness depended on the particle fraction susceptible to emission and on the bulk material's susceptibility to release these particles. On the one hand, the developed model allows the dustiness mechanisms to be better understood. In this regard, it may be noted that relative emission increased with mean particle size. However, this did not necessarily imply that dustiness did, because dustiness also depended on the fraction of particles susceptible to be emitted. On the other hand, the developed model enables dustiness to be estimated using just the particle size distribution data. The quality of the fits was quite good and the fact that only particle size distribution data are needed facilitates industrial application, since these data are usually known by raw materials managers, thus making additional tests unnecessary. This model may therefore be deemed a key tool in drawing up efficient preventive and/or corrective measures to reduce dust emissions during bulk powder processing, both inside and outside industrial facilities. It is recommended

  11. Distributional shifts in size structure of phytoplankton community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waga, H.; Hirawake, T.; Fujiwara, A.; Nishino, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Suzuki, K.; Takao, S.

    2015-12-01

    Increased understanding on how marine species shift their distribution is required for effective conservation of fishery resources under climate change. Previous studies have often predicted distributional shifts of fish using satellite derived sea surface temperature (SST). However, SST may not fully represent the changes in species distribution through food web structure and as such this remains an open issue due to lack of ecological perspective on energy transfer process in the earlier studies. One of the most important factors in ecosystem is composition of phytoplankton community, and its size structure determines energy flow efficiency from base to higher trophic levels. To elucidate spatiotemporal variation in phytoplankton size structure, chlorophyll-a size distribution (CSD) algorithm was developed using spectral variance of phytoplankton absorption coefficient through principal component analysis. Slope of CSD (CSD slope) indicates size structure of phytoplankton community where, strong and weak magnitudes of CSD slope indicate smaller and larger phytoplankton structure, respectively. Shifts in CSD slope and SST were derived as the ratio of temporal trend over the 12-year period (2003-2014) to 2-dimensional spatial gradient and the resulting global median velocity of CSD slope and SST were 0.361 and 0.733 km year-1, respectively. In addition, the velocity of CSD slope monotonically increases with increasing latitude, while relatively complex latitudinal pattern for SST emerged. Moreover, angle of shifts suggest that species are required to shift their distribution toward not limited to simple pole-ward migration, and some regions exhibit opposite direction between the velocity of CSD slope and SST. These findings further imply that combined phytoplankton size structure and SST may contribute for more accurate prediction of species distribution shifts relative to existing studies which only considering variations in thermal niches.

  12. Selecting series size where the generalized Pareto distribution best fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, Arie

    2016-10-01

    Rates of arrival and magnitudes of hydrologic variables are frequently described by the Poisson and the generalized Pareto (GP) distributions. Variations of their goodness-of-fit to nested series are studied here. The variable employed is depth of rainfall events at five stations of the Israel Meteorological Service. Series sizes range from about 50 (number of years on records) to about 1000 (total number of recorded events). The goodness-of-fit is assessed by the Anderson-Darling test. Three versions of this test are applied here. These are the regular two-sided test (of which the statistic is designated here by A2), the upper one-sided test (UA2) and the adaptation to the Poisson distribution (PA2). Very good fits, with rejection significance levels higher than 0.5 for A2 and higher than 0.25 for PA2, are found for many series of different sizes. Values of the shape parameter of the GP distribution and of the predicted rainfall depths widely vary with series size. Small coefficients of variation are found, at each station, for the 100-year rainfall depths, predicted through the series with very good fit of the GP distribution. Therefore, predictions through series of very good fit appear more consistent than through other selections of series size. Variations of UA2, with series size, are found narrower than those of A2. Therefore, it is advisable to predict through the series of low UA2. Very good fits of the Poisson distribution to arrival rates are found for series with low UA2. But, a reversed relation is not found here. Thus, the model of Poissonian arrival rates and GP distribution of magnitudes suits here series with low UA2. It is recommended to predict through the series, to which the lowest UA2 is obtained.

  13. Elemental composition and size distribution of particulates in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Neustadter, H. E.; Leibecki, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made of the elemental particle size distribution at five contrasting urban environments with different source-type distributions in Cleveland, Ohio. Air quality conditions ranged from normal to air pollution alert levels. A parallel network of high-volume cascade impactors (5-state) were used for simultaneous sampling on glass fiber surfaces for mass determinations and on Whatman-41 surfaces for elemental analysis by neutron activation for 25 elements. The elemental data are assessed in terms of distribution functions and interrelationships and are compared between locations as a function of resultant wind direction in an attempt to relate the findings to sources.

  14. Cluster size and composition dependent water deprotonation by free manganese oxide clusters.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sandra M; Bernhardt, Thorsten M; Kiawi, Denis M; Bakker, Joost M; Barnett, Robert N; Landman, Uzi

    2016-06-21

    In the quest for cheap and earth abundant but highly effective and energy efficient water splitting catalysts, manganese oxide represents one of the materials of choice. In the framework of a new hierarchical modeling strategy we employ free non-ligated manganese oxide clusters MnxOx+y(+) (x = 2-5, y = -1, 0, 1, 2) as simplified molecular models to probe the interaction of water with nano-scale manganese oxide materials. Infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IR-MPD) spectroscopy in conjunction with first-principles spin density functional theory calculations is applied to study several series of MnxOx+y(H2O)n(+) complexes and reveal that the reaction of water with MnxOx+y(+) leads to the deprotonation of the water molecules via hydroxylation of the cluster oxo-bridges. This process is independent of the formal Mn oxidation state and occurs already for the first adsorbed water molecule and it proceeds until all oxo-bridges are hydroxylated. Additional water molecules are bound intact and favorably form H3O2 units with the hydroxylated oxo-bridges. Water adsorption and deprotonation is also found to induce structural transformations of the cluster core, including dimensionality crossover. Furthermore, the IR-MPD measurements reveal that clusters with one oxygen atom in excess MnxOx+1(+) contain a terminal O atom while clusters with two oxygen atoms in excess MnxOx+2(+) contain an intact O2 molecule which, however, dissociates upon adsorption of a minimum number of water molecules. These basic concepts could aid the future design of artificial water-splitting molecular catalysts.

  15. A Grouping Method of Distribution Substations Using Cluster Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtaka, Toshiya; Iwamoto, Shinichi

    Recently, it has been considered to group distribution substations together for evaluating the reinforcement planning of distribution systems. However, the grouping is carried out by the knowledge and experience of an expert who is in charge of distribution systems, and a subjective feeling of a human being causes ambiguous grouping at the moment. Therefore, a method for imitating the grouping by the expert has been desired in order to carry out a systematic grouping which has numerical corroboration. In this paper, we propose a grouping method of distribution substations using cluster analysis based on the interconnected power between the distribution substations. Moreover, we consider the geographical constraints such as rivers, roads, business office boundaries and branch boundaries, and also examine a method for adjusting the interconnected power. Simulations are carried out to verify the validity of the proposed method using an example system. From the simulation results, we can find that the imitation of the grouping by the expert becomes possible due to considering the geographical constraints and adjusting the interconnected power, and also the calculation time and iterations can be greatly reduced by introducing the local and tabu search methods.

  16. Calculation of the probability distribution of basic clusters involved in cluster-variation approximations to the Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinograd, Victor L.; Saxena, Surendra K.; Putnis, Andrew

    1997-11-01

    The free energy of the Ising model in the cluster-variation method (CVM) is traditionally described as a function of many configuration variables (correlation functions) the number of which is equal to the number of all distinct subclusters of the chosen set of basic clusters. According to the present approach the description of the equilibrium distribution of basic clusters such as point, pair, triangle, square, hexagon, octagon, tetrahedron, cube, and octahedron requires no more than four basic variables corresponding to the four basic subclusters, namely, point, pair, triangle, and tetrahedron. The values of all other correlation functions can be found with the help of a set of irreversible transformations on basic clusters which equilibrate the cluster distributions with respect to the given distribution of their basic subclusters. The decrease in the number of cluster variables results in a significant simplification of formulation and minimization of the free-energy expressions used in the CVM.

  17. A Simple Method for the Size Controlled Synthesis of Stable Oligomeric Clusters of Gold Nanoparticles under Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Marlon; Testen, Anze; Koklic, Tilen; Smithies, Oliver

    2016-02-05

    Reducing dilute aqueous HAuCl4 with sodium thiocyanate (NaSCN) under alkaline conditions produces 2 to 3 nm diameter nanoparticles. Stable grape-like oligomeric clusters of these yellow nanoparticles of narrow size distribution are synthesized under ambient conditions via two methods. The delay-time method controls the number of subunits in the oligoclusters by varying the time between the addition of HAuCl₄ to alkaline solution and the subsequent addition of reducing agent, NaSCN. The yellow oligoclusters produced range in size from ~3 to ~25 nm. This size range can be further extended by an add-on method utilizing hydroxylated gold chloride (Na(+)[Au(OH₄-x)Clx](-)) to auto-catalytically increase the number of subunits in the as-synthesized oligocluster nanoparticles, providing a total range of 3 nm to 70 nm. The crude oligocluster preparations display narrow size distributions and do not require further fractionation for most purposes. The oligoclusters formed can be concentrated >300 fold without aggregation and the crude reaction mixtures remain stable for weeks without further processing. Because these oligomeric clusters can be concentrated before derivatization they allow expensive derivatizing agents to be used economically. In addition, we present two models by which predictions of particle size can be made with great accuracy.

