Science.gov

Sample records for cmb polarization maps

  1. Delensing CMB polarization with external datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kendrick M.; Hanson, Duncan; LoVerde, Marilena; Hirata, Christopher M.; Zahn, Oliver E-mail: duncan.hanson@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: chirata@tapir.caltech.edu

    2012-06-01

    One of the primary scientific targets of current and future CMB polarization experiments is the search for a stochastic background of gravity waves in the early universe. As instrumental sensitivity improves, the limiting factor will eventually be B-mode power generated by gravitational lensing, which can be removed through use of so-called ''delensing'' algorithms. We forecast prospects for delensing using lensing maps which are obtained externally to CMB polarization: either from large-scale structure observations, or from high-resolution maps of CMB temperature. We conclude that the forecasts in either case are not encouraging, and that significantly delensing large-scale CMB polarization requires high-resolution polarization maps with sufficient sensitivity to measure the lensing B-mode. We also present a simple formalism for including delensing in CMB forecasts which is computationally fast and agrees well with Monte Carlos.

  2. New Measurements of CMB Polarization with SPTpol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Jason; SPTpol Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    All-sky surveys of the primary temperature anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) are now cosmic variance limited on large to intermediate scales. To place tighter constraints on cosmology from CMB primary anisotropies we turn to measurements of CMB polarization. Not only is polarization another probe of ΛCDM cosmology, but secondary anisotropies are expected to have low polarized emission, which opens more of the so-called CMB damping tail to cosmological study. In this talk, we present new 150 GHz measurements of the CMB E-mode polarization auto-power and temperature-E-mode cross-power spectra from a 500 deg2 patch of sky observed with the SPTpol instrument, the second-generation receiver installed on the South Pole Telescope. Over a range of spherical harmonic multipoles 50 ≤ l < 10000 we detect 9 acoustic peaks in the E-mode spectrum. With these spectra we constrain ΛCDM cosmology independently from temperature-only measurements, and present new joint constraints with the Planck temperature auto-power spectrum. The CMB is also gravitationally lensed by large-scale structure. We use our high-fidelity map of E-mode polarization, in conjunction with SPTpol maps of B-mode polarization and temperature, to map the lensing potential of the CMB and measure its corresponding power spectrum. Finally, the CMB lensing potential can be combined with our E-mode map to estimate lensing B modes present in our field, which can be delensed to improve constraints on primordial B modes and the energy scale of inflation through the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r.

  3. Faraday rotation in CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Granados, Beatriz; Battaner, Eduardo; Florido, Estrella

    2016-10-01

    WMAP CMB polarization maps have been used to detect a low signal of Faraday Rotation (FR). If this detection is not interpreted as simple noise, it could be produced: at the last scattering surface (LSS) (z=1100), being primordial, at Reionization (z=10), in the Milky Way. The second interpretation is favoured here. In this case magnetic fields at Reionization with peak values of the order of 10-8 G should produce this observational FR.

  4. Nonlinear electrodynamics and CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, Herman J. Mosquera; Lambiase, G. E-mail: lambiase@sa.infn.it

    2011-03-01

    Recently WMAP and BOOMERanG experiments have set stringent constraints on the polarization angle of photons propagating in an expanding universe: Δα = (−2.4±1.9)°. The polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation (CMB) is reviewed in the context of nonlinear electrodynamics (NLED). We compute the polarization angle of photons propagating in a cosmological background with planar symmetry. For this purpose, we use the Pagels-Tomboulis (PT) Lagrangian density describing NLED, which has the form L ∼ (X/Λ{sup 4}){sup δ−1} X, where X = ¼F{sub αβ}F{sup αβ}, and δ the parameter featuring the non-Maxwellian character of the PT nonlinear description of the electromagnetic interaction. After looking at the polarization components in the plane orthogonal to the (x)-direction of propagation of the CMB photons, the polarization angle is defined in terms of the eccentricity of the universe, a geometrical property whose evolution on cosmic time (from the last scattering surface to the present) is constrained by the strength of magnetic fields over extragalactic distances.

  5. CMB polarization can constrain cosmology better than CMB temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Silvia; Benabed, Karim; Bouchet, François; Cardoso, Jean-François; Elsner, Franz; Hivon, Eric; Mangilli, Anna; Prunet, Simon; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate that for a cosmic variance limited experiment, cosmic microwave background (CMB) E polarization alone places stronger constraints on cosmological parameters than CMB temperature. For example, we show that CℓEE can constrain parameters better than CℓTT by up to a factor 2.8 when a multipole range of ℓ=30-2500 is considered. We expose the physical effects at play behind this remarkable result and study how it depends on the multipole range included in the analysis. In most relevant cases, CℓTE or CℓEE surpass the CℓTT-based cosmological constraints. This result is important as the small-scale astrophysical foregrounds are expected to have a much reduced impact on polarization, thus opening the possibility of building cleaner and more stringent constraints of the ΛCDM model. This is relevant especially for proposed future CMB satellite missions, such as CORE or PRISM, that are designed to be cosmic variance limited in polarization till very large multipoles. We perform the same analysis for a Planck-like experiment, and conclude that even in this case CℓTE alone should determine the constraint on Ωch2 better than CℓTT by ˜15%, while determining Ωbh2, ns and θ with comparable accuracy. Finally, we explore a few classical extensions of the ΛCDM model and show again that CMB polarization alone provides more stringent constraints than CMB temperature in the case of a cosmic variance limited experiment.

  6. The Simons Array CMB polarization experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebor, N.; Ade, P.; Akiba, Y.; Aleman, C.; Arnold, K.; Baccigalupi, C.; Barch, B.; Barron, D.; Beckman, S.; Bender, A.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Cukierman, A.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunner, R.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feeney, S.; Feng, C.; Fujino, T.; Fuller, G.; Gilbert, A. J.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Groh, J.; Hall, G.; Halverson, N.; Hamada, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Hill, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Howe, L.; Inoue, Y.; Irie, F.; Jaehnig, G.; Jaffe, A.; Jeong, O.; Katayama, N.; Kaufman, J. P.; Kazemzadeh, K.; Keating, B. G.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Kusaka, A.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Leon, D.; Linder, E. V.; Lowry, L.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Miller, N.; Montgomery, J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Puglisi, G.; Raum, C. R.; Rebeiz, G. M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Rotermund, K. M.; Segawa, Y.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shirley, I.; Siritanasak, P.; Steinmetz, L.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Tajima, O.; Takada, S.; Takatori, S.; Teply, G. P.; Tikhomirov, A.; Tomaru, T.; Westbrook, B.; Whitehorn, N.; Zahn, A.; Zahn, O.

    2016-07-01

    The Simons Array is a next generation cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment whose science target is a precision measurement of the B-mode polarization pattern produced both by inflation and by gravitational lensing. As a continuation and extension of the successful POLARBEAR experimental program, the Simons Array will consist of three cryogenic receivers each featuring multichroic bolometer arrays mounted onto separate 3.5m telescopes. The first of these, also called POLARBEAR-2A, will be the first to deploy in late 2016 and has a large diameter focal plane consisting of dual-polarization dichroic pixels sensitive at 95 GHz and 150 GHz. The POLARBEAR-2A focal plane will utilize 7,588 antenna-coupled superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers read out with SQUID amplifiers using frequency domain multiplexing techniques. The next two receivers that will make up the Simons Array will be nearly identical in overall design but will feature extended frequency capability. The combination of high sensitivity, multichroic frequency coverage and large sky area available from our mid-latitude Chilean observatory will allow Simons Array to produce high quality polarization sky maps over a wide range of angular scales and to separate out the CMB B-modes from other astrophysical sources with high fidelity. After accounting for galactic foreground separation, the Simons Array will detect the primordial gravitational wave B-mode signal to r > 0.01 with a significance of > 5σ and will constrain the sum of neutrino masses to 40 meV (1σ) when cross-correlated with galaxy surveys. We present the current status of this funded experiment, its future, and discuss its projected science return.

  7. CMB polarization map derived from the WMAP 5 year data through the harmonic internal linear combination method

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaiseung; Naselsky, Pavel; Christensen, Per Rex

    2009-01-15

    We have derived whole-sky cosmic microwave background polarization maps from the WMAP 5 year polarization data, using the harmonic internal linear combination (HILC) method. Our HILC method incorporates spatial variability of linear weights in a natural way and yields continuous linear weights over the entire sky. To estimate the power spectrum of HILC maps, we have derived an unbiased quadratic estimator, which is similar to the WMAP team's cross-power estimator, but in a more convenient form for HILC maps. From our cosmic microwave background polarization map, we have obtained TE correlation and E mode power spectra without applying any mask. They are similar to the WMAP team's estimation and consistent with the WMAP best-fit {lambda}CDM model. Foreground reduction by the HILC method is more effective for high resolution and low noise data. Hence, our HILC method will enable effective foreground reduction in polarization data from the Planck surveyor.

  8. The Gauss-Legendre Sky Pixelization for the CMB Polarization Glesp-Pol Errors due to Pixelization of the CMB Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, Andrei G.; Verkhodanov, Oleg V.; Naselsky, Pavel D.; Kim, Jaiseung; Novikov, Dmitry I.; Turchaninov, Viktor I.; Novikov, Igor D.; Chiang, Lung-Yih; Hansen, Martin

    We present the development of the method for numerical analysis of polarization in the Gauss-Legendre sky pixelization (GLESP) scheme for CMB maps. This incorporation of the polarization transforms in the pixelization scheme GLESP completes the creation of our new method for numerical analysis of CMB maps. A comparison of GLESP and HEALPix calculations is done.

  9. Reconstruction of CMB temperature anisotropies with primordial CMB induced polarization in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guo-Chin; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2016-07-01

    Scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation in galaxy clusters induces polarization signals determined by the quadrupole anisotropy in the photon distribution at the location of clusters. This `remote quadrupole' derived from the measurements of the induced polarization in galaxy clusters provides an opportunity to reconstruct local CMB temperature anisotropies. In this Letter, we develop an algorithm of the reconstruction through the estimation of the underlying primordial gravitational potential, which is the origin of the CMB temperature and polarization fluctuations and CMB induced polarization in galaxy clusters. We found a nice reconstruction for the quadrupole and octopole components of the CMB temperature anisotropies with the assistance of the CMB induced polarization signals. The reconstruction can be an important consistency test on the puzzles of CMB anomalies, especially for the low-quadrupole and axis-of-evil problems reported in Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and Planck data.

