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Sample records for clusters quantum methods

  1. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties. [Atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) (0.1981), 0.1895(9) (0.1874(4)), 0.1530(34) (0.1599(73)), 0.1664(37) (0.1724(110)), 0.1613(43) (0.1675(110)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) (0.0203(12)), 0.0188(10) (0.0220(21)), 0.0247(8) (0.0310(12)), 0.0253(8) (0.0351(8)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  2. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) [0.1981], 0.1895(9) [0.1874(4)], 0.1530(34) [0.1599(73)], 0.1664(37) [0.1724(110)], 0.1613(43) [0.1675(110)] Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) [0.0203(12)], 0.0188(10) [0.0220(21)], 0.0247(8) [0.0310(12)], 0.0253(8) [0.0351(8)] Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  3. Method for discovering relationships in data by dynamic quantum clustering

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, Marvin; Horn, David

    2014-10-28

    Data clustering is provided according to a dynamical framework based on quantum mechanical time evolution of states corresponding to data points. To expedite computations, we can approximate the time-dependent Hamiltonian formalism by a truncated calculation within a set of Gaussian wave-functions (coherent states) centered around the original points. This allows for analytic evaluation of the time evolution of all such states, opening up the possibility of exploration of relationships among data-points through observation of varying dynamical-distances among points and convergence of points into clusters. This formalism may be further supplemented by preprocessing, such as dimensional reduction through singular value decomposition and/or feature filtering.

  4. Cluster State Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    nearest neighbor cluster state has been shown to be a universal resource for MBQC thus we can say our quantum computer is universal. We note that...CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTATION FEBRUARY 2014 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED STINFO COPY AIR FORCE...TITLE AND SUBTITLE CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTATION 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62788F 6

  5. Cluster State Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    implementation of quantum computation,” Fortschr. Phys. 48, 771 (2000). [Dragoman01] D. Dragoman, “Proposal for a three-qubit teleportation experiment”, Phys...CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTING DECEMBER 2012 INTERIM TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION...From - To) NOV 2010 – OCT 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTING 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c

  6. Recent developments in quantum Monte Carlo methods for electronic structure of atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitas, Lubos

    2004-03-01

    Recent developments of quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) for electronic structure calculations of clusters, other nanomaterials and quantum systems will be reviewed. QMC methodology is based on a combination of analytical insights about properties of exact wavefunctions, explicit treatment of electron-electron correlation and robustness of computational stochastic techniques. In the course of QMC development for calculations of real materials, small and medium size clusters proved to be invaluable systems both for testing and for revealing unique insights into electron correlation effects in nanostructured materials. The method shows remarkable accuracy which will be demonstrated on calculations of magnetic states of transition metal atoms encapsulated in silicon cluster cages, optical excitations in quantum nanodots and molecules and on studies of reactions in biomolecular metallic centers. Indeed, in some cases QMC turned out to be the only feasible method to provide the necessary accuracy. I will also discuss current QMC developments in using correlated sampling techniques for efficient evaluation of energy differences, efforts to reach beyond the fixed-node approximation and on incorporating QMC methods into multi-scale simulation approaches. In collaboration with P. Sen, L.K. Wagner, Z.M. Helms, M. Bajdich, G. Drobny, and J.C. Grossman. Supported by NSF, ONR and DARPA.

  7. Coupled-cluster method: A lattice-path-based subsystem approximation scheme for quantum lattice models

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, R. F.; Li, P. H. Y.

    2011-04-15

    An approximation hierarchy, called the lattice-path-based subsystem (LPSUBm) approximation scheme, is described for the coupled-cluster method (CCM). It is applicable to systems defined on a regular spatial lattice. We then apply it to two well-studied prototypical (spin-(1/2) Heisenberg antiferromagnetic) spin-lattice models, namely, the XXZ and the XY models on the square lattice in two dimensions. Results are obtained in each case for the ground-state energy, the ground-state sublattice magnetization, and the quantum critical point. They are all in good agreement with those from such alternative methods as spin-wave theory, series expansions, quantum Monte Carlo methods, and the CCM using the alternative lattice-animal-based subsystem (LSUBm) and the distance-based subsystem (DSUBm) schemes. Each of the three CCM schemes (LSUBm, DSUBm, and LPSUBm) for use with systems defined on a regular spatial lattice is shown to have its own advantages in particular applications.

  8. Quantum cluster algebras and quantum nilpotent algebras

    PubMed Central

    Goodearl, Kenneth R.; Yakimov, Milen T.

    2014-01-01

    A major direction in the theory of cluster algebras is to construct (quantum) cluster algebra structures on the (quantized) coordinate rings of various families of varieties arising in Lie theory. We prove that all algebras in a very large axiomatically defined class of noncommutative algebras possess canonical quantum cluster algebra structures. Furthermore, they coincide with the corresponding upper quantum cluster algebras. We also establish analogs of these results for a large class of Poisson nilpotent algebras. Many important families of coordinate rings are subsumed in the class we are covering, which leads to a broad range of applications of the general results to the above-mentioned types of problems. As a consequence, we prove the Berenstein–Zelevinsky conjecture [Berenstein A, Zelevinsky A (2005) Adv Math 195:405–455] for the quantized coordinate rings of double Bruhat cells and construct quantum cluster algebra structures on all quantum unipotent groups, extending the theorem of Geiß et al. [Geiß C, et al. (2013) Selecta Math 19:337–397] for the case of symmetric Kac–Moody groups. Moreover, we prove that the upper cluster algebras of Berenstein et al. [Berenstein A, et al. (2005) Duke Math J 126:1–52] associated with double Bruhat cells coincide with the corresponding cluster algebras. PMID:24982197

  9. Unconventional methods for clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotyrba, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Cluster analysis or clustering is a task of grouping a set of objects in such a way that objects in the same group (called a cluster) are more similar (in some sense or another) to each other than to those in other groups (clusters). It is the main task of exploratory data mining and a common technique for statistical data analysis used in many fields, including machine learning, pattern recognition, image analysis, information retrieval, and bioinformatics. The topic of this paper is one of the modern methods of clustering namely SOM (Self Organising Map). The paper describes the theory needed to understand the principle of clustering and descriptions of algorithm used with clustering in our experiments.

  10. Quantum Q systems: from cluster algebras to quantum current algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Philippe; Kedem, Rinat

    2017-02-01

    This paper gives a new algebraic interpretation for the algebra generated by the quantum cluster variables of the A_r quantum Q-system (Di Francesco and Kedem in Int Math Res Not IMRN 10:2593-2642, 2014). We show that the algebra can be described as a quotient of the localization of the quantum algebra U_{√{q}}({n}[u,u^{-1}])subset U_{√{q}}(widehat{{sl}}_2), in the Drinfeld presentation. The generating current is made up of a subset of the cluster variables which satisfy the Q-system, which we call fundamental. The other cluster variables are given by a quantum determinant-type formula, and are polynomials in the fundamental generators. The conserved quantities of the discrete evolution (Di Francesco and Kedem in Adv Math 228(1):97-152, 2011) described by quantum Q-system generate the Cartan currents at level 0, in a non-standard polarization. The rest of the quantum affine algebra is also described in terms of cluster variables.

  11. Photo-induced brightening and broadening effects of gold quantum clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsiu-Ying; Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Cheng-An J.

    2016-04-01

    We describe the use of UV light under different radiation time induces a variety of fluorescence wavelength of gold quantum clusters. First, we synthesize blue-emitted gold quantum clusters by dissolving the gold trichloride in pure toluene. To simplify the expression, we assume that the several featured PL peak (425, 450, 470 nm) is the signal for blue-emitted gold quantum clusters. Undergo UV irradiation can brighten and broaden the PL spectra of gold quantum clusters, which are observed by the evolutional spectra versus exposure time. After UV light exposure, the major population of gold quantum clusters @425nm decreased and turned to gold quantum clusters@450nm, followed by the growing population of gold quantum clusters@470nm clusters. Until 2 hour exposure, the spectra become broad with major peak shifted to 525 nm. The tunable spectra from blue to green attributes to the induced growth of gold quantum clusters by UV irradiation. The UV energy indeed tunes and broadens the emission covering the whole visible-spectra range. Finally, we also utilize via proper selection of organic surfactant (such as: trioctyl phosphine, TOP) can coordinate the quantum yield enhancement of blue-emitted gold quantum clusters under UV irradiation. The experiment method is easily for gold quantum clusters synthesis. Thus we expect this materials can be developed for fluorescence labeling application in the future.

  12. Quantum computing with spin cluster qubits.

    PubMed

    Meier, Florian; Levy, Jeremy; Loss, Daniel

    2003-01-31

    We study the low energy states of finite spin chains with isotropic (Heisenberg) and anisotropic (XY and Ising-like) antiferromagnetic exchange interaction with uniform and nonuniform coupling constants. We show that for an odd number of sites a spin cluster qubit can be defined in terms of the ground state doublet. This qubit is remarkably insensitive to the placement and coupling anisotropy of spins within the cluster. One- and two-qubit quantum gates can be generated by magnetic fields and intercluster exchange, and leakage during quantum gate operation is small. Spin cluster qubits inherit the long decoherence times and short gate operation times of single spins. Control of single spins is hence not necessary for the realization of universal quantum gates.

  13. Adiabatic cluster-state quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Dave; Flammia, Steven T.

    2010-09-15

    Models of quantum computation (QC) are important because they change the physical requirements for achieving universal QC. For example, one-way QC requires the preparation of an entangled ''cluster'' state, followed by adaptive measurement on this state, a set of requirements which is different from the standard quantum-circuit model. Here we introduce a model based on one-way QC but without measurements (except for the final readout), instead using adiabatic deformation of a Hamiltonian whose initial ground state is the cluster state. Our results could help increase the feasibility of adiabatic schemes by using tools from one-way QC.

  14. Quantum Dynamics of Helium Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    helium clusters [10-12]. (10) DMC starts with the time - dependent Schr ~ dinger equation in imaginary time and has been employed most- The approximate...bound. (For example, the binding values may be computed by the Metropolis approach . energy of He 3 is five times greater than that of 1l1lie I We first...or four times for computational effort. If this is also the case with the the larger clusters) its original size. If the maximum en- DMC approach

  15. High-performance dynamic quantum clustering on graphics processors

    SciTech Connect

    Wittek, Peter

    2013-01-15

    Clustering methods in machine learning may benefit from borrowing metaphors from physics. Dynamic quantum clustering associates a Gaussian wave packet with the multidimensional data points and regards them as eigenfunctions of the Schroedinger equation. The clustering structure emerges by letting the system evolve and the visual nature of the algorithm has been shown to be useful in a range of applications. Furthermore, the method only uses matrix operations, which readily lend themselves to parallelization. In this paper, we develop an implementation on graphics hardware and investigate how this approach can accelerate the computations. We achieve a speedup of up to two magnitudes over a multicore CPU implementation, which proves that quantum-like methods and acceleration by graphics processing units have a great relevance to machine learning.

  16. High-performance dynamic quantum clustering on graphics processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittek, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Clustering methods in machine learning may benefit from borrowing metaphors from physics. Dynamic quantum clustering associates a Gaussian wave packet with the multidimensional data points and regards them as eigenfunctions of the Schrödinger equation. The clustering structure emerges by letting the system evolve and the visual nature of the algorithm has been shown to be useful in a range of applications. Furthermore, the method only uses matrix operations, which readily lend themselves to parallelization. In this paper, we develop an implementation on graphics hardware and investigate how this approach can accelerate the computations. We achieve a speedup of up to two magnitudes over a multicore CPU implementation, which proves that quantum-like methods and acceleration by graphics processing units have a great relevance to machine learning.

  17. Photodissociation of Cl 2 in helium clusters: an application of hybrid method of quantum wavepacket dynamics and path integral centroid molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Shiga, Motoyuki

    2003-04-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of Cl 2 embedded in helium clusters is studied by numerical simulation with an emphasis on the effect of quantum character of helium motions. The simulation is based on the hybrid model in which Cl-Cl internuclear dynamics is treated in a wavepacket technique, while the helium motions are described by a path integral centroid molecular dynamics approach. It is found that the cage effect largely decreases when the helium motion is treated quantum mechanically. The mechanism is affected not only by the zero-point vibration in the helium solvation structure, but also by the quantum dynamics of helium.

  18. Arbitrated quantum signature scheme based on cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Lei, He; Liu, Zhi-Chao; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Shi, Wei-Min

    2016-06-01

    Cluster states can be exploited for some tasks such as topological one-way computation, quantum error correction, teleportation and dense coding. In this paper, we investigate and propose an arbitrated quantum signature scheme with cluster states. The cluster states are used for quantum key distribution and quantum signature. The proposed scheme can achieve an efficiency of 100 %. Finally, we also discuss its security against various attacks.

  19. Quantum Theoretical Study of KCl and LiCl Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koetter, Ted; Hira, Ajit; Salazar, Justin; Jaramillo, Danelle

    2014-03-01

    This research focuses on the theoretical study of molecular clusters to examine the chemical properties of small KnClnandLinCln clusters (n = 2 - 20). The potentially important role of these molecular species in biochemical and medicinal processes is well known. This work applies the hybrid ab initio methods of quantum chemistry to derive the different alkali-halide (MnHn) geometries. Of particular interest is the competition between hexagonal ring geometries and rock salt structures. Electronic energies, rotational constants, dipole moments, and vibrational frequencies for these geometries are calculated. Magic numbers for cluster stability are identified and are related to the property of cluster compactness. Mapping of the singlet, triplet, and quintet, potential energy surfaces is performed. Calculations were performed to examine the interactions of these clusters with some atoms and molecules of biological interest, including O, O2, and Fe. Potential design of new medicinal drugs is explored.

  20. Quantum-mechanical investigation of large water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, K.N.; Shields, G.C.

    1994-12-31

    The PM3 quantum-mechanical method has been used to study large water clusters ranging from 8 to 42 water molecules. These large clusters are built from smaller building blocks. The building blocks include cyclic tetramers, pentamers, octamers, and a pentagonal dodecahedron cage. The correlations between the strain energy resulting from bending of the hydrogen bonds formed by different cluster motifs and the number of waters involved in the cluster are discussed. The PM3 results are compared with TIP4P potential and ab initio results. The number of net hydrogen bonds per water increases with the cluster size. This places a limit on the size of clusters that would fit the Benson model of liquid water. Many of the 20-mer clusters fit the Benson model well. Calculations of the ion cluster (H{sub 2}O){sub 40}(H{sub 3}O{sup +}){sub 2} reveal that the m/e ratio obtainable by mass spectrometry experiments can uniquely indicate the conformation of the 20 water pentagonal dodecahedron cage present in the larger clusters.

  1. Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Sanfilippo, Antonio; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2009-12-22

    Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a document clustering method includes providing a document set comprising a plurality of documents, providing a cluster comprising a subset of the documents of the document set, using a plurality of terms of the documents, providing a cluster label indicative of subject matter content of the documents of the cluster, wherein the cluster label comprises a plurality of word senses, and selecting one of the word senses of the cluster label.

  2. Structural transformations and melting in neon clusters: quantum versus classical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Meluzzi, Dario; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

    2006-03-24

    The extraordinary complexity of Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters, which exhibit numerous structures and "phases" when their size or temperature is varied, presents a great challenge for accurate numerical simulations, even without accounting for quantum effects. To study the latter, we utilize the variational Gaussian wave packet method in conjunction with the exchange Monte Carlo sampling technique. We show that the quantum nature of neon clusters has a substantial effect on their size-temperature "phase diagrams," particularly the critical parameters of certain structural transformations. We also give a numerical confirmation that none of the nonicosahedral structures observed for some classical LJ clusters are favorable in the quantum case.

  3. Splitting Methods for Convex Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Eric C.; Lange, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Clustering is a fundamental problem in many scientific applications. Standard methods such as k-means, Gaussian mixture models, and hierarchical clustering, however, are beset by local minima, which are sometimes drastically suboptimal. Recently introduced convex relaxations of k-means and hierarchical clustering shrink cluster centroids toward one another and ensure a unique global minimizer. In this work we present two splitting methods for solving the convex clustering problem. The first is an instance of the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM); the second is an instance of the alternating minimization algorithm (AMA). In contrast to previously considered algorithms, our ADMM and AMA formulations provide simple and unified frameworks for solving the convex clustering problem under the previously studied norms and open the door to potentially novel norms. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm on both simulated and real data examples. While the differences between the two algorithms appear to be minor on the surface, complexity analysis and numerical experiments show AMA to be significantly more efficient. This article has supplemental materials available online. PMID:27087770

  4. Noise thresholds for optical cluster-state quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Christopher M.; Nielsen, Michael A.; Haselgrove, Henry L.

    2006-05-15

    In this paper we do a detailed numerical investigation of the fault-tolerant threshold for optical cluster-state quantum computation. Our noise model allows both photon loss and depolarizing noise, as a general proxy for all types of local noise other than photon loss noise. We obtain a threshold region of allowed pairs of values for the two types of noise. Roughly speaking, our results show that scalable optical quantum computing is possible in the combined presence of both noise types, provided that the loss probability is less than 3x10{sup -3} and the depolarization probability is less than 10{sup -4}. Our fault-tolerant protocol involves a number of innovations, including a method for syndrome extraction known as telecorrection, whereby repeated syndrome measurements are guaranteed to agree. This paper is an extended version of Dawson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 020501 (2006)].

  5. First-principles quantum transport in S3 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing-Xin; Liu, Xiu-Ying; Zhang, Li-Ying; Cheng, Yan; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    2015-09-01

    The quantum transport in S3 clusters sandwiched between Au electrodes was investigated using density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function method. Five different configurations were considered, and the equilibrium conductance and the projected density of states were obtained at optimal positions. Results revealed local minima for two strain chains connected to the pyramidal electrodes at the top site and a triangular S3 open chain linked to the pyramidal electrodes at the top hollow site. The relationship between conductance and external bias voltage was also calculated. Transmission of straight chains was determined by resonance and strongly affected by the bias voltage. Transport of top-hollow configuration was dominated by several closely spaced and broad molecular orbitals; hence, the transmission coefficient was almost flat around the gold Fermi level. The calculations proved that the coupling morphologies of S3 clusters connected with the electrodes significantly affected the electrical transport properties of nanoscale junctions.

  6. On the applicability of one- and many-electron quantum chemistry models for hydrated electron clusters.

    PubMed

    Turi, László

    2016-04-21

    We evaluate the applicability of a hierarchy of quantum models in characterizing the binding energy of excess electrons to water clusters. In particular, we calculate the vertical detachment energy of an excess electron from water cluster anions with methods that include one-electron pseudopotential calculations, density functional theory(DFT) based calculations, and ab initio quantum chemistry using MP2 and eom-EA-CCSD levels of theory. The examined clusters range from the smallest cluster size (n = 2) up to nearly nanosize clusters with n = 1000 molecules. The examined cluster configurations are extracted from mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics trajectories of cluster anions with n = 1000 water molecules using two different one-electron pseudopotenial models. We find that while MP2 calculations with large diffuse basis set provide a reasonable description for the hydrated electron system, DFT methods should be used with precaution and only after careful benchmarking. Strictly tested one-electron psudopotentials can still be considered as reasonable alternatives to DFT methods, especially in large systems. The results of quantum chemistry calculations performed on configurations, that represent possible excess electron binding motifs in the clusters, appear to be consistent with the results using a cavitystructure preferring one-electron pseudopotential for the hydrated electron, while they are in sharp disagreement with the structural predictions of a non-cavity model.

  7. Quantum-dot cluster-state computing with encoded qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Yaakov S.; Hellberg, C. Stephen; Levy, Jeremy

    2005-08-15

    A class of architectures is advanced for cluster-state quantum computation using quantum dots. These architectures include using single and multiple dots as logical qubits. Special attention is given to supercoherent qubits introduced by Bacon et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 247902 (2001)] for which we discuss the effects of various errors and present a means of error protection.

  8. Geometric methods in quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun

    Recent advances in the physical sciences and engineering have created great hopes for new computational paradigms and substrates. One such new approach is the quantum computer, which holds the promise of enhanced computational power. Analogous to the way a classical computer is built from electrical circuits containing wires and logic gates, a quantum computer is built from quantum circuits containing quantum wires and elementary quantum gates to transport and manipulate quantum information. Therefore, design of quantum gates and quantum circuits is a prerequisite for any real application of quantum computation. In this dissertation we apply geometric control methods from differential geometry and Lie group representation theory to analyze the properties of quantum gates and to design optimal quantum circuits. Using the Cartan decomposition and the Weyl group, we show that the geometric structure of nonlocal two-qubit gates is a 3-Torus. After further reducing the symmetry, the geometric representation of nonlocal gates is seen to be conveniently visualized as a tetrahedron. Each point in this tetrahedron except on the base corresponds to a different equivalent class of nonlocal gates. This geometric representation is one of the cornerstones for the discussion on quantum computation in this dissertation. We investigate the properties of those two-qubit operations that can generate maximal entanglement. It is an astonishing finding that if we randomly choose a two-qubit operation, the probability that we obtain a perfect entangler is exactly one half. We prove that given a two-body interaction Hamiltonian, it is always possible to explicitly construct a quantum circuit for exact simulation of any arbitrary nonlocal two-qubit gate by turning on the two-body interaction for at most three times, together with at most four local gates. We also provide an analytic approach to construct a universal quantum circuit from any entangling gate supplemented with local gates

  9. Quantum AdaBoost algorithm via cluster state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan

    2017-03-01

    The principle and theory of quantum computation are investigated by researchers for many years, and further applied to improve the efficiency of classical machine learning algorithms. Based on physical mechanism, a quantum version of AdaBoost (Adaptive Boosting) training algorithm is proposed in this paper, of which purpose is to construct a strong classifier. In the proposed scheme with cluster state in quantum mechanism is to realize the weak learning algorithm, and then update the corresponding weight of examples. As a result, a final classifier can be obtained by combining efficiently weak hypothesis based on measuring cluster state to reweight the distribution of examples.

  10. Theoretically extensible quantum digital signature with starlike cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Liu, Zhi-Chao; Li, Jian; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Zuo, Hui-Juan; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Shi, Wei-Min

    2017-01-01

    Chen et al. (Phys Rev A 73:012303, 2006) constructed this "starlike cluster" state, which involves one qubit located at the center and n neighboring two-qubit arms. This genuine entangled state has been used for the construction of 2D and 3D cluster states, topological one-way computation, and dynamical quantum secret sharing. In this paper, we investigate the usefulness of this starlike cluster state and propose a theoretically extensible quantum digital signature scheme. The proposed scheme can be theoretically generalized to more than three participants. Moreover, it retains the merits of no requirements such as authenticated quantum channels and long-term quantum memory. We also give a security proof for the proposed scheme against repudiation and forgery.

  11. Quantum chemistry of the minimal CdSe clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping; Tretiak, Sergei; Masunov, Artëm E.; Ivanov, Sergei

    2008-08-01

    Colloidal quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) which have stimulated a great deal of research and have attracted technical interest in recent years due to their chemical stability and the tunability of photophysical properties. While internal structure of large quantum dots is similar to bulk, their surface structure and passivating role of capping ligands (surfactants) are not fully understood to date. We apply ab initio wavefunction methods, density functional theory, and semiempirical approaches to study the passivation effects of substituted phosphine and amine ligands on the minimal cluster Cd2Se2, which is also used to benchmark different computational methods versus high level ab initio techniques. Full geometry optimization of Cd2Se2 at different theory levels and ligand coverage is used to understand the affinities of various ligands and the impact of ligands on cluster structure. Most possible bonding patterns between ligands and surface Cd/Se atoms are considered, including a ligand coordinated to Se atoms. The degree of passivation of Cd and Se atoms (one or two ligands attached to one atom) is also studied. The results suggest that B3LYP/LANL2DZ level of theory is appropriate for the system modeling, whereas frequently used semiempirical methods (such as AM1 and PM3) produce unphysical results. The use of hydrogen atom for modeling of the cluster passivating ligands is found to yield unphysical results as well. Hence, the surface termination of II-VI semiconductor NCs with hydrogen atoms often used in computational models should probably be avoided. Basis set superposition error, zero-point energy, and thermal corrections, as well as solvent effects simulated with polarized continuum model are found to produce minor variations on the ligand binding energies. The effects of Cd-Se complex structure on both the electronic band gap (highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy difference) and ligand binding

  12. Structural, spectroscopic aspects, and electronic properties of (TiO2)n clusters: a study based on the use of natural algorithms in association with quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Ganguly Neogi, Soumya; Chaudhury, Pinaki

    2014-01-05

    In this article, we propose a stochastic search-based method, namely genetic algorithm (GA) and simulated annealing (SA) in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate global and local minimum structures of (TiO2)n clusters with n = 1-12. Once the structures are established, we evaluate the infrared spectroscopic modes, cluster formation energy, vertical excitation energy, vertical ionization potential, vertical electron affinity, highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gaps, and so forth. We show that an initial determination of structure using stochastic techniques (GA/SA), also popularly known as natural algorithms as their working principle mimics certain natural processes, and following it up with density functional calculations lead to high-quality structures for these systems. We have shown that the clusters tend to form three-dimensional networks. We compare our results with the available experimental and theoretical results. The results obtained from SA/GA-DFT technique agree well with available theoretical and experimental data of literature.

  13. Deterministic photonic cluster state generation from quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Sophia; Gimeno-Segovia, Mercedes; Rudolph, Terry

    2014-03-01

    Currently, the most promising approach for photon-based quantum information processing is measurement-based, or one-way, quantum computing. In this scheme, a large entangled state of photons is prepared upfront and the computation is implemented with single-qubit measurements alone. Available approaches to generating the cluster state are probabilistic, which makes scalability challenging. We propose to generate the cluster state using a quantum dot molecule with one electron spin per quantum dot. The two spins are coupled by exchange interaction and are periodically pulsed to produce photons. We show that the entanglement created by free evolution between the spins is transferred to the emitted photons, and thus a 2D photonic ladder can be created. Our scheme only utilizes single-spin gates and measurement, and is thus fully consistent with available technology.

  14. Generalized quantum kinetic expansion: Time scale separation between intra-cluster and inter-cluster kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhoufei; Gong, Zhihao; Wu, Jianlan

    2015-09-14

    For a general two-cluster network, a new methodology of the cluster-based generalized quantum kinetic expansion (GQKE) is developed in the matrix formalism under two initial conditions: the local cluster equilibrium and system-bath factorized states. For each initial condition, the site population evolution follows exactly a distinct closed equation, where all the four terms involved are systematically expanded over inter-cluster couplings. For the system-bath factorized initial state, the numerical investigation of the two models, a biased (2, 1)-site system and an unbiased (2, 2)-site system, verifies the reliability of the GQKE and the relevance of higher-order corrections. The time-integrated site-to-site rates and the time evolution of site population reveal the time scale separation between intra-cluster and inter-cluster kinetics. The population evolution of aggregated clusters can be quantitatively described by the approximate cluster Markovian kinetics.

  15. Cluster-like coordinates in supersymmetric quantum field theory

    PubMed Central

    Neitzke, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recently it has become apparent that N=2 supersymmetric quantum field theory has something to do with cluster algebras. I review one aspect of the connection: supersymmetric quantum field theories have associated hyperkähler moduli spaces, and these moduli spaces carry a structure that looks like an extension of the notion of cluster variety. In particular, one encounters the usual variables and mutations of the cluster story, along with more exotic extra variables and generalized mutations. I focus on a class of examples where the underlying cluster varieties are moduli spaces of flat connections on surfaces, as considered by Fock and Goncharov [Fock V, Goncharov A (2006) Publ Math Inst Hautes Études Sci 103:1–211]. The work reviewed here is largely joint with Davide Gaiotto and Greg Moore. PMID:24982190

  16. Cluster-like coordinates in supersymmetric quantum field theory.

    PubMed

    Neitzke, Andrew

    2014-07-08

    Recently it has become apparent that N = 2 supersymmetric quantum field theory has something to do with cluster algebras. I review one aspect of the connection: supersymmetric quantum field theories have associated hyperkähler moduli spaces, and these moduli spaces carry a structure that looks like an extension of the notion of cluster variety. In particular, one encounters the usual variables and mutations of the cluster story, along with more exotic extra variables and generalized mutations. I focus on a class of examples where the underlying cluster varieties are moduli spaces of flat connections on surfaces, as considered by Fock and Goncharov [Fock V, Goncharov A (2006) Publ Math Inst Hautes Études Sci 103:1-211]. The work reviewed here is largely joint with Davide Gaiotto and Greg Moore.

  17. Quantum partition functions from classical distributions: Application to rare-gas clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, F.; Doye, J. P. K.; Wales, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic behavior of quantum many-body systems using several methods based on classical calculations. These approaches are compared for the melting of Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters, where path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) results are also available. First, we examine two quasiclassical approaches where the classical potential is replaced by effective potentials accounting for quantum corrections of low order in ℏ. Of the Wigner-Kirkwood and Feynman-Hibbs effective potentials, only the latter is found to be in quantitative agreement with quantum simulations. However, both potentials fail to describe even qualitatively the low-temperature regime, where quantum effects are strong. Our second approach is based on the harmonic superposition approximation, but with explicit quantum oscillators. In its basic form, this approach is in good qualitative agreement with PIMC results, and becomes more accurate at low temperatures. By including anharmonic corrections in the form of temperature-dependent frequency shifts, the agreement between the quantum superposition and the PIMC results becomes quantitative for the caloric curve of neon clusters. The superposition method is then applied to larger clusters to study the influence of quantum delocalization on the melting and premelting of LJ19, LJ31, LJ38, and LJ55. The quantum character strongly affects the thermodynamics via changes in the ground state structure due to increasing zero-point energies. Finally, we focus on the lowest temperature range, and we estimate the Debye temperatures of argon clusters and their size variation. A strong sensitivity to the cluster structure is found, especially when many surface atoms reorganize as in the anti-Mackay/Mackay transition. In the large size regime, the Debye temperature smoothly rises to its bulk limit, but still depends slightly on the growth sequence considered.

  18. Tripartite Quantum Controlled Teleportation via Seven-Qubit Cluster State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Zha, Xin-Wei; Qi, Jian-Xia

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a theoretical scheme for tripartite quantum controlled teleportation is presented using the entanglement property of seven-qubit cluster state. This means that Alice wants to transmit a entangled state of particle a to Bob, Charlie wants to transmit a entangled state of particle b to David and Edison wants to transmit a entangled state of particle c to Ford via the control of the supervisor. In the end, we compared the aspects of quantum resource consumption, operation complexity, classical resource consumption, quantum information bits transmitted, success probability and efficiency with other schemes.

  19. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  20. The SMART CLUSTER METHOD - adaptive earthquake cluster analysis and declustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Daniell, James; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake declustering is an essential part of almost any statistical analysis of spatial and temporal properties of seismic activity with usual applications comprising of probabilistic seismic hazard assessments (PSHAs) and earthquake prediction methods. The nature of earthquake clusters and subsequent declustering of earthquake catalogues plays a crucial role in determining the magnitude-dependent earthquake return period and its respective spatial variation. Various methods have been developed to address this issue from other researchers. These have differing ranges of complexity ranging from rather simple statistical window methods to complex epidemic models. This study introduces the smart cluster method (SCM), a new methodology to identify earthquake clusters, which uses an adaptive point process for spatio-temporal identification. Hereby, an adaptive search algorithm for data point clusters is adopted. It uses the earthquake density in the spatio-temporal neighbourhood of each event to adjust the search properties. The identified clusters are subsequently analysed to determine directional anisotropy, focussing on a strong correlation along the rupture plane and adjusts its search space with respect to directional properties. In the case of rapid subsequent ruptures like the 1992 Landers sequence or the 2010/2011 Darfield-Christchurch events, an adaptive classification procedure is applied to disassemble subsequent ruptures which may have been grouped into an individual cluster using near-field searches, support vector machines and temporal splitting. The steering parameters of the search behaviour are linked to local earthquake properties like magnitude of completeness, earthquake density and Gutenberg-Richter parameters. The method is capable of identifying and classifying earthquake clusters in space and time. It is tested and validated using earthquake data from California and New Zealand. As a result of the cluster identification process, each event in

  1. Quantum secret sharing with continuous-variable cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Weedbrook, Christian

    2013-10-01

    We extend the formalism of cluster-state quantum secret sharing, as presented by Markham and Sanders [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.78.042309 78, 042309 (2008)] and Keet [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.82.062315 82, 062315 (2010)], to the continuous-variable regime. We show that both classical and quantum information can be shared by distributing continuous-variable cluster states through either public or private channels. We find that the adversary structure is completely denied from the secret if the cluster state is infinitely squeezed, but some secret information would be leaked if a realistic finitely squeezed state is employed. We suggest benchmarks to evaluate the security in the finitely squeezed cases. For the sharing of classical secrets, we borrow techniques from the continuous-variable quantum key distribution to compute the secret-sharing rate. For the sharing of quantum states, we estimate the amount of entanglement distilled for teleportation from each cluster state.

  2. Ordering Quantum Dot Clusters via Nematic Liquid Crystal Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodarte, Andrea; Pandolfi, R.; Hirst, L. S.; Ghosh, S.

    2012-11-01

    Nematic liquid crystal (LC) materials can be used to create ordered clusters of CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) from a homogeneous isotropic dispersion. At the phase transition, the ordered domains of nematic LC expel the majority of dispersed QDs into the isotropic domains. The final LC phase produces a series of QD clusters that are situated at the defect points of the liquid crystal texture. Lower concentrations of QDs are organized in a network throughout the LC matrix that originates from the LC phase transition. Inside the QD clusters the inter-particle distance enables efficient energy transfer from high energy dots to lower energy dots. Because the QD clusters form at defect sites, the location of the clusters can be preselected by seeding the LC cell with defect nucleation points.

  3. Quantum key agreement protocols with four-qubit cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ye-Feng; Ma, Wen-Ping

    2015-09-01

    Based on unitary operations and four-qubit cluster states, a two-party and a three-party quantum key agreement protocols are proposed, respectively, in this paper. The two-party protocol allows that each participant contributes equally to the agreement key by one party performing the unitary operations on two photons of a cluster state and another party performing the delayed measurement on the transformed cluster state. In the three-party scheme, each party can extract the other two parties' secret keys, respectively, encoded in the different photons of the same cluster state by performing the measurement with cluster basis and fairly generates the shared key. The security analysis shows that the two protocols can resist against both participant and outsider attacks. Furthermore, the two protocols also achieve high qubit efficiency.

  4. Quantum Estimation Methods for Quantum Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, M.; Las Heras, U.; García-Ripoll, J. J.; Solano, E.; Di Candia, R.

    2017-02-01

    Quantum illumination consists in shining quantum light on a target region immersed in a bright thermal bath with the aim of detecting the presence of a possible low-reflective object. If the signal is entangled with the receiver, then a suitable choice of the measurement offers a gain with respect to the optimal classical protocol employing coherent states. Here, we tackle this detection problem by using quantum estimation techniques to measure the reflectivity parameter of the object, showing an enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio up to 3 dB with respect to the classical case when implementing only local measurements. Our approach employs the quantum Fisher information to provide an upper bound for the error probability, supplies the concrete estimator saturating the bound, and extends the quantum illumination protocol to non-Gaussian states. As an example, we show how Schrödinger's cat states may be used for quantum illumination.

  5. Quantum Estimation Methods for Quantum Illumination.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M; Las Heras, U; García-Ripoll, J J; Solano, E; Di Candia, R

    2017-02-17

    Quantum illumination consists in shining quantum light on a target region immersed in a bright thermal bath with the aim of detecting the presence of a possible low-reflective object. If the signal is entangled with the receiver, then a suitable choice of the measurement offers a gain with respect to the optimal classical protocol employing coherent states. Here, we tackle this detection problem by using quantum estimation techniques to measure the reflectivity parameter of the object, showing an enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio up to 3 dB with respect to the classical case when implementing only local measurements. Our approach employs the quantum Fisher information to provide an upper bound for the error probability, supplies the concrete estimator saturating the bound, and extends the quantum illumination protocol to non-Gaussian states. As an example, we show how Schrödinger's cat states may be used for quantum illumination.

  6. Metallic clusters on a model surface: Quantum versus geometric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, S. A.; Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Kanhere, D. G.

    2011-08-01

    We determine the structure and melting behavior of supported metallic clusters using an ab initio density-functional-based treatment of intracluster interactions and an approximate treatment of the surface as an idealized smooth plane yielding an effective Lennard-Jones interaction with the ions of the cluster. We apply this model to determine the structure of sodium clusters containing from 4 to 22 atoms, treating the cluster-surface interaction strength as a variable parameter. For a strong cluster-surface interaction, the clusters form two-dimensional (2D) monolayer structures; comparisons with calculations of structure and dissociation energy performed with a classical Gupta interatomic potential show clearly the role of quantum shell effects in the metallic binding in this case, and evidence is presented that these shell effects correspond to those for a confined 2D electron gas. The thermodynamics and melting behavior of a supported Na20 cluster is considered in detail using the model for several cluster-surface interaction strengths. We find quantitative differences in the melting temperatures and caloric curve from density-functional and Gupta treatments of the valence electrons. A clear dimensional effect on the melting behavior is also demonstrated, with 2D structures showing melting temperatures above those of the bulk or (at very strong cluster-surface interactions) no clear meltinglike transition.

  7. Cluster-seeded synthesis of doped CdSe:Cu4 quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Ali M; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Wink, Donald J; Page, Leah E; Snee, Preston T

    2013-04-23

    We report here a method for synthesizing CdSe quantum dots (QDs) containing copper such that each QD is doped with four copper ions. The synthesis is a derivative of the cluster-seed method, whereby organometallic clusters act as nucleation centers for quantum dots. The method is tolerant of the chemical identity of the seed; as such, we have doped four copper ions into CdSe QDs using [Na(H2O)3]2[Cu4(SPh)6] as a cluster seed. The controlled doping allows us to monitor the photophysical properties of guest ions with X-ray spectroscopy, specifically XANES and EXAFS at the copper K-edge. These data reveal that copper can capture both electrons and holes from photoexcited CdSe QDs. When the dopant is oxidized, photoluminescence is quenched and the copper ions translocate within the CdSe matrix, which slows the return to an emissive state.

  8. Quantum implementation of the unitary coupled cluster for simulating molecular electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yangchao; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Shuaining; Zhang, Jing-Ning; Yung, Man-Hong; Kim, Kihwan

    2017-02-01

    In classical computational chemistry, the coupled-cluster ansatz is one of the most commonly used ab initio methods, which is critically limited by its nonunitary nature. The unitary modification as an ideal solution to the problem is, however, extremely inefficient in classical conventional computation. Here, we provide experimental evidence that indeed the unitary version of the coupled-cluster ansatz can be reliably performed in a physical quantum system, a trapped-ion system. We perform a simulation on the electronic structure of a molecular ion (HeH+), where the ground-state energy surface curve is probed, the energies of the excited states are studied, and bond dissociation is simulated nonperturbatively. Our simulation takes advantages from quantum computation to overcome the intrinsic limitations in classical computation, and our experimental results indicate that the method is promising for preparing molecular ground states for quantum simulations.

  9. Report of a Workshop on Parallelization of Coupled Cluster Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney J. Bartlett Erik Deumens

    2008-05-08

    The benchmark, ab initio quantum mechanical methods for molecular structure and spectra are now recognized to be coupled-cluster theory. To benefit from the transiiton to tera- and petascale computers, such coupled-cluster methods must be created to run in a scalable fashion. This Workshop, held as a aprt of the 48th annual Sanibel meeting, at St. Simns, Island, GA, addressed that issue. Representatives of all the principal scientific groups who are addressing this topic were in attendance, to exchange information about the problem and to identify what needs to be done in the future. This report summarized the conclusions of the workshop.

  10. Clusters, Quantum Confinement and Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerade, Jean-Patrick

    One of the challenges posed by the demand for clean urban transportation is the compact and cyclically recoverable storage of energy in quantities sufficient for propulsion. Promising routes, such as the reversible insertion of Li+ ions inside solids for `rocking chair' batteries, require a deformable host material with no irreversibility. Such `soft' deformations are in general highly complex, but the compressibility of atoms or larger systems can be studied directly in situations with simpler symmetry. Thus, the search for `soft' materials leads one to consider certain types of cluster, as well as linear or nearly-spherical structures (chains of metallofullerenes, for example) whose deformations can be computed from the Schrodinger equation. Extended or `giant' atomic models allow one to construct compression-dilation cycles analogous in a rough sense to the Carnot cycle of classical thermodynamics. This simplified approach suggests that, even for idealised systems, there are constraints on the reversible storage and recovery of energy, and that (when applied to realistic structures) modelling based on such principles might help in the selection of appropriate materials.

  11. Quantum broadcast scheme and multi-output quantum teleportation via four-qubit cluster state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan; Zha, Xin Wei; Li, Wei

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, two theoretical schemes of the arbitrary single-qubit states via four-qubit cluster state are proposed. One is three-party quantum broadcast scheme, which realizes the broadcast among three participants. The other is multi-output quantum teleportation. Both allow two distant receivers to simultaneously and deterministically obtain the arbitrary single-qubit states, respectively. Compared with former schemes of an arbitrary single-qubit state, the proposed schemes realize quantum multi-cast communication efficiently, which enables Bob and Charlie to obtain the states simultaneously in the case of just knowing Alice's measurement results. The proposed schemes play an important role in quantum information, specially in secret sharing and quantum teleportation.

  12. Generation of cluster states in optomechanical quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houhou, Oussama; Aissaoui, Habib; Ferraro, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    We consider an optomechanical quantum system composed of a single cavity mode interacting with N mechanical resonators. We propose a scheme for generating continuous-variable graph states of arbitrary size and shape, including the so-called cluster states for universal quantum computation. The main feature of this scheme is that, differently from previous approaches, the graph states are hosted in the mechanical degrees of freedom rather than in the radiative ones. Specifically, via a 2 N -tone drive, we engineer a linear Hamiltonian which is instrumental to dissipatively drive the system to the desired target state. The robustness of this scheme is assessed against finite interaction times and mechanical noise, confirming it as a valuable approach towards quantum state engineering for continuous-variable computation in a solid-state platform.

  13. Clustering of ions at atomic dimensions in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Padma K.; Eliasson, Bengt; Eliasson

    2013-08-01

    By means of particle simulations of the equations of motion for ions interacting among themselves under the influence of newly discovered Shukla-Eliasson attractive force (SEAF) in a dense quantum plasma, we demonstrate that the SEAF can bring ions closer at atomic dimensions. We present simulation results of the dynamics of an ensemble of ions in the presence of the SEAF without and with confining external potentials and collisions between ions and degenerate electrons. Our particle simulations reveal that under the SEAF, ions attract each other, come closer, and form ionic clusters in the bath of degenerate electrons that shield ions. Furthermore, an external confining potential produces robust ion clusters that can have cigar- and ball-like shapes, which remain stable when the confining potential is removed. The stability of ion clusters is discussed. Our results may have applications to solid density plasmas (density exceeding 1023 per cm3), where the electrons will be degenerate and quantum forces due to the electron recoil effect caused by the overlapping of electron wave functions and electron tunneling through the Bohm potential, electron-exchange and electron-exchange and electron correlations associated with electron-1/2 spin effect, and the quantum statistical pressure of the degenerate electrons play a decisive role.

  14. Strongly confined excitons in self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasey, Megan; Li, Xiaoqin; Lee, Jihoon; Wang, Zhiming; Salamo, Gregory

    2011-03-01

    Quantum dot clusters (QDCs) consisting of regular geometric patterns of six InGaAs quantum dots (QD) are grown on a GaAs substrate using a hybrid growth method that combines droplet homoepitaxy and Stranski-Krastonov growth. These novel structures have potential applications as tunable single photon sources, entangled photon sources, or error corrected qubits - devices critical to the fields of secure optical communications and quantum computing We study the photoluminescence arising from a single cluster using both continuous wave and ultrafast spectroscopic techniques with variations in the sample temperature and excitation power. Our results suggest excitons (bound electron-hole pairs) are strongly confined within the individual QDs rather than loosely confined throughout the entire QDC. The work at Texas is supported financially by NSF, ARO, AFOSR, ONR, the Welch Foundation, and the Alfred Sloan Foundation. The work at Arkansas is supported by the NSF.

  15. Visual cluster analysis and pattern recognition methods

    DOEpatents

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil; Martinez, Rubel Francisco

    2001-01-01

    A method of clustering using a novel template to define a region of influence. Using neighboring approximation methods, computation times can be significantly reduced. The template and method are applicable and improve pattern recognition techniques.

  16. Cluster-based architecture for fault-tolerant quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Katsuji

    2010-04-15

    We present a detailed description of an architecture for fault-tolerant quantum computation, which is based on the cluster model of encoded qubits. In this cluster-based architecture, concatenated computation is implemented in a quite different way from the usual circuit-based architecture where physical gates are recursively replaced by logical gates with error-correction gadgets. Instead, some relevant cluster states, say fundamental clusters, are recursively constructed through verification and postselection in advance for the higher-level one-way computation, which namely provides error-precorrection of gate operations. A suitable code such as the Steane seven-qubit code is adopted for transversal operations. This concatenated construction of verified fundamental clusters has a simple transversal structure of logical errors, and achieves a high noise threshold {approx}3% for computation by using appropriate verification procedures. Since the postselection is localized within each fundamental cluster with the help of deterministic bare controlled-Z gates without verification, divergence of resources is restrained, which reconciles postselection with scalability.

  17. Cluster-based architecture for fault-tolerant quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Katsuji

    2010-04-01

    We present a detailed description of an architecture for fault-tolerant quantum computation, which is based on the cluster model of encoded qubits. In this cluster-based architecture, concatenated computation is implemented in a quite different way from the usual circuit-based architecture where physical gates are recursively replaced by logical gates with error-correction gadgets. Instead, some relevant cluster states, say fundamental clusters, are recursively constructed through verification and postselection in advance for the higher-level one-way computation, which namely provides error-precorrection of gate operations. A suitable code such as the Steane seven-qubit code is adopted for transversal operations. This concatenated construction of verified fundamental clusters has a simple transversal structure of logical errors, and achieves a high noise threshold ~3% for computation by using appropriate verification procedures. Since the postselection is localized within each fundamental cluster with the help of deterministic bare controlled-Z gates without verification, divergence of resources is restrained, which reconciles postselection with scalability.

  18. Note on the cluster variation method

    SciTech Connect

    An, G.

    1988-08-01

    Kikuchi's cluster variation method (CVM) is reformulated as the truncation of a Moebius inversion. An attempt is made to explicate and simplify the various approaches to the CVM. This formulation makes apparent the connection of the method with other types of cluster approximation. An illustration of the procedure is provided.

  19. Stochastic methods for zero energy quantum scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Justus H.; Mall, Hubertus R.; Lenz, Stefan

    1998-02-01

    We investigate the use of stochastic methods for zero energy quantum scattering based on a path integral approach. With the application to the scattering of a projectile from a nuclear many-body target in mind, we use the potential scattering of a particle as a test for the accuracy and efficiency of several methods. To be able to deal with complex potentials, we introduce a path sampling action and a modified scattering observable. The approaches considered are the random walk, where the points of a path are sequentially generated, and the Langevin algorithm, which updates an entire path. Several improvements are investigated. A cluster algorithm for dealing with scattering problems is finally proposed, which shows the best accuracy and stability.

  20. Perspectives for quantum interference with biomolecules and biomolecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, P.; Sezer, U.; Rodewald, J.; Mairhofer, L.; Dörre, N.; Haslinger, P.; Eibenberger, S.; Brand, C.; Arndt, M.

    2016-06-01

    Modern quantum optics encompasses a wide field of phenomena that are either related to the discrete quantum nature of light, the quantum wave nature of matter or light-matter interactions. We here discuss new perspectives for quantum optics with biological nanoparticles. We focus in particular on the prospects of matter-wave interferometry with amino acids, nucleotides, polypeptides or DNA strands. We motivate the challenge of preparing these objects in a ‘biomimetic’ environment and argue that hydrated molecular beam sources are promising tools for quantum-assisted metrology. The method exploits the high sensitivity of matter-wave interference fringes to dephasing and shifts in the presence of external perturbations to access and determine molecular properties.

  1. Molecular Limits to the Quantum Confinement Model in Diamond Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Bostedt, C; van Buuren, T; Dahl, J E; Liu, S E; Carlson, R K; Terminello, L J; Moller, T

    2005-04-07

    The electronic structure of monodisperse, hydrogen-passivated diamond clusters in the gas phase has been studied with x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The data show that the bulk-related unoccupied states do not exhibit any quantum confinement. Additionally, density of states below the bulk absorption edge appears, consisting of features correlated to CH and CH{sub 2} hydrogen surface termination, resulting in an effective red shift of the lowest unoccupied states. The results contradict the commonly used and very successful quantum confinement model for semiconductors which predicts increasing band edge blue shifts with decreasing particle size. Our findings indicate that in the ultimate size limit for nanocrystals a more molecular description is necessary.

  2. Quantum cluster equilibrium model of N-methylformamide-water binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Domaros, Michael; Jähnigen, Sascha; Friedrich, Joachim; Kirchner, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The established quantum cluster equilibrium (QCE) approach is refined and applied to N-methylformamide (NMF) and its aqueous solution. The QCE method is split into two iterative cycles: one which converges to the liquid phase solution of the QCE equations and another which yields the gas phase. By comparing Gibbs energies, the thermodynamically stable phase at a given temperature and pressure is then chosen. The new methodology avoids metastable solutions and allows a different treatment of the mean-field interactions within the gas and liquid phases. These changes are of crucial importance for the treatment of binary mixtures. For the first time in a QCE study, the cis-trans-isomerism of a species (NMF) is explicitly considered. Cluster geometries and frequencies are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and complementary coupled cluster single point energies are used to benchmark the DFT results. Independent of the selected quantum-chemical method, a large set of clusters is required for an accurate thermodynamic description of the binary mixture. The liquid phase of neat NMF is found to be dominated by the cyclic trans-NMF pentamer, which can be interpreted as a linear trimer that is stabilized by explicit solvation of two further NMF molecules. This cluster reflects the known hydrogen bond network preferences of neat NMF.

  3. Quantum cluster equilibrium model of N-methylformamide-water binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    von Domaros, Michael; Jähnigen, Sascha; Friedrich, Joachim; Kirchner, Barbara

    2016-02-14

    The established quantum cluster equilibrium (QCE) approach is refined and applied to N-methylformamide (NMF) and its aqueous solution. The QCE method is split into two iterative cycles: one which converges to the liquid phase solution of the QCE equations and another which yields the gas phase. By comparing Gibbs energies, the thermodynamically stable phase at a given temperature and pressure is then chosen. The new methodology avoids metastable solutions and allows a different treatment of the mean-field interactions within the gas and liquid phases. These changes are of crucial importance for the treatment of binary mixtures. For the first time in a QCE study, the cis-trans-isomerism of a species (NMF) is explicitly considered. Cluster geometries and frequencies are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and complementary coupled cluster single point energies are used to benchmark the DFT results. Independent of the selected quantum-chemical method, a large set of clusters is required for an accurate thermodynamic description of the binary mixture. The liquid phase of neat NMF is found to be dominated by the cyclic trans-NMF pentamer, which can be interpreted as a linear trimer that is stabilized by explicit solvation of two further NMF molecules. This cluster reflects the known hydrogen bond network preferences of neat NMF.

  4. Quantum cluster equilibrium model of N-methylformamide–water binary mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Domaros, Michael von; Kirchner, Barbara; Jähnigen, Sascha; Friedrich, Joachim

    2016-02-14

    The established quantum cluster equilibrium (QCE) approach is refined and applied to N-methylformamide (NMF) and its aqueous solution. The QCE method is split into two iterative cycles: one which converges to the liquid phase solution of the QCE equations and another which yields the gas phase. By comparing Gibbs energies, the thermodynamically stable phase at a given temperature and pressure is then chosen. The new methodology avoids metastable solutions and allows a different treatment of the mean-field interactions within the gas and liquid phases. These changes are of crucial importance for the treatment of binary mixtures. For the first time in a QCE study, the cis-trans-isomerism of a species (NMF) is explicitly considered. Cluster geometries and frequencies are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and complementary coupled cluster single point energies are used to benchmark the DFT results. Independent of the selected quantum-chemical method, a large set of clusters is required for an accurate thermodynamic description of the binary mixture. The liquid phase of neat NMF is found to be dominated by the cyclic trans-NMF pentamer, which can be interpreted as a linear trimer that is stabilized by explicit solvation of two further NMF molecules. This cluster reflects the known hydrogen bond network preferences of neat NMF.

  5. Clustering of Nonergodic Eigenstates in Quantum Spin Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, C. L.; Laumann, C. R.; Pal, A.; Scardicchio, A.

    2017-03-01

    The two primary categories for eigenstate phases of matter at a finite temperature are many-body localization (MBL) and the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH). We show that, in the paradigmatic quantum p -spin models of the spin-glass theory, eigenstates violate the ETH yet are not MBL either. A mobility edge, which we locate using the forward-scattering approximation and replica techniques, separates the nonergodic phase at a small transverse field from an ergodic phase at a large transverse field. The nonergodic phase is also bounded from above in temperature, by a transition in configuration-space statistics reminiscent of the clustering transition in the spin-glass theory. We show that the nonergodic eigenstates are organized in clusters which exhibit distinct magnetization patterns, as characterized by an eigenstate variant of the Edwards-Anderson order parameter.

  6. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  7. Symplectic method in quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, E. V. Correa; Monerat, G. A.; Oliveira-Neto, G.; Neves, C.; Ferreira Filho, L. G.

    2009-08-15

    In the present work, we study the quantum cosmology description of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models in the presence of a generic perfect fluid and a cosmological constant, which may be positive or negative. We work in Schutz's variational formalism and the three-dimensional spatial sections may have positive, negative, or zero constant curvature. If one uses the scale factor and its canonically conjugated momentum as the phase space variables that describe the geometrical sector of these models, one obtains Wheeler-DeWitt equations with operator ordering ambiguities. In order to avoid those ambiguities and simplify the quantum treatment of the models, we follow references [Edesio M. Barbosa, Jr. and Nivaldo A. Lemos, Gen. Relativ. Gravit. 38, 1609 (2006).][Edesio M. Barbosa, Jr. and Nivaldo A. Lemos, Phys. Rev. D 78, 023504 (2008).] and introduce new phase space variables. We explicitly demonstrate, using the symplectic method, that the transformation leading from the old set of variables to the new one is canonical.

  8. Quantum Cluster Equilibrium Theory Applied in Hydrogen Bond Number Studies of Water. 1. Assessment of the Quantum Cluster Equilibrium Model for Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, S B C; Spickermann, C; Kirchner, B

    2009-06-09

    Different cluster sets containing only 2-fold coordinated water, 2- and 3-fold coordinated water, and 2-fold, 3-fold, and tetrahedrally coordinated water molecules were investigated by applying second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and density functional theory based on generalized gradient approximation functionals in the framework of the quantum cluster equilibrium theory. We found an improvement of the calculated isobars at low temperatures if tetrahedrally coordinated water molecules were included in the set of 2-fold hydrogen-bonded clusters. This was also reflected in a reduced parameter for the intercluster interaction. If all parameters were kept constant and only the electronic structure methods were varied, large basis set dependencies in the liquid state for the density functional theory results were found. The behavior of the intercluster parameter was also examined for the case that cooperative effects were neglected. The values were 3 times as large as in the calculations including the total electronic structure. Furthermore, these effects are more severe in the tetrahedrally coordinated clusters. Different populations were considered, one weighted by the total number of clusters and one depending on the monomers.

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of Nanoscale MgH2 Cluster Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhigang; Allendorf, Mark; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2010-03-01

    We calculated the desorption energy of MgH2 clusters using the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, which can provide desorption energies with chemical accuracy (within 1 kcal/mol) and therefore a valuable benchmark for such hydrogen-storage simulations. Compared with these QMC results, the widely used density-functional-theory (DFT) computations cannot reach a consistent and suitable level of accuracy across the thermodynamically tunable range for MgH2 clusters, for a wide range of exchange-correlation functionals. Furthermore, our QMC calculations show that the DFT error depends substantially on cluster size. These results suggest that in simulating metal-hydride systems it is crucial to apply accurate methods that go beyond traditional mean-field approaches as a benchmark of their performance for a given material, and QMC is an appealing method for such a benchmark due to its high level of accuracy and favorable scaling (N^3) with number of electrons.

  10. Protein-protected luminescent noble metal quantum clusters: an emerging trend in atomic cluster nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2012-01-01

    Noble metal quantum clusters (NMQCs) are the missing link between isolated noble metal atoms and nanoparticles. NMQCs are sub-nanometer core sized clusters composed of a group of atoms, most often luminescent in the visible region, and possess intriguing photo-physical and chemical properties. A trend is observed in the use of ligands, ranging from phosphines to functional proteins, for the synthesis of NMQCs in the liquid phase. In this review, we briefly overview recent advancements in the synthesis of protein protected NMQCs with special emphasis on their structural and photo-physical properties. In view of the protein protection, coupled with direct synthesis and easy functionalization, this hybrid QC-protein system is expected to have numerous optical and bioimaging applications in the future, pointers in this direction are visible in the literature.

  11. Using Dynamic Quantum Clustering to Analyze Hierarchically Heterogeneous Samples on the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Hume, Allison; /Princeton U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07

    Dynamic Quantum Clustering (DQC) is an unsupervised, high visual data mining technique. DQC was tested as an analysis method for X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) data from the Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) group. The TXM group images hierarchically heterogeneous materials with nanoscale resolution and large field of view. XANES data consists of energy spectra for each pixel of an image. It was determined that DQC successfully identifies structure in data of this type without prior knowledge of the components in the sample. Clusters and sub-clusters clearly reflected features of the spectra that identified chemical component, chemical environment, and density in the image. DQC can also be used in conjunction with the established data analysis technique, which does require knowledge of components present.

  12. New mixed quantum/semiclassical propagation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniou, Dimitri; Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2007-05-01

    The authors developed a new method for calculating the quantum evolution of multidimensional systems, for cases in which the system can be assumed to consist of a quantum subsystem and a bath subsystem of heavier atoms. The method combines two ideas: starting from a simple frozen Gaussian description of the bath subsystem, then calculate quantum corrections to the propagation of the quantum subsystem. This follows from recent work by one of them, showing how one can calculate corrections to approximate evolution schemes, even when the Hamiltonian that corresponds to these approximate schemes is unknown. Then, they take the limit in which the width of the frozen Gaussians approaches zero, which makes the corrections to the evolution of the quantum subsystem depend only on classical bath coordinates. The test calculations they present use low-dimensional systems, in which comparison to exact quantum dynamics is feasible.

  13. Compensated Crystal Assemblies for Type-II Entangled Photon Generation in Quantum Cluster States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    multi-crystal sources, such as cluster states, entanglement swapping, and teleportation . 15. SUBJECT TERMS quantum , entangled photons, joint...entanglement swapping, and teleportation . Key Words: quantum , entangled photons, joint spectral function, spontaneous parametric downconversion 2...DATES COVERED (From - To) OCT 2009 – SEP 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE COMPENSATED CRYSTAL ASSEMBLIES FOR TYPE-II ENTANGLED PHOTO GENERATION IN QUANTUM

  14. Permanent excimer superstructures by supramolecular networking of metal quantum clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Gonzalez, Beatriz; Monguzzi, Angelo; Azpiroz, Jon Mikel; Prato, Mirko; Erratico, Silvia; Campione, Marcello; Lorenzi, Roberto; Pedrini, Jacopo; Santambrogio, Carlo; Torrente, Yvan; De Angelis, Filippo; Meinardi, Francesco; Brovelli, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    Excimers are evanescent quasi-particles that typically form during collisional intermolecular interactions and exist exclusively for their excited-state lifetime. We exploited the distinctive structure of metal quantum clusters to fabricate permanent excimer-like colloidal superstructures made of ground-state noninteracting gold cores, held together by a network of hydrogen bonds between their capping ligands. This previously unknown aggregation state of matter, studied through spectroscopic experiments and ab initio calculations, conveys the photophysics of excimers into stable nanoparticles, which overcome the intrinsic limitation of excimers in single-particle applications—that is, their nearly zero formation probability in ultra-diluted solutions. In vitro experiments demonstrate the suitability of the superstructures as nonresonant intracellular probes and further reveal their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species, which enhances their potential as anticytotoxic agents for biomedical applications.