  18. A Simple Method for the Size Controlled Synthesis of Stable Oligomeric Clusters of Gold Nanoparticles under Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Marlon; Testen, Anze; Koklic, Tilen; Smithies, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Reducing dilute aqueous HAuCl4 with sodium thiocyanate (NaSCN) under alkaline conditions produces 2 to 3 nm diameter nanoparticles. Stable grape-like oligomeric clusters of these yellow nanoparticles of narrow size distribution are synthesized under ambient conditions via two methods. The delay-time method controls the number of subunits in the oligoclusters by varying the time between the addition of HAuCl4 to alkaline solution and the subsequent addition of reducing agent, NaSCN. The yellow oligoclusters produced range in size from ~3 to ~25 nm. This size range can be further extended by an add-on method utilizing hydroxylated gold chloride (Na+[Au(OH4-x)Clx]-) to auto-catalytically increase the number of subunits in the as-synthesized oligocluster nanoparticles, providing a total range of 3 nm to 70 nm. The crude oligocluster preparations display narrow size distributions and do not require further fractionation for most purposes. The oligoclusters formed can be concentrated >300 fold without aggregation and the crude reaction mixtures remain stable for weeks without further processing. Because these oligomeric clusters can be concentrated before derivatization they allow expensive derivatizing agents to be used economically. In addition, we present two models by which predictions of particle size can be made with great accuracy. PMID:26890032

  19. Tracing Particle Size Distribution Curves Using an Analogue Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisschop, F. De; Segaert, O.

    1986-01-01

    Proposes an analog circuit for use in sedimentation analysis of finely divided solid materials. Discusses a method of particle size distribution analysis and provides schematics of the circuit with list of components as well as a discussion about the operation of the circuit. (JM)

  20. Pore-size distributions of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Walther, D.H.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M. |

    1993-11-01

    Pore-size distributions have been measured for N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) hydrogels at 25 and 32{degrees}C with swelling capacities 11.3 and 6.0 g swollen gel per g dry gel. The mixed-solute-exclusion method (introduced by Kuga) was used to obtain the experimental solute-exclusion curve which represents the amount of imbibed liquid inside the gel inaccessible for a solute of radius r. The pore-size distributions were obtained by using Casassa`s Brownian-motion model and numerically solving the Fredholm integral equation. The pore-size distributions of temperature-sensitive NIPA hydrogels are strongly dependent on temperature which determines swelling capacity. With increasing swelling capacity (from 6.0 to 11.3), the pore-size distribution shifts to higher mode values (27.3 to 50.6 {angstrom}) and to higher variance (1.07{center_dot}10{sup 3} to 3.58{center_dot}10{sup 3} {angstrom}{sup 2}).

  1. Environmental DNA particle size distribution from Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis)

    Treesearch

    Taylor M. Wilcox; Kevin S. McKelvey; Michael K. Young; Winsor H. Lowe; Michael K. Schwartz

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling has become a widespread approach for detecting aquatic animals with high potential for improving conservation biology. However, little research has been done to determine the size of particles targeted by eDNA surveys. In this study, we conduct particle distribution analysis of eDNA from a captive Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in...

  2. Modeling of Microporosity Size Distribution in Aluminum Alloy A356

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lu; Cockcroft, Steve; Zhu, Jindong; Reilly, Carl

    2011-12-01

    Porosity is one of the most common defects to degrade the mechanical properties of aluminum alloys. Prediction of pore size, therefore, is critical to optimize the quality of castings. Moreover, to the design engineer, knowledge of the inherent pore population in a casting is essential to avoid potential fatigue failure of the component. In this work, the size distribution of the porosity was modeled based on the assumptions that the hydrogen pores are nucleated heterogeneously and that the nucleation site distribution is a Gaussian function of hydrogen supersaturation in the melt. The pore growth is simulated as a hydrogen-diffusion-controlled process, which is driven by the hydrogen concentration gradient at the pore liquid interface. Directionally solidified A356 (Al-7Si-0.3Mg) alloy castings were used to evaluate the predictive capability of the proposed model. The cast pore volume fraction and size distributions were measured using X-ray microtomography (XMT). Comparison of the experimental and simulation results showed that good agreement could be obtained in terms of both porosity fraction and size distribution. The model can effectively evaluate the effect of hydrogen content, heterogeneous pore nucleation population, cooling conditions, and degassing time on microporosity formation.

  3. Sample Size Tables, "t" Test, and a Prevalent Psychometric Distribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawilowsky, Shlomo S.; Hillman, Stephen B.

    Psychology studies often have low statistical power. Sample size tables, as given by J. Cohen (1988), may be used to increase power, but they are based on Monte Carlo studies of relatively "tame" mathematical distributions, as compared to psychology data sets. In this study, Monte Carlo methods were used to investigate Type I and Type II…

  4. Size and moisture distribution characteristics of walnuts and their components

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to determine the size characteristics and moisture content (MC) distributions of individual walnuts and their components, including hulls, shells and kernels under different harvest conditions. Measurements were carried out for three walnut varieties, Tulare, Howard a...

  5. Tracing Particle Size Distribution Curves Using an Analogue Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisschop, F. De; Segaert, O.

    1986-01-01

    Proposes an analog circuit for use in sedimentation analysis of finely divided solid materials. Discusses a method of particle size distribution analysis and provides schematics of the circuit with list of components as well as a discussion about the operation of the circuit. (JM)

  6. Stand size, stand distribution, and rotation lengths for forest wildlife

    Treesearch

    Steven E. Backs; Russel R. Titus

    1989-01-01

    The key to managing forest wildlife is providing diverse habitats. Stand size, stand distribution, and rotation length determine how diverse habitats will be. Since the tenure of private forest owners is generally shorter than prescribed rotations, rotation recommendations serve more as guides to the amount and intensity of cutting needed to maintain desired habitat....

  7. Factors influencing the effect size distribution of adaptive substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Christopher G.; Gould, Billie A.; Schemske, Douglas W.

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of effect sizes of adaptive substitutions has been central to evolutionary biology since the modern synthesis. Early theory proposed that because large-effect mutations have negative pleiotropic consequences, only small-effect mutations contribute to adaptation. More recent theory suggested instead that large-effect mutations could be favoured when populations are far from their adaptive peak. Here we suggest that the distributions of effect sizes are expected to differ among study systems, reflecting the wide variation in evolutionary forces and ecological conditions experienced in nature. These include selection, mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and other factors such as the degree of pleiotropy, the distance to the phenotypic optimum, whether the optimum is stable or moving, and whether new mutation or standing genetic variation provides the source of adaptive alleles. Our goal is to review how these factors might affect the distribution of effect sizes and to identify new research directions. Until more theory and empirical work is available, we feel that it is premature to make broad generalizations about the effect size distribution of adaptive substitutions important in nature. PMID:27053750

  8. Whistler Waves Driven by Anisotropic Strahl Velocity Distributions: Cluster Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, A.F.; Gurgiolo, C.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Gary, S. P.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Observed properties of the strahl using high resolution 3D electron velocity distribution data obtained from the Cluster/PEACE experiment are used to investigate its linear stability. An automated method to isolate the strahl is used to allow its moments to be computed independent of the solar wind core+halo. Results show that the strahl can have a high temperature anisotropy (T(perpindicular)/T(parallell) approximately > 2). This anisotropy is shown to be an important free energy source for the excitation of high frequency whistler waves. The analysis suggests that the resultant whistler waves are strong enough to regulate the electron velocity distributions in the solar wind through pitch-angle scattering

  9. Weighing Supported Nanoparticles: Size-Selected Clusters as Mass Standards in Nanometrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, N. P.; Li, Z. Y.; Chen, Y.; Palomba, S.; di Vece, M.; Palmer, R. E.

    2008-12-01

    We present a new approach to quantify the mass and 3D shape of nanoparticles on supports, using size-selected nanoclusters as mass standards in scanning transmission electron microscope. Through quantitative image intensity analysis, we show that the integrated high angle annular dark field intensities of size-selected gold clusters soft-landed on graphite display a monotonic dependence on the cluster size as far as ˜6500 atoms. We applied this mass standard to study gold nanoparticles prepared by thermal vapor deposition and by colloidal wet chemistry, and from which we deduced the shapes of these two types of nanoparticles as expected.

  10. Characterization of Flocs and Floc Size Distributions Using Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Siwei; Weber-Shirk, Monroe; Lion, Leonard W

    2016-01-01

    A nonintrusive digital imaging process was developed to study particle size distributions created through flocculation and sedimentation. Quantification of particle size distributions under different operating conditions can be of use in the understanding of aggregation mechanisms. This process was calibrated by measuring standardized polystyrene particles of known size and was utilized to count and measure individual kaolin clay particles as well as aggregates formed by coagulation with polyaluminum chloride and flocculation. Identification of out-of-focus flocs was automated with LabVIEW and used to remove them from the database that was analyzed. The particle diameter of the test suspension of kaolinite clay was measured to be 7.7 ± 3.8 μm and a linear relationship was obtained between turbidity and the concentration of clay particles determined by imaging. The analysis technique was applied to characterize flocs and floc particle size distribution as a function of coagulant dose. Removal of flocs by sedimentation was characterized by imaging, and the negative logarithm of the fraction of turbidity remaining after settling had a linear relationship with the logarithm of aluminum dose. The maximum floc size observed in the settled water was less than 120 μm, which was in accordance with the value predicted by a model for the capture velocity of the experimental tube settler of 0.21 mm/s.