  10. Illuminating the Early Universe with CMB Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wayne

    The standard model of cosmology, established in large part from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with the WMAP and Planck missions, involves inflation, a period of exponential expansion in the very early Universe that is thought to seed all cosmological structure. Yet the earliest accessible epochs, corresponding to the largest observable scales, remains poorly constrained with hints of interesting new physics in the form of anomalies in the CMB temperature data. While the temperature data is already cosmic variance limited, the large-angle polarization provides a new window on the dynamics at the beginning of the observable epochs of inflation. Indeed the less heralded E-mode polarization is actually in principle the most incisive of the CMB observables for these purposes but requires more modeling of astrophysics and low redshift cosmology to understand. We propose to utilize upcoming polarization data from Planck to devise techniques for reconstructing the earliest observable epochs of inflation in as model independent a fashion as possible. Specifically we will develop and utilize techniques that go beyond the ordinary slow roll and instantaneous reionization approximations to reconstruct jointly and robustly the temporal evolution of inflation and the ionization history. With such modeling and cosmic variance limited polarization measurements at large angles, inflationary explanations of features in the temperature power spectrum and violations of statistical isotropy should be definitively tested. The proposed research will maximize NASA's investment in these missions while complementing existing analyses and providing groundwork studies for a next generation polarization mission.

  11. Spin-SILC: CMB polarization component separation with spin wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Keir K.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Leistedt, Boris; McEwen, Jason D.; Pontzen, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    We present Spin-SILC, a new foreground component separation method that accurately extracts the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization E and B modes from raw multifrequency Stokes Q and U measurements of the microwave sky. Spin-SILC is an internal linear combination method that uses spin wavelets to analyse the spin-2 polarization signal P = Q + iU. The wavelets are additionally directional (non-axisymmetric). This allows different morphologies of signals to be separated and therefore the cleaning algorithm is localized using an additional domain of information. The advantage of spin wavelets over standard scalar wavelets is to simultaneously and self-consistently probe scales and directions in the polarization signal P = Q + iU and in the underlying E and B modes, therefore providing the ability to perform component separation and E-B decomposition concurrently for the first time. We test Spin-SILC on full-mission Planck simulations and data and show the capacity to correctly recover the underlying cosmological E and B modes. We also demonstrate a strong consistency of our CMB maps with those derived from existing component separation methods. Spin-SILC can be combined with the pseudo- and pure E-B spin wavelet estimators presented in a companion paper to reliably extract the cosmological signal in the presence of complicated sky cuts and noise. Therefore, it will provide a computationally efficient method to accurately extract the CMB E and B modes for future polarization experiments.

  12. Internal delensing of Planck CMB temperature and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carron, Julien; Lewis, Antony; Challinor, Anthony

    2017-05-01

    We present a first internal delensing of CMB maps, both in temperature and polarization, using the public foreground-cleaned (SMICA) Planck 2015 maps. After forming quadratic estimates of the lensing potential, we use the corresponding displacement field to undo the lensing on the same data. We build differences of the delensed spectra to the original data spectra specifically to look for delensing signatures. After taking into account reconstruction noise biases in the delensed spectra, we find an expected sharpening of the power spectrum acoustic peaks with a delensing efficiency of 29 % (TT) 25 % (TE) and 22 % (EE). The detection significance of the delensing effects is very high in all spectra: 12 σ in EE polarization; 18 σ in TE; and 20 σ in TT. The null hypothesis of no lensing in the maps is rejected at 26 σ. While direct detection of the power in lensing B-modes themselves is not possible at high significance at Planck noise levels, we do detect (at 4.5 σ {under the null hypothesis}) delensing effects in the B-mode map, with 7 % reduction in lensing power. Our results provide a first demonstration of polarization delensing, and generally of internal CMB delensing, and stand in agreement with the baseline ΛCDM Planck 2015 cosmology expectations.

  13. Unveiling hidden patterns in CMB anisotropy maps

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Tuhin; Souradeep, Tarun; Hajian, Amir

    2007-04-15

    Bianchi VII{sub h} models have been recently proposed to explain potential anomalies in the CMB anisotropy as observed by WMAP. We investigate the violation of statistical isotropy due to an embedded Bianchi VII{sub h} template in the CMB anisotropy maps to determine whether the existence of a hidden Bianchi template in the WMAP data is consistent with the previous null detection of the bipolar power spectrum in the WMAP first-year maps. We argue that, although correcting the WMAP maps for the Bianchi template may explain some features in the WMAP data, it may cause other anomalies such as preferred directions leading to detectable levels of violation of statistical isotropy in the Bianchi corrected maps. We compute the bipolar power spectrum for the low density Bianchi VII{sub h} models embedded in the background CMB anisotropy maps with the power spectrum that have been shown in recent literature to best fit the first-year WMAP data. By examining the statistical isotropy of these maps, we put a limit of (({sigma}/H)){sub 0}{<=}2.77x10{sup -10}(99% C.L.) on the shear parameter in Bianchi VII{sub h} models.

  14. Joint Planck and WMAP CMB map reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobin, J.; Sureau, F.; Starck, J.-L.; Rassat, A.; Paykari, P.

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel estimate of the cosmological microwave background (CMB) map by combining the two latest full-sky microwave surveys: WMAP nine-year and Planck PR1. The joint processing benefits from a recently introduced component separation method coined"local-generalized morphological component analysis" (LGMCA) and based on the sparse distribution of the foregrounds in the wavelet domain. The proposed estimation procedure takes advantage of the IRIS 100 μm as an extra observation on the galactic center for enhanced dust removal. We show that this new CMB map presents several interesting aspects: i) it is a full sky map without using any inpainting or interpolating method; ii) foreground contamination is very low; iii) the Galactic center is very clean with especially low dust contamination as measured by the cross-correlation between the estimated CMB map and the IRIS 100 μm map; and iv) it is free of thermal SZ contamination. Appendix is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. CMB lensing forecasts for constraining the primordial perturbations: adding to the CMB temperature and polarization information

    SciTech Connect

    Kasanda, Simon Muya; Moodley, Kavilan E-mail: moodleyk41@ukzn.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    We forecast how current (PLANCK) and future (PRISM) cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments constrain the adiabatic mode and its admixtures with primordial isocurvature modes. The forecasts are based on measurements of the reconstructed CMB lensing potential and lensing-induced CMB B-mode polarization anisotropies in combination with the CMB temperature and E-mode polarization anisotropies. We first study the characteristic features of the CMB temperature, polarization and lensing spectra for adiabatic and isocurvature modes. We then consider how information from the CMB lensing potential and B-mode polarization induced by lensing can improve constraints on an admixture of adiabatic and three correlated isocurvature modes. We find that the CMB lensing spectrum improves constraints on isocurvature modes by at most 10% for the PLANCK and PRISM experiments. The limited improvement is a result of the low amplitude of isocurvature lensing spectra and cancellations between these spectra that render them only slightly detectable. There is a larger gain from using the lensing-induced B-mode polarization spectrum measured by PRISM. In this case constraints on isocurvature mode amplitudes improve by as much as 40% relative to the CMB temperature and E-mode polarization constraints. The addition of both lensing and lensing-induced B-mode polarization information constrains isocurvature mode amplitudes at the few percent level or better. In the case of admixtures of the adiabatic mode with one or two correlated isocurvature modes we find that constraints at the percent level or better are possible. We investigate the dependence of our results to various assumptions in our analysis, such as the inclusion of dark energy parameters, the CMB temperature-lensing correlation, and the presence of primordial tensor modes, and find that these assumptions do not significantly change our main results.

  16. CMB Polarization B -mode Delensing with SPTpol and Herschel

    DOE PAGES

    Manzotti, A.; Story, K. T.; Wu, W. L. K.; ...

    2017-08-30

    Here, we present a demonstration of delensing the observed cosmic microwave background (CMB) Bmode polarization anisotropy. This process of reducing the gravitational-lensing generated B-mode component will become increasingly important for improving searches for the B modes produced by primordial gravitational waves. In this work, we delens B-mode maps constructed from multi-frequency SPTpol observations of a 90 deg2 patch of sky by subtracting a B-mode template constructed from two inputs: SPTpol E-mode maps and a lensing potential map estimated from the Herschel 500 µm map of the CIB. We find that our delensing procedure reduces the measured B-mode power spectrum bymore » 28% in the multipole range 300 < ℓ< 2300; this is shown to be consistent with expectations from theory and simulations and to be robust against systematics. Furthermore, the null hypothesis of no delensing is rejected at 6.9σ. Furthermore, we build and use a suite of realistic simulations to study the general properties of the delensing process and find that the delensing efficiency achieved in this work is limited primarily by the noise in the lensing potential map. We also demonstrate the importance of including realistic experimental non-idealities in the delensing forecasts used to inform instrument and survey-strategy planning of upcoming lower-noise experiments, such as CMB-S4.« less

  17. CMB Polarization B-mode Delensing with SPTpol and Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzotti, A.; Story, K. T.; Wu, W. L. K.; Austermann, J. E.; Beall, J. A.; Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bock, J. J.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Cho, H.-M.; Citron, R.; Conley, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dodelson, S.; Everett, W.; Gallicchio, J.; George, E. M.; Gilbert, A.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Li, D.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L. M.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J. P.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Smecher, G.; Stark, A. A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Viero, M. P.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Zemcov, M.