  15. Cluster size convergence of the density matrix embedding theory and its dynamical cluster formulation: A study with an auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bo-Xiao; Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the cluster size convergence of the energy and observables using two forms of density matrix embedding theory (DMET): the original cluster form (CDMET) and a new formulation motivated by the dynamical cluster approximation (DCA-DMET). Both methods are applied to the half-filled one- and two-dimensional Hubbard models using a sign-problem free auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver, which allows for the treatment of large impurity clusters of up to 100 sites. While CDMET is more accurate at smaller impurity cluster sizes, DCA-DMET exhibits faster asymptotic convergence towards the thermodynamic limit. We use our two formulations to produce new accurate estimates for the energy and local moment of the two-dimensional Hubbard model for U /t =2 ,4 ,6 . These results compare favorably with the best data available in the literature, and help resolve earlier uncertainties in the moment for U /t =2 .

  16. A nonperturbative light-front coupled-cluster method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, J. R.

    2012-10-01

    The nonperturbative Hamiltonian eigenvalue problem for bound states of a quantum field theory is formulated in terms of Dirac's light-front coordinates and then approximated by the exponential-operator technique of the many-body coupled-cluster method. This approximation eliminates any need for the usual approximation of Fock-space truncation. Instead, the exponentiated operator is truncated, and the terms retained are determined by a set of nonlinear integral equations. These equations are solved simultaneously with an effective eigenvalue problem in the valence sector, where the number of constituents is small. Matrix elements can be calculated, with extensions of techniques from standard coupled-cluster theory, to obtain form factors and other observables.

  17. Quantum speedup of Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Ashley

    2015-09-08

    Monte Carlo methods use random sampling to estimate numerical quantities which are hard to compute deterministically. One important example is the use in statistical physics of rapidly mixing Markov chains to approximately compute partition functions. In this work, we describe a quantum algorithm which can accelerate Monte Carlo methods in a very general setting. The algorithm estimates the expected output value of an arbitrary randomized or quantum subroutine with bounded variance, achieving a near-quadratic speedup over the best possible classical algorithm. Combining the algorithm with the use of quantum walks gives a quantum speedup of the fastest known classical algorithms with rigorous performance bounds for computing partition functions, which use multiple-stage Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. The quantum algorithm can also be used to estimate the total variation distance between probability distributions efficiently.

  18. A Survey of Quantum Lyapunov Control Methods

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The condition of a quantum Lyapunov-based control which can be well used in a closed quantum system is that the method can make the system convergent but not just stable. In the convergence study of the quantum Lyapunov control, two situations are classified: nondegenerate cases and degenerate cases. For these two situations, respectively, in this paper the target state is divided into four categories: the eigenstate, the mixed state which commutes with the internal Hamiltonian, the superposition state, and the mixed state which does not commute with the internal Hamiltonian. For these four categories, the quantum Lyapunov control methods for the closed quantum systems are summarized and analyzed. Particularly, the convergence of the control system to the different target states is reviewed, and how to make the convergence conditions be satisfied is summarized and analyzed. PMID:23766732

  19. Quantum speedup of Monte Carlo methods

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods use random sampling to estimate numerical quantities which are hard to compute deterministically. One important example is the use in statistical physics of rapidly mixing Markov chains to approximately compute partition functions. In this work, we describe a quantum algorithm which can accelerate Monte Carlo methods in a very general setting. The algorithm estimates the expected output value of an arbitrary randomized or quantum subroutine with bounded variance, achieving a near-quadratic speedup over the best possible classical algorithm. Combining the algorithm with the use of quantum walks gives a quantum speedup of the fastest known classical algorithms with rigorous performance bounds for computing partition functions, which use multiple-stage Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. The quantum algorithm can also be used to estimate the total variation distance between probability distributions efficiently. PMID:26528079

  20. The Development of Cluster and Histogram Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swendsen, Robert H.

    2003-11-01

    This talk will review the history of both cluster and histogram methods for Monte Carlo simulations. Cluster methods are based on the famous exact mapping by Fortuin and Kasteleyn from general Potts models onto a percolation representation. I will discuss the Swendsen-Wang algorithm, as well as its improvement and extension to more general spin models by Wolff. The Replica Monte Carlo method further extended cluster simulations to deal with frustrated systems. The history of histograms is quite extensive, and can only be summarized briefly in this talk. It goes back at least to work by Salsburg et al. in 1959. Since then, it has been forgotten and rediscovered several times. The modern use of the method has exploited its ability to efficiently determine the location and height of peaks in various quantities, which is of prime importance in the analysis of critical phenomena. The extensions of this approach to the multiple histogram method and multicanonical ensembles have allowed information to be obtained over a broad range of parameters. Histogram simulations and analyses have become standard techniques in Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Creating fractional quantum Hall states with atomic clusters using light-assisted insertion of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junyi; Beugnon, Jérôme; Nascimbene, Sylvain

    2016-10-01

    We describe a protocol to prepare clusters of ultracold bosonic atoms in strongly interacting states reminiscent of fractional quantum Hall states. Our scheme consists in injecting a controlled amount of angular momentum to an atomic gas using Raman transitions carrying orbital angular momentum. By injecting one unit of angular momentum per atom, one realizes a single-vortex state, which is well described by mean-field theory for large enough particle numbers. We also present schemes to realize fractional quantum Hall states, namely, the bosonic Laughlin and Moore-Read states. We investigate the requirements for adiabatic nucleation of such topological states, in particular comparing linear Landau-Zener ramps and arbitrary ramps obtained from optimized control methods. We also show that this protocol requires excellent control over the isotropic character of the trapping potential.

  2. Clustering of CdSe/CdS Quantum Dot/Quantum Rods into Micelles Can Form Bright, Non-blinking, Stable, and Biocompatible Probes.

    PubMed

    Rafipoor, Mona; Schmidtke, Christian; Wolter, Christopher; Strelow, Christian; Weller, Horst; Lange, Holger

    2015-09-01

    We investigate clustered CdSe/CdS quantum dots/quantum rods, ranging from single to multiple encapsulated rods within amphiphilic diblock copolymer micelles, by time-resolved optical spectroscopy. The effect of the clustering and the cluster size on the optical properties is addressed. The clusters are bright and stable and show no blinking while retaining the fundamental optical properties of the individual quantum dots/quantum rods. Cell studies show neither unspecific uptake nor morphological changes of the cells, despite the increased sizes of the clusters.

  3. Cluster-state quantum computing enhanced by high-fidelity generalized measurements.

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, D N; Kaltenbaek, R; Hamel, D R; Weihs, G; Rudolph, T; Resch, K J

    2009-12-11

    We introduce and implement a technique to extend the quantum computational power of cluster states by replacing some projective measurements with generalized quantum measurements (POVMs). As an experimental demonstration we fully realize an arbitrary three-qubit cluster computation by implementing a tunable linear-optical POVM, as well as fast active feedforward, on a two-qubit photonic cluster state. Over 206 different computations, the average output fidelity is 0.9832+/-0.0002; furthermore the error contribution from our POVM device and feedforward is only of O(10(-3)), less than some recent thresholds for fault-tolerant cluster computing.

  4. Nonequilibrium variational cluster perturbation theory: Quench dynamics of the quantum Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadzadeh, Mohammad Zhian; Fabrizio, Michele; Arrigoni, Enrico

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a variational implementation of cluster perturbation theory (CPT) to address the dynamics of spin systems driven out of equilibrium. We benchmark the method with the quantum Ising model subject to a sudden quench of the transverse magnetic field across the transition or within a phase. We treat both the one-dimensional case, for which an exact solution is available, as well the two-dimensional case, for which we have to resort to numerical results. Comparison with exact results shows that the approach provides a quite accurate description of the real-time dynamics up to a characteristic timescale τ that increases with the size of the cluster used for CPT. In addition, and not surprisingly, τ is small for quenches across the equilibrium phase transition point, but can be quite larger for quenches within the ordered or disordered phases.

  5. Quantum correlated cluster mean-field theory applied to the transverse Ising model.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, F M; Schmidt, M; Maziero, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    Mean-field theory (MFT) is one of the main available tools for analytical calculations entailed in investigations regarding many-body systems. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in ameliorating this kind of method, mainly with the aim of incorporating geometric and correlation properties of these systems. The correlated cluster MFT (CCMFT) is an improvement that succeeded quite well in doing that for classical spin systems. Nevertheless, even the CCMFT presents some deficiencies when applied to quantum systems. In this article, we address this issue by proposing the quantum CCMFT (QCCMFT), which, in contrast to its former approach, uses general quantum states in its self-consistent mean-field equations. We apply the introduced QCCMFT to the transverse Ising model in honeycomb, square, and simple cubic lattices and obtain fairly good results both for the Curie temperature of thermal phase transition and for the critical field of quantum phase transition. Actually, our results match those obtained via exact solutions, series expansions or Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Clustering method for estimating principal diffusion directions

    PubMed Central

    Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Davoodi-Bojd, Esmaeil; Jiang, Quan; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTMRI) is a non-invasive tool for the investigation of white matter structure within the brain. However, the traditional tensor model is unable to characterize anisotropies of orders higher than two in heterogeneous areas containing more than one fiber population. To resolve this issue, high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) with a large number of diffusion encoding gradients is used along with reconstruction methods such as Q-ball. Using HARDI data, the fiber orientation distribution function (ODF) on the unit sphere is calculated and used to extract the principal diffusion directions (PDDs). Fast and accurate estimation of PDDs is a prerequisite for tracking algorithms that deal with fiber crossings. In this paper, the PDDs are defined as the directions around which the ODF data is concentrated. Estimates of the PDDs based on this definition are less sensitive to noise in comparison with the previous approaches. A clustering approach to estimate the PDDs is proposed which is an extension of fuzzy c-means clustering developed for orientation of points on a sphere. MDL (Minimum description length) principle is proposed to estimate the number of PDDs. Using both simulated and real diffusion data, the proposed method has been evaluated and compared with some previous protocols. Experimental results show that the proposed clustering algorithm is more accurate, more resistant to noise, and faster than some of techniques currently being utilized. PMID:21642005

  7. Phase Space Theory of Evaporation in Neon Clusters: The Role of Quantum Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, F.; Parneix, P.

    2009-07-01

    Unimolecular evaporation of neon clusters containing between 14 and 148 atoms is theoretically investigated in the framework of phase space theory. Quantum effects are incorporated in the vibrational densities of states, which include both zero-point and anharmonic contributions, and in the possible tunneling through the centrifugal barrier. The evaporation rates, kinetic energy released, and product angular momentum are calculated as a function of excess energy or temperature in the parent cluster and compared to the classical results. Quantum fluctuations are found to generally increase both the kinetic energy released and the angular momentum of the product, but the effects on the rate constants depend nontrivially on the excess energy. These results are interpreted as due to the very few vibrational states available in the product cluster when described quantum mechanically. Because delocalization also leads to much narrower thermal energy distributions, the variations of evaporation observables as a function of canonical temperature appear much less marked than in the microcanonical ensemble. While quantum effects tend to smooth the caloric curve in the product cluster, the melting phase change clearly keeps a signature on these observables. The microcanonical temperature extracted from fitting the kinetic energy released distribution using an improved Arrhenius form further suggests a backbending in the quantum Ne13 cluster that is absent in the classical system. Finally, in contrast to delocalization effects, quantum tunneling through the centrifugal barrier does not play any appreciable role on the evaporation kinetics of these rather heavy clusters.

  8. Qcompiler: Quantum compilation with the CSD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. G.; Wang, J. B.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we present a general quantum computation compiler, which maps any given quantum algorithm to a quantum circuit consisting a sequential set of elementary quantum logic gates based on recursive cosine-sine decomposition. The resulting quantum circuit diagram is provided by directly linking the package output written in LaTeX to Qcircuit.tex . We illustrate the use of the Qcompiler package through various examples with full details of the derived quantum circuits. Besides its accuracy, generality and simplicity, Qcompiler produces quantum circuits with significantly reduced number of gates when the systems under study have a high degree of symmetry. Catalogue identifier: AENX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4321 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 50943 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran. Computer: Any computer with a Fortran compiler. Operating system: Linux, Mac OS X 10.5 (and later). RAM: Depends on the size of the unitary matrix to be decomposed Classification: 4.15. External routines: Lapack (http://www.netlib.org/lapack/) Nature of problem: Decompose any given unitary operation into a quantum circuit with only elementary quantum logic gates. Solution method: This package decomposes an arbitrary unitary matrix, by applying the CSD algorithm recursively, into a series of block-diagonal matrices, which can then be readily associated with elementary quantum gates to form a quantum circuit. Restrictions: The only limitation is imposed by the available memory on the user's computer. Additional comments: This package is applicable for any arbitrary unitary matrices, both real and complex. If the

  9. Quantum Teleportation of A Four-qubit State by Using Six-qubit Cluster State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan-hua; Sang, Ming-huang; Wang, Xian-ping; Nie, Yi-you

    2016-08-01

    We propose a scheme for perfect quantum teleportation of a special form of four-qubit state by using a six-qubit cluster state as quantum channel. In our scheme, the sender only needs six-qubit von-Neumann projective measurements, and the receiver can reconstruct the original four-qubit state by applying the appropriate unitary operation.

  10. Thermodynamics and equilibrium structure of Ne38 cluster: quantum mechanics versus classical.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Cristian; Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

    2005-04-15

    The equilibrium properties of classical Lennard-Jones (LJ38) versus quantum Ne38 Lennard-Jones clusters are investigated. The quantum simulations use both the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and the recently developed variational-Gaussian wave packet Monte Carlo (VGW-MC) methods. The PIMC and the classical MC simulations are implemented in the parallel tempering framework. The classical heat capacity Cv(T) curve agrees well with that of Neirotti et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 112, 10340 (2000)], although a much larger confining sphere is used in the present work. The classical Cv(T) shows a peak at about 6 K, interpreted as a solid-liquid transition, and a shoulder at approximately 4 K, attributed to a solid-solid transition involving structures from the global octahedral (Oh) minimum and the main icosahedral (C5v) minimum. The VGW method is used to locate and characterize the low energy states of Ne38, which are then further refined by PIMC calculations. Unlike the classical case, the ground state of Ne38 is a liquidlike structure. Among the several liquidlike states with energies below the two symmetric states (Oh and C5v), the lowest two exhibit strong delocalization over basins associated with at least two classical local minima. Because the symmetric structures do not play an essential role in the thermodynamics of Ne38, the quantum heat capacity is a featureless curve indicative of the absence of any structural transformations. Good agreement between the two methods, VGW and PIMC, is obtained. The present results are also consistent with the predictions by Calvo et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 7312 (2001)] based on the quantum superposition method within the harmonic approximation. However, because of its approximate nature, the latter method leads to an incorrect assignment of the Ne38 ground state as well as to a significant underestimation of the heat capacity.

  11. Breaking the hierarchy - a new cluster selection mechanism for hierarchical clustering methods

    PubMed Central

    Zahoránszky, László A; Katona, Gyula Y; Hári, Péter; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Zweig, Katharina A; Zahoránszky-Köhalmi, Gergely

    2009-01-01

    Background Hierarchical clustering methods like Ward's method have been used since decades to understand biological and chemical data sets. In order to get a partition of the data set, it is necessary to choose an optimal level of the hierarchy by a so-called level selection algorithm. In 2005, a new kind of hierarchical clustering method was introduced by Palla et al. that differs in two ways from Ward's method: it can be used on data on which no full similarity matrix is defined and it can produce overlapping clusters, i.e., allow for multiple membership of items in clusters. These features are optimal for biological and chemical data sets but until now no level selection algorithm has been published for this method. Results In this article we provide a general selection scheme, the level independent clustering selection method, called LInCS. With it, clusters can be selected from any level in quadratic time with respect to the number of clusters. Since hierarchically clustered data is not necessarily associated with a similarity measure, the selection is based on a graph theoretic notion of cohesive clusters. We present results of our method on two data sets, a set of drug like molecules and set of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data. In both cases the method provides a clustering with very good sensitivity and specificity values according to a given reference clustering. Moreover, we can show for the PPI data set that our graph theoretic cohesiveness measure indeed chooses biologically homogeneous clusters and disregards inhomogeneous ones in most cases. We finally discuss how the method can be generalized to other hierarchical clustering methods to allow for a level independent cluster selection. Conclusion Using our new cluster selection method together with the method by Palla et al. provides a new interesting clustering mechanism that allows to compute overlapping clusters, which is especially valuable for biological and chemical data sets. PMID:19840391

  12. Universality of quantum computation with cluster states and (X, Y)-plane measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantri, Atul; Demarie, Tommaso F.; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2017-02-01

    Measurement-based quantum computing (MBQC) is a model of quantum computation where quantum information is coherently processed by means of projective measurements on highly entangled states. Following the introduction of MBQC, cluster states have been studied extensively both from the theoretical and experimental point of view. Indeed, the study of MBQC was catalysed by the realisation that cluster states are universal for MBQC with (X, Y)-plane and Z measurements. Here we examine the question of whether the requirement for Z measurements can be dropped while maintaining universality. We answer this question in the affirmative by showing that universality is possible in this scenario.

  13. Universality of quantum computation with cluster states and (X, Y)-plane measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Atul; Demarie, Tommaso F.; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2017-01-01

    Measurement-based quantum computing (MBQC) is a model of quantum computation where quantum information is coherently processed by means of projective measurements on highly entangled states. Following the introduction of MBQC, cluster states have been studied extensively both from the theoretical and experimental point of view. Indeed, the study of MBQC was catalysed by the realisation that cluster states are universal for MBQC with (X, Y)-plane and Z measurements. Here we examine the question of whether the requirement for Z measurements can be dropped while maintaining universality. We answer this question in the affirmative by showing that universality is possible in this scenario. PMID:28216652

  14. A Novel Quantum Blind Signature Scheme with Four-Particle Cluster States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ling

    2016-03-01

    In an arbitrated quantum signature scheme, the signer signs the message and the receiver verifies the signature's validity with the assistance of the arbitrator. We present an arbitrated quantum blind signature scheme by measuring four-particle cluster states and coding. By using the special relationship of four-particle cluster states, we cannot only support the security of quantum signature, but also guarantee the anonymity of the message owner. It has a wide application to E-payment system, E-government, E-business, and etc.

  15. Universality of quantum computation with cluster states and (X, Y)-plane measurements.

    PubMed

    Mantri, Atul; Demarie, Tommaso F; Fitzsimons, Joseph F

    2017-02-20

    Measurement-based quantum computing (MBQC) is a model of quantum computation where quantum information is coherently processed by means of projective measurements on highly entangled states. Following the introduction of MBQC, cluster states have been studied extensively both from the theoretical and experimental point of view. Indeed, the study of MBQC was catalysed by the realisation that cluster states are universal for MBQC with (X, Y)-plane and Z measurements. Here we examine the question of whether the requirement for Z measurements can be dropped while maintaining universality. We answer this question in the affirmative by showing that universality is possible in this scenario.

  16. Fault-tolerant measurement-based quantum computing with continuous-variable cluster states.

    PubMed

    Menicucci, Nicolas C

    2014-03-28

    A long-standing open question about Gaussian continuous-variable cluster states is whether they enable fault-tolerant measurement-based quantum computation. The answer is yes. Initial squeezing in the cluster above a threshold value of 20.5 dB ensures that errors from finite squeezing acting on encoded qubits are below the fault-tolerance threshold of known qubit-based error-correcting codes. By concatenating with one of these codes and using ancilla-based error correction, fault-tolerant measurement-based quantum computation of theoretically indefinite length is possible with finitely squeezed cluster states.

  17. Two Ways of Robust Quantum Dialogue by Using Four-Qubit Cluster State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-jin; Li, Dong-fen; Liu, Yao; Qin, Zhi-guang; Baagyere, Edward

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a scheme for quantum dialogue by using a four-qubit cluster state as quantum channel.The scheme has two cases: Case 1, Sender Alice and receiver Bob share information using an orderly sequence of entangled state as quantum channel which was prepared by Alice. This case is achieved as follows: The two sides agreed to encode quantum state information, then Alice perform a bell state measurement for quantum information which has been encoded. This will convey the information to Bob, then Bob measuring his own qubits, through the analysis of the measurement results of Alice and Bob, Bob can obtain quantum information. For case 2, four-qubit cluster state and quantum state information is transmitted to form a total quantum system. In the Case 2 scenario, Alice and Bob perform bell state measurements for part of the qubits, and tell the measurement result to each other through the classical channel. Finally, according to the measurement result, Alice and Bob operate an appropriate unitary transformation, as a result, Alice's qubit will be renewed upon Bob's measurements, and also, Bob's qubit will be renewed upon Alice's measurements. Thus, a bidirectional quantum dialogue is achieved. After analysis, this scheme has high security by taking certain eavesdropping attacks into account. There is therefore a certain reference value to the realization of quantum dialogue.

  18. Five-wave-packet quantum error correction based on continuous-variable cluster entanglement.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuhong; Su, Xiaolong; Tian, Caixing; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2015-10-26

    Quantum error correction protects the quantum state against noise and decoherence in quantum communication and quantum computation, which enables one to perform fault-torrent quantum information processing. We experimentally demonstrate a quantum error correction scheme with a five-wave-packet code against a single stochastic error, the original theoretical model of which was firstly proposed by S. L. Braunstein and T. A. Walker. Five submodes of a continuous variable cluster entangled state of light are used for five encoding channels. Especially, in our encoding scheme the information of the input state is only distributed on three of the five channels and thus any error appearing in the remained two channels never affects the output state, i.e. the output quantum state is immune from the error in the two channels. The stochastic error on a single channel is corrected for both vacuum and squeezed input states and the achieved fidelities of the output states are beyond the corresponding classical limit.

  19. Treatment of dilute clusters of methanol and water by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations.

    PubMed

    Ruckenstein, Eli; Shulgin, Ivan L; Tilson, Jeffrey L

    2005-02-10

    Large molecular clusters can be considered as intermediate states between gas and condensed phases, and information about them can help us understand condensed phases. In this paper, ab initio quantum mechanical methods have been used to examine clusters formed of methanol and water molecules. The main goal was to obtain information about the intermolecular interactions and the structure of methanol/water clusters at the molecular level. The large clusters (CH(4)O...(H(2)O)(12) and H(2)O...(CH(4)O)(10)) containing one molecule of one component (methanol or water) and many (12, 10) molecules of the other component were considered. Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) was used in the calculations. Several representative cluster geometries were optimized, and nearest-neighbor interaction energies were calculated for the geometries obtained in the first step. The results of the calculations were compared to the available experimental information regarding the liquid methanol/water mixtures and to the molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement was found. For the CH(4)O...(H(2)O)(12) cluster, it was shown that the molecules of water can be subdivided into two classes: (i) H bonded to the central methanol molecule and (ii) not H bonded to the central methanol molecule. As expected, these two classes exhibited striking energy differences. Although they are located almost the same distance from the carbon atom of the central methanol molecule, they possess very different intermolecular interaction energies with the central molecule. The H bonding constitutes a dominant factor in the hydration of methanol in dilute aqueous solutions. For the H(2)O...(CH(4)O)(10) cluster, it was shown that the central molecule of water has almost three H bonds with the methanol molecules; this result differs from those in the literature that concluded that the average number of H bonds between a central water molecule and methanol molecules in dilute solutions of

  20. Perspective: Quantum mechanical methods in biochemistry and biophysics

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    In this perspective article, I discuss several research topics relevant to quantum mechanical (QM) methods in biophysical and biochemical applications. Due to the immense complexity of biological problems, the key is to develop methods that are able to strike the proper balance of computational efficiency and accuracy for the problem of interest. Therefore, in addition to the development of novel ab initio and density functional theory based QM methods for the study of reactive events that involve complex motifs such as transition metal clusters in metalloenzymes, it is equally important to develop inexpensive QM methods and advanced classical or quantal force fields to describe different physicochemical properties of biomolecules and their behaviors in complex environments. Maintaining a solid connection of these more approximate methods with rigorous QM methods is essential to their transferability and robustness. Comparison to diverse experimental observables helps validate computational models and mechanistic hypotheses as well as driving further development of computational methodologies. PMID:27782516

  1. Perspective: Quantum mechanical methods in biochemistry and biophysics.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qiang

    2016-10-14

    In this perspective article, I discuss several research topics relevant to quantum mechanical (QM) methods in biophysical and biochemical applications. Due to the immense complexity of biological problems, the key is to develop methods that are able to strike the proper balance of computational efficiency and accuracy for the problem of interest. Therefore, in addition to the development of novel ab initio and density functional theory based QM methods for the study of reactive events that involve complex motifs such as transition metal clusters in metalloenzymes, it is equally important to develop inexpensive QM methods and advanced classical or quantal force fields to describe different physicochemical properties of biomolecules and their behaviors in complex environments. Maintaining a solid connection of these more approximate methods with rigorous QM methods is essential to their transferability and robustness. Comparison to diverse experimental observables helps validate computational models and mechanistic hypotheses as well as driving further development of computational methodologies.

  2. Perspective: Quantum mechanical methods in biochemistry and biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    In this perspective article, I discuss several research topics relevant to quantum mechanical (QM) methods in biophysical and biochemical applications. Due to the immense complexity of biological problems, the key is to develop methods that are able to strike the proper balance of computational efficiency and accuracy for the problem of interest. Therefore, in addition to the development of novel ab initio and density functional theory based QM methods for the study of reactive events that involve complex motifs such as transition metal clusters in metalloenzymes, it is equally important to develop inexpensive QM methods and advanced classical or quantal force fields to describe different physicochemical properties of biomolecules and their behaviors in complex environments. Maintaining a solid connection of these more approximate methods with rigorous QM methods is essential to their transferability and robustness. Comparison to diverse experimental observables helps validate computational models and mechanistic hypotheses as well as driving further development of computational methodologies.

  3. Collaborative Simulation Grid: Multiscale Quantum-Mechanical/Classical Atomistic Simulations on Distributed PC Clusters in the US and Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Ogata, Shuji; Kouno, Takahisa; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Tsuruta, Kanji; Saini, Subhash; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, collaborative simulation has been performed on a Grid of geographically distributed PC clusters. The multiscale simulation approach seamlessly combines i) atomistic simulation backed on the molecular dynamics (MD) method and ii) quantum mechanical (QM) calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT), so that accurate but less scalable computations are performed only where they are needed. The multiscale MD/QM simulation code has been Grid-enabled using i) a modular, additive hybridization scheme, ii) multiple QM clustering, and iii) computation/communication overlapping. The Gridified MD/QM simulation code has been used to study environmental effects of water molecules on fracture in silicon. A preliminary run of the code has achieved a parallel efficiency of 94% on 25 PCs distributed over 3 PC clusters in the US and Japan, and a larger test involving 154 processors on 5 distributed PC clusters is in progress.

  4. A comparison of clustering methods for biogeography with fossil datasets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cluster analysis is one of the most commonly used methods in palaeoecological studies, particularly in studies investigating biogeographic patterns. Although a number of different clustering methods are widely used, the approach and underlying assumptions of many of these methods are quite different. For example, methods may be hierarchical or non-hierarchical in their approaches, and may use Euclidean distance or non-Euclidean indices to cluster the data. In order to assess the effectiveness of the different clustering methods as compared to one another, a simulation was designed that could assess each method over a range of both cluster distinctiveness and sampling intensity. Additionally, a non-hierarchical, non-Euclidean, iterative clustering method implemented in the R Statistical Language is described. This method, Non-Euclidean Relational Clustering (NERC), creates distinct clusters by dividing the data set in order to maximize the average similarity within each cluster, identifying clusters in which each data point is on average more similar to those within its own group than to those in any other group. While all the methods performed well with clearly differentiated and well-sampled datasets, when data are less than ideal the linkage methods perform poorly compared to non-Euclidean based k-means and the NERC method. Based on this analysis, Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean and neighbor joining methods are less reliable with incomplete datasets like those found in palaeobiological analyses, and the k-means and NERC methods should be used in their place. PMID:26966658

  5. A General Method of Selecting Quantum Channel for Bidirectional Quantum Teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hong-Zi; Tian, Xiu-Lao; Hu, Yang

    2014-06-01

    Based on tensor representation and Bell basis measurement in bidirectional quantum teleportation, a criterion that can be used to judge whether a four-qubit quantum state can be regarded as quantum channel or not in bidirectional teleportation is suggested and a theoretical scheme of bidirectional teleportation via four-qubit state as the quantum channel is proposed. In accordance with this criterion we give a general method of selecting quantum channel in bidirectional teleportation, which is determined by the channel parameter matrix R in the Bell basis measurement. This general method provide a theoretical basis for quantum channel selection in bidirectional quantum teleportation experiments.

  6. Hall effect in quantum critical charge-cluster glass.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Bollinger, Anthony T; Sun, Yujie; Božović, Ivan

    2016-04-19

    Upon doping, cuprates undergo a quantum phase transition from an insulator to a d-wave superconductor. The nature of this transition and of the insulating state is vividly debated. Here, we study the Hall effect in La2-xSrxCuO4(LSCO) samples doped near the quantum critical point atx∼ 0.06. Dramatic fluctuations in the Hall resistance appear belowTCG∼ 1.5 K and increase as the sample is cooled down further, signaling quantum critical behavior. We explore the doping dependence of this effect in detail, by studying a combinatorial LSCO library in which the Sr content is varied in extremely fine steps,Δx∼ 0.00008. We observe that quantum charge fluctuations wash out when superconductivity emerges but can be restored when the latter is suppressed by applying a magnetic field, showing that the two instabilities compete for the ground state.

  7. Hall effect in quantum critical charge-cluster glass

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Bollinger, Anthony T.; Sun, Yujie; Božović, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Upon doping, cuprates undergo a quantum phase transition from an insulator to a d-wave superconductor. The nature of this transition and of the insulating state is vividly debated. Here, we study the Hall effect in La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) samples doped near the quantum critical point at x ∼ 0.06. Dramatic fluctuations in the Hall resistance appear below TCG ∼ 1.5 K and increase as the sample is cooled down further, signaling quantum critical behavior. We explore the doping dependence of this effect in detail, by studying a combinatorial LSCO library in which the Sr content is varied in extremely fine steps, Δx ∼ 0.00008. We observe that quantum charge fluctuations wash out when superconductivity emerges but can be restored when the latter is suppressed by applying a magnetic field, showing that the two instabilities compete for the ground state. PMID:27044081

  8. Discrete range clustering using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterji, G. B.; Sridhar, B.

    1993-01-01

    For automatic obstacle avoidance guidance during rotorcraft low altitude flight, a reliable model of the nearby environment is needed. Such a model may be constructed by applying surface fitting techniques to the dense range map obtained by active sensing using radars. However, for covertness, passive sensing techniques using electro-optic sensors are desirable. As opposed to the dense range map obtained via active sensing, passive sensing algorithms produce reliable range at sparse locations, and therefore, surface fitting techniques to fill the gaps in the range measurement are not directly applicable. Both for automatic guidance and as a display for aiding the pilot, these discrete ranges need to be grouped into sets which correspond to objects in the nearby environment. The focus of this paper is on using Monte Carlo methods for clustering range points into meaningful groups. One of the aims of the paper is to explore whether simulated annealing methods offer significant advantage over the basic Monte Carlo method for this class of problems. We compare three different approaches and present application results of these algorithms to a laboratory image sequence and a helicopter flight sequence.

  9. Integrated management of thesis using clustering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astuti, Indah Fitri; Cahyadi, Dedy

    2017-02-01

    Thesis is one of major requirements for student in pursuing their bachelor degree. In fact, finishing the thesis involves a long process including consultation, writing manuscript, conducting the chosen method, seminar scheduling, searching for references, and appraisal process by the board of mentors and examiners. Unfortunately, most of students find it hard to match all the lecturers' free time to sit together in a seminar room in order to examine the thesis. Therefore, seminar scheduling process should be on the top of priority to be solved. Manual mechanism for this task no longer fulfills the need. People in campus including students, staffs, and lecturers demand a system in which all the stakeholders can interact each other and manage the thesis process without conflicting their timetable. A branch of computer science named Management Information System (MIS) could be a breakthrough in dealing with thesis management. This research conduct a method called clustering to distinguish certain categories using mathematics formulas. A system then be developed along with the method to create a well-managed tool in providing some main facilities such as seminar scheduling, consultation and review process, thesis approval, assessment process, and also a reliable database of thesis. The database plays an important role in present and future purposes.

  10. Coronene molecules in helium clusters: Quantum and classical studies of energies and configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Cantano, Rocío; Pérez de Tudela, Ricardo; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Hernández, Marta I.; Campos-Martínez, José; González-Lezana, Tomás Villarreal, Pablo; Hernández-Rojas, Javier; Bretón, José

    2015-12-14

    Coronene-doped helium clusters have been studied by means of classical and quantum mechanical (QM) methods using a recently developed He–C{sub 24}H{sub 12} global potential based on the use of optimized atom-bond improved Lennard-Jones functions. Equilibrium energies and geometries at global and local minima for systems with up to 69 He atoms were calculated by means of an evolutive algorithm and a basin-hopping approach and compared with results from path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) calculations at 2 K. A detailed analysis performed for the smallest sizes shows that the precise localization of the He atoms forming the first solvation layer over the molecular substrate is affected by differences between relative potential minima. The comparison of the PIMC results with the predictions from the classical approaches and with diffusion Monte Carlo results allows to examine the importance of both the QM and thermal effects.

  11. Absence of exponential clustering in quantum Coulomb fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alastuey, A.; Martin, Ph. A.

    1989-12-01

    We show that the quantum corrections to the classical correlations of a Coulomb fluid do not decay exponentially fast for all values of the thermodynamical parameters. Specifically, the ħ4 term in the Wigner-Kirkwood expansion of the equilibrium charge-charge correlations of the quantum one-component plasma is found to decay like ||r||-10. More generally, using functional integration, we present a diagrammatic representation of the ħ expansion of the correlations in a multicomponent fluid with a locally regularized Coulomb potential and Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics. The ħ2n terms are found to decay algebraically for all n>=2. Furthermore, an analysis of the hierarchy equations for the correlations provides upper bounds that are compatible with the findings of the perturbative expansion. Except for the monopole, all higher-order multipole sum rules do not hold, in general, in the quantum system. This violation of the multipole sum rules as well as the related algebraic tails are due to the intrinsic quantum fluctuations that prevent a perfect organization of the screening clouds. This phenomenon is illustrated in a simpler model where the large-distance correlations between two quantum particles embedded in a classical plasma can be exactly computed.

  12. Size specific emission in peptide capped gold quantum clusters with tunable photoswitching behavior.

    PubMed

    Baral, Abhishek; Basu, Kingshuk; Ghosh, Sirshendu; Bhattacharyya, Kalishankar; Roy, Subhasish; Datta, Ayan; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-03-16

    Three different types of fluorescent gold clusters (namely blue, green and red emitting) have been prepared from a gold precursor (chloroauric acid) under moderate conditions in aqueous medium. A cysteine containing dipeptide has been used for the formation of these quantum clusters as this peptide molecule contains a thiol group in the side chain to cap these nascently formed clusters and the free amino and carboxylic moieties assist in water solubility. Thus, the clusters are also environmentally friendly as the capped peptide is made up of only naturally occurring protein amino acids. These clusters have been well characterized by using UV-visible, fluorescence, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and ultrahigh resolution field emission gun-transmission electron microscopy (UHR-FEG-TEM). Arrangements of gold atoms and their interaction with the corresponding ligands in three different fluorescent clusters have been predicted computationally. The excited state behavior of three different clusters has also been studied using time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) and computational studies suggest intersystem crossing (S1 → T1) in the case of red-emitting Au23 clusters. Interestingly, these gold clusters exhibit semiconducting and photoswitching properties (Ion/Ioff), which are shown to be controlled by varying the size of these clusters. This holds future promise of using these gold cluster based nanomaterials for optoelectronic applications.

  13. Multiple-quantum NMR studies of spin clusters in liquid crystals and zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, J. . Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1991-07-01

    This work will describe the use of MQ NMR to study spin clusters in anisotropic materials. A technique known as multiple-quantum spin counting was used to determine average spin cluster sizes liquid crystalline materials and in faujacitic zeolites containing aromatic hydrocarbons. The first half of the thesis will describe MQ NMR and the MQ spin counting technique, and the second half of the thesis will describe the actual experiments and their results.

  14. Coupled-cluster methods for core-hole dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picon, Antonio; Cheng, Lan; Hammond, Jeff R.; Stanton, John F.; Southworth, Stephen H.

    2014-05-01

    Coupled cluster (CC) is a powerful numerical method used in quantum chemistry in order to take into account electron correlation with high accuracy and size consistency. In the CC framework, excited, ionized, and electron-attached states can be described by the equation of motion (EOM) CC technique. However, bringing CC methods to describe molecular dynamics induced by x rays is challenging. X rays have the special feature of interacting with core-shell electrons that are close to the nucleus. Core-shell electrons can be ionized or excited to a valence shell, leaving a core-hole that will decay very fast (e.g. 2.4 fs for K-shell of Ne) by emitting photons (fluorescence process) or electrons (Auger process). Both processes are a clear manifestation of a many-body effect, involving electrons in the continuum in the case of Auger processes. We review our progress of developing EOM-CC methods for core-hole dynamics. Results of the calculations will be compared with measurements on core-hole decays in atomic Xe and molecular XeF2. This work is funded by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  15. Degenerate four-wave mixing from layered semiconductor clusters in the quantum size regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Rhee, Bum Ku; McGinnis, Brian P.; Sandroff, Claude J.

    1986-11-01

    We report the first measurement of the third-order nonlinear susceptibility χ(3) in layered semiconductor clusters exhibiting pronounced quantum size effects at room temperature. BiI3 clusters prepared in colloidal form in acetonitrile had a thickness of ≂7 Å and lateral dimensions between 60 and 90 Å. Using degenerate four-wave mixing, we observed that the conjugate pulses from the small and the large gratings had comparable intensities, verifying the electronic origin of the nonlinearity. The nonlinear susceptibility was found to be 2.3×10-11 esu for a colloid with a cluster volume fraction of 10-5.

  16. Research on palmprint identification method based on quantum algorithms.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Zhanzhan

    2014-01-01

    Quantum image recognition is a technology by using quantum algorithm to process the image information. It can obtain better effect than classical algorithm. In this paper, four different quantum algorithms are used in the three stages of palmprint recognition. First, quantum adaptive median filtering algorithm is presented in palmprint filtering processing. Quantum filtering algorithm can get a better filtering result than classical algorithm through the comparison. Next, quantum Fourier transform (QFT) is used to extract pattern features by only one operation due to quantum parallelism. The proposed algorithm exhibits an exponential speed-up compared with discrete Fourier transform in the feature extraction. Finally, quantum set operations and Grover algorithm are used in palmprint matching. According to the experimental results, quantum algorithm only needs to apply square of N operations to find out the target palmprint, but the traditional method needs N times of calculation. At the same time, the matching accuracy of quantum algorithm is almost 100%.

  17. Research on Palmprint Identification Method Based on Quantum Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhanzhan

    2014-01-01

    Quantum image recognition is a technology by using quantum algorithm to process the image information. It can obtain better effect than classical algorithm. In this paper, four different quantum algorithms are used in the three stages of palmprint recognition. First, quantum adaptive median filtering algorithm is presented in palmprint filtering processing. Quantum filtering algorithm can get a better filtering result than classical algorithm through the comparison. Next, quantum Fourier transform (QFT) is used to extract pattern features by only one operation due to quantum parallelism. The proposed algorithm exhibits an exponential speed-up compared with discrete Fourier transform in the feature extraction. Finally, quantum set operations and Grover algorithm are used in palmprint matching. According to the experimental results, quantum algorithm only needs to apply square of N operations to find out the target palmprint, but the traditional method needs N times of calculation. At the same time, the matching accuracy of quantum algorithm is almost 100%. PMID:25105165

  18. Quantum beam generations via the laser-cluster interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yuji; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tania; Tampo, Motonobu; Yogo, Akifumi; Kando, Masaki; Hayashi, Yukio; Kameshima, Takeshi; Homma, Takayuki; Pirozhkov, Alexander; Kato, Yoshiaki; Tajima, Toshiki; Daido, Hiroyuki; Bulanov, Sergei

    2008-11-01

    The novel soft X-ray light source using the supersonic expansion of the mixed gas of He and CO2, when irradiated by a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulse, is observed to enhance the radiation of soft X-rays from the CO2 clusters. Using this soft X-ray emissions, nanostructure images of 100-nm thick Mo foils in a wide field of view (mm^2 scale) with high spatial resolution (800 nm) are obtained with high dynamic range LiF crystal detectors. We also demonstrate the acceleration of charged particles via the laser-cluster interactions.

  19. Study of molecular vibration by coupled cluster method: Bosonic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Subrata; Pal, Sourav; Prasad, M. Durga

    2015-01-01

    The vibrational coupled cluster method in bosonic representation is formulated to describe the molecular anharmonic vibrational spectra. The vibrational coupled cluster formalism is based on Watson Hamiltonian in normal coordinates. The vibrational excited states are described using coupled cluster linear response theory (CCLRT). The quality of the coupled cluster wave function is analyzed. Specifically, the mean displacement values of the normal coordinates and expectation values of the square of the normal coordinates of different vibrational states are calculated. A good agreement between the converged full CI results and coupled cluster results is found for the lower lying vibrational states.

  20. Bond additivity corrections for quantum chemistry methods

    SciTech Connect

    C. F. Melius; M. D. Allendorf

    1999-04-01

    In the 1980's, the authors developed a bond-additivity correction procedure for quantum chemical calculations called BAC-MP4, which has proven reliable in calculating the thermochemical properties of molecular species, including radicals as well as stable closed-shell species. New Bond Additivity Correction (BAC) methods have been developed for the G2 method, BAC-G2, as well as for a hybrid DFT/MP2 method, BAC-Hybrid. These BAC methods use a new form of BAC corrections, involving atomic, molecular, and bond-wise additive terms. These terms enable one to treat positive and negative ions as well as neutrals. The BAC-G2 method reduces errors in the G2 method due to nearest-neighbor bonds. The parameters within the BAC-G2 method only depend on atom types. Thus the BAC-G2 method can be used to determine the parameters needed by BAC methods involving lower levels of theory, such as BAC-Hybrid and BAC-MP4. The BAC-Hybrid method should scale well for large molecules. The BAC-Hybrid method uses the differences between the DFT and MP2 as an indicator of the method's accuracy, while the BAC-G2 method uses its internal methods (G1 and G2MP2) to provide an indicator of its accuracy. Indications of the average error as well as worst cases are provided for each of the BAC methods.

  1. Visual cluster analysis and pattern recognition template and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Osbourn, G.C.; Martinez, R.F.

    1993-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a method of clustering using a novel template to define a region of influence. Using neighboring approximation methods, computation times can be significantly reduced. The template and method are applicable and improve pattern recognition techniques.

  2. Visual cluster analysis and pattern recognition template and methods

    DOEpatents

    Osbourn, G.C.; Martinez, R.F.

    1999-05-04

    A method of clustering using a novel template to define a region of influence is disclosed. Using neighboring approximation methods, computation times can be significantly reduced. The template and method are applicable and improve pattern recognition techniques. 30 figs.

  3. Visual cluster analysis and pattern recognition template and methods

    DOEpatents

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil; Martinez, Rubel Francisco

    1999-01-01

    A method of clustering using a novel template to define a region of influence. Using neighboring approximation methods, computation times can be significantly reduced. The template and method are applicable and improve pattern recognition techniques.

  4. Quantum dynamics of an excited alkali atom in a noble gas cluster: lithium attached to a helium cluster.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Thorndyke, Brian; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A

    2007-12-28

    An alkali atom-noble gas cluster system is considered as a model for solvation effects in optical spectra, within a quantum-classical description based on the density operator of a many-atom system and its partial Wigner transform. This leads to an eikonal-time-dependent molecular orbital treatment suitable for a time-dependent description of the coupling of light emission and atom dynamics in terms of the time-dependent electric dipole of the whole system. As an application, we consider an optically excited lithium atom as the dopant in a helium cluster at 0.5 K. We describe the motions of the excited Li atom interacting with a cluster of He atoms and calculate the time-dependent electric dipole of the Li-He(99) system during the dynamics. The electronic Hamiltonian is taken as a sum of three-body Li-He diatomic potentials including electronic polarization and repulsion, with l-dependent atomic pseudopotentials for Li and He, while we use a modified pair potential for He-He. The calculations involve the coupling of 12 quantum states with 300 classical degrees of freedom. We present results for the dynamics and spectra of a Li atom interacting with a model cluster surface of He atoms and also interacting with a droplet of He. We have found that the Li atom is attracted or repulsed from the He surface, depending on the orientation of its 2p orbitals. The spectra and dynamics of Li inside and at the surface of a cluster are found to be strongly dependent on its electronic states, its velocity direction, and whether light is present during emission or not.

  5. A graph clustering method for community detection in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, HongFang; Li, Jin; Li, JunHuai; Zhang, FaCun; Cui, YingAn

    2017-03-01

    Information mining from complex networks by identifying communities is an important problem in a number of research fields, including the social sciences, biology, physics and medicine. First, two concepts are introduced, Attracting Degree and Recommending Degree. Second, a graph clustering method, referred to as AR-Cluster, is presented for detecting community structures in complex networks. Third, a novel collaborative similarity measure is adopted to calculate node similarities. In the AR-Cluster method, vertices are grouped together based on calculated similarity under a K-Medoids framework. Extensive experimental results on two real datasets show the effectiveness of AR-Cluster.

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Joseph A.; Gandolfi, Stefano; Pederiva, Francesco; Pieper, Steven C.; Schiavilla, Rocco; Schmidt, K. E,; Wiringa, Robert B.

    2014-10-19

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved very valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. We review the nuclear interactions and currents, and describe the continuum Quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-body interactions. We present a variety of results including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. We also describe low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars. A coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    DOE PAGES

    Carlson, Joseph A.; Gandolfi, Stefano; Pederiva, Francesco; ...

    2014-10-19

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved very valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. We review the nuclear interactions and currents, and describe the continuum Quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-bodymore » interactions. We present a variety of results including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. We also describe low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars. A coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.« less

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    DOE PAGES

    Carlson, J.; Gandolfi, S.; Pederiva, F.; ...

    2015-09-09

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments, and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. The nuclear interactions and currents are reviewed along with a description of the continuum quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit,more » and three-body interactions. A variety of results are presented, including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. Low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars are also described. Furthermore, a coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.« less

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.; Gandolfi, S.; Pederiva, F.; Pieper, Steven C.; Schiavilla, R.; Schmidt, K. E.; Wiringa, R. B.

    2015-09-09

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments, and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. The nuclear interactions and currents are reviewed along with a description of the continuum quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-body interactions. A variety of results are presented, including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. Low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars are also described. Furthermore, a coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.

  10. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, J.; Gandolfi, S.; Pederiva, F.; Pieper, Steven C.; Schiavilla, R.; Schmidt, K. E.; Wiringa, R. B.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments, and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. The nuclear interactions and currents are reviewed along with a description of the continuum quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-body interactions. A variety of results are presented, including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. Low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars are also described. A coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.

  11. Prediction of Solvent Physical Properties using the Hierarchical Clustering Method

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently a QSAR (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship) method, the hierarchical clustering method, was developed to estimate acute toxicity values for large, diverse datasets. This methodology has now been applied to the estimate solvent physical properties including sur...

  12. New methods for quantum mechanical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Ward Hugh

    1996-12-01

    Quantum mechanical methods are developed to describe the dynamics of bimolecular chemical reactions. We focus on developing approaches for directly calculating the desired quantity of interest. Methods for the calculation of single matrix elements of the scattering matrix (S-matrix) and initial state-selected reaction probabilities are presented. This is accomplished by the use of absorbing boundary conditions (ABC) to obtain a localized (L2) representation of the outgoing wave scattering Green`s function. This approach enables the efficient calculation of only a single column of the S-matrix with a proportionate savings in effort over the calculation of the entire S-matrix. Applying this method to the calculation of the initial (or final) state-selected reaction probability, a more averaged quantity, requires even less effort than the state-to-state S-matrix elements. It is shown how the same representation of the Green`s function can be effectively applied to the calculation of negative ion photodetachment intensities. Photodetachment spectroscopy of the anion ABC- can be a very useful method for obtaining detailed information about the neutral ABC potential energy surface, particularly if the ABC- geometry is similar to the transition state of the neutral ABC. Total and arrangement-selected photodetachment spectra are calculated for the H3O- system, providing information about the potential energy surface for the OH + H2 reaction when compared with experimental results. Finally, we present methods for the direct calculation of the thermal rate constant from the flux-position and flux-flux correlation functions. The spirit of transition state theory is invoked by concentrating on the short time dynamics in the area around the transition state that determine reactivity. These methods are made efficient by evaluating the required quantum mechanical trace in the basis of eigenstates of the

  13. Quantum-classical simulation of electron localization in negatively charged methanol clusters.

    PubMed

    Mones, Letif; Rossky, Peter J; Turi, László

    2011-08-28

    A series of quantum molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the energetic, structural, dynamic, and spectroscopic properties of methanol cluster anions, [(CH(3)OH)(n)](-), (n = 50-500). Consistent with the inference from photo-electron imaging experiments, we find two main localization modes of the excess electron in equilibrated methanol clusters at ∼200 K. The two different localization patterns have strikingly different physical properties, consistent with experimental observations, and are manifest in comparable cluster sizes to those observed. Smaller clusters (n ≤ 128) tend to localize the electron in very weakly bound, diffuse electronic states on the surface of the cluster, while in larger ones the electron is stabilized in solvent cavities, in compact interior-bound states. The interior states exhibit properties that largely resemble and smoothly extrapolate to those simulated for a solvated electron in bulk methanol. The surface electronic states of methanol cluster anions are significantly more weakly bound than the surface states of the anionic water clusters. The key source of the difference is the lack of stabilizing free hydroxyl groups on a relaxed methanol cluster surface. We also provide a mechanistic picture that illustrates the essential role of the interactions of the excess electron with the hydroxyl groups in the dynamic process of the transition of the electron from surface-bound states to interior-bound states.

  14. Spectral-luminescence characteristics of lead sulfide molecular clusters and quantum dots in fluorophosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatova, Zh. O.; Kolobkova, E. V.; Nikonorov, N. V.

    2015-12-01

    PbS molecular clusters and quantum dots (QDs) have been formed by heat treatment in fluorophosphate glasses of the Na2O3-P2O5-Ga2O3-ALF3-ZnO(S)-PbF2 system, and their spectral-luminescence characteristics have been investigated. It is experimentally shown that the transition from molecular clusters to QDs is accompanied by a stepwise change in the spectrum and luminescence quantum yield. Molecular PbS clusters luminesce in the visible spectral range (1.5-3.5 eV) and QDs luminesce in the IR region (0.6-1.4 eV). The luminescence of molecular PbS clusters is characterized by low quantum yield, which decreases from 10 to 1% with an increase in excitation energy. An increase in nanoparticle size leads to a decrease in the Stokes shift from 80 to 50 meV. The QD luminescence spectrum contains two bands, which are due to transitions from two lower excited states.

  15. Versatile Formal Methods Applied to Quantum Information.

    SciTech Connect

    Witzel, Wayne; Rudinger, Kenneth Michael; Sarovar, Mohan

    2015-11-01

    Using a novel formal methods approach, we have generated computer-veri ed proofs of major theorems pertinent to the quantum phase estimation algorithm. This was accomplished using our Prove-It software package in Python. While many formal methods tools are available, their practical utility is limited. Translating a problem of interest into these systems and working through the steps of a proof is an art form that requires much expertise. One must surrender to the preferences and restrictions of the tool regarding how mathematical notions are expressed and what deductions are allowed. Automation is a major driver that forces restrictions. Our focus, on the other hand, is to produce a tool that allows users the ability to con rm proofs that are essentially known already. This goal is valuable in itself. We demonstrate the viability of our approach that allows the user great exibility in expressing state- ments and composing derivations. There were no major obstacles in following a textbook proof of the quantum phase estimation algorithm. There were tedious details of algebraic manipulations that we needed to implement (and a few that we did not have time to enter into our system) and some basic components that we needed to rethink, but there were no serious roadblocks. In the process, we made a number of convenient additions to our Prove-It package that will make certain algebraic manipulations easier to perform in the future. In fact, our intent is for our system to build upon itself in this manner.

  16. Experimental realization of one-way quantum computing with two-photon four-qubit cluster states.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Li, Che-Ming; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Yu-Ao; Goebel, Alexander; Chen, Shuai; Mair, Alois; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2007-09-21

    We report an experimental realization of one-way quantum computing on a two-photon four-qubit cluster state. This is accomplished by developing a two-photon cluster state source entangled both in polarization and spatial modes. With this special source, we implemented a highly efficient Grover's search algorithm and high-fidelity two-qubit quantum gates. Our experiment demonstrates that such cluster states could serve as an ideal source and a building block for rapid and precise optical quantum computation.

  17. Progeny Clustering: A Method to Identify Biological Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chenyue W.; Kornblau, Steven M.; Slater, John H.; Qutub, Amina A.

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the optimal number of clusters is a major challenge in applying cluster analysis to any type of dataset, especially to biomedical datasets, which are high-dimensional and complex. Here, we introduce an improved method, Progeny Clustering, which is stability-based and exceptionally efficient in computing, to find the ideal number of clusters. The algorithm employs a novel Progeny Sampling method to reconstruct cluster identity, a co-occurrence probability matrix to assess the clustering stability, and a set of reference datasets to overcome inherent biases in the algorithm and data space. Our method was shown successful and robust when applied to two synthetic datasets (datasets of two-dimensions and ten-dimensions containing eight dimensions of pure noise), two standard biological datasets (the Iris dataset and Rat CNS dataset) and two biological datasets (a cell phenotype dataset and an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) reverse phase protein array (RPPA) dataset). Progeny Clustering outperformed some popular clustering evaluation methods in the ten-dimensional synthetic dataset as well as in the cell phenotype dataset, and it was the only method that successfully discovered clinically meaningful patient groupings in the AML RPPA dataset. PMID:26267476

  18. Probing dynamic fluorescence properties of single and clustered quantum dots toward quantitative biomedical imaging of cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyeong-Gon; Tokumasu, Fuyuki; Clarke, Matthew; Zhou, Zhenping; Tang, Jianyong; Nguyen, Tinh; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2010-01-01

    We present results on the dynamic fluorescence properties of bioconjugated nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) in different chemical and physical environments. A variety of QD samples was prepared and compared: isolated individual QDs, QD aggregates, and QDs conjugated to other nanoscale materials, such as single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and human erythrocyte plasma membrane proteins. We discuss plausible scenarios to explain the results obtained for the fluorescence characteristics of QDs in these samples, especially for the excitation time-dependent fluorescence emission from clustered QDs. We also qualitatively demonstrate enhanced fluorescence emission signals from clustered QDs and deduce that the band 3 membrane proteins in erythrocytes are clustered. This approach is promising for the development of QD-based quantitative molecular imaging techniques for biomedical studies involving biomolecule clustering.

  19. Nonlinear model-based method for clustering periodically expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li-Ping; Liu, Li-Zhi; Zhang, Qian-Wei; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Clustering periodically expressed genes from their time-course expression data could help understand the molecular mechanism of those biological processes. In this paper, we propose a nonlinear model-based clustering method for periodically expressed gene profiles. As periodically expressed genes are associated with periodic biological processes, the proposed method naturally assumes that a periodically expressed gene dataset is generated by a number of periodical processes. Each periodical process is modelled by a linear combination of trigonometric sine and cosine functions in time plus a Gaussian noise term. A two stage method is proposed to estimate the model parameter, and a relocation-iteration algorithm is employed to assign each gene to an appropriate cluster. A bootstrapping method and an average adjusted Rand index (AARI) are employed to measure the quality of clustering. One synthetic dataset and two biological datasets were employed to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results show that our method allows the better quality clustering than other clustering methods (e.g., k-means) for periodically expressed gene data, and thus it is an effective cluster analysis method for periodically expressed gene data.

  20. Membership determination of open cluster with parametric method: cross entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoirul Fitriana, Itsna; Ikbal Arifiyanto, M.

    2016-11-01

    Stellar open clusters are useful for studying the structure and evolution of Galaxy. Determination of the open cluster members can be viewed from their kinematics: proper motion and radial velocity. It is because the star cluster members will have a motion in the same direction, towards a convergent point. Parametric method with a double elliptic bivariate gaussian function which contains 11 parameters is used as a model of the proper motion distribution. The value of these parameters are determined numerically by cross entropy method. This method is a method of data fitting using the likelihood function whose value is maximized to get the proper parameters. This method solves the problem of determining the initial value that is often difficult to determine in other numerical methods. There are four open clusters which we have analysed: NGC 2244, ASCC 100, NGC 5168, and NGC 2169. The resulting of proper motion parameters of this method matches the parameters in the literature.

  1. Tuned oscillatory behavior in discrete quantum walks on star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, R. F. S.; Souza, A. M. C.

    2015-10-01

    A discrete time quantum walk on the star network is considered, on which the walker has a waiting probability at any time step and for any of the N nodes. This contrasts with a previous continuous time analysis, in which the walker in any of the N -1 leaf nodes is forced to jump back to the central hub. The model amounts to considering two coin operators, one for the hub (with N possible states) and another one for all leaf nodes (with two possible states). The solution depends on N and θ , an angle gauging the action of the coin operator on the leaf nodes. Periodic solutions are identified, which can be represented as superposition of large-period branches, sharing a relative small number of shapes and displaced by a regular interval. It is shown that the large period is very sensitive to the choice of N and θ . The possibility of experimental applications of this property is briefly mentioned.

  2. Electronic and dielectric properties of vacancy clusters as quantum dot in silicane

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Brij Sharma, Munish; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-06-24

    First principal study of electronic and dielectric properties of a silicane nanostructure containing cluster of vacancies as quantum dot (QD) has been investigated within density functional theory (DFT). Electronic band structure and corresponding density of states show the decrease in band gap with increasing size of quantum dot. A band gap of 0.38 eV has been achieved for silicane containing 3QD. Electron energy loss spectra (EEL) function shows additional plasmonic features for QD containing silicane in visible region, which may have potential applications in optoelectronic devices.

  3. Electronic and dielectric properties of vacancy clusters as quantum dot in silicane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Brij; Sharma, Munish; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    First principal study of electronic and dielectric properties of a silicane nanostructure containing cluster of vacancies as quantum dot (QD) has been investigated within density functional theory (DFT). Electronic band structure and corresponding density of states show the decrease in band gap with increasing size of quantum dot. A band gap of 0.38 eV has been achieved for silicane containing 3QD. Electron energy loss spectra (EEL) function shows additional plasmonic features for QD containing silicane in visible region, which may have potential applications in optoelectronic devices.

  4. The smart cluster method - Adaptive earthquake cluster identification and analysis in strong seismic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Andreas M.; Daniell, James E.; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2017-03-01

    Earthquake clustering is an essential part of almost any statistical analysis of spatial and temporal properties of seismic activity. The nature of earthquake clusters and subsequent declustering of earthquake catalogues plays a crucial role in determining the magnitude-dependent earthquake return period and its respective spatial variation for probabilistic seismic hazard assessment. This study introduces the Smart Cluster Method (SCM), a new methodology to identify earthquake clusters, which uses an adaptive point process for spatio-temporal cluster identification. It utilises the magnitude-dependent spatio-temporal earthquake density to adjust the search properties, subsequently analyses the identified clusters to determine directional variation and adjusts its search space with respect to directional properties. In the case of rapid subsequent ruptures like the 1992 Landers sequence or the 2010-2011 Darfield-Christchurch sequence, a reclassification procedure is applied to disassemble subsequent ruptures using near-field searches, nearest neighbour classification and temporal splitting. The method is capable of identifying and classifying earthquake clusters in space and time. It has been tested and validated using earthquake data from California and New Zealand. A total of more than 1500 clusters have been found in both regions since 1980 with M m i n = 2.0. Utilising the knowledge of cluster classification, the method has been adjusted to provide an earthquake declustering algorithm, which has been compared to existing methods. Its performance is comparable to established methodologies. The analysis of earthquake clustering statistics lead to various new and updated correlation functions, e.g. for ratios between mainshock and strongest aftershock and general aftershock activity metrics.