  11. Soil signature simulation of complex mixtures and particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Tyler; Bachmann, Charles M.; Salvaggio, Carl

    2015-09-01

    Soil reflectance signatures were modeled using the digital imaging and remote sensing image generation model and Blender three-dimensional (3-D) graphic design software. Using these tools, the geometry, radiometry, and chemistry of quartz and magnetite were exploited to model the presence of particle size and porosity effects in the visible and the shortwave infrared spectrum. Using the physics engines within the Blender 3-D graphic design software, physical representations of granular soil scenes were created. Each scene characterized a specific particle distribution and density. Chemical and optical properties of pure quartz and magnetite were assigned to particles in the scene based on particle size. This work presents a model to describe an observed phase-angle dependence of beach sand density. Bidirectional reflectance signatures were simulated for targets of varying size distribution and density. This model provides validation for a phenomenological trade space between density and particle size distribution in complex, heterogeneous soil mixtures. It also confirms the suggestion that directional reflectance signatures can be defined by intimate mixtures that depend on pore spacing. The study demonstrated that by combining realistic target geometry and spectral measurements of pure quartz and magnetite, effects of soil particle size and density could be modeled without functional data fitting or rigorous analysis of material dynamics. This research does not use traditional function-based models for simulation. The combination of realistic geometry, physically viable particle structure, and first-principles ray-tracing enables the ability to represent signature changes that have been observed in experimental observations.

  12. Characterization of Flocs and Floc Size Distributions Using Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Siwei; Weber-Shirk, Monroe; Lion, Leonard W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A nonintrusive digital imaging process was developed to study particle size distributions created through flocculation and sedimentation. Quantification of particle size distributions under different operating conditions can be of use in the understanding of aggregation mechanisms. This process was calibrated by measuring standardized polystyrene particles of known size and was utilized to count and measure individual kaolin clay particles as well as aggregates formed by coagulation with polyaluminum chloride and flocculation. Identification of out-of-focus flocs was automated with LabVIEW and used to remove them from the database that was analyzed. The particle diameter of the test suspension of kaolinite clay was measured to be 7.7 ± 3.8 μm and a linear relationship was obtained between turbidity and the concentration of clay particles determined by imaging. The analysis technique was applied to characterize flocs and floc particle size distribution as a function of coagulant dose. Removal of flocs by sedimentation was characterized by imaging, and the negative logarithm of the fraction of turbidity remaining after settling had a linear relationship with the logarithm of aluminum dose. The maximum floc size observed in the settled water was less than 120 μm, which was in accordance with the value predicted by a model for the capture velocity of the experimental tube settler of 0.21 mm/s. PMID:26909006

  13. Reexamining cluster radioactivity in trans-lead nuclei with consideration of specific density distributions in daughter nuclei and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yibin; Ren, Zhongzhou; Ni, Dongdong

    2016-08-01

    We further investigate the cluster emission from heavy nuclei beyond the lead region in the framework of the preformed cluster model. The refined cluster-core potential is constructed by the double-folding integral of the density distributions of the daughter nucleus and the emitted cluster, where the radius or the diffuseness parameter in the Fermi density distribution formula is determined according to the available experimental data on the charge radii and the neutron skin thickness. The Schrödinger equation of the cluster-daughter relative motion is then solved within the outgoing Coulomb wave-function boundary conditions to obtain the decay width. It is found that the present decay width of cluster emitters is clearly enhanced as compared to that in the previous case, which involved the fixed parametrization for the density distributions of daughter nuclei and clusters. Among the whole procedure, the nuclear deformation of clusters is also introduced into the calculations, and the degree of its influence on the final decay half-life is checked to some extent. Moreover, the effect from the bubble density distribution of clusters on the final decay width is carefully discussed by using the central depressed distribution.

  14. Novel magnetic Fe onion-like fullerene micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snovski, Ron; Grinblat, Judith; Margel, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic polydivinylbenzene (PDVB)/magnetite micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution were prepared by entrapping Fe(CO)5 within the pores of uniform porous PDVB particles, followed by the thermal decomposition of the encapsulated Fe(CO)5 at 300 °C in a sealed cell under inert atmosphere. Magnetic Fe onion-like fullerene micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution have been prepared by the thermal decomposition of the PDVB/magnetite magnetic microspheres at 1100 °C under inert atmosphere. The graphitic coating protects the elemental iron particles from oxidation and thereby preserves their very high magnetic moment for at least a year. Characterization of these unique magnetic carbon graphitic particles was also performed.

  15. Size and energy distributions of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.; Chao, J. K.

    2007-02-01

    In observations from 1995 to 2001 from the Wind spacecraft, 144 interplanetary magnetic flux ropes were identified in the solar wind around 1 AU. Their durations vary from tens of minutes to tens of hours. These magnetic flux ropes include many small- and intermediate-sized structures and display a continuous distribution in size. Energies of these flux ropes are estimated and it is found that the distribution of their energies is a good power law spectrum with an index ~-0.87. The possible relationship between them and solar eruptions is discussed. It is suggested that like interplanetary magnetic clouds are interplanetary coronal mass ejections, the small- and intermediate-sized interplanetary magnetic flux ropes are the interplanetary manifestations of small coronal mass ejections produced in small solar eruptions. However, these small coronal mass ejections are too weak to appear clearly in the coronagraph observations as an ordinary coronal mass ejection.

  16. Turbulent Concentration of Chondrules: Size Distribution and Multifractal Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Hogan, Robert C.; Paque, Julie M.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    Size-selective concentration of particles in 3D turbulence may be related to collection of chondrules and other constituents into primitive bodies in a weakly turbulent protoplanetary nebula. In the terrestrial planet region, both the characteristic size and narrow size distribution of chondrules are explained, whereas "fluffier" particles would be concentrated in lower density, or more intensely turbulent, regions of the nebula. The spatial distribution of concentrated particle density obeys multifractal scaling, suggesting a dose tie to the turbulent cascade process. This scaling behavior allows predictions of the concentration probabilities to be made in the protoplanetary nebula, which are so large (> 10(exp 3) - 10(exp 4)) that further studies must be made of the role of mass loading.

  17. Determination of atmospheric particle size distribution from forward scattering data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    Description of an analytic method of reconstructing the particle size distribution of atmospheric aerosols when no a priori information is available regarding the refractive index of the particles, the analytic form of the distribution, the size range, and the size extremal values. The method applies in principle to angle-dependent scattering data at a fixed wave number, or to wave-number-dependent scattering data at a fixed angle, or to a combination of the two. Some results of an angular scan study of the aureole are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the method. In conclusion, an analysis is made of the efficiency and accuracy of the method, the uniqueness of the inverse solutions, and the stability of the method relative to experimental noise.

  18. Remnant lipoprotein size distribution profiling via dynamic light scattering analysis.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Richa; Mellis, Birgit; Garza, Kyana; Hameed, Samee A; Jurica, James M; Hernandez, Ana V; Nguyen, Mia N; Mittal, Chandra K

    2016-11-01

    Remnant lipoproteins (RLP) are a metabolically derived subpopulation of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in human blood that are involved in the metabolism of dietary fats or triglycerides. RLP, the smaller and denser variants of TRL particles, are strongly correlated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and were listed as an emerging atherogenic risk factor by the AHA in 2001. Varying analytical techniques used in clinical studies in the size determination of RLP contribute to conflicting hypotheses in regard to whether larger or smaller RLP particles contribute to CVD progression, though multiple pathways may exist. We demonstrated a unique combinatorial bioanalytical approach involving the preparative immunoseparation of RLP, and dynamic light scattering for size distribution analysis. This is a new facile and robust methodology for the size distribution analysis of RLP that in conjunction with clinical studies may reveal the mechanisms by which RLP cause CVD progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Size Distribution of Stardust Injected into the ISM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, D.; Sedlmayr, E.

    1996-01-01

    A multi-component method for the description of the evolution of the grain size distribution in consideration of a size dependent grain drift and growth rate is applied in order to model dust driven winds around cool C-stars. Grain drift introduces several modifications concerning dust growth: on one hand the residence time in the region of efficient growth is reduced, on the other hand the growth efficiency is higher due to an increased collisional rate. For carbon grains the surface density of radical sites is increased, but on the other hand there is a reduction of the sticking efficiency of the growth species for drift velocities larger than a few km/s. It is found that the consideration of drift results in a considerable distortion of the size distribution as compared to the case of zero drift velocity. Generally, there are less, but larger grains if drift is included.

  20. Growing axons analysis by using Granulometric Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Mariela A.; Ballarin, Virginia L.; Rapacioli, Melina; Celín, A. R.; Sánchez, V.; Flores, V.

    2011-09-01

    Neurite growth (neuritogenesis) in vitro is a common methodology in the field of developmental neurobiology. Morphological analyses of growing neurites are usually difficult because their thinness and low contrast usually prevent to observe clearly their shape, number, length and spatial orientation. This paper presents the use of the granulometric size distribution in order to automatically obtain information about the shape, size and spatial orientation of growing axons in tissue cultures. The results here presented show that the granulometric size distribution results in a very useful morphological tool since it allows the automatic detection of growing axons and the precise characterization of a relevant parameter indicative of the axonal growth spatial orientation such as the quantification of the angle of deviation of the growing direction. The developed algorithms automatically quantify this orientation by facilitating the analysis of these images, which is important given the large number of images that need to be processed for this type of study.

  1. Lognormal field size distributions as a consequence of economic truncation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Drew, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    The assumption of lognormal (parent) field size distributions has for a long time been applied to resource appraisal and evaluation of exploration strategy by the petroleum industry. However, frequency distributions estimated with observed data and used to justify this hypotheses are conditional. Examination of various observed field size distributions across basins and over time shows that such distributions should be regarded as the end result of an economic filtering process. Commercial discoveries depend on oil and gas prices and field development costs. Some new fields are eliminated due to location, depths, or water depths. This filtering process is called economic truncation. Economic truncation may occur when predictions of a discovery process are passed through an economic appraisal model. We demonstrate that (1) economic resource appraisals, (2) forecasts of levels of petroleum industry activity, and (3) expected benefits of developing and implementing cost reducing technology are sensitive to assumptions made about the nature of that portion of (parent) field size distribution subject to economic truncation. ?? 1985 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  2. Size distributions and failure initiation of submarine and subaerial landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brink, U. S.; Barkan, R.; Andrews, B. D.; Chaytor, J. D.