    2017-09-01

    We present a demonstration of delensing the observed cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization anisotropy. This process of reducing the gravitational-lensing-generated B-mode component will become increasingly important for improving searches for the B modes produced by primordial gravitational waves. In this work, we delens B-mode maps constructed from multi-frequency SPTpol observations of a 90 deg2 patch of sky by subtracting a B-mode template constructed from two inputs: SPTpol E-mode maps and a lensing potential map estimated from the Herschel 500 μm map of the cosmic infrared background. We find that our delensing procedure reduces the measured B-mode power spectrum by 28% in the multipole range 300< {\\ell }< 2300; this is shown to be consistent with expectations from simulations and to be robust against systematics. The null hypothesis of no delensing is rejected at 6.9σ . Furthermore, we build and use a suite of realistic simulations to study the general properties of the delensing process and find that the delensing efficiency achieved in this work is limited primarily by the noise in the lensing potential map. We demonstrate the importance of including realistic experimental non-idealities in the delensing forecasts used to inform instrument and survey-strategy planning of upcoming lower-noise experiments, such as CMB-S4.

  18. Multifrequency Beam Characterization and Systematics for the Keck Array, BICEP3, and Future CMB Polarization Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkare, Kirit S.; BICEP/Keck Array Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The BICEP/Keck Array cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments located at the South Pole are a series of small-aperture refracting telescopes focused on the degree-scale B-mode signature of inflationary gravitational waves. These highly-targeted experiments have produced the world's deepest maps of CMB polarization, leading to the most stringent constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio to date: sigma(r) = 0.024 and r < 0.09 from B-modes alone, and r < 0.07 in combination with other datasets. These constraints will rapidly improve with upcoming measurements at the multiple frequencies needed to separate Galactic foregrounds from the CMB, and in combination with higher-resolution experiments to remove B-modes induced by gravitational lensing. The primary instrumental systematic for pair differencing CMB experiments is temperature-to-polarization leakage from mismatched co-located orthogonally polarized beams. We present extensive far field beam measurements taken in situ at the South Pole, and demonstrate how the resulting high-fidelity beam maps for each detector are used in dedicated simulations to predict the expected leakage in the final CMB maps, focusing on the 95, 150, and 220 GHz beams present in the BK15 dataset. We discuss prospects for dealing with temperature-to-polarization leakage in next-generation CMB experiments with hundreds of thousands of detectors, and how the beams systematics levels we achieve with current instrument and analysis technology will scale with detector count.

  19. On Minkowski Functionals of CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chingangbam, Pravabati; Ganesan, Vidhya; Yogendran, K. P.; Park, Changbom

    2017-08-01

    CMB polarization data is usually analyzed using E and B modes because they are scalar quantities under rotations along the lines of sight and have distinct physical origins. We explore the possibility of using the Stokes parameters Q and U for complementary analysis and consistency checks in the context of searches for non-Gaussianity. We show that the Minkowski Functionals (MFs) of Q, U are invariant under local rotations along the lines of sight even though Q, U are spin-2 variables, for full sky analysis. The invariance does not hold for incomplete sky. For local type primordial non-Gaussianity, when we compare the non-Gaussian deviations of MFs for Q, U to what is obtained for E mode or temperature fluctuations, we find that the amplitude is about an order of magnitude lower and the shapes of the deviations are different. This finding can be useful in distinguishing local type non-Gaussianity from other origins of non-Gaussianity in the observed data. Lastly, we analyze the sensitivity of the amplitudes of the MFs for Q, U and the number density of singularities of the total polarization intensity to the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, and find that all of them decrease as r increases.

  20. Establishing the origin of CMB B -mode polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheere, Connor; van Engelen, Alexander; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyers, Joel

    2017-09-01

    Primordial gravitational waves leave a characteristic imprint on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in the form of B -mode polarization. Photons are also deflected by large scale gravitational waves which intervene between the source screen and our telescopes, resulting in curl-type gravitational lensing. Gravitational waves present at the epoch of reionization contribute to both effects, thereby leading to a nonvanishing cross-correlation between B -mode polarization and curl lensing of the CMB. Observing such a cross-correlation would be very strong evidence that an observation of B -mode polarization was due to the presence of large scale gravitational waves, as opposed to astrophysical foregrounds or experimental systematic effects. We study the cross-correlation across a wide range of source redshifts and show that a post-SKA experiment aimed to map out the 21-cm sky between 15 ≤z ≤30 could rule out non-zero cross-correlation at high significance for r ≥0.01 .

  1. Millicharged fermion vacuum polarization in a cosmic magnetic field and generation of CMB elliptic polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejlli, Damian

    2017-07-01

    The contribution of one-loop millicharged fermion vacuum polarization in a cosmic magnetic field to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization is considered. Exact and perturbative solutions of the density matrix equations of motion in terms of the Stokes parameters are presented. For linearly polarized CMB at the decoupling time, it is shown that the propagation of CMB photons in a cosmic magnetic field would generate elliptic polarization (circular and linear) of the CMB due to millicharged fermion vacuum polarization. Analytic expressions for the degree of circular polarization and rotation angle of the polarization plane of the CMB are presented. Depending on the ratio of millicharged fermion relative charge to mass, ɛ /mɛ, magnetic field amplitude, and CMB observation frequency, it is shown that the acquired CMB degree of circular polarization could be of the order of magnitude PC(T0)˜10-10- 10-6 in the best scenario for a canonical value of magnetic field amplitude of the order of ˜nG and ɛ /mɛ˜10-4-few ×10-3. The mechanism considered in this work generates CMB polarization even in the case when the CMB is initially in thermal equilibrium. Limits on the magnetic field amplitude due to prior-decoupling CMB polarization are presented.

  2. Cosmology from CMB polarization with POLARBEAR and the Simons Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Darcy; POLARBEAR Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    POLARBEAR is a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment located in the Atacama desert in Chile. The science goals of the POLARBEAR project are to do a deep search for CMB B-mode polarization created by inflationary gravitational waves, as well as characterize the CMB B-mode signal from gravitational lensing. POLARBEAR-1 started observations in 2012. The POLARBEAR team has published results from its first season of observations on a small fraction of the sky, including a measurement of a non-zero B-mode polarization angular power spectrum at sub-degree scales, where the dominant signal is gravitational lensing of the CMB. Improving these measurements requires precision characterization of the CMB polarization signal over large fractions of the sky, at multiple frequencies. To achieve these goals, POLARBEAR has begun expanding to include an additional two 3.5 meter telescopes with multi-chroic receivers, known as the Simons Array. With high sensitivity and large sky coverage, the Simons Array will create a detailed survey of B-mode polarization, and its spectral information will be used to extract the CMB signal from astrophysical foregrounds. The Simons Array data will place strong constraints on the sum of the neutrino masses, when combined with data from the next generation of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements. We present the status of this funded instrument and its expected capabilities.

  3. Measuring the Polarized CMB with ACT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staggs, Suzanne

    2016-06-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope is a special-purpose 6m telescope designed for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements at arcminute resolution. We will describe recent results using the second-generation camera called ACTPol. The camera comprises three sets of optics and detectors. Two operate at 150 GHz, and the third is the first multichroic detector array deployed for the CMB. The latter operates at 90 and 150 GHz.

  4. Neutrino mass effects on the CMB polarization with PMF

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Kazuhiko; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2009-05-04

    Our previous work showed that if a primordial magnetic field (PMF) was present during photon decoupling and afterward, massive neutrinos affect all modes of the CMB. This is because of the compensation of anisotropic stress between the neutrinos and the PMF. In order to study the observability of this new effect, we need careful analysis of the passive mode generated by the PMF. Here, we focus on the polarization of the CMB and study the observability of the finite neutrino mass effect.

  5. Planck 2015 results. IX. Diffuse component separation: CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casaponsa, B.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present foreground-reduced cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps derived from the full Planck data set in both temperature and polarization. Compared to the corresponding Planck 2013 temperature sky maps, the total data volume is larger by a factor of 3.2 for frequencies between 30 and 70 GHz, and by 1.9 for frequencies between 100 and 857 GHz. In addition, systematic errors in the forms of temperature-to-polarization leakage, analogue-to-digital conversion uncertainties, and very long time constant errors have been dramatically reduced, to the extent that the cosmological polarization signal may now be robustly recovered on angular scales ℓ ≳ 40. On the very largest scales, instrumental systematic residuals are still non-negligible compared to the expected cosmological signal, and modes with ℓ< 20 are accordingly suppressed in the current polarization maps by high-pass filtering. As in 2013, four different CMB component separation algorithms are applied to these observations, providing a measure of stability with respect to algorithmic and modelling choices. The resulting polarization maps have rms instrumental noise ranging between 0.21 and 0.27μK averaged over 55' pixels, and between 4.5 and 6.1μK averaged over 3.4 parcm pixels. The cosmological parameters derived from the analysis of temperature power spectra are in agreement at the 1σ level with the Planck 2015 likelihood. Unresolved mismatches between the noise properties of the data and simulations prevent a satisfactory description of the higher-order statistical properties of the polarization maps. Thus, the primary applications of these polarization maps are those that do not require massive simulations for accurate estimation of uncertainties, for instance estimation of cross-spectra and cross-correlations, or stacking analyses. However, the amplitude of primordial non-Gaussianity is consistent with zero within 2σ for all local, equilateral, and orthogonal configurations of the bispectrum

  6. Planck 2015 results: IX. Diffuse component separation: CMB maps

    DOE PAGES

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; ...

    2016-09-20

    In this paper, we present foreground-reduced cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps derived from the full Planck data set in both temperature and polarization. Compared to the corresponding Planck 2013 temperature sky maps, the total data volume is larger by a factor of 3.2 for frequencies between 30 and 70 GHz, and by 1.9 for frequencies between 100 and 857 GHz. In addition, systematic errors in the forms of temperature-to-polarization leakage, analogue-to-digital conversion uncertainties, and very long time constant errors have been dramatically reduced, to the extent that the cosmological polarization signal may now be robustly recovered on angular scales ℓ ≳ 40. On the very largest scales, instrumental systematic residuals are still non-negligible compared to the expected cosmological signal, and modes with ℓ< 20 are accordingly suppressed in the current polarization maps by high-pass filtering. As in 2013, four different CMB component separation algorithms are applied to these observations, providing a measure of stability with respect to algorithmic and modelling choices. Additionally, the resulting polarization maps have rms instrumental noise ranging between 0.21 and 0.27μK averaged over 55' pixels, and between 4.5 and 6.1μK averaged over 3more » $$'\\atop{.}$$4 pixels. The cosmological parameters derived from the analysis of temperature power spectra are in agreement at the 1σ level with the Planck 2015 likelihood. Unresolved mismatches between the noise properties of the data and simulations prevent a satisfactory description of the higher-order statistical properties of the polarization maps. Thus, the primary applications of these polarization maps are those that do not require massive simulations for accurate estimation of uncertainties, for instance estimation of cross-spectra and cross-correlations, or stacking analyses. However, the amplitude of primordial non-Gaussianity is consistent with zero within 2σ for all local, equilateral, and

  7. A New Limit on CMB Circular Polarization from SPIDER

    DOE PAGES

    Nagy, J. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; ...