  5. Matrix IR spectra and quantum-chemical calculations of the products of small nickel cluster interactions with water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrennikov, L. V.; Dalvyatshin, D. I.; Golovkin, A. V.

    2010-12-01

    Reactions of Ni n clusters with water molecules were studied by IR spectroscopy in inert matrices and quantum chemistry methods. The geometric configurations, total energies, and vibrational frequencies of all the possible Ni2(H2O) and Ni3(H2O) isomers were calculated. For both systems, the main minima and transition states were found. Water was shown to dissociate to hydrogen and hydroxyl in the reactions, and, in all the complexes formed, hydrogen is situated in the bridge position on the Ni-Ni bond.

  6. New method for calculation of nuclear cluster structure of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ibishi, A.I.

    2005-05-06

    In the calculations of the many-nucleon bound states, using the realistic nucleon-nucleon potential, and a three- and four-nucleon potential, the Exact Many-Body Nuclear Cluster Model (EMBNCM) was found to give accurate results, that converege much more rapidly, than those obtained by the Faddeev equation calculations. With the use of realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, and many-nucleon potentials, containing strong tensor, Majorana, and repulsive core components, the many-body cluster structure of 16O, 27Al, 44Ti, and 48Ti is discussed. In 27Al(p,x)Na reactions we assume that two different nuclear cluster structures of 27Al, gives us two different isotopes of Na: 22Na and 24Na. But the most important result is the existence of two different permutations symmetries of 27Al. Using new method for calculation of nuclear cluster structure of 27Al, we have found two different nuclear cluster structures of 27Al: 24Na+3He and 25Na+d. The internal nuclear cluster wave functions of different nuclear cluster models (nuclear cluster isomers) of the same isotope are not equivalent, if we take into account Many-Body Nuclear Forces, such as 3BF and 4BF. The core clusters of 16O, 27Al, 44Ti, and 48Ti nuclei have a trigonal-pyramide Td, D2d, and C3v symmetry, while exterior clusters in 16O and 27Al[(24Na +3 He)model] nuclei have a trigonal symmetry C2v, and D3h. We have developed a new system of Jacobi coordinates for our EMBNCM model with the symmetry above. The new computer code for determination of direct nuclear cluster reactions has been written in Mathematica 5 programming language. We have found a high level of dependence of the nuclear cluster wave functions from the center of mass and cluster effects.

  7. New method for calculation of nuclear cluster structure of nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibishi, A. I.

    2005-05-01

    In the calculations of the many-nucleon bound states, using the realistic nucleon-nucleon potential, and a three- and four-nucleon potential, the Exact Many-Body Nuclear Cluster Model (EMBNCM) was found to give accurate results, that converege much more rapidly, than those obtained by the Faddeev equation calculations. With the use of realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, and many-nucleon potentials, containing strong tensor, Majorana, and repulsive core components, the many-body cluster structure of 16O, 27Al, 44Ti, and 48Ti is discussed. In 27Al(p,x)Na reactions we assume that two different nuclear cluster structures of 27Al, gives us two different isotopes of Na: 22Na and 24Na. But the most important result is the existence of two different permutations symmetries of 27Al. Using new method for calculation of nuclear cluster structure of 27Al, we have found two different nuclear cluster structures of 27Al: 24Na+3He and 25Na+d. The internal nuclear cluster wave functions of different nuclear cluster models (nuclear cluster isomers) of the same isotope are not equivalent, if we take into account Many-Body Nuclear Forces, such as 3BF and 4BF. The core clusters of 16O, 27Al, 44Ti, and 48Ti nuclei have a trigonal-pyramide Td, D2d, and C3v symmetry, while exterior clusters in 16O and 27Al[(24Na +3 He)model] nuclei have a trigonal symmetry C2v, and D3h. We have developed a new system of Jacobi coordinates for our EMBNCM model with the symmetry above. The new computer code for determination of direct nuclear cluster reactions has been written in Mathematica 5 programming language. We have found a high level of dependence of the nuclear cluster wave functions from the center of mass and cluster effects.

  8. Hydrocarbon adsorption on gold clusters: Experiment and quantum chemical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanin, S. N.; Pichugina, D. A.; Shestakov, A. F.; Smirnov, V. V.; Nikolaev, S. A.; Lanina, K. S.; Vasil'Kov, A. Yu.; Zung, Fam Tien; Beletskaya, A. V.

    2010-12-01

    Heats of adsorption Q of n-alkanes C6-C9 on ZrO2 modified with gold and nickel nanoparticles were determined experimentally. The Q values were found to be higher on average by 7 kJ/mol on the modified samples as compared to the pure support. Density functional theory with the PBE functional and the pseudopotential for gold effectively allowing for relativistic corrections was used to model the adsorption of saturated hydrocarbons on Au and Au + Ni, as exemplified by the interaction of alkanes C1-C3 with Au m , Au m - 1Ni ( m = 3, 4, 5) clusters as well as the interaction of C1-C8 with Au20. Based on the calculation results, the probable coordination centers of alkanes on nanoparticle surfaces were found to be vertices and edges, whereas face localization was less probable.

  9. Protoribosome by quantum kernel energy method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lulu; Krupkin, Miri; Bashan, Anat; Yonath, Ada; Massa, Lou

    2013-09-10

    Experimental evidence suggests the existence of an RNA molecular prebiotic entity, called by us the "protoribosome," which may have evolved in the RNA world before evolution of the genetic code and proteins. This vestige of the RNA world, which possesses all of the capabilities required for peptide bond formation, seems to be still functioning in the heart of all of the contemporary ribosome. Within the modern ribosome this remnant includes the peptidyl transferase center. Its highly conserved nucleotide sequence is suggestive of its robustness under diverse environmental conditions, and hence on its prebiotic origin. Its twofold pseudosymmetry suggests that this entity could have been a dimer of self-folding RNA units that formed a pocket within which two activated amino acids might be accommodated, similar to the binding mode of modern tRNA molecules that carry amino acids or peptidyl moieties. Using quantum mechanics and crystal coordinates, this work studies the question of whether the putative protoribosome has properties necessary to function as an evolutionary precursor to the modern ribosome. The quantum model used in the calculations is density functional theory--B3LYP/3-21G*, implemented using the kernel energy method to make the computations practical and efficient. It occurs that the necessary conditions that would characterize a practicable protoribosome--namely (i) energetic structural stability and (ii) energetically stable attachment to substrates--are both well satisfied.

  10. Nonperturbative linked-cluster expansions in long-range ordered quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ixert, Dominik; Schmidt, Kai Phillip

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a generic scheme to perform nonperturbative linked cluster expansions in long-range ordered quantum phases. Clusters are considered to be surrounded by an ordered reference state leading to effective edge fields in the exact diagonalization on clusters, which break the associated symmetry of the ordered phase. Two approaches, based either on a self-consistent solution of the order parameter or on minimal sensitivity with respect to the ground-state energy per site, are formulated to find the optimal edge field in each NLCE order. Furthermore, we investigate the scaling behavior of the NLCE data sequences towards the infinite-order limit. We apply our scheme to gapped and gapless ordered phases of XXZ Heisenberg models on various lattices and for spins 1/2 and 1 using several types of cluster expansions ranging from a full-graph decomposition, rectangular clusters, up to more symmetric square clusters. It is found that the inclusion of edge fields allows to regularize nonperturbative linked-cluster expansions in ordered phases yielding convergent data sequences. This includes the long-range spin-ordered ground state of the spin-1/2 and spin-1 Heisenberg model on the square and triangular lattice as well as the trimerized valence bond crystal of the spin-1 Heisenberg model on the kagome lattice.

  11. Clustering PPI data by combining FA and SHC method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Clustering is one of main methods to identify functional modules from protein-protein interaction (PPI) data. Nevertheless traditional clustering methods may not be effective for clustering PPI data. In this paper, we proposed a novel method for clustering PPI data by combining firefly algorithm (FA) and synchronization-based hierarchical clustering (SHC) algorithm. Firstly, the PPI data are preprocessed via spectral clustering (SC) which transforms the high-dimensional similarity matrix into a low dimension matrix. Then the SHC algorithm is used to perform clustering. In SHC algorithm, hierarchical clustering is achieved by enlarging the neighborhood radius of synchronized objects continuously, while the hierarchical search is very difficult to find the optimal neighborhood radius of synchronization and the efficiency is not high. So we adopt the firefly algorithm to determine the optimal threshold of the neighborhood radius of synchronization automatically. The proposed algorithm is tested on the MIPS PPI dataset. The results show that our proposed algorithm is better than the traditional algorithms in precision, recall and f-measure value. PMID:25707632

  12. Clustering PPI data by combining FA and SHC method.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xiujuan; Ying, Chao; Wu, Fang-Xiang; Xu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Clustering is one of main methods to identify functional modules from protein-protein interaction (PPI) data. Nevertheless traditional clustering methods may not be effective for clustering PPI data. In this paper, we proposed a novel method for clustering PPI data by combining firefly algorithm (FA) and synchronization-based hierarchical clustering (SHC) algorithm. Firstly, the PPI data are preprocessed via spectral clustering (SC) which transforms the high-dimensional similarity matrix into a low dimension matrix. Then the SHC algorithm is used to perform clustering. In SHC algorithm, hierarchical clustering is achieved by enlarging the neighborhood radius of synchronized objects continuously, while the hierarchical search is very difficult to find the optimal neighborhood radius of synchronization and the efficiency is not high. So we adopt the firefly algorithm to determine the optimal threshold of the neighborhood radius of synchronization automatically. The proposed algorithm is tested on the MIPS PPI dataset. The results show that our proposed algorithm is better than the traditional algorithms in precision, recall and f-measure value.

  13. An efficient controlled quantum secure direct communication and authentication by using four particle cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanvakenari, Milad; Houshmand, Monireh

    In this paper, a three-party controlled quantum secure direct communication and authentication (QSDCA) protocol is proposed by using four particle cluster states via a quantum one-time pad and local unitary operations. In the present scheme, only under the permission of the controller, the sender and the receiver can implement secure direct communication successfully. But under any circumstances, Charlie cannot obtain the secret message. Eavesdropping detection and identity authentication are achieved with the help of the previously shared reusable base identity strings of users. This protocol is unconditionally secure in both ideal and practical noisy cases. In one transmission, a qubit of each four particle cluster state is used as controller’s permission and the same qubit with another qubit are used to recover two classical bits of information. In the proposed scheme, the efficiency is improved compared with the previous works.

  14. Computer-aided cluster expansion: An efficient algebraic approach for open quantum many-particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, A.; Leymann, H. A. M.; Wiersig, J.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce an equation of motion approach that allows for an approximate evaluation of the time evolution of a quantum system, where the algebraic work to derive the equations of motion is done by the computer. The introduced procedures offer a variety of different types of approximations applicable for finite systems with strong coupling as well as for arbitrary large systems where augmented mean-field theories like the cluster expansion can be applied.

  15. An answer checking method for quantum annealers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Dilina; Novotny, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    We present a generic approach for checking the validity of the solutions returned by quantum annealing devices to aid in the analysis of whether the solution is the true ground state of the desired problem. The underlying principle is to embed a mirrored graph G' of the original graph G, and connect the two graphs via strong ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic couplings that span across the mirror plane. This allows one to dismiss solutions that do not agree with the underlying mirror symmetry inherent to the true ground state of the composite graph. Using a 1000 qubit D-Wave 2X device, we demonstrate this method by applying it to spin glass problems defined on the device's native Chimera architecture.

  16. Toward demonstrating controlled-X operation based on continuous-variable four-partite cluster states and quantum teleporters

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yu; Su Xiaolong; Shen Heng; Tan Aihong; Xie Changde; Peng Kunchi

    2010-02-15

    One-way quantum computation based on measurement and multipartite cluster entanglement offers the ability to perform a variety of unitary operations only through different choices of measurement bases. Here we present an experimental study toward demonstrating the controlled-X operation, a two-mode gate in which continuous variable (CV) four-partite cluster states of optical modes are utilized. Two quantum teleportation elements are used for achieving the gate operation of the quantum state transformation from input target and control states to output states. By means of the optical cluster state prepared off-line, the homodyne detection and electronic feeding forward, the information carried by the input control state is transformed to the output target state. The presented scheme of the controlled-X operation based on teleportation can be implemented nonlocally and deterministically. The distortion of the quantum information resulting from the imperfect cluster entanglement is estimated with the fidelity.

  17. QUANTUM CALCULATIONS OF ENERGETICS OF RHENIUM CLUSTERS IN TUNGSTEN

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-09-22

    Density functional theory was employed to explore the energetic properties of clusters up to size 2 of Re in W. While WW<111> is the most stable intrinsic dumbbell, ReW<110> is more stable than ReW<111>. However, when they are trapped by a substitutional Re (Re_s), ReW<111> becomes more stable than ReW<110>. In this case, the most stable configuration forms a ReWRe crowdion with the W atom in between the Re atoms. Simulations of a ReW[111] (dumbbell’s vector is from Re to W) approaching a Re_s along [111] indicate that the binding energy decreases from 0.83 eV at the first nearest neighbor (NN1) to 0.10 eV at NN3 and ~0 at NN4. In addition, while ReW<111> and ReW<110> are stable near a Re_s at NN1, the ReW<100> instantaneously rotates toward ReW<111>.

  18. Minimal Model of Quantum Kinetic Clusters for the Energy-Transfer Network of a Light-Harvesting Protein Complex.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianlan; Tang, Zhoufei; Gong, Zhihao; Cao, Jianshu; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-04-02

    The energy absorbed in a light-harvesting protein complex is often transferred collectively through aggregated chromophore clusters. For population evolution of chromophores, the time-integrated effective rate matrix allows us to construct quantum kinetic clusters quantitatively and determine the reduced cluster-cluster transfer rates systematically, thus defining a minimal model of energy-transfer kinetics. For Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) and light-havrvesting complex II (LCHII) monomers, quantum Markovian kinetics of clusters can accurately reproduce the overall energy-transfer process in the long-time scale. The dominant energy-transfer pathways are identified in the picture of aggregated clusters. The chromophores distributed extensively in various clusters can assist a fast and long-range energy transfer.

  19. Luminescent, bimetallic AuAg alloy quantum clusters in protein templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Jyoti Sarita; Xavier, P. Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Bootharaju, M. S.; Goswami, N.; Pal, S. K.; Pradeep, T.

    2012-06-01

    We report the synthesis of luminescent AuAg alloy quantum clusters (QCs) in bovine serum albumin (BSA), for the first time, with experimentally determined atomic composition. Mixing of the as-synthesized protein-protected Au and Ag clusters resulted in the formation of alloy AuAg clusters within the BSA. Mass spectrometric analysis of the product of a 1 : 1 molar ratio reaction mixture of AuQC@BSA and AgQC@BSA suggested that the alloy clusters could be Au38-xAgx@BSA. Further analyses by standard techniques revealed that the alloy cluster core of ~1.2 nm diameter is composed of nearly zero valent Au and Ag atoms that exhibit distinctly different steady state and time resolved excited state luminescence profiles compared to the parent clusters. Tuning of the alloy composition was achieved by varying the molar ratio of the parent species in the reaction mixture and compositional changes were observed by mass spectrometry. In another approach, mixing of Au3+ ions with the as-synthesized AgQC@BSA also resulted in the formation of alloy clusters through galvanic exchange reactions. We believe that alloy clusters with the combined properties of the constituents in versatile protein templates would have potential applications in the future. The work presents interesting aspects of the reactivity of the protein-protected clusters.We report the synthesis of luminescent AuAg alloy quantum clusters (QCs) in bovine serum albumin (BSA), for the first time, with experimentally determined atomic composition. Mixing of the as-synthesized protein-protected Au and Ag clusters resulted in the formation of alloy AuAg clusters within the BSA. Mass spectrometric analysis of the product of a 1 : 1 molar ratio reaction mixture of AuQC@BSA and AgQC@BSA suggested that the alloy clusters could be Au38-xAgx@BSA. Further analyses by standard techniques revealed that the alloy cluster core of ~1.2 nm diameter is composed of nearly zero valent Au and Ag atoms that exhibit distinctly different

  20. Preparation of Aun quantum clusters with catalytic activity in β-cyclodextrin polyurethane nanosponges.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Diego Andrade; Kubota, Tatiana; Santos, Douglas C; Araujo, Marcia V G; Teixeira, Zaine; Gimenez, Iara F

    2016-01-20

    Here we report the use of β-cyclodextrin polyurethane nanosponges cross-linked with 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate as a template for the preparation of Aun quantum clusters, by the core-etching of glutathione-capped Au nanoparticles. The study of temporal evolution of the core-etching process using different Au concentrations indicated that formation of Aun clusters embedded in the nanosponge is favored by the use of lower Au concentrations, since it began at shorter times and lead to higher cluster loading. An estimation of the number of Au atoms based on the maximum photoluminescence wavelength suggested that, depending on the Au concentration and the core etching time, clusters with 11-15 atoms were formed. After excluding the possibility of an inclusion complex formation, evaluation of the catalytic activity of nanosponge-loaded Aun clusters toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol has shown that the reaction is catalyzed by the Aun clusters with no induction time, following the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model.

  1. Quantum monte carlo study of the energetics of small hydrogenated and fluoride lithium clusters.

    PubMed

    Moreira, N L; Brito, B G A; Rabelo, J N Teixeira; Cândido, Ladir

    2016-06-30

    An investigation of the energetics of small lithium clusters doped either with a hydrogen or with a fluorine atom as a function of the number of lithium atoms using fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) simulation is reported. It is found that the binding energy (BE) for the doped clusters increases in absolute values leading to a more stable system than for the pure ones in excellent agreement with available experimental measurements. The BE increases for pure, remains almost constant for hydrogenated, and decreases rapidly toward the bulk lithium for the fluoride as a function of the number of lithium atoms in the clusters. The BE, dissociation energy as well as the second difference in energy display a pronounced odd-even oscillation with the number of lithium atoms. The electron correlation inverts the odd-even oscillation pattern for the doped in comparison with the pure clusters and has an impact of 29%-83% to the BE being higher in the pure cluster followed by the hydrogenated and then by the fluoride. The dissociation energy and the second difference in energy indicate that the doped cluster Li3 H is the most stable whereas among the pure ones the more stable are Li2 , Li4 , and Li6 . The electron correlation energy is crucial for the stabilization of Li3 H. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Controlled placement of colloidal quantum dots in sub-15 nm clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfrinato, Vitor R.; Wanger, Darcy D.; Strasfeld, David B.; Han, Hee-Sun; Marsili, Francesco; Arrieta, Jose P.; Mentzel, Tamar S.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Berggren, Karl K.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrated a technique to control the placement of 6 nm-diameter CdSe and 5 nm-diameter CdSe/CdZnS colloidal quantum dots (QDs) through electron-beam lithography. This QD-placement technique resulted in an average of three QDs in each cluster, and 87% of the templated sites were occupied by at least one QD. These QD clusters could be in close proximity to one another, with a minimum separation of 12 nm. Photoluminescence measurements of the fabricated QD clusters showed intermittent photoluminescence, which indicates that the QDs were optically active after the fabrication process. This optimized top-down lithographic process is a step towards the integration of individual QDs in optoelectronic and nano-optical systems.

  3. Controlled placement of colloidal quantum dots in sub-15 nm clusters.

    PubMed

    Manfrinato, Vitor R; Wanger, Darcy D; Strasfeld, David B; Han, Hee-Sun; Marsili, Francesco; Arrieta, Jose P; Mentzel, Tamar S; Bawendi, Moungi G; Berggren, Karl K

    2013-03-29

    We demonstrated a technique to control the placement of 6 nm-diameter CdSe and 5 nm-diameter CdSe/CdZnS colloidal quantum dots (QDs) through electron-beam lithography. This QD-placement technique resulted in an average of three QDs in each cluster, and 87% of the templated sites were occupied by at least one QD. These QD clusters could be in close proximity to one another, with a minimum separation of 12 nm. Photoluminescence measurements of the fabricated QD clusters showed intermittent photoluminescence, which indicates that the QDs were optically active after the fabrication process. This optimized top-down lithographic process is a step towards the integration of individual QDs in optoelectronic and nano-optical systems.

  4. Lieb-Liniger-like model of quantum solvation in CO-4HeN clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrelly, D.; Iñarrea, M.; Lanchares, V.; Salas, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    Small 4He clusters doped with various molecules allow for the study of "quantum solvation" as a function of cluster size. A peculiarity of quantum solvation is that, as the number of 4He atoms is increased from N = 1, the solvent appears to decouple from the molecule which, in turn, appears to undergo free rotation. This is generally taken to signify the onset of "microscopic superfluidity." Currently, little is known about the quantum mechanics of the decoupling mechanism, mainly because the system is a quantum (N + 1)-body problem in three dimensions which makes computations difficult. Here, a one-dimensional model is studied in which the 4He atoms are confined to revolve on a ring and encircle a rotating CO molecule. The Lanczos algorithm is used to investigate the eigenvalue spectrum as the number of 4He atoms is varied. Substantial solvent decoupling is observed for as few as N = 5 4He atoms. Examination of the Hamiltonian matrix, which has an almost block diagonal structure, reveals increasingly weak inter-block (solvent-molecule) coupling as the number of 4He atoms is increased. In the absence of a dopant molecule the system is similar to a Lieb-Liniger (LL) gas and we find a relatively rapid transition to the LL limit as N is increased. In essence, the molecule initially—for very small N—provides a central, if relatively weak, attraction to organize the cluster; as more 4He atoms are added, the repulsive interactions between the identical bosons start to dominate as the solvation ring (shell) becomes more crowded which causes the molecule to start to decouple. For low N, the molecule pins the atoms in place relative to itself; as N increases the atom-atom repulsion starts to dominate the Hamiltonian and the molecule decouples. We conclude that, while the notion of superfluidity is a useful and correct description of the decoupling process, a molecular viewpoint provides complementary insights into the quantum mechanism of the transition from a molecular

  5. Lieb-Liniger-like model of quantum solvation in CO-(4)HeN clusters.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, D; Iñarrea, M; Lanchares, V; Salas, J P

    2016-05-28

    Small (4)He clusters doped with various molecules allow for the study of "quantum solvation" as a function of cluster size. A peculiarity of quantum solvation is that, as the number of (4)He atoms is increased from N = 1, the solvent appears to decouple from the molecule which, in turn, appears to undergo free rotation. This is generally taken to signify the onset of "microscopic superfluidity." Currently, little is known about the quantum mechanics of the decoupling mechanism, mainly because the system is a quantum (N + 1)-body problem in three dimensions which makes computations difficult. Here, a one-dimensional model is studied in which the (4)He atoms are confined to revolve on a ring and encircle a rotating CO molecule. The Lanczos algorithm is used to investigate the eigenvalue spectrum as the number of (4)He atoms is varied. Substantial solvent decoupling is observed for as few as N = 5 (4)He atoms. Examination of the Hamiltonian matrix, which has an almost block diagonal structure, reveals increasingly weak inter-block (solvent-molecule) coupling as the number of (4)He atoms is increased. In the absence of a dopant molecule the system is similar to a Lieb-Liniger (LL) gas and we find a relatively rapid transition to the LL limit as N is increased. In essence, the molecule initially-for very small N-provides a central, if relatively weak, attraction to organize the cluster; as more (4)He atoms are added, the repulsive interactions between the identical bosons start to dominate as the solvation ring (shell) becomes more crowded which causes the molecule to start to decouple. For low N, the molecule pins the atoms in place relative to itself; as N increases the atom-atom repulsion starts to dominate the Hamiltonian and the molecule decouples. We conclude that, while the notion of superfluidity is a useful and correct description of the decoupling process, a molecular viewpoint provides complementary insights into the quantum mechanism of the transition from a

  6. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Hadron clusters and half-dressed particles in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feĭnberg, E. L.

    1980-10-01

    Accelerator experiments show that multiple production of hadrons in high-energy collisions of particles involves the formation of unstable intermediate entities, which subsequently decay into the final hadrons. These entities are apparently not only the comparatively light resonances with which we are already familiar but also heavy nonresonant clusters (with a mass above 2-5 GeV). The cluster concept was introduced previously in cosmic-ray physics, under the name "fireballs". To determine what these clusters are from the standpoint of quantum field theory, a detailed and thorough analysis is made of some analogous processes in quantum electrodynamics which are amenable to calculation. The QED analogs of the nonresonant clusters are "half-dressed" electrons and heavy photons. The half-dressed electrons decay into photons and electrons and are completely observable entities, whose interaction properties distinguish them from dressed electrons. In other words, the nonresonant particles are generally off-shell particles (the excursion from the mass shell is in the timelike direction). The assumption that hadron clusters are only resonances would be equivalent to a very specialized assumption regarding the nature of the spectral function of the hadron propagator; it would be different from that in electrodynamics, where the spectral function can be calculated. Nonresonant hadron clusters thus fit naturally into hadron field theory and are nonequilibrium hadrons far from the mass shell in the timelike direction. (In certain cases, their structural distortion is of the same nature as that of a half-dressed electron, so that this term can be conventionally applied to them as well.

  7. An Automated Method for Characterizing the Relaxedness of Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    George, Matt; /Harvard Coll. Observ. /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    Relaxed galaxy clusters are useful tools for probing cosmological parameters like the gas mass fraction of the universe. Selecting relaxed clusters for this purpose can be a time-consuming and subjective task, so we present methods to automate parts of the process. We fit elliptical isophotes to a diverse sample of Chandra cluster data and summarize other methods for quantifying relaxedness which will be included in future work. Analysis of the results of tests from isophote fitting, combined with numerical simulations of cluster structures and comparison to previous classifications will allow us to formulate criteria for selection of relaxed clusters. We find that they tend to have core radii less than approximately 60 kpc from King model fits, shifts in isophote centroids of less than 25 kpc over a range in semi-major axes of several hundred kpc, and significantly greater surface brightness profile gradients within 30 kpc of their cores than unrelaxed clusters. These criteria will help with future cosmological work as larger amounts of cluster data are taken and need objective classification.

  8. A liquid drop model for embedded atom method cluster energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, C. W.; Abel, P. B.; Ferrante, J.

    1996-01-01

    Minimum energy configurations for homonuclear clusters containing from two to twenty-two atoms of six metals, Ag, Au, Cu, Ni, Pd, and Pt have been calculated using the Embedded Atom Method (EAM). The average energy per atom as a function of cluster size has been fit to a liquid drop model, giving estimates of the surface and curvature energies. The liquid drop model gives a good representation of the relationship between average energy and cluster size. As a test the resulting surface energies are compared to EAM surface energy calculations for various low-index crystal faces with reasonable agreement.

  9. The Complementary Use of Cluster and Factor Analysis Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Bernard S.; Primavera, Louis H.

    1983-01-01

    Factor and cluster analyses are distinctly different multivariate procedures with different goals. However, when used in a complementary fashion, each set of methods can be used to enhance the interpretation of results found in the other set of methods. Simple examples illustrating the joint use of the methods are provided. (Author)

  10. Method and apparatus for the production of cluster ions

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Lewis; Beuhler, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the production of cluster ions, and preferably isotopic hydrogen cluster ions is disclosed. A gas, preferably comprising a carrier gas and a substrate gas, is cooled to about its boiling point and expanded through a supersonic nozzle into a region maintained at a low pressure. Means are provided for the generation of a plasma in the gas before or just as it enters the nozzle.

  11. Method and apparatus for the production of cluster ions

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, L.; Beuhler, R.J.

    A method and apparatus for the production of cluster ions, and preferably isotopic hydrogen cluster ions is disclosed. A gas, preferably comprising a carrier gas and a substrate gas, is cooled to about its boiling point and expanded through a supersonic nozzle into a region maintained at a low pressure. Means are provided for the generation of a plasma in the gas before or just as it enters the nozzle.

  12. The influence of silver ion exchange on the formation and luminescent properties of lead sulfide molecular clusters and quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdrshin, A. N.; Lipatova, Zh. O.; Kolobkova, E. V.; Sgibnev, E. M.; Nikonorov, N. V.

    2016-12-01

    PbS molecular clusters and quantum dots are formed by heat treatment in fluorophosphate glasses of the Na2O3-P2O5-Ga2O3-AlF3-ZnO(S)-PbF2 system with different lead concentrations. PbS molecular clusters are characterized by optical absorption in the range of 300-800 nm and low quantum yields, which decrease from 8.9 to 2.7% with a semiconductor component concentration. It is shown that the parameters of formation of quantum dots luminescing in the wavelength range of 1000-1500 nm are considerably different at different semiconductor component concentrations. The influence of silver ion exchange on the formation of PbS nanoparticles is studied. Introduction of silver stimulates the growth of molecular clusters, which is seen in the absorption spectra. A possible mechanism of interaction of silver nanoparticles with PbS quantum dots is presented.

  13. Mass spectrometric and quantum chemical determination of proton water clustering equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likholyot, Alexander; Lemke, Kono H.; Hovey, Jamey K.; Seward, Terry M.

    2007-05-01

    We report on the thermochemistry of proton hydration by water in the gas phase both experimentally using high-pressure mass spectrometry (HPMS) and theoretically using multilevel G3, G3B3, CBS-Q, CBS-QB3, CBS/QCI-APNO as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Gas phase hydration enthalpies and entropies for protonated water cluster equilibria with up to 7 waters (i.e., n ⩽ 7H 3O +·(H 2O) n) were observed and exhibited non-monotonic behavior for successive hydration steps as well as enthalpy and entropy anomalies at higher cluster rank numbers. In particular, there is a significant jump in the stepwise enthalpies and entropies of cluster formation for n varying from 6 to 8. This behavior can be successfully interpreted using cluster geometries obtained from quantum chemical calculations by considering the number of additional hydrogen bonds formed at each hydration step and simultaneous weakening of ion-solvent interaction with increasing cluster size. The measured total hydration energy for the attachment of the first six water molecules around the hydronium ion was found to account for more than 60% of total bulk hydration free energy.

  14. Structural properties of methanol-water binary mixtures within the quantum cluster equilibrium model.

    PubMed

    Matisz, G; Kelterer, A-M; Fabian, W M F; Kunsági-Máté, S

    2015-04-07

    Density functional theory (B3LYP-D3, M06-2X) has been used to calculate the structures, interaction energies and vibrational frequencies of a set of 93 methanol-water clusters of different type (cubic, ring, spiro, lasso, bicyclic), size and composition. These interaction energies have been used within the framework of the Quantum Cluster Equilibrium Theory (QCE) to calculate cluster populations as well as thermodynamic properties of binary methanol-water mixtures spanning the whole range from pure water to pure methanol. The necessary parameters amf and bxv of the QCE model were obtained by fitting to experimental isobars of MeOH-H2O mixtures with different MeOH content. The cubic and spiro motifs dominate the distribution of methanol-water clusters in the mixtures with a maximum of mixed clusters at x(MeOH) = 0.365. Reasonable agreement with experimental data as well as earlier molecular dynamics simulations was found for excess enthalpies H(E), entropies S(E) as well as Gibbs free energies of mixing G(E). In contrast, heat capacities Cp and C showed only poor agreement with experimental data.

  15. Fluorescence Imaging Assisted Photodynamic Therapy Using Photosensitizer-Linked Gold Quantum Clusters.

    PubMed

    Nair, Lakshmi V; Nazeer, Shaiju S; Jayasree, Ramapurath S; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2015-06-23

    Fluorescence imaging assisted photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a viable two-in-one clinical tool for cancer treatment and follow-up. While the surface plasmon effect of gold nanorods and nanoparticles has been effective for cancer therapy, their emission properties when compared to gold nanoclusters are weak for fluorescence imaging guided PDT. In order to address the above issues, we have synthesized a near-infrared-emitting gold quantum cluster capped with lipoic acid (L-AuC with (Au)18(L)14) based nanoplatform with excellent tumor reduction property by incorporating a tumor-targeting agent (folic acid) and a photosensitizer (protoporphyrin IX), for selective PDT. The synthesized quantum cluster based photosensitizer PFL-AuC showed 80% triplet quantum yield when compared to that of the photosensitizer alone (63%). PFL-AuC having 60 μg (0.136 mM) of protoporphyrin IX was sufficient to kill 50% of the tumor cell population. Effective destruction of tumor cells was evident from the histopathology and fluorescence imaging, which confirm the in vivo PDT efficacy of PFL-AuC.

  16. Light clusters in nuclear matter: Excluded volume versus quantum many-body approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen; Typel, Stefan; Röpke, Gerd

    2011-11-01

    The formation of clusters in nuclear matter is investigated, which occurs, e.g., in low-energy heavy-ion collisions or core-collapse supernovae. In astrophysical applications, the excluded volume concept is commonly used for the description of light clusters. Here we compare a phenomenological excluded volume approach to two quantum many-body models, the quantum statistical model and the generalized relativistic mean-field model. All three models contain bound states of nuclei with mass number A≤4. It is explored to which extent the complex medium effects can be mimicked by the simpler excluded volume model, regarding the chemical composition and thermodynamic variables. Furthermore, the role of heavy nuclei and excited states is investigated by use of the excluded volume model. At temperatures of a few MeV the excluded volume model gives a poor description of the medium effects on the light clusters, but there the composition is actually dominated by heavy nuclei. At larger temperatures there is a rather good agreement, whereas some smaller differences and model dependencies remain.

  17. Theory of the vortex-clustering transition in a confined two-dimensional quantum fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaoquan; Billam, Thomas P.; Nian, Jun; Reeves, Matthew T.; Bradley, Ashton S.

    2016-08-01

    Clustering of like-sign vortices in a planar bounded domain is known to occur at negative temperature, a phenomenon that Onsager demonstrated to be a consequence of bounded phase space. In a confined superfluid, quantized vortices can support such an ordered phase, provided they evolve as an almost isolated subsystem containing sufficient energy. A detailed theoretical understanding of the statistical mechanics of such states thus requires a microcanonical approach. Here we develop an analytical theory of the vortex clustering transition in a neutral system of quantum vortices confined to a two-dimensional disk geometry, within the microcanonical ensemble. The choice of ensemble is essential for identifying the correct thermodynamic limit of the system, enabling a rigorous description of clustering in the language of critical phenomena. As the system energy increases above a critical value, the system develops global order via the emergence of a macroscopic dipole structure from the homogeneous phase of vortices, spontaneously breaking the Z2 symmetry associated with invariance under vortex circulation exchange, and the rotational SO (2 ) symmetry due to the disk geometry. The dipole structure emerges characterized by the continuous growth of the macroscopic dipole moment which serves as a global order parameter, resembling a continuous phase transition. The critical temperature of the transition, and the critical exponent associated with the dipole moment, are obtained exactly within mean-field theory. The clustering transition is shown to be distinct from the final state reached at high energy, known as supercondensation. The dipole moment develops via two macroscopic vortex clusters and the cluster locations are found analytically, both near the clustering transition and in the supercondensation limit. The microcanonical theory shows excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, and signatures of the transition are apparent even for a modest system of 100

  18. The secret of dimethyl sulfoxide-water mixtures. A quantum chemical study of 1DMSO-nwater clusters.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Barbara; Reiher, Markus

    2002-05-29

    DMSO-water mixtures exhibit a marked freezing point depression, reaching close to 60 K at n(DMSO) = 0.33. The phase diagram indicates that stable DMSO-water clusters may be responsible for this phenomenon. Using time-independent quantum chemical methods, we investigate possible candidates for stable supermolecules at mole fractions n(DMSO) = 0.25 and 0.33. The model clusters are built by adding various numbers of water molecules to a single DMSO molecule. Structures and interaction energetics are discussed in the light of experimental and theoretical results from the literature. A comparison with results from molecular dynamics simulations is of particular interest. Our optimized structures are spatially very different from those previously identified through MD simulations. To identify the structural patterns characterizing the clusters, we classify them on the basis of hydrogen-acceptor interactions. These are well separated on an interaction energy scale. For the hydrophobic interactions of the methyl groups with water, attractive interactions of up to 8 kJ/mol are found. In forming clusters corresponding to a range of different mole fractions, up to four water molecules are added to each DMSO molecule. This corresponds to a rough local model of solvation. Examination of the trends in the interactions indicates that the methyl-water interaction becomes more important upon solvation. Finally, we investigate how the clusters interact and attempt to explain which role is played by the various structures and their intercluster interaction modes in the freezing behavior of DMSO-water.

  19. Quantum Cloning of an Unknown 2-Atom State via Entangled Cluster States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.-z.; Zhong, F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presented a scheme for cloning a 2-atom state in the QED cavity with the help of Victor who is the state's preparer. The cloning scheme has two steps. In the first step, the scheme requires probabilistic teleportation of a 2-atom state that is unknown in advance, and uses a 4-atom cluster state as quantum channel. In the second step, perfect copies of the 2-atom entangled state may be realized with the assistance of Victor. The finding is that our scheme has two outstanding advantages: it is not sensitive to the cavity decay, and Bell state is easy to identify.

  20. Bipartite quantum channels using multipartite cluster-type entangled coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Munhoz, P. P.; Semiao, F. L.; Roversi, J. A.; Vidiella-Barranco, A.

    2010-04-15

    We propose a particular encoding for bipartite entangled states derived from multipartite cluster-type entangled coherent states (CTECSs). We investigate the effects of amplitude damping on the entanglement content of this bipartite state, as well as its usefulness as a quantum channel for teleportation. We find interesting relationships among the amplitude of the coherent states constituting the CTECSs, the number of subsystems forming the logical qubits (redundancy), and the extent to which amplitude damping affects the entanglement of the channel. For instance, in the sense of sudden death of entanglement, given a fixed value of the initial coherent state amplitude, the entanglement life span is shortened if redundancy is increased.

  1. Entanglement percolation on a quantum internet with scale-free and clustering characters

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Liang; Zhu Shiqun

    2011-11-15

    The applicability of entanglement percolation protocol to real Internet structure is investigated. If the current Internet can be used directly in the quantum regime, the protocol can provide a way to establish long-distance entanglement when the links are pure nonmaximally entangled states. This applicability is primarily due to the combination of scale-free degree distribution and a high level of clustering, both of which are widely observed in many natural and artificial networks including the current Internet. It suggests that the topology of real Internet may play an important role in entanglement establishment.

  2. Vortex clustering and universal scaling laws in two-dimensional quantum turbulence.

    PubMed

    Skaugen, Audun; Angheluta, Luiza

    2016-03-01

    We investigate numerically the statistics of quantized vortices in two-dimensional quantum turbulence using the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We find that a universal -5/3 scaling law in the turbulent energy spectrum is intimately connected with the vortex statistics, such as number fluctuations and vortex velocity, which is also characterized by a similar scaling behavior. The -5/3 scaling law appearing in the power spectrum of vortex number fluctuations is consistent with the scenario of passive advection of isolated vortices by a turbulent superfluid velocity generated by like-signed vortex clusters. The velocity probability distribution of clustered vortices is also sensitive to spatial configurations, and exhibits a power-law tail distribution with a -5/3 exponent.

  3. Agent-based method for distributed clustering of textual information

    DOEpatents

    Potok, Thomas E [Oak Ridge, TN; Reed, Joel W [Knoxville, TN; Elmore, Mark T [Oak Ridge, TN; Treadwell, Jim N [Louisville, TN

    2010-09-28

    A computer method and system for storing, retrieving and displaying information has a multiplexing agent (20) that calculates a new document vector (25) for a new document (21) to be added to the system and transmits the new document vector (25) to master cluster agents (22) and cluster agents (23) for evaluation. These agents (22, 23) perform the evaluation and return values upstream to the multiplexing agent (20) based on the similarity of the document to documents stored under their control. The multiplexing agent (20) then sends the document (21) and the document vector (25) to the master cluster agent (22), which then forwards it to a cluster agent (23) or creates a new cluster agent (23) to manage the document (21). The system also searches for stored documents according to a search query having at least one term and identifying the documents found in the search, and displays the documents in a clustering display (80) of similarity so as to indicate similarity of the documents to each other.

  4. Cluster Monte Carlo methods for the FePt Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyberatos, A.; Parker, G. J.

    2016-02-01

    Cluster Monte Carlo methods for the classical spin Hamiltonian of FePt with long range exchange interactions are presented. We use a combination of the Swendsen-Wang (or Wolff) and Metropolis algorithms that satisfies the detailed balance condition and ergodicity. The algorithms are tested by calculating the temperature dependence of the magnetization, susceptibility and heat capacity of L10-FePt nanoparticles in a range including the critical region. The cluster models yield numerical results in good agreement within statistical error with the standard single-spin flipping Monte Carlo method. The variation of the spin autocorrelation time with grain size is used to deduce the dynamic exponent of the algorithms. Our cluster models do not provide a more accurate estimate of the magnetic properties at equilibrium.

  5. A Quantum-Based Similarity Method in Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Al-Dabbagh, Mohammed Mumtaz; Salim, Naomie; Himmat, Mubarak; Ahmed, Ali; Saeed, Faisal

    2015-10-02

    One of the most widely-used techniques for ligand-based virtual screening is similarity searching. This study adopted the concepts of quantum mechanics to present as state-of-the-art similarity method of molecules inspired from quantum theory. The representation of molecular compounds in mathematical quantum space plays a vital role in the development of quantum-based similarity approach. One of the key concepts of quantum theory is the use of complex numbers. Hence, this study proposed three various techniques to embed and to re-represent the molecular compounds to correspond with complex numbers format. The quantum-based similarity method that developed in this study depending on complex pure Hilbert space of molecules called Standard Quantum-Based (SQB). The recall of retrieved active molecules were at top 1% and top 5%, and significant test is used to evaluate our proposed methods. The MDL drug data report (MDDR), maximum unbiased validation (MUV) and Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD) data sets were used for experiments and were represented by 2D fingerprints. Simulated virtual screening experiment show that the effectiveness of SQB method was significantly increased due to the role of representational power of molecular compounds in complex numbers forms compared to Tanimoto benchmark similarity measure.

  6. Select and Cluster: A Method for Finding Functional Networks of Clustered Voxels in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    DonGiovanni, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Extracting functional connectivity patterns among cortical regions in fMRI datasets is a challenge stimulating the development of effective data-driven or model based techniques. Here, we present a novel data-driven method for the extraction of significantly connected functional ROIs directly from the preprocessed fMRI data without relying on a priori knowledge of the expected activations. This method finds spatially compact groups of voxels which show a homogeneous pattern of significant connectivity with other regions in the brain. The method, called Select and Cluster (S&C), consists of two steps: first, a dimensionality reduction step based on a blind multiresolution pairwise correlation by which the subset of all cortical voxels with significant mutual correlation is selected and the second step in which the selected voxels are grouped into spatially compact and functionally homogeneous ROIs by means of a Support Vector Clustering (SVC) algorithm. The S&C method is described in detail. Its performance assessed on simulated and experimental fMRI data is compared to other methods commonly used in functional connectivity analyses, such as Independent Component Analysis (ICA) or clustering. S&C method simplifies the extraction of functional networks in fMRI by identifying automatically spatially compact groups of voxels (ROIs) involved in whole brain scale activation networks. PMID:27656202

  7. Exciton-plasmon interaction in hybrid quantum dot/metal cluster structures fabricated by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyamkina, A. A.; Moshchenko, S. P.; Dmitriev, D. V.; Toropov, A. I.; Shamirzaev, T. S.

    2014-04-01

    Hybrid structures consisting of InAs/AlGaAs quantum dots and In clusters on the surface separated by an AlGaAs spacer with a specified thickness are investigated. The enhancement of the photoluminescence signal in the long-wavelength region manifesting itself in the appearance of a new narrow emission line is observed. This line is absent in the control structure with a quantum-dot array and no metal clusters. It also disappears with increasing thickness of the dielectric spacer between the layers. These results are explained in terms of a model taking into account the resonance interaction of excitons in quantum dots with localized surface plasmons in metal clusters.

  8. Efficient method for transport simulations in quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maczka, Mariusz; Pawlowski, Stanislaw

    2016-12-01

    An efficient method for simulating quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers is presented. The calculations are performed within a simple approximation inspired by Büttiker probes and based on a finite model for semiconductor superlattices. The formalism of non-equilibrium Green's functions is applied to determine the selected transport parameters in a typical structure of a terahertz laser. Results were compared with those obtained for a infinite model as well as other methods described in literature.

  9. Exciton photoluminescence and energy in a percolation cluster of ZnSe quantum dots as a fractal object

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, N. V. Brodyn, M. S.

    2012-05-15

    The results of studies of samples containing ZnSe quantum dots with a density corresponding to or considerably higher than the exciton percolation threshold, at which quantum dots form conglomerates, are reported. Excitonic emission from a percolation cluster of bound quantum dots as a fractal object is observed for the first time. Analysis of the structure of the photoluminescence spectra shows that the spectra are determined by the contribution of exciton states that belong to different structural elements of the percolation cluster, specifically, to the skeleton (backbone), dangling (dead) ends, and internal hollow spaces. A qualitative model is proposed to interpret the dependence of the exciton energy in these structural elements on the concentration of quantum dots in the material.

  10. Clustering Methods with Qualitative Data: a Mixed-Methods Approach for Prevention Research with Small Samples.

    PubMed

    Henry, David; Dymnicki, Allison B; Mohatt, Nathaniel; Allen, James; Kelly, James G

    2015-10-01

    Qualitative methods potentially add depth to prevention research but can produce large amounts of complex data even with small samples. Studies conducted with culturally distinct samples often produce voluminous qualitative data but may lack sufficient sample sizes for sophisticated quantitative analysis. Currently lacking in mixed-methods research are methods allowing for more fully integrating qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques. Cluster analysis can be applied to coded qualitative data to clarify the findings of prevention studies by aiding efforts to reveal such things as the motives of participants for their actions and the reasons behind counterintuitive findings. By clustering groups of participants with similar profiles of codes in a quantitative analysis, cluster analysis can serve as a key component in mixed-methods research. This article reports two studies. In the first study, we conduct simulations to test the accuracy of cluster assignment using three different clustering methods with binary data as produced when coding qualitative interviews. Results indicated that hierarchical clustering, K-means clustering, and latent class analysis produced similar levels of accuracy with binary data and that the accuracy of these methods did not decrease with samples as small as 50. Whereas the first study explores the feasibility of using common clustering methods with binary data, the second study provides a "real-world" example using data from a qualitative study of community leadership connected with a drug abuse prevention project. We discuss the implications of this approach for conducting prevention research, especially with small samples and culturally distinct communities.

  11. Galaxy cluster center detection methods with weak lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simet, Melanie

    The precise location of galaxy cluster centers is a persistent problem in weak lensing mass estimates and in interpretations of clusters in a cosmological context. In this work, we test methods of centroid determination from weak lensing data and examine the effects of such self-calibration on the measured masses. Drawing on lensing data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82, a 275 square degree region of coadded data in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with a catalog of MaxBCG clusters, we show that halo substructure as well as shape noise and stochasticity in galaxy positions limit the precision of such a self-calibration (in the context of Stripe 82, to ˜ 500 h-1 kpc or larger) and bias the mass estimates around these points to a level that is likely unacceptable for the purposes of making cosmological measurements. We also project the usefulness of this technique in future surveys.

  12. Fast synthesize ZnO quantum dots via ultrasonic method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weimin; Zhang, Bing; Ding, Nan; Ding, Wenhao; Wang, Lixi; Yu, Mingxun; Zhang, Qitu

    2016-05-01

    Green emission ZnO quantum dots were synthesized by an ultrasonic sol-gel method. The ZnO quantum dots were synthesized in various ultrasonic temperature and time. Photoluminescence properties of these ZnO quantum dots were measured. Time-resolved photoluminescence decay spectra were also taken to discover the change of defects amount during the reaction. Both ultrasonic temperature and time could affect the type and amount of defects in ZnO quantum dots. Total defects of ZnO quantum dots decreased with the increasing of ultrasonic temperature and time. The dangling bonds defects disappeared faster than the optical defects. Types of optical defects first changed from oxygen interstitial defects to oxygen vacancy and zinc interstitial defects. Then transformed back to oxygen interstitial defects again. The sizes of ZnO quantum dots would be controlled by both ultrasonic temperature and time as well. That is, with the increasing of ultrasonic temperature and time, the sizes of ZnO quantum dots first decreased then increased. Moreover, concentrated raw materials solution brought larger sizes and more optical defects of ZnO quantum dots.

  13. Quantum Imaging: New Methods and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-23

    Rochester and Jon Dowling of LSU. Quantum information science has made great strides over the last two decades. Motivated by technologies that... Barnett , S. Franke- Arnold, and M.J. Padgett, “Fourier Relation between the Angle and Angular Momentum for Entangled Photons,“ Phys. Rev. A 78...Romero, M. Ritsch-Marte, R. W. Boyd, A. K. Jha, S. M. Barnett , S. Franke-Arnold, and M. J. Padgett, “Violation of a Bell inequality in two-dimensional

  14. Quantum Cluster Equilibrium Theory Applied in Hydrogen Bond Number Studies of Water. 2. Icebergs in a Two-Dimensional Water Continuum?

    PubMed

    Lehmann, S B C; Spickermann, C; Kirchner, B

    2009-06-09

    With the aid of the quantum cluster equilibrium method, we calculate thermodynamic properties for a new water cluster set containing 2-fold and additional tetrahedrally hydrogen-bonded water molecules on the basis of accurate correlated electronic structure calculations. The addition of clusters with 4-fold coordinated water molecules leads to an improved thermodynamical description of the liquid phase in comparison to experimental values. The comparison of the obtained isobars from the pure 2-fold cluster set with the mixed cluster set shows improved results for the mixed set. Furthermore, the results of the liquid-phase entropy calculation compare excellently with experiment if the mixed cluster set is applied. The calculated populations allow us to determine hydrogen bond numbers, resulting in a temperature-dependent average hydrogen bond number. We observe a decreasing average hydrogen bond number of 2.77 at 274 K to 2.26 at 373 K and a dominance of 75% 2-fold hydrogen-bonded water molecules at room temperature for the mixed cluster set.

  15. Method of preparing size-selected metal clusters

    DOEpatents

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stair, Peter C.

    2010-05-11

    The invention provides a method for depositing catalytic clusters on a surface, the method comprising confining the surface to a controlled atmosphere; contacting the surface with catalyst containing vapor for a first period of time; removing the vapor from the controlled atmosphere; and contacting the surface with a reducing agent for a second period of time so as to produce catalyst-containing nucleation sites.

  16. Investigation of quantum confinement behavior of zinc sulphide quantum dots synthesized via various chemical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, Meera Sakthivel, T. Chandran, Hrisheekesh T. Nivea, R. Gunasekaran, V.

    2014-10-15

    In this work, undoped and Ag-doped ZnS quantum dots were synthesized using various chemical methods. The products were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible spectroscopy and Photoluminescence spectroscopy. Our results revealed that the size of the as-prepared samples range from 1–6 nm in diameter and have a cubic zinc-blende structure. Also, we observed the emission of different wavelength of light from different sized quantum dots of the same material due to quantum confinement effect. The results will be presented in detail and ZnS can be a potential candidate for optical device development and applications.

  17. Distinguishing Functional DNA Words; A Method for Measuring Clustering Levels

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddasi, Hanieh; Khalifeh, Khosrow; Darooneh, Amir Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Functional DNA sub-sequences and genome elements are spatially clustered through the genome just as keywords in literary texts. Therefore, some of the methods for ranking words in texts can also be used to compare different DNA sub-sequences. In analogy with the literary texts, here we claim that the distribution of distances between the successive sub-sequences (words) is q-exponential which is the distribution function in non-extensive statistical mechanics. Thus the q-parameter can be used as a measure of words clustering levels. Here, we analyzed the distribution of distances between consecutive occurrences of 16 possible dinucleotides in human chromosomes to obtain their corresponding q-parameters. We found that CG as a biologically important two-letter word concerning its methylation, has the highest clustering level. This finding shows the predicting ability of the method in biology. We also proposed that chromosome 18 with the largest value of q-parameter for promoters of genes is more sensitive to dietary and lifestyle. We extended our study to compare the genome of some selected organisms and concluded that the clustering level of CGs increases in higher evolutionary organisms compared to lower ones. PMID:28128320

  18. Distinguishing Functional DNA Words; A Method for Measuring Clustering Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddasi, Hanieh; Khalifeh, Khosrow; Darooneh, Amir Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Functional DNA sub-sequences and genome elements are spatially clustered through the genome just as keywords in literary texts. Therefore, some of the methods for ranking words in texts can also be used to compare different DNA sub-sequences. In analogy with the literary texts, here we claim that the distribution of distances between the successive sub-sequences (words) is q-exponential which is the distribution function in non-extensive statistical mechanics. Thus the q-parameter can be used as a measure of words clustering levels. Here, we analyzed the distribution of distances between consecutive occurrences of 16 possible dinucleotides in human chromosomes to obtain their corresponding q-parameters. We found that CG as a biologically important two-letter word concerning its methylation, has the highest clustering level. This finding shows the predicting ability of the method in biology. We also proposed that chromosome 18 with the largest value of q-parameter for promoters of genes is more sensitive to dietary and lifestyle. We extended our study to compare the genome of some selected organisms and concluded that the clustering level of CGs increases in higher evolutionary organisms compared to lower ones.

  19. An improved unsupervised clustering-based intrusion detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Yong J.; Wu, Yu; Wang, Guo Y.

    2005-03-01

    Practical Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs) based on data mining are facing two key problems, discovering intrusion knowledge from real-time network data, and automatically updating them when new intrusions appear. Most data mining algorithms work on labeled data. In order to set up basic data set for mining, huge volumes of network data need to be collected and labeled manually. In fact, it is rather difficult and impractical to label intrusions, which has been a big restrict for current IDSs and has led to limited ability of identifying all kinds of intrusion types. An improved unsupervised clustering-based intrusion model working on unlabeled training data is introduced. In this model, center of a cluster is defined and used as substitution of this cluster. Then all cluster centers are adopted to detect intrusions. Testing on data sets of KDDCUP"99, experimental results demonstrate that our method has good performance in detection rate. Furthermore, the incremental-learning method is adopted to detect those unknown-type intrusions and it decreases false positive rate.

  20. Self-organized formation of quantum dots of a material on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Wendelken, John F.; Chang, Ming-Che; Pai, Woei Wu

    2001-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for fabricating arrays of quantum dots. A method for making a quantum dot device, includes: forming clusters of atoms on a substrate; and charging the clusters of atoms such that the clusters of atoms repel one another. The systems and methods provide advantages because the quantum dots can be ordered with regard to spacing and/or size.

  1. Unbiased methods for removing systematics from galaxy clustering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Franz; Leistedt, Boris; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2016-02-01

    Measuring the angular clustering of galaxies as a function of redshift is a powerful method for extracting information from the three-dimensional galaxy distribution. The precision of such measurements will dramatically increase with ongoing and future wide-field galaxy surveys. However, these are also increasingly sensitive to observational and astrophysical contaminants. Here, we study the statistical properties of three methods proposed for controlling such systematics - template subtraction, basic mode projection, and extended mode projection - all of which make use of externally supplied template maps, designed to characterize and capture the spatial variations of potential systematic effects. Based on a detailed mathematical analysis, and in agreement with simulations, we find that the template subtraction method in its original formulation returns biased estimates of the galaxy angular clustering. We derive closed-form expressions that should be used to correct results for this shortcoming. Turning to the basic mode projection algorithm, we prove it to be free of any bias, whereas we conclude that results computed with extended mode projection are biased. Within a simplified setup, we derive analytical expressions for the bias and discuss the options for correcting it in more realistic configurations. Common to all three methods is an increased estimator variance induced by the cleaning process, albeit at different levels. These results enable unbiased high-precision clustering measurements in the presence of spatially varying systematics, an essential step towards realizing the full potential of current and planned galaxy surveys.

  2. Ionic adsorption on the brucite (0001) surface: A periodic electrostatic embedded cluster method study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makkos, Eszter; Kerridge, Andrew; Austin, Jonathan; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas

    2016-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) at the generalised gradient approximation level is employed within the periodic electrostatic embedded cluster method (PEECM) to model the brucite (0001) surface. Three representative studies are then used to demonstrate the reliability of the PEECM for the description of the interactions of various ionic species with the layered Mg(OH)2 structure, and its performance is compared with periodic DFT, an approach known to be challenging for the adsorption of charged species. The adsorption energies of a series of s block cations, including Sr2+ and Cs+ which are known to coexist with brucite in nuclear waste storage ponds, are well described by the embedded cluster model, provided that basis sets of triple-zeta quality are employed for the adsorbates. The substitution energies of Ca2+ and Sr2+ into brucite obtained with the PEECM are very similar to periodic DFT results, and comparison of the approaches indicates that two brucite layers in the quantum mechanical part of the PEECM are sufficient to describe the substitution. Finally, a detailed comparison of the periodic and PEECM DFT approaches to the energetic and geometric properties of differently coordinated Sr[(OH)2(H2O)4] complexes on brucite shows an excellent agreement in adsorption energies, Sr-O distances, and bond critical point electron densities (obtained via the quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules), demonstrating that the PEECM can be a useful alternative to periodic DFT in these situations.

  3. Scalability of a Low-Cost Multi-Teraflop Linux Cluster for High-End Classical Atomistic and Quantum Mechanical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Saini, Subhash

    2003-01-01

    Scalability of a low-cost, Intel Xeon-based, multi-Teraflop Linux cluster is tested for two high-end scientific applications: Classical atomistic simulation based on the molecular dynamics method and quantum mechanical calculation based on the density functional theory. These scalable parallel applications use space-time multiresolution algorithms and feature computational-space decomposition, wavelet-based adaptive load balancing, and spacefilling-curve-based data compression for scalable I/O. Comparative performance tests are performed on a 1,024-processor Linux cluster and a conventional higher-end parallel supercomputer, 1,184-processor IBM SP4. The results show that the performance of the Linux cluster is comparable to that of the SP4. We also study various effects, such as the sharing of memory and L2 cache among processors, on the performance.

  4. A general method for selecting quantum channel for bidirectional controlled state teleportation and other schemes of controlled quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapliyal, Kishore; Verma, Amit; Pathak, Anirban

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a large number of protocols for bidirectional controlled state teleportation (BCST) have been proposed using n-qubit entangled states (nin {5,6,7}) as quantum channel. Here, we propose a general method of selecting multiqubit (n>4) quantum channels suitable for BCST and show that all the channels used in the existing protocols of BCST can be obtained using the proposed method. Further, it is shown that the quantum channels used in the existing protocols of BCST form only a negligibly small subset of the set of all the quantum channels that can be constructed using the proposed method to implement BCST. It is also noted that all these quantum channels are also suitable for controlled bidirectional remote state preparation. Following the same logic, methods for selecting quantum channels for other controlled quantum communication tasks, such as controlled bidirectional joint remote state preparation and controlled quantum dialogue, are also provided.

  5. Quark-gluon plasma phase transition using cluster expansion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syam Kumar, A. M.; Prasanth, J. P.; Bannur, Vishnu M.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the phase transitions in QCD using Mayer's cluster expansion method. The inter quark potential is modified Cornell potential. The equation of state (EoS) is evaluated for a homogeneous system. The behaviour is studied by varying the temperature as well as the number of Charm Quarks. The results clearly show signs of phase transition from Hadrons to Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP).

  6. Efficient method for the calculation of dissipative quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Greck, Peter; Birner, Stefan; Huber, Bernhard; Vogl, Peter

    2015-03-09

    We present a novel and very efficient method for calculating quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). It follows the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) framework but sidesteps the calculation of lesser self-energies by replacing them by a quasi-equilibrium expression. This method generalizes the phenomenological Büttiker probe model by taking into account individual scattering mechanisms. It is orders of magnitude more efficient than a fully self-consistent NEGF calculation for realistic devices. We apply this method to a new THz QCL design which works up to 250 K - according to our calculations.