    2009-09-01

    Landslides are often viewed together with other natural hazards, such as earthquakes and fires, as phenomena whose size distribution obeys an inverse power law. Inverse power law distributions are the result of additive avalanche processes, in which the final size cannot be predicted at the onset of the disturbance. Volume and area distributions of submarine landslides along the U.S. Atlantic continental slope follow a lognormal distribution and not an inverse power law. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generated area distributions of submarine landslides that show a characteristic size and with few smaller and larger areas, which can be described well by a lognormal distribution. To generate these distributions we assumed that the area of slope failure depends on earthquake magnitude, i.e., that failure occurs simultaneously over the area affected by horizontal ground shaking, and does not cascade from nucleating points. Furthermore, the downslope movement of displaced sediments does not entrain significant amounts of additional material. Our simulations fit well the area distribution of landslide sources along the Atlantic continental margin, if we assume that the slope has been subjected to earthquakes of magnitude ≤ 6.3. Regions of submarine landslides, whose area distributions obey inverse power laws, may be controlled by different generation mechanisms, such as the gradual development of fractures in the headwalls of cliffs. The observation of a large number of small subaerial landslides being triggered by a single earthquake is also compatible with the hypothesis that failure occurs simultaneously in many locations within the area affected by ground shaking. Unlike submarine landslides, which are found on large uniformly-dipping slopes, a single large landslide scarp cannot form on land because of the heterogeneous morphology and short slope distances of tectonically-active subaerial regions. However, for a given earthquake magnitude, the total area

  3. Size distributions and failure initiation of submarine and subaerial landslides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.S.; Barkan, R.; Andrews, B.D.; Chaytor, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Landslides are often viewed together with other natural hazards, such as earthquakes and fires, as phenomena whose size distribution obeys an inverse power law. Inverse power law distributions are the result of additive avalanche processes, in which the final size cannot be predicted at the onset of the disturbance. Volume and area distributions of submarine landslides along the U.S. Atlantic continental slope follow a lognormal distribution and not an inverse power law. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generated area distributions of submarine landslides that show a characteristic size and with few smaller and larger areas, which can be described well by a lognormal distribution. To generate these distributions we assumed that the area of slope failure depends on earthquake magnitude, i.e., that failure occurs simultaneously over the area affected by horizontal ground shaking, and does not cascade from nucleating points. Furthermore, the downslope movement of displaced sediments does not entrain significant amounts of additional material. Our simulations fit well the area distribution of landslide sources along the Atlantic continental margin, if we assume that the slope has been subjected to earthquakes of magnitude ??? 6.3. Regions of submarine landslides, whose area distributions obey inverse power laws, may be controlled by different generation mechanisms, such as the gradual development of fractures in the headwalls of cliffs. The observation of a large number of small subaerial landslides being triggered by a single earthquake is also compatible with the hypothesis that failure occurs simultaneously in many locations within the area affected by ground shaking. Unlike submarine landslides, which are found on large uniformly-dipping slopes, a single large landslide scarp cannot form on land because of the heterogeneous morphology and short slope distances of tectonically-active subaerial regions. However, for a given earthquake magnitude, the total area

  4. One-pot synthesis and characterization of subnanometre-size benzotriazolate protected copper clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salorinne, Kirsi; Chen, Xi; Troff, Ralf W.; Nissinen, Maija; Häkkinen, Hannu

    2012-06-01

    A simple one-pot method for the preparation of subnanometre-size benzotriazolate (BTA) protected copper clusters, CunBTAm, is reported. The clusters were analyzed by optical and infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy together with computational methods. We suggest a structural motif where the copper core of the CunBTAm clusters is protected by BTA-Cu(i)-BTA units.A simple one-pot method for the preparation of subnanometre-size benzotriazolate (BTA) protected copper clusters, CunBTAm, is reported. The clusters were analyzed by optical and infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy together with computational methods. We suggest a structural motif where the copper core of the CunBTAm clusters is protected by BTA-Cu(i)-BTA units. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional UV-Vis, ESI-MS, Raman and TEM data; synthesis protocol for the alternative procedure to prepare Cu:BTA clusters; and coordinates of the Cu6BTA4 cluster. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30444a

  5. Particle size distributions and the vertical distribution of suspended matter in the upwelling region off Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchen, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Various methods of presenting and mathematically describing particle size distribution are explained and evaluated. The hyperbolic distribution is found to be the most practical but the more complex characteristic vector analysis is the most sensitive to changes in the shape of the particle size distributions. A method for determining onshore-offshore flow patterns from the distribution of particulates was presented. A numerical model of the vertical structure of two size classes of particles was developed. The results show a close similarity to the observed distributions but overestimate the particle concentration by forty percent. This was attributed to ignoring grazing by zooplankton. Sensivity analyses showed the size preference was most responsive to the maximum specific growth rates and nutrient half saturation constants. The verical structure was highly dependent on the eddy diffusivity followed closely by the growth terms.

  6. Distributing Power Grid State Estimation on HPC Clusters A System Architecture Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; Jiang, Wei; Jin, Shuangshuang; Rice, Mark J.; Chen, Yousu

    2012-08-20

    The future power grid is expected to further expand with highly distributed energy sources and smart loads. The increased size and complexity lead to increased burden on existing computational resources in energy control centers. Thus the need to perform real-time assessment on such systems entails efficient means to distribute centralized functions such as state estimation in the power system. In this paper, we present our early prototype of a system architecture that connects distributed state estimators individually running parallel programs to solve non-linear estimation procedure. The prototype consists of a middleware and data processing toolkits that allows data exchange in the distributed state estimation. We build a test case based on the IEEE 118 bus system and partition the state estimation of the whole system model to available HPC clusters. The measurement from the testbed demonstrates the low overhead of our solution.

  7. Prey size-distributions and size-specific foraging success of Ambystoma larvae.

    PubMed

    Smith, C K; Petranka, J W

    1987-01-01

    We examined how prey size-distributions influence size-specific foraing rate and food gain, i.e., food intake scaled to metabolic demands, in Jefferson's and small-mouth salamander larvae. Ambystoma jeffersonianum larvae sampled on 17 dates from a farm pond whose fauna was dominated by macrozooplankton and chironomid larvae were rarely gape-limited, and total volume of food in the stomach (VS) showed only a slight tendency to increase with larval size. Although 15 of 17 correlation coefficients of VS with larval size were positive, only 1 of 17 correlations were statistically significant, and body size explained only 8% of the overall variation in VS. Correlation coefficients of food gain and body size were positive in 9 cases and negative in 8, but only 3 were statistically significant.In contrast, Ambystoma texanum larvae in 42 samples taken from five sites dominated by macrozooplankton as well as relatively large isopods and amphipods were almost always gape-limited, and VS tended to increase markedly with larval size. 40 of 42 correlation coefficients of VS and larval size were positive, and 19 correlations were statistically significant. Body size in turn explained about 35% of the overall variation in VS. Correlation coefficients of food gain and larval size were positive in 32 of 42 samples, and 9 of 10 significant correlations were positive.When food is limiting and prey selection is not limited by gape, smaller larvae may grow as fast or in some cases faster than larger larvae because they are nearly as effective foragers, but have lower metabolic demands. Larger larvae may in turn grow faster than smaller larvae in environments which support a broad size spectrum of prey, particularly when gape limitations are highly disproportionate among size classes. The growth rate of larvae in one size class relative to another depends primarily on the extent to which increased foraging rate compensates for higher energy demands as body size increases. Size

  8. Size distribution of possible dust carriers for the extended red emission

    SciTech Connect

    Mahapatra, D. P.; Chutjian, A.; Machacek, J. R.; Mangina, R. S.

    2014-08-01

    Power-law size distributions expected to be applicable to possible carriers of extended red emission (ERE) have been examined using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Si nanoparticles and some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon complexes such as oligoacene and oligorylenes with energy gaps close to 2 eV have been considered. In the simplest case of unit quantum efficiency, the MC-generated size distributions are used to obtain photoluminescence (PL) spectra that are then corrected for dust extinction and reddening effects for comparison with observed ERE spectra. It is shown that a power-law size distribution with a decay exponent of α = 7/2, which closely agrees with starlight extinction data, fails to produce an ERE-like spectrum. However, size distributions with decay exponents of α = 19/12 and 3/2 are found to lead to acceptable spectra. Results indicate that energetic photon-induced breakup and competing aggregation effects dominate collisional effects in producing the observed steady-state mass distribution. It is shown that the peak wavelength of emission critically depends on the band gap, rather than cluster mass, which for oligoacenes and oligorylenes is widely different. The peak wavelength is also shown to be insensitive to dust attenuation.