    2017-08-02

    Here, we present a new upper limit on cosmic microwave background (CMB) circular polarization from the 2015 flight of Spider, a balloon-borne telescope designed to search for B-mode linear polarization from cosmic inflation. Although the level of circular polarization in the CMB is predicted to be very small, experimental limits provide a valuable test of the underlying models. By exploiting the nonzero circular-to-linear polarization coupling of the half-wave plate polarization modulators, data from Spider's 2015 Antarctic flight provide a constraint on Stokes V at 95 and 150 GHz in the rangemore » $$33\\lt {\\ell }\\lt 307$$. No other limits exist over this full range of angular scales, and Spider improves on the previous limit by several orders of magnitude, providing 95% C.L. constraints on $${\\ell }({\\ell }+1){C}_{{\\ell }}^{{VV}}/(2\\pi )$$ ranging from 141 to 255 μK2 at 150 GHz for a thermal CMB spectrum. In conclusion, as linear CMB polarization experiments become increasingly sensitive, the techniques described in this paper can be applied to obtain even stronger constraints on circular polarization.« less

  8. A New Limit on CMB Circular Polarization from SPIDER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, J. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Benton, S. J.; Bergman, A. S.; Bihary, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bryan, S. A.; Chiang, H. C.; Contaldi, C. R.; Doré, O.; Duivenvoorden, A. J.; Eriksen, H. K.; Farhang, M.; Filippini, J. P.; Fissel, L. M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Freese, K.; Galloway, M.; Gambrel, A. E.; Gandilo, N. N.; Ganga, K.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halpern, M.; Hartley, J.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G.; Holmes, W.; Hristov, V. V.; Huang, Z.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Kuo, C. L.; Kermish, Z. D.; Li, S.; Mason, P. V.; Megerian, K.; Moncelsi, L.; Morford, T. A.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nolta, M.; Padilla, I. L.; Racine, B.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Ruud, T. M.; Shariff, J. A.; Soler, J. D.; Song, X.; Trangsrud, A.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.; Van Der List, J. F.; Weber, A. C.; Wehus, I. K.; Wiebe, D. V.; Young, E. Y.

    2017-08-01

    We present a new upper limit on cosmic microwave background (CMB) circular polarization from the 2015 flight of Spider, a balloon-borne telescope designed to search for B-mode linear polarization from cosmic inflation. Although the level of circular polarization in the CMB is predicted to be very small, experimental limits provide a valuable test of the underlying models. By exploiting the nonzero circular-to-linear polarization coupling of the half-wave plate polarization modulators, data from Spider's 2015 Antarctic flight provide a constraint on Stokes V at 95 and 150 GHz in the range 33< {\\ell }< 307. No other limits exist over this full range of angular scales, and Spider improves on the previous limit by several orders of magnitude, providing 95% C.L. constraints on {\\ell }({\\ell }+1){C}{\\ell }{VV}/(2π ) ranging from 141 to 255 μK2 at 150 GHz for a thermal CMB spectrum. As linear CMB polarization experiments become increasingly sensitive, the techniques described in this paper can be applied to obtain even stronger constraints on circular polarization.

  9. On the impact of large angle CMB polarization data on cosmological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Burigana, Carlo; Gerbino, Martina; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Natoli, Paolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Salvati, Laura; Trombetti, Tiziana

    2017-02-01

    We study the impact of the large-angle CMB polarization datasets publicly released by the WMAP and Planck satellites on the estimation of cosmological parameters of the ΛCDM model. To complement large-angle polarization, we consider the high resolution (or "high-l") CMB datasets from either WMAP or Planck as well as CMB lensing as traced by Planck's measured four point correlation function. In the case of WMAP, we compute the large-angle polarization likelihood starting over from low resolution frequency maps and their covariance matrices, and perform our own foreground mitigation technique, which includes as a possible alternative Planck 353 GHz data to trace polarized dust. We find that the latter choice induces a downward shift in the optical depth τ, roughly of order 2σ, robust to the choice of the complementary high resolution dataset. When the Planck 353 GHz is consistently used to minimize polarized dust emission, WMAP and Planck 70 GHz large-angle polarization data are in remarkable agreement: by combining them we find τ = 0.066 +0.012‑0.013, again very stable against the particular choice for high-l data. We find that the amplitude of primordial fluctuations As, notoriously degenerate with τ, is the parameter second most affected by the assumptions on polarized dust removal, but the other parameters are also affected, typically between 0.5 and 1σ. In particular, cleaning dust with Planck's 353 GHz data imposes a 1σ downward shift in the value of the Hubble constant H0, significantly contributing to the tension reported between CMB based and direct measurements of the present expansion rate. On the other hand, we find that the appearance of the so-called low l anomaly, a well-known tension between the high- and low-resolution CMB anisotropy amplitude, is not significantly affected by the details of large-angle polarization, or by the particular high-l dataset employed.

  10. Optical design of Argonne/KICP detectors for CMB polarization.

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, J.; Bleem, L. E.; Crites, A. T.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Datesman, A.; Divan, R.; Everett, W.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Novosad, V.; Pearson, J.; Ruhl, J.; Sayre, J.; Wang, G.; Yefremenko, V.; Case Western Reserve Univ.

    2009-01-01

    We present simulations and measurements of a new optical coupling scheme for bolometric detectors for cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization under development by Argonne National Labs and the University of Chicago. We show simulations of the performance and a tolerance analysis of this device along with measurements that validate its performance. Optical measurements of a prototype point to a 90% coupling efficiency with a cross-polarization below -20 dB.

  11. Novel calibration system with sparse wires for CMB polarization receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, O.; Nguyen, H.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A. /Chicago U., KICP

    2011-07-01

    B-modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization is a smoking gun signature of the inflationary universe. To achieve better sensitivity to this faint signal, CMB polarization experiments aim to maximize the number of detector elements, resulting in a large focal plane receiver. Detector calibration of the polarization response becomes essential. It is extremely useful to be able to calibrate 'simultaneously' all detectors on the large focal plane. We developed a novel calibration system that rotates a large 'sparse' grid of metal wires, in front of and fully covering the field of view of the focal plane receiver. Polarized radiation is created via the reflection of ambient temperature from the wire surface. Since the detector has a finite beam size, the observed signal is smeared according to the beam property. The resulting smeared polarized radiation has a reasonable intensity (a few Kelvin or less) compared to the sky temperature ({approx}10 K observing condition). The system played a successful role for receiver calibration of QUIET, a CMB polarization experiment located in the Atacama desert in Chile. The successful performance revealed that this system is applicable to other experiments based on different technologies, e.g. TES bolometers.

  12. Novel Calibration System with Sparse Wires for CMB Polarization Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, O.; Nguyen, H.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A.

    2012-06-01

    A curl competent (also known as B-modes) in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization is a smoking gun signature of the inflationary universe. To achieve better sensitivity to this faint signal, CMB polarization experiments aim to maximize the number of detector elements, resulting in a large focal plane receiver. Detector calibration of the polarization response becomes essential. It is extremely useful to be able to calibrate "simultaneously" all detectors on the large focal plane. We developed a novel calibration system that rotates a large "sparse" grid of metal wires, in front of and fully covering the field of view of the focal plane receiver. Polarized radiation is created via the reflection of ambient temperature photons from the wire surface. Since the detector has a finite beam size, the observed signal is convolved with the beam property. The intensity of the of the calibrator is reasonable (a few Kelvin or less) compared to sky temperature for typical observing conditions (˜10 K). The system played a successful role for receiver calibration of QUIET, a CMB polarization experiment located in the Atacama desert in Chile. The successful performance revealed that this system is applicable to other experiments based on different technologies, e.g. TES bolometers.

  13. Sensitive Detection of CMB B-Mode Polarization: Instrumentation and Systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyerman, Stephanie

    Numerous experiments in the last two decades have shown that the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a powerful cosmological probe. The temperature anisotropy of the CMB has now been mapped to exquisite precision by many experiments, yielding tight constraints on the standard ΛCDM cosmological model. Many current and upcoming experiments focus on measuring CMB polarization, in particular the B-mode polarization, which potentially encodes information from long before the epoch of matter-radiation decoupling. However, the magnitude of the inflationary B-mode signal is constrained by an upper limit of tens of nK, which represents a massive experimental challenge. Foreground contamination and systematic effects, among other factors, further increase the difficulty of detection. A measurement of this signal therefore requires the development of dedicated telescopes with exquisite control of systematics and large kilo-pixel arrays of background limited detectors. This thesis describes my work on Cosmic Microwave Background polarization studies. Specifically, it describes my data analysis efforts on two CMB polarization telescopes, BICEP and POLARBEAR, my contribution to hardware efforts on POLARBEAR, and my design and fabrication work on next generation detector arrays.

  14. A Bayesian framework for cosmic string searches in CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuca, Razvan; Hernández, Oscar F.

    2017-08-01

    There exists various proposals to detect cosmic strings from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) or 21 cm temperature maps. Current proposals do not aim to find the location of strings on sky maps, all of these approaches can be thought of as a statistic on a sky map. We propose a Bayesian interpretation of cosmic string detection and within that framework, we derive a connection between estimates of cosmic string locations and cosmic string tension Gμ. We use this Bayesian framework to develop a machine learning framework for detecting strings from sky maps and outline how to implement this framework with neural networks. The neural network we trained was able to detect and locate cosmic strings on noiseless CMB temperature map down to a string tension of Gμ=5 ×10-9 and when analyzing a CMB temperature map that does not contain strings, the neural network gives a 0.95 probability that Gμ<=2.3×10-9.