  7. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches in the study of metal atom clusters requires simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential (ECP) technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculation were examined. The ECP molecular integral formulae were modified to bring out the shell characteristics as a first step towards fulfilling the increasing need to speed up the computation of the ECP integrals. Work on the relationships among the derivatives of the molecular integrals that extends some of the techniques pioneered by Komornicki for the calculation of the gradients of the electronic energy was completed and a formulation of the ECP approach that quite naturally unifies the various state-of-the-art "shape- and Hamiltonian-consistent" techniques was discovered.

  8. Method for adding nodes to a quantum key distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Grice, Warren P

    2015-02-24

    An improved quantum key distribution (QKD) system and method are provided. The system and method introduce new clients at intermediate points along a quantum channel, where any two clients can establish a secret key without the need for a secret meeting between the clients. The new clients perform operations on photons as they pass through nodes in the quantum channel, and participate in a non-secret protocol that is amended to include the new clients. The system and method significantly increase the number of clients that can be supported by a conventional QKD system, with only a modest increase in cost. The system and method are compatible with a variety of QKD schemes, including polarization, time-bin, continuous variable and entanglement QKD.

  9. Quantum dynamics of finite atomic and molecular systems through density matrix methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorndyke, Brian

    We develop a mixed quantum-classical formulation to describe the dynamics of few- and many-body atomic systems by applying a partial Wigner transform over the quantum Liouville equation of motion. In this approach, the density operator becomes a function in quasiclassical phase space, while remaining an operator over a subset of quantal variables. By taking appropriate limits and introducing an effective potential, we derive equations of motion describing quasiclassical nuclear trajectories coupled to quantal electronic evolution. We also introduce a variable timestep procedure to account for the disparity between slow nuclear motion and fast electronic fluctuations. Our mixed quantum-classical method is applied to the study of three simple one-dimensional two-state models. The first model represents the photoinduced desorption of an alkali atom from a metal surface, where near-resonant electron transfer is important. A second model explores a binary collision under conditions where two avoided crossings are present. The third model follows the photoinduced dissociation of the sodium iodide complex, whose long-range attractive surface results in oscillations of internuclear distance. Quantities such as state populations and quantum coherence are computed, and found to be in excellent agreement with precise quantal results obtained through fast Fourier transform grid methods. Having validated our approach, we turn to the study of alkali atoms embedded in rare gas clusters, treating the alkali atom-rare gas interactions with l-dependent semi-local pseudopotentials. Light emission from the electronic motion of the alkali atom is derived in the semiclassical limit, and computational methods to render the simulation feasible for a many-atom cluster are discussed. The formalism is applied to lithium atoms in helium clusters, where the cluster configuration and the electronic population dynamics of the lithium atom are monitored over time. We study both the ground and

  10. Quantum-chemical modeling of energy parameters and vibrational spectra of chain and cyclic clusters of monohydric alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, P.; Doroshenko, I.; Pogorelov, V.

    2014-05-01

    The specific peculiarities of alcohols such as heightened viscosity, boiling temperature and surface tension can be explained by the capability of their molecules to form relatively stable associates named clusters due to hydrogen bonding. In present work the stability of different chain-like and cyclic clusters of methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol and 1-hexanol was investigated by means of quantum-chemical simulation and particular by recently developed DFT exchange-correlation functional M06-2X. The relative stability of the cluster structure was evaluated by the total energy per molecule at low temperatures (where all alcohols exist in solid state) and by the changing of the free Gibbs energy upon cluster formation at the room temperature. For the verification of revealed results the conformity of calculated IR spectra of the most stable cluster structures with the experimental IR spectra at different temperatures was analyzed.

  11. Calculating Floquet states of large quantum systems: A parallelization strategy and its cluster implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptyeva, T. V.; Kozinov, E. A.; Meyerov, I. B.; Ivanchenko, M. V.; Denisov, S. V.; Hänggi, P.

    2016-04-01

    We present a numerical approach to calculate non-equilibrium eigenstates of a periodically time-modulated quantum system. The approach is based on the use of a chain of single-step propagating operators. Each operator is time-specific and constructed by combining the Magnus expansion of the time-dependent system Hamiltonian with the Chebyshev expansion of an operator exponent. The construction of the unitary Floquet operator, which evolves a system state over the full modulation period, is performed by propagating the identity matrix over the period. The independence of the evolution of basis vectors makes the propagation stage suitable for realization on a parallel cluster. Once the propagation stage is completed, a routine diagonalization of the Floquet matrix is performed. Finally, an additional propagation round, now involving the eigenvectors as the initial states, allows to resolve the time-dependence of the Floquet states and calculate their characteristics. We demonstrate the accuracy and scalability of the algorithm by applying it to calculate the Floquet states of two quantum models, namely (i) a synthesized random-matrix Hamiltonian and (ii) a many-body Bose-Hubbard dimer, both of the size up to 104 states.

  12. Electron and boson clusters in confined geometries: Symmetry breaking in quantum dots and harmonic traps

    PubMed Central

    Yannouleas, Constantine; Landman, Uzi

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the formation of crystalline electron clusters in semiconductor quantum dots and of crystalline patterns of neutral bosons in harmonic traps. In a first example, we use calculations for two electrons in an elliptic quantum dot to show that the electrons can localize and form a molecular dimer. The calculated singlet–triplet splitting (J) as a function of the magnetic field (B) agrees with cotunneling measurements with its behavior reflecting the effective dissociation of the dimer for large B. Knowledge of the dot shape and of J(B) allows determination of the degree of entanglement. In a second example, we study strongly repelling neutral bosons in two-dimensional harmonic traps. Going beyond the Gross–Pitaevskii (GP) mean-field approximation, we show that bosons can localize and form polygonal-ring-like crystalline patterns. The total energy of the crystalline phase saturates in contrast to the GP solution, and its spatial extent becomes smaller than that of the GP condensate. PMID:16740665

  13. Super pixel density based clustering automatic image classification method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingxing; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Tianxu

    2015-12-01

    The image classification is an important means of image segmentation and data mining, how to achieve rapid automated image classification has been the focus of research. In this paper, based on the super pixel density of cluster centers algorithm for automatic image classification and identify outlier. The use of the image pixel location coordinates and gray value computing density and distance, to achieve automatic image classification and outlier extraction. Due to the increased pixel dramatically increase the computational complexity, consider the method of ultra-pixel image preprocessing, divided into a small number of super-pixel sub-blocks after the density and distance calculations, while the design of a normalized density and distance discrimination law, to achieve automatic classification and clustering center selection, whereby the image automatically classify and identify outlier. After a lot of experiments, our method does not require human intervention, can automatically categorize images computing speed than the density clustering algorithm, the image can be effectively automated classification and outlier extraction.

  14. Adapted G-mode Clustering Method applied to Asteroid Taxonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselmann, Pedro H.; Carvano, Jorge M.; Lazzaro, D.

    2013-11-01

    The original G-mode was a clustering method developed by A. I. Gavrishin in the late 60's for geochemical classification of rocks, but was also applied to asteroid photometry, cosmic rays, lunar sample and planetary science spectroscopy data. In this work, we used an adapted version to classify the asteroid photometry from SDSS Moving Objects Catalog. The method works by identifying normal distributions in a multidimensional space of variables. The identification starts by locating a set of points with smallest mutual distance in the sample, which is a problem when data is not planar. Here we present a modified version of the G-mode algorithm, which was previously written in FORTRAN 77, in Python 2.7 and using NumPy, SciPy and Matplotlib packages. The NumPy was used for array and matrix manipulation and Matplotlib for plot control. The Scipy had a import role in speeding up G-mode, Scipy.spatial.distance.mahalanobis was chosen as distance estimator and Numpy.histogramdd was applied to find the initial seeds from which clusters are going to evolve. Scipy was also used to quickly produce dendrograms showing the distances among clusters. Finally, results for Asteroids Taxonomy and tests for different sample sizes and implementations are presented.

  15. Generation of high-fidelity four-photon cluster state and quantum-domain demonstration of one-way quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Kuwashiro, Shin; Yamamoto, Takashi; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2008-05-30

    We experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme for generating a four-photon entangled cluster state with fidelity over 0.860+/-0.015. We show that the fidelity is high enough to guarantee that the produced state is distinguished from Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger, W, and Dicke types of genuine four-qubit entanglement. We also demonstrate basic operations of one-way quantum computing using the produced state and show that the output state fidelities surpass classical bounds, which indicates that the entanglement in the produced state essentially contributes to the quantum operation.

  16. The magnetic and quantum transport properties of benzene-vanadium-borazine mixed sandwich clusters: a new kind of spin filter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Liu, Shaoding; Liu, Xuguang; Yang, Yongzhen; Li, Xiuyan; Xiong, Shijie; Xu, Bingshe

    2012-11-07

    Using density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function technique, we performed theoretical investigations on the magnetic and quantum transport properties of benzene-vanadium-borazine mixed organic/inorganic ligand sandwich clusters. The calculated results show that these finite sandwich clusters coupled to Ni electrodes exhibit novel quantum transport properties such as half-metallicity, negative differential resistance and spin-reversal effect, and can be viewed as a new kind of spin filter. However, for the infinite molecular wire, the ground state was identified as a ferromagnetic semiconductor with high stability. These findings suggest that the mixed organic/inorganic ligand sandwich clusters and molecular wires are promising materials for application in molecular electronics and spintronics.

  17. Quantum Monte-Carlo Study of Mn and Mn-oxide clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kino, Hiori; Wagner, Lucas K.; Mitas, Lubos

    2007-03-01

    Many molecules and clusters of Mn and Mn-oxide have not only interesting physical properties but also can be found in enzymes as important components in biochemical reactions. The electronic structure calculations of these systems are difficult and, for example, choice of exchange-correlation functionals in Density Functional Theory can significantly influence both ground state geometries and spin-state predictions. Therefore, highly accurate calculation is very desirable for these systems. Experimentally, it is established that the Mn dimer is a van der Waals system with weak binding, however, the spin multiplicity has not been settled unambiguously with possibilities covering a range from singlet, triplet, etc, up to 2S+1=11. On the other hand, MnnOn molecules are quite well understood as being a high-spin system, but their geometries depend on the exchange-correlation functionals. We will present our recent results from the fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo calculations of these systems. We will also report on recent progress in modeling the [4Mn-4O-Ca] cluster structural prototypes for the oxygen evolving center in green plants Photosystem II.

  18. Bond additivity corrections for quantum chemistry methods

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C.F.; Allendorf, M.D.

    2000-03-23

    New bond additivity correction (BAC) methods have been developed for the G2 method, BAC-G2, as well as for a hybrid density functional theory (DFT) Moller-Plesset (MP)2 method, BAC-hybrid. These BAC methods use a new form of BAC corrections, involving atomic, molecular, and bond-wise additive terms. These terms enable one to treat positive and negative ions as well as neutrals. The BAC-G2 method reduces errors in the G2 method due to nearest-neighbor bonds. The parameters within the BAC-G2 method only depend on atom types. Thus the BAC-G2 method can be used to determine the parameters needed by BAC methods involving lower levels of theory, such as BAC-hybrid and BAC-MP4. The BAC-hybrid method is expected to scale well for large molecules. The BAC-hybrid method uses the differences between the DFT and MP2 predictions as an indication of the method's accuracy, whereas the BAC-G2 method uses its internal methods (G1 and G2MP2) to accomplish this. A statistical analysis of the error in each of the methods is presented on the basis of calculations performed for large sets (more than 120) of molecules.

  19. Quantum-size effect on the electronic and optical properties of hybrid TiO{sub 2}/Au clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chun-Sheng E-mail: yexiaojuan1980@gmail.com; Wang, Xiangfu; Yan, Xiaohong; Ye, Xiaojuan E-mail: yexiaojuan1980@gmail.com; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-08-07

    Although TiO{sub 2}/Au nanosystems exhibit high photocatalytic activities under solar radiation in the experiment, the quantum-size effect of TiO{sub 2} on the growth, electronic properties, and reactivity of Au clusters remains elusive. Using (time dependent) density functional theory, it is found that Au atoms attach to low-coordinated Ti and O atoms and serve as seeds for the growth of Au clusters, and the electronic (optical) properties of hybrid Au-TiO{sub 2} nano-clusters depend strongly upon the type of supported Au clusters. Interestingly, decorating TiO{sub 2} nano-particles with even-numbered Au clusters (Au{sub 8} or Au{sub 10}) can enhance the photocatalytic activity by: (i) spatially separating electron and hole states and (ii) balancing redox strength and visible light absorption. Furthermore, the interactions between the Au-TiO{sub 2} clusters and a single water molecule have been studied. It will open up new avenues for exploring controlled photocatalysts in semiconductor-based quantum-confined systems.

  20. Quantum-size effect on the electronic and optical properties of hybrid TiO2/Au clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; Ye, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiangfu; Yan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-08-01

    Although TiO2/Au nanosystems exhibit high photocatalytic activities under solar radiation in the experiment, the quantum-size effect of TiO2 on the growth, electronic properties, and reactivity of Au clusters remains elusive. Using (time dependent) density functional theory, it is found that Au atoms attach to low-coordinated Ti and O atoms and serve as seeds for the growth of Au clusters, and the electronic (optical) properties of hybrid Au-TiO2 nano-clusters depend strongly upon the type of supported Au clusters. Interestingly, decorating TiO2 nano-particles with even-numbered Au clusters (Au8 or Au10) can enhance the photocatalytic activity by: (i) spatially separating electron and hole states and (ii) balancing redox strength and visible light absorption. Furthermore, the interactions between the Au-TiO2 clusters and a single water molecule have been studied. It will open up new avenues for exploring controlled photocatalysts in semiconductor-based quantum-confined systems.

  1. Quantum-size effect on the electronic and optical properties of hybrid TiO₂/Au clusters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; Ye, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiangfu; Yan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-08-07

    Although TiO2/Au nanosystems exhibit high photocatalytic activities under solar radiation in the experiment, the quantum-size effect of TiO2 on the growth, electronic properties, and reactivity of Au clusters remains elusive. Using (time dependent) density functional theory, it is found that Au atoms attach to low-coordinated Ti and O atoms and serve as seeds for the growth of Au clusters, and the electronic (optical) properties of hybrid Au-TiO2 nano-clusters depend strongly upon the type of supported Au clusters. Interestingly, decorating TiO2 nano-particles with even-numbered Au clusters (Au8 or Au10) can enhance the photocatalytic activity by: (i) spatially separating electron and hole states and (ii) balancing redox strength and visible light absorption. Furthermore, the interactions between the Au-TiO2 clusters and a single water molecule have been studied. It will open up new avenues for exploring controlled photocatalysts in semiconductor-based quantum-confined systems.

  2. Optimal sensor placement using FRFs-based clustering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiqi; Zhang, Heng; Liu, Shiping; Zhang, Zhe

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an optimal sensor placement method by selecting the most relevant degrees of freedom as actual measure position. Based on observation matrix of a structure's frequency response, two optimal criteria are used to avoid the information redundancy of the candidate degrees of freedom. By using principal component analysis, the frequency response matrix can be decomposed into principal directions and their corresponding singular. A relatively small number of principal directions will maintain a system's dominant response information. According to the dynamic similarity of each degree of freedom, the k-means clustering algorithm is designed to classify the degrees of freedom, and effective independence method deletes the sensors which are redundant of each cluster. Finally, two numerical examples and a modal test are included to demonstrate the efficient of the derived method. It is shown that the proposed method provides a way to extract sub-optimal sets and the selected sensors are well distributed on the whole structure.

  3. On optimal methods for adiabatic quantum state transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, Rolando

    2013-03-01

    Many problems in science could be solved by preparing the low-energy quantum state (or any eigenstate) of a Hamiltonian. A common example is the Boolean satisfiability problem, where each clause can be mapped to the energy of an interacting many-body system, and the problem reduces to minimizing the energy. In quantum computing, adiabatic quantum state transformations (ASTs) provide a tool for preparing the quantum state. ASTs are conventionally implemented via slow or adiabatic perturbations to the Hamiltonian, relying on the quantum adiabatic theorem. Nevertheless, more efficient implementations of ASTs exist. In this talk I will review recently developed methods for ASTs that are more efficient and require less assumptions on the Hamiltonians than the conventional implementation. Such methods involve measurements of the states along the evolution path and have a best-case implementation cost of L/G, where L is the length of the (evolved) state path and G is a lower bound to the spectral gap of the Hamiltonians. I will show that this cost is optimal and comment on results of the gap amplification problem, where the goal is to reduce the cost by increasing G. We acknowledge support from NSF through the CCF program and the LDRD programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories.

  4. Charged vanadium-benzene multidecker clusters: DFT and quantum Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Tokár, K.; Derian, R.; Mitas, L.; Štich, I.

    2016-02-14

    Using explicitly correlated fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo and density functional theory (DFT) methods, we study electronic properties, ground-state multiplets, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and low-energy fragmentation channels of charged half-sandwich and multidecker vanadium-benzene systems with up to 3 vanadium atoms, including both anions and cations. It is shown that, particularly in anions, electronic correlations play a crucial role; these effects are not systematically captured with any commonly used DFT functionals such as gradient corrected, hybrids, and range-separated hybrids. On the other hand, tightly bound cations can be described qualitatively by DFT. A comparison of DFT and quantum Monte Carlo provides an in-depth understanding of the electronic structure and properties of these correlated systems. The calculations also serve as a benchmark study of 3d molecular anions that require a balanced many-body description of correlations at both short- and long-range distances.

  5. Charged vanadium-benzene multidecker clusters: DFT and quantum Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Tokár, K; Derian, R; Mitas, L; Štich, I

    2016-02-14

    Using explicitly correlated fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo and density functional theory (DFT) methods, we study electronic properties, ground-state multiplets, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and low-energy fragmentation channels of charged half-sandwich and multidecker vanadium-benzene systems with up to 3 vanadium atoms, including both anions and cations. It is shown that, particularly in anions, electronic correlations play a crucial role; these effects are not systematically captured with any commonly used DFT functionals such as gradient corrected, hybrids, and range-separated hybrids. On the other hand, tightly bound cations can be described qualitatively by DFT. A comparison of DFT and quantum Monte Carlo provides an in-depth understanding of the electronic structure and properties of these correlated systems. The calculations also serve as a benchmark study of 3d molecular anions that require a balanced many-body description of correlations at both short- and long-range distances.

  6. A multiscale quantum mechanics/electromagnetics method for device simulations.

    PubMed

    Yam, ChiYung; Meng, Lingyi; Zhang, Yu; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-07

    Multiscale modeling has become a popular tool for research applying to different areas including materials science, microelectronics, biology, chemistry, etc. In this tutorial review, we describe a newly developed multiscale computational method, incorporating quantum mechanics into electronic device modeling with the electromagnetic environment included through classical electrodynamics. In the quantum mechanics/electromagnetics (QM/EM) method, the regions of the system where active electron scattering processes take place are treated quantum mechanically, while the surroundings are described by Maxwell's equations and a semiclassical drift-diffusion model. The QM model and the EM model are solved, respectively, in different regions of the system in a self-consistent manner. Potential distributions and current densities at the interface between QM and EM regions are employed as the boundary conditions for the quantum mechanical and electromagnetic simulations, respectively. The method is illustrated in the simulation of several realistic systems. In the case of junctionless field-effect transistors, transfer characteristics are obtained and a good agreement between experiments and simulations is achieved. Optical properties of a tandem photovoltaic cell are studied and the simulations demonstrate that multiple QM regions are coupled through the classical EM model. Finally, the study of a carbon nanotube-based molecular device shows the accuracy and efficiency of the QM/EM method.

  7. The influence of sodium nanoparticles formation on luminescent properties of fluorophosphate glasses containing molecular clusters and quantum dots of lead selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatova, Zh. O.; Kolobkova, E. V.; Sidorov, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of sodium nanoparticles and secondary heat treatment conditions on the spectralluminescent characteristics of fluorophosphate glasses with PbSe molecular clusters and quantum dots is studied. Experiments with glasses containing no sodium nanoparticles show that their thermal treatment leads to the formation of molecular clusters with subsequent formation of quantum dots having an intense luminescence. The results of numerical simulation for glasses with sodium nanoparticles shows that heat treatment leads to formation of a sodium fluoride shell on the nanoparticles surface. It is shown that quenching of the luminescence of PbSe molecular clusters and quantum dots takes place in these glasses.

  8. Efficient hybrid-symbolic methods for quantum mechanical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, T. C.; Zhang, Wenxing

    2015-06-01

    We present hybrid symbolic-numerical tools to generate optimized numerical code for rapid prototyping and fast numerical computation starting from a computer algebra system (CAS) and tailored to any given quantum mechanical problem. Although a major focus concerns the quantum chemistry methods of H. Nakatsuji which has yielded successful and very accurate eigensolutions for small atoms and molecules, the tools are general and may be applied to any basis set calculation with a variational principle applied to its linear and non-linear parameters.

  9. A quantum Monte Carlo study on electron correlation in all-metal aromatic clusters MAl4(-) (M = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cu, Ag and Au).

    PubMed

    Brito, Bráulio Gabriel A; Hai, G-Q; Teixeira Rabelo, J N; Cândido, Ladir

    2014-05-14

    Using fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (FN-DMC) simulation we investigate the electron correlation in all-metal aromatic clusters MAl4(-) (with M = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cu, Ag and Au). The electron detachment energies and electron affinities of the clusters are obtained. The vertical electron detachment energies obtained from the FN-DMC calculations are in very good agreement with the available experimental results. Calculations are also performed within the Hartree-Fock approximation, density-functional theory (DFT), and the couple-cluster (CCSD(T)) method. From the obtained results, we analyse the impact of the electron correlation effects in these bimetallic clusters and find that the correlation of the valence electrons contributes significantly to the detachment energies and electron affinities, varying between 20% and 50% of their total values. Furthermore, we discuss the electron correlation effects on the stability of the clusters as well as the accuracy of the DFT and CCSD(T) calculations in the present systems.

  10. An Immune Quantum Communication Model for Dephasing Noise Using Four-Qubit Cluster State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-jin; Li, Dong-fen; Qin, Zhi-guang

    2016-01-01

    Quantum secure communication of dephasing in the presence of noise is a hot spot in research in the field of quantum secure communication. Quantum steganography aims is to transfer secret information in public quantum channel. But because effect of annealing phase noise, quantum states which is need to transfer easily delayed or changed. So, quantum steganography is very meaning apply to transmit secret information covertly in quantum noisy channels. The article introduced dephasing noise impact on the physics of quantum state, through the theoretical research, construct the logic of quantum states to back the phase noise immunity, and construct the decoherence free subspace, It can guarantees fidelity secret information exchange through quantum communication model in a noisy environment.

  11. Perturbative approximation to hybrid equation of motion coupled cluster/effective fragment potential method

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Debashree

    2014-03-07

    Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods provide an attractive way to closely retain the accuracy of the QM method with the favorable computational scaling of the MM method. Therefore, it is not surprising that QM/MM methods are being increasingly used for large chemical/biological systems. Hybrid equation of motion coupled cluster singles doubles/effective fragment potential (EOM-CCSD/EFP) methods have been developed over the last few years to understand the effect of solvents and other condensed phases on the electronic spectra of chromophores. However, the computational cost of this approach is still dominated by the steep scaling of the EOM-CCSD method. In this work, we propose and implement perturbative approximations to the EOM-CCSD method in this hybrid scheme to reduce the cost of EOM-CCSD/EFP. The timings and accuracy of this hybrid approach is tested for calculation of ionization energies, excitation energies, and electron affinities of microsolvated nucleic acid bases (thymine and cytosine), phenol, and phenolate.

  12. Advances in methods and algorithms in a modern quantum chemistry program package.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yihan; Molnar, Laszlo Fusti; Jung, Yousung; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian; Brown, Shawn T; Gilbert, Andrew T B; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V; Levchenko, Sergey V; O'Neill, Darragh P; DiStasio, Robert A; Lochan, Rohini C; Wang, Tao; Beran, Gregory J O; Besley, Nicholas A; Herbert, John M; Lin, Ching Yeh; Van Voorhis, Troy; Chien, Siu Hung; Sodt, Alex; Steele, Ryan P; Rassolov, Vitaly A; Maslen, Paul E; Korambath, Prakashan P; Adamson, Ross D; Austin, Brian; Baker, Jon; Byrd, Edward F C; Dachsel, Holger; Doerksen, Robert J; Dreuw, Andreas; Dunietz, Barry D; Dutoi, Anthony D; Furlani, Thomas R; Gwaltney, Steven R; Heyden, Andreas; Hirata, So; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Kedziora, Gary; Khalliulin, Rustam Z; Klunzinger, Phil; Lee, Aaron M; Lee, Michael S; Liang, Wanzhen; Lotan, Itay; Nair, Nikhil; Peters, Baron; Proynov, Emil I; Pieniazek, Piotr A; Rhee, Young Min; Ritchie, Jim; Rosta, Edina; Sherrill, C David; Simmonett, Andrew C; Subotnik, Joseph E; Woodcock, H Lee; Zhang, Weimin; Bell, Alexis T; Chakraborty, Arup K; Chipman, Daniel M; Keil, Frerich J; Warshel, Arieh; Hehre, Warren J; Schaefer, Henry F; Kong, Jing; Krylov, Anna I; Gill, Peter M W; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2006-07-21

    Advances in theory and algorithms for electronic structure calculations must be incorporated into program packages to enable them to become routinely used by the broader chemical community. This work reviews advances made over the past five years or so that constitute the major improvements contained in a new release of the Q-Chem quantum chemistry package, together with illustrative timings and applications. Specific developments discussed include fast methods for density functional theory calculations, linear scaling evaluation of energies, NMR chemical shifts and electric properties, fast auxiliary basis function methods for correlated energies and gradients, equation-of-motion coupled cluster methods for ground and excited states, geminal wavefunctions, embedding methods and techniques for exploring potential energy surfaces.

  13. Quantum Private Comparison of Equality Based on Five-Particle Cluster State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yan; Zhang, Wen-Bo; Zhang, Shi-Bin; Wang, Hai-Chun; Yan, Li-Li; Han, Gui-Hua; Sheng, Zhi-Wei; Huang, Yuan-Yuan; Suo, Wang; Xiong, Jin-Xin

    2016-12-01

    A protocol for quantum private comparison of equality (QPCE) is proposed based on five-particle cluster state with the help of a semi-honest third party (TP). In our protocol, TP is allowed to misbehave on its own but can not conspire with either of two parties. Compared with most two-user QPCE protocols, our protocol not only can compare two groups of private information (each group has two users) in one execution, but also compare just two private information. Compared with the multi-user QPCE protocol proposed, our protocol is safer with more reasonable assumptions of TP. The qubit efficiency is computed and analyzed. Our protocol can also be generalized to the case of 2N participants with one TP. The 2N-participant protocol can compare two groups (each group has N private information) in one execution or just N private information. Supported by NSFC under Grant Nos. 61402058, 61572086, the Fund for Middle and Young Academic Leaders of CUIT under Grant No. J201511, the Science and Technology Support Project of Sichuan Province of China under Grant No. 2013GZX0137, the Fund for Young Persons Project of Sichuan Province of China under Grant No. 12ZB017, and the Foundation of Cyberspace Security Key Laboratory of Sichuan Higher Education Institutions under Grant No. szjj2014-074

  14. Self-consistent phonons revisited. I. The role of thermal versus quantum fluctuations on structural transitions in large Lennard-Jones clusters.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Ionuţ; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

    2012-10-14

    The theory of self-consistent phonons (SCP) was originally developed to address the anharmonic effects in condensed matter systems. The method seeks a harmonic, temperature-dependent Hamiltonian that provides the "best fit" for the physical Hamiltonian, the "best fit" being defined as the one that optimizes the Helmholtz free energy at a fixed temperature. The present developments provide a scalable O(N) unified framework that accounts for anharmonic effects in a many-body system, when it is probed by either thermal (ℏ → 0) or quantum fluctuations (T → 0). In these important limits, the solution of the nonlinear SCP equations can be reached in a manner that requires only the multiplication of 3N × 3N matrices, with no need of diagonalization. For short range potentials, such as Lennard-Jones, the Hessian, and other related matrices are highly sparse, so that the scaling of the matrix multiplications can be reduced from O(N(3)) to ~O(N). We investigate the role of quantum effects by continuously varying the de-Boer quantum delocalization parameter Λ and report the N-Λ (T = 0), and also the classical N-T (Λ = 0) phase diagrams for sizes up to N ~ 10(4). Our results demonstrate that the harmonic approximation becomes inadequate already for such weakly quantum systems as neon clusters, or for classical systems much below the melting temperatures.

  15. Method and system for data clustering for very large databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Tian (Inventor); Ramakrishnan, Raghu (Inventor); Livny, Miron (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Multi-dimensional data contained in very large databases is efficiently and accurately clustered to determine patterns therein and extract useful information from such patterns. Conventional computer processors may be used which have limited memory capacity and conventional operating speed, allowing massive data sets to be processed in a reasonable time and with reasonable computer resources. The clustering process is organized using a clustering feature tree structure wherein each clustering feature comprises the number of data points in the cluster, the linear sum of the data points in the cluster, and the square sum of the data points in the cluster. A dense region of data points is treated collectively as a single cluster, and points in sparsely occupied regions can be treated as outliers and removed from the clustering feature tree. The clustering can be carried out continuously with new data points being received and processed, and with the clustering feature tree being restructured as necessary to accommodate the information from the newly received data points.

  16. Method for imaging quantum dots during exposure to gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immucci, Andrea N.; Chamson-Reig, Astrid; Yu, Kui; Wilkinson, Diana; Li, Chunsheng; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2011-03-01

    Quantum dots have been used in a wide variety of biomedical applications. A key advantage of these particles is that their optical properties depend predictably on size, which enables tuning of the emission wavelength. Recently, it was found that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots lose their ability to photoluminescence after exposure to gamma radiation (J. Phys. Chem. C., 113: 2580-2585 (2009). A method for readout of the loss of quantum dot photoluminescence during exposure to radiation could enable a multitude of real-time dosimetry applications. Here, we report on a method to image photoluminescence from quantum dots from a distance and under ambient lighting conditions. The approach was to construct and test a time-gated imaging system that incorporated pulsed illumination. The system was constructed from a pulsed green laser (Nd:YAG, 20 pulses/s, 5 ns pulse duration, ~5 mJ/pulse), a time-gated camera (LaVision Picostar, 2 ns gate width), and optical components to enable coaxial illumination and imaging. Using the system to image samples of equivalent concentration to the previous end-point work, quantum dot photoluminescence was measureable under ambient room lighting at a distance of 25 cm from the sample with a signal to background of 7.5:1. Continuous exposure of samples to pulsed laser produced no measureable loss of photoluminescence over a time period of one hour. With improvements to the light collection optics the range of the system is expected to increase to several metres, which will enable imaging of samples during exposure to a gamma radiation source.

  17. Hybrid Methods in Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Prischi, Filippo; Pastore, Annalisa

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid methods, which combine and integrate several biochemical and biophysical techniques, have rapidly caught up in the last twenty years to provide a way to obtain a fuller description of proteins and molecular complexes with sizes and complexity otherwise not easily affordable. Here, we review the use of a robust hybrid methodology based on a mixture of NMR, SAXS, site directed mutagenesis and molecular docking which we have developed to determine the structure of weakly interacting molecular complexes. We applied this technique to gain insights into the structure of complexes formed amongst proteins involved in the molecular machine, which produces the essential iron-sulfur cluster prosthetic groups. Our results were validated both by X-ray structures and by other groups who adopted the same approach. We discuss the advantages and the limitations of our methodology and propose new avenues, which could improve it. PMID:28349052

  18. Quantum memory effects in the dynamics of electrons in gold clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzweil, Yair; Baer, Roi

    2006-02-01

    Electron dynamics in metallic clusters are examined using a time-dependent density functional theory that includes a “memory term,” i.e., attempts to describe temporal nonlocal correlations. Using the Iwamoto, Gross, and Kohn exchange-correlation (XC) kernel, we construct a translationally invariant memory action from which an XC potential is derived that is translationally covariant and exerts zero net force on the electrons. An efficient and stable numerical method to solve the resulting Kohn-Sham equations is presented. Using this framework, we study memory effects on electron dynamics in spherical jellium gold clusters. We find memory significantly broadens the surface plasmon absorption line, yet considerably less than measured in real gold clusters, attributed to the inadequacy of the jellium model. Memory effects on nonlinear spectroscopy are studied as well: a real-time pump-probe setup is used to study the temporal decay profile of the plasmon, finding a fast decay followed by slower tail; and in high harmonic generation, we show that memory narrows and redshifts emission lines.

  19. Solvothermal method to prepare graphene quantum dots by hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Renbing; Zhong, Suting; Wu, Juan; Jiang, Wei; Shen, Yewen; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Tianhe

    2016-10-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been synthesized by different chemical methods in recent years. For conventional chemical methods, it is inevitable to introduce a large amount of impurities in the preparation process. Long time of dialysis process increases the time cost extremely. Herein, we report a one-step solvothermal method for synthesizing GQDs with the application of hydrogen peroxide in N, N-Dimethylformamide (DMF) environment, which completely avoids the use of concentrated sulphuric acid and nitric acid to treat raw material and introduces no impurity in whole preparation process simultaneously for the first time. Pure GQDs can be obtained after evaporation/redissolution and filtration process with a strong blue emission at 15% quantum yield. This solvothermal method, not requiring dialysis process and complicated equipments, exhibits simple, eco-friendly and low time-cost properties. Besides high quantum yields, the as-prepared GQDs also show good photoluminescence stability in different pH conditions. The optical properties, morphology and structure of GQDs were studied by various equipments, implying potential application in biomedical fields and electronic device.

  20. Free Energies of Quantum Particles: The Coupled-Perturbed Quantum Umbrella Sampling Method.

    PubMed

    Glover, William J; Casey, Jennifer R; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2014-10-14

    We introduce a new simulation method called Coupled-Perturbed Quantum Umbrella Sampling that extends the classical umbrella sampling approach to reaction coordinates involving quantum mechanical degrees of freedom. The central idea in our method is to solve coupled-perturbed equations to find the response of the quantum system's wave function along a reaction coordinate of interest. This allows for propagation of the system's dynamics under the influence of a quantum biasing umbrella potential and provides a method to rigorously undo the effects of the bias to compute equilibrium ensemble averages. In this way, one can drag electrons into regions of high free energy where they would otherwise not go, thus enabling chemistry by fiat. We demonstrate the applicability of our method for two condensed-phase systems of interest. First, we consider the interaction of a hydrated electron with an aqueous sodium cation, and we calculate a potential of mean force that shows that an e(-):Na(+) contact pair is the thermodynamically favored product starting from either a neutral sodium atom or the separate cation and electron species. Second, we present the first determination of a hydrated electron's free-energy profile relative to an air/water interface. For the particular model parameters used, we find that the hydrated electron is more thermodynamically stable in the bulk rather than at the interface. Our analysis suggests that the primary driving force keeping the electron away from the interface is the long-range electron-solvent polarization interaction rather than the short-range details of the chosen pseudopotential.

  1. Quantum Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2013-09-01

    Prologue; Preface; Part I. Background: 1. Introduction to decoherence and noise in open quantum systems Daniel Lidar and Todd Brun; 2. Introduction to quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 3. Introduction to decoherence-free subspaces and noiseless subsystems Daniel Lidar; 4. Introduction to quantum dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 5. Introduction to quantum fault tolerance Panos Aliferis; Part II. Generalized Approaches to Quantum Error Correction: 6. Operator quantum error correction David Kribs and David Poulin; 7. Entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes Todd Brun and Min-Hsiu Hsieh; 8. Continuous-time quantum error correction Ognyan Oreshkov; Part III. Advanced Quantum Codes: 9. Quantum convolutional codes Mark Wilde; 10. Non-additive quantum codes Markus Grassl and Martin Rötteler; 11. Iterative quantum coding systems David Poulin; 12. Algebraic quantum coding theory Andreas Klappenecker; 13. Optimization-based quantum error correction Andrew Fletcher; Part IV. Advanced Dynamical Decoupling: 14. High order dynamical decoupling Zhen-Yu Wang and Ren-Bao Liu; 15. Combinatorial approaches to dynamical decoupling Martin Rötteler and Pawel Wocjan; Part V. Alternative Quantum Computation Approaches: 16. Holonomic quantum computation Paolo Zanardi; 17. Fault tolerance for holonomic quantum computation Ognyan Oreshkov, Todd Brun and Daniel Lidar; 18. Fault tolerant measurement-based quantum computing Debbie Leung; Part VI. Topological Methods: 19. Topological codes Héctor Bombín; 20. Fault tolerant topological cluster state quantum computing Austin Fowler and Kovid Goyal; Part VII. Applications and Implementations: 21. Experimental quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 22. Experimental dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 23. Architectures Jacob Taylor; 24. Error correction in quantum communication Mark Wilde; Part VIII. Critical Evaluation of Fault Tolerance: 25. Hamiltonian methods in QEC and fault tolerance Eduardo Novais, Eduardo Mucciolo and

  2. Least-squares finite element methods for quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelsen, Christian; Brannick, J; Manteuffel, T; Mccormick, S

    2008-01-01

    A significant amount of the computational time in large Monte Carlo simulations of lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is spent inverting the discrete Dirac operator. Unfortunately, traditional covariant finite difference discretizations of the Dirac operator present serious challenges for standard iterative methods. For interesting physical parameters, the discretized operator is large and ill-conditioned, and has random coefficients. More recently, adaptive algebraic multigrid (AMG) methods have been shown to be effective preconditioners for Wilson's discretization of the Dirac equation. This paper presents an alternate discretization of the Dirac operator based on least-squares finite elements. The discretization is systematically developed and physical properties of the resulting matrix system are discussed. Finally, numerical experiments are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of adaptive smoothed aggregation ({alpha}SA ) multigrid as a preconditioner for the discrete field equations resulting from applying the proposed least-squares FE formulation to a simplified test problem, the 2d Schwinger model of quantum electrodynamics.

  3. The classification of HLA supertypes by GRID/CPCA and hierarchical clustering methods.

    PubMed

    Guan, Pingping; Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2007-01-01

    Biological experiments often produce enormous amount of data, which are usually analyzed by data clustering. Cluster analysis refers to statistical methods that are used to assign data with similar properties into several smaller, more meaningful groups. Two commonly used clustering techniques are introduced in the following section: principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering. PCA calculates the variance between variables and groups them into a few uncorrelated groups or principal components (PCs) that are orthogonal to each other. Hierarchical clustering is carried out by separating data into many clusters and merging similar clusters together. Here, we use an example of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertype classification to demonstrate the usage of the two methods. Two programs, Generating Optimal Linear Partial Least Square Estimations (GOLPE) and Sybyl, are used for PCA and hierarchical clustering, respectively. However, the reader should bear in mind that the methods have been incorporated into other software as well, such as SIMCA, statistiXL, and R.

  4. ClusterViSu, a method for clustering of protein complexes by Voronoi tessellation in super-resolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Andronov, Leonid; Orlov, Igor; Lutz, Yves; Vonesch, Jean-Luc; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy (PALM, STORM etc.) provides a plethora of fluorescent signals in dense cellular environments which can be difficult to interpret. Here we describe ClusterViSu, a method for image reconstruction, visualization and quantification of labelled protein clusters, based on Voronoi tessellation of the individual fluorescence events. The general applicability of this clustering approach for the segmentation of super-resolution microscopy data, including for co-localization, is illustrated on a series of important biological objects such as chromatin complexes, RNA polymerase, nuclear pore complexes and microtubules. PMID:27068792

  5. Computational alanine scanning with linear scaling semiempirical quantum mechanical methods.

    PubMed

    Diller, David J; Humblet, Christine; Zhang, Xiaohua; Westerhoff, Lance M

    2010-08-01

    Alanine scanning is a powerful experimental tool for understanding the key interactions in protein-protein interfaces. Linear scaling semiempirical quantum mechanical calculations are now sufficiently fast and robust to allow meaningful calculations on large systems such as proteins, RNA and DNA. In particular, they have proven useful in understanding protein-ligand interactions. Here we ask the question: can these linear scaling quantum mechanical methods developed for protein-ligand scoring be useful for computational alanine scanning? To answer this question, we assembled 15 protein-protein complexes with available crystal structures and sufficient alanine scanning data. In all, the data set contains Delta Delta Gs for 400 single point alanine mutations of these 15 complexes. We show that with only one adjusted parameter the quantum mechanics-based methods outperform both buried accessible surface area and a potential of mean force and compare favorably to a variety of published empirical methods. Finally, we closely examined the outliers in the data set and discuss some of the challenges that arise from this examination.

  6. Motion estimation using point cluster method and Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Senesh, M; Wolf, A

    2009-05-01

    The most frequently used method in a three dimensional human gait analysis involves placing markers on the skin of the analyzed segment. This introduces a significant artifact, which strongly influences the bone position and orientation and joint kinematic estimates. In this study, we tested and evaluated the effect of adding a Kalman filter procedure to the previously reported point cluster technique (PCT) in the estimation of a rigid body motion. We demonstrated the procedures by motion analysis of a compound planar pendulum from indirect opto-electronic measurements of markers attached to an elastic appendage that is restrained to slide along the rigid body long axis. The elastic frequency is close to the pendulum frequency, as in the biomechanical problem, where the soft tissue frequency content is similar to the actual movement of the bones. Comparison of the real pendulum angle to that obtained by several estimation procedures--PCT, Kalman filter followed by PCT, and low pass filter followed by PCT--enables evaluation of the accuracy of the procedures. When comparing the maximal amplitude, no effect was noted by adding the Kalman filter; however, a closer look at the signal revealed that the estimated angle based only on the PCT method was very noisy with fluctuation, while the estimated angle based on the Kalman filter followed by the PCT was a smooth signal. It was also noted that the instantaneous frequencies obtained from the estimated angle based on the PCT method is more dispersed than those obtained from the estimated angle based on Kalman filter followed by the PCT method. Addition of a Kalman filter to the PCT method in the estimation procedure of rigid body motion results in a smoother signal that better represents the real motion, with less signal distortion than when using a digital low pass filter. Furthermore, it can be concluded that adding a Kalman filter to the PCT procedure substantially reduces the dispersion of the maximal and minimal

  7. A quantum chemical method for rapid optimization of protein structures.

    PubMed

    Wada, Mitsuhito; Sakurai, Minoru

    2005-01-30

    A quantum chemical method for rapid optimization of protein structures is proposed. In this method, a protein structure is treated as an assembly of amino acid units, and the geometry optimization of each unit is performed with taking the effect of its surrounding environment into account. The optimized geometry of a whole protein is obtained by repeated application of such a local optimization procedure over the entire part of the protein. Here, we implemented this method in the MOPAC program and performed geometry optimization for three different sizes of proteins. Consequently, these results demonstrate that the total energies of the proteins are much efficiently minimized compared with the use of conventional optimization methods, including the MOZYME algorithm (a representative linear-scaling method) with the BFGS routine. The proposed method is superior to the conventional methods in both CPU time and memory requirements.

  8. Stochastic multi-reference perturbation theory with application to the linearized coupled cluster method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Sharma, Sandeep; Alavi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    In this article we report a stochastic evaluation of the recently proposed multireference linearized coupled cluster theory [S. Sharma and A. Alavi, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 102815 (2015)]. In this method, both the zeroth-order and first-order wavefunctions are sampled stochastically by propagating simultaneously two populations of signed walkers. The sampling of the zeroth-order wavefunction follows a set of stochastic processes identical to the one used in the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) method. To sample the first-order wavefunction, the usual FCIQMC algorithm is augmented with a source term that spawns walkers in the sampled first-order wavefunction from the zeroth-order wavefunction. The second-order energy is also computed stochastically but requires no additional overhead outside of the added cost of sampling the first-order wavefunction. This fully stochastic method opens up the possibility of simultaneously treating large active spaces to account for static correlation and recovering the dynamical correlation using perturbation theory. The method is used to study a few benchmark systems including the carbon dimer and aromatic molecules. We have computed the singlet-triplet gaps of benzene and m-xylylene. For m-xylylene, which has proved difficult for standard complete active space self consistent field theory with perturbative correction, we find the singlet-triplet gap to be in good agreement with the experimental values.

  9. Spatial temporal clustering for hotspot using kulldorff scan statistic method (KSS): A case in Riau Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudjimartsu, S. A.; Djatna, T.; Ambarwari, A.; Apriliantono

    2017-01-01

    The forest fires in Indonesia occurs frequently in the dry season. Almost all the causes of forest fires are caused by the human activity itself. The impact of forest fires is the loss of biodiversity, pollution hazard and harm the economy of surrounding communities. To prevent fires required the method, one of them with spatial temporal clustering. Spatial temporal clustering formed grouping data so that the results of these groupings can be used as initial information on fire prevention. To analyze the fires, used hotspot data as early indicator of fire spot. Hotspot data consists of spatial and temporal dimensions can be processed using the Spatial Temporal Clustering with Kulldorff Scan Statistic (KSS). The result of this research is to the effectiveness of KSS method to cluster spatial hotspot in a case within Riau Province and produces two types of clusters, most cluster and secondary cluster. This cluster can be used as an early fire warning information.

  10. Learning and retention of quantum concepts with different teaching methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deslauriers, Louis; Wieman, Carl

    2011-06-01

    We measured mastery and retention of conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics in a modern physics course. This was studied for two equivalent cohorts of students taught with different pedagogical approaches using the Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey. We measured the impact of pedagogical approach both on the original conceptual learning and on long-term retention. The cohort of students who had a very highly rated traditional lecturer scored 19% lower than the equivalent cohort that was taught using interactive engagement methods. However, the amount of retention was very high for both cohorts, showing only a few percent decrease in scores when retested 6 and 18 months after completion of the course and with no exposure to the material in the interim period. This high level of retention is in striking contrast to the retention measured for more factual learning from university courses and argues for the value of emphasizing conceptual learning.

  11. Multilevel Analysis Methods for Partially Nested Cluster Randomized Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores multilevel modeling approaches for 2-group randomized experiments in which a treatment condition involving clusters of individuals is compared to a control condition involving only ungrouped individuals, otherwise known as partially nested cluster randomized designs (PNCRTs). Strategies for comparing groups from a PNCRT in the…

  12. The Stanford Cluster Search: Scope, Method, and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willick, Jeffrey A.; Thompson, Keith L.; Mathiesen, Benjamin F.; Perlmutter, Saul; Knop, Robert A.; Hill, Gary J.

    2001-06-01

    We describe the scientific motivation behind, and the methodology of, the Stanford Cluster Search (StaCS), a program to compile a catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters at intermediate and high (0.3<~z<~1) redshifts. The clusters are identified using a matched filter algorithm applied to deep CCD images covering ~60 deg2 of sky. These images are obtained from several data archives, principally that of the Berkeley Supernova Cosmology Project of Perlmutter et al. Potential clusters are confirmed with spectroscopic observations at the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Follow-up observations at optical, submillimeter, and X-ray wavelengths are planned in order to estimate cluster masses. Our long-term scientific goal is to measure the cluster number density as a function of mass and redshift, n(M, z), which is sensitive to the cosmological density parameter Ωm and the amplitude of density fluctuations σ8. The combined data set will contain clusters ranging over an order of magnitude in mass and allow constraints on these parameters accurate to ~10%. We present our first spectroscopically confirmed cluster candidates and describe how to access them electronically. The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximillians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen. The HET is named in honor of its principal benefactors, William P. Hobby and Robert E. Eberly.

  13. Method of identifying clusters representing statistical dependencies in multivariate data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Card, D. H.; Lyle, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    Approach is first to cluster and then to compute spatial boundaries for resulting clusters. Next step is to compute, from set of Monte Carlo samples obtained from scrambled data, estimates of probabilities of obtaining at least as many points within boundaries as were actually observed in original data.

  14. Clusters in the biopharmaceutical industry: toward a new method of analysis.

    PubMed

    Erden, Zeynep; von Krogh, Georg

    2011-05-01

    Clusters are groups of co-located and interconnected firms and institutions linked by commonalities in their strategies and complementarities in their activities and resources. There are several reasons for the geographical clustering of firms in the biopharmaceutical industry. This review unpacks some advantages and disadvantages of cluster participation, and proposes a new method to enable managers and researchers to identify clusters in the biopharmaceutical industry.

  15. Differences Between Ward's and UPGMA Methods of Cluster Analysis: Implications for School Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Robert L.; Dougherty, Donna

    1988-01-01

    Compared the efficacy of two methods of cluster analysis, the unweighted pair-groups method using arithmetic averages (UPGMA) and Ward's method, for students grouped on intelligence, achievement, and social adjustment by both clustering methods. Found UPGMA more efficacious based on output, on cophenetic correlation coefficients generated by each…

  16. Path Sampling Methods for Enzymatic Quantum Particle Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Dzierlenga, M W; Varga, M J; Schwartz, S D

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are studied via a host of computational techniques. While previous methods have been used successfully, many fail to incorporate the full dynamical properties of enzymatic systems. This can lead to misleading results in cases where enzyme motion plays a significant role in the reaction coordinate, which is especially relevant in particle transfer reactions where nuclear tunneling may occur. In this chapter, we outline previous methods, as well as discuss newly developed dynamical methods to interrogate mechanisms of enzymatic particle transfer reactions. These new methods allow for the calculation of free energy barriers and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with the incorporation of quantum effects through centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and the full complement of enzyme dynamics through transition path sampling (TPS). Recent work, summarized in this chapter, applied the method for calculation of free energy barriers to reaction in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). We found that tunneling plays an insignificant role in YADH but plays a more significant role in LDH, though not dominant over classical transfer. Additionally, we summarize the application of a TPS algorithm for the calculation of reaction rates in tandem with CMD to calculate the primary H/D KIE of YADH from first principles. We found that the computationally obtained KIE is within the margin of error of experimentally determined KIEs and corresponds to the KIE of particle transfer in the enzyme. These methods provide new ways to investigate enzyme mechanism with the inclusion of protein and quantum dynamics.

  17. Evidence of magnetic clusters in the disordered ferromagnet Ni-V close to the quantum critical concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruizhe; Ubaid-Kassis, S.; Schroeder, A.; Baker, P. J.; Pratt, F. L.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Franke, I.; Moeller, J. S.; Vojta, T.

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of muon spin relaxation (μSR) experiments in zero field (ZF) and transverse field (TF) as well as magnetization (M) data of Ni1-xVx close to the critical vanadium concentration xc ~ 11 . 6 % where the onset of the ferromagnetic (FM) order is suppressed. This material features a prototypical disordered quantum phase transition (QPT) as seen in the temperature (T) and magnetic field (H) dependence of M (H , T) . In the paramagnetic phase (PM) above xc, M (H , T) is well described by non-universal power laws characterized by an exponent α (x -xc) , establishing a quantum Griffiths phase. Here, we focus on the FM side of the QPT below xc. After subtracting the spontaneous magnetization M0, we find that M (H , T) -M0 also follows a power law in H at low T with an analogous non-universal exponent α (xc - x) . This is the first evidence of a quantum Griffiths phase within the FM phase in this disordered alloy. μSR in ZF recognized a broad field distribution below xc as evidence of magnetic spatial inhomogeneities in the FM phase. Different muon depolarization rates in TF and ZF reveal magnetic clusters already in the PM regime. These observed clusters are important generic ingredients of a disordered QPT. Current: Durham University, U.K.

  18. Dissipative dynamics with the corrected propagator method. Numerical comparison between fully quantum and mixed quantum/classical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2010-05-01

    The recently developed quantum-classical method has been applied to the study of dissipative dynamics in multidimensional systems. The method is designed to treat many-body systems consisting of a low dimensional quantum part coupled to a classical bath. Assuming the approximate zeroth order evolution rule, the corrections to the quantum propagator are defined in terms of the total Hamiltonian and the zeroth order propagator. Then the corrections are taken to the classical limit by introducing the frozen Gaussian approximation for the bath degrees of freedom. The evolution of the primary part is governed by the corrected propagator yielding the exact quantum dynamics. The method has been tested on two model systems coupled to a harmonic bath: (i) an anharmonic (Morse) oscillator and (ii) a double-well potential. The simulations have been performed at zero temperature. The results have been compared to the exact quantum simulations using the surrogate Hamiltonian approach.

  19. Generation and entanglement concentration for electron-spin entangled cluster states using charged quantum dots in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; Zheng, Chun-Hong; Shi, Peng; Ren, Chun-Nian; Gu, Yong-Jian

    2014-07-01

    We present schemes for deterministically generating multi-qubit electron-spin entangled cluster states by the giant circular birefringence, induced by the interface between the spin of a photon and the spin of an electron confined in a quantum dot embedded in a double-sided microcavity. Based on this interface, we construct the controlled phase flip (CPF) gate deterministically which is performed on electron-spin qubits and is the essential component of the cluster-state generation. As one of the universal gates, the CPF gate constructed can also be utilized in achieving scalable quantum computing. Besides, we propose the entanglement concentration protocol to reconstruct a partially entangled cluster state into a maximally entangled one, resorting to the projection measurement on an ancillary photon. By iterating the concentration scheme several times, the maximum success probability can be achieved. The fidelities and experimental feasibilities are analyzed with respect to currently available techniques, indicating that our schemes can work well in both the strong and weak (Purcell) coupling regimes.

  20. A short course on quantum mechanics and methods of quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercolessi, Elisa

    2015-07-01

    These notes collect the lectures given by the author to the "XXIII International Workshop on Geometry and Physics" held in Granada (Spain) in September 2014. The first part of this paper aims at introducing a mathematical oriented reader to the realm of Quantum Mechanics (QM) and then to present the geometric structures that underline the mathematical formalism of QM which, contrary to what is usually done in Classical Mechanics (CM), are usually not taught in introductory courses. The mathematics related to Hilbert spaces and Differential Geometry are assumed to be known by the reader. In the second part, we concentrate on some quantization procedures, that are founded on the geometric structures of QM — as we have described them in the first part — and represent the ones that are more operatively used in modern theoretical physics. We will discuss first the so-called Coherent State Approach which, mainly complemented by "Feynman Path Integral Technique", is the method which is most widely used in quantum field theory. Finally, we will describe the "Weyl Quantization Approach" which is at the origin of modern tomographic techniques, originally used in optics and now in quantum information theory.

  1. The Cluster Variation Method: A Primer for Neuroscientists

    PubMed Central

    Maren, Alianna J.

    2016-01-01

    Effective Brain–Computer Interfaces (BCIs) require that the time-varying activation patterns of 2-D neural ensembles be modelled. The cluster variation method (CVM) offers a means for the characterization of 2-D local pattern distributions. This paper provides neuroscientists and BCI researchers with a CVM tutorial that will help them to understand how the CVM statistical thermodynamics formulation can model 2-D pattern distributions expressing structural and functional dynamics in the brain. The premise is that local-in-time free energy minimization works alongside neural connectivity adaptation, supporting the development and stabilization of consistent stimulus-specific responsive activation patterns. The equilibrium distribution of local patterns, or configuration variables, is defined in terms of a single interaction enthalpy parameter (h) for the case of an equiprobable distribution of bistate (neural/neural ensemble) units. Thus, either one enthalpy parameter (or two, for the case of non-equiprobable distribution) yields equilibrium configuration variable values. Modeling 2-D neural activation distribution patterns with the representational layer of a computational engine, we can thus correlate variational free energy minimization with specific configuration variable distributions. The CVM triplet configuration variables also map well to the notion of a M = 3 functional motif. This paper addresses the special case of an equiprobable unit distribution, for which an analytic solution can be found. PMID:27706022

  2. Cluster-cell calculation using the method of generalized homogenization

    SciTech Connect

    Laletin, N.I.; Boyarinov, V.F.

    1988-05-01

    The generalized-homogenization method (GHM), used for solving the neutron transfer equation, was applied to calculating the neutron distribution in the cluster cell with a series of cylindrical cells with cylindrically coaxial zones. Single-group calculations of the technological channel of the cell of an RBMK reactor were performed using GHM. The technological channel was understood to be the reactor channel, comprised of the zirconium rod, the water or steam-water mixture, the uranium dioxide fuel element, and the zirconium tube, together with the adjacent graphite layer. Calculations were performed for channels with no internal sources and with unit incoming current at the external boundary as well as for channels with internal sources and zero current at the external boundary. The PRAKTINETs program was used to calculate the symmetric neutron distributions in the microcell and in channels with homogenized annular zones. The ORAR-TsM program was used to calculate the antisymmetric distribution in the microcell. The accuracy of the calculations were compared for the two channel versions.

  3. Quantum chemical approach in the description of the amphiphile clusterization at the air/liquid and liquid/liquid interfaces with phase nature accounting. I. Aliphatic normal alcohols at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yuri B; Belyaeva, Elena A; Kartashynska, Elena S; Fainerman, Valentine B; Smirnova, Natalia A

    2015-02-19

    A new model based on the quantum chemical approach is proposed to describe structural and thermodynamic parameters of clusterization for substituted alkanes at the air/liquid and liquid/liquid interfaces. The new model by the authors, unlike the previous one, proposes an explicit account of the liquid phase (phases) influence on the parameters of monomers, clusters and monolayers of substituted alkanes at the regarded interface. The calculations were carried out in the frameworks of the quantum chemical semiempirical PM3 method (Mopac 2012), using the COSMO procedure. The new model was tested in the calculations of the clusterization parameters of fatty alcohols under the standard conditions at the air/water interface. The enthalpy, Gibbs' energy and absolute entropy of formation for alcohol monomers alongside with clusterization parameters for the cluster series including the monolayer at air/water interface were calculated. In our calculations the sinkage of monomers, molecules in clusters and monolayers was varied from 1 up to 5 methylene groups. Thermodynamic parameters calculated using the proposed model for the alcohol monolayers are in a good agreement with the corresponding experimental data. However, the proposed model cannot define the most energetically preferable immersion of the monolayer molecules in the water phase.

  4. One-way quantum computing in the optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Menicucci, Nicolas C; Flammia, Steven T; Pfister, Olivier

    2008-09-26

    One-way quantum computing allows any quantum algorithm to be implemented easily using just measurements. The difficult part is creating the universal resource, a cluster state, on which the measurements are made. We propose a scalable method that uses a single, multimode optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The method is very efficient and generates a continuous-variable cluster state, universal for quantum computation, with quantum information encoded in the quadratures of the optical frequency comb of the OPO.

  5. Chemical physics without the Born-Oppenheimer approximation: The molecular coupled-cluster method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkhorst, Hendrik J.

    1987-08-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) and Born-Huang (BH) treatments of molecular eigenstates are reexamined. It is argued that in application of the BO approximation to nonrigid molecules and chemical dynamics involving single potential-energy surfaces (PES's), errors on the order of tens of percents can easily occur in many computed properties. Introduction of a BH expansion (in BO states) will always lead to poor convergence when the BO approximation fails; its diagonal (or adiabatic) approximation will not change this situation. The main problem in the above applications is the absence of well-developed, well-separated minima in the PES (or no minima at all). Inspired by a non-BO view of a molecule by Essén [Int. J. Quantum Chem. 12, 721 (1977)], a molecular coupled-cluster (MCC) method is formulated. An Essén molecule consists of neutral subunits (``atoms''), weakly interacting (``bonds'') in some spatial arrangement (``structure''). The quasiseparation in collective and individual motions within the molecule comes about by virtue of the virial theorem, not the smallness of the electron-to-nuclear mass ratio. The MCC method not only should converge well in the cluster sizes, but it also is capable of describing electronic shell and molecular geometric structures. It can be viewed as the workable formalism for Essén's physical picture of a molecule. The time-independent and time-dependent versions are described. The latter one is useful for scattering, chemical dynamics, laser chemistry, half-collisions, and any other phenomena that can be described as the time evolution of many-particle wave packets. Close relationship to time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory exists. A few implementational aspects are discussed, such as symmetry, conservation laws, approximations, numerical techniques, as well as a possible relation with a non-BO PES. Appendixes contain mathematical details.