  9. Computing the size and number of neuronal clusters in local circuits.

    PubMed

    Perin, Rodrigo; Telefont, Martin; Markram, Henry

    2013-01-01

    The organization of connectivity in neuronal networks is fundamental to understanding the activity and function of neural networks and information processing in the brain. Recent studies show that the neocortex is not only organized in columns and layers but also, within these, into synaptically connected clusters of neurons (Ko et al., 2011; Perin et al., 2011). The recently discovered common neighbor rule, according to which the probability of any two neurons being synaptically connected grows with the number of their common neighbors, is an organizing principle for this local clustering. Here we investigated the theoretical constraints for how the spatial extent of neuronal axonal and dendritic arborization, heretofore described by morphological reach, the density of neurons and the size of the network determine cluster size and numbers within neural networks constructed according to the common neighbor rule. In the formulation we developed, morphological reach, cell density, and network size are sufficient to estimate how many neurons, on average, occur in a cluster and how many clusters exist in a given network. We find that cluster sizes do not grow indefinitely as network parameters increase, but tend to characteristic limiting values.

  10. Sample size and robust marginal methods for cluster-randomized trials with censored event times.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yujie; Cook, Richard J

    2015-03-15

    In cluster-randomized trials, intervention effects are often formulated by specifying marginal models, fitting them under a working independence assumption, and using robust variance estimates to address the association in the responses within clusters. We develop sample size criteria within this framework, with analyses based on semiparametric Cox regression models fitted with event times subject to right censoring. At the design stage, copula models are specified to enable derivation of the asymptotic variance of estimators from a marginal Cox regression model and to compute the number of clusters necessary to satisfy power requirements. Simulation studies demonstrate the validity of the sample size formula in finite samples for a range of cluster sizes, censoring rates, and degrees of within-cluster association among event times. The power and relative efficiency implications of copula misspecification is studied, as well as the effect of within-cluster dependence in the censoring times. Sample size criteria and other design issues are also addressed for the setting where the event status is only ascertained at periodic assessments and times are interval censored.

  11. EXPLAINING THE GALACTIC INTERSTELLAR DUST GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Casuso, E.; Beckman, J. E.

    2010-04-15

    We present here a new theoretical model designed to explain the interstellar dust grain size distribution function (IDGSDF), and compare its results with previous observationally derived distributions and with previous theoretical models. The range of grain sizes produced in the late stages of stars with different masses is considered, and folded into a model which takes into account the observed changes in the historical local star formation rate. Stars in different mass ranges reach their grain producing epochs at times whose mass dependence is quantifiable, and the range of grain sizes produced has also been estimated as a function of stellar mass. The results show an IDGSDF that has a global slope comparable to the observationally derived plot and three peaks at values of the grain radius comparable to those in the observationally derived distribution, which have their ultimate origin in three major peaks which have been observed in the star formation rate (SFR) over the past 15 Gyr. The model uses grain-grain interactions to modify pre-existing size distributions at lower grain sizes, where collisions appear more important. The interactions include disruption by collisions as well as coagulation to form larger grains. The initial distributions are given a range of initial functions (flat, Gaussian, fractal) for their physical parameters, as well as geometrical forms ranging from spherical to highly elongated. The particles are constrained in an imaginary box, and laws of inelastic collisions are applied. Finally, we combine the two models and produce an IDGSDF which is a notably good match to the observational fit, and specifically at small grain radii reproduces the data better than the 'SFR model' alone.

  12. Analysis of speedup as function of block size and cluster size for parallel feed-forward neural networks on a Beowulf cluster.

    PubMed

    Mörchen, Fabian

    2004-03-01

    The performance of feed-forward neural networks trained with the backpropagation algorithm on a dedicated Beowulf cluster is analyzed. The concept of training set parallelism is applied. A new model for run time and speedup prediction is developed. With the model the speedup and efficiency of one iteration of the neural networks can be estimated as a function of block size and cluster size. The model is applied to three example problems representing different applications and network architectures. The estimation of the model has a higher accuracy than traditional methods for run time estimation and can be efficiently calculated. Experiments show that speedup of one iteration does not necessarily translate to a shorter training time toward a given error level. To overcome this problem a heuristic extension to training set parallelism called weight averaging is developed. The results show that training in parallel should only be done on clusters with high performance network connections or a multiprocessor machine. A rule of thumb is given for how much network performance of the cluster is needed to achieve speedup of the training time for a neural network.

  13. Particle-Size-Distribution of Nevada Test Site Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, G; Ray-Maitra, A

    2007-09-17

    The amount of each size particle in a given soil is called the particle-size distribution (PSD), and the way it feels to the touch is called the soil texture. Sand, silt, and clay are the three particle sizes of mineral material found in soils. Sand is the largest sized particle and it feels gritty; silt is medium sized and it feels floury; and clay is the smallest and if feels sticky. Knowing the particle-size distribution of a soil sample helps to understand many soil properties such as how much water, heat, and nutrients the soil will hold, how fast water and heat will move through the soil, and what kind of structure, bulk density and consistence the soil will have. Furthermore, the native particle-size distribution of the soil in the vicinity of ground zero of a nuclear detonation plays a major role in nuclear fallout. For soils that have a high-sand content, the near-range fallout will be relatively high and the far-range fallout will be relatively light. Whereas, for soils that have a high-silt and high-clay content, the near-range fallout will be significantly lower and the far-range fallout will be significantly higher. As part of a program funded by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has recently measured the PSDs from the various major areas at the Nevada Test Site where atmospheric detonations and/or nuclear weapon safety tests were performed back in the 50s and 60s. The purpose of this report is to document those results.

  14. Melting of size-selected gallium clusters with 60-183 atoms.

    PubMed

    Pyfer, Katheryne L; Kafader, Jared O; Yalamanchali, Anirudh; Jarrold, Martin F

    2014-07-10

    Heat capacities have been measured as a function of temperature for size-selected gallium cluster cations with between 60 and 183 atoms. Almost all clusters studied show a single peak in the heat capacity that is attributed to a melting transition. The peaks can be fit by a two-state model incorporating only fully solid-like and fully liquid-like species, and hence no partially melted intermediates. The exceptions are Ga90(+), which does not show a peak, and Ga80(+) and Ga81(+), which show two peaks. For the clusters with two peaks, the lower temperature peak is attributed to a structural transition. The melting temperatures for clusters with less than 50 atoms have previously been shown to be hundreds of degrees above the bulk melting point. For clusters with more than 60 atoms the melting temperatures decrease, approaching the bulk value (303 K) at around 95 atoms, and then show several small upward excursions with increasing cluster size. A plot of the latent heat against the entropy change for melting reveals two groups of clusters: the latent heats and entropy changes for clusters with less than 94 atoms are distinct from those for clusters with more than 93 atoms. This observation suggests that a significant change in the nature of the bonding or the structure of the clusters occurs at 93-94 atoms. Even though the melting temperatures are close to the bulk value for the larger clusters studied here, the latent heats and entropies of melting are still far from the bulk values.

  15. Bivariate Mixed Effects Analysis of Clustered Data with Large Cluster Sizes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daowen; Sun, Jie Lena; Pieper, Karen

    2016-10-01

    Linear mixed effects models are widely used to analyze a clustered response variable. Motivated by a recent study to examine and compare the hospital length of stay (LOS) between patients undertaking percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) from several international clinical trials, we proposed a bivariate linear mixed effects model for the joint modeling of clustered PCI and CABG LOS's where each clinical trial is considered a cluster. Due to the large number of patients in some trials, commonly used commercial statistical software for fitting (bivariate) linear mixed models failed to run since it could not allocate enough memory to invert large dimensional matrices during the optimization process. We consider ways to circumvent the computational problem in the maximum likelihood (ML) inference and restricted maximum likelihood (REML) inference. Particularly, we developed an expected and maximization (EM) algorithm for the REML inference and presented an ML implementation using existing software. The new REML EM algorithm is easy to implement and computationally stable and efficient. With this REML EM algorithm, we could analyze the LOS data and obtained meaningful results.

  16. Aged Boreal Biomass Burning Size Distributions from Bortas 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, J. R.; Sakamoto, K.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Taylor, J.; Duck, T.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols contribute to aerosol radiative forcing on the climate system. The magnitude of this effect is partially determined by aerosol size distributions, which are strong functions of source fire characteristics (e.g. fuel type, MCE) and in-plume microphysical processing. The uncertainties in biomass-burning emission number size-distributions in climate model inventories lead to uncertainties in the CCN concentrations and forcing estimates derived from these models. The BORTAS-B measurement campaign was designed to sample boreal biomass-burning outflow over Eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Using these BORTAS-B data, we implement plume criteria to isolate the characteristic size-distribution of aged biomass-burning emissions (aged ~ 1.5 - 2 days) from boreal wildfires in Northwestern Ontario. The composite median size-distribution yields a single dominant accumulation mode with Dpm = 232 nm, σ = 1.7, which are comparable to literature values of other aged plumes of a similar type. The organic aerosol enhancement ratios (ΔOA/ΔCO) along the path of Flight b622 show values of 0.08-0.18 μg m-3 ppbv-1 with no significant trend with distance from the source. This lack of enhancement ratio increase/decrease with distance suggests no detectable net OA production/evaporation within the aged plume over the sampling period. A Lagrangian microphysical model was used to determine an estimate of the freshly emitted size distribution and flux corresponding to the BORTAS-B aged size-distributions. The model was restricted to coagulation and dilution processes only based on the insignificant net OA production/evaporation derived from the ΔOA/ΔCO enhancement ratios. Depending on the, we estimate that the fresh-plume median diameter was in the range of 59-94 nm with modal widths in the range of 1.7-2.8. Thus, the size of the freshly emitted particles is somewhat unconstrained due to the uncertainties in the plume dilution rates.