  15. POLARBEAR-2: an instrument for CMB polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Y.; Ade, P.; Akiba, Y.; Aleman, C.; Arnold, K.; Baccigalupi, C.; Barch, B.; Barron, D.; Bender, A.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Cukierman, A.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Ducout, A.; Dünner, R.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feeney, S.; Feng, C.; Fuller, G.; Gilbert, A. J.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Groh, J.; Hall, G.; Halverson, N.; Hamada, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Hill, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Howe, L.; Irie, F.; Jaehnig, G.; Jaffe, A.; Jeong, O.; Katayama, N.; Kaufman, J. P.; Kazemzadeh, K.; Keating, B. G.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kusaka, A.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Leon, D.; Linder, E. V.; Lowry, L.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Miller, N.; Mizukami, K.; Montgomery, J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Puglisi, G.; Raum, C. R.; Rebeiz, G. M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Rotermund, K. M.; Segawa, Y.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shirley, I.; Siritanasak, P.; Stebor, N.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, J.; Suzuki, A.; Tajima, O.; Takada, S.; Takatori, S.; Teply, G. P.; Tikhomirov, A.; Tomaru, T.; Whitehorn, N.; Zahn, A.; Zahn, O.

    2016-07-01

    POLARBEAR-2 (PB-2) is a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment that will be located in the Atacama highland in Chile at an altitude of 5200 m. Its science goals are to measure the CMB polarization signals originating from both primordial gravitational waves and weak lensing. PB-2 is designed to measure the tensor to scalar ratio, r, with precision σ(r) > 0:01, and the sum of neutrino masses, Σmz, with σ(Σmv) < 90 meV. To achieve these goals, PB-2 will employ 7588 transition-edge sensor bolometers at 95 GHz and 150 GHz, which will be operated at the base temperature of 250 mK. Science observations will begin in 2017.

  16. Cosmological birefringence constraints from CMB and astrophysical polarization data

    SciTech Connect

    Galaverni, M.; Gubitosi, G.; Paci, F.; Finelli, F. E-mail: giulia.gubitosi@imperial.ac.uk E-mail: finelli@iasfbo.inaf.it

    2015-08-01

    Cosmological birefringence is a rotation of the polarization plane of photons coming from sources of astrophysical and cosmological origin. The rotation can also depend on the energy of the photons and not only on the distance of the source and on the cosmological evolution of the underlying theoretical model. In this work, we constrain few selected models for cosmological birefringence, combining CMB and astrophysical data at radio, optical, X and γ wavelengths, taking into account the specific energy and distance dependences.

  17. CMB and galactic maps in the millimetric region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bernardis, Paolo; Masi, Silvia; Vittorio, Nicola

    We present low angular resolution, full sky maps of the expected millimetric diffuse emission, in order to illustrate the level of Galactic contamination in CMB (Cosmic Microwave Background) large scale anisotropy experiments. The maps are obtained by simple modelling the diffuse emission of our Galaxy at mm wavelengths, including dust and radio continuum emission. CMB maps expected in cold dark matter (CDM) and baryonic isocurvature scenarios are compared to the Galactic anisotropy pattern. We present the results of a complete analysis of the Quadrupole anisotropy, which, in the case of COBE-DMR, seems to be the most useful tool for cosmological tests.

  18. Preferred axis of CMB parity asymmetry in the masked maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhao, Wen; Huang, Qing-Guo; Santos, Larissa

    2016-06-01

    Both WMAP and Planck data show a significant odd-multipole preference in the large scales of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies. If this pattern originates from cosmological effects, then it can be considered a crucial clue for a violation in the cosmological principle. By defining various direction dependent statistics in the full-sky Planck 2015 maps (see, for instance, Naselsky et al. (2012); W. Zhao (2014)), we found that the CMB parity asymmetry has a preferred direction, which is independent of the choices of the statistics. In particular, this preferred axis is strongly aligned with those in the CMB quadrupole and octopole, as well as that in the CMB kinematic dipole, which hints to their non-cosmological origin. In realistic observations, the foreground residuals are inevitable, and should be properly masked out in order to avoid possible misinterpretation of the results. In this paper, we extend our previous analyses to the masked Planck 2015 data. By defining a similar direction dependent statistic in the masked map, we find a preferred direction of the CMB parity asymmetry, in which the axis also coincides with that found in the full-sky analysis. Therefore, our conclusions on the CMB parity violation and its directional properties are confirmed.

  19. Gauss-Legendre Sky Pixelization (glesp) for CMB Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, A. G.; Naselsky, P. D.; Verkhodanov, O. V.; Novikov, D. I.; Turchaninov, V. I.; Novikov, I. D.; Christensen, P. R.; Chiang, L.-Y.

    A new scheme of sky pixelization is developed for CMB maps. The scheme is based on the Gauss-Legendre polynomials zeros and allows one to create strict orthogonal expansion of the map. A corresponding code has been implemented and comparison with other methods has been done.

  20. Expected dipole asymmetry in CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Namjoo, M.H.; Abolhasani, A.A.; Baghram, S.; Assadullahi, H.; Wands, D.; Firouzjahi, H. E-mail: abolhasani@ipm.ir E-mail: shant.baghramian@gmail.com E-mail: david.wands@port.ac.uk

    2015-05-01

    We explore the hemispherical asymmetry predicted in cosmic microwave background polarization when there is an asymmetry in temperature anisotropies due to primordial perturbations. We consider the cases of asymmetries due to adiabatic and isocurvature modes, and tensor perturbations. We show that the asymmetry in the TE, EE and/or BB correlations can be substantially larger than those in the TT power spectrum in certain cases. The relative asymmetry in the different cross-correlations, as well as the angular scale dependence, can in principle distinguish between different origins for the asymmetry.

  1. Mapping gravitational lensing of the CMB using local likelihoods

    SciTech Connect

    Anderes, Ethan; Knox, Lloyd; Engelen, Alexander van

    2011-02-15

    We present a new estimation method for mapping the gravitational lensing potential from observed CMB intensity and polarization fields. Our method uses Bayesian techniques to estimate the average curvature of the potential over small local regions. These local curvatures are then used to construct an estimate of a low pass filter of the gravitational potential. By utilizing Bayesian/likelihood methods one can easily overcome problems with missing and/or nonuniform pixels and problems with partial sky observations (E- and B-mode mixing, for example). Moreover, our methods are local in nature, which allow us to easily model spatially varying beams, and are highly parallelizable. We note that our estimates do not rely on the typical Taylor approximation which is used to construct estimates of the gravitational potential by Fourier coupling. We present our methodology with a flat sky simulation under nearly ideal experimental conditions with a noise level of 1 {mu}K-arcmin for the temperature field, {radical}(2) {mu}K-arcmin for the polarization fields, with an instrumental beam full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.25 arcmin.

  2. Designs for a large-aperture telescope to map the CMB 10× faster.

    PubMed

    Niemack, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    Current large-aperture cosmic microwave background (CMB) telescopes have nearly maximized the number of detectors that can be illuminated while maintaining diffraction-limited image quality. The polarization-sensitive detector arrays being deployed in these telescopes in the next few years will have roughly 10⁴ detectors. Increasing the mapping speed of future instruments by at least an order of magnitude is important to enable precise probes of the inflationary paradigm in the first fraction of a second after the big bang and provide strong constraints on cosmological parameters. The CMB community has begun planning a next generation "Stage IV" CMB project that will be comprised of multiple telescopes with between 10⁵-10⁶ detectors to pursue these goals. This paper introduces the new crossed Dragone telescope and receiver optics designs that increase the usable diffraction-limited field-of-view, and therefore the mapping speed, by an order of magnitude compared to the upcoming generation of large-aperture instruments. Polarization systematics and engineering considerations are presented, including a preliminary receiver model to demonstrate that these designs will enable high efficiency illumination of >10⁵ detectors in a next generation CMB telescope.

  3. Non-Gaussianity in the foreground-reduced CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Bernui, A.; Reboucas, M. J.

    2010-03-15

    A detection or nondetection of primordial non-Gaussianity by using the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) data is crucial not only to discriminate inflationary models but also to test alternative scenarios. Non-Gaussianity offers, therefore, a powerful probe of the physics of the primordial Universe. The extraction of primordial non-Gaussianity is a difficult enterprise since several effects of a nonprimordial nature can produce non-Gaussianity. Given the far-reaching consequences of such a non-Gaussianity for our understanding of the physics of the early Universe, it is important to employ a range of different statistical tools to quantify and/or constrain its amount in order to have information that may be helpful for identifying its causes. Moreover, different indicators can in principle provide information about distinct forms of non-Gaussianity that can be present in CMB data. Most of the Gaussianity analyses of CMB data have been performed by using part-sky frequency, where the mask is used to deal with the galactic diffuse foreground emission. However, full-sky map seems to be potentially more appropriate to test for Gaussianity of the CMB data. On the other hand, masks can induce bias in some non-Gaussianity analyses. Here we use two recent large-angle non-Gaussianity indicators, based on skewness and kurtosis of large-angle patches of CMB maps, to examine the question of non-Gaussianity in the available full-sky five-year and seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) maps. We show that these full-sky foreground-reduced maps present a significant deviation from Gaussianity of different levels, which vary with the foreground-reducing procedures. We also make a Gaussianity analysis of the foreground-reduced five-year and seven-year WMAP maps with a KQ75 mask, and compare with the similar analysis performed with the corresponding full-sky foreground-reduced maps. This comparison shows a significant reduction in the levels of non

  4. Evidence for horizon-scale power from CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Mortonson, Michael J.; Hu, Wayne

    2009-07-15

    The CMB temperature power spectrum offers ambiguous evidence for the existence of horizon-scale power in the primordial power spectrum due to uncertainties in spatial curvature and the physics of cosmic acceleration as well as the observed low quadrupole. Current polarization data from WMAP provide evidence for horizon-scale power that is robust to these uncertainties. Polarization on the largest scales arises mainly from scattering at z < or approx. 6 when the Universe is fully ionized, making the evidence robust to ionization history variations at higher redshifts as well. A cutoff in the power spectrum is limited to C=k{sub C}/10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -1}<5.2 (95% C.L.) by polarization, only slightly weaker than joint temperature and polarization constraints in flat {lambda}CDM (C<4.2). Planck should improve the polarization limit to C<3.6 for any model of the acceleration epoch and ionization history as well as provide tests for foreground and systematic contamination.