  6. On the stability of perfluoroalkyl-substituted singlet carbenes: a coupled-cluster quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Rozhenko, Alexander B; Schoeller, Wolfgang W; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-02-27

    A series of trifluoromethyl-substituted carbenes R-C(:)-CF3 (R = NMe2, OMe, F, PMe2, P(NMe2)2, P(N(Pr-i)2)2, SMe, Cl); (dimethylamino)(perfluoroalkyl)carbenes Me2N-C(:)-R (R = CF3, C2F5, n-C3F7, i-C3F7, and t-C4F9) and symmetrically substituted carbenes R-C(:)-R (R = NMe2, OMe, F, PMe2, SMe, Cl) have been investigated by means of quantum chemistry methods. Different levels of approximation were used, including the CCSD(T) approach also known in quantum chemistry as the "golden standard", in combination with three different basis sets (TZVP, cc-pVDZ, cc-pVTZ). Relative stabilities of carbenes have been estimated using the differences between the singlet and triplet ground state energies (ΔEST) and energies of the hydrogenation reaction for the singlet and triplet ground states of the carbenes. The latter seem to correlate better with stability of carbenes than the ΔEST values. The (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the methylidene carbon indicate the more high-field chemical shift values in the known, isolable carbenes compared to the unstable ones. This is the first report on the expected chemical shifts in the highly unstable singlet carbenes. Using these criteria, some carbene structures from the studied series (as, for instance, Me2N-C(:)-CF3, Me2N-C(:)-C3F7-i) are proposed as good candidates for the experimental preparation.

  7. Positioning nuclear spins in interacting clusters for quantum technologies and bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Haase, Jan F.; Casanova, Jorge; Plenio, Martin B.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a method to measure the hyperfine vectors between a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center and an environment of interacting nuclear spins. Our protocol enables the generation of tunable electron-nuclear coupling Hamiltonians while suppressing unwanted internuclear interactions. In this manner, each nucleus can be addressed and controlled individually, thereby permitting the reconstruction of the individual hyperfine vectors. With this ability the three-dimensional (3D) structure of spin ensembles and spins in biomolecules can be identified without the necessity of varying the direction of applied magnetic fields. We demonstrate examples including the complete reconstruction of an interacting spin cluster in diamond and 3D imaging of all the nuclear spins in a biomolecule.

  8. Quantum Conductivity of Nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozhar, Liudmila

    2004-03-01

    Quantum statistical mechanical method of Bogoliubov-Tyablikov two-time Green's functions (TTGFs) suggested by Zubarev and Tserkovnikov is generalized to include spatially inhomogeneous systems, such as small semiconductor quantum dots, artificial atoms, etc. The developed formalism is applied to derive a fundamental quantum theory of conductivity of spatially inhomogeneous systems in weak external electromagnetic fields. Conservation equations for the charge and current densities are derived and analyzed. Explicit expressions for the linear (in the field potentials) longitudal and transverse quantum conductivity, dielectric and magnetic susceptibilities are also derived in terms of the equilibrium/steady state charge density - charge density and microcurrent-microcurrent retarded TTGFs. The obtained results are used in conjunction with quantum computations of electronic energy spectra of small clusters of In, Ga and As atoms to predict the quantum conductivity of such clusters.

  9. Absorption diagnostics of quantum size effect on the excited states of SbI3 clusters in FAU zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virko, Sergij V.; Motsnyi, Fedir V.; Telbiz, German M.

    1998-04-01

    We report the absorption spectra (at 10 K) for SbI3 clusters with molecular numbers 1/2, 1 and 2 which were created in FAU-zeolite cages. At 2.0 - 3.7 eV there appear bands whose energies strongly depends of the loading densities of SbI3 molecules. These energies are remarkable blue shifted compared with the one of the bulk exciton (2.615 eV). This shift is interpreted in terms of the quantum size effect. The observed blue-shift of absorption bands coincides with one calculated in mh/me>>1 approximation (typical for MI3 layered crystals).

  10. Hydrogen cluster/network in tobermorite as studied by multiple-quantum spin counting {sup 1}H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Mogami, Yuuki; Yamazaki, Satoru; Matsuno, Shinya; Matsui, Kunio; Noda, Yasuto; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-15

    Proton multiple-quantum (MQ) spin-counting experiment has been employed to study arrangement of hydrogen atoms in 9 Å/11 Å natural/synthetic tobermorites. Even though all tobermorite samples give similar characterless, broad static-powder {sup 1}H NMR spectra, their MQ spin-counting spectra are markedly different; higher quanta in 11 Å tobermorite do not grow with the MQ excitation time, while those in 9 Å one do. A statistical analysis of the MQ results recently proposed [26] is applied to show that hydrogens align in 9 Å tobermorite one dimensionally, while in 11 Å tobermorite they exist as a cluster of 5–8 hydrogen atoms.

  11. High-Efficient Arbitrated Quantum Signature Scheme Based on Cluster States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatahi, Negin; Naseri, Mosayeb; Gong, Li-Hua; Liao, Qing-Hong

    2017-02-01

    The arbitrated quantum signature characteristics including the security and the efficiency are investigated and a new efficient and secure arbitrated quantum signature is proposed. It is shown that the proposed scheme exhibits an efficiency of 64 %. Furthermore, to gain a higher security, the decoy photons security checking is employed.

  12. A clustering method of Chinese medicine prescriptions based on modified firefly algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Feng; Liu, Hong; Chen, Shou-Qiang; Xu, Liang

    2016-12-01

    This paper is aimed to study the clustering method for Chinese medicine (CM) medical cases. The traditional K-means clustering algorithm had shortcomings such as dependence of results on the selection of initial value, trapping in local optimum when processing prescriptions form CM medical cases. Therefore, a new clustering method based on the collaboration of firefly algorithm and simulated annealing algorithm was proposed. This algorithm dynamically determined the iteration of firefly algorithm and simulates sampling of annealing algorithm by fitness changes, and increased the diversity of swarm through expansion of the scope of the sudden jump, thereby effectively avoiding premature problem. The results from confirmatory experiments for CM medical cases suggested that, comparing with traditional K-means clustering algorithms, this method was greatly improved in the individual diversity and the obtained clustering results, the computing results from this method had a certain reference value for cluster analysis on CM prescriptions.

  13. Optimal pulse design in quantum control: A unified computational method

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jr-Shin; Ruths, Justin; Yu, Tsyr-Yan; Arthanari, Haribabu; Wagner, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Many key aspects of control of quantum systems involve manipulating a large quantum ensemble exhibiting variation in the value of parameters characterizing the system dynamics. Developing electromagnetic pulses to produce a desired evolution in the presence of such variation is a fundamental and challenging problem in this research area. We present such robust pulse designs as an optimal control problem of a continuum of bilinear systems with a common control function. We map this control problem of infinite dimension to a problem of polynomial approximation employing tools from geometric control theory. We then adopt this new notion and develop a unified computational method for optimal pulse design using ideas from pseudospectral approximations, by which a continuous-time optimal control problem of pulse design can be discretized to a constrained optimization problem with spectral accuracy. Furthermore, this is a highly flexible and efficient numerical method that requires low order of discretization and yields inherently smooth solutions. We demonstrate this method by designing effective broadband π/2 and π pulses with reduced rf energy and pulse duration, which show significant sensitivity enhancement at the edge of the spectrum over conventional pulses in 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy experiments. PMID:21245345

  14. Self-consistent phonons: An accurate and practical method to account for anharmonic effects in equilibrium properties of general classical or quantum many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Sandra E.; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A.

    2016-12-01

    The self-consistent phonons (SCP) method is a practical approach for computing structural and dynamical properties of a general quantum or classical many-body system while incorporating anharmonic effects. However, a convincing demonstration of the accuracy of SCP and its advantages over the standard harmonic approximation is still lacking. Here we apply SCP to classical Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters and compare with numerically exact results. The close agreement between the two reveals that SCP accurately describes structural properties of the classical LJ clusters from zero-temperature (where the method is exact) up to the temperatures at which the chosen cluster conformation becomes unstable. Given the similarities between thermal and quantum fluctuations, both physically and within the SCP ansatz, the accuracy of classical SCP over a range of temperatures suggests that quantum SCP is also accurate over a range of quantum de Boer parameter Λ = ℏ / (σ√{ mε }) , which describes the degree of quantum character of the system.

  15. Synthesis of a uranyl persulfide complex and quantum chemical studies of formation and topologies of hypothetical uranyl persulfide cage clusters.

    PubMed

    Grant, Daniel J; Weng, Zhehui; Jouffret, Laurent J; Burns, Peter C; Gagliardi, Laura

    2012-07-16

    The compound Na(4)[(UO(2))(S(2))(3)](CH(3)OH)(8) was synthesized at room temperature in an oxygen-free environment. It contains a rare example of the [(UO(2))(S(2))(3)](4-) complex in which a uranyl ion is coordinated by three bidentate persulfide groups. We examined the possible linkage of these units to form nanoscale cage clusters analogous to those formed from uranyl peroxide polyhedra. Quantum chemical calculations at the density functional and multiconfigurational wave function levels show that the uranyl-persulfide-uranyl, U-(S(2))-U, dihedral angles of model clusters are bent due to partial covalent interactions. We propose that this bent interaction will favor assembly of uranyl ions through persulfide bridges into curved structures, potentially similar to the family of nanoscale cage clusters built from uranyl peroxide polyhedra. However, the U-(S(2))-U dihedral angles predicted for several model structures may be too tight for them to self-assemble into cage clusters with fullerene topologies in the absence of other uranyl-ion bridges that adopt a flatter configuration. Assembly of species such as [(UO(2))(S(2))(SH)(4)](4-) or [(UO(2))(S(2))(C(2)O(4))(4)](4-) into fullerene topologies with ~60 vertices may be favored by use of large counterions.

  16. Cluster cross sections from pickup measurements: Are the established methods consistent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedor, J.; Poterya, V.; Pysanenko, A.; Fárník, M.

    2011-09-01

    Pickup of several molecules, H2O, HBr, and CH3OH, and Ar atoms on free ArN clusters has been investigated in a molecular beam experiment. The pickup cross sections of the clusters with known mean sizes, bar{N}≈ 150 and 260 were measured by two independent methods: (i) the cluster beam velocity decrease due to the momentum transfer of the picked up molecules to the clusters, and (ii) Poisson distribution of a selected cluster fragment ion as a function of the pickup pressure. In addition, the pickup cross sections were calculated using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The simulations support the results of the velocity measurements. On the other hand, the Poisson distributions yield significantly smaller cross sections, inconsistent with the known ArN cluster sizes. These results are discussed in terms of: (i) an incomplete coagulation of guest molecules on the argon clusters when two or more molecules are picked up; and (ii) the fragmentation pattern of the embedded molecules and their clusters upon ionization on the Ar cluster. We conclude that the Poisson distribution method has to be cautiously examined, if conclusions should be drawn about the cluster cross section, or the mean cluster size bar{N}, and the number of picked up molecules.

  17. An empirical method to cluster objective nebulizer adherence data among adults with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoo, Zhe H; Campbell, Michael J; Curley, Rachael; Wildman, Martin J

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of using preventative inhaled treatments in cystic fibrosis is to improve health outcomes. Therefore, understanding the relationship between adherence to treatment and health outcome is crucial. Temporal variability, as well as absolute magnitude of adherence affects health outcomes, and there is likely to be a threshold effect in the relationship between adherence and outcomes. We therefore propose a pragmatic algorithm-based clustering method of objective nebulizer adherence data to better understand this relationship, and potentially, to guide clinical decisions. Methods to cluster adherence data This clustering method consists of three related steps. The first step is to split adherence data for the previous 12 months into four 3-monthly sections. The second step is to calculate mean adherence for each section and to score the section based on mean adherence. The third step is to aggregate the individual scores to determine the final cluster (“cluster 1” = very low adherence; “cluster 2” = low adherence; “cluster 3” = moderate adherence; “cluster 4” = high adherence), and taking into account adherence trend as represented by sequential individual scores. The individual scores should be displayed along with the final cluster for clinicians to fully understand the adherence data. Three illustrative cases We present three cases to illustrate the use of the proposed clustering method. Conclusion This pragmatic clustering method can deal with adherence data of variable duration (ie, can be used even if 12 months’ worth of data are unavailable) and can cluster adherence data in real time. Empirical support for some of the clustering parameters is not yet available, but the suggested classifications provide a structure to investigate parameters in future prospective datasets in which there are accurate measurements of nebulizer adherence and health outcomes.

  18. Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations using Quantum Chemistry Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    1998-03-01

    This talk will address our recent efforts in developing fast, linear scaling electronic structure methods for large scale applications. Of special importance is our fast multipole method( M. C. Strain, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, Science 271), 51 (1996). (FMM) for achieving linear scaling for the quantum Coulomb problem (GvFMM), the traditional bottleneck in quantum chemistry calculations based on Gaussian orbitals. Fast quadratures(R. E. Stratmann, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, Chem. Phys. Lett. 257), 213 (1996). combined with methods that avoid the Hamiltonian diagonalization( J. M. Millam and G. E. Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 106), 5569 (1997) have resulted in density functional theory (DFT) programs that can be applied to systems containing many hundreds of atoms and ---depending on computational resources or level of theory-- to many thousands of atoms.( A. D. Daniels, J. M. Millam and G. E. Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 107), 425 (1997). Three solutions for the diagonalization bottleneck will be analyzed and compared: a conjugate gradient density matrix search (CGDMS), a Hamiltonian polynomial expansion of the density matrix, and a pseudo-diagonalization method. Besides DFT, our near-field exchange method( J. C. Burant, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, J. Chem. Phys. 105), 8969 (1996). for linear scaling Hartree-Fock calculations will be discussed. Based on these improved capabilities, we have also developed programs to obtain vibrational frequencies (via analytic energy second derivatives) and excitation energies (through time-dependent DFT) of large molecules like porphyn or C_70. Our GvFMM has been extended to periodic systems( K. N. Kudin and G. E. Scuseria, Chem. Phys. Lett., in press.) and progress towards a Gaussian-based DFT and HF program for polymers and solids will be reported. Last, we will discuss our progress on a Laplace-transformed \\cal O(N^2) second-order pertubation theory (MP2) method.

  19. Classification of excessive domestic water consumption using Fuzzy Clustering Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zairi Zaidi, A.; Rasmani, Khairul A.

    2016-08-01

    Demand for clean and treated water is increasing all over the world. Therefore it is crucial to conserve water for better use and to avoid unnecessary, excessive consumption or wastage of this natural resource. Classification of excessive domestic water consumption is a difficult task due to the complexity in determining the amount of water usage per activity, especially as the data is known to vary between individuals. In this study, classification of excessive domestic water consumption is carried out using a well-known Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering algorithm. Consumer data containing information on daily, weekly and monthly domestic water usage was employed for the purpose of classification. Using the same dataset, the result produced by the FCM clustering algorithm is compared with the result obtained from a statistical control chart. The finding of this study demonstrates the potential use of the FCM clustering algorithm for the classification of domestic consumer water consumption data.

  20. Monotonically convergent optimization in quantum control using Krotov's method.

    PubMed

    Reich, Daniel M; Ndong, Mamadou; Koch, Christiane P

    2012-03-14

    The non-linear optimization method developed by A. Konnov and V. Krotov [Autom. Remote Cont. (Engl. Transl.) 60, 1427 (1999)] has been used previously to extend the capabilities of optimal control theory from the linear to the non-linear Schrödinger equation [S. E. Sklarz and D. J. Tannor, Phys. Rev. A 66, 053619 (2002)]. Here we show that based on the Konnov-Krotov method, monotonically convergent algorithms are obtained for a large class of quantum control problems. It includes, in addition to nonlinear equations of motion, control problems that are characterized by non-unitary time evolution, nonlinear dependencies of the Hamiltonian on the control, time-dependent targets, and optimization functionals that depend to higher than second order on the time-evolving states. We furthermore show that the nonlinear (second order) contribution can be estimated either analytically or numerically, yielding readily applicable optimization algorithms. We demonstrate monotonic convergence for an optimization functional that is an eighth-degree polynomial in the states. For the "standard" quantum control problem of a convex final-time functional, linear equations of motion and linear dependency of the Hamiltonian on the field, the second-order contribution is not required for monotonic convergence but can be used to speed up convergence. We demonstrate this by comparing the performance of first- and second-order algorithms for two examples.

  1. Grinding Wheel Condition Monitoring with Hidden Markov Model-Based Clustering Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, T. W.; Hua, G; Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian

    2006-01-01

    Hidden Markov model (HMM) is well known for sequence modeling and has been used for condition monitoring. However, HMM-based clustering methods are developed only recently. This article proposes a HMM-based clustering method for monitoring the condition of grinding wheel used in grinding operations. The proposed method first extract features from signals based on discrete wavelet decomposition using a moving window approach. It then generates a distance (dissimilarity) matrix using HMM. Based on this distance matrix several hierarchical and partitioning-based clustering algorithms are applied to obtain clustering results. The proposed methodology was tested with feature sequences extracted from acoustic emission signals. The results show that clustering accuracy is dependent upon cutting condition. Higher material removal rate seems to produce more discriminatory signals/features than lower material removal rate. The effect of window size, wavelet decomposition level, wavelet basis, clustering algorithm, and data normalization were also studied.

  2. Predicting low-thermal-conductivity Si-Ge nanowires with a modified cluster expansion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Jesper; Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    2015-02-01

    We introduce the cluster-expansion ghost-lattice method, which extends the applicability of existing cluster-expansion software, to cluster expand structures of arbitrary finite and infinite geometries in a fast, unique, and transferable way. The ghost site that is introduced zeroes the cluster function of any cluster which includes it. This enables the use of bulk clusters grouped by bulk symmetries in nonbulk systems and distinguishes the cluster-expansion ghost-lattice method from a regular ternary cluster expansion with an inactive vacuum atom type. Even though the method does not treat surface terms, it can be used as an efficient way to obtain the bulk term in D. Lerch et al. [Modell. Simul. Mater. Sci. Eng. 17, 055003 (2009), 10.1088/0965-0393/17/5/055003]. We use the method to learn the thermal conductivity of Si-Ge nanowires, oriented along the [111] direction on a diamond lattice, versus their configuration of Si and Ge atoms. Once learned, the ghost-lattice cluster-expansion method is shown to be able to predict the lowest-thermal-conductivity nanowire configuration, in agreement with the configuration found in M. Chan et al. [Phys. Rev. B 81, 174303 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.81.174303].

  3. A Survey of Quantum Programming Languages: History, Methods, and Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Simulating physics with computers,” in International Journal of Theoretical Physics 21(6–7), pp. 467–488, 1982. [5] J. Preskill, “ Lecture notes...time [4]. Preskill credits Paul Benioff [5] with making this proposal concomitantly with Feynman . However, the roots of quantum programming go far... physically realizable quantum computer [25]. In 2004 van Tonder [26] defined a quantum lambda calculus for pure quantum computation (no measurements take

  4. Random Sampling of Quantum States: a Survey of Methods. And Some Issues Regarding the Overparametrized Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziero, Jonas

    2015-12-01

    The numerical generation of random quantum states (RQS) is an important procedure for investigations in quantum information science. Here, we review some methods that may be used for performing that task. We start by presenting a simple procedure for generating random state vectors, for which the main tool is the random sampling of unbiased discrete probability distributions (DPD). Afterwards, the creation of random density matrices is addressed. In this context, we first present the standard method, which consists in using the spectral decomposition of a quantum state for getting RQS from random DPDs and random unitary matrices. In the sequence, the Bloch vector parametrization method is described. This approach, despite being useful in several instances, is not in general convenient for RQS generation. In the last part of the article, we regard the overparametrized method (OPM) and the related Ginibre and Bures techniques. The OPM can be used to create random positive semidefinite matrices with unit trace from randomly produced general complex matrices in a simple way that is friendly for numerical implementations. We consider a physically relevant issue related to the possible domains that may be used for the real and imaginary parts of the elements of such general complex matrices. Subsequently, a too fast concentration of measure in the quantum state space that appears in this parametrization is noticed.

  5. Hydrogen-bond cooperative effects in small cyclic water clusters as revealed by the interacting quantum atoms approach.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Chávez-Calvillo, Rodrigo; García-Revilla, Marco; Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Christiansen, Ove; Francisco, Evelio; Martín Pendás, Angel; Rocha-Rinza, Tomás

    2013-10-11

    The cooperative effects of hydrogen bonding in small water clusters (H2 O)n (n=3-6) have been studied by using the partition of the electronic energy in accordance with the interacting quantum atoms (IQA) approach. The IQA energy splitting is complemented by a topological analysis of the electron density (ρ(r)) compliant with the quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules (QTAIM) and the calculation of electrostatic interactions by using one- and two-electron integrals, thereby avoiding convergence issues inherent to a multipolar expansion. The results show that the cooperative effects of hydrogen bonding in small water clusters arise from a compromise between: 1) the deformation energy (i.e., the energy necessary to modify the electron density and the configuration of the nuclei of the isolated water molecules to those within the water clusters), and 2) the interaction energy (Eint ) of these contorted molecules in (H2 O)n . Whereas the magnitude of both deformation and interaction energies is enhanced as water molecules are added to the system, the augmentation of the latter becomes dominant when the size of the cluster is increased. In addition, the electrostatic, classic, and exchange components of Eint for a pair of water molecules in the cluster (H2 O)n-1 become more attractive when a new H2 O unit is incorporated to generate the system (H2 O)n with the last-mentioned contribution being consistently the most important part of Eint throughout the hydrogen bonds under consideration. This is opposed to the traditional view, which regards hydrogen bonding in water as an electrostatically driven interaction. Overall, the trends of the delocalization indices, δ(Ω,Ω'), the QTAIM atomic charges, the topology of ρ(r), and the IQA results altogether show how polarization, charge transfer, electrostatics, and covalency contribute to the cooperative effects of hydrogen bonding in small water clusters. It is our hope that the analysis presented in this paper could

  6. Platinum-ruthenium bimetallic clusters on graphite: a comparison of vapor deposition and electroless deposition methods.

    PubMed

    Galhenage, Randima P; Xie, Kangmin; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John Meynard M; Seuser, Grant S; Monnier, John R; Chen, Donna A

    2015-11-14

    Bimetallic Pt-Ru clusters have been grown on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by vapor deposition and by electroless deposition. These studies help to bridge the material gap between well-characterized vapor deposited clusters and electrolessly deposited clusters, which are better suited for industrial catalyst preparation. In the vapor deposition experiments, bimetallic clusters were formed by the sequential deposition of Pt on Ru or Ru on Pt. Seed clusters of the first metal were grown on HOPG surfaces that were sputtered with Ar(+) to introduce defects, which act as nucleation sites for Pt or Ru. On the unmodified HOPG surface, both Pt and Ru clusters preferentially nucleated at the step edges, whereas on the sputtered surface, clusters with relatively uniform sizes and spatial distributions were formed. Low energy ion scattering experiments showed that the surface compositions of the bimetallic clusters are Pt-rich, regardless of the order of deposition, indicating that the interdiffusion of metals within the clusters is facile at room temperature. Bimetallic clusters on sputtered HOPG were prepared by the electroless deposition of Pt on Ru seed clusters from a Pt(+2) solution using dimethylamine borane as the reducing agent at pH 11 and 40 °C. After exposure to the electroless deposition bath, Pt was selectively deposited on Ru, as demonstrated by the detection of Pt on the surface by XPS, and the increase in the average cluster height without an increase in the number of clusters, indicating that Pt atoms are incorporated into the Ru seed clusters. Electroless deposition of Ru on Pt seed clusters was also achieved, but it should be noted that this deposition method is extremely sensitive to the presence of other metal ions in solution that have a higher reduction potential than the metal ion targeted for deposition.

  7. The coupled cluster method and entanglement in three fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lévay, Péter; Nagy, Szilvia; Pipek, János; Sárosi, Gábor

    2017-01-01

    The Coupled Cluster (CC) and full CI expansions are studied for three fermions with six and seven modes. Surprisingly the CC expansion is tailor made to characterize the usual stochastic local operations and classical communication (SLOCC) entanglement classes. It means that the notion of a SLOCC transformation shows up quite naturally as a one relating the CC and CI expansions, and going from the CI expansion to the CC one is equivalent to obtaining a form for the state where the structure of the entanglement classes is transparent. In this picture, entanglement is characterized by the parameters of the cluster operators describing transitions from occupied states to singles, doubles, and triples of non-occupied ones. Using the CC parametrization of states in the seven-mode case, we give a simple formula for the unique SLOCC invariant J . Then we consider a perturbation problem featuring a state from the unique SLOCC class characterized by J ≠ 0 . For this state with entanglement generated by doubles, we investigate the phenomenon of changing the entanglement type due to the perturbing effect of triples. We show that there are states with real amplitudes such that their entanglement encoded into configurations of clusters of doubles is protected from errors generated by triples. Finally we put forward a proposal to use the parameters of the cluster operator describing transitions to doubles for entanglement characterization. Compared to the usual SLOCC classes, this provides a coarse grained approach to fermionic entanglement.

  8. An Empirical Comparison of Variable Standardization Methods in Cluster Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Catherine M.; Green, Paul E.

    1996-01-01

    The common marketing research practice of standardizing the columns of a persons-by-variables data matrix prior to clustering the entities corresponding to the rows was evaluated with 10 large-scale data sets. Results indicate that the column standardization practice may be problematic for some kinds of data that marketing researchers used for…

  9. Silver quantum cluster (ag9 )-grafted graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets for photocatalytic hydrogen generation and dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Kishore; Jang, Eunyong; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Jung-Ho; Park, Tae Joo

    2015-06-15

    We report the visible-light photocatalytic properties of a composite system consisting of silver quantum clusters [Ag9 (H2 MSA)7 ] (H2 MSA=mercaptosuccinic acid) embedded on graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (AgQCs-GCN). The composites were prepared through a simple chemical route; their structural, chemical, morphological, and optical properties were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, UV/Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Embedment of [Ag9 (H2 MSA)7 ] on graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets (GCN) resulted in extended visible-light absorption through multiple single-electron transitions in Ag quantum clusters and an effective electronic structure for hydroxyl radical generation, which enabled increased activity in the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue and methyl orange dye molecules compared with pristine GCN and silver nanoparticle-grafted GCN (AgNPs-GCN). Similarly, the amount of hydrogen generated by using AgQCs-GCN was 1.7 times higher than pristine GCN. However, the rate of hydrogen generated using AgQCs-GCN was slightly less than that of AgNPs-GCN because of surface hydroxyl radical formation. The plausible photocatalytic processes are discussed in detail.

  10. Refined entanglement concentration for electron-spin entangled cluster states with quantum-dot spins in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Fang-Fang; Long, Gui-Lu

    2017-01-01

    We present a refined entanglement concentration protocol (ECP) for an arbitrary unknown less-entangled four-electron-spin cluster state by exploring the optical selection rules derived from the quantum-dot spins in one-sided optical microcavities. In our ECP, the parties obtain not only the four-electron-spin systems in the partial entanglement with two unknown parameters, but also the less-entangled two-electron-spin systems in the first step. Utilizing the above preserved systems as the resource for the second step of our ECP, the parties can obtain a standard cluster state by keeping the robust odd-parity instances with two parity-check gates. Meanwhile, the systems in the rest three instances can be used as the resource in the next round of our ECP. The success probability of our ECP is largely increased by iteration of the ECP process. Moreover, all the coefficients of our ECP are unknown for the parties without assistance of extra single electron-spin, so our ECP maybe has good applications in quantum communication network in the future.

  11. Robustness of serial clustering of extra-tropical cyclones to the choice of tracking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Joaquim G.; Ulbrich, Sven; Karremann, Melanie K.; Stephenson, David B.; Economou, Theodoros; Shaffrey, Len C.

    2016-04-01

    Cyclone families are a frequent synoptic weather feature in the Euro-Atlantic area in winter. Given appropriate large-scale conditions, the occurrence of such series (clusters) of storms may lead to large socio-economic impacts and cumulative losses. Recent studies analyzing Reanalysis data using single cyclone tracking methods have shown that serial clustering of cyclones occurs on both flanks and downstream regions of the North Atlantic storm track. This study explores the sensitivity of serial clustering to the choice of tracking method. With this aim, the IMILAST cyclone track database based on ERA-interim data is analysed. Clustering is estimated by the dispersion (ratio of variance to mean) of winter (DJF) cyclones passages near each grid point over the Euro-Atlantic area. Results indicate that while the general pattern of clustering is identified for all methods, there are considerable differences in detail. This can primarily be attributed to the differences in the variance of cyclone counts between the methods, which range up to one order of magnitude. Nevertheless, clustering over the Eastern North Atlantic and Western Europe can be identified for all methods and can thus be generally considered as a robust feature. The statistical links between large-scale patterns like the NAO and clustering are obtained for all methods, though with different magnitudes. We conclude that the occurrence of cyclone clustering over the Eastern North Atlantic and Western Europe is largely independent from the choice of tracking method and hence from the definition of a cyclone.

  12. Quantum Simulations of Solvated Biomolecules Using Hybrid Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav

    2009-03-01

    One of the most important challenges in quantum simulations on biomolecules is efficient and accurate inclusion of the solvent, because the solvent atoms usually outnumber those in the biomolecule of interest. We have developed a hybrid method that allows for explicit quantum-mechanical treatment of the solvent at low computational cost. In this method, Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) is combined with an orbital-free (OF) DFT. Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT is used to describe the biomolecule and its first solvation shells, while the orbital-free (OF) DFT is employed for the rest of the solvent. The OF part is fully O(N) and capable of handling 10^5 solvent molecules on current parallel supercomputers, while taking only ˜ 10 % of the total time. The compatibility between the KS and OF DFT methods enables seamless integration between the two. In particular, the flow of solvent molecules across the KS/OF interface is allowed and the total energy is conserved. As the first large-scale applications, the hybrid method has been used to investigate the binding of copper ions to proteins involved in prion (PrP) and Parkinson's diseases. Our results for the PrP, which causes mad cow disease when misfolded, resolve a contradiction found in experiments, in which a stronger binding mode is replaced by a weaker one when concentration of copper ions is increased, and show how it can act as a copper buffer. Furthermore, incorporation of copper stabilizes the structure of the full-length PrP, suggesting its protective role in prion diseases. For alpha-synuclein, a Parkinson's disease (PD) protein, we show that Cu binding modifies the protein structurally, making it more susceptible to misfolding -- an initial step in the onset of PD. In collaboration with W. Lu, F. Rose and J. Bernholc.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Bubble Cluster Induced Flow by Three-Dimensional Vortex-in-Cell Method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Wang, Zhiwei; Uchiyama, Tomomi

    2014-08-01

    The behavior of air bubble clusters rising in water and the induced flow field are numerically studied using a three-dimensional two-way coupling algorithm based on a vortex-in-cell (VIC) method. In this method, vortex elements are convected in the Lagrangian frame and the liquid velocity field is solved from the Poisson equation of potential on the Eulerian grid. Two-way coupling is implemented by introducing a vorticity source term induced by the gradient of void fraction. Present simulation results are favorably compared with the measured results of bubble plume, which verifies the validity of the proposed VIC method. The rising of a single bubble cluster as well as two tandem bubble clusters are simulated. The mechanism of the aggregation effect in the rising process of bubble cluster is revealed and the transient processes of the generation, rising, strengthening, and separation of a vortex ring structure with bubble clusters are illustrated and analyzed in detail. Due to the aggregation, the average rising velocity increases with void fraction and is larger than the terminal rising velocity of single bubble. For the two tandem bubble cluster cases, the aggregation effect is stronger for smaller initial cluster distance, and both the strength of the induced vortex structure and the average bubble rising velocity are larger. For the 20 mm cluster distance case, the peak velocity of the lower cluster is about 2.7 times that of the terminal velocity of the single bubble and the peak average velocity of two clusters is about 2 times larger. While for the 30 mm cluster distance case, both the peak velocity of the lower cluster and two clusters are about 1.7 times that of the terminal velocity of the single bubble.

  14. A method for clustering and cooperation in wireless multimedia sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Alaei, Mohammad; Barcelo-Ordinas, Jose M

    2010-01-01

    Wireless multimedia sensor nodes sense areas that are uncorrelated to the areas covered by radio neighbouring sensors. Thus, node clustering for coordinating multimedia sensing and processing cannot be based on classical sensor clustering algorithms. This paper presents a clustering mechanism for Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks (WMSNs) based on overlapped Field of View (FoV) areas. Overlapping FoVs in dense networks cause the wasting of power due to redundant area sensing. The main aim of the proposed clustering method is energy conservation and network lifetime prolongation. This objective is achieved through coordination of nodes belonging to the same cluster to perform assigned tasks in a cooperative manner avoiding redundant sensing or processing. A paradigm in this concept, a cooperative scheduling scheme for object detection, is presented based on the proposed clustering method.

  15. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing circuit and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin P. (Inventor); Gingrich, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A quantum circuit performing quantum computation in a quantum computer. A chosen transformation of an initial n-qubit state is probabilistically obtained. The circuit comprises a unitary quantum operator obtained from a non-unitary quantum operator, operating on an n-qubit state and an ancilla state. When operation on the ancilla state provides a success condition, computation is stopped. When operation on the ancilla state provides a failure condition, computation is performed again on the ancilla state and the n-qubit state obtained in the previous computation, until a success condition is obtained.

  16. Nonzero-temperature entanglement negativity of quantum spin models: Area law, linked cluster expansions, and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Nicholas E; Devakul, Trithep; Hastings, Matthew B; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2016-02-01

    We show that the bipartite logarithmic entanglement negativity (EN) of quantum spin models obeys an area law at all nonzero temperatures. We develop numerical linked cluster (NLC) expansions for the "area-law" logarithmic entanglement negativity as a function of temperature and other parameters. For one-dimensional models the results of NLC are compared with exact diagonalization on finite systems and are found to agree very well. The NLC results are also obtained for two dimensional XXZ and transverse field Ising models. In all cases, we find a sudden onset (or sudden death) of negativity at a finite temperature above which the negativity is zero. We use perturbation theory to develop a physical picture for this sudden onset (or sudden death). The onset of EN or its magnitude are insensitive to classical finite-temperature phase transitions, supporting the argument for absence of any role of quantum mechanics at such transitions. On approach to a quantum critical point at T=0, negativity shows critical scaling in size and temperature.

  17. Nonzero-temperature entanglement negativity of quantum spin models: Area law, linked cluster expansions, and sudden death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Nicholas E.; Devakul, Trithep; Hastings, Matthew B.; Singh, Rajiv R. P.

    2016-02-01

    We show that the bipartite logarithmic entanglement negativity (EN) of quantum spin models obeys an area law at all nonzero temperatures. We develop numerical linked cluster (NLC) expansions for the "area-law" logarithmic entanglement negativity as a function of temperature and other parameters. For one-dimensional models the results of NLC are compared with exact diagonalization on finite systems and are found to agree very well. The NLC results are also obtained for two dimensional X X Z and transverse field Ising models. In all cases, we find a sudden onset (or sudden death) of negativity at a finite temperature above which the negativity is zero. We use perturbation theory to develop a physical picture for this sudden onset (or sudden death). The onset of EN or its magnitude are insensitive to classical finite-temperature phase transitions, supporting the argument for absence of any role of quantum mechanics at such transitions. On approach to a quantum critical point at T =0 , negativity shows critical scaling in size and temperature.

  18. Using full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo in a seniority zero space to investigate the correlation energy equivalence of pair coupled cluster doubles and doubly occupied configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, James J.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-03-01

    Over the past few years, pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) has shown promise for the description of strong correlation. This promise is related to its apparent ability to match results from doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), even though the latter method has exponential computational cost. Here, by modifying the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo algorithm to sample only the seniority zero sector of Hilbert space, we show that the DOCI and pCCD energies are in agreement for a variety of 2D Hubbard models, including for systems well out of reach for conventional configuration interaction algorithms. Our calculations are aided by the sign problem being much reduced in the seniority zero space compared with the full space. We present evidence for this and then discuss the sign problem in terms of the wave function of the system which appears to have a simplified sign structure.

  19. A cluster merging method for time series microarray with production values.

    PubMed

    Chira, Camelia; Sedano, Javier; Camara, Monica; Prieto, Carlos; Villar, Jose R; Corchado, Emilio

    2014-09-01

    A challenging task in time-course microarray data analysis is to cluster genes meaningfully combining the information provided by multiple replicates covering the same key time points. This paper proposes a novel cluster merging method to accomplish this goal obtaining groups with highly correlated genes. The main idea behind the proposed method is to generate a clustering starting from groups created based on individual temporal series (representing different biological replicates measured in the same time points) and merging them by taking into account the frequency by which two genes are assembled together in each clustering. The gene groups at the level of individual time series are generated using several shape-based clustering methods. This study is focused on a real-world time series microarray task with the aim to find co-expressed genes related to the production and growth of a certain bacteria. The shape-based clustering methods used at the level of individual time series rely on identifying similar gene expression patterns over time which, in some models, are further matched to the pattern of production/growth. The proposed cluster merging method is able to produce meaningful gene groups which can be naturally ranked by the level of agreement on the clustering among individual time series. The list of clusters and genes is further sorted based on the information correlation coefficient and new problem-specific relevant measures. Computational experiments and results of the cluster merging method are analyzed from a biological perspective and further compared with the clustering generated based on the mean value of time series and the same shape-based algorithm.

  20. Mixture model and Markov random field-based remote sensing image unsupervised clustering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y.; Yang, Y.; Rao, N.; Lun, X.; Lan, J.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, a novel method for remote sensing image clustering based on mixture model and Markov random field (MRF) is proposed. A remote sensing image can be considered as Gaussian mixture model. The image clustering result corresponding to the image label field is a MRF. So, the image clustering procedure is transformed to a maximum a posterior (MAP) problem by Bayesian theorem. The intensity difference and the spatial distance between the two pixels in the same clique are introduced into the traditional MRF potential function. The iterative conditional model (ICM) is employed to find the solution of MAP. We use the max entropy criterion to choose the optimal clustering number. In the experiments, the method is compared with the traditional MRF clustering method using ICM and simulated annealing (SA). The results show that this method is better than the traditional MRF model both in noise filtering and miss-classification ratio.

  1. Entropy generation in Gaussian quantum transformations: applying the replica method to continuous-variable quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagatsos, Christos N.; Karanikas, Alexandros I.; Kordas, Georgios; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2016-02-01

    In spite of their simple description in terms of rotations or symplectic transformations in phase space, quadratic Hamiltonians such as those modelling the most common Gaussian operations on bosonic modes remain poorly understood in terms of entropy production. For instance, determining the quantum entropy generated by a Bogoliubov transformation is notably a hard problem, with generally no known analytical solution, while it is vital to the characterisation of quantum communication via bosonic channels. Here we overcome this difficulty by adapting the replica method, a tool borrowed from statistical physics and quantum field theory. We exhibit a first application of this method to continuous-variable quantum information theory, where it enables accessing entropies in an optical parametric amplifier. As an illustration, we determine the entropy generated by amplifying a binary superposition of the vacuum and a Fock state, which yields a surprisingly simple, yet unknown analytical expression.

  2. Economic and Deterministic Quantum Teleportation of Arbitrary Bipartite Pure and Mixed State with Shared Cluster Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Binbin; Liu, Yu

    2009-09-01

    We present a novel protocol for teleportation of arbitrary bipartite pure and mixed state with shared cluster entanglement in this paper. By employing Bell-state measurement on the teleported state and the shared cluster state twice, a sender could transmit the arbitrary bipartite state to a distant receiver. We show the good feature of the cluster state channel, with which it can realize the deterministic teleportation rather than probabilistic one. Moreover, since we require less particles to be shared and need no auxiliary qubit in our protocol, it is more efficient and applicable than the previous schemes.

  3. High quantum yield ZnO quantum dots synthesizing via an ultrasonication microreactor method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weimin; Yang, Huafang; Ding, Wenhao; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Le; Wang, Lixi; Yu, Mingxun; Zhang, Qitu

    2016-11-01

    Green emission ZnO quantum dots were synthesized by an ultrasonic microreactor. Ultrasonic radiation brought bubbles through ultrasonic cavitation. These bubbles built microreactor inside the microreactor. The photoluminescence properties of ZnO quantum dots synthesized with different flow rate, ultrasonic power and temperature were discussed. Flow rate, ultrasonic power and temperature would influence the type and quantity of defects in ZnO quantum dots. The sizes of ZnO quantum dots would be controlled by those conditions as well. Flow rate affected the reaction time. With the increasing of flow rate, the sizes of ZnO quantum dots decreased and the quantum yields first increased then decreased. Ultrasonic power changed the ultrasonic cavitation intensity, which affected the reaction energy and the separation of the solution. With the increasing of ultrasonic power, sizes of ZnO quantum dots first decreased then increased, while the quantum yields kept increasing. The effect of ultrasonic temperature on the photoluminescence properties of ZnO quantum dots was influenced by the flow rate. Different flow rate related to opposite changing trend. Moreover, the quantum yields of ZnO QDs synthesized by ultrasonic microreactor could reach 64.7%, which is higher than those synthesized only under ultrasonic radiation or only by microreactor.

  4. New variable stars in open clusters. I. Methods and results for 20 open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Zwintz, K.; Maitzen, H. M.; Pintado, O. I.; Rode-Paunzen, M.

    2004-04-01

    We present high precision CCD photometry of 1791 objects in 20 open clusters with an age of 10 Myr to 1 Gyr. These observations were performed within the Δ a photometric system which is primarily used to detect chemically peculiar stars of the upper main sequence. Time bases range from 30 min up to 60 days with data from several nights. We describe the time series analysis reaching a detection limit of down to 0.006 mag for apparent variability. In total, we have detected 35 variable objects of which four are not members of their corresponding clusters. The variables cover the entire Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, hence they are interesting targets for follow-up observations. Based on observations obtained at Complejo Astronómico el Leoncito (CASLEO), operated under the agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba y San Juan; ESO-La Silla and UTSO-Las Campanas.

  5. Performance Optimization of Tensor Contraction Expressions for Many Body Methods in Quantum Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Bernholdt, David E; Pitzer, R. M.; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2009-01-01

    Complex tensor contraction expressions arise in accurate electronic structure models in quantum chemistry, such as the coupled cluster method. This paper addresses two complementary aspects of performance optimization of such tensor contraction expressions. Transformations using algebraic properties of commutativity and associativity can be used to significantly decrease the number of arithmetic operations required for evaluation of these expressions. The identification of common subexpressions among a set of tensor contraction expressions can result in a reduction of the total number of operations required to evaluate the tensor contractions. The first part of the paper describes an effective algorithm for operation minimization with common subexpression identification and demonstrates its effectiveness on tensor contraction expressions for coupled cluster equations. The second part of the paper highlights the importance of data layout transformation in the optimization of tensor contraction computations on modern processors. A number of considerations, such as minimization of cache misses and utilization of multimedia vector instructions, are discussed. A library for efficient index permutation of multidimensional tensors is described, and experimental performance data is provided that demonstrates its effectiveness.

  6. Performance Optimization of Tensor Contraction Expressions for Many Body Methods in Quantum Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Hartono, Albert; Lu, Qingda; henretty, thomas; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; zhang, huaijian; Baumgartner, Gerald; Bernholdt, David E.; Nooijen, Marcel; Pitzer, Russell M.; Ramanujam, J.; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2009-11-12

    Complex tensor contraction expressions arise in accurate electronic structure models in quantum chemistry, such as the coupled cluster method. This paper addresses two complementary aspects of performance optimization of such tensor contraction expressions. Transformations using algebraic properties of commutativity and associativity can be used to significantly decrease the number of arithmetic operations required for evaluation of these expressions. The identification of common subexpressions among a set of tensor contraction expressions can result in a reduction of the total number of operations required to evaluate the tensor contractions. The first part of the paper describes an effective algorithm for operation minimization with common subexpression identification and demonstrates its effectiveness on tensor contraction expressions for coupled cluster equations. The second part of the paper highlights the importance of data layout transformation in the optimization of tensor contraction computations on modern processors. A number of considerations such as minimization of cache misses and utilization of multimedia vector instructions are discussed. A library for efficient index permutation of multi-dimensional tensors is described and experimental performance data is provided that demonstrates its effectiveness.

  7. Performance optimization of tensor contraction expressions for many-body methods in quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hartono, Albert; Lu, Qingda; Henretty, Thomas; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Zhang, Huaijian; Baumgartner, Gerald; Bernholdt, David E; Nooijen, Marcel; Pitzer, Russell; Ramanujam, J; Sadayappan, P

    2009-11-12

    Complex tensor contraction expressions arise in accurate electronic structure models in quantum chemistry, such as the coupled cluster method. This paper addresses two complementary aspects of performance optimization of such tensor contraction expressions. Transformations using algebraic properties of commutativity and associativity can be used to significantly decrease the number of arithmetic operations required for evaluation of these expressions. The identification of common subexpressions among a set of tensor contraction expressions can result in a reduction of the total number of operations required to evaluate the tensor contractions. The first part of the paper describes an effective algorithm for operation minimization with common subexpression identification and demonstrates its effectiveness on tensor contraction expressions for coupled cluster equations. The second part of the paper highlights the importance of data layout transformation in the optimization of tensor contraction computations on modern processors. A number of considerations, such as minimization of cache misses and utilization of multimedia vector instructions, are discussed. A library for efficient index permutation of multidimensional tensors is described, and experimental performance data is provided that demonstrates its effectiveness.

  8. Network color management system using a cluster dividing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichogi, Mutsuko; Kanamori, Katsuhiro

    2001-12-01

    Recently the color reproduction of the real objects is becoming more and more important in the field of telemedicine and internet shopping. To reproduce the object's color under the various conditions, the surface spectral reflectance has to be estimated. In this paper we present the novel way to estimate it using conventional 3- band digital camera. Usually the precise estimation of the spectra from the 3-band image is very difficult, as it has metameric black and the simple camera model is not suitable. To improve the estimation accuracy, we propose dividing color space in to clusters and estimating spectra using different model parameters at each cluster. Clusters are set corresponding to the major objects in camera images. Next the estimated spectral image is reproduced on the monitor. When luminance and color temperature of the specified viewing illuminant and the monitor are different, the subject hardly perceives the object's real color. Therefore the image is converted using CIECAM97s. This paper shows the results of simulation using the image of enlarged human's mouth assuming remote consulting with dental clinic. In this system, a dentist can perceive the real color of patient's gums and teeth on the monitor.

  9. Spectral methods and cluster structure in correlation-based networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimo, Tapio; Tibély, Gergely; Saramäki, Jari; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János

    2008-10-01

    We investigate how in complex systems the eigenpairs of the matrices derived from the correlations of multichannel observations reflect the cluster structure of the underlying networks. For this we use daily return data from the NYSE and focus specifically on the spectral properties of weight W=|-δ and diffusion matrices D=W/sj-δ, where C is the correlation matrix and si=∑jW the strength of node j. The eigenvalues (and corresponding eigenvectors) of the weight matrix are ranked in descending order. As in the earlier observations, the first eigenvector stands for a measure of the market correlations. Its components are, to first approximation, equal to the strengths of the nodes and there is a second order, roughly linear, correction. The high ranking eigenvectors, excluding the highest ranking one, are usually assigned to market sectors and industrial branches. Our study shows that both for weight and diffusion matrices the eigenpair analysis is not capable of easily deducing the cluster structure of the network without a priori knowledge. In addition we have studied the clustering of stocks using the asset graph approach with and without spectrum based noise filtering. It turns out that asset graphs are quite insensitive to noise and there is no sharp percolation transition as a function of the ratio of bonds included, thus no natural threshold value for that ratio seems to exist. We suggest that these observations can be of use for other correlation based networks as well.

  10. Cryptanalysis of Controlled Quantum Secure Direct Communication and Authentication Protocol Based on Five-Particle Cluster State and Quantum One-Time Pad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhihao; Chen, Hanwu; Liu, Wenjie

    2016-10-01

    A new attack strategy, the so-called intercept-selectively-measure-resend attack is put forward. It shows that there are some security issues in the controlled quantum secure direct communication (CQSDC) and authentication protocol based on five-particle cluster states and quantum one-time pad. Firstly, an eavesdropper (Eve) can use this attack to eavesdrop on 0.656 bit of every bit of the identity string of the receiver and 1.406 bits of every couple of the corresponding bits of the secret message without being detected. Also, she can eavesdrop on 0.311 bit of every bit of the identity string of the controller. Secondly, the receiver can also take this attack to obtain 1.311 bits of every couple of the corresponding bits of the secret message without the permission of the controller, which is not allowed in the CQSDC protocols. In fact, there is another security issue in this protocol, that is, one half of the information about the secret is leaked out unconsciously. In addition, an alternative attack strategy which is called as the selective-CNOT-operation attack strategy to attack this protocol is discussed.

  11. A noniterative asymmetric triple excitation correction for the density-fitted coupled-cluster singles and doubles method: Preliminary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkaya, Uǧur

    2016-04-01

    An efficient implementation of the asymmetric triples correction for the coupled-cluster singles and doubles [ΛCCSD(T)] method [S. A. Kucharski and R. J. Bartlett, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 5243 (1998); T. D. Crawford and J. F. Stanton, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 70, 601 (1998)] with the density-fitting [DF-ΛCCSD(T)] approach is presented. The computational time for the DF-ΛCCSD(T) method is compared with that of ΛCCSD(T). Our results demonstrate that the DF-ΛCCSD(T) method provide substantially lower computational costs than ΛCCSD(T). Further application results show that the ΛCCSD(T) and DF-ΛCCSD(T) methods are very beneficial for the study of single bond breaking problems as well as noncovalent interactions and transition states. We conclude that ΛCCSD(T) and DF-ΛCCSD(T) are very promising for the study of challenging chemical systems, where the coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples method fails.

  12. Atomistic Modeling of Nanostructures via the BFS Quantum Approximate Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Garces, Jorge E.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Farias, D.

    2003-01-01

    Ideally, computational modeling techniques for nanoscopic physics would be able to perform free of limitations on the type and number of elements, while providing comparable accuracy when dealing with bulk or surface problems. Computational efficiency is also desirable, if not mandatory, for properly dealing with the complexity of typical nano-strucured systems. A quantum approximate technique, the BFS method for alloys, which attempts to meet these demands, is introduced for the calculation of the energetics of nanostructures. The versatility of the technique is demonstrated through analysis of diverse systems, including multi-phase precipitation in a five element Ni-Al-Ti-Cr-Cu alloy and the formation of mixed composition Co-Cu islands on a metallic Cu(III) substrate.

  13. Methods to Characterize the Oligonucleotide Functionalization of Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Weichelt, Richard; Leubner, Susanne; Henning-Knechtel, Anja; Mertig, Michael; Gaponik, Nikolai; Schmidt, Thorsten-Lars; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Currently, DNA nanotechnology offers the most programmable, scalable, and accurate route for the self-assembly of matter with nanometer precision into 1, 2, or 3D structures. One example is DNA origami that is well suited to serve as a molecularly defined "breadboard", and thus, to organize various nanomaterials such as nanoparticles into hybrid systems. Since the controlled assembly of quantum dots (QDs) is of high interest in the field of photonics and other optoelectronic applications, a more detailed view on the functionalization of QDs with oligonucleotides shall be achieved. In this work, four different methods are presented to characterize the functionalization of thiol-capped cadmium telluride QDs with oligonucleotides and for the precise quantification of the number of oligonucleotides bound to the QD surface. This study enables applications requiring the self-assembly of semiconductor-oligonucleotide hybrid materials and proves the conjugation success in a simple and straightforward manner.

  14. Method of precisely modifying predetermined surface layers of a workpiece by cluster ion impact therewith

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Lewis; Buehler, Robert J.; Matthew, Michael W.; Ledbetter, Myron

    1985-01-01

    A method of precisely modifying a selected area of a workpiece by producing a beam of charged cluster ions that is narrowly mass selected to a predetermined mean size of cluster ions within a range of 25 to 10.sup.6 atoms per cluster ion, and accelerated in a beam to a critical velocity. The accelerated beam is used to impact a selected area of an outer surface of the workpiece at a preselected rate of impacts of cluster ions/cm.sup.2 /sec. in order to effect a precise modification in that selected area of the workpiece.

  15. Method of precisely modifying predetermined surface layers of a workpiece by cluster ion impact therewith

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, L.; Beuhler, R.J.; Matthew, M.W.; Ledbetter, M.

    1984-06-25

    A method of precisely modifying a selected area of a workpiece by producing a beam of charged cluster ions that is narrowly mass selected to a predetermined mean size of cluster ions within a range of 25 to 10/sup 6/ atoms per cluster ion, and accelerated in a beam to a critical velocity. The accelerated beam is used to impact a selected area of an outer surface of the workpiece at a preselected rate of impacts of cluster ions/cm/sup 2//sec in order to effect a precise modification in that selected area of the workpiece.

  16. Calculation of Dipole Transition Matrix Elements and Expectation Values by Vibrational Coupled Cluster Method.

    PubMed

    Banik, Subrata; Pal, Sourav; Prasad, M Durga

    2010-10-12

    An effective operator approach based on the coupled cluster method is described and applied to calculate vibrational expectation values and absolute transition matrix elements. Coupled cluster linear response theory (CCLRT) is used to calculate excited states. The convergence pattern of these properties with the rank of the excitation operator is studied. The method is applied to a water molecule. Arponen-type double similarity transformation in extended coupled cluster (ECCM) framework is also used to generate an effective operator, and the convergence pattern of these properties is compared to the normal coupled cluster (NCCM) approach. It is found that the coupled cluster method provides an accurate description of these quantities for low lying vibrational excited states. The ECCM provides a significant improvement for the calculation of the transition matrix elements.

  17. A solvothermal method for synthesizing monolayer protected amorphous calcium carbonate clusters.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengtong; Gebauer, Denis; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-05-19

    A solvothermal method was developed for synthesizing organic monolayer protected amorphous calcium carbonate clusters using 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid as ligand, ethanol as solvent and NaHCO3 decomposition as CO2 source, which can be extended to synthesize other monolayer protected mineral clusters.

  18. A method of using cluster analysis to study statistical dependence in multivariate data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Card, D. H.; Lyle, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    A technique is presented that uses both cluster analysis and a Monte Carlo significance test of clusters to discover associations between variables in multidimensional data. The method is applied to an example of a noisy function in three-dimensional space, to a sample from a mixture of three bivariate normal distributions, and to the well-known Fisher's Iris data.

  19. Cluster Analysis as a Method of Recovering Types of Intraindividual Growth Trajectories: A Monte Carlo Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumenci, Levent; Windle, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Used Monte Carlo methods to evaluate the adequacy of cluster analysis to recover group membership based on simulated latent growth curve (LCG) models. Cluster analysis failed to recover growth subtypes adequately when the difference between growth curves was shape only. Discusses circumstances under which it was more successful. (SLD)

  20. Clustering Methods; Part IV of Scientific Report No. ISR-18, Information Storage and Retrieval...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY. Dept. of Computer Science.

    Two papers are included as Part Four of this report on Salton's Magical Automatic Retriever of Texts (SMART) project report. The first paper: "A Controlled Single Pass Classification Algorithm with Application to Multilevel Clustering" by D. B. Johnson and J. M. Laferente presents a single pass clustering method which compares favorably…

  1. Frequency-domain multiscale quantum mechanics/electromagnetics simulation method

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Lingyi; Yin, Zhenyu; Yam, ChiYung E-mail: ghc@everest.hku.hk; Koo, SiuKong; Chen, GuanHua E-mail: ghc@everest.hku.hk; Chen, Quan; Wong, Ngai

    2013-12-28

    A frequency-domain quantum mechanics and electromagnetics (QM/EM) method is developed. Compared with the time-domain QM/EM method [Meng et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 1190–1199 (2012)], the newly developed frequency-domain QM/EM method could effectively capture the dynamic properties of electronic devices over a broader range of operating frequencies. The system is divided into QM and EM regions and solved in a self-consistent manner via updating the boundary conditions at the QM and EM interface. The calculated potential distributions and current densities at the interface are taken as the boundary conditions for the QM and EM calculations, respectively, which facilitate the information exchange between the QM and EM calculations and ensure that the potential, charge, and current distributions are continuous across the QM/EM interface. Via Fourier transformation, the dynamic admittance calculated from the time-domain and frequency-domain QM/EM methods is compared for a carbon nanotube based molecular device.

  2. Sulfate radical oxidation of aromatic contaminants: a detailed assessment of density functional theory and high-level quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Pari, Sangavi; Wang, Inger A; Liu, Haizhou; Wong, Bryan M

    2017-03-22

    Advanced oxidation processes that utilize highly oxidative radicals are widely used in water reuse treatment. In recent years, the application of sulfate radical (SO4˙(-)) as a promising oxidant for water treatment has gained increasing attention. To understand the efficiency of SO4˙(-) in the degradation of organic contaminants in wastewater effluent, it is important to be able to predict the reaction kinetics of various SO4˙(-)-driven oxidation reactions. In this study, we utilize density functional theory (DFT) and high-level wavefunction-based methods (including computationally-intensive coupled cluster methods), to explore the activation energies of SO4˙(-)-driven oxidation reactions on a series of benzene-derived contaminants. These high-level calculations encompass a wide set of reactions including 110 forward/reverse reactions and 5 different computational methods in total. Based on the high-level coupled-cluster quantum calculations, we find that the popular M06-2X DFT functional is significantly more accurate for OH(-) additions than for SO4˙(-) reactions. Most importantly, we highlight some of the limitations and deficiencies of other computational methods, and we recommend the use of high-level quantum calculations to spot-check environmental chemistry reactions that may lie outside the training set of the M06-2X functional, particularly for water oxidation reactions that involve SO4˙(-) and other inorganic species.

  3. International journal of quantum chemistry. Quantum Chemistry Symposium Number 27: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Atomic, Molecular, and Condensed Matter Theory and Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowdin, Per-Olov; Ohrn, N. Y.; Sabin, John R.; Zerner, Michael C.

    1993-03-01

    The topics covered at the 33rd annual Sanibel Symposium, organized by the faculty and staff of the Quantum Theory Project of the University of Florida, and held March 13 - 20, 1993, include advanced scientific computing, interaction of photons and matter, quantum molecular dynamics, electronic structure methods, polymeric systems, and quantum chemical methods for extended systems.

  4. Communication: Improved pair approximations in local coupled-cluster methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwilk, Max; Usvyat, Denis; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2015-03-01

    In local coupled cluster treatments the electron pairs can be classified according to the magnitude of their energy contributions or distances into strong, close, weak, and distant pairs. Different approximations are introduced for the latter three classes. In this communication, an improved simplified treatment of close and weak pairs is proposed, which is based on long-range cancellations of individually slowly decaying contributions in the amplitude equations. Benchmark calculations for correlation, reaction, and activation energies demonstrate that these approximations work extremely well, while pair approximations based on local second-order Møller-Plesset theory can lead to errors that are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger.

  5. Quantum Calculations On Hydrogen Bonds In Certain Water Clusters Show Cooperative Effects

    PubMed Central

    ZNAMENSKIY, VASILIY S.; GREEN, MICHAEL E.

    2008-01-01

    Water molecules in clefts and small clusters are in a significantly different environment than in bulk water. We have carried out ab initio calculations that demonstrate this in a series of clusters, showing that cooperative effects must be taken into account in the treatment of hydrogen bonds and water clusters in such bounded systems. Hydrogen bonds between water molecules in simulations are treated most frequently by using point charge water potentials, such as TIP3P or SPC, sometimes with a polarizable extension. These produce excellent results in bulk water, for which they are calibrated. Clefts are different from bulk; it is necessary to look at smaller systems, and investigate the effect of limited numbers of neighbors. We start with a study of isolated clusters of water with varying numbers of neighbors of a hydrogen bonded pair of water molecules. The cluster as a whole is in vacuum. The clusters are defined so as to provide the possible arrangements of nearest neighbors of a central hydrogen bonded pair of water molecules. We then scan the length and angles of the central hydrogen bond of the clusters, using density functional theory, for each possible arrangement of donor and acceptor hydrogen bonds on the central hydrogen bonding pair; the potential of interaction of two water molecules varies with the number of donor and of acceptor neighbors. This also involves changes in charge on the water molecules as a function of bond length, and changes in energy and length as a function of number of neighboring donor and acceptor molecules. Energy varies by approximately 6 kBT near room temperature from the highest to the lowest energy when bond length alone is varied, enough to seriously affect simulations. PMID:19169381

  6. Tunneling dynamics with a mixed quantum-classical method: Quantum corrected propagator combined with frozen Gaussian wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2008-07-01

    The recently developed mixed quantum-classical propagation method is extended to treat tunneling effects in multidimensional systems. Formulated for systems consisting of a quantum primary part and a classical bath of heavier particles, the method employs a frozen Gaussian description for the bath degrees of freedom, while the dynamics of the quantum subsystem is governed by a corrected propagator. The corrections are defined in terms of matrix elements of zeroth-order propagators. The method is applied to a model system of a double-well potential bilinearly coupled to a harmonic oscillator. The extension of the method, which includes nondiagonal elements of the correction propagator, enables an accurate treatment of tunneling in an antisymmetric double-well potential.