  17. Size distribution of mist generated during metal machining.

    PubMed

    Thornburg, J; Leith, D

    2000-08-01

    Mist generated by machining processes is formed by three mechanisms: impaction, centrifugal force, and evaporation/condensation. This study characterized the size distribution of soluble and mineral oil mists that resulted from these formation mechanisms. Salient parameters influencing the particle size distributions also were identified. Variables investigated included metalworking fluid and machining characteristics. The size distribution of the mist generated on a small lathe by each mechanism was measured using an Aerosizer LD. For impaction, only the mineral oil viscosity influenced the mass median diameter of the mist. No parameter affected the geometric standard deviation. High-viscosity mineral oil mist had a mass median diameter of 6.1 microns and a geometric standard deviation of 2.0. Low-viscosity mineral oil mist had a mass median diameter of 21.9 microns and a geometric standard deviation of 2.2. The mass median diameter of the mist generated by centrifugal force depended on the type of metalworking fluid, fluid flow, and rotational speed of the lathe. Mass median diameters for low-viscosity mineral oil mist ranged from 5 to 110 microns. Mass median diameters for soluble oil mist varied between 40 and 80 microns. The average geometric standard deviation was 2.4, and was not affected by any parameter. The mass median diameter and geometric standard deviation of the mist generated by evaporation/condensation varied with the type of metalworking fluid. The mineral oil mist and soluble oil mist mass median diameters were 2.1 microns and 3.2 microns, respectively. No machining or fluid parameter was important because the mist size distribution depended on the rate of condensation, coagulation processes, and the dynamics of the apparatus. Using the size distribution data from all three mechanisms, the estimated inhalable, thoracic, and respirable fractions of the total mass generated for each metalworking fluid were 60 percent, 12 percent, and 8 percent

  18. Transneptunians as probes of planet building: The Plutino size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandersen, M.; Gladman, B.; Kavelaars, J.; Petit, J.; Gwyn, S.

    2014-07-01

    Planetesimals that formed during planet formation are the building blocks of giant planet cores; some are preserved as large transneptunian objects (TNOs). Previous work has shown steep power-law size distributions for TNOs of diameters > 100 km. Recent results claim a dramatic roll-over or divot in the size distribution of Neptunian Trojans (1:1 resonance with Neptune) and scattering TNOs, with a significant lack of intermediate-size D < 100 km planetesimals [1,2,3]. One theoretical explanation for this is that planetesimals were born big, skipping the intermediate sizes, contrary to the expectation of bottom-up planetesimal formation. Exploration of the TNO size distribution requires more precisely calibrated detections in order to improve statistics on these results. We have searched a 32 sq.deg. area near RA=2 hr to an r-band limiting magnitude of m_r=24.6 using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. This coverage was near the Neptunian L4 region to maximise our detection rate, as this is where Neptunian Trojans reside and where Plutinos (and several other resonant populations) come to perihelion. This program successfully detected and tracked 77 TNOs and Centaurs for up to 17 months, giving us both the high-quality orbits and the quantitative detection efficiency needed for precise modelling. Among our detections were one Uranian Trojan, two Neptunian Trojans, 18 Plutinos (3:2 resonance with Neptune) and other resonant objects. We test TNO size and orbital-distribution models using a survey simulator, which simulates the detectability of model objects, accounting for the survey biases. We show that the Plutino size distribution cannot continue as a rising power law past H_r˜8.3 (equivalent to ˜100 km). A single power law is found rejectable at 99.5 % confidence, and a knee (a broken power law to a softer slope) is also rejectable. A divot (sudden drop in number of objects at a transition size), with parameters found independently for scattering TNOs by Shankman

  19. Size-frequency distributions of chondrules in CO3 chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1989-01-01

    The size-frequency distributions of chondrules were determined for eleven CO3 chondrites (including ALHA77003, ALHA77307, ALH82101, ALH85003, Colony, Felix, Isna, Kainsaz, Lance, Ornans, and Warrenton), using the results of petrographic analyses of thin sections. The mean proportion of different chondrule types in CO3 chondrites were estimated to be 69 percent POP, 18 percent PP, 8 percent PO, 2 percent BO, 2 percent RP, 1 percent C, and less than 0.1 percent GOP. These proportions are very different from those in ordinary or EH and CV chondrites, with the smaller proportion of nonporphyritic chondrules than EH chondrites, but a larger proportion than CV chondrites. Relative proportions of chondrule types vary with size interval; thus, with decreasing chondrule size, PO chondrules decrease fairly regularly in abundance, while RP chondrules are most abundant in the smallest size intervals.

  20. Determination of the pore size distribution and porosity of aerobic granules using size-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu-Ming; Yu, Han-Qing

    2007-01-01

    The pore size distribution and porosity of aerobic granules with different diameters were evaluated using size-exclusion chromatography, in which polyethylene glycols and distilled water were, respectively, used as solute and mobile phase. The porosity of the aerobic granules varied from 68% to 93% and the exclusion limit, expressed as molecular mass, showed a significant difference. For the small-size granules with a diameter of 0.2-0.6mm, molecules greater than 137,000Da could not penetrate the pores, while the exclusion limits of the middle-size granules with a diameter of 0.6-0.9mm and large-size ones with a diameter of 0.9-1.5mm were 76,000 and 29,000Da, respectively. The extracellular polymeric substances of the granules might clog the pores and might be responsible for the reduced porosity. A correlation between the bioactivity and available porosity of the aerobic granules was found. The experimental results show that the size-exclusion chromatography was appropriate for elucidating the pore size distribution and porosity of the aerobic granules.

  1. Evaluation of the Malvern optical particle monitor. [Volumetric size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R. J.; Johnson, E.

    1983-07-01

    The Malvern 2200/3300 Particle Sizer is a laser-based optical particle sizing device which utilizes the principle of Fraunhofer Diffraction as the means of particle size measurement. The instrument is designed to analyze particle sizes in the range of 1 to 1800 microns diameter through a selection of lenses for the receiving optics. It is not a single-particle counter but rather an ensemble averager over the distribution of particles present in the measuring volume. Through appropriate measurement techniques, the instrument can measure the volumetric size distribution of: solids in gas or liquid suspension; liquid droplets in gas or other immiscible liquids; and, gas bubbles in liquid. (Malvern Handbook, Version 1.5). This report details a limited laboratory evaluation of the Malvern system to determine its operational characteristics, limitations, and accuracy. This investigation focused on relatively small particles in the range of 5 to 150 microns. Primarily, well characterized particles of coal in a coal and water mixture were utilized, but a selection of naturally occurring, industrially generated, and standard samples (i.e., glass beads) wer also tested. The characteristic size parameter from the Malvern system for each of these samples was compared with the results of a Coulter particle counter (Model TA II) analysis to determine the size measurement accuracy. Most of the particulate samples were suspended in a liquid media (water or isoton, plus a dispersant) for the size characterization. Specifically, the investigations contained in this report fall into four categories: (a) Sample-to-lense distance and sample concentration studies, (b) studies testing the applicability to aerosols, (c) tests of the manufacturer supplied software, and (d) size measurement comparisons with the results of Coulter analysis. 5 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Expansion flow and cluster distributions originating from ultrafast-laser-induced fragmentation of thin metal films: A molecular-dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Arun K.; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2006-01-15

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we study the fragmentation patterns of ultrathin metal films as a function of the initial energization. The energization is assumed to occur instantaneously. Above the threshold for fragmentation, a homogeneous expansion of the exploding film is observed, in which a mixture of clusters of all sizes is found. The internal temperature of the clusters is constant, independent of space, time, and cluster size. The cluster size distribution can be characterized for small energizations as a biexponential distribution, but is better represented for larger energizations by a power law in cluster size m,{proportional_to}m{sup -{alpha}}, with an exponent {alpha} congruent with 2.8-3.1.

  3. Aerosol size distribution, composition, and CO2 backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Porter, John N.

    1991-01-01

    The aerosol size distribution, composition, and CO2 backscatter at 10.6 microns (beta-CO2) were measured continuosly at the Mauna Loa Observatory (Hawaii) during January-March and November-December, 1988 periods to compare the characteristics of periods associated with appreciable Asian dust transport to that site (January-March) with those of periods characterized by low-dust condition. The aerosol size distribution in the range 0.15 micron to 7.6 microns was measured at temperatures of 40, 150, and 340 C to differentiate between volatile and nonvolatile aerosols. Large ranges of variability was found in measurements of aerosol size distribution during both periods, but the average distributions were similar for both the high-dust and the low-dust periods. However, values for beta-CO2 were more elevated (by about six times) during periods associated with active Asian dust transport to the observatory site than during the low-dust periods.

  4. Exceptional oxidation activity with size-controlled supported gold clusters of low atomicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corma, Avelino; Concepción, Patricia; Boronat, Mercedes; Sabater, Maria J.; Navas, Javier; Yacaman, Miguel José; Larios, Eduardo; Posadas, Alvaro; López-Quintela, M. Arturo; Buceta, David; Mendoza, Ernest; Guilera, Gemma; Mayoral, Alvaro

    2013-09-01

    The catalytic activity of gold depends on particle size, with the reactivity increasing as the particle diameter decreases. However, investigations into behaviour in the subnanometre regime (where gold exists as small clusters of a few atoms) began only recently with advances in synthesis and characterization techniques. Here we report an easy method to prepare isolated gold atoms supported on functionalized carbon nanotubes and their performance in the oxidation of thiophenol with O2. We show that single gold atoms are not active, but they aggregate under reaction conditions into gold clusters of low atomicity that exhibit a catalytic activity comparable to that of sulfhydryl oxidase enzymes. When clusters grow into larger nanoparticles, catalyst activity drops to zero. Theoretical calculations show that gold clusters are able to activate thiophenol and O2 simultaneously, and larger nanoparticles are passivated by strongly adsorbed thiolates. The combination of both reactants activation and facile product desorption makes gold clusters excellent catalysts.