  5. N-body lensed CMB maps: lensing extraction and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Antolini, Claudia; Martinelli, Matteo; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Fantaye, Yabebal; Carbone, Carmelita E-mail: y.t.fantaye@astro.uio.no E-mail: carmelita.carbone@brera.inaf.it

    2014-02-01

    We reconstruct shear maps and angular power spectra from simulated weakly lensed total intensity (TT) and polarised (EB) maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, obtained using Born approximated ray-tracing through the N-body simulated Cold Dark Matter (CDM) structures in the Millennium Simulations (MS). We compare the recovered signal with the ΛCDM prediction, on the whole interval of angular scales which is allowed by the finite box size, extending from the degree scale to the arcminute, by applying a quadratic estimator in the flat sky limit; we consider PRISM-like instrumental specification for future generation CMB satellites, corresponding to arcminute angular resolution of 3.2' and sensitivity of 2.43 μK-arcmin. The noise contribution in the simulations closely follows the estimator prediction, becoming dominated by limits in the angular resolution for the EB signal, at ℓ ≅ 1500. The recovered signal shows no visible departure from predictions of the weak lensing power within uncertainties, when considering TT and EB data singularly. In particular, the reconstruction precision reaches the level of a few percent in bins with Δℓ ≅ 100 in the angular multiple interval 1000∼<ℓ∼<2000 for T, and about 10% for EB. Within the adopted specifications, polarisation data do represent a significant contribution to the lensing shear, which appear to faithfully trace the underlying N-body structure down to the smallest angular scales achievable with the present setup, validating at the same time the latter with respect to semi-analytical predictions from ΛCDM cosmology at the level of CMB lensing statistics. This work demonstrates the feasibility of CMB lensing studies based on large scale simulations of cosmological structure formation in the context of the current and future high resolution and sensitivity CMB experiment.

  6. N-body lensed CMB maps: lensing extraction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolini, Claudia; Fantaye, Yabebal; Martinelli, Matteo; Carbone, Carmelita; Baccigalupi, Carlo

    2014-02-01

    We reconstruct shear maps and angular power spectra from simulated weakly lensed total intensity (TT) and polarised (EB) maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, obtained using Born approximated ray-tracing through the N-body simulated Cold Dark Matter (CDM) structures in the Millennium Simulations (MS). We compare the recovered signal with the ΛCDM prediction, on the whole interval of angular scales which is allowed by the finite box size, extending from the degree scale to the arcminute, by applying a quadratic estimator in the flat sky limit; we consider PRISM-like instrumental specification for future generation CMB satellites, corresponding to arcminute angular resolution of 3.2' and sensitivity of 2.43 μK-arcmin. The noise contribution in the simulations closely follows the estimator prediction, becoming dominated by limits in the angular resolution for the EB signal, at l simeq 1500. The recovered signal shows no visible departure from predictions of the weak lensing power within uncertainties, when considering TT and EB data singularly. In particular, the reconstruction precision reaches the level of a few percent in bins with Δl simeq 100 in the angular multiple interval 1000lesssimllesssim2000 for T, and about 10% for EB. Within the adopted specifications, polarisation data do represent a significant contribution to the lensing shear, which appear to faithfully trace the underlying N-body structure down to the smallest angular scales achievable with the present setup, validating at the same time the latter with respect to semi-analytical predictions from ΛCDM cosmology at the level of CMB lensing statistics. This work demonstrates the feasibility of CMB lensing studies based on large scale simulations of cosmological structure formation in the context of the current and future high resolution and sensitivity CMB experiment.

  7. Exploring two-spin internal linear combinations for the recovery of the CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Cobos, R.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Vielva, P.; Martínez-González, E.; Barreiro, R. B.

    2016-06-01

    We present a methodology to recover cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization in which the quantity P = Q + iU is linearly combined at different frequencies using complex coefficients. This is the most general linear combination of the Q and U Stokes parameters which preserves the physical coherence of the residual contribution on the CMB estimation. The approach is applied to the internal linear combination (ILC) and the internal template fitting (ITF) methodologies. The variance of P of the resulting map is minimized to compute the coefficients of the linear combination. One of the key aspects of this procedure is that it serves to account for a global frequency-dependent shift of the polarization phase. Although in the standard case, in which no global E-B transference depending on frequency is expected in the foreground components, minimizing <|P|2> is similar to minimizing and separately (as previous methodologies proceed), multiplying Q and U by different coefficients induces arbitrary changes in the polarization angle and it does not preserve the coherence between the spinorial components. The approach is tested on simulations, obtaining a similar residual level with respect to the one obtained with other implementations of the ILC, and perceiving the polarization rotation of a toy model with the frequency dependence of the Faraday rotation.

  8. Searching for long strings in CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perivolaropoulos, L.

    1998-11-01

    Using analytical methods and Monte Carlo simulations, we analyze new statistics designed to detect isolated step-like discontinuities which are coherent over large areas of cosmic microwave background pixel maps. Such coherent temperature discontinuities are predicted by the Kaiser-Stebbins effect to form due to long cosmic strings in our present horizon. The background of the coherent step-like seed is assumed to be a scale invariant Gaussian random field which could have been produced by a superposition of seeds on smaller scales and/or by inflationary quantum fluctuations. We find that the proposed statistics can detect the presence of a coherent discontinuity at a sensitivity level almost an order of magnitude better compared to more conventional statistics such as skewness or kurtosis.

  9. Digital deblurring of CMB maps: Performance and efficient implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vio, R.; Nagy, J. G.; Tenorio, L.; Andreani, P.; Baccigalupi, C.; Wamsteker, W.

    2003-04-01

    Digital deblurring of images is an important problem that arises in multifrequency observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) where, because of the width of the point spread functions (PSF), maps at different frequencies suffer a different loss of spatial resolution. Deblurring is useful for various reasons: first, it helps to restore high frequency components lost through the smoothing effect of the instrument's PSF; second, emissions at various frequencies observed with different resolutions can be better studied on a comparable resolution; third, some map-based component separation algorithms require maps with similar level of degradation. Because of computational efficiency, deblurring is usually done in the frequency domain. But this approach has some limitations as it requires spatial invariance of the PSF, stationarity of the noise, and is not flexible in the selection of more appropriate boundary conditions. Deblurring in real space is more flexible but usually not used because of its high computational cost. In this paper (the first in a series on the subject) we present new algorithms that allow the use of real space deblurring techniques even for very large images. In particular, we consider the use of Tikhonov deblurring of noisy maps with applications to PLANCK. We provide details for efficient implementations of the algorithms. Their performance is tested on Gaussian and non-Gaussian simulated CMB maps, and PSFs with both circular and elliptical symmetry. Matlab code is made available.

  10. Instrument development of the CMB polarization POLARBEAR-2 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siritanasak, Praween; POLARBEAR Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    We present the status of the development of the Polarbear-2 (PB-2) and Simons Array experiments. PB-2 is a ground-based Cosmic Microwave Back- ground (CMB) polarization experiment located at the James Ax observatory in the Atacama desert of Northern Chile. The Simons Array will consist of three PB-2 receivers on three Huan Tran-style telescopes, each containing a multi-chroic detector array. The first new Simons Array receiver, Polarbear- 2A(PB-2A), will be deployed in 2017. The PB-2A focal plane consists of 1,897 lenslet-coupled, dual-polarization, sinuous-antenna-coupled pixels operating at 95 and 150 GHz, making a total of 7,588 polarization-sensitive transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. In the order to cover both frequencies, we developed broadband two layer anti-reflection (AR) coating for 5.345 mm diameter lenslets using two types of epoxy: Stycast2850FT and Stycast1090. We developed a mass production AR coating methodology that can control the uniformity and shape to within 25 μm error from the designed value. The second (PB-2B) and third (PB-2C) receivers will employ similar technologies and will cover 95, 150, 220 and 280 GHz. The Simons Array will survey 80% of the sky with broad frequency coverage and high resolution, making it a powerful tool to constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio through measurements of primordial B-modes and the sum of the neutrino masses through measurements of B-modes produced by gravitational lensing.

  11. MADAM- a map-making method for CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keihänen, E.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Poutanen, T.

    2005-06-01

    We present a new map-making method for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements. The method is based on the destriping technique, but it also utilizes information about the noise spectrum. The low-frequency component of the instrument noise stream is modelled as a superposition of a set of simple base functions, whose amplitudes are determined by means of maximum-likelihood analysis, involving the covariance matrix of the amplitudes. We present simulation results with 1/f noise and show a reduction in the residual noise with respect to ordinary destriping. This study is related to Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) activities.

  12. COMPASS: an instrument for measuring the polarization of the CMB on intermediate angular scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farese, Philip C.; Dall'Oglio, Giorgio; Gundersen, Josh; Keating, Brian; Klawikowski, Slade; Knox, Lloyd; Levy, Alan; O'Dell, Chris; Peel, Alan; Piccirillo, Lucio; Ruhl, John; Timbie, Peter

    2003-12-01

    COMPASS is an on-axis 2.6-m telescope coupled to a correlation polarimeter. The entire instrument was built specifically for CMB polarization studies. Careful attention was given to receiver and optics design, stability of the pointing platform, avoidance of systematic offsets, and development of data analysis techniques. Here we describe the experiment, its strengths and weaknesses, and the various things we have learned that may benefit future efforts to measure the polarization of the CMB.