  7. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Overview and Membership Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donor, John; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; O'Connell, Julia; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Melendez, Matthew; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Allende-Prieto, Carlos; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Schultheis, Mathias; Stassun, Keivan G.; Apogee Team

    2017-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Analysis and Mapping (OCCAM) survey aims to produce a comprehensive, uniform, infrared-based data set for hundreds of open clusters, and constrain key Galactic dynamical and chemical parameters using the SDSS/APOGEE survey. We present the sample and methods being used by the survey to determine membership for the few-star sampling for most clusters as observed by the SDSS/APOGEE. We present verification of the membership method using the DR13 sample, and show an extension of the method by incorporation of proper motion and parallax data from the ESA Gaia mission.This work is supported by an NSF AAG grant AST-1311835.

  8. A two-stage method for microcalcification cluster segmentation in mammography by deformable models

    SciTech Connect

    Arikidis, N.; Kazantzi, A.; Skiadopoulos, S.; Karahaliou, A.; Costaridou, L.; Vassiou, K.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Segmentation of microcalcification (MC) clusters in x-ray mammography is a difficult task for radiologists. Accurate segmentation is prerequisite for quantitative image analysis of MC clusters and subsequent feature extraction and classification in computer-aided diagnosis schemes. Methods: In this study, a two-stage semiautomated segmentation method of MC clusters is investigated. The first stage is targeted to accurate and time efficient segmentation of the majority of the particles of a MC cluster, by means of a level set method. The second stage is targeted to shape refinement of selected individual MCs, by means of an active contour model. Both methods are applied in the framework of a rich scale-space representation, provided by the wavelet transform at integer scales. Segmentation reliability of the proposed method in terms of inter and intraobserver agreements was evaluated in a case sample of 80 MC clusters originating from the digital database for screening mammography, corresponding to 4 morphology types (punctate: 22, fine linear branching: 16, pleomorphic: 18, and amorphous: 24) of MC clusters, assessing radiologists’ segmentations quantitatively by two distance metrics (Hausdorff distance—HDIST{sub cluster}, average of minimum distance—AMINDIST{sub cluster}) and the area overlap measure (AOM{sub cluster}). The effect of the proposed segmentation method on MC cluster characterization accuracy was evaluated in a case sample of 162 pleomorphic MC clusters (72 malignant and 90 benign). Ten MC cluster features, targeted to capture morphologic properties of individual MCs in a cluster (area, major length, perimeter, compactness, and spread), were extracted and a correlation-based feature selection method yielded a feature subset to feed in a support vector machine classifier. Classification performance of the MC cluster features was estimated by means of the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (Az ± Standard Error) utilizing

  9. Merging symmetry projection methods with coupled cluster theory: Lessons from the Lipkin model Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlen-Strothman, Jacob M.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Hermes, Matthew R.; Degroote, Matthias; Qiu, Yiheng; Zhao, Jinmo; Dukelsky, Jorge; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2017-02-01

    Coupled cluster and symmetry projected Hartree-Fock are two central paradigms in electronic structure theory. However, they are very different. Single reference coupled cluster is highly successful for treating weakly correlated systems but fails under strong correlation unless one sacrifices good quantum numbers and works with broken-symmetry wave functions, which is unphysical for finite systems. Symmetry projection is effective for the treatment of strong correlation at the mean-field level through multireference non-orthogonal configuration interaction wavefunctions, but unlike coupled cluster, it is neither size extensive nor ideal for treating dynamic correlation. We here examine different scenarios for merging these two dissimilar theories. We carry out this exercise over the integrable Lipkin model Hamiltonian, which despite its simplicity, encompasses non-trivial physics for degenerate systems and can be solved via diagonalization for a very large number of particles. We show how symmetry projection and coupled cluster doubles individually fail in different correlation limits, whereas models that merge these two theories are highly successful over the entire phase diagram. Despite the simplicity of the Lipkin Hamiltonian, the lessons learned in this work will be useful for building an ab initio symmetry projected coupled cluster theory that we expect to be accurate in the weakly and strongly correlated limits, as well as the recoupling regime.

  10. Fast optimization of binary clusters using a novel dynamic lattice searching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xia; Cheng, Wen

    2014-09-01

    Global optimization of binary clusters has been a difficult task despite of much effort and many efficient methods. Directing toward two types of elements (i.e., homotop problem) in binary clusters, two classes of virtual dynamic lattices are constructed and a modified dynamic lattice searching (DLS) method, i.e., binary DLS (BDLS) method, is developed. However, it was found that the BDLS can only be utilized for the optimization of binary clusters with small sizes because homotop problem is hard to be solved without atomic exchange operation. Therefore, the iterated local search (ILS) method is adopted to solve homotop problem and an efficient method based on the BDLS method and ILS, named as BDLS-ILS, is presented for global optimization of binary clusters. In order to assess the efficiency of the proposed method, binary Lennard-Jones clusters with up to 100 atoms are investigated. Results show that the method is proved to be efficient. Furthermore, the BDLS-ILS method is also adopted to study the geometrical structures of (AuPd)79 clusters with DFT-fit parameters of Gupta potential.

  11. Fast optimization of binary clusters using a novel dynamic lattice searching method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xia; Cheng, Wen

    2014-09-28

    Global optimization of binary clusters has been a difficult task despite of much effort and many efficient methods. Directing toward two types of elements (i.e., homotop problem) in binary clusters, two classes of virtual dynamic lattices are constructed and a modified dynamic lattice searching (DLS) method, i.e., binary DLS (BDLS) method, is developed. However, it was found that the BDLS can only be utilized for the optimization of binary clusters with small sizes because homotop problem is hard to be solved without atomic exchange operation. Therefore, the iterated local search (ILS) method is adopted to solve homotop problem and an efficient method based on the BDLS method and ILS, named as BDLS-ILS, is presented for global optimization of binary clusters. In order to assess the efficiency of the proposed method, binary Lennard-Jones clusters with up to 100 atoms are investigated. Results show that the method is proved to be efficient. Furthermore, the BDLS-ILS method is also adopted to study the geometrical structures of (AuPd)79 clusters with DFT-fit parameters of Gupta potential.

  12. Fast optimization of binary clusters using a novel dynamic lattice searching method

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xia Cheng, Wen

    2014-09-28

    Global optimization of binary clusters has been a difficult task despite of much effort and many efficient methods. Directing toward two types of elements (i.e., homotop problem) in binary clusters, two classes of virtual dynamic lattices are constructed and a modified dynamic lattice searching (DLS) method, i.e., binary DLS (BDLS) method, is developed. However, it was found that the BDLS can only be utilized for the optimization of binary clusters with small sizes because homotop problem is hard to be solved without atomic exchange operation. Therefore, the iterated local search (ILS) method is adopted to solve homotop problem and an efficient method based on the BDLS method and ILS, named as BDLS-ILS, is presented for global optimization of binary clusters. In order to assess the efficiency of the proposed method, binary Lennard-Jones clusters with up to 100 atoms are investigated. Results show that the method is proved to be efficient. Furthermore, the BDLS-ILS method is also adopted to study the geometrical structures of (AuPd){sub 79} clusters with DFT-fit parameters of Gupta potential.

  13. The swift UVOT stars survey. I. Methods and test clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Michael H.; Porterfield, Blair L.; Linevsky, Jacquelyn S.; Bond, Howard E.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Berrier, Joshua L.; Gronwall, Caryl A.; Holland, Stephen T.; Breeveld, Alice A.; Brown, Peter J. E-mail: blp14@psu.edu E-mail: caryl@astro.psu.edu E-mail: aab@mssl.ucl.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We describe the motivations and background of a large survey of nearby stellar populations using the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. UVOT, with its wide field, near-UV sensitivity, and 2.″3 spatial resolution, is uniquely suited to studying nearby stellar populations and providing insight into the near-UV properties of hot stars and the contribution of those stars to the integrated light of more distant stellar populations. We review the state of UV stellar photometry, outline the survey, and address problems specific to wide- and crowded-field UVOT photometry. We present color–magnitude diagrams of the nearby open clusters M67, NGC 188, and NGC 2539, and the globular cluster M79. We demonstrate that UVOT can easily discern the young- and intermediate-age main sequences, blue stragglers, and hot white dwarfs, producing results consistent with previous studies. We also find that it characterizes the blue horizontal branch of M79 and easily identifies a known post-asymptotic giant branch star.

  14. Barrier heights of hydrogen-transfer reactions with diffusion quantum monte carlo method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaojun; Wang, Fan

    2017-04-30

    Hydrogen-transfer reactions are an important class of reactions in many chemical and biological processes. Barrier heights of H-transfer reactions are underestimated significantly by popular exchange-correlation functional with density functional theory (DFT), while coupled-cluster (CC) method is quite expensive and can be applied only to rather small systems. Quantum Monte-Carlo method can usually provide reliable results for large systems. Performance of fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte-Carlo method (FN-DMC) on barrier heights of the 19 H-transfer reactions in the HTBH38/08 database is investigated in this study with the trial wavefunctions of the single-Slater-Jastrow form and orbitals from DFT using local density approximation. Our results show that barrier heights of these reactions can be calculated rather accurately using FN-DMC and the mean absolute error is 1.0 kcal/mol in all-electron calculations. Introduction of pseudopotentials (PP) in FN-DMC calculations improves efficiency pronouncedly. According to our results, error of the employed PPs is smaller than that of the present CCSD(T) and FN-DMC calculations. FN-DMC using PPs can thus be applied to investigate H-transfer reactions involving larger molecules reliably. In addition, bond dissociation energies of the involved molecules using FN-DMC are in excellent agreement with reference values and they are even better than results of the employed CCSD(T) calculations using the aug-cc-pVQZ basis set. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. An application of the k-th nearest neighbor method to open cluster membership determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin-Hua

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a non-parametric method for open cluster membership determination in three-dimensional (3D) velocity space (proper motion and radial velocity). Clean 3D cluster members can be obtained by statistically analyzing the Euclidean distance between each star and its k-th nearest neighbor in 3D velocity space. We use 513 sample stars in the direction of open cluster M67 to construct a 3D velocity space and test our method; 291 3D cluster members are obtained. The color-magnitude diagram, proper motions, radial velocities and spatial distribution of these 3D cluster members demonstrate the effectiveness of our method. From the 291 3D cluster members, the mean radial velocity and absolute proper motion of M67 are Vr = +33.46 ± 0.05 km s-1 and (PMRA, PMDEC) = (-7.64 ± 0.07, -5.98 ± 0.07) mas yr-1, respectively. In addition, we use 640 sample stars with precise proper motions and radial velocities in the direction of open cluster NGC 188 to test our method. The test results also show that our method is effective.

  16. One-way quantum computing with arbitrarily large time-frequency continuous-variable cluster states from a single optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Rafael N.; Wang, Pei; Sridhar, Niranjan; Chen, Moran; Pfister, Olivier; Menicucci, Nicolas C.

    2016-09-01

    One-way quantum computing is experimentally appealing because it requires only local measurements on an entangled resource called a cluster state. Record-size, but nonuniversal, continuous-variable cluster states were recently demonstrated separately in the time and frequency domains. We propose to combine these approaches into a scalable architecture in which a single optical parametric oscillator and simple interferometer entangle up to (3 ×103 frequencies) × (unlimited number of temporal modes) into a computationally universal continuous-variable cluster state. We introduce a generalized measurement protocol to enable improved computational performance on this entanglement resource.

  17. Choosing appropriate analysis methods for cluster randomised cross-over trials with a binary outcome.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Katy E; Forbes, Andrew B; Keogh, Ruth H; Jairath, Vipul; Kahan, Brennan C

    2017-01-30

    In cluster randomised cross-over (CRXO) trials, clusters receive multiple treatments in a randomised sequence over time. In such trials, there is usual correlation between patients in the same cluster. In addition, within a cluster, patients in the same period may be more similar to each other than to patients in other periods. We demonstrate that it is necessary to account for these correlations in the analysis to obtain correct Type I error rates. We then use simulation to compare different methods of analysing a binary outcome from a two-period CRXO design. Our simulations demonstrated that hierarchical models without random effects for period-within-cluster, which do not account for any extra within-period correlation, performed poorly with greatly inflated Type I errors in many scenarios. In scenarios where extra within-period correlation was present, a hierarchical model with random effects for cluster and period-within-cluster only had correct Type I errors when there were large numbers of clusters; with small numbers of clusters, the error rate was inflated. We also found that generalised estimating equations did not give correct error rates in any scenarios considered. An unweighted cluster-level summary regression performed best overall, maintaining an error rate close to 5% for all scenarios, although it lost power when extra within-period correlation was present, especially for small numbers of clusters. Results from our simulation study show that it is important to model both levels of clustering in CRXO trials, and that any extra within-period correlation should be accounted for. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Clustering Scientific Publications Based on Citation Relations: A Systematic Comparison of Different Methods

    PubMed Central

    Šubelj, Lovro; van Eck, Nees Jan; Waltman, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Clustering methods are applied regularly in the bibliometric literature to identify research areas or scientific fields. These methods are for instance used to group publications into clusters based on their relations in a citation network. In the network science literature, many clustering methods, often referred to as graph partitioning or community detection techniques, have been developed. Focusing on the problem of clustering the publications in a citation network, we present a systematic comparison of the performance of a large number of these clustering methods. Using a number of different citation networks, some of them relatively small and others very large, we extensively study the statistical properties of the results provided by different methods. In addition, we also carry out an expert-based assessment of the results produced by different methods. The expert-based assessment focuses on publications in the field of scientometrics. Our findings seem to indicate that there is a trade-off between different properties that may be considered desirable for a good clustering of publications. Overall, map equation methods appear to perform best in our analysis, suggesting that these methods deserve more attention from the bibliometric community. PMID:27124610

  19. Clustering Scientific Publications Based on Citation Relations: A Systematic Comparison of Different Methods.

    PubMed

    Šubelj, Lovro; van Eck, Nees Jan; Waltman, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Clustering methods are applied regularly in the bibliometric literature to identify research areas or scientific fields. These methods are for instance used to group publications into clusters based on their relations in a citation network. In the network science literature, many clustering methods, often referred to as graph partitioning or community detection techniques, have been developed. Focusing on the problem of clustering the publications in a citation network, we present a systematic comparison of the performance of a large number of these clustering methods. Using a number of different citation networks, some of them relatively small and others very large, we extensively study the statistical properties of the results provided by different methods. In addition, we also carry out an expert-based assessment of the results produced by different methods. The expert-based assessment focuses on publications in the field of scientometrics. Our findings seem to indicate that there is a trade-off between different properties that may be considered desirable for a good clustering of publications. Overall, map equation methods appear to perform best in our analysis, suggesting that these methods deserve more attention from the bibliometric community.

  20. Learning and Retention of Quantum Concepts with Different Teaching Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deslauriers, Louis; Wieman, Carl

    2011-01-01

    We measured mastery and retention of conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics in a modern physics course. This was studied for two equivalent cohorts of students taught with different pedagogical approaches using the Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey. We measured the impact of pedagogical approach both on the original conceptual learning…

  1. Alkylthio bridged 44 cve triangular platinum clusters: synthesis, oxidation, degradation, ligand substitution, and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Christian; Schwieger, Sebastian; Bruhn, Clemens; Wagner, Christoph; Kluge, Ralph; Schmidt, Harry; Steinborn, Dirk

    2007-04-18

    Acetylplatinum(II) complexes trans-[Pt(COMe)Cl(L)2] (L = PPh3, 2a; P(4-FC6H4)3, 2b) were found to react with dialkyldisulfides R2S2 (R = Me, Et, Pr, Bu; Pr = n-propyl, Bu = n-butyl), yielding trinuclear 44 cve (cluster valence electrons) platinum clusters [(PtL)3(mu-SR)3]Cl (4). The analogous reaction of 2a-b with Ph2S2 gave SPh bridged dinuclear complexes trans-[{PtCl(L)}2(mu-SPh)2] (5), whereas the addition of Bn2S2 (Bn = benzyl) to 2a ended up in the formation of [{Pt(PPh3)}3(mu3-S)(mu-SBn)3]Cl (6). Theoretical studies based on the AIM theory revealed that type 4 complexes must be regarded as triangular platinum clusters with Pt-Pt bonds whereas complex 6 must be treated as a sulfur capped 48 ve (valence electrons) trinuclear platinum(II) complex without Pt-Pt bonding interactions. Phosphine ligands with a lower donor capability in clusters 4 proved to be subject to substitution by stronger donating monodentate phosphine ligands (L' = PMePh2, PMe2Ph, PBu3) yielding clusters [(PtL')3(mu-SR)3]Cl (9). In case of the reaction of clusters 4 and 9 with PPh2CH2PPh2 (dppm), a fragmentation reaction occurred, and the complexes [(PtL)2(mu-SMe)(mu-dppm)]Cl (12) and [Pt(mu-SMe)2(dppm)] (13) were isolated. Furthermore, oxidation reactions of cluster [{Pt(PPh3)}3(mu-SMe)3]Cl (4a) using halogens (Br2, I2) gave dimeric platinum(II) complexes cis-[{PtX(PPh3)}2(mu-SMe)2] (14, X = Br, I) whereas oxidation reactions using sulfur and selenium afforded chalcogen capped trinuclear 48 ve complexes [{Pt(PPh3)}3(mu3-E)(mu-SMe)3] (15, E = S, Se). All compounds were fully characterized by means of NMR and IR spectroscopy, microanalyses, and ESI mass spectrometry. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction analyses were performed for the triangular cluster 4a, the trinuclear complex 6, as well as for the dinuclear complexes trans-[{Pt(AsPh3)}2(mu-SPh)2] (5c), [{Pt(PPh3)}2(mu-SMe)(mu-dppm)]Cl (12a), and [{{PtBr(PPh3)}2(mu-SMe)2] (14a).

  2. Lower Rydberg series of methane: a combined coupled cluster linear response and molecular quantum defect orbital calculation.

    PubMed

    Velasco, A M; Pitarch-Ruiz, J; Sánchez de Merás, Alfredo M J; Sánchez-Marín, J; Martin, I

    2006-03-28

    Vertical excitation energies as well as related absolute photoabsorption oscillator strength data are very scarce in the literature for methane. In this study, we have characterized the three existing series of low-lying Rydberg states of CH4 by computing coupled cluster linear response (CCLR) vertical excitation energies together with oscillator strengths in the molecular-adapted quantum defect orbital formalism from a distorted Cs geometry selected on the basis of outer valence green function calculations. The present work provides a wide range of data of excitation energies and absolute oscillator strengths which correspond to the Rydberg series converging to the three lower ionization potential values of the distorted methane molecule, in energy regions for which experimentally measured data appear to be unavailable.

  3. Trajectory Clustering: a Non-Parametric Method for Grouping Gene Expression Time Courses, with Applications to Mammary Development

    PubMed Central

    Phang, T.L.; Neville, M.C.; Rudolph, M.; Hunter, L.

    2008-01-01

    Trajectory clustering is a novel and statistically well-founded method for clustering time series data from gene expression arrays. Trajectory clustering uses non-parametric statistics and is hence not sensitive to the particular distributions underlying gene expression data. Each cluster is clearly defined in terms of direction of change of expression for successive time points (its ‘trajectory’), and therefore has easily appreciated biological meaning. Applying the method to a dataset from mouse mammary gland development, we demonstrate that it produces different clusters than Hierarchical, K-means, and Jackknife clustering methods, even when those methods are applied to differences between successive time points. Compared to all of the other methods, trajectory clustering was better able to match a manual clustering by a domain expert, and was better able to cluster groups of genes with known related functions. PMID:12603041

  4. A Synthetic Approach to the Transfer Matrix Method in Classical and Quantum Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pujol, O.; Perez, J. P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a synthetic approach to the transfer matrix method in classical and quantum physics. This method is an efficient tool to deal with complicated physical systems of practical importance in geometrical light or charged particle optics, classical electronics, mechanics, electromagnetics and quantum physics. Teaching…

  5. Topographic prominence as a method for cluster identification in single-molecule localisation data.

    PubMed

    Griffié, Juliette; Boelen, Lies; Burn, Garth; Cope, Andrew P; Owen, Dylan M

    2015-11-01

    Single-molecule localisation based super-resolution fluorescence imaging produces maps of the coordinates of fluorescent molecules in a region of interest. Cluster analysis algorithms provide information concerning the clustering characteristics of these molecules, often through the generation of cluster heat maps based on local molecular density. The goal of this study was to generate a new cluster analysis method based on a topographic approach. In particular, a topographic map of the level of clustering across a region is generated based on Getis' variant of Ripley's K-function. By using the relative heights (topographic prominence, TP) of the peaks in the map, cluster characteristics can be identified more accurately than by using previously demonstrated height thresholds. Analogous to geological TP, the concepts of wet and dry TP and topographic isolation are introduced to generate binary maps. The algorithm is validated using simulated and experimental data and found to significantly outperform previous cluster identification methods. Illustration of the topographic prominence based cluster analysis algorithm.

  6. Relation between financial market structure and the real economy: comparison between clustering methods.

    PubMed

    Musmeci, Nicoló; Aste, Tomaso; Di Matteo, T

    2015-01-01

    We quantify the amount of information filtered by different hierarchical clustering methods on correlations between stock returns comparing the clustering structure with the underlying industrial activity classification. We apply, for the first time to financial data, a novel hierarchical clustering approach, the Directed Bubble Hierarchical Tree and we compare it with other methods including the Linkage and k-medoids. By taking the industrial sector classification of stocks as a benchmark partition, we evaluate how the different methods retrieve this classification. The results show that the Directed Bubble Hierarchical Tree can outperform other methods, being able to retrieve more information with fewer clusters. Moreover,we show that the economic information is hidden at different levels of the hierarchical structures depending on the clustering method. The dynamical analysis on a rolling window also reveals that the different methods show different degrees of sensitivity to events affecting financial markets, like crises. These results can be of interest for all the applications of clustering methods to portfolio optimization and risk hedging [corrected].

  7. Relation between Financial Market Structure and the Real Economy: Comparison between Clustering Methods

    PubMed Central

    Musmeci, Nicoló; Aste, Tomaso; Di Matteo, T.

    2015-01-01

    We quantify the amount of information filtered by different hierarchical clustering methods on correlations between stock returns comparing the clustering structure with the underlying industrial activity classification. We apply, for the first time to financial data, a novel hierarchical clustering approach, the Directed Bubble Hierarchical Tree and we compare it with other methods including the Linkage and k-medoids. By taking the industrial sector classification of stocks as a benchmark partition, we evaluate how the different methods retrieve this classification. The results show that the Directed Bubble Hierarchical Tree can outperform other methods, being able to retrieve more information with fewer clusters. Moreover, we show that the economic information is hidden at different levels of the hierarchical structures depending on the clustering method. The dynamical analysis on a rolling window also reveals that the different methods show different degrees of sensitivity to events affecting financial markets, like crises. These results can be of interest for all the applications of clustering methods to portfolio optimization and risk hedging. PMID:25786703

  8. Signature of clustering in quantum many-body systems probed by the giant dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Deepak; Mondal, Debasish; Dey, Balaram; Bhattacharya, Srijit; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; De, A.; Banerjee, S. R.

    2017-03-01

    The present experimental study illustrates how large deformations attained by nuclei due to cluster formation are perceived through the giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function. The high energy GDR γ rays have been measured from 32S at different angular momenta (J ) but similar temperatures in the reactions 4He(Elab=45 MeV )+28Si and 20Ne(Elab=145 MeV )+12C . The experimental data at lower J (˜10 ℏ ) suggests a normal deformation, similar to the ground state value, showing no potential signature of clustering. However, it is found that the GDR lineshape is fragmented into two prominent peaks at high J (˜20 ℏ ) providing a direct measurement of the large deformation developed in the nucleus. The observed lineshape is also completely different from the ones seen for Jacobi shape transition at high J pointing towards the formation of cluster structure in superdeformed states of 32S at such high spin. Thus, the GDR can be regarded as a unique tool to study cluster formation at high excitation energies and angular momenta.

  9. Modeling vibrational resonance in linear hydrocarbon chain with a mixed quantum-classical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2009-04-01

    The quantum dynamics of a vibrational excitation in a linear hydrocarbon model system is studied with a new mixed quantum-classical method. The method is suited to treat many-body systems consisting of a low dimensional quantum primary part coupled to a classical bath. The dynamics of the primary part is governed by the quantum corrected propagator, with the corrections defined in terms of matrix elements of zeroth order propagators. The corrections are taken to the classical limit by introducing the frozen Gaussian approximation for the bath degrees of freedom. The ability of the method to describe dynamics of multidimensional systems has been tested. The results obtained by the method have been compared to previous quantum simulations performed with the quasiadiabatic path integral method.

  10. Exact special twist method for quantum Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagrada, Mario; Karakuzu, Seher; Vildosola, Verónica Laura; Casula, Michele; Sorella, Sandro

    2016-12-01

    We present a systematic investigation of the special twist method introduced by Rajagopal et al. [Phys. Rev. B 51, 10591 (1995), 10.1103/PhysRevB.51.10591] for reducing finite-size effects in correlated calculations of periodic extended systems with Coulomb interactions and Fermi statistics. We propose a procedure for finding special twist values which, at variance with previous applications of this method, reproduce the energy of the mean-field infinite-size limit solution within an adjustable (arbitrarily small) numerical error. This choice of the special twist is shown to be the most accurate single-twist solution for curing one-body finite-size effects in correlated calculations. For these reasons we dubbed our procedure "exact special twist" (EST). EST only needs a fully converged independent-particles or mean-field calculation within the primitive cell and a simple fit to find the special twist along a specific direction in the Brillouin zone. We first assess the performances of EST in a simple correlated model such as the three-dimensional electron gas. Afterwards, we test its efficiency within ab initio quantum Monte Carlo simulations of metallic elements of increasing complexity. We show that EST displays an overall good performance in reducing finite-size errors comparable to the widely used twist average technique but at a much lower computational cost since it involves the evaluation of just one wave function. We also demonstrate that the EST method shows similar performances in the calculation of correlation functions, such as the ionic forces for structural relaxation and the pair radial distribution function in liquid hydrogen. Our conclusions point to the usefulness of EST for correlated supercell calculations; our method will be particularly relevant when the physical problem under consideration requires large periodic cells.

  11. Continuous-variable quantum computing in optical time-frequency modes using quantum memories.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Peter C; Kolthammer, W Steven; Nunn, Joshua; Barbieri, Marco; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-09-26

    We develop a scheme for time-frequency encoded continuous-variable cluster-state quantum computing using quantum memories. In particular, we propose a method to produce, manipulate, and measure two-dimensional cluster states in a single spatial mode by exploiting the intrinsic time-frequency selectivity of Raman quantum memories. Time-frequency encoding enables the scheme to be extremely compact, requiring a number of memories that are a linear function of only the number of different frequencies in which the computational state is encoded, independent of its temporal duration. We therefore show that quantum memories can be a powerful component for scalable photonic quantum information processing architectures.

  12. A spatial division clustering method and low dimensional feature extraction technique based indoor positioning system.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yun; Zhang, Zhongzhao; Meng, Weixiao; Ma, Lin; Wang, Yao

    2014-01-22

    Indoor positioning systems based on the fingerprint method are widely used due to the large number of existing devices with a wide range of coverage. However, extensive positioning regions with a massive fingerprint database may cause high computational complexity and error margins, therefore clustering methods are widely applied as a solution. However, traditional clustering methods in positioning systems can only measure the similarity of the Received Signal Strength without being concerned with the continuity of physical coordinates. Besides, outage of access points could result in asymmetric matching problems which severely affect the fine positioning procedure. To solve these issues, in this paper we propose a positioning system based on the Spatial Division Clustering (SDC) method for clustering the fingerprint dataset subject to physical distance constraints. With the Genetic Algorithm and Support Vector Machine techniques, SDC can achieve higher coarse positioning accuracy than traditional clustering algorithms. In terms of fine localization, based on the Kernel Principal Component Analysis method, the proposed positioning system outperforms its counterparts based on other feature extraction methods in low dimensionality. Apart from balancing online matching computational burden, the new positioning system exhibits advantageous performance on radio map clustering, and also shows better robustness and adaptability in the asymmetric matching problem aspect.

  13. A Spatial Division Clustering Method and Low Dimensional Feature Extraction Technique Based Indoor Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yun; Zhang, Zhongzhao; Meng, Weixiao; Ma, Lin; Wang, Yao

    2014-01-01

    Indoor positioning systems based on the fingerprint method are widely used due to the large number of existing devices with a wide range of coverage. However, extensive positioning regions with a massive fingerprint database may cause high computational complexity and error margins, therefore clustering methods are widely applied as a solution. However, traditional clustering methods in positioning systems can only measure the similarity of the Received Signal Strength without being concerned with the continuity of physical coordinates. Besides, outage of access points could result in asymmetric matching problems which severely affect the fine positioning procedure. To solve these issues, in this paper we propose a positioning system based on the Spatial Division Clustering (SDC) method for clustering the fingerprint dataset subject to physical distance constraints. With the Genetic Algorithm and Support Vector Machine techniques, SDC can achieve higher coarse positioning accuracy than traditional clustering algorithms. In terms of fine localization, based on the Kernel Principal Component Analysis method, the proposed positioning system outperforms its counterparts based on other feature extraction methods in low dimensionality. Apart from balancing online matching computational burden, the new positioning system exhibits advantageous performance on radio map clustering, and also shows better robustness and adaptability in the asymmetric matching problem aspect. PMID:24451470

  14. Two worlds collide: Image analysis methods for quantifying structural variation in cluster molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Steenbergen, K. G.; Gaston, N.

    2014-02-14

    Inspired by methods of remote sensing image analysis, we analyze structural variation in cluster molecular dynamics (MD) simulations through a unique application of the principal component analysis (PCA) and Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC). The PCA analysis characterizes the geometric shape of the cluster structure at each time step, yielding a detailed and quantitative measure of structural stability and variation at finite temperature. Our PCC analysis captures bond structure variation in MD, which can be used to both supplement the PCA analysis as well as compare bond patterns between different cluster sizes. Relying only on atomic position data, without requirement for a priori structural input, PCA and PCC can be used to analyze both classical and ab initio MD simulations for any cluster composition or electronic configuration. Taken together, these statistical tools represent powerful new techniques for quantitative structural characterization and isomer identification in cluster MD.

  15. WEIGHING GALAXY CLUSTERS WITH GAS. I. ON THE METHODS OF COMPUTING HYDROSTATIC MASS BIAS

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Erwin T.; Nagai, Daisuke; Nelson, Kaylea

    2013-11-10

    Mass estimates of galaxy clusters from X-ray and Sunyeav-Zel'dovich observations assume the intracluster gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium with their gravitational potential. However, since galaxy clusters are dynamically active objects whose dynamical states can deviate significantly from the equilibrium configuration, the departure from the hydrostatic equilibrium assumption is one of the largest sources of systematic uncertainties in cluster cosmology. In the literature there have been two methods for computing the hydrostatic mass bias based on the Euler and the modified Jeans equations, respectively, and there has been some confusion about the validity of these two methods. The word 'Jeans' was a misnomer, which incorrectly implies that the gas is collisionless. To avoid further confusion, we instead refer these methods as 'summation' and 'averaging' methods respectively. In this work, we show that these two methods for computing the hydrostatic mass bias are equivalent by demonstrating that the equation used in the second method can be derived from taking spatial averages of the Euler equation. Specifically, we identify the correspondences of individual terms in these two methods mathematically and show that these correspondences are valid to within a few percent level using hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation. In addition, we compute the mass bias associated with the acceleration of gas and show that its contribution is small in the virialized regions in the interior of galaxy clusters, but becomes non-negligible in the outskirts of massive galaxy clusters. We discuss future prospects of understanding and characterizing biases in the mass estimate of galaxy clusters using both hydrodynamical simulations and observations and their implications for cluster cosmology.

  16. Indium clustering in a-plane InGaN quantum wells as evidenced by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Fengzai; Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Fu, Wai Yuen; Griffiths, James T.; Massabuau, Fabien C.-P.; Kappers, Menno J.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Martin, Tomas L.; Bagot, Paul A. J.; Moody, Michael P.

    2015-02-16

    Atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to characterize the distribution of In atoms within non-polar a-plane InGaN quantum wells (QWs) grown on a GaN pseudo-substrate produced using epitaxial lateral overgrowth. Application of the focused ion beam microscope enabled APT needles to be prepared from the low defect density regions of the grown sample. A complementary analysis was also undertaken on QWs having comparable In contents grown on polar c-plane sample pseudo-substrates. Both frequency distribution and modified nearest neighbor analyses indicate a statistically non-randomized In distribution in the a-plane QWs, but a random distribution in the c-plane QWs. This work not only provides insights into the structure of non-polar a-plane QWs but also shows that APT is capable of detecting as-grown nanoscale clustering in InGaN and thus validates the reliability of earlier APT analyses of the In distribution in c-plane InGaN QWs which show no such clustering.

  17. Structural damage reduction in protected gold clusters by electron diffraction methods.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Eduardo; Ponce, Arturo; Santiago, Ulises; Alducin, Diego; Benitez-Lara, Alfredo; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The present work explores electron diffraction methods for studying the structure of metallic clusters stabilized with thiol groups, which are susceptible to structural damage caused by electron beam irradiation. There is a compromise between the electron dose used and the size of the clusters since they have small interaction volume with electrons and as a consequence weak reflections in the diffraction patterns. The common approach of recording individual clusters using nanobeam diffraction has the problem of an increased current density. Dosage can be reduced with the use of a smaller condenser aperture and a higher condenser lens excitation, but even with those set ups collection times tend to be high. For that reason, the methods reported herein collects in a faster way diffraction patterns through the scanning across the clusters under nanobeam diffraction mode. In this way, we are able to collect a map of diffraction patterns, in areas with dispersed clusters, with short exposure times (milliseconds) using a high sensitive CMOS camera. When these maps are compared with their theoretical counterparts, oscillations of the clusters can be observed. The stability of the patterns acquired demonstrates that our methods provide a systematic and precise way to unveil the structure of atomic clusters without extensive detrimental damage of their crystallinity.

  18. Quantum chemical analysis of thermodynamics of 2D cluster formation of alkanes at the water/vapor interface in the presence of aliphatic alcohols.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Kartashynska, E S; Belyaeva, E A; Fainerman, V B; Vollhardt, D; Miller, R

    2015-11-21

    Using the quantum chemical semi-empirical PM3 method it is shown that aliphatic alcohols favor the spontaneous clusterization of vaporous alkanes at the water surface due to the change of adsorption from the barrier to non-barrier mechanism. A theoretical model of the non-barrier mechanism for monolayer formation is developed. In the framework of this model alcohols (or any other surfactants) act as 'floats', which interact with alkane molecules of the vapor phase using their hydrophobic part, whereas the hydrophilic part is immersed into the water phase. This results in a significant increase of contact effectiveness of alkanes with the interface during the adsorption and film formation. The obtained results are in good agreement with the existing experimental data. To test the model the thermodynamic and structural parameters of formation and clusterization are calculated for vaporous alkanes C(n)H(2n+2) (n(CH3) = 6-16) at the water surface in the presence of aliphatic alcohols C(n)H(2n+1)OH (n(OH) = 8-16) at 298 K. It is shown that the values of clusterization enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs' energy per one monomer of the cluster depend on the chain lengths of corresponding alcohols and alkanes, the alcohol molar fraction in the monolayers formed, and the shift of the alkane molecules with respect to the alcohol molecules Δn. Two possible competitive structures of mixed 2D film alkane-alcohol are considered: 2D films 1 with single alcohol molecules enclosed by alkane molecules (the alcohols do not form domains) and 2D films 2 that contain alcohol domains enclosed by alkane molecules. The formation of the alkane films of the first type is nearly independent of the surfactant type present at the interface, but depends on their molar fraction in the monolayer formed and the chain length of the compounds participating in the clusterization, whereas for the formation of the films of the second type the interaction between the hydrophilic parts of the surfactant is

  19. Correction for dispersion and Coulombic interactions in molecular clusters with density functional derived methods: application to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon clusters.

    PubMed

    Rapacioli, Mathias; Spiegelman, Fernand; Talbi, Dahbia; Mineva, Tzonka; Goursot, Annick; Heine, Thomas; Seifert, Gotthard

    2009-06-28

    The density functional based tight binding (DFTB) is a semiempirical method derived from the density functional theory (DFT). It inherits therefore its problems in treating van der Waals clusters. A major error comes from dispersion forces, which are poorly described by commonly used DFT functionals, but which can be accounted for by an a posteriori treatment DFT-D. This correction is used for DFTB. The self-consistent charge (SCC) DFTB is built on Mulliken charges which are known to give a poor representation of Coulombic intermolecular potential. We propose to calculate this potential using the class IV/charge model 3 definition of atomic charges. The self-consistent calculation of these charges is introduced in the SCC procedure and corresponding nuclear forces are derived. Benzene dimer is then studied as a benchmark system with this corrected DFTB (c-DFTB-D) method, but also, for comparison, with the DFT-D. Both methods give similar results and are in agreement with references calculations (CCSD(T) and symmetry adapted perturbation theory) calculations. As a first application, pyrene dimer is studied with the c-DFTB-D and DFT-D methods. For coronene clusters, only the c-DFTB-D approach is used, which finds the sandwich configurations to be more stable than the T-shaped ones.

  20. Source clustering in the Hi-GAL survey determined using a minimum spanning tree method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuret, M.; Billot, N.; Cambrésy, L.; Eden, D. J.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Pezzuto, S.; Schisano, E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The aims are to investigate the clustering of the far-infrared sources from the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) in the Galactic longitude range of -71 to 67 deg. These clumps, and their spatial distribution, are an imprint of the original conditions within a molecular cloud. This will produce a catalogue of over-densities. Methods: The minimum spanning tree (MST) method was used to identify the over-densities in two dimensions. The catalogue was further refined by folding in heliocentric distances, resulting in more reliable over-densities, which are cluster candidates. Results: We found 1633 over-densities with more than ten members. Of these, 496 are defined as cluster candidates because of the reliability of the distances, with a further 1137 potential cluster candidates. The spatial distributions of the cluster candidates are different in the first and fourth quadrants, with all clusters following the spiral structure of the Milky Way. The cluster candidates are fractal. The clump mass functions of the clustered and isolated are statistically indistinguishable from each other and are consistent with Kroupa's initial mass function. Hi-GAL is a key-project of the Herschel Space Observatory survey (Pilbratt et al. 2010) and uses the PACS (Poglitsch et al. 2010) and SPIRE (Griffin et al. 2010) cameras in parallel mode.The catalogues of cluster candidates and potential clusters are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/597/A114

  1. Comparison of Bayesian clustering and edge detection methods for inferring boundaries in landscape genetics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safner, T.; Miller, M.P.; McRae, B.H.; Fortin, M.-J.; Manel, S.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, techniques available for identifying clusters of individuals or boundaries between clusters using genetic data from natural populations have expanded rapidly. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate these different techniques. We used spatially-explicit simulation models to compare three spatial Bayesian clustering programs and two edge detection methods. Spatially-structured populations were simulated where a continuous population was subdivided by barriers. We evaluated the ability of each method to correctly identify boundary locations while varying: (i) time after divergence, (ii) strength of isolation by distance, (iii) level of genetic diversity, and (iv) amount of gene flow across barriers. To further evaluate the methods' effectiveness to detect genetic clusters in natural populations, we used previously published data on North American pumas and a European shrub. Our results show that with simulated and empirical data, the Bayesian spatial clustering algorithms outperformed direct edge detection methods. All methods incorrectly detected boundaries in the presence of strong patterns of isolation by distance. Based on this finding, we support the application of Bayesian spatial clustering algorithms for boundary detection in empirical datasets, with necessary tests for the influence of isolation by distance. ?? 2011 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  2. Dynamic Quantum Clustering: A Tool for Unsupervised Exploration of Structures in Data

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Marvin; Horn, David; /Tel Aviv U.

    2008-10-30

    A given set of data-points in some feature space may be associated with a Schroedinger equation whose potential is determined by the data. This is known to lead to good clustering solutions. Here we extend this approach into a full-fledged dynamical scheme using a time-dependent Schroedinger equation with a small diffusion component. Moreover, we approximate this Hamiltonian formalism by a truncated calculation within a set of Gaussian wave functions (coherent states) centered around the original points. This allows for analytic evaluation of the time evolution of all such states, opening up the possibility of exploration of relationships among data-points through observation of varying dynamical-distances among points and convergence of points into clusters. This formalism may be further supplemented by preprocessing, such as dimensional reduction through singular value decomposition or feature filtering.

  3. Dynamic quantum clustering: a tool for visual exploration of structures in data

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Marvin; Horn, David; /Tel Aviv U.

    2009-10-17

    A given set of data-points in some feature space may be associated with a Schroedinger equation whose potential is determined by the data. This is known to lead to good clustering solutions. Here we extend this approach into a full-fledged dynamical scheme using a time-dependent Schroedinger equation. Moreover, we approximate this Hamiltonian formalism by a truncated calculation within a set of Gaussian wave functions (coherent states) centered around the original points. This allows for analytic evaluation of the time evolution of all such states, opening up the possibility of exploration of relationships among data-points through observation of varying dynamical-distances among points and convergence of points into clusters. This formalism may be further supplemented by preprocessing, such as dimensional reduction through singular value decomposition or feature filtering.

  4. Accurate and efficient quantum chemistry calculations for noncovalent interactions in many-body systems: the XSAPT family of methods.

    PubMed

    Lao, Ka Un; Herbert, John M

    2015-01-15

    We present an overview of "XSAPT", a family of quantum chemistry methods for noncovalent interactions. These methods combine an efficient, iterative, monomer-based approach to computing many-body polarization interactions with a two-body version of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT). The result is an efficient method for computing accurate intermolecular interaction energies in large noncovalent assemblies such as molecular and ionic clusters, molecular crystals, clathrates, or protein-ligand complexes. As in traditional SAPT, the XSAPT energy is decomposable into physically meaningful components. Dispersion interactions are problematic in traditional low-order SAPT, and two new approaches are introduced here in an attempt to improve this situation: (1) third-generation empirical atom-atom dispersion potentials, and (2) an empirically scaled version of second-order SAPT dispersion. Comparison to high-level ab initio benchmarks for dimers, water clusters, halide-water clusters, a methane clathrate hydrate, and a DNA intercalation complex illustrate both the accuracy of XSAPT-based methods as well as their limitations. The computational cost of XSAPT scales as O(N(3))-O(N(5)) with respect to monomer size, N, depending upon the particular version that is employed, but the accuracy is typically superior to alternative ab initio methods with similar scaling. Moreover, the monomer-based nature of XSAPT calculations makes them trivially parallelizable, such that wall times scale linearly with respect to the number of monomer units. XSAPT-based methods thus open the door to both qualitative and quantitative studies of noncovalent interactions in clusters, biomolecules, and condensed-phase systems.

  5. Bayesian Analysis of Two Stellar Populations in Galactic Globular Clusters. I. Statistical and Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenning, D. C.; Wagner-Kaiser, R.; Robinson, E.; van Dyk, D. A.; von Hippel, T.; Sarajedini, A.; Stein, N.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a Bayesian model for globular clusters composed of multiple stellar populations, extending earlier statistical models for open clusters composed of simple (single) stellar populations. Specifically, we model globular clusters with two populations that differ in helium abundance. Our model assumes a hierarchical structuring of the parameters in which physical properties—age, metallicity, helium abundance, distance, absorption, and initial mass—are common to (i) the cluster as a whole or to (ii) individual populations within a cluster, or are unique to (iii) individual stars. An adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm is devised for model fitting that greatly improves convergence relative to its precursor non-adaptive MCMC algorithm. Our model and computational tools are incorporated into an open-source software suite known as BASE-9. We use numerical studies to demonstrate that our method can recover parameters of two-population clusters, and also show how model misspecification can potentially be identified. As a proof of concept, we analyze the two stellar populations of globular cluster NGC 5272 using our model and methods. (BASE-9 is available from GitHub: https://github.com/argiopetech/base/releases).

  6. On the Brodutch and Modi method of constructing geometric measures of classical and quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Zbigniew; Wintrowicz, Iwona

    2017-03-01

    Recently, Brodutch and Modi proposed a general method of constructing meaningful measures of classical and quantum correlations. We systematically apply this method to obtain geometric classical and quantum correlations based on the Bures and the trace distances for two-qubit Bell diagonal states. Moreover, we argue that in general the Brodutch and Modi method may provide non-unique results, and we show how to modify this method to avoid this issue.

  7. A new method to search for high-redshift clusters using photometric redshifts

    SciTech Connect

    Castignani, G.; Celotti, A.; Chiaberge, M.; Norman, C.

    2014-09-10

    We describe a new method (Poisson probability method, PPM) to search for high-redshift galaxy clusters and groups by using photometric redshift information and galaxy number counts. The method relies on Poisson statistics and is primarily introduced to search for megaparsec-scale environments around a specific beacon. The PPM is tailored to both the properties of the FR I radio galaxies in the Chiaberge et al. sample, which are selected within the COSMOS survey, and to the specific data set used. We test the efficiency of our method of searching for cluster candidates against simulations. Two different approaches are adopted. (1) We use two z ∼ 1 X-ray detected cluster candidates found in the COSMOS survey and we shift them to higher redshift up to z = 2. We find that the PPM detects the cluster candidates up to z = 1.5, and it correctly estimates both the redshift and size of the two clusters. (2) We simulate spherically symmetric clusters of different size and richness, and we locate them at different redshifts (i.e., z = 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) in the COSMOS field. We find that the PPM detects the simulated clusters within the considered redshift range with a statistical 1σ redshift accuracy of ∼0.05. The PPM is an efficient alternative method for high-redshift cluster searches that may also be applied to both present and future wide field surveys such as SDSS Stripe 82, LSST, and Euclid. Accurate photometric redshifts and a survey depth similar or better than that of COSMOS (e.g., I < 25) are required.

  8. Quantum image pseudocolor coding based on the density-stratified method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Wu, Wenya; Wang, Luo; Zhao, Na

    2015-05-01

    Pseudocolor processing is a branch of image enhancement. It dyes grayscale images to color images to make the images more beautiful or to highlight some parts on the images. This paper proposes a quantum image pseudocolor coding scheme based on the density-stratified method which defines a colormap and changes the density value from gray to color parallel according to the colormap. Firstly, two data structures: quantum image GQIR and quantum colormap QCR are reviewed or proposed. Then, the quantum density-stratified algorithm is presented. Based on them, the quantum realization in the form of circuits is given. The main advantages of the quantum version for pseudocolor processing over the classical approach are that it needs less memory and can speed up the computation. Two kinds of examples help us to describe the scheme further. Finally, the future work are analyzed.

  9. Comparison of Bayesian Clustering and Edge Detection Methods for Inferring Boundaries in Landscape Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Safner, Toni; Miller, Mark P.; McRae, Brad H.; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Manel, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    Recently, techniques available for identifying clusters of individuals or boundaries between clusters using genetic data from natural populations have expanded rapidly. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate these different techniques. We used spatially-explicit simulation models to compare three spatial Bayesian clustering programs and two edge detection methods. Spatially-structured populations were simulated where a continuous population was subdivided by barriers. We evaluated the ability of each method to correctly identify boundary locations while varying: (i) time after divergence, (ii) strength of isolation by distance, (iii) level of genetic diversity, and (iv) amount of gene flow across barriers. To further evaluate the methods’ effectiveness to detect genetic clusters in natural populations, we used previously published data on North American pumas and a European shrub. Our results show that with simulated and empirical data, the Bayesian spatial clustering algorithms outperformed direct edge detection methods. All methods incorrectly detected boundaries in the presence of strong patterns of isolation by distance. Based on this finding, we support the application of Bayesian spatial clustering algorithms for boundary detection in empirical datasets, with necessary tests for the influence of isolation by distance. PMID:21541031

  10. A Bayesian method for cluster detection with application to five cancer sites in Puget Sound

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Albert; Wakefield, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Cluster detection is an important public health endeavor and in this paper we describe and apply a recently developed Bayesian method. Commonly-used approaches are based on so-called scan statistics and suffer from a number of difficulties including how to choose a level of significance and how to deal with the possibility of multiple clusters. The basis of our model is to partition the study region into a set of areas which are either “null” or “non-null”, the latter corresponding to clusters (excess risk) or anti-clusters (reduced risk). We demonstrate the Bayesian method and compare with a popular existing approach, using data on breast, brain, lung, prostate and colorectal cancer, in the Puget Sound region of Washington St ate. We address the important issues of sensitivity to the priors, and the incorporation of covariates. The approach is implemented within the freely-available R package SpatialEpi. PMID:26841056

  11. [Alternative German clusters for the core conflictual relationship theme method (CCRT)].

    PubMed

    Körner, Annett; Albani, Cornelia; Villmann, Thomas; Pokorny, Dan; Geyer, Michael

    2002-08-01

    The Core Conflictual Relationship Theme Method (CCRT) is without doubt one of the most widely used relationship structure instruments in the field of psychodynamic psychotherapy research. Despite the important and sustained criticism of the German translation of the original Anglo-Saxon description of clusters and of standard categories, research in German-speaking countries still relies on this translation. This study aimed at developing an alternative German cluster version while maintaining the existing set of standard categories. This alternative cluster structure for the three CCRT components showed higher inner consistency while at the same time making more clinical sense. It also is promising in that it can be used with CCRTs scored using the original translation of the instrument. This first investigation of relationship patterns using the original and alternative clusters confirmed the increase of discriminant and convergent validity of the CCRT-method.

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo Methods for First Principles Simulation of Liquid Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gergely, John Robert

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining an accurate microscopic description of water structure and dynamics is of great interest to molecular biology researchers and in the physics and quantum chemistry simulation communities. This dissertation describes efforts to apply quantum Monte Carlo methods to this problem with the goal of making progress toward a fully "ab initio"…

  13. Quantum-Mechanical Method for the Soliton Transported Bio-energy in Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiaofeng

    1993-07-01

    The equations of motion of the soliton transported bio-energy in the protein, were heretofore already obtained by a combination of quantum-mechanical and classical methods, but here have been derived based completely on quantum mechanics. And we point out the shortcoming of no self-consistency of the Davydov theory. Some interesting results have also been got.

  14. Cool Cluster Correctly Correlated

    SciTech Connect

    Varganov, Sergey Aleksandrovich

    2005-01-01

    Atomic clusters are unique objects, which occupy an intermediate position between atoms and condensed matter systems. For a long time it was thought that physical and chemical properties of atomic dusters monotonically change with increasing size of the cluster from a single atom to a condensed matter system. However, recently it has become clear that many properties of atomic clusters can change drastically with the size of the clusters. Because physical and chemical properties of clusters can be adjusted simply by changing the cluster's size, different applications of atomic clusters were proposed. One example is the catalytic activity of clusters of specific sizes in different chemical reactions. Another example is a potential application of atomic clusters in microelectronics, where their band gaps can be adjusted by simply changing cluster sizes. In recent years significant advances in experimental techniques allow one to synthesize and study atomic clusters of specified sizes. However, the interpretation of the results is often difficult. The theoretical methods are frequently used to help in interpretation of complex experimental data. Most of the theoretical approaches have been based on empirical or semiempirical methods. These methods allow one to study large and small dusters using the same approximations. However, since empirical and semiempirical methods rely on simple models with many parameters, it is often difficult to estimate the quantitative and even qualitative accuracy of the results. On the other hand, because of significant advances in quantum chemical methods and computer capabilities, it is now possible to do high quality ab-initio calculations not only on systems of few atoms but on clusters of practical interest as well. In addition to accurate results for specific clusters, such methods can be used for benchmarking of different empirical and semiempirical approaches. The atomic clusters studied in this work contain from a few atoms to

  15. Path integral molecular dynamic study of nuclear quantum effect on small chloride water clusters of Cl-(H2O)1-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Suzuki, Kimichi; Nagashima, Umpei; Tachikawa, Masanori; Yan, Shiwei

    2013-06-01

    The nuclear quantum effect, which plays important roles on ionic hydrogen bonded structures of Cl-(H2O)n (n = 1-4) clusters, was explored by carrying out path integral molecular dynamic simulations. An outer shell coordinate rl(Cl⋯O) is selected to display the rearrangement of single and multi hydration shell cluster structures. By incorporating the nuclear quantum effect, it is shown that the probability for single shell structures is decreased while the probability for multi shell structures is increased. On the other hand, the correlations between changing of bonded H∗ atom to Cl- (defined as δ) and other cluster vibration coordinates are studied. We have found that δ strongly correlates with proton transfer motion while it has little correlation with ion-water stretching motion. Contrary to θ(H-O-H∗) coordinate, the correlations between δ and other coordinates are decreased by inclusion of nuclear quantum effect. The results indicate that the water-water hydrogen bond interactions are encouraged by quantum simulations.

  16. A Method for Generating Simulated Plasmodes and Artificial Test Clusters with User-Defined Shape, Size, and Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Niels G.; Underhill, J. Michael; Kaiser, Heather A.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a simple method for generating simulated plasmodes and artificial test clusters with user-defined shape, size, and orientation. For "J" clusters, indicator validity is defined as the squared correlation ratio between the cluster indicator and J-1 dummy variables. Illustrates the method through simulation. (SLD)

  17. Comparison of seismicity declustering methods using a probabilistic measure of clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbi, Abdelhak; Nanjo, Kazuyoshi; Satake, Kenji; Zhuang, Jiancang; Hamdache, Mohamed

    2013-07-01

    We present a new measure of earthquake clustering and explore its use for comparing the performance of three different declustering methods. The advantage of this new clustering measure over existing techniques is that it can be used for non-Poissonian background seismicity and, in particular, to compare the results of declustering algorithms where different background models are used. We use our approach to study inter-event times between successive earthquakes using earthquake catalog data from Japan and southern California. A measure of the extent of clustering is introduced by comparing the inter-event time distributions of the background seismicity to that of the whole observed seismicity. Theoretical aspects of the clustering measure are then discussed with respect to the Poissonian and Weibull models for the background inter-event time distribution. In the case of a Poissonian background, the obtained clustering measure shows a decrease followed by an increase, defining a V-shaped trend, which can be explained by the presence of short- and long-range correlation in the inter-event time series. Three previously proposed declustering methods (i.e., the methods of Gardner and Knopoff, Reasenberg, and Zhuang et al.) are used to obtain an approximation of the residual "background" inter-event time distribution in order to apply our clustering measure to real seismicity. The clustering measure is then estimated for different values of magnitude cutoffs and time periods, taking into account the completeness of each catalog. Plots of the clustering measure are presented as clustering attenuation curves (CACs), showing how the correlation decreases when inter-event times increase. The CACs demonstrate strong clustering at short inter-event time ranges and weak clustering at long time ranges. When the algorithm of Gardner and Knopoff is used, the CACs show strong correlation with a weak background at the short inter-event time ranges. The fit of the CACs using the

  18. A semantics-based method for clustering of Chinese web search results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Deqing; Wang, Li; Bi, Zhuming; Chen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Information explosion is a critical challenge to the development of modern information systems. In particular, when the application of an information system is over the Internet, the amount of information over the web has been increasing exponentially and rapidly. Search engines, such as Google and Baidu, are essential tools for people to find the information from the Internet. Valuable information, however, is still likely submerged in the ocean of search results from those tools. By clustering the results into different groups based on subjects automatically, a search engine with the clustering feature allows users to select most relevant results quickly. In this paper, we propose an online semantics-based method to cluster Chinese web search results. First, we employ the generalised suffix tree to extract the longest common substrings (LCSs) from search snippets. Second, we use the HowNet to calculate the similarities of the words derived from the LCSs, and extract the most representative features by constructing the vocabulary chain. Third, we construct a vector of text features and calculate snippets' semantic similarities. Finally, we improve the Chameleon algorithm to cluster snippets. Extensive experimental results have shown that the proposed algorithm has outperformed over the suffix tree clustering method and other traditional clustering methods.

  19. Water-soluble luminescent quantum dots and biomolecular conjugates thereof and related compositions and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Nie, Shuming; Chan, Warren C. W.; Emory, Steven R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a water-soluble luminescent quantum dot, a biomolecular conjugate thereof and a composition comprising such a quantum dot or conjugate. Additionally, the present invention provides a method of obtaining a luminescent quantum dot, a method of making a biomolecular conjugate thereof, and methods of using a biomolecular conjugate for ultrasensitive nonisotopic detection in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Water-soluble luminescent quantum dots and biomolecular conjugates thereof and related compositions and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Nie, Shuming; Chan, Warren C. W.; Emory, Stephen

    2007-03-20

    The present invention provides a water-soluble luminescent quantum dot, a biomolecular conjugate thereof and a composition comprising such a quantum dot or conjugate. Additionally, the present invention provides a method of obtaining a luminescent quantum dot, a method of making a biomolecular conjugate thereof, and methods of using a biomolecular conjugate for ultrasensitive nonisotopic detection in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Instanton paths and coherent quantum tunneling in antiferromagnetic spin clusters subject to a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, B. A. Kireev, V. E.

    2008-09-15

    The coherent quantum tunneling effects in antiferromagnets in the presence of a strong external magnetic field parallel to the easy axis have been investigated using the instanton formalism. In a wide field range including the region of the phase spin-flop transition, the tunneling is described by 180{sup o} instantons for which the Euclidean action is real and destructive interference is absent. At the transition point, 90{sup o} instantons describing the tunneling between the collinear and spin-flop states appear. The Euclidean action decreases, whereas the tunneling probability and tunneling level splitting in both phases increase significantly in the immediate vicinity of the spin-flop transition point. The possibility of observing the coherent tunneling effects for artificial small particles (magnetic dots) made of antiferromagnets is discussed.

  2. Functional methods underlying classical mechanics, relativity and quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A.

    2013-04-01

    The paper investigates the physical content of a recently proposed mathematical framework that unifies the standard formalisms of classical mechanics, relativity and quantum theory. In the framework states of a classical particle are identified with Dirac delta functions. The classical space is "made" of these functions and becomes a submanifold in a Hilbert space of states of the particle. The resulting embedding of the classical space into the space of states is highly non-trivial and accounts for numerous deep relations between classical and quantum physics and relativity. One of the most striking results is the proof that the normal probability distribution of position of a macroscopic particle (equivalently, position of the corresponding delta state within the classical space submanifold) yields the Born rule for transitions between arbitrary quantum states.

  3. Computational method for the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation: Bound states in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.-C.; Wyatt, Robert E.

    2006-11-07

    An accurate computational method for the one-dimensional quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation is presented. The Moebius propagation scheme, which can accurately pass through singularities, is used to numerically integrate the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the quantum momentum function. Bound state wave functions are then synthesized from the phase integral using the antithetic cancellation technique. Through this procedure, not only the quantum momentum functions but also the wave functions are accurately obtained. This computational approach is demonstrated through two solvable examples: the harmonic oscillator and the Morse potential. The excellent agreement between the computational and the exact analytical results shows that the method proposed here may be useful for solving similar quantum mechanical problems.

  4. An effective trust-based recommendation method using a novel graph clustering algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Parham; Ahmadian, Sajad; Akhlaghian, Fardin

    2015-10-01

    Recommender systems are programs that aim to provide personalized recommendations to users for specific items (e.g. music, books) in online sharing communities or on e-commerce sites. Collaborative filtering methods are important and widely accepted types of recommender systems that generate recommendations based on the ratings of like-minded users. On the other hand, these systems confront several inherent issues such as data sparsity and cold start problems, caused by fewer ratings against the unknowns that need to be predicted. Incorporating trust information into the collaborative filtering systems is an attractive approach to resolve these problems. In this paper, we present a model-based collaborative filtering method by applying a novel graph clustering algorithm and also considering trust statements. In the proposed method first of all, the problem space is represented as a graph and then a sparsest subgraph finding algorithm is applied on the graph to find the initial cluster centers. Then, the proposed graph clustering algorithm is performed to obtain the appropriate users/items clusters. Finally, the identified clusters are used as a set of neighbors to recommend unseen items to the current active user. Experimental results based on three real-world datasets demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms several state-of-the-art recommender system methods.