  5. Structure and energetics of nanometer size clusters of sulfuric acid with ammonia and dimethylamine.

    PubMed

    DePalma, Joseph W; Bzdek, Bryan R; Doren, Douglas J; Johnston, Murray V

    2012-01-26

    The structures of positively and negatively charged clusters of sulfuric acid with ammonia and/or dimethylamine ((CH(3))(2)NH or DMA) are investigated using a combination of Monte Carlo configuration sampling, semiempirical calculations, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Positively charged clusters of the formula [(NH(4)(+))(x)(HSO(4)(-))(y)](+), where x = y + 1, are studied for 1 ≤ y ≤ 10. These clusters exhibit strong cation-anion interactions, with no contribution to the hydrogen-bonding network from the bisulfate ion protons. A similar hydrogen-bonding network is found for the [(DMAH(+))(5)(HSO(4)(-))(4)](-) cluster. Negatively charged clusters derived from the reaction of DMA with [(H(2)SO(4))(3)(NH(4)(+))(HSO(4)(-))(2)](-) are also studied, up to the fully reacted cluster [(DMAH(+))(4)(HSO(4)(-))(5)](-). These clusters exhibit anion-anion and ion-molecule interactions in addition to cation-anion interactions. While the hydrogen-bonding network is extensive for both positively and negatively charged clusters, the binding energies of ions and molecules in these clusters are determined mostly by electrostatic interactions. The thermodynamics of amine substitution is explored and compared to experimental thermodynamic and kinetic data. Ammonia binds more strongly than DMA to sulfuric acid due to its greater participation in hydrogen bonding and its ability to form a more compact structure that increases electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged ions. However, the greater gas-phase basicity of DMA is sufficient to overcome the stronger binding of ammonia, making substitution of DMA for ammonia thermodynamically favorable. For small clusters of both polarities, substitutions of surface ammonium ions are facile. As the cluster size increases, an ammonium ion becomes encapsulated in the center of the cluster, making it inaccessible to substitution.

  6. The role of micro size computing clusters for small physics groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevel, A. Y.

    2014-06-01

    A small physics group (3-15 persons) might use a number of computing facilities for the analysis/simulation, developing/testing, teaching. It is discussed different types of computing facilities: collaboration computing facilities, group local computing cluster (including colocation), cloud computing. The author discuss the growing variety of different computing options for small groups and does emphasize the role of the group owned computing cluster of micro size.

  7. Laboratory air bubble generation of various size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Puleo, Jack A.; Johnson, Rex V.; Kooney, Tim N.

    2004-11-01

    Air bubble size in aqueous environments is an important factor governing natural processes ranging from fluid/atmosphere gas transfer to noise production. Bubbles are also known to affect various scientific instruments. In this study we investigate the production capability of eight inexpensive bubble generators using optical imaging techniques. Specific emphasis is directed towards determining bubble size and distribution for a given device, flow conditions, and type of water used (fresh vs salt). In almost all cases tested here, bubbles produced in salt water were more numerous, and smaller than for the same bubbler and conditions in fresh water. For porous media, the finer the pore size, the smaller the bubble produced with some variation depending on thickness of material containing the pore and water type. While no single generator tested was capable of spanning all the bubble sizes observed (100 to 6000 microns), the data contained herein will enable proper choice of bubbler or combinations thereof for future studies depending on the size and distribution of bubbles required.

  8. Effects of Grain Size Distributions on Fluid-Sediment Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Daniel; Buscombe, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Accounting for the feedback effects between sediment suspension and the generation of turbulence (Conley et al., 2008) has recently been shown to improve predictions of morphological evolution (Falchetti et al. 2010). Accounting for these interactions, which in general lead to an increase in the wave coherent component of transport relative to the mean component of transport, have been shown to even result in a change of transport direction. However most research to date has focused on simulations representing the unrealistic case of sediment beds composed of a single grain size. The recently initiated project TSSAR Waves (Turbulence, Sediment Stratification and Altered Resuspension under Waves) has initially focused on examining how the size distribution of bed sediments affects this fluid-sediment feedback. It has already been demonstrated (Conley et al. 2008) that the magnitude of the effects of sediment stratification scale with the ratio of maximum orbital velocity to grain settling velocity suggesting that the effects will be highly dependent on the grain size distribution. The nature of these effects has been investigated utilizing a modified version of the Generalized Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM). Implementation of the ability to handle size distributions involved investigating questions such as how the mobility of individual scaseize fractions are related to total bed mobility, how excess shear stress is partitioned among size classes and grain size dependency of the Schmidt number. Observations from these investigations will be presented as well as predictions of sediment mobilization and suspension which are compared to appropriate laboratory experiments. Reference: Conley, D.C., Falchetti, S., Lohmann, I.P., Brocchini, M. (2008) The effects of flow stratification by non-cohesive sediment on transport in high-energy wave-driven flows. J. Fluid Mech., 610, 43-67. Falchetti, S., Conley, D.C., Brocchini, M. Elgar, S. (2010), Nearshore bar migration and

  9. Clone size distributions in networks of genetic similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-García, E.; Rozenfeld, A. F.; Eguíluz, V. M.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Duarte, C. M.

    2006-12-01

    We build networks of genetic similarity in which the nodes are organisms sampled from biological populations. The procedure is illustrated by constructing networks from genetic data of a marine clonal plant. An important feature in the networks is the presence of clone subgraphs, i.e. sets of organisms with identical genotype forming clones. As a first step to understanding the dynamics that has shaped these networks, we point up a relationship between a particular degree distribution and the clone size distribution in the populations. We construct a dynamical model for the population dynamics, focussing on the dynamics of the clones, and solve it for the required distributions. Scale free and exponentially decaying forms are obtained depending on parameter values, the first type being obtained when clonal growth is the dominant process. Average distributions are dominated by the power law behavior presented by the fastest replicating populations.

  10. Measurement of Droplet Size Distribution in Insecticide and Herbicide Sprays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    exceeding 100 :m, this result is not critical to the measurement requirements of the U.S. Army. o The spread in the processed signal is less for mineral oil...AD-A136 391 MEASUREMENT OF DROPLET SIZE DISTRIRUTION IN INSECTICIDE 1/1 AND HERRICIDE SPRAYS(UI KLD ASSOCIATES INC HUNTINGTON U D S MAHLER APR 83...NATIONAL BUREAU Of SIANDARDS 1963 A r TR- 126 AD______ MEASUREMENT Or DROPLET SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN INSECTICIDE AND HERBICIDE SPRAYS Phase.I Final

  11. Collagen fibril arrangement and size distribution in monkey oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    OTTANI, V.; FRANCHI, M.; DE PASQUALE, V.; LEONARDI, L.; MOROCUTTI, M.; RUGGERI, A.

    1998-01-01

    Collagen fibre organisation and fibril size were studied in the buccal gingival and hard palate mucosa of Macacus rhesus monkey. Light and electron microscopy analysis showed connective papillae exhibiting a similar inner structure in the different areas examined, but varying in distribution, shape and size. Moving from the deep to surface layers of the buccal gingival mucosa (free and attached portions), large collagen fibril bundles became smaller and progressively more wavy with decreasing collagen fibril diameter. This gradual diameter decrease did not occur in the hard palate mucosa (free portion, rugae and interrugal regions) where the fibril diameter remained constant. A link between collagen fibril diameter and mechanical function is discussed. PMID:9688498

  12. Rock sampling. [method for controlling particle size distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A method for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The method involves cutting grooves in the rock surface to provide a grouping of parallel ridges and subsequently machining the ridges to provide a powder specimen. The machining step may comprise milling, drilling, lathe cutting or the like; but a planing step is advantageous. Control of the particle size distribution is effected primarily by changing the height and width of these ridges. This control exceeds that obtainable by conventional grinding.

  13. Clustering and velocity distributions in granular gases cooling by solid friction.

    PubMed

    Das, Prasenjit; Puri, Sanjay; Schwartz, Moshe

    2016-09-01

    We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the free evolution of granular gases. Initially, the density of particles is homogeneous and the velocity follows a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution. The system cools down due to solid friction between the granular particles. The density remains homogeneous, and the velocity distribution remains MB at early times, while the kinetic energy of the system decays with time. However, fluctuations in the density and velocity fields grow, and the system evolves via formation of clusters in the density field and the local ordering of velocity field, consistent with the onset of plug flow. This is accompanied by a transition of the velocity distribution function from MB to non-MB behavior. We used equal-time correlation functions and structure factors of the density and velocity fields to study the morphology of clustering. From the correlation functions, we obtain the cluster size, L, as a function of time, t. We show that it exhibits power law growth with L(t)∼t^{1/3}.

  14. Clustering and velocity distributions in granular gases cooling by solid friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Prasenjit; Puri, Sanjay; Schwartz, Moshe

    2016-09-01

    We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to study the free evolution of granular gases. Initially, the density of particles is homogeneous and the velocity follows a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution. The system cools down due to solid friction between the granular particles. The density remains homogeneous, and the velocity distribution remains MB at early times, while the kinetic energy of the system decays with time. However, fluctuations in the density and velocity fields grow, and the system evolves via formation of clusters in the density field and the local ordering of velocity field, consistent with the onset of plug flow. This is accompanied by a transition of the velocity distribution function from MB to non-MB behavior. We used equal-time correlation functions and structure factors of the density and velocity fields to study the morphology of clustering. From the correlation functions, we obtain the cluster size, L , as a function of time, t . We show that it exhibits power law growth with L (t ) ˜t1 /3 .