  13. Optical Modeling and Polarization Calibration for CMB Measurements with Actpol and Advanced Actpol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koopman, Brian; Austermann, Jason; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Coughlin, Kevin P.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Hasselfield, Matthew; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hubmayr, Johannes; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) is a polarization sensitive upgrade to the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, located at an elevation of 5190 m on Cerro Toco in Chile. ACTPol uses transition edge sensor bolometers coupled to orthomode transducers to measure both the temperature and polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Calibration of the detector angles is a critical step in producing polarization maps of the CMB. Polarization angle offsets in the detector calibration can cause leakage in polarization from E to B modes and induce a spurious signal in the EB and TB cross correlations, which eliminates our ability to measure potential cosmological sources of EB and TB signals, such as cosmic birefringence. We calibrate the ACTPol detector angles by ray tracing the designed detector angle through the entire optical chain to determine the projection of each detector angle on the sky. The distribution of calibrated detector polarization angles are consistent with a global offset angle from zero when compared to the EB-nulling offset angle, the angle required to null the EB cross-correlation power spectrum. We present the optical modeling process. The detector angles can be cross checked through observations of known polarized sources, whether this be a galactic source or a laboratory reference standard. To cross check the ACTPol detector angles, we use a thin film polarization grid placed in front of the receiver of the telescope, between the receiver and the secondary reflector. Making use of a rapidly rotating half-wave plate (HWP) mount we spin the polarizing grid at a constant speed, polarizing and rotating the incoming atmospheric signal. The resulting sinusoidal signal is used to determine the detector angles. The optical modeling calibration was shown to be consistent with a global offset angle of zero when compared to EB nulling in the first ACTPol results and will continue to be a part of our calibration implementation. The first

  14. Optical Modeling and Polarization Calibration for CMB Measurements with Actpol and Advanced Actpol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koopman, Brian; Austermann, Jason; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Coughlin, Kevin P.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Hasselfield, Matthew; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeff; Nati, Federico; Niemack, Michael D.; Newburgh, Laura; Page, Lyman A.; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Simon, Sara M.; Vavagiakis, Eva M.; Ward, Jonathan T.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) is a polarization sensitive upgrade to the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, located at an elevation of 5190 m on Cerro Toco in Chile. ACTPol uses transition edge sensor bolometers coupled to orthomode transducers to measure both the temperature and polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Calibration of the detector angles is a critical step in producing polarization maps of the CMB. Polarization angle offsets in the detector calibration can cause leakage in polarization from E to B modes and induce a spurious signal in the EB and TB cross correlations, which eliminates our ability to measure potential cosmological sources of EB and TB signals, such as cosmic birefringence. We calibrate the ACTPol detector angles by ray tracing the designed detector angle through the entire optical chain to determine the projection of each detector angle on the sky. The distribution of calibrated detector polarization angles are consistent with a global offset angle from zero when compared to the EB-nulling offset angle, the angle required to null the EB cross-correlation power spectrum. We present the optical modeling process. The detector angles can be cross checked through observations of known polarized sources, whether this be a galactic source or a laboratory reference standard. To cross check the ACTPol detector angles, we use a thin film polarization grid placed in front of the receiver of the telescope, between the receiver and the secondary reflector. Making use of a rapidly rotating half-wave plate (HWP) mount we spin the polarizing grid at a constant speed, polarizing and rotating the incoming atmospheric signal. The resulting sinusoidal signal is used to determine the detector angles. The optical modeling calibration was shown to be consistent with a global offset angle of zero when compared to EB nulling in the first ACTPol results and will continue to be a part of our calibration implementation. The first

  15. Optical modeling and polarization calibration for CMB measurements with ACTPol and Advanced ACTPol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopman, Brian; Austermann, Jason; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Coughlin, Kevin P.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Hasselfield, Matthew; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeff; Nati, Federico; Niemack, Michael D.; Newburgh, Laura; Page, Lyman A.; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Simon, Sara M.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Ward, Jonathan T.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-07-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) is a polarization sensitive upgrade to the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, located at an elevation of 5190 m on Cerro Toco in Chile. ACTPol uses transition edge sensor bolometers coupled to orthomode transducers to measure both the temperature and polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Calibration of the detector angles is a critical step in producing polarization maps of the CMB. Polarization angle offsets in the detector calibration can cause leakage in polarization from E to B modes and induce a spurious signal in the EB and TB cross correlations, which eliminates our ability to measure potential cosmological sources of EB and TB signals, such as cosmic birefringence. We calibrate the ACTPol detector angles by ray tracing the designed detector angle through the entire optical chain to determine the projection of each detector angle on the sky. The distribution of calibrated detector polarization angles are consistent with a global offset angle from zero when compared to the EB-nulling offset angle, the angle required to null the EB cross-correlation power spectrum. We present the optical modeling process. The detector angles can be cross checked through observations of known polarized sources, whether this be a galactic source or a laboratory reference standard. To cross check the ACTPol detector angles, we use a thin film polarization grid placed in front of the receiver of the telescope, between the receiver and the secondary reflector. Making use of a rapidly rotating half-wave plate (HWP) mount we spin the polarizing grid at a constant speed, polarizing and rotating the incoming atmospheric signal. The resulting sinusoidal signal is used to determine the detector angles. The optical modeling calibration was shown to be consistent with a global offset angle of zero when compared to EB nulling in the first ACTPol results and will continue to be a part of our calibration implementation. The first

  16. Non Gaussian Minkowski functionals and extrema counts for CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogosyan, Dmitri; Codis, Sandrine; Pichon, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    In the conference presentation we have reviewed the theory of non-Gaussian geometrical measures for 3D Cosmic Web of the matter distribution in the Universe and 2D sky data, such as Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) maps that was developed in a series of our papers. The theory leverages symmetry of isotropic statistics such as Minkowski functionals and extrema counts to develop post Gaussian expansion of the statistics in orthogonal polynomials of invariant descriptors of the field, its first and second derivatives. The application of the approach to 2D fields defined on a spherical sky was suggested, but never rigorously developed. In this paper we present such development treating the effects of the curvature and finiteness of the spherical space $S_2$ exactly, without relying on flat-sky approximation. We present Minkowski functionals, including Euler characteristic and extrema counts to the first non-Gaussian correction, suitable for weakly non-Gaussian fields on a sphere, of which CMB is the prime example.

  17. Robust forecasts on fundamental physics from the foreground-obscured, gravitationally-lensed CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen M.; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Peiris, Hiranya V. E-mail: s.feeney@imperial.ac.uk E-mail: a.jaffe@imperial.ac.uk

    2016-03-01

    Recent results from the BICEP, Keck Array and Planck Collaborations demonstrate that Galactic foregrounds are an unavoidable obstacle in the search for evidence of inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. Beyond the foregrounds, the effect of lensing by intervening large-scale structure further obscures all but the strongest inflationary signals permitted by current data. With a plethora of ongoing and upcoming experiments aiming to measure these signatures, careful and self-consistent consideration of experiments' foreground- and lensing-removal capabilities is critical in obtaining credible forecasts of their performance. We investigate the capabilities of instruments such as Advanced ACTPol, BICEP3 and Keck Array, CLASS, EBEX10K, PIPER, Simons Array, SPT-3G and SPIDER, and projects as COrE+, LiteBIRD-ext, PIXIE and Stage IV, to clean contamination due to polarized synchrotron and dust from raw multi-frequency data, and remove lensing from the resulting co-added CMB maps (either using iterative CMB-only techniques or through cross-correlation with external data). Incorporating these effects, we present forecasts for the constraining power of these experiments in terms of inflationary physics, the neutrino sector, and dark energy parameters. Made publicly available through an online interface, this tool enables the next generation of CMB experiments to foreground-proof their designs, optimize their frequency coverage to maximize scientific output, and determine where cross-experimental collaboration would be most beneficial. We find that analyzing data from ground, balloon and space instruments in complementary combinations can significantly improve component separation performance, delensing, and cosmological constraints over individual datasets. In particular, we find that a combination of post-2020 ground- and space-based experiments could achieve constraints such as σ(r)∼1.3×10{sup −4}, σ(n{sub t})∼0

  18. Robust forecasts on fundamental physics from the foreground-obscured, gravitationally-lensed CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen M.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Jaffe, Andrew H.

    2016-03-01

    Recent results from the BICEP, Keck Array and Planck Collaborations demonstrate that Galactic foregrounds are an unavoidable obstacle in the search for evidence of inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. Beyond the foregrounds, the effect of lensing by intervening large-scale structure further obscures all but the strongest inflationary signals permitted by current data. With a plethora of ongoing and upcoming experiments aiming to measure these signatures, careful and self-consistent consideration of experiments' foreground- and lensing-removal capabilities is critical in obtaining credible forecasts of their performance. We investigate the capabilities of instruments such as Advanced ACTPol, BICEP3 and Keck Array, CLASS, EBEX10K, PIPER, Simons Array, SPT-3G and SPIDER, and projects as COrE+, LiteBIRD-ext, PIXIE and Stage IV, to clean contamination due to polarized synchrotron and dust from raw multi-frequency data, and remove lensing from the resulting co-added CMB maps (either using iterative CMB-only techniques or through cross-correlation with external data). Incorporating these effects, we present forecasts for the constraining power of these experiments in terms of inflationary physics, the neutrino sector, and dark energy parameters. Made publicly available through an online interface, this tool enables the next generation of CMB experiments to foreground-proof their designs, optimize their frequency coverage to maximize scientific output, and determine where cross-experimental collaboration would be most beneficial. We find that analyzing data from ground, balloon and space instruments in complementary combinations can significantly improve component separation performance, delensing, and cosmological constraints over individual datasets. In particular, we find that a combination of post-2020 ground- and space-based experiments could achieve constraints such as σ(r)~1.3×10-4, σ(nt)~0.03, σ( ns )~1.8×10

  19. Planck 2015 results: IX. Diffuse component separation: CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Casaponsa, B.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-20