  5. Cluster Method Analysis of K. S. C. Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Joe, Jr.; Desai, M.

    1997-01-01

    Information obtained from satellite-based systems has moved to the forefront as a method in the identification of many land cover types. Identification of different land features through remote sensing is an effective tool for regional and global assessment of geometric characteristics. Classification data acquired from remote sensing images have a wide variety of applications. In particular, analysis of remote sensing images have special applications in the classification of various types of vegetation. Results obtained from classification studies of a particular area or region serve towards a greater understanding of what parameters (ecological, temporal, etc.) affect the region being analyzed. In this paper, we make a distinction between both types of classification approaches although, focus is given to the unsupervised classification method using 1987 Thematic Mapped (TM) images of Kennedy Space Center.

  6. Note: Excited State Studies of Ozone using State-Specific Multireference Coupled Cluster Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Kowalski, Karol

    2012-12-07

    Vertical excitation energies obtained with state-specific multi-reference coupled cluster (MRCC) methods are reported for the ozone molecule. Using state-specific MRCC non-iterative methods with singles, doubles, and non-iterative triples (MRCCSD(T)) we obtain 4.40 eV for the challenging doubly excited 21A1 state when using a reliable model space. This estimate is in good agreement with experiment (4.5 eV). We also compare our MRCC results with the excitation energies obtained with high-order equation-of-motion coupled cluster methods

  7. A Fusion Method of Gabor Wavelet Transform and Unsupervised Clustering Algorithms for Tissue Edge Detection

    PubMed Central

    Ergen, Burhan

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes two edge detection methods for medical images by integrating the advantages of Gabor wavelet transform (GWT) and unsupervised clustering algorithms. The GWT is used to enhance the edge information in an image while suppressing noise. Following this, the k-means and Fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering algorithms are used to convert a gray level image into a binary image. The proposed methods are tested using medical images obtained through Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) devices, and a phantom image. The results prove that the proposed methods are successful for edge detection, even in noisy cases. PMID:24790590

  8. Least squares regression methods for clustered ROC data with discrete covariates.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liansheng Larry; Zhang, Wei; Li, Qizhai; Ye, Xuan; Chan, Leighton

    2016-07-01

    The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is a popular tool to evaluate and compare the accuracy of diagnostic tests to distinguish the diseased group from the nondiseased group when test results from tests are continuous or ordinal. A complicated data setting occurs when multiple tests are measured on abnormal and normal locations from the same subject and the measurements are clustered within the subject. Although least squares regression methods can be used for the estimation of ROC curve from correlated data, how to develop the least squares methods to estimate the ROC curve from the clustered data has not been studied. Also, the statistical properties of the least squares methods under the clustering setting are unknown. In this article, we develop the least squares ROC methods to allow the baseline and link functions to differ, and more importantly, to accommodate clustered data with discrete covariates. The methods can generate smooth ROC curves that satisfy the inherent continuous property of the true underlying curve. The least squares methods are shown to be more efficient than the existing nonparametric ROC methods under appropriate model assumptions in simulation studies. We apply the methods to a real example in the detection of glaucomatous deterioration. We also derive the asymptotic properties of the proposed methods.

  9. Beating the efficiency of both quantum and classical simulations with a semiclassical method.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Cesare; Vaníček, Jiří

    2011-11-18

    While rigorous quantum dynamical simulations of many-body systems are extremely difficult (or impossible) due to exponential scaling with dimensionality, the corresponding classical simulations ignore quantum effects. Semiclassical methods are generally more efficient but less accurate than quantum methods and more accurate but less efficient than classical methods. We find a remarkable exception to this rule by showing that a semiclassical method can be both more accurate and faster than a classical simulation. Specifically, we prove that for the semiclassical dephasing representation the number of trajectories needed to simulate quantum fidelity is independent of dimensionality and also that this semiclassical method is even faster than the most efficient corresponding classical algorithm. Analytical results are confirmed with simulations of fidelity in up to 100 dimensions with 2(1700)-dimensional Hilbert space.

  10. Numerical simulation of quantum systems using the Particle-In-Cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirkmann, Sven; Youssef, Ziad; Hemke, Torben; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is a very powerful method for studying the dynamics of plasmas. It has been primarily developed for tracking the charged particle trajectories subject to selfconsistent and external electromagnetic fields. Exploiting the power of modern computers, one is able to track the classical paths of tens of millions of particles at the same time. In the late 1980th, it was Dawson (and later Dauger) who had the idea to apply the PIC method to the classical part in the semiclassical approach to quantum systems via path integral methods. One could estimate that if a thousands of classical paths are sufficient to describe the dynamics of one quantum particle, then millions classical paths could describe the dynamics of a quantum particle system. A PIC code in the frame of a semiclassical approach would therefore enable the investigation of a number of quantum phenomena, e.g., optical properties, electrical properties, and, ultimately, chemical reactions. In this contribution we explain the use of the PIC code yapic (developed by the authors) in the frame of the path integral method and discuss the numerical results for simple quantum phenomena, i.e., the quantum harmonic oscillator and quantum tunneling. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of FOR 2093.

  11. A New Soft Computing Method for K-Harmonic Means Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yunzhi; Chen, Yee-Fen; Chen, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    The K-harmonic means clustering algorithm (KHM) is a new clustering method used to group data such that the sum of the harmonic averages of the distances between each entity and all cluster centroids is minimized. Because it is less sensitive to initialization than K-means (KM), many researchers have recently been attracted to studying KHM. In this study, the proposed iSSO-KHM is based on an improved simplified swarm optimization (iSSO) and integrates a variable neighborhood search (VNS) for KHM clustering. As evidence of the utility of the proposed iSSO-KHM, we present extensive computational results on eight benchmark problems. From the computational results, the comparison appears to support the superiority of the proposed iSSO-KHM over previously developed algorithms for all experiments in the literature. PMID:27846228

  12. A New Soft Computing Method for K-Harmonic Means Clustering.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Wei-Chang; Jiang, Yunzhi; Chen, Yee-Fen; Chen, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    The K-harmonic means clustering algorithm (KHM) is a new clustering method used to group data such that the sum of the harmonic averages of the distances between each entity and all cluster centroids is minimized. Because it is less sensitive to initialization than K-means (KM), many researchers have recently been attracted to studying KHM. In this study, the proposed iSSO-KHM is based on an improved simplified swarm optimization (iSSO) and integrates a variable neighborhood search (VNS) for KHM clustering. As evidence of the utility of the proposed iSSO-KHM, we present extensive computational results on eight benchmark problems. From the computational results, the comparison appears to support the superiority of the proposed iSSO-KHM over previously developed algorithms for all experiments in the literature.

  13. Coresets vs clustering: comparison of methods for redundancy reduction in very large white matter fiber sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandroni, Guy; Zimmerman Moreno, Gali; Sochen, Nir; Greenspan, Hayit

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DW-MRI) of white matter in conjunction with improved tractography produce impressive reconstructions of White Matter (WM) pathways. These pathways (fiber sets) often contain hundreds of thousands of fibers, or more. In order to make fiber based analysis more practical, the fiber set needs to be preprocessed to eliminate redundancies and to keep only essential representative fibers. In this paper we demonstrate and compare two distinctive frameworks for selecting this reduced set of fibers. The first framework entails pre-clustering the fibers using k-means, followed by Hierarchical Clustering and replacing each cluster with one representative. For the second clustering stage seven distance metrics were evaluated. The second framework is based on an efficient geometric approximation paradigm named coresets. Coresets present a new approach to optimization and have huge success especially in tasks requiring large computation time and/or memory. We propose a modified version of the coresets algorithm, Density Coreset. It is used for extracting the main fibers from dense datasets, leaving a small set that represents the main structures and connectivity of the brain. A novel approach, based on a 3D indicator structure, is used for comparing the frameworks. This comparison was applied to High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI) scans of 4 healthy individuals. We show that among the clustering based methods, that cosine distance gives the best performance. In comparing the clustering schemes with coresets, Density Coreset method achieves the best performance.

  14. Galaxy cluster mass reconstruction project - I. Methods and first results on galaxy-based techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Old, L.; Skibba, R. A.; Pearce, F. R.; Croton, D.; Muldrew, S. I.; Muñoz-Cuartas, J. C.; Gifford, D.; Gray, M. E.; der Linden, A. von; Mamon, G. A.; Merrifield, M. R.; Müller, V.; Pearson, R. J.; Ponman, T. J.; Saro, A.; Sepp, T.; Sifón, C.; Tempel, E.; Tundo, E.; Wang, Y. O.; Wojtak, R.

    2014-06-01

    This paper is the first in a series in which we perform an extensive comparison of various galaxy-based cluster mass estimation techniques that utilize the positions, velocities and colours of galaxies. Our primary aim is to test the performance of these cluster mass estimation techniques on a diverse set of models that will increase in complexity. We begin by providing participating methods with data from a simple model that delivers idealized clusters, enabling us to quantify the underlying scatter intrinsic to these mass estimation techniques. The mock catalogue is based on a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model that assumes spherical Navarro, Frenk and White (NFW) haloes truncated at R200, with no substructure nor colour segregation, and with isotropic, isothermal Maxwellian velocities. We find that, above 1014M⊙, recovered cluster masses are correlated with the true underlying cluster mass with an intrinsic scatter of typically a factor of 2. Below 1014M⊙, the scatter rises as the number of member galaxies drops and rapidly approaches an order of magnitude. We find that richness-based methods deliver the lowest scatter, but it is not clear whether such accuracy may simply be the result of using an over-simplistic model to populate the galaxies in their haloes. Even when given the true cluster membership, large scatter is observed for the majority non-richness-based approaches, suggesting that mass reconstruction with a low number of dynamical tracers is inherently problematic.

  15. Study of Optical Properties on Fractal Aggregation Using the GMM Method by Different Cluster Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kuo-En; Lin, Tang-Huang; Lien, Wei-Hung

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic pollutants or smoke from biomass burning contribute significantly to global particle aggregation emissions, yet their aggregate formation and resulting ensemble optical properties are poorly understood and parameterized in climate models. Particle aggregation refers to formation of clusters in a colloidal suspension. In clustering algorithms, many parameters, such as fractal dimension, number of monomers, radius of monomer, and refractive index real part and image part, will alter the geometries and characteristics of the fractal aggregation and change ensemble optical properties further. The cluster-cluster aggregation algorithm (CCA) is used to specify the geometries of soot and haze particles. In addition, the Generalized Multi-particle Mie (GMM) method is utilized to compute the Mie solution from a single particle to the multi particle case. This computer code for the calculation of the scattering by an aggregate of spheres in a fixed orientation and the experimental data have been made publicly available. This study for the model inputs of optical determination of the monomer radius, the number of monomers per cluster, and the fractal dimension is presented. The main aim in this study is to analyze and contrast several parameters of cluster aggregation aforementioned which demonstrate significant differences of optical properties using the GMM method finally. Keywords: optical properties, fractal aggregation, GMM, CCA

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance and quantum-mechanical analysis of binuclear niobium clusters in lithium-niobium phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhimov, R. R.; Turney, V. J.; Jones, D. E.; Dobryakov, S. N.; Borisov, Yu. A.; Prokof'ev, A. I.; Aleksandrov, A. I.

    2003-04-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of Nb4+ ions in Li2O-Nb2O5-P2O5 glasses with different composition of oxide components have been investigated. The EPR spectrum shape analysis of Nb4+ (electron configuration 4d1, electron spin S=1/2) reveals the formation of triplet niobium binuclear complex (total electron spin S=1) in glasses. The amount of Nb4+ ions in glasses reversibly changes with temperature and is explained via the mechanism of electron hopping between niobium ions in clusters. The dependence of the amount of Nb4+ ions upon Li2O content has a maximal character, which implies that small amounts of Li+ ions stabilize the Nb4+ pairs, but cause their disproportionation at higher concentrations of Li+ ions in the glass. Quantum mechanical analysis of electronic and spin states of binuclear niobium clusters has been performed on model binuclear complexes, (HO)3Nb-O-Nb(OH)3, [(HO)3Nb-O-Nb(OH)3]Li+, and [(HO)3Nb-O-Nb(OH)3](Li+)2 that exhibit the reversible disproportionation reaction Nb4+-O-Nb4+⇔Nb3+-O-Nb5+. Triplet states of these complexes (total electron spin S=1) have lower energies than singlet states (S=0), and Li+ ions stabilize the binuclear niobium complex. We have found that electron spin densities on niobium ions change depending upon the shift of the bridging oxygen atom. Application of this theoretical modeling to the analysis of the experimental EPR spectrum in Li2O-Nb2O5-P2O5 glass concludes noncentrosymmetric structure of binuclear niobium complex with ˜0.1 Å offset of the bridging oxygen atom towards one Nb atom.

  17. A Cluster-based Method to Map Urban Area from DMSP/OLS Nightlights

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yuyu; Smith, Steven J.; Elvidge, Christopher; Zhao, Kaiguang; Thomson, Allison M.; Imhoff, Marc L.

    2014-05-05

    Accurate information of urban areas at regional and global scales is important for both the science and policy-making communities. The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) nighttime stable light data (NTL) provide a potential way to map urban area and its dynamics economically and timely. In this study, we developed a cluster-based method to estimate the optimal thresholds and map urban extents from the DMSP/OLS NTL data in five major steps, including data preprocessing, urban cluster segmentation, logistic model development, threshold estimation, and urban extent delineation. Different from previous fixed threshold method with over- and under-estimation issues, in our method the optimal thresholds are estimated based on cluster size and overall nightlight magnitude in the cluster, and they vary with clusters. Two large countries of United States and China with different urbanization patterns were selected to map urban extents using the proposed method. The result indicates that the urbanized area occupies about 2% of total land area in the US ranging from lower than 0.5% to higher than 10% at the state level, and less than 1% in China, ranging from lower than 0.1% to about 5% at the province level with some municipalities as high as 10%. The derived thresholds and urban extents were evaluated using high-resolution land cover data at the cluster and regional levels. It was found that our method can map urban area in both countries efficiently and accurately. Compared to previous threshold techniques, our method reduces the over- and under-estimation issues, when mapping urban extent over a large area. More important, our method shows its potential to map global urban extents and temporal dynamics using the DMSP/OLS NTL data in a timely, cost-effective way.

  18. Determining the size of spatial clusters in focused tests: Comparing two methods by means of simulation in a GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yifei

    Based on a four-point evaluation system consisting of accuracy, consistency, power, and chance to commit type I errors, this study compares Tango's minimum p (MinP) and Stone's maximum relative risk (MaxRR) methods for detecting focused cluster size through simulations in GIS. It reveals that the MinP method is more effective than the MaxRR method. The MinP method exhibits higher levels of accuracy and consistency; and its power and chance to commit type I errors are similar to the MinP method. The MaxRR method has a tendency to underestimate the cluster size, while the MinP method tends to overestimate the cluster size, particularly when the clusters are relatively big and have high relative risk levels. In addition, the MinP method seems to be most effective in revealing the size of clusters when clusters are neither too strong nor too weak. The lowest detection rates for clustering occur when the clustering signal is relatively weak, which is easily understandable. In practice, it might be useful to use both the methods to estimate a range of possible cluster sizes, where the MaxRR method indicates the lower estimate, while the MinP method gives the higher estimate of the cluster size.

  19. The Impact of Enhanced He and CNONa Abundances on Globular Cluster Relative Age-Dating Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín-Franch, Antonio; Cassisi, Santi; Aparicio, Antonio; Pietrinferni, Adriano

    2010-05-01

    The impact that unrecognized differences in the chemical patterns of Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) have on their relative age determinations is studied. The two most widely used relative age-dating methods, horizontal and vertical, together with the more recent relative MS-fitting method, were carefully analyzed on a purely theoretical basis. The BaSTI library was adopted to perform the present analysis. We find that relative ages derived using the horizontal and vertical methods are largely dependent on the initial He content and heavy element distribution. Unrecognized cluster-to-cluster chemical abundance differences can lead to an error in the derived relative ages as large as ~0.5 (or ~6 Gyr if an age of 12.8 Gyr is adopted for normalization) and even larger for some extreme cases. It is shown that the relative MS-fitting method is by far the age-dating technique for which undetected cluster-to-cluster differences in the He abundance have less impact. Present results are used in order to pose constraints on the maximum possible spread in the He and CNONa elements abundances on the basis of the estimates—taken from the literature—of the GGCs relative age dispersion obtained with the various relative age-dating techniques. Finally, it is shown that the age-metallicity relation found for young GGCs by the GC Treasury program is a real age sequence and cannot be produced by variations in the He and/or heavy element distribution.

  20. Can the ring polymer molecular dynamics method be interpreted as real time quantum dynamics?

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Seogjoo; Sinitskiy, Anton V.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-04-21

    The ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method has gained popularity in recent years as a simple approximation for calculating real time quantum correlation functions in condensed media. However, the extent to which RPMD captures real dynamical quantum effects and why it fails under certain situations have not been clearly understood. Addressing this issue has been difficult in the absence of a genuine justification for the RPMD algorithm starting from the quantum Liouville equation. To this end, a new and exact path integral formalism for the calculation of real time quantum correlation functions is presented in this work, which can serve as a rigorous foundation for the analysis of the RPMD method as well as providing an alternative derivation of the well established centroid molecular dynamics method. The new formalism utilizes the cyclic symmetry of the imaginary time path integral in the most general sense and enables the expression of Kubo-transformed quantum time correlation functions as that of physical observables pre-averaged over the imaginary time path. Upon filtering with a centroid constraint function, the formulation results in the centroid dynamics formalism. Upon filtering with the position representation of the imaginary time path integral, we obtain an exact quantum dynamics formalism involving the same variables as the RPMD method. The analysis of the RPMD approximation based on this approach clarifies that an explicit quantum dynamical justification does not exist for the use of the ring polymer harmonic potential term (imaginary time kinetic energy) as implemented in the RPMD method. It is analyzed why this can cause substantial errors in nonlinear correlation functions of harmonic oscillators. Such errors can be significant for general correlation functions of anharmonic systems. We also demonstrate that the short time accuracy of the exact path integral limit of RPMD is of lower order than those for finite discretization of path. The

  1. Hidden algebra method (quasi-exact-solvability in quantum mechanics)

    SciTech Connect

    Turbiner, Alexander

    1996-02-20

    A general introduction to quasi-exactly-solvable problems of quantum mechanics is presented. Main attention is given to multidimensional quasi-exactly-solvable and exactly-solvable Schroedinger operators. Exact-solvability of the Calogero and Sutherland N-body problems ass ociated with an existence of the hidden algebra slN is discussed extensively.

  2. System and Method for Outlier Detection via Estimating Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, David J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An efficient method and system for real-time or offline analysis of multivariate sensor data for use in anomaly detection, fault detection, and system health monitoring is provided. Models automatically derived from training data, typically nominal system data acquired from sensors in normally operating conditions or from detailed simulations, are used to identify unusual, out of family data samples (outliers) that indicate possible system failure or degradation. Outliers are determined through analyzing a degree of deviation of current system behavior from the models formed from the nominal system data. The deviation of current system behavior is presented as an easy to interpret numerical score along with a measure of the relative contribution of each system parameter to any off-nominal deviation. The techniques described herein may also be used to "clean" the training data.

  3. A new method to assign galaxy cluster membership using photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castignani, G.; Benoist, C.

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a new effective strategy to assign group and cluster membership probabilities Pmem to galaxies using photometric redshift information. Large dynamical ranges both in halo mass and cosmic time are considered. The method takes into account the magnitude distribution of both cluster and field galaxies as well as the radial distribution of galaxies in clusters using a non-parametric formalism, and relies on Bayesian inference to take photometric redshift uncertainties into account. We successfully test the method against 1208 galaxy clusters within redshifts z = 0.05-2.58 and masses 1013.29-14.80M⊙ drawn from wide field simulated galaxy mock catalogs mainly developed for the forthcoming Euclid mission. Median purity and completeness values of and are reached for galaxies brighter than 0.25 L∗ within r200 of each simulated halo and for a statistical photometric redshift accuracy σ((zs-zp)/(1 + zs)) = 0.03. The mean values p̅=56% and c̅=93% are consistent with the median and have negligible sub-percent uncertainties. Accurate photometric redshifts (σ((zs-zp)/(1 + zs)) ≲ 0.05) and robust estimates for the cluster redshift and cluster center coordinates are required. The dependence of the assignments on photometric redshift accuracy, galaxy magnitude and distance from the halo center, and halo properties such as mass, richness, and redshift are investigated. Variations in the mean values of both purity and completeness are globally limited to a few percent. The largest departures from the mean values are found for galaxies associated with distant z ≳ 1.5 halos, faint ( 0.25 L∗) galaxies, and those at the outskirts of the halo (at cluster-centric projected distances r200) for which the purity is decreased, Δp ≃ 20% at most, with respect to the mean value. The proposed method is applied to derive accurate richness estimates. A statistical comparison between the true (Ntrue) vs. estimated richness (λ = ∑ Pmem) yields on average to unbiased

  4. Use of multiple cluster analysis methods to explore the validity of a community outcomes concept map.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    Concept mapping is now a commonly-used technique for articulating and evaluating programmatic outcomes. However, research regarding validity of knowledge and outcomes produced with concept mapping is sparse. The current study describes quantitative validity analyses using a concept mapping dataset. We sought to increase the validity of concept mapping evaluation results by running multiple cluster analysis methods and then using several metrics to choose from among solutions. We present four different clustering methods based on analyses using the R statistical software package: partitioning around medoids (PAM), fuzzy analysis (FANNY), agglomerative nesting (AGNES) and divisive analysis (DIANA). We then used the Dunn and Davies-Bouldin indices to assist in choosing a valid cluster solution for a concept mapping outcomes evaluation. We conclude that the validity of the outcomes map is high, based on the analyses described. Finally, we discuss areas for further concept mapping methods research.

  5. The panel-clustering method for the wave equation in two spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falletta, Silvia; Sauter, Stefan A.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the numerical solution of the wave equation in a two-dimensional domain and start from a boundary integral formulation for its discretization. We employ the convolution quadrature (CQ) for the temporal and a Galerkin boundary element method (BEM) for the spatial discretization. Our main focus is the sparse approximation of the arising sequence of boundary integral operators by panel clustering. This requires the definition of an appropriate admissibility condition such that the arising kernel functions can be efficiently approximated on admissible blocks. The resulting method has a complexity of O (N (N + M) q 4 + s) , s ∈ { 0 , 1 } , where N is the number of time points, M denotes the dimension of the boundary element space, and q = O (log ⁡ (NM)) is the order of the panel-clustering expansion. Numerical experiments will illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed CQ-BEM method with panel clustering.

  6. The Modeling Library of Eavesdropping Methods in Quantum Cryptography Protocols by Model Checking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Yang, Guowu; Hao, Yujie

    2016-07-01

    The most crucial issue of quantum cryptography protocols is its security. There exists many ways to attack the quantum communication process. In this paper, we present a model checking method for modeling the eavesdropping in quantum information protocols. So when the security properties of a certain protocol are needed to be verified, we can directly use the models which are already built. Here we adopt the probabilistic model checking tool—PRISM to model these attack methods. The verification results show that the detection rate of eavesdropping is approximately close to 1 when enough photons are transmitted.

  7. Combined Mapping of Multiple clUsteriNg ALgorithms (COMMUNAL): A Robust Method for Selection of Cluster Number, K.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Timothy E; Chen, Albert C; Gevaert, Olivier

    2015-11-19

    In order to discover new subsets (clusters) of a data set, researchers often use algorithms that perform unsupervised clustering, namely, the algorithmic separation of a dataset into some number of distinct clusters. Deciding whether a particular separation (or number of clusters, K) is correct is a sort of 'dark art', with multiple techniques available for assessing the validity of unsupervised clustering algorithms. Here, we present a new technique for unsupervised clustering that uses multiple clustering algorithms, multiple validity metrics, and progressively bigger subsets of the data to produce an intuitive 3D map of cluster stability that can help determine the optimal number of clusters in a data set, a technique we call COmbined Mapping of Multiple clUsteriNg ALgorithms (COMMUNAL). COMMUNAL locally optimizes algorithms and validity measures for the data being used. We show its application to simulated data with a known K, and then apply this technique to several well-known cancer gene expression datasets, showing that COMMUNAL provides new insights into clustering behavior and stability in all tested cases. COMMUNAL is shown to be a useful tool for determining K in complex biological datasets, and is freely available as a package for R.

  8. An Efficient Initialization Method for K-Means Clustering of Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizade Naeini, A.; Jamshidzadeh, A.; Saadatseresht, M.; Homayouni, S.

    2014-10-01

    K-means is definitely the most frequently used partitional clustering algorithm in the remote sensing community. Unfortunately due to its gradient decent nature, this algorithm is highly sensitive to the initial placement of cluster centers. This problem deteriorates for the high-dimensional data such as hyperspectral remotely sensed imagery. To tackle this problem, in this paper, the spectral signatures of the endmembers in the image scene are extracted and used as the initial positions of the cluster centers. For this purpose, in the first step, A Neyman-Pearson detection theory based eigen-thresholding method (i.e., the HFC method) has been employed to estimate the number of endmembers in the image. Afterwards, the spectral signatures of the endmembers are obtained using the Minimum Volume Enclosing Simplex (MVES) algorithm. Eventually, these spectral signatures are used to initialize the k-means clustering algorithm. The proposed method is implemented on a hyperspectral dataset acquired by ROSIS sensor with 103 spectral bands over the Pavia University campus, Italy. For comparative evaluation, two other commonly used initialization methods (i.e., Bradley & Fayyad (BF) and Random methods) are implemented and compared. The confusion matrix, overall accuracy and Kappa coefficient are employed to assess the methods' performance. The evaluations demonstrate that the proposed solution outperforms the other initialization methods and can be applied for unsupervised classification of hyperspectral imagery for landcover mapping.

  9. Weighing the Giants - I. Weak-lensing masses for 51 massive galaxy clusters: project overview, data analysis methods and cluster images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Linden, Anja; Allen, Mark T.; Applegate, Douglas E.; Kelly, Patrick L.; Allen, Steven W.; Ebeling, Harald; Burchat, Patricia R.; Burke, David L.; Donovan, David; Morris, R. Glenn; Blandford, Roger; Erben, Thomas; Mantz, Adam

    2014-03-01

    uncertainty for our weak-lensing mass measurements. In accompanying papers, we discuss the key aspects of our photometric calibration and photometric redshift measurements (Kelly et al.), and measure cluster masses using two methods, including a novel Bayesian weak-lensing approach that makes full use of the photometric redshift probability distributions for individual background galaxies (Applegate et al.). In subsequent papers, we will incorporate these weak-lensing mass measurements into a self-consistent framework to simultaneously determine cluster scaling relations and cosmological parameters.

  10. Clustering of attitudes towards obesity: a mixed methods study of Australian parents and children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current population-based anti-obesity campaigns often target individuals based on either weight or socio-demographic characteristics, and give a ‘mass’ message about personal responsibility. There is a recognition that attempts to influence attitudes and opinions may be more effective if they resonate with the beliefs that different groups have about the causes of, and solutions for, obesity. Limited research has explored how attitudinal factors may inform the development of both upstream and downstream social marketing initiatives. Methods Computer-assisted face-to-face interviews were conducted with 159 parents and 184 of their children (aged 9–18 years old) in two Australian states. A mixed methods approach was used to assess attitudes towards obesity, and elucidate why different groups held various attitudes towards obesity. Participants were quantitatively assessed on eight dimensions relating to the severity and extent, causes and responsibility, possible remedies, and messaging strategies. Cluster analysis was used to determine attitudinal clusters. Participants were also able to qualify each answer. Qualitative responses were analysed both within and across attitudinal clusters using a constant comparative method. Results Three clusters were identified. Concerned Internalisers (27% of the sample) judged that obesity was a serious health problem, that Australia had among the highest levels of obesity in the world and that prevalence was rapidly increasing. They situated the causes and remedies for the obesity crisis in individual choices. Concerned Externalisers (38% of the sample) held similar views about the severity and extent of the obesity crisis. However, they saw responsibility and remedies as a societal rather than an individual issue. The final cluster, the Moderates, which contained significantly more children and males, believed that obesity was not such an important public health issue, and judged the extent of obesity to be

  11. Quantum dynamical structure factor of liquid neon via a quasiclassical symmetrized method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteferrante, Michele; Bonella, Sara; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    We apply the phase integration method for quasiclassical quantum time correlation functions [M. Monteferrante, S. Bonella, and G. Ciccotti, Mol. Phys. 109, 3015 (2011), 10.1080/00268976.2011.619506] to compute the dynamic structure factor of liquid neon. So far the method had been tested only on model systems. By comparing our results for neon with experiments and previous calculations, we demonstrate that the scheme is accurate and efficient also for a realistic model of a condensed phase system showing quantum behavior.

  12. Ramsey's method of separated oscillating fields and its application to gravitationally induced quantum phase shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Abele, H.; Jenke, T.; Leeb, H.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2010-03-15

    We propose to apply Ramsey's method of separated oscillating fields to the spectroscopy of the quantum states in the gravity potential above a horizontal mirror. This method allows a precise measurement of quantum mechanical phaseshifts of a Schroedinger wave packet bouncing off a hard surface in the gravitational field of the Earth. Measurements with ultracold neutrons will offer a sensitivity to Newton's law or hypothetical short-ranged interactions, which is about 21 orders of magnitude below the energy scale of electromagnetism.

  13. Generalized Moment Method for Gap Estimation and Quantum Monte Carlo Level Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Hidemaro; Todo, Synge

    2015-08-21

    We formulate a convergent sequence for the energy gap estimation in the worldline quantum Monte Carlo method. The ambiguity left in the conventional gap calculation for quantum systems is eliminated. Our estimation will be unbiased in the low-temperature limit, and also the error bar is reliably estimated. The level spectroscopy from quantum Monte Carlo data is developed as an application of the unbiased gap estimation. From the spectral analysis, we precisely determine the Kosterlitz-Thouless quantum phase-transition point of the spin-Peierls model. It is established that the quantum phonon with a finite frequency is essential to the critical theory governed by the antiadiabatic limit, i.e., the k=1 SU(2) Wess-Zumino-Witten model.

  14. Color image segmentation using watershed and Nyström method based spectral clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaodong; Cao, Zhiguo; Yu, Zhenghong; Zhu, Hu

    2011-11-01

    Color image segmentation draws a lot of attention recently. In order to improve efficiency of spectral clustering in color image segmentation, a novel two-stage color image segmentation method is proposed. In the first stage, we use vector gradient approach to detect color image gradient information, and watershed transformation to get the pre-segmentation result. In the second stage, Nyström extension based spectral clustering is used to get the final result. To verify the proposed algorithm, it is applied to color images from the Berkeley Segmentation Dataset. Experiments show our method can bring promising results and reduce the runtime significantly.

  15. Perturbative universal state-selective correction for state-specific multi-reference coupled cluster methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brabec, Jiri; Banik, Subrata; Kowalski, Karol; Pittner, Jiří

    2016-10-28

    The implementation details of the universal state-selective (USS) multi-reference coupled cluster (MRCC) formalism with singles and doubles (USS(2)) are discussed on the example of several benchmark systems. We demonstrate that the USS(2) formalism is capable of improving accuracies of state specific multi-reference coupled-cluster (MRCC) methods based on the Brillouin-Wigner and Mukherjee’s sufficiency conditions. Additionally, it is shown that the USS(2) approach significantly alleviates problems associated with the lack of invariance of MRCC theories upon the rotation of active orbitals. We also discuss the perturbative USS(2) formulations that significantly reduce numerical overhead of the full USS(2) method.

  16. Clustering method and representative feeder selection for the California solar initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Robert Joseph; Williams, Joseph R.; Munoz-Ramos, Karina

    2014-02-01

    The screening process for DG interconnection procedures needs to be improved in order to increase the PV deployment level on the distribution grid. A significant improvement in the current screening process could be achieved by finding a method to classify the feeders in a utility service territory and determine the sensitivity of particular groups of distribution feeders to the impacts of high PV deployment levels. This report describes the utility distribution feeder characteristics in California for a large dataset of 8,163 feeders and summarizes the California feeder population including the range of characteristics identified and most important to hosting capacity. The report describes the set of feeders that are identified for modeling and analysis as well as feeders identified for the control group. The report presents a method for separating a utilitys distribution feeders into unique clusters using the k-means clustering algorithm. An approach for determining the feeder variables of interest for use in a clustering algorithm is also described. The report presents an approach for choosing the feeder variables to be utilized in the clustering process and a method is identified for determining the optimal number of representative clusters.

  17. Exotic quantum clusters and non-equilibrium dynamics of Rydberg excitations in one-dimensional optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, Marco

    2016-12-01

    In this mini-review, we report results from M. Mattioli, et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 165302 (2013)], M. Dalmonte, et al. [Phys. Rev. B 92, 045106 (2015)] and M. Mattioli, et al. [New J. Phys. 17, 113039 (2015)], where it is shown that Rydberg atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattices are a useful tool to investigate the equilibrium phase diagram and the non-equilibrium dynamics of extended Hubbard models and Kinetically Constrained Models, respectively. Atoms weakly-dressed to an high-lying Rydberg state, which interact with a constant potential extended over several lattice sites, can be in an exotic quantum liquid state, the cluster Luttinger liquid phase [42, 43]. Furthermore, we show how a many-body model of interacting three-level atoms in the V-shaped configuration, where one of the level is a Rydberg state, might relax to equilibrium according to the same rules, so-called kinetic constraints, which are known to reproduce the characteristic dynamical arrest and separation of timescales of real glass-forming materials [62].

  18. Open-Source Sequence Clustering Methods Improve the State Of the Art.

    PubMed

    Kopylova, Evguenia; Navas-Molina, Jose A; Mercier, Céline; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Mahé, Frédéric; He, Yan; Zhou, Hong-Wei; Rognes, Torbjørn; Caporaso, J Gregory; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Sequence clustering is a common early step in amplicon-based microbial community analysis, when raw sequencing reads are clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to reduce the run time of subsequent analysis steps. Here, we evaluated the performance of recently released state-of-the-art open-source clustering software products, namely, OTUCLUST, Swarm, SUMACLUST, and SortMeRNA, against current principal options (UCLUST and USEARCH) in QIIME, hierarchical clustering methods in mothur, and USEARCH's most recent clustering algorithm, UPARSE. All the latest open-source tools showed promising results, reporting up to 60% fewer spurious OTUs than UCLUST, indicating that the underlying clustering algorithm can vastly reduce the number of these derived OTUs. Furthermore, we observed that stringent quality filtering, such as is done in UPARSE, can cause a significant underestimation of species abundance and diversity, leading to incorrect biological results. Swarm, SUMACLUST, and SortMeRNA have been included in the QIIME 1.9.0 release. IMPORTANCE Massive collections of next-generation sequencing data call for fast, accurate, and easily accessible bioinformatics algorithms to perform sequence clustering. A comprehensive benchmark is presented, including open-source tools and the popular USEARCH suite. Simulated, mock, and environmental communities were used to analyze sensitivity, selectivity, species diversity (alpha and beta), and taxonomic composition. The results demonstrate that recent clustering algorithms can significantly improve accuracy and preserve estimated diversity without the application of aggressive filtering. Moreover, these tools are all open source, apply multiple levels of multithreading, and scale to the demands of modern next-generation sequencing data, which is essential for the analysis of massive multidisciplinary studies such as the Earth Microbiome Project (EMP) (J. A. Gilbert, J. K. Jansson, and R. Knight, BMC Biol 12:69, 2014, http

  19. Calculating two-dimensional spectra with the mixed quantum-classical Ehrenfest method.

    PubMed

    van der Vegte, C P; Dijkstra, A G; Knoester, J; Jansen, T L C

    2013-07-25

    We present a mixed quantum-classical simulation approach to calculate two-dimensional spectra of coupled two-level electronic model systems. We include the change in potential energy of the classical system due to transitions in the quantum system using the Ehrenfest method. We study how this feedback of the quantum system on the classical system influences the shape of two-dimensional spectra. We show that the feedback leads to the expected Stokes shift of the energy levels in the quantum system. This subsequently leads to changes in the population transfer between quantum sites, which in turn influence the intensities of the peaks in two-dimensional spectra. The obtained spectra are compared with spectra calculated using the Hierarchical Equations of Motion method which is exact. While the spectra match perfectly for short waiting times, clear differences are found for longer waiting times. This is attributed to a violation of detailed balance between the quantum states in the Ehrenfest method. The energy of the total quantum-classical system however does obey a Boltzmann distribution, when coupled to a stochastic heat bath.

  20. A multi-similarity spectral clustering method for community detection in dynamic networks.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xuanmei; Dai, Weidi; Jiao, Pengfei; Wang, Wenjun; Yuan, Ning

    2016-08-16

    Community structure is one of the fundamental characteristics of complex networks. Many methods have been proposed for community detection. However, most of these methods are designed for static networks and are not suitable for dynamic networks that evolve over time. Recently, the evolutionary clustering framework was proposed for clustering dynamic data, and it can also be used for community detection in dynamic networks. In this paper, a multi-similarity spectral (MSSC) method is proposed as an improvement to the former evolutionary clustering method. To detect the community structure in dynamic networks, our method considers the different similarity metrics of networks. First, multiple similarity matrices are constructed for each snapshot of dynamic networks. Then, a dynamic co-training algorithm is proposed by bootstrapping the clustering of different similarity measures. Compared with a number of baseline models, the experimental results show that the proposed MSSC method has better performance on some widely used synthetic and real-world datasets with ground-truth community structure that change over time.

  1. A multi-similarity spectral clustering method for community detection in dynamic networks

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xuanmei; Dai, Weidi; Jiao, Pengfei; Wang, Wenjun; Yuan, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Community structure is one of the fundamental characteristics of complex networks. Many methods have been proposed for community detection. However, most of these methods are designed for static networks and are not suitable for dynamic networks that evolve over time. Recently, the evolutionary clustering framework was proposed for clustering dynamic data, and it can also be used for community detection in dynamic networks. In this paper, a multi-similarity spectral (MSSC) method is proposed as an improvement to the former evolutionary clustering method. To detect the community structure in dynamic networks, our method considers the different similarity metrics of networks. First, multiple similarity matrices are constructed for each snapshot of dynamic networks. Then, a dynamic co-training algorithm is proposed by bootstrapping the clustering of different similarity measures. Compared with a number of baseline models, the experimental results show that the proposed MSSC method has better performance on some widely used synthetic and real-world datasets with ground-truth community structure that change over time. PMID:27528179

  2. A multi-similarity spectral clustering method for community detection in dynamic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xuanmei; Dai, Weidi; Jiao, Pengfei; Wang, Wenjun; Yuan, Ning

    2016-08-01

    Community structure is one of the fundamental characteristics of complex networks. Many methods have been proposed for community detection. However, most of these methods are designed for static networks and are not suitable for dynamic networks that evolve over time. Recently, the evolutionary clustering framework was proposed for clustering dynamic data, and it can also be used for community detection in dynamic networks. In this paper, a multi-similarity spectral (MSSC) method is proposed as an improvement to the former evolutionary clustering method. To detect the community structure in dynamic networks, our method considers the different similarity metrics of networks. First, multiple similarity matrices are constructed for each snapshot of dynamic networks. Then, a dynamic co-training algorithm is proposed by bootstrapping the clustering of different similarity measures. Compared with a number of baseline models, the experimental results show that the proposed MSSC method has better performance on some widely used synthetic and real-world datasets with ground-truth community structure that change over time.

  3. Coupled quantum-classical method for long range charge transfer: relevance of the nuclear motion to the quantum electron dynamics.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Robson; Hoff, Diego A; Rego, Luis G C

    2015-04-10

    Charge and excitonic-energy transfer phenomena are fundamental for energy conversion in solar cells as well as artificial photosynthesis. Currently, much interest is being paid to light-harvesting and energy transduction processes in supramolecular structures, where nuclear dynamics has a major influence on electronic quantum dynamics. For this reason, the simulation of long range electron transfer in supramolecular structures, under environmental conditions described within an atomistic framework, has been a difficult problem to study. This work describes a coupled quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method that aims at describing long range charge transfer processes in supramolecular systems, taking into account the atomistic details of large molecular structures, the underlying nuclear motion, and environmental effects. The method is applied to investigate the relevance of electron-nuclei interaction on the mechanisms for photo-induced electron-hole pair separation in dye-sensitized interfaces as well as electronic dynamics in molecular structures.

  4. Quantum Diffusion Monte Carlo Method for strong field time dependent problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinski, Matt

    2006-05-01

    We formulate the Quantum Diffusion Quantum Monte Carlo (QDMC) method for the solution of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation for atoms in strong laser fields. Unlike for the normal diffusion Monte Carlo the wave function is represented by walkers with two kinds or colors which solve two coupled and nonlinear diffusion equations. Those diffusion equations are coupled by the potentials similar to those introduced by Shay which must be added to Schr"odingers equation to obtain classical dynamics equivalent to the quantum mechanics [1]. The potentials are calculated semi-analytically similarly to smoothing methods of smooth particle electrodynamics (SPD) with Gaussian smoothing kernels. We apply this method to strong field two electron ionization of Helium. We calculate two electron double ionization rate in full six-dimensional configuration space quantum mechanically. Comparison with classical mechanics and the low dimensional grid models is also provided. 1cm [1] D. Shay, Phys. Rev A 13, 2261 (1976)

  5. Enchanced methods of hydrophilized CdSe quantum dots synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapkin, D. V.; Zharkova, I. S.; Goryacheva, I. Y.

    2015-03-01

    Quantum dots are bright and stable fluorescence signal sources, but for most of applications they need an additional hydrophilization step. Unfortunately, most of existing approaches lead to QD's fluorescence quenching, so there is a need for additional enhancing of hydrophilized QD's brightness like UV irradiation, which can be used both on water insoluble QD's with oleic acid ligands (in toluene) and on hydrophilized QD's covered with UV-stable polymer (in aqueous solution). For synthesis of bright water-soluble fluorescent labels CdSe/CdS/ZnS colloidal quantum dots were covered with PAMAM dendrimer and irradiated with UV lamp in quartz cuvettes for 3 hours at the room temperature and then compared with control sample.

  6. Geometric and Topological Methods for Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Alexander; Contreras, Iván.; Reyes-Lega, Andrés. F.

    2013-05-01

    Introduction; 1. A brief introduction to Dirac manifolds Henrique Bursztyn; 2. Differential geometry of holomorphic vector bundles on a curve Florent Schaffhauser; 3. Paths towards an extension of Chern-Weil calculus to a class of infinite dimensional vector bundles Sylvie Paycha; 4. Introduction to Feynman integrals Stefan Weinzierl; 5. Iterated integrals in quantum field theory Francis Brown; 6. Geometric issues in quantum field theory and string theory Luis J. Boya; 7. Geometric aspects of the standard model and the mysteries of matter Florian Scheck; 8. Absence of singular continuous spectrum for some geometric Laplacians Leonardo A. Cano García; 9. Models for formal groupoids Iván Contreras; 10. Elliptic PDEs and smoothness of weakly Einstein metrics of Hölder regularity Andrés Vargas; 11. Regularized traces and the index formula for manifolds with boundary Alexander Cardona and César Del Corral; Index.

  7. Form gene clustering method about pan-ethnic-group products based on emotional semantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dengkai; Ding, Jingjing; Gao, Minzhuo; Ma, Danping; Liu, Donghui

    2016-09-01

    The use of pan-ethnic-group products form knowledge primarily depends on a designer's subjective experience without user participation. The majority of studies primarily focus on the detection of the perceptual demands of consumers from the target product category. A pan-ethnic-group products form gene clustering method based on emotional semantic is constructed. Consumers' perceptual images of the pan-ethnic-group products are obtained by means of product form gene extraction and coding and computer aided product form clustering technology. A case of form gene clustering about the typical pan-ethnic-group products is investigated which indicates that the method is feasible. This paper opens up a new direction for the future development of product form design which improves the agility of product design process in the era of Industry 4.0.

  8. Method of making an improved superconducting quantum interference device

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Cheng-Teh; Falco, Charles M.; Kampwirth, Robert T.

    1977-01-01

    An improved superconducting quantum interference device is made by sputtering a thin film of an alloy of three parts niobium to one part tin in a pattern comprising a closed loop with a narrow region, depositing a thin film of a radiation shield such as copper over the niobium-tin, scribing a narrow line in the copper over the narrow region, exposing the structure at the scribed line to radiation and removing the deposited copper.

  9. A quaternion-based spectral clustering method for color image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Jin, Lianghai; Liu, Hong; He, Zeng

    2011-11-01

    Spectral clustering method has been widely used in image segmentation. A key issue in spectral clustering is how to build the affinity matrix. When it is applied to color image segmentation, most of the existing methods either use Euclidean metric to define the affinity matrix, or first converting color-images into gray-level images and then use the gray-level images to construct the affinity matrix (component-wise method). However, it is known that Euclidean distances can not represent the color differences well and the component-wise method does not consider the correlation between color channels. In this paper, we propose a new method to produce the affinity matrix, in which the color images are first represented in quaternion form and then the similarities between color pixels are measured by quaternion rotation (QR) mechanism. The experimental results show the superiority of the new method.

  10. Quantum simulation of quantum field theory using continuous variables

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Kevin; Pooser, Raphael C.; Siopsis, George; Weedbrook, Christian

    2015-12-14

    Much progress has been made in the field of quantum computing using continuous variables over the last couple of years. This includes the generation of extremely large entangled cluster states (10,000 modes, in fact) as well as a fault tolerant architecture. This has lead to the point that continuous-variable quantum computing can indeed be thought of as a viable alternative for universal quantum computing. With that in mind, we present a new algorithm for continuous-variable quantum computers which gives an exponential speedup over the best known classical methods. Specifically, this relates to efficiently calculating the scattering amplitudes in scalar bosonic quantum field theory, a problem that is known to be hard using a classical computer. Thus, we give an experimental implementation based on cluster states that is feasible with today's technology.

  11. Quantum simulation of quantum field theory using continuous variables

    DOE PAGES

    Marshall, Kevin; Pooser, Raphael C.; Siopsis, George; ...

    2015-12-14

    Much progress has been made in the field of quantum computing using continuous variables over the last couple of years. This includes the generation of extremely large entangled cluster states (10,000 modes, in fact) as well as a fault tolerant architecture. This has lead to the point that continuous-variable quantum computing can indeed be thought of as a viable alternative for universal quantum computing. With that in mind, we present a new algorithm for continuous-variable quantum computers which gives an exponential speedup over the best known classical methods. Specifically, this relates to efficiently calculating the scattering amplitudes in scalar bosonicmore » quantum field theory, a problem that is known to be hard using a classical computer. Thus, we give an experimental implementation based on cluster states that is feasible with today's technology.« less

  12. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation of the ligand vibrations of the water-oxidizing Mn4CaO5 cluster in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shin; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-10-11

    During photosynthesis, the light-driven oxidation of water performed by photosystem II (PSII) provides electrons necessary to fix CO2, in turn supporting life on Earth by liberating molecular oxygen. Recent high-resolution X-ray images of PSII show that the water-oxidizing center (WOC) is composed of an Mn4CaO5 cluster with six carboxylate, one imidazole, and four water ligands. FTIR difference spectroscopy has shown significant structural changes of the WOC during the S-state cycle of water oxidation, especially within carboxylate groups. However, the roles that these carboxylate groups play in water oxidation as well as how they should be properly assigned in spectra are unresolved. In this study, we performed a normal mode analysis of the WOC using the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method to simulate FTIR difference spectra on the S1 to S2 transition in the carboxylate stretching region. By evaluating WOC models with different oxidation and protonation states, we determined that models of high-oxidation states, Mn(III)2Mn(IV)2, satisfactorily reproduced experimental spectra from intact and Ca-depleted PSII compared with low-oxidation models. It is further suggested that the carboxylate groups bridging Ca and Mn ions within this center tune the reactivity of water ligands bound to Ca by shifting charge via their π conjugation.

  13. Resonances in SN2 reactions: Two-mode quantum calculations for Cl-+CH3Br on a coupled-cluster potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmatz, Stefan; Botschwina, Peter; Hauschildt, Jan; Schinke, Reinhard

    2002-12-01

    An effective two-dimensional potential energy surface has been constructed for the SN2 reaction Cl-+CH3Br→ClCH3+Br- from coupled-cluster calculations with a large basis set. In the quantum dynamics calculations Radau coordinates were employed to describe the Cl-C and C-Br stretching modes. Making use of the filter diagonalization method and an optical potential, bound states as well as resonance states up to energies far above the dissociation threshold have been calculated. The resonance widths fluctuate over several orders of magnitude. In addition to a majority of Feshbach-type resonances there are also exceedingly long-lived shape resonances, which can only decay by tunneling. Owing to a smaller width of the potential barrier and a larger density of states, tunneling through the barrier is more important for Cl-+CH3Br than for Cl-+CH3Cl despite the larger total mass of this system. Excitation of the C-Br stretching vibration enhances the tunneling probability of the entrance channel complex.

  14. Controlling Smectic Liquid Crystal Defect Patterns by Physical Stamping-Assisted Domain Separation and Their Use as Templates for Quantum Dot Cluster Arrays.

    PubMed

    Ok, Jong Min; Kim, Yun Ho; Lee, Tae Yong; Yoo, Hae-Wook; Kwon, Kiok; Jung, Woo-Bin; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2016-12-20

    Controlling the organization of self-assembling building blocks over a large area is crucial for lithographic tools based on the bottom-up approach. However, the fabrication of liquid crystal (LC) defect patterns with a particular ordering still remains a challenge because of the limited close-packed morphologies of LC defects. Here, we introduce a multiple-stamping domain separation method for the control of the dimensions and organization of LC defect structures. Prepatterns with various grid shapes on planar polyimide (PI) surfaces were fabricated by pressing a line-shaped stamp into the PI surfaces in two different directions, and then these surfaces were used to prepare LC defect structures confined to these grid domains. The dimensions of the LC defect structures, namely, the equilibrium diameter and the center to center spacing, are controlled by varying the line spacing of the stamps and the film thickness. A variety of arrangements of LC defects, including square, rhombic, hexagonal, and other oblique lattices, can be obtained by simply varying the stamping angle (Ω) between the first and second stamping directions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the resulting controllable LC defect arrays can be used as templates for generating various patterns of nanoparticle clusters by trapping quantum dots (QDs) within the cores of the LC defects.

  15. A method to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster using conventional optical microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyeonggon; Attota, Ravikiran Tondare, Vipin; Vladár, András E.; Kavuri, Premsagar

    2015-09-07

    We present a method that uses conventional optical microscopes to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster, which is typically not possible using traditional image-based optical methods due to the diffraction limit. The method, called through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM), uses a series of optical images taken at varying focus levels to achieve this. The optical images cannot directly resolve the individual nanoparticles, but contain information related to the number of particles. The TSOM method makes use of this information to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster. Initial good agreement between the simulations and the measurements is also presented. The TSOM method can be applied to fluorescent and non-fluorescent as well as metallic and non-metallic nano-scale materials, including soft materials, making it attractive for tag-less, high-speed, optical analysis of nanoparticles down to 45 nm diameter.

  16. Multipolar Ewald Methods, 2: Applications Using a Quantum Mechanical Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A fully quantum mechanical force field (QMFF) based on a modified “divide-and-conquer” (mDC) framework is applied to a series of molecular simulation applications, using a generalized Particle Mesh Ewald method extended to multipolar charge densities. Simulation results are presented for three example applications: liquid water, p-nitrophenylphosphate reactivity in solution, and crystalline N,N-dimethylglycine. Simulations of liquid water using a parametrized mDC model are compared to TIP3P and TIP4P/Ew water models and experiment. The mDC model is shown to be superior for cluster binding energies and generally comparable for bulk properties. Examination of the dissociative pathway for dephosphorylation of p-nitrophenylphosphate shows that the mDC method evaluated with the DFTB3/3OB and DFTB3/OPhyd semiempirical models bracket the experimental barrier, whereas DFTB2 and AM1/d-PhoT QM/MM simulations exhibit deficiencies in the barriers, the latter for which is related, in part, to the anomalous underestimation of the p-nitrophenylate leaving group pKa. Simulations of crystalline N,N-dimethylglycine are performed and the overall structure and atomic fluctuations are compared with the experiment and the general AMBER force field (GAFF). The QMFF, which was not parametrized for this application, was shown to be in better agreement with crystallographic data than GAFF. Our simulations highlight some of the application areas that may benefit from using new QMFFs, and they demonstrate progress toward the development of accurate QMFFs using the recently developed mDC framework. PMID:25691830

  17. Multipolar Ewald methods, 2: applications using a quantum mechanical force field.

    PubMed

    Giese, Timothy J; Panteva, Maria T; Chen, Haoyuan; York, Darrin M

    2015-02-10

    A fully quantum mechanical force field (QMFF) based on a modified “divide-and-conquer” (mDC) framework is applied to a series of molecular simulation applications, using a generalized Particle Mesh Ewald method extended to multipolar charge densities. Simulation results are presented for three example applications: liquid water, p-nitrophenylphosphate reactivity in solution, and crystalline N,N-dimethylglycine. Simulations of liquid water using a parametrized mDC model are compared to TIP3P and TIP4P/Ew water models and experiment. The mDC model is shown to be superior for cluster binding energies and generally comparable for bulk properties. Examination of the dissociative pathway for dephosphorylation of p-nitrophenylphosphate shows that the mDC method evaluated with the DFTB3/3OB and DFTB3/OPhyd semiempirical models bracket the experimental barrier, whereas DFTB2 and AM1/d-PhoT QM/MM simulations exhibit deficiencies in the barriers, the latter for which is related, in part, to the anomalous underestimation of the p-nitrophenylate leaving group pKa. Simulations of crystalline N,N-dimethylglycine are performed and the overall structure and atomic fluctuations are compared with the experiment and the general AMBER force field (GAFF). The QMFF, which was not parametrized for this application, was shown to be in better agreement with crystallographic data than GAFF. Our simulations highlight some of the application areas that may benefit from using new QMFFs, and they demonstrate progress toward the development of accurate QMFFs using the recently developed mDC framework.

  18. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics embedded cluster density functional theory: single-excitation configuration interaction study.

    PubMed

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Glover, William J; Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2007-06-21

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the hydrated electron were extracted from the MQC MD simulations and embedded in a roughly 18 Ax18 Ax18 A matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory (DFT) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid DFT(CIS)/MQC MD calculations is significant transfer (approximately 18%) of the excess electron's charge density into the 2p orbitals of oxygen atoms in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the singly occupied and the lower unoccupied molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfcc) tensors, and the infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of these embedded water cluster anions. The calculated hfcc tensors were used to compute electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra for the hydrated electron that compared favorably to the experimental spectra of trapped electrons in alkaline ice. The calculated vibrational spectra of the hydrated electron are consistent with the red-shifted bending and stretching frequencies observed in resonance Raman experiments. In addition to reproducing the visible/near IR absorption spectrum, the hybrid DFT model also accounts for the hydrated electron's 190-nm absorption band in the ultraviolet. Thus, our study suggests that to explain several important experimentally observed properties of the hydrated electron, many-electron effects must be accounted for: one-electron models that do not allow for mixing of the excess

  19. A Combinational Clustering Based Method for cDNA Microarray Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Guifang; Li, Tiejun; Zuo, Wangda; Wu, Shunxiang; Liu, Tundong

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technology plays an important role in drawing useful biological conclusions by analyzing thousands of gene expressions simultaneously. Especially, image analysis is a key step in microarray analysis and its accuracy strongly depends on segmentation. The pioneering works of clustering based segmentation have shown that k-means clustering algorithm and moving k-means clustering algorithm are two commonly used methods in microarray image processing. However, they usually face unsatisfactory results because the real microarray image contains noise, artifacts and spots that vary in size, shape and contrast. To improve the segmentation accuracy, in this article we present a combination clustering based segmentation approach that may be more reliable and able to segment spots automatically. First, this new method starts with a very simple but effective contrast enhancement operation to improve the image quality. Then, an automatic gridding based on the maximum between-class variance is applied to separate the spots into independent areas. Next, among each spot region, the moving k-means clustering is first conducted to separate the spot from background and then the k-means clustering algorithms are combined for those spots failing to obtain the entire boundary. Finally, a refinement step is used to replace the false segmentation and the inseparable ones of missing spots. In addition, quantitative comparisons between the improved method and the other four segmentation algorithms--edge detection, thresholding, k-means clustering and moving k-means clustering--are carried out on cDNA microarray images from six different data sets. Experiments on six different data sets, 1) Stanford Microarray Database (SMD), 2) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), 3) Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), 4) Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), 5) Joe DeRisi's individual tiff files (DeRisi), and 6) University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), indicate that the improved approach is

  20. A Combinational Clustering Based Method for cDNA Microarray Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Guifang; Li, Tiejun; Zuo, Wangda; Wu, Shunxiang; Liu, Tundong

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technology plays an important role in drawing useful biological conclusions by analyzing thousands of gene expressions simultaneously. Especially, image analysis is a key step in microarray analysis and its accuracy strongly depends on segmentation. The pioneering works of clustering based segmentation have shown that k-means clustering algorithm and moving k-means clustering algorithm are two commonly used methods in microarray image processing. However, they usually face unsatisfactory results because the real microarray image contains noise, artifacts and spots that vary in size, shape and contrast. To improve the segmentation accuracy, in this article we present a combination clustering based segmentation approach that may be more reliable and able to segment spots automatically. First, this new method starts with a very simple but effective contrast enhancement operation to improve the image quality. Then, an automatic gridding based on the maximum between-class variance is applied to separate the spots into independent areas. Next, among each spot region, the moving k-means clustering is first conducted to separate the spot from background and then the k-means clustering algorithms are combined for those spots failing to obtain the entire boundary. Finally, a refinement step is used to replace the false segmentation and the inseparable ones of missing spots. In addition, quantitative comparisons between the improved method and the other four segmentation algorithms--edge detection, thresholding, k-means clustering and moving k-means clustering--are carried out on cDNA microarray images from six different data sets. Experiments on six different data sets, 1) Stanford Microarray Database (SMD), 2) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), 3) Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), 4) Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), 5) Joe DeRisi’s individual tiff files (DeRisi), and 6) University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), indicate that the improved approach is

  1. Catalytic Cycle of Multicopper Oxidases Studied by Combined Quantum- and Molecular-Mechanical Free-Energy Perturbation Methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Jilai; Farrokhnia, Maryam; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Ryde, Ulf

    2015-07-02

    We have used combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical free-energy perturbation methods in combination with explicit solvent simulations to study the reaction mechanism of the multicopper oxidases, in particular, the regeneration of the reduced state from the native intermediate. For 52 putative states of the trinuclear copper cluster, differing in the oxidation states of the copper ions and the protonation states of water- and O2-derived ligands, we have studied redox potentials, acidity constants, isomerization reactions, as well as water- and O2 binding reactions. Thereby, we can propose a full reaction mechanism of the multicopper oxidases with atomic detail. We also show that the two copper sites in the protein communicate so that redox potentials and acidity constants of one site are affected by up to 0.2 V or 3 pKa units by a change in the oxidation state of the other site.

  2. Accelerating calculations of ultrafast time-resolved electronic spectra with efficient quantum dynamics methods.

    PubMed

    Wehrle, Marius; Sulc, Miroslav; Vanícek, Jirí

    2011-01-01

    We explore three specific approaches for speeding up the calculation of quantum time correlation functions needed for time-resolved electronic spectra. The first relies on finding a minimum set of sufficiently accurate electronic surfaces. The second increases the time step required for convergence of exact quantum simulations by using different split-step algorithms to solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The third approach lowers the number of trajectories needed for convergence of approximate semiclassical dynamics methods.