  15. How can young massive clusters reach their present-day sizes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Context. The classic question of how young massive star clusters attain the shapes and sizes, as we find them today, is still a difficult one. Both observational and computational studies of star-forming massive molecular gas clouds suggest that massive cluster formation is primarily triggered along the small-scale (≲0.3 pc) filamentary substructures within the clouds. Aims: The present study investigates the possible ways in which a filament-like, compact, massive star cluster (effective radius 0.1-0.3 pc) can expand more than 10 times, still remaining massive enough (≳ 104M⊙) to become the young massive star cluster that we observe today. Methods: To this end, model massive clusters (initially 104-105M⊙) are evolved using Sverre Aarseth's state-of-the-art N-body code NBODY7. Apart from the accurate calculation of two-body relaxation of the constituent stars, these evolutionary models take into account stellar-evolutionary mass loss and dynamical energy injection due to massive, tight primordial binaries and stellar-remnant black holes and neutron stars. These calculations also include a solar-neighbourhood-like external tidal field. All the computed clusters expand with time, and their sizes (effective radii) are compared with those observed for young massive clusters (≲ 100 Myr) in the Milky Way and other nearby galaxies. Results: In this study, it is found that beginning from the above compact sizes, a star cluster cannot expand on its own, i.e., due to two-body relaxation, stellar mass loss, and dynamical heating by primordial binaries and compact stars up to the observed sizes of young massive clusters; star clusters always remain much more compact than the observed ones. Conclusions: This calls for additional mechanisms that boost the expansion of a massive cluster after its assembly. Using further N-body calculations, it is shown that a substantial residual gas expulsion with ≈ 30% star formation efficiency can indeed swell the newborn embedded

  16. Degenerate four-wave mixing from layered semiconductor clusters in the quantum size regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Rhee, Bum Ku; McGinnis, Brian P.; Sandroff, Claude J.

    1986-11-01

    We report the first measurement of the third-order nonlinear susceptibility χ(3) in layered semiconductor clusters exhibiting pronounced quantum size effects at room temperature. BiI3 clusters prepared in colloidal form in acetonitrile had a thickness of ≂7 Å and lateral dimensions between 60 and 90 Å. Using degenerate four-wave mixing, we observed that the conjugate pulses from the small and the large gratings had comparable intensities, verifying the electronic origin of the nonlinearity. The nonlinear susceptibility was found to be 2.3×10-11 esu for a colloid with a cluster volume fraction of 10-5.

  17. The effect of cluster size imbalance and covariates on the estimation performance of quadratic inference functions.

    PubMed

    Westgate, Philip M; Braun, Thomas M

    2012-09-10

    Generalized estimating equations (GEE) are commonly used for the analysis of correlated data. However, use of quadratic inference functions (QIFs) is becoming popular because it increases efficiency relative to GEE when the working covariance structure is misspecified. Although shown to be advantageous in the literature, the impacts of covariates and imbalanced cluster sizes on the estimation performance of the QIF method in finite samples have not been studied. This cluster size variation causes QIF's estimating equations and GEE to be in separate classes when an exchangeable correlation structure is implemented, causing QIF and GEE to be incomparable in terms of efficiency. When utilizing this structure and the number of clusters is not large, we discuss how covariates and cluster size imbalance can cause QIF, rather than GEE, to produce estimates with the larger variability. This occurrence is mainly due to the empirical nature of weighting QIF employs, rather than differences in estimating equations classes. We demonstrate QIF's lost estimation precision through simulation studies covering a variety of general cluster randomized trial scenarios and compare QIF and GEE in the analysis of data from a cluster randomized trial. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Sub-nanometre sized metal clusters: from synthetic challenges to the unique property discoveries.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yizhong; Chen, Wei

    2012-05-07

    Sub-nanometre sized metal clusters, with dimensions between metal atoms and nanoparticles, have attracted more and more attention due to their unique electronic structures and the subsequent unusual physical and chemical properties. However, the tiny size of the metal clusters brings the difficulty of their synthesis compared to the easier preparation of large nanoparticles. Up to now various synthetic techniques and routes have been successfully applied to the preparation of sub-nanometre clusters. Among the metals, gold clusters, especially the alkanethiolate monolayer protected clusters (MPCs), have been extensively investigated during the past decades. In recent years, silver and copper nanoclusters have also attracted enormous interest mainly due to their excellent photoluminescent properties. Meanwhile, more structural characteristics, particular optical, catalytic, electronic and magnetic properties and the related technical applications of the metal nanoclusters have been discovered in recent years. In this critical review, recent advances in sub-nanometre sized metal clusters (Au, Ag, Cu, etc.) including the synthetic techniques, structural characterizations, novel physical, chemical and optical properties and their potential applications are discussed in detail. We finally give a brief outlook on the future development of metal nanoclusters from the viewpoint of controlled synthesis and their potential applications.

  19. Foraging arena size and structural complexity affect the dynamics of food distribution in ant colonies.

    PubMed

    Buczkowski, Grzegorz; VanWeelden, Matthew

    2010-12-01

    Food acquisition by ant colonies is a complex process that starts with acquiring food at the source (i.e., foraging) and culminates with food exchange in or around the nest (i.e., feeding). While ant foraging behavior is relatively well understood, the process of food distribution has received little attention, largely because of the lack of methodology that allows for accurate monitoring of food flow. In this study, we used the odorous house ant, Tapinoma sessile (Say) to investigate the effect of foraging arena size and structural complexity on the rate and the extent of spread of liquid carbohydrate food (sucrose solution) throughout a colony. To track the movement of food, we used protein marking and double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, DAS-ELISA. Variation in arena size, in conjunction with different colony sizes, allowed us to test the effect of different worker densities on food distribution. Results demonstrate that both arena size and colony size have a significant effect on the spread of the food and the number of workers receiving food decreased as arena size and colony size increased. When colony size was kept constant and arena size increased, the percentage of workers testing positive for the marker decreased, most likely because of fewer trophallactic interactions resulting from lower worker density. When arena size was kept constant and colony size increased, the percentage of workers testing positive decreased. Nonrandom (clustered) worker dispersion and a limited supply of food may have contributed to this result. Overall, results suggest that food distribution is more complete is smaller colonies regardless of the size of the foraging arena and that colony size, rather than worker density, is the primary factor affecting food distribution. The structural complexity of foraging arenas ranged from simple, two-dimensional space (empty arenas) to complex, three-dimensional space (arenas filled with mulch). The structural

  20. Cluster randomised crossover trials with binary data and unbalanced cluster sizes: application to studies of near-universal interventions in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Andrew B; Akram, Muhammad; Pilcher, David; Cooper, Jamie; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2015-02-01

    Cluster randomised crossover trials have been utilised in recent years in the health and social sciences. Methods for analysis have been proposed; however, for binary outcomes, these have received little assessment of their appropriateness. In addition, methods for determination of sample size are currently limited to balanced cluster sizes both between clusters and between periods within clusters. This article aims to extend this work to unbalanced situations and to evaluate the properties of a variety of methods for analysis of binary data, with a particular focus on the setting of potential trials of near-universal interventions in intensive care to reduce in-hospital mortality. We derive a formula for sample size estimation for unbalanced cluster sizes, and apply it to the intensive care setting to demonstrate the utility of the cluster crossover design. We conduct a numerical simulation of the design in the intensive care setting and for more general configurations, and we assess the performance of three cluster summary estimators and an individual-data estimator based on binomial-identity-link regression. For settings similar to the intensive care scenario involving large cluster sizes and small intra-cluster correlations, the sample size formulae developed and analysis methods investigated are found to be appropriate, with the unweighted cluster summary method performing well relative to the more optimal but more complex inverse-variance weighted method. More generally, we find that the unweighted and cluster-size-weighted summary methods perform well, with the relative efficiency of each largely determined systematically from the study design parameters. Performance of individual-data regression is adequate with small cluster sizes but becomes inefficient for large, unbalanced cluster sizes. When outcome prevalences are 6% or less and the within-cluster-within-period correlation is 0.05 or larger, all methods display sub-nominal confidence interval coverage

  1. Moving Target Tracking through Distributed Clustering in Directional Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Enayet, Asma; Razzaque, Md. Abdur; Hassan, Mohammad Mehedi; Almogren, Ahmad; Alamri, Atif

    2014-01-01

    The problem of moving target tracking in directional sensor networks (DSNs) introduces new research challenges, including optimal selection of sensing and communication sectors of the directional sensor nodes, determination of the precise location of the target and an energy-efficient data collection mechanism. Existing solutions allow individual sensor nodes to detect the target's location through collaboration among neighboring nodes, where most of the sensors are activated and communicate with the sink. Therefore, they incur much overhead, loss of energy and reduced target tracking accuracy. In this paper, we have proposed a clustering algorithm, where distributed cluster heads coordinate their member nodes in optimizing the active sensing and communication directions of the nodes, precisely determining the target location by aggregating reported sensing data from multiple nodes and transferring the resultant location information to the sink. Thus, the proposed target tracking mechanism minimizes the sensing redundancy and maximizes the number of sleeping nodes in the network. We have also investigated the dynamic approach of activating sleeping nodes on-demand so that the moving target tracking accuracy can be enhanced while maximizing the network lifetime. We have carried out our extensive simulations in ns-3, and the results show that the proposed mechanism achieves higher performance compared to the state-of-the-art works. PMID:25529205

  2. Modelling galaxy clustering: halo occupation distribution versus subhalo matching.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Zheng, Zheng; Behroozi, Peter S; Zehavi, Idit; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Favole, Ginevra; Gottloeber, Stefan; Klypin, Anatoly; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A; Weinberg, David H; Yepes, Gustavo