  3. Ab initio path integral simulations for the fluoride ion-water clusters: competitive nuclear quantum effect between F(-)-water and water-water hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Yukio; Suzuki, Kimichi; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2013-06-20

    Small hydrated fluoride ion complexes, F(-)(H2O)n (n = 1-3), have been studied by ab initio hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) and ab initio path integral hybrid Monte Carlo (PIHMC) simulations. Because of the quantum effect, our simulation shows that the average hydrogen-bonded F(-)···HO distance in the quantum F(-)(H2O) is shorter than that in the classical one, while the relation inverts at the three water molecular F(-)(H2O)3 cluster. In the case of F(-)(H2O)3, we have found that the nuclear quantum effect enhances the formation of hydrogen bonds between two water molecules. In F(-)(H2O)2 and F(-)(H2O)3, the nuclear quantum effect on two different kinds of hydrogen bonds, F(-)-water and water-water hydrogen bonds, competes against each other. In F(-)(H2O)3, thus, the nuclear quantum effect on the water-water hydrogen bond leads to the elongation of hydrogen-bonded F(-)···HO distance, which we suggest this as the possible origin of the structural inversion from F(-)(H2O) to F(-)(H2O)3.

  4. Strengths and weaknesses of weak-strong cluster problems: A detailed overview of state-of-the-art classical heuristics versus quantum approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrà, Salvatore; Zhu, Zheng; Wang, Wenlong; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2016-08-01

    To date, a conclusive detection of quantum speedup remains elusive. Recently, a team by Google Inc. [V. S. Denchev et al., Phys. Rev. X 6, 031015 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevX.6.031015] proposed a weak-strong cluster model tailored to have tall and narrow energy barriers separating local minima, with the aim to highlight the value of finite-range tunneling. More precisely, results from quantum Monte Carlo simulations as well as the D-Wave 2X quantum annealer scale considerably better than state-of-the-art simulated annealing simulations. Moreover, the D-Wave 2X quantum annealer is ˜108 times faster than simulated annealing on conventional computer hardware for problems with approximately 103 variables. Here, an overview of different sequential, nontailored, as well as specialized tailored algorithms on the Google instances is given. We show that the quantum speedup is limited to sequential approaches and study the typical complexity of the benchmark problems using insights from the study of spin glasses.

  5. Coordinate-Based Clustering Method for Indoor Fingerprinting Localization in Dense Cluttered Environments

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Fu, Xiao; Deng, Zhongliang

    2016-01-01

    Indoor positioning technologies has boomed recently because of the growing commercial interest in indoor location-based service (ILBS). Due to the absence of satellite signal in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), various technologies have been proposed for indoor applications. Among them, Wi-Fi fingerprinting has been attracting much interest from researchers because of its pervasive deployment, flexibility and robustness to dense cluttered indoor environments. One challenge, however, is the deployment of Access Points (AP), which would bring a significant influence on the system positioning accuracy. This paper concentrates on WLAN based fingerprinting indoor location by analyzing the AP deployment influence, and studying the advantages of coordinate-based clustering compared to traditional RSS-based clustering. A coordinate-based clustering method for indoor fingerprinting location, named Smallest-Enclosing-Circle-based (SEC), is then proposed aiming at reducing the positioning error lying in the AP deployment and improving robustness to dense cluttered environments. All measurements are conducted in indoor public areas, such as the National Center For the Performing Arts (as Test-bed 1) and the XiDan Joy City (Floors 1 and 2, as Test-bed 2), and results show that SEC clustering algorithm can improve system positioning accuracy by about 32.7% for Test-bed 1, 71.7% for Test-bed 2 Floor 1 and 73.7% for Test-bed 2 Floor 2 compared with traditional RSS-based clustering algorithms such as K-means. PMID:27918454

  6. Coordinate-Based Clustering Method for Indoor Fingerprinting Localization in Dense Cluttered Environments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Fu, Xiao; Deng, Zhongliang

    2016-12-02

    Indoor positioning technologies has boomed recently because of the growing commercial interest in indoor location-based service (ILBS). Due to the absence of satellite signal in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), various technologies have been proposed for indoor applications. Among them, Wi-Fi fingerprinting has been attracting much interest from researchers because of its pervasive deployment, flexibility and robustness to dense cluttered indoor environments. One challenge, however, is the deployment of Access Points (AP), which would bring a significant influence on the system positioning accuracy. This paper concentrates on WLAN based fingerprinting indoor location by analyzing the AP deployment influence, and studying the advantages of coordinate-based clustering compared to traditional RSS-based clustering. A coordinate-based clustering method for indoor fingerprinting location, named Smallest-Enclosing-Circle-based (SEC), is then proposed aiming at reducing the positioning error lying in the AP deployment and improving robustness to dense cluttered environments. All measurements are conducted in indoor public areas, such as the National Center For the Performing Arts (as Test-bed 1) and the XiDan Joy City (Floors 1 and 2, as Test-bed 2), and results show that SEC clustering algorithm can improve system positioning accuracy by about 32.7% for Test-bed 1, 71.7% for Test-bed 2 Floor 1 and 73.7% for Test-bed 2 Floor 2 compared with traditional RSS-based clustering algorithms such as K-means.

  7. Cluster Expansion Method for Evolving Weighted Networks Having Vector-Like Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, M.; Gligor, M.

    2008-09-01

    The cluster variation method known in statistical mechanics and condensed matter is revived for weighted bipartite networks. The decomposition (or expansion) of a Hamiltonian through a finite number of components, whence serving to define variable clusters, is recalled. As an illustration the network built from data representing correlations between (4) macroeconomic features, i.e. the so-called vector components, of 15 EU countries, as (function) nodes, is discussed. We show that statistical physics principles, like the maximum entropy criterion points to clusters, here in a (4) variable phase space: Gross Domestic Product, Final Consumption Expenditure, Gross Capital Formation and Net Exports. It is observed that the maximum entropy corresponds to a cluster which does not explicitly include the Gross Domestic Product but only the other (3) "axes", i.e. consumption, investment and trade components. On the other hand, the minimal entropy clustering scheme is obtained from a coupling necessarily including Gross Domestic Product and Final Consumption Expenditure. The results confirm intuitive economic theory and practice expectations at least as regards geographical connexions. The technique can of course be applied to many other cases in the physics of socio-economy networks.

  8. Subspace projection method for unstructured searches with noisy quantum oracles using a signal-based quantum emulation device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cour, Brian R.; Ostrove, Corey I.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to solving unstructured search problems using a classical, signal-based emulation of a quantum computer. The classical nature of the representation allows one to perform subspace projections in addition to the usual unitary gate operations. Although bandwidth requirements will limit the scale of problems that can be solved by this method, it can nevertheless provide a significant computational advantage for problems of limited size. In particular, we find that, for the same number of noisy oracle calls, the proposed subspace projection method provides a higher probability of success for finding a solution than does an single application of Grover's algorithm on the same device.

  9. A Comprehensive Comparison of Different Clustering Methods for Reliability Analysis of Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Kafieh, Rahele; Mehridehnavi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we considered some competitive learning methods including hard competitive learning and soft competitive learning with/without fixed network dimensionality for reliability analysis in microarrays. In order to have a more extensive view, and keeping in mind that competitive learning methods aim at error minimization or entropy maximization (different kinds of function optimization), we decided to investigate the abilities of mixture decomposition schemes. Therefore, we assert that this study covers the algorithms based on function optimization with particular insistence on different competitive learning methods. The destination is finding the most powerful method according to a pre-specified criterion determined with numerical methods and matrix similarity measures. Furthermore, we should provide an indication showing the intrinsic ability of the dataset to form clusters before we apply a clustering algorithm. Therefore, we proposed Hopkins statistic as a method for finding the intrinsic ability of a data to be clustered. The results show the remarkable ability of Rayleigh mixture model in comparison with other methods in reliability analysis task. PMID:24083134

  10. A New Multistage Medical Segmentation Method Based on Superpixel and Fuzzy Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benzheng; Yu, Zhen; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong

    2014-01-01

    The medical image segmentation is the key approach of image processing for brain MRI images. However, due to the visual complex appearance of image structures and the imaging characteristic, it is still challenging to automatically segment brain MRI image. A new multi-stage segmentation method based on superpixel and fuzzy clustering (MSFCM) is proposed to achieve the good brain MRI segmentation results. The MSFCM utilizes the superpixels as the clustering objects instead of pixels, and it can increase the clustering granularity and overcome the influence of noise and bias effectively. In the first stage, the MRI image is parsed into several atomic areas, namely, superpixels, and a further parsing step is adopted for the areas with bigger gray variance over setting threshold. Subsequently, designed fuzzy clustering is carried out to the fuzzy membership of each superpixel, and an iterative broadcast method based on the Butterworth function is used to redefine their classifications. Finally, the segmented image is achieved by merging the superpixels which have the same classification label. The simulated brain database from BrainWeb site is used in the experiments, and the experimental results demonstrate that MSFCM method outperforms the traditional FCM algorithm in terms of segmentation accuracy and stability for MRI image. PMID:24734117

  11. Methods for accurate analysis of galaxy clustering on non-linear scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, Mohammadjavad

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of galaxy clustering with the low-redshift galaxy surveys provide sensitive probe of cosmology and growth of structure. Parameter inference with galaxy clustering relies on computation of likelihood functions which requires estimation of the covariance matrix of the observables used in our analyses. Therefore, accurate estimation of the covariance matrices serves as one of the key ingredients in precise cosmological parameter inference. This requires generation of a large number of independent galaxy mock catalogs that accurately describe the statistical distribution of galaxies in a wide range of physical scales. We present a fast method based on low-resolution N-body simulations and approximate galaxy biasing technique for generating mock catalogs. Using a reference catalog that was created using the high resolution Big-MultiDark N-body simulation, we show that our method is able to produce catalogs that describe galaxy clustering at a percentage-level accuracy down to highly non-linear scales in both real-space and redshift-space.In most large-scale structure analyses, modeling of galaxy bias on non-linear scales is performed assuming a halo model. Clustering of dark matter halos has been shown to depend on halo properties beyond mass such as halo concentration, a phenomenon referred to as assembly bias. Standard large-scale structure studies assume that halo mass alone is sufficient in characterizing the connection between galaxies and halos. However, modeling of galaxy bias can face systematic effects if the number of galaxies are correlated with other halo properties. Using the Small MultiDark-Planck high resolution N-body simulation and the clustering measurements of Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 main galaxy sample, we investigate the extent to which the dependence of galaxy bias on halo concentration can improve our modeling of galaxy clustering.

  12. Efficient method for calculating electronic bound states in arbitrary one-dimensional quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Aquino, V. M.; Iwamoto, H.; Dias, I. F. L.; Laureto, E.; da Silva, M. A. T.; da Silva, E. C. F.; Quivy, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper it is demonstrated that the bound electronic states of multiple quantum wells structures may be calculated very efficiently by expanding their eigenstates in terms of the eigenfunctions of a particle in a box. The bound states of single and multiple symmetric or nonsymmetric wells are calculated within the single-band effective mass approximation. A comparison is then made between the results obtained for simple cases with exact calculations. We also apply our approach to a GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well structure composed of forty periods each one with seven quantum wells. The method may be very useful to design narrow band quantum cascade photodetectors to work without applied bias in a photovoltaic mode. With the presented method the effects of a electric field may also be easily included which is very important if one desires study quantum well structures for application to the development of quantum cascade lasers. The advantages of the method are also presented.

  13. Determination of the transmission coefficients for quantum structures using FDTD method.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yangyang; Wang, Xiaoying; Sui, Wenquan

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a simple method to incorporate quantum effect in traditional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulators. Witch could make it possible to co-simulate systems include quantum structures and traditional components. In this paper, tunneling transmission coefficient is calculated by solving time-domain Schrödinger equation with a developed FDTD technique, called FDTD-S method. To validate the feasibility of the method, a simple resonant tunneling diode (RTD) structure model has been simulated using the proposed method. The good agreement between the numerical and analytical results proves its accuracy. The effectness and accuracy of this approach makes it a potential method for analysis and design of hybrid systems includes quantum structures and traditional components.

  14. An efficient quantum mechanical method for radical pair recombination reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Alan M.; Fay, Thomas P.; Manolopoulos, David E.

    2016-12-01

    The standard quantum mechanical expressions for the singlet and triplet survival probabilities and product yields of a radical pair recombination reaction involve a trace over the states in a combined electronic and nuclear spin Hilbert space. If this trace is evaluated deterministically, by performing a separate time-dependent wavepacket calculation for each initial state in the Hilbert space, the computational effort scales as O (Z2log ⁡Z ) , where Z is the total number of nuclear spin states. Here we show that the trace can also be evaluated stochastically, by exploiting the properties of spin coherent states. This results in a computational effort of O (M Z log ⁡Z ) , where M is the number of Monte Carlo samples needed for convergence. Example calculations on a strongly coupled radical pair with Z >106 show that the singlet yield can be converged to graphical accuracy using just M =200 samples, resulting in a speed up by a factor of >5000 over a standard deterministic calculation. We expect that this factor will greatly facilitate future quantum mechanical simulations of a wide variety of radical pairs of interest in chemistry and biology.

  15. An accurate potential energy surface for the F + H2 → HF + H reaction by the coupled-cluster method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Sun, Zhigang; Zhang, Dong H

    2015-01-14

    A three dimensional potential energy surface for the F + H2 → HF + H reaction has been computed by the spin unrestricted coupled cluster method with singles, doubles, triples, and perturbative quadruples [UCCSDT(2)Q] using the augmented correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the fluorine atom and the correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the hydrogen atom. All the calculations are based on the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock orbitals, together with the frozen core approximations, and the UCCSD(T)/complete basis set (CBS) correction term was included. The global potential energy surface was calculated by fitting the sampled ab initio points without any scaling factor for the correlation energy part using a neutral network function method. Extensive dynamics calculations have been carried out on the potential energy surface. The reaction rate constants, integral cross sections, product rotational states distribution, and forward and backward scattering as a function of collision energy of the F + HD → HF + D, F + HD → DF + H, and F + H2 reaction, were calculated by the time-independent quantum dynamics scattering theory using the new surface. The satisfactory agreement with the reported experimental observations previously demonstrates the accuracy of the new potential energy surface.

  16. Automatic active space selection for the similarity transformed equations of motion coupled cluster method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Achintya Kumar; Nooijen, Marcel; Neese, Frank; Izsák, Róbert

    2017-02-01

    An efficient scheme for the automatic selection of an active space for similarity transformed equations of motion (STEOM) coupled cluster method is proposed. It relies on state averaged configuration interaction singles (CIS) natural orbitals and makes it possible to use STEOM as a black box method. The performance of the new scheme is tested for singlet and triplet valence, charge transfer, and Rydberg excited states.

  17. Comparison of clustering methods for high-dimensional single-cell flow and mass cytometry data.

    PubMed

    Weber, Lukas M; Robinson, Mark D

    2016-12-01

    Recent technological developments in high-dimensional flow cytometry and mass cytometry (CyTOF) have made it possible to detect expression levels of dozens of protein markers in thousands of cells per second, allowing cell populations to be characterized in unprecedented detail. Traditional data analysis by "manual gating" can be inefficient and unreliable in these high-dimensional settings, which has led to the development of a large number of automated analysis methods. Methods designed for unsupervised analysis use specialized clustering algorithms to detect and define cell populations for further downstream analysis. Here, we have performed an up-to-date, extensible performance comparison of clustering methods for high-dimensional flow and mass cytometry data. We evaluated methods using several publicly available data sets from experiments in immunology, containing both major and rare cell populations, with cell population identities from expert manual gating as the reference standard. Several methods performed well, including FlowSOM, X-shift, PhenoGraph, Rclusterpp, and flowMeans. Among these, FlowSOM had extremely fast runtimes, making this method well-suited for interactive, exploratory analysis of large, high-dimensional data sets on a standard laptop or desktop computer. These results extend previously published comparisons by focusing on high-dimensional data and including new methods developed for CyTOF data. R scripts to reproduce all analyses are available from GitHub (https://github.com/lmweber/cytometry-clustering-comparison), and pre-processed data files are available from FlowRepository (FR-FCM-ZZPH), allowing our comparisons to be extended to include new clustering methods and reference data sets. © 2016 The Authors. Cytometry Part A published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of ISAC.

  18. Workshop on Coupled-Cluster Theory at the Interface of Atomic Physics and Quantum Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-05

    potentials, electron affinities, and Auger spectroscopy, Fock space multi-reference methods (as discussed at the workshop by Mukherjee, Kaldor , Rittby...Bishop K. Jankowski Zuwei Liu University of Manchester Nicholas Capernicus University University of Virginia Dept. of Mathematics Institute of Physics...Kingston, NY 12401 Bhanu Pratap Das Uzi Kaldor Peter Mohr Utah State University Tel Aviv University National Institute of Standards & Physics Dept

  19. Two-Step Nucleation and Growth of InP Quantum Dots via Magic-Sized Cluster Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, Dylan C.; Terban, Maxwell W.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Cossairt, Brandi M.

    2015-01-30

    We report on the role of magic-sized clusters (MSCs) as key intermediates in the synthesis of indium phosphide quantum dots (InP QDs) from molecular precursors. These observations suggest that previous efforts to control nucleation and growth by tuning precursor reactivity have been undermined by formation of these kinetically persistent MSCs prior to QD formation. The thermal stability of InP MSCs is influenced by the presence of exogenous bases as well as choice of the anionic ligand set. Addition of a primary amine, a common additive in previous InP QD syntheses, to carboxylate terminated MSCs was found to bypass the formation of MSCs, allowing for homogeneous growth of InP QDs through a continuum of isolable sizes. Substitution of the carboxylate ligand set for a phosphonate ligand set increased the thermal stability of one particular InP MSC to 400°C. The structure and optical properties of the MSCs with both carboxylate and phosphonate ligand sets were studied by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, powder XRD analysis, and solution ³¹P{¹H} and ¹H NMR spectroscopy. Finally, the carboxylate terminated MSCs were identified as effective single source precursors (SSPs) for the synthesis of high quality InP QDs. Employing InP MSCs as SSPs for QDs effectively decouples the formation of MSCs from the subsequent second nucleation event and growth of InP QDs. The concentration dependence of this SSP reaction, as well as the shape uniformity of particles observed by TEM suggests that the stepwise growth from MSCs directly to QDs proceeds via a second nucleation event rather than an aggregative growth mechanism.

  20. Two-Step Nucleation and Growth of InP Quantum Dots via Magic-Sized Cluster Intermediates

    DOE PAGES

    Gary, Dylan C.; Terban, Maxwell W.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; ...

    2015-01-30

    We report on the role of magic-sized clusters (MSCs) as key intermediates in the synthesis of indium phosphide quantum dots (InP QDs) from molecular precursors. These observations suggest that previous efforts to control nucleation and growth by tuning precursor reactivity have been undermined by formation of these kinetically persistent MSCs prior to QD formation. The thermal stability of InP MSCs is influenced by the presence of exogenous bases as well as choice of the anionic ligand set. Addition of a primary amine, a common additive in previous InP QD syntheses, to carboxylate terminated MSCs was found to bypass the formationmore » of MSCs, allowing for homogeneous growth of InP QDs through a continuum of isolable sizes. Substitution of the carboxylate ligand set for a phosphonate ligand set increased the thermal stability of one particular InP MSC to 400°C. The structure and optical properties of the MSCs with both carboxylate and phosphonate ligand sets were studied by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, powder XRD analysis, and solution ³¹P{¹H} and ¹H NMR spectroscopy. Finally, the carboxylate terminated MSCs were identified as effective single source precursors (SSPs) for the synthesis of high quality InP QDs. Employing InP MSCs as SSPs for QDs effectively decouples the formation of MSCs from the subsequent second nucleation event and growth of InP QDs. The concentration dependence of this SSP reaction, as well as the shape uniformity of particles observed by TEM suggests that the stepwise growth from MSCs directly to QDs proceeds via a second nucleation event rather than an aggregative growth mechanism.« less

  1. A comparison of cluster and systematic sampling methods for measuring crude mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Angela M. C.; Grais, Rebecca F.; Coulombier, Denis; Ritter, Helga

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the results of two different survey sampling techniques (cluster and systematic) used to measure retrospective mortality on the same population at about the same time. METHODS: Immediately following a cluster survey to assess mortality retrospectively in a town in North Darfur, Sudan in 2005, we conducted a systematic survey on the same population and again measured mortality retrospectively. This was only possible because the geographical layout of the town, and the availability of a good previous estimate of the population size and distribution, were conducive to the systematic survey design. RESULTS: Both the cluster and the systematic survey methods gave similar results below the emergency threshold for crude mortality (0.80 versus 0.77 per 10,000/day, respectively). The results for mortality in children under 5 years old (U5MR) were different (1.16 versus 0.71 per 10,000/day), although this difference was not statistically significant. The 95% confidence intervals were wider in each case for the cluster survey, especially for the U5MR (0.15-2.18 for the cluster versus 0.09-1.33 for the systematic survey). CONCLUSION: Both methods gave similar age and sex distributions. The systematic survey, however, allowed for an estimate of the town's population size, and a smaller sample could have been used. This study was conducted in a purely operational, rather than a research context. A research study into alternative methods for measuring retrospective mortality in areas with mortality significantly above the emergency threshold is needed, and is planned for 2006. PMID:16628302

  2. THE IMPACT OF ENHANCED He AND CNONa ABUNDANCES ON GLOBULAR CLUSTER RELATIVE AGE-DATING METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    MarIn-Franch, Antonio; Aparicio, Antonio; Cassisi, Santi; Pietrinferni, Adriano E-mail: antapaj@iac.e E-mail: pietrinferni@oa-teramo.inaf.i

    2010-05-10

    The impact that unrecognized differences in the chemical patterns of Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) have on their relative age determinations is studied. The two most widely used relative age-dating methods, horizontal and vertical, together with the more recent relative MS-fitting method, were carefully analyzed on a purely theoretical basis. The BaSTI library was adopted to perform the present analysis. We find that relative ages derived using the horizontal and vertical methods are largely dependent on the initial He content and heavy element distribution. Unrecognized cluster-to-cluster chemical abundance differences can lead to an error in the derived relative ages as large as {approx}0.5 (or {approx}6 Gyr if an age of 12.8 Gyr is adopted for normalization) and even larger for some extreme cases. It is shown that the relative MS-fitting method is by far the age-dating technique for which undetected cluster-to-cluster differences in the He abundance have less impact. Present results are used in order to pose constraints on the maximum possible spread in the He and CNONa elements abundances on the basis of the estimates-taken from the literature-of the GGCs relative age dispersion obtained with the various relative age-dating techniques. Finally, it is shown that the age-metallicity relation found for young GGCs by the GC Treasury program is a real age sequence and cannot be produced by variations in the He and/or heavy element distribution.

  3. Stepwise threshold clustering: a new method for genotyping MHC loci using next-generation sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Stutz, William E; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    Genes of the vertebrate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are of great interest to biologists because of their important role in immunity and disease, and their extremely high levels of genetic diversity. Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are quickly becoming the method of choice for high-throughput genotyping of multi-locus templates like MHC in non-model organisms. Previous approaches to genotyping MHC genes using NGS technologies suffer from two problems:1) a "gray zone" where low frequency alleles and high frequency artifacts can be difficult to disentangle and 2) a similar sequence problem, where very similar alleles can be difficult to distinguish as two distinct alleles. Here were present a new method for genotyping MHC loci--Stepwise Threshold Clustering (STC)--that addresses these problems by taking full advantage of the increase in sequence data provided by NGS technologies. Unlike previous approaches for genotyping MHC with NGS data that attempt to classify individual sequences as alleles or artifacts, STC uses a quasi-Dirichlet clustering algorithm to cluster similar sequences at increasing levels of sequence similarity. By applying frequency and similarity based criteria to clusters rather than individual sequences, STC is able to successfully identify clusters of sequences that correspond to individual or similar alleles present in the genomes of individual samples. Furthermore, STC does not require duplicate runs of all samples, increasing the number of samples that can be genotyped in a given project. We show how the STC method works using a single sample library. We then apply STC to 295 threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) samples from four populations and show that neighboring populations differ significantly in MHC allele pools. We show that STC is a reliable, accurate, efficient, and flexible method for genotyping MHC that will be of use to biologists interested in a variety of downstream applications.

  4. Simulated scaling method for localized enhanced sampling and simultaneous "alchemical" free energy simulations: a general method for molecular mechanical, quantum mechanical, and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhi; Fajer, Mikolai; Yang, Wei

    2007-01-14

    A potential scaling version of simulated tempering is presented to efficiently sample configuration space in a localized region. The present "simulated scaling" method is developed with a Wang-Landau type of updating scheme in order to quickly flatten the distributions in the scaling parameter lambdam space. This proposal is meaningful for a broad range of biophysical problems, in which localized sampling is required. Besides its superior capability and robustness in localized conformational sampling, this simulated scaling method can also naturally lead to efficient "alchemical" free energy predictions when dual-topology alchemical hybrid potential is applied; thereby simultaneously, both of the chemically and conformationally distinct portions of two end point chemical states can be efficiently sampled. As demonstrated in this work, the present method is also feasible for the quantum mechanical and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations.

  5. Applying clustering approach in predictive uncertainty estimation: a case study with the UNEEC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogulu, Nilay; Solomatine, Dimitri; Lal Shrestha, Durga

    2014-05-01

    Within the context of flood forecasting, assessment of predictive uncertainty has become a necessity for most of the modelling studies in operational hydrology. There are several uncertainty analysis and/or prediction methods available in the literature; however, most of them rely on normality and homoscedasticity assumptions for model residuals occurring in reproducing the observed data. This study focuses on a statistical method analyzing model residuals without having any assumptions and based on a clustering approach: Uncertainty Estimation based on local Errors and Clustering (UNEEC). The aim of this work is to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the UNEEC method's performance in view of clustering approach employed within its methodology. This is done by analyzing normality of model residuals and comparing uncertainty analysis results (for 50% and 90% confidence level) with those obtained from uniform interval and quantile regression methods. An important part of the basis by which the methods are compared is analysis of data clusters representing different hydrometeorological conditions. The validation measures used are PICP, MPI, ARIL and NUE where necessary. A new validation measure linking prediction interval to the (hydrological) model quality - weighted mean prediction interval (WMPI) - is also proposed for comparing the methods more effectively. The case study is Brue catchment, located in the South West of England. A different parametrization of the method than its previous application in Shrestha and Solomatine (2008) is used, i.e. past error values in addition to discharge and effective rainfall is considered. The results show that UNEEC's notable characteristic in its methodology, i.e. applying clustering to data of predictors upon which catchment behaviour information is encapsulated, contributes increased accuracy of the method's results for varying flow conditions. Besides, classifying data so that extreme flow events are individually

  6. Foliated Quantum Error-Correcting Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolt, A.; Duclos-Cianci, G.; Poulin, D.; Stace, T. M.

    2016-08-01

    We show how to construct a large class of quantum error-correcting codes, known as Calderbank-Steane-Shor codes, from highly entangled cluster states. This becomes a primitive in a protocol that foliates a series of such cluster states into a much larger cluster state, implementing foliated quantum error correction. We exemplify this construction with several familiar quantum error-correction codes and propose a generic method for decoding foliated codes. We numerically evaluate the error-correction performance of a family of finite-rate Calderbank-Steane-Shor codes known as turbo codes, finding that they perform well over moderate depth foliations. Foliated codes have applications for quantum repeaters and fault-tolerant measurement-based quantum computation.

  7. Foliated Quantum Error-Correcting Codes.

    PubMed

    Bolt, A; Duclos-Cianci, G; Poulin, D; Stace, T M

    2016-08-12

    We show how to construct a large class of quantum error-correcting codes, known as Calderbank-Steane-Shor codes, from highly entangled cluster states. This becomes a primitive in a protocol that foliates a series of such cluster states into a much larger cluster state, implementing foliated quantum error correction. We exemplify this construction with several familiar quantum error-correction codes and propose a generic method for decoding foliated codes. We numerically evaluate the error-correction performance of a family of finite-rate Calderbank-Steane-Shor codes known as turbo codes, finding that they perform well over moderate depth foliations. Foliated codes have applications for quantum repeaters and fault-tolerant measurement-based quantum computation.

  8. AptaCluster - A Method to Cluster HT-SELEX Aptamer Pools and Lessons from its Application

    PubMed Central

    Hoinka, Jan; Berezhnoy, Alexey; Sauna, Zuben E.; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential Enrichment (SELEX) is a well established experimental procedure to identify aptamers - synthetic single-stranded (ribo)nucleic molecules that bind to a given molecular target. Recently, new sequencing technologies have revolutionized the SELEX protocol by allowing for deep sequencing of the selection pools after each cycle. The emergence of High Throughput SELEX (HT-SELEX) has opened the field to new computational opportunities and challenges that are yet to be addressed. To aid the analysis of the results of HT-SELEX and to advance the understanding of the selection process itself, we developed AptaCluster. This algorithm allows for an efficient clustering of whole HT-SELEX aptamer pools; a task that could not be accomplished with traditional clustering algorithms due to the enormous size of such datasets. We performed HT-SELEX with Interleukin 10 receptor alpha chain (IL-10RA) as the target molecule and used AptaCluster to analyze the resulting sequences. AptaCluster allowed for the first survey of the relationships between sequences in different selection rounds and revealed previously not appreciated properties of the SELEX protocol. As the first tool of this kind, AptaCluster enables novel ways to analyze and to optimize the HT-SELEX procedure. Our AptaCluster algorithm is available as a very fast multiprocessor implementation upon request. PMID:25558474

  9. a Three-Step Spatial-Temporal Clustering Method for Human Activity Pattern Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Li, S.; Xu, S.

    2016-06-01

    How people move in cities and what they do in various locations at different times form human activity patterns. Human activity pattern plays a key role in in urban planning, traffic forecasting, public health and safety, emergency response, friend recommendation, and so on. Therefore, scholars from different fields, such as social science, geography, transportation, physics and computer science, have made great efforts in modelling and analysing human activity patterns or human mobility patterns. One of the essential tasks in such studies is to find the locations or places where individuals stay to perform some kind of activities before further activity pattern analysis. In the era of Big Data, the emerging of social media along with wearable devices enables human activity data to be collected more easily and efficiently. Furthermore, the dimension of the accessible human activity data has been extended from two to three (space or space-time) to four dimensions (space, time and semantics). More specifically, not only a location and time that people stay and spend are collected, but also what people "say" for in a location at a time can be obtained. The characteristics of these datasets shed new light on the analysis of human mobility, where some of new methodologies should be accordingly developed to handle them. Traditional methods such as neural networks, statistics and clustering have been applied to study human activity patterns using geosocial media data. Among them, clustering methods have been widely used to analyse spatiotemporal patterns. However, to our best knowledge, few of clustering algorithms are specifically developed for handling the datasets that contain spatial, temporal and semantic aspects all together. In this work, we propose a three-step human activity clustering method based on space, time and semantics to fill this gap. One-year Twitter data, posted in Toronto, Canada, is used to test the clustering-based method. The results show that the

  10. Dressed qubits: a new method for eliminating inherent gate errors in quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2003-03-01

    Inherent gate errors can arise in quantum computation when the applied Hamiltonian deviates from the desired one. Two important examples are (1) Quantum computation using spin-coupled quantum dots in the presence of spin-orbit perturbations to the Heisenberg exchange interaction; (2) Off-resonant transitions induced by strong and fast pulses. Quantum error correcting codes cannot deal with such errors if they are too strong. In this talk we propose a new solution for dealing with such inherent errors: dressed qubits. Particularly important is the fact that the dressed qubits method does not require additional operations or encoding redundancy, can be applied in the presence of large errors, and is experimentally feasible. We present the general notion of dressed qubits and then focus on the two examples of inherent errors mentioned above.

  11. General Method for Constructing Local Hidden Variable Models for Entangled Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, D.; Guerini, L.; Rabelo, R.; Skrzypczyk, P.

    2016-11-01

    Entanglement allows for the nonlocality of quantum theory, which is the resource behind device-independent quantum information protocols. However, not all entangled quantum states display nonlocality. A central question is to determine the precise relation between entanglement and nonlocality. Here we present the first general test to decide whether a quantum state is local, and show that the test can be implemented by semidefinite programing. This method can be applied to any given state and for the construction of new examples of states with local hidden variable models for both projective and general measurements. As applications, we provide a lower-bound estimate of the fraction of two-qubit local entangled states and present new explicit examples of such states, including those that arise from physical noise models, Bell-diagonal states, and noisy Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and W states.

  12. Research on Quantum Authentication Methods for the Secure Access Control Among Three Elements of Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yumin; Xiao, Shufen; Ma, Hongyang; Chen, Libo

    2016-12-01

    Cloud computing and big data have become the developing engine of current information technology (IT) as a result of the rapid development of IT. However, security protection has become increasingly important for cloud computing and big data, and has become a problem that must be solved to develop cloud computing. The theft of identity authentication information remains a serious threat to the security of cloud computing. In this process, attackers intrude into cloud computing services through identity authentication information, thereby threatening the security of data from multiple perspectives. Therefore, this study proposes a model for cloud computing protection and management based on quantum authentication, introduces the principle of quantum authentication, and deduces the quantum authentication process. In theory, quantum authentication technology can be applied in cloud computing for security protection. This technology cannot be cloned; thus, it is more secure and reliable than classical methods.

  13. Quantum entanglement generation in trapped ions using coherent and dissipative methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yiheng

    Entangled states are a key resource in fundamental quantum physics, quantum cryptography, and quantum computation. In this thesis, we focus on the demonstrations of two novel methods to generate entanglement. First, we implement dissipative production of a maximally entangled steady state on two trapped ions. Dissipative and coherent processes are combined and implemented in a continuous time-independent fashion, analogous to optical pumping of atomic states, continuously driving the system towards the steady entangled state. With this method, we obtain a Bell state fidelity up to 0.89(2). Second, we propose and demonstrate a novel coherent process to confine quantum evolution in a subspace between an initial separable state and the target entangled state. We demonstrate this scheme on two and three ions obtaining a Bell state fidelity up to 0.992(2). Both of these methods are robust against certain types of experimental noise and decoherence. Additionally, we demonstrate sympathetic cooling of ion chains to near the ground state of motion with an electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) method. This results in roughly an order of magnitude faster cooling time while using significantly lower laser power compared to the conventional resolved sideband cooling method. These techniques may be helpful for scaled-up quantum computing.

  14. Development of the cyclic cluster model formalism for Kohn-Sham auxiliary density functional theory methods.

    PubMed

    Janetzko, Florian; Köster, Andreas M; Salahub, Dennis R

    2008-01-14

    The development of the cyclic cluster model (CCM) formalism for Kohn-Sham auxiliary density functional theory (KS-ADFT) methods is presented. The CCM is a direct space approach for the calculation of perfect and defective systems under periodic boundary conditions. Translational symmetry is introduced in the CCM by integral weighting. A consistent weighting scheme for all two-center and three-center interactions appearing in the KS-ADFT method is presented. For the first time, an approach for the numerical integration of the exchange-correlation potential within the cyclic cluster formalism is derived. The presented KS-ADFT CCM implementation was applied to covalent periodic systems. The results of cyclic and molecular cluster model (MCM) calculations for trans-polyacetylene, graphene, and diamond are discussed as examples for systems periodic in one, two, and three dimensions, respectively. All structures were optimized. It is shown that the CCM results represent the results of MCM calculations in the limit of infinite molecular clusters. By analyzing the electronic structure, we demonstrate that the symmetry of the corresponding periodic systems is retained in CCM calculations. The obtained geometric and electronic structures are compared with available data from the literature.

  15. A new Monte Carlo method for getting the density of states of atomic cluster systems.

    PubMed

    Soudan, J-M; Basire, M; Mestdagh, J-M; Angelié, C

    2011-10-14

    A novel Monte Carlo flat histogram algorithm is proposed to get the classical density of states in terms of the potential energy, g(E(p)), for systems with continuous variables such as atomic clusters. It aims at avoiding the long iterative process of the Wang-Landau method and controlling carefully the convergence, but keeping the ability to overcome energy barriers. Our algorithm is based on a preliminary mapping in a series of points (called a σ-mapping), obtained by a two-parameter local probing of g(E(p)), and it converges in only two subsequent reweighting iterations on large intervals. The method is illustrated on the model system of a 432 atom cluster bound by a Rydberg type potential. Convergence properties are first examined in detail, particularly in the phase transition zone. We get g(E(p)) varying by a factor 10(3700) over the energy range [0.01 < E(p) < 6000 eV], covered by only eight overlapping intervals. Canonical quantities are derived, such as the internal energy U(T) and the heat capacity C(V)(T). This reveals the solid to liquid phase transition, lying in our conditions at the triple point. This phase transition is further studied by computing a Lindemann-Berry index, the atomic cluster density n(r), and the pressure, demonstrating the progressive surface melting at this triple point. Some limited results are also given for 1224 and 4044 atom clusters.

  16. An Energy-Efficient Cluster-Based Vehicle Detection on Road Network Using Intention Numeration Method

    PubMed Central

    Devasenapathy, Deepa; Kannan, Kathiravan

    2015-01-01

    The traffic in the road network is progressively increasing at a greater extent. Good knowledge of network traffic can minimize congestions using information pertaining to road network obtained with the aid of communal callers, pavement detectors, and so on. Using these methods, low featured information is generated with respect to the user in the road network. Although the existing schemes obtain urban traffic information, they fail to calculate the energy drain rate of nodes and to locate equilibrium between the overhead and quality of the routing protocol that renders a great challenge. Thus, an energy-efficient cluster-based vehicle detection in road network using the intention numeration method (CVDRN-IN) is developed. Initially, sensor nodes that detect a vehicle are grouped into separate clusters. Further, we approximate the strength of the node drain rate for a cluster using polynomial regression function. In addition, the total node energy is estimated by taking the integral over the area. Finally, enhanced data aggregation is performed to reduce the amount of data transmission using digital signature tree. The experimental performance is evaluated with Dodgers loop sensor data set from UCI repository and the performance evaluation outperforms existing work on energy consumption, clustering efficiency, and node drain rate. PMID:25793221

  17. Adapting interrelated two-way clustering method for quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling of mutagenicity/non- mutagenicity of a diverse set of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Subhabrata; Basak, Subhash C; Grunwald, Gregory D

    2013-12-01

    Interrelated Two-way Clustering (ITC) is an unsupervised clustering method developed to divide samples into two groups in gene expression data obtained through microarrays, selecting important genes simultaneously in the process. This has been found to be a better approach than conventional clustering methods like K-means or selforganizing map for the scenarios when number of samples is much smaller than number of variables (n«p). In this paper we used the ITC approach for classification of a diverse set of 508 chemicals regarding mutagenicity. A large number of topological indices (TIs), 3-dimensional, and quantum chemical descriptors, as well as atom pairs (APs) has been used as explanatory variables. In this paper, ITC has been used only for predictor selection, after which ridge regression is employed to build the final predictive model. The proper leave-one-out (LOO) method of cross-validation in this scenario is to take as holdout each of the 508 compounds before predictor thinning and compare the predicted values with the experimental data. ITC based results obtained here are comparable to those developed earlier.

  18. [Planning of monitoring points for agricultural products security based on integrated weighted clustering method].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui-Chao; Chen, Lian-Cheng; Wang, Lu; Li, Qing; Xue, Yue-Ju; Du, Guo-Ming

    2009-08-01

    Integrated weighted clustering method was applied to plan the monitoring points for agricultural products security. Definite amounts of key monitoring sampling points were mined out from enormous monitoring objects to make the fewer monitoring sampling points cover the product categories, yields, and regions as more as possible. Among the 10172 agricultural products security enterprises all over the China, 2.46% of them were selected. The tested categories, yields, and regions of agricultural safety products covered 32.71%, 44.29%, and 75% of the total, and their coverage increased by 2.80%, 10.85%, 5.56%, respectively, compared with that by using conventional monitoring and management methods, which suggested that it could be more effective to apply integrated weighted clustering method in setting the monitoring points for agricultural products security.

  19. On the Binary Fraction of Globular Cluster NGC 5053: the Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jun; Bregman, J. N.

    2010-01-01

    Binaries are thought to be the primary energy source in globular clusters, since they can heat the environmental stars in globular clusters by converting their binding energy to kinetic energy of the encounter stars through dynamical interactions. Even a small primordial binary fraction is sufficient to prevent globular clusters from core collapse for many relaxation times. So binary fraction is an essential parameter which can dramatically affect the evolution of globular clusters. Here we present a detailed analyzing method on the binary fraction of globular cluster NGC 5053, with the HST archival ACS data in the F606W and F814W bands. The PSF-fitting photometry is used with the DOLPHOT ACS module to obtain a high quality color-magnitude diagram. An aperture photometry is also performed for comparison. We find that both the PSF-fitting and aperture photometry obtain similar quality CMDs, but PSF photometry tends to recover more stars towards the cluster core. We also formulate the blending effect (or star superposition) to be the Poisson probability distribution function, which is confirmed by our Monte-Carlo simulations for blending. A minimum binary fraction is obtained by counting stars that are beyond 3-sigma photometric errors on the blue side. A global binary fraction is also obtained by comparing the residual color distribution profile of the Main Sequence stars to the one that is constructed by artificial stars with a known binary fraction. Chi-square test is then used to search the best-fit binary fraction value. We obtain a minimum binary fraction of 6.6% for NGC 5053, which does not depend on any assumption of the binary mass ratio distribution, and a model-dependent binary fraction range of 7% to 12%. Finally, we select 242 binary candidates that are beyond 3-sigma photometric errors, which could be later confirmed by spectroscopic observations from the ground.

  20. Threshold selection for classification of MR brain images by clustering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovanu, Simona; Obreja, Cristian; Moraru, Luminita

    2015-12-01

    Given a grey-intensity image, our method detects the optimal threshold for a suitable binarization of MR brain images. In MR brain image processing, the grey levels of pixels belonging to the object are not substantially different from the grey levels belonging to the background. Threshold optimization is an effective tool to separate objects from the background and further, in classification applications. This paper gives a detailed investigation on the selection of thresholds. Our method does not use the well-known method for binarization. Instead, we perform a simple threshold optimization which, in turn, will allow the best classification of the analyzed images into healthy and multiple sclerosis disease. The dissimilarity (or the distance between classes) has been established using the clustering method based on dendrograms. We tested our method using two classes of images: the first consists of 20 T2-weighted and 20 proton density PD-weighted scans from two healthy subjects and from two patients with multiple sclerosis. For each image and for each threshold, the number of the white pixels (or the area of white objects in binary image) has been determined. These pixel numbers represent the objects in clustering operation. The following optimum threshold values are obtained, T = 80 for PD images and T = 30 for T2w images. Each mentioned threshold separate clearly the clusters that belonging of the studied groups, healthy patient and multiple sclerosis disease.

  1. Threshold selection for classification of MR brain images by clustering method

    SciTech Connect

    Moldovanu, Simona; Obreja, Cristian; Moraru, Luminita

    2015-12-07

    Given a grey-intensity image, our method detects the optimal threshold for a suitable binarization of MR brain images. In MR brain image processing, the grey levels of pixels belonging to the object are not substantially different from the grey levels belonging to the background. Threshold optimization is an effective tool to separate objects from the background and further, in classification applications. This paper gives a detailed investigation on the selection of thresholds. Our method does not use the well-known method for binarization. Instead, we perform a simple threshold optimization which, in turn, will allow the best classification of the analyzed images into healthy and multiple sclerosis disease. The dissimilarity (or the distance between classes) has been established using the clustering method based on dendrograms. We tested our method using two classes of images: the first consists of 20 T2-weighted and 20 proton density PD-weighted scans from two healthy subjects and from two patients with multiple sclerosis. For each image and for each threshold, the number of the white pixels (or the area of white objects in binary image) has been determined. These pixel numbers represent the objects in clustering operation. The following optimum threshold values are obtained, T = 80 for PD images and T = 30 for T2w images. Each mentioned threshold separate clearly the clusters that belonging of the studied groups, healthy patient and multiple sclerosis disease.

  2. PSII manganese cluster: protonation of W2, O5, O4 and His337 in the S1 state explored by combined quantum chemical and electrostatic energy computations.

    PubMed

    Robertazzi, Arturo; Galstyan, Artur; Knapp, Ernst Walter

    2014-08-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a membrane-bound protein complex that oxidizes water to produce energized protons, which are used to built up a proton gradient across the thylakoidal membrane in the leafs of plants. This light-driven reaction is catalyzed by withdrawing electrons from the Mn₄CaO₅-cluster (Mn-cluster) in four discrete oxidation steps [S₁-(S₄/S₀)] characterized in the Kok-cycle. In order to understand in detail the proton release events and the subsequent translocation of such energized protons, the protonation pattern of the Mn-cluster need to be elucidated. The new high-resolution PSII crystal structure from Umena, Kawakami, Shen, and Kamiya is an excellent basis to make progress in solving this problem. Following our previous work on oxidation and protonation states of the Mn-cluster, in this work, quantum chemical/electrostatic calculations were performed in order to estimate the pKa of different protons of relevant groups and atoms of the Mn-cluster such as W2, O4, O5 and His337. In broad agreement with previous experimental and theoretical work, our data suggest that W2 and His337 are likely to be in hydroxyl and neutral form, respectively, O5 and O4 to be unprotonated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: Keys to Produce Clean Energy.

  3. Fast Electron Correlation Methods for Molecular Clusters without Basis Set Superposition Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, Muneaki; Hirata, So; Valiev, Marat

    2008-02-19

    Two critical extensions to our fast, accurate, and easy-to-implement binary or ternary interaction method for weakly-interacting molecular clusters [Hirata et al. Mol. Phys. 103, 2255 (2005)] have been proposed, implemented, and applied to water hexamers, hydrogen fluoride chains and rings, and neutral and zwitterionic glycine–water clusters with an excellent result for an initial performance assessment. Our original method included up to two- or three-body Coulomb, exchange, and correlation energies exactly and higher-order Coulomb energies in the dipole–dipole approximation. In this work, the dipole moments are replaced by atom-centered point charges determined so that they reproduce the electrostatic potentials of the cluster subunits as closely as possible and also self-consistently with one another in the cluster environment. They have been shown to lead to dramatic improvement in the description of short-range electrostatic potentials not only of large, charge-separated subunits like zwitterionic glycine but also of small subunits. Furthermore, basis set superposition errors (BSSE) known to plague direct evaluation of weak interactions have been eliminated by com-bining the Valiron–Mayer function counterpoise (VMFC) correction with our binary or ternary interaction method in an economical fashion (quadratic scaling n2 with respect to the number of subunits n when n is small and linear scaling when n is large). A new variant of VMFC has also been proposed in which three-body and all higher-order Coulomb effects on BSSE are estimated approximately. The BSSE-corrected ternary interaction method with atom-centered point charges reproduces the VMFC-corrected results of conventional electron correlation calculations within 0.1 kcal/mol. The proposed method is significantly more accurate and also efficient than conventional correlation methods uncorrected of BSSE.

  4. Quantum mechanical method of fragment's angular and energy distribution calculation for binary and ternary fission

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G. Titova, L. V.; Pen'kov, N. V.

    2006-08-15

    In the framework of quantum-mechanical fission theory, the method of calculation for partial fission width amplitudes and asymptotic behavior of the fissile nucleus wave function with strong channel coupling taken into account has been suggested. The method allows one to solve the calculation problem of angular and energy distribution countation for binary and ternary fission.

  5. 2D Quantum Simulation of MOSFET Using the Non Equilibrium Green's Function Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexel; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The objectives this viewgraph presentation summarizes include: (1) the development of a quantum mechanical simulator for ultra short channel MOSFET simulation, including theory, physical approximations, and computer code; (2) explore physics that is not accessible by semiclassical methods; (3) benchmarking of semiclassical and classical methods; and (4) study other two-dimensional devices and molecular structure, from discretized Hamiltonian to tight-binding Hamiltonian.

  6. Various methods of optimizing control pulses for quantum systems with decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawela, Łukasz; Sadowski, Przemysław

    2016-05-01

    We design control setting that allows the implementation of an approximation of an unitary operation of a quantum system under decoherence using various quantum system layouts and numerical algorithms. We focus our attention on the possibility of adding ancillary qubits which help to achieve a desired quantum map on the initial system. Furthermore, we use three methods of optimizing the control pulses: genetic optimization, approximate evolution method and approximate gradient method. To model the noise in the system we use the Lindblad equation. We obtain results showing that applying the control pulses to the ancilla allows one to successfully implement unitary operation on a target system in the presence of noise, which is not possible which control field applied to the system qubits.

  7. Torsional diffusion Monte Carlo: A method for quantum simulations of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, David C.

    2001-06-01

    The quantum diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method is extended to the treatment of coupled torsional motions in proteins. A general algorithm and computer program has been developed by interfacing this torsional-DMC method with all-atom force-fields for proteins. The method gives the zero-point energy and atomic coordinates averaged over the coupled torsional motions in the quantum ground state of the protein. Application of the new algorithm is made to the proteins gelsolin (356 atoms and 142 torsions) and gp41-HIV (1101 atoms and 452 torsions). The results indicate that quantum-dynamical effects are important for the energies and geometries of typical proteins such as these.

  8. THE IMACS CLUSTER BUILDING SURVEY. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE SURVEY AND ANALYSIS METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Oemler, Augustus Jr.; Dressler, Alan; Kelson, Daniel; Villanueva, Edward; Gladders, Michael G.; Rigby, Jane R.; Bai Lei; Fritz, Jacopo; Rieke, George; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2013-06-10

    The IMACS Cluster Building Survey uses the wide field spectroscopic capabilities of the IMACS spectrograph on the 6.5 m Baade Telescope to survey the large-scale environment surrounding rich intermediate-redshift clusters of galaxies. The goal is to understand the processes which may be transforming star-forming field galaxies into quiescent cluster members as groups and individual galaxies fall into the cluster from the surrounding supercluster. This first paper describes the survey: the data taking and reduction methods. We provide new calibrations of star formation rates (SFRs) derived from optical and infrared spectroscopy and photometry. We demonstrate that there is a tight relation between the observed SFR per unit B luminosity, and the ratio of the extinctions of the stellar continuum and the optical emission lines. With this, we can obtain accurate extinction-corrected colors of galaxies. Using these colors as well as other spectral measures, we determine new criteria for the existence of ongoing and recent starbursts in galaxies.

  9. The IMACS Cluster Building Survey. I. Description of the Survey and Analysis Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oemler Jr., Augustus; Dressler, Alan; Gladders, Michael G.; Rigby, Jane R.; Bai, Lei; Kelson, Daniel; Villanueva, Edward; Fritz, Jacopo; Rieke, George; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2013-01-01

    The IMACS Cluster Building Survey uses the wide field spectroscopic capabilities of the IMACS spectrograph on the 6.5 m Baade Telescope to survey the large-scale environment surrounding rich intermediate-redshift clusters of galaxies. The goal is to understand the processes which may be transforming star-forming field galaxies into quiescent cluster members as groups and individual galaxies fall into the cluster from the surrounding supercluster. This first paper describes the survey: the data taking and reduction methods. We provide new calibrations of star formation rates (SFRs) derived from optical and infrared spectroscopy and photometry. We demonstrate that there is a tight relation between the observed SFR per unit B luminosity, and the ratio of the extinctions of the stellar continuum and the optical emission lines.With this, we can obtain accurate extinction-corrected colors of galaxies. Using these colors as well as other spectral measures, we determine new criteria for the existence of ongoing and recent starbursts in galaxies.

  10. Linear-response theory for Mukherjee's multireference coupled-cluster method: excitation energies.

    PubMed

    Jagau, Thomas-C; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-07-28

    The recently presented linear-response function for Mukherjee's multireference coupled-cluster method (Mk-MRCC) [T.-C. Jagau and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044115 (2012)] is employed to determine vertical excitation energies within the singles and doubles approximation (Mk-MRCCSD-LR) for ozone as well as for o-benzyne, m-benzyne, and p-benzyne, which display increasing multireference character in their ground states. In order to assess the impact of a multireference ground-state wavefunction on excitation energies, we compare all our results to those obtained at the single-reference coupled-cluster level of theory within the singles and doubles as well as within the singles, doubles, and triples approximation. Special attention is paid to the artificial splitting of certain excited states which arises from the redundancy intrinsic to Mk-MRCC theory and hinders the straightforward application of the Mk-MRCC-LR method.

  11. A new artefacts resistant method for automatic lineament extraction using Multi-Hillshade Hierarchic Clustering (MHHC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šilhavý, Jakub; Minár, Jozef; Mentlík, Pavel; Sládek, Ján

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new method of automatic lineament extraction which includes the removal of the 'artefacts effect' which is associated with the process of raster based analysis. The core of the proposed Multi-Hillshade Hierarchic Clustering (MHHC) method incorporates a set of variously illuminated and rotated hillshades in combination with hierarchic clustering of derived 'protolineaments'. The algorithm also includes classification into positive and negative lineaments. MHHC was tested in two different territories in Bohemian Forest and Central Western Carpathians. The original vector-based algorithm was developed for comparison of the individual lineaments proximity. Its use confirms the compatibility of manual and automatic extraction and their similar relationships to structural data in the study areas.

  12. Segmentation of bone pixels from EROI Image using clustering method for bone age assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakthula, Rajitha; Agarwal, Suneeta

    2016-03-01

    The bone age of a human can be identified using carpal and epiphysis bones ossification, which is limited to teen age. The accurate age estimation depends on best separation of bone pixels and soft tissue pixels in the ROI image. The traditional approaches like canny, sobel, clustering, region growing and watershed can be applied, but these methods requires proper pre-processing and accurate initial seed point estimation to provide accurate results. Therefore this paper proposes new approach to segment the bone from soft tissue and background pixels. First pixels are enhanced using BPE and the edges are identified by HIPI. Later a K-Means clustering is applied for segmentation. The performance of the proposed approach has been evaluated and compared with the existing methods.

  13. Linear scaling explicitly correlated MP2-F12 and ONIOM methods for the long-range interactions of the nanoscale clusters in methanol aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei

    2013-01-07

    A linear scaling quantum chemistry method, generalized energy-based fragmentation (GEBF) approach has been extended to the explicitly correlated second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory F12 (MP2-F12) method and own N-layer integrated molecular orbital molecular mechanics (ONIOM) method, in which GEBF-MP2-F12, GEBF-MP2, and conventional density functional tight-binding methods could be used for different layers. Then the long-range interactions in dilute methanol aqueous solutions are studied by computing the binding energies between methanol molecule and water molecules in gas-phase and condensed phase methanol-water clusters with various sizes, which were taken from classic molecular dynamics (MD) snapshots. By comparing with the results of force field methods, including SPC, TIP3P, PCFF, and AMOEBA09, the GEBF-MP2-F12 and GEBF-ONIOM methods are shown to be powerful and efficient for studying the long-range interactions at a high level. With the GEBF-ONIOM(MP2-F12:MP2) and GEBF-ONIOM(MP2-F12:MP2:cDFTB) methods, the diameters of the largest nanoscale clusters under studies are about 2.4 nm (747 atoms and 10 209 basis functions with aug-cc-pVDZ basis set) and 4 nm (3351 atoms), respectively, which are almost impossible to be treated by conventional MP2 or MP2-F12 method. Thus, the GEBF-F12 and GEBF-ONIOM methods are expected to be a practical tool for studying the nanoscale clusters in condensed phase, providing an alternative benchmark for ab initio and density functional theory studies, and developing new force fields by combining with classic MD simulations.

  14. Systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions

    DOEpatents

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Anyin; Luo, Qingjie

    2017-01-24

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions. In certain aspects, the invention provides methods that involve providing a metal and a solvent. The methods additionally involve applying voltage to the solvated metal to thereby produce solvent droplets including ions of the metal containing compound, and directing the solvent droplets including the metal ions to a target. In certain embodiments, once at the target, the metal ions can react directly or catalyze reactions.

  15. Semiclassical modeling of quantum-mechanical multiparticle systems using parallel particle-in-cell methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauger, Dean Edward

    2001-08-01

    We are successful in building a code that models many particle dynamic quantum systems by combining a semiclassical approximation of Feynman path integrals with parallel computing techniques (particle-in-cell) and numerical methods developed for simulating plasmas, establishing this approach as a viable technique for multiparticle time-dependent quantum mechanics. Run on high-performance parallel computers, this code applies semiclassical methods to simulate the time evolution of wavefunctions of many particles. We describe the analytical derivation and computational implementation of these techniques in detail. We present a study to thoroughly demonstrate the code's fidelity to quantum mechanics, resulting in innovative visualization and analysis techniques. We introduce and exhibit a method to address fermion particle statistics. We present studies of two quantum-mechanical problems: a two-electron, one- dimensional atom, resulting in high-quality extractions of one- and two-electron eigenstates, and electrostatic quasi-modes due to quantum effects in a hot electron plasma, relevant for predictions about stellar evolution. We supply discussions of alternative derivations, alternative implementations of the derivations, and an exploration of their consequences. Source code is shown throughout this dissertation. Finally, we present an extensive discussion of applications and extrapolations of this work, with suggestions for future direction.

  16. Molecular orbital calculations of octahedral molybdenum cluster complexes with the DV-X{alpha} method

    SciTech Connect

    Imoto, Hideo; Saito, Taro; Adachi, Hirohiko

    1995-04-26

    Discrete variational-{Chi}{alpha} molecular orbital methods were applied to octahedral cluster complexes, [Mo{sub 6}X{sub 8}-(PH{sub 3}){sub 6}](X = S and Se). This structure is of interest due to its role in superconductivity of Chevrel plates. Level energies are discussed and factors contributing to their separations are categorized. Agreement with empirical XPS data is excellent.

  17. Thermodynamic properties of ammonia clusters (NH3)n n = 2-11: comparing classical and quantum simulation results for hydrogen bonded species.

    PubMed

    Lubombo, C; Curotto, E; Janeiro Barral, Paula E; Mella, Massimo

    2009-07-21

    Classical and quantum simulations of ammonia clusters in the dimer through the hendecamer range are performed using the stereographic projection path integral. Employing the most recent polarizable potential to describe intermolecular interactions, energetic and structural data obtained with our simulations provide support for a more fluxional or flexible nature at low temperature of the ammonia dimer, pentamer, and hexamer than in the other investigated species. The octamer and the hendecamer display a relatively strong melting peak in the classical heat capacity and a less intense but significant melting peak in the quantum heat capacity. The latter are shifted to lower temperature (roughly 15 and 40 K lower, respectively) by the quantum effects. The features present in both classical and quantum constant volume heat capacity are interpreted as an indication of melting even in the octamer case, where a large energy gap is present between its global minimum and second most stable species. We develop a first order finite difference algorithm to integrate the geodesic equations in the inertia ellipsoid generated by n rigid nonlinear bodies mapped with stereographic projections. We use the technique to optimize configurations and to explore the potential surface of the hendecamer.

  18. Method and apparatus for detecting and/or imaging clusters of small scattering centers in the body

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Sommer, F.G.

    1982-07-13

    An ultrasonic method and apparatus are provided for detecting and imaging clusters of small scattering centers in the breast wherein periodic pulses are applied to an ultrasound emitting transducer and projected into the body, thereafter being received by at least one receiving transducer positioned to receive scattering from the scattering center clusters. The signals are processed to provide an image showing cluster extent and location. 6 figs.

  19. Method and apparatus for detecting and/or imaging clusters of small scattering centers in the body

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Sommer, Frank G.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic method and apparatus are provided for detecting and imaging clusters of small scattering centers in the breast wherein periodic pulses are applied to an ultrasound emitting transducer and projected into the body, thereafter being received by at least one receiving transducer positioned to receive scattering from the scattering center clusters. The signals are processed to provide an image showing cluster extent and location.

  20. An efficient monte carlo method for calculating the equilibrium properties for a quantum system coupled strongly to a classical one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Benny; Metiu, Horia

    1987-02-01

    We calculate the equilibrium properties of a system consisting of two strongly interacting quantum and classical subsystems, by using a fast Fourier transform method to evaluate the quantum contribution and a Monte Carlo method to evaluate the contribution of the classical part. The method is applied to a model relevant to tunneling problems.