    In this paper, we present foreground-reduced cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps derived from the full Planck data set in both temperature and polarization. Compared to the corresponding Planck 2013 temperature sky maps, the total data volume is larger by a factor of 3.2 for frequencies between 30 and 70 GHz, and by 1.9 for frequencies between 100 and 857 GHz. In addition, systematic errors in the forms of temperature-to-polarization leakage, analogue-to-digital conversion uncertainties, and very long time constant errors have been dramatically reduced, to the extent that the cosmological polarization signal may now be robustly recovered on angular scales ℓ ≳ 40. On the very largest scales, instrumental systematic residuals are still non-negligible compared to the expected cosmological signal, and modes with ℓ< 20 are accordingly suppressed in the current polarization maps by high-pass filtering. As in 2013, four different CMB component separation algorithms are applied to these observations, providing a measure of stability with respect to algorithmic and modelling choices. Additionally, the resulting polarization maps have rms instrumental noise ranging between 0.21 and 0.27μK averaged over 55' pixels, and between 4.5 and 6.1μK averaged over 3$'\\atop{.}$4 pixels. The cosmological parameters derived from the analysis of temperature power spectra are in agreement at the 1σ level with the Planck 2015 likelihood. Unresolved mismatches between the noise properties of the data and simulations prevent a satisfactory description of the higher-order statistical properties of the polarization maps. Thus, the primary applications of these polarization maps are those that do not require massive simulations for accurate estimation of uncertainties, for instance estimation of cross-spectra and cross-correlations, or stacking analyses. However, the amplitude of primordial non-Gaussianity is consistent with zero within 2σ for all local, equilateral, and orthogonal

  20. Wavelet reconstruction of E and B modes for CMB polarization and cosmic shear analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leistedt, Boris; McEwen, Jason D.; Büttner, Martin; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2017-04-01

    We present new methods for mapping the curl-free (E-mode) and divergence-free (B-mode) components of spin 2 signals using spin directional wavelets. Our methods are equally applicable to measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the shear of galaxy shapes due to weak gravitational lensing. We derive pseudo- and pure wavelet estimators, where E-B mixing arising due to incomplete sky coverage is suppressed in wavelet space using scale- and orientation-dependent masking and weighting schemes. In the case of the pure estimator, ambiguous modes (which have vanishing curl and divergence simultaneously on the incomplete sky) are also cancelled. On simulations, we demonstrate the improvement (i.e. reduction in leakage) provided by our wavelet space estimators over standard harmonic space approaches. Our new methods can be directly interfaced in a coherent and computationally efficient manner with component separation or feature extraction techniques that also exploit wavelets.

  1. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: CMB polarization at 200 < ℓ < 9000

    SciTech Connect

    Naess, Sigurd; Allison, Rupert; Calabrese, Erminia; Hasselfield, Matthew; McMahon, Jeff; Coughlin, Kevin; Datta, Rahul; Niemack, Michael D.; De Bernardis, Francesco; Addison, Graeme E.; Amiri, Mandana; Ade, Peter A. R.; Battaglia, Nick; Beall, James A.; Britton, Joe; Cho, Hsiao-mei; Bond, J Richard; Crichton, Devin; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; and others

    2014-10-01

    We report on measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and celestial polarization at 146 GHz made with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) in its first three months of observing. Four regions of sky covering a total of 270 square degrees were mapped with an angular resolution of 1.3'. The map noise levels in the four regions are between 11 and 17 μK-arcmin. We present TT, TE, EE, TB, EB, and BB power spectra from three of these regions. The observed E-mode polarization power spectrum, displaying six acoustic peaks in the range 200 < ℓ < 3000, is an excellent fit to the prediction of the best-fit cosmological models from WMAP9+ACT and Planck data. The polarization power spectrum, which mainly reflects primordial plasma velocity perturbations, provides an independent determination of cosmological parameters consistent with those based on the temperature power spectrum, which results mostly from primordial density perturbations. We find that without masking any point sources in the EE data at ℓ < 9000, the Poisson tail of the EE power spectrum due to polarized point sources has an amplitude less than 2.4 μ {sup 2} at ℓ = 3000 at 95% confidence. Finally, we report that the Crab Nebula, an important polarization calibration source at microwave frequencies, has 8.7% polarization with an angle of 150.7{sup o} ± 0.6{sup o} when smoothed with a 5' Gaussian beam.

  2. Spider: Probing the Early Universe with a Large-Scale CMB Polarization Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William

    of the polarization of the CMB to search for the signature of primordial gravitational waves that are predicted within the currently favored theories of inflation. A definitive detection of this signal would provide the first direct insight into the underlying physics of inflation as well as a measurement of its energy scale. A stringent limit on the amplitude of this signal would exclude the currently favored class of inflationary models, bolstering the case for alternative theories. Spider is a suborbital Long-Duration Balloon payload housing six cryogenic smallaperture (half-degree resolution) millimeter-wave polarimeters. The frequency bands of the individual polarimeters are chosen to optimize overall sensitivity to the inflationary CMB polarization signal in the presence of Galactic foregrounds. By making extremely deep, high fidelity measurements of the entire portion of the southern sky that is relatively free of Galactic emission, the Spider data complement those of Planck (in sensitivity and control of systematics) PIPER (in frequency coverage) and EBEX (in sky coverage and angular scale). The data from Spider's inaugural flight in 2015 has resulted in high signal-to-noise maps of the southern Galactic hemisphere covering 10% of the full sky at each of 94 and 150 GHz. The payload is now being fabricated and fitted with a suite of 285 GHz cameras to extend our frequency coverage, improving our ability to disentangle the Galactic and cosmological signals. If its signature is present in the CMB, Spider's frequency coverage and fidelity to a broad range of angular scales enable the experiment to take a step beyond detection, toward the characterization of the gravitational wave induced signature in the CMB. Additionally Spider serves as a training ground for young scientists, including 16 graduate students (9 female, 7 male).

  3. Impact of modelling foreground uncertainties on future CMB polarization satellite experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervías-Caimapo, Carlos; Bonaldi, Anna; Brown, Michael L.

    2017-07-01

    We present an analysis of errors on the tensor-to-scalar ratio due to residual diffuse foregrounds. We use simulated observations of a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization satellite, the Cosmic Origins Explorer (COrE), using the specifications of the version proposed to ESA in 2010. We construct a full pipeline from microwave sky maps to r likelihood, using two models of diffuse Galactic foregrounds with different complexity and assuming component separation with varying degrees of accuracy. Our pipeline uses a linear mixture (generalized least squares) solution for component separation, and a hybrid approach for power spectrum estimation, with a quadratic maximum likelihood estimator at low ℓs and a pseudo-Cℓ deconvolution at high ℓs. In the likelihood for r, we explore modelling foreground residuals as nuisance parameters. Our analysis aims at measuring the bias introduced in r by mismodelling the foregrounds and to determine what error is tolerable while still successfully detecting r. We find that r = 0.01 can be measured successfully even for a complex sky model and in the presence of foreground parameters error. However, the detection of r = 0.001 is a lot more challenging, as inaccurate modelling of the foreground spectral properties may result in a biased measurement of r. Once biases are eliminated, the total error on r allows setting an upper limit rather than a detection, unless the uncertainties on the foreground spectral indices are very small, i.e. equal or better than 0.5 per cent error for both dust and synchrotron. This emphasizes the need for pursuing research on component separation and foreground characterization in view of next-generation CMB polarization experiments.

  4. CMB B-mode Polarization Measurements and constraints on Primordial Gravitational Waves from the BICEP/Keck Program at South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovac, John; Bicep/Keck Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The BICEP/Keck Array cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments located at the South Pole are a series of small-aperture refracting telescopes designed to probe the degree-scale B-mode signature of primordial gravitational waves. These highly-targeted experiments have produced the world's deepest maps of CMB polarization, leading to the most stringent constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio to date: r < 0 . 09 from B-modes alone, and r < 0 . 07 in combination with other datasets. These limits are rapidly improving with ongoing measurements at the multiple frequencies needed to separate Galactic foregrounds from the CMB, and in combination with higher-resolution experiments to remove B-modes induced by gravitational lensing. I will review the current status of measurements and results, and will discuss the challenges that will be confronted as measurements reach sensitivities to primordial gravitational waves at a level r < 0 . 01 and below within the next several years.

  5. Searching for primordial non-Gaussianity in Planck CMB maps using a combined estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Novaes, C.P.; Wuensche, C.A.; Bernui, A.; Ferreira, I.S. E-mail: bernui@on.br E-mail: ca.wuensche@inpe.br

    2014-01-01

    The extensive search for deviations from Gaussianity in cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) data is very important due to the information about the very early moments of the universe encoded there. Recent analyses from Planck CMB data do not exclude the presence of non-Gaussianity of small amplitude, although they are consistent with the Gaussian hypothesis. The use of different techniques is essential to provide information about types and amplitudes of non-Gaussianities in the CMB data. In particular, we find interesting to construct an estimator based upon the combination of two powerful statistical tools that appears to be sensitive enough to detect tiny deviations from Gaussianity in CMB maps. This estimator combines the Minkowski functionals with a Neural Network, maximizing a tool widely used to study non-Gaussian signals with a reinforcement of another tool designed to identify patterns in a data set. We test our estimator by analyzing simulated CMB maps contaminated with different amounts of local primordial non-Gaussianity quantified by the dimensionless parameter f{sub  NL}. We apply it to these sets of CMB maps and find ∼> 98% of chance of positive detection, even for small intensity local non-Gaussianity like f{sub  NL} = 38±18, the current limit from Planck data for large angular scales. Additionally, we test the suitability to distinguish between primary and secondary non-Gaussianities: first we train the Neural Network with two sets, one of nearly Gaussian CMB maps (|f{sub  NL}| ≤ 10) but contaminated with realistic inhomogeneous Planck noise (i.e., secondary non-Gaussianity) and the other of non-Gaussian CMB maps, that is, maps endowed with weak primordial non-Gaussianity (28 ≤ f{sub  NL} ≤ 48); after that we test an ensemble composed of CMB maps either with one of these non-Gaussian contaminations, and find out that our method successfully classifies ∼ 95% of the tested maps as being CMB maps containing primordial or

  6. Mapping the CMB with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2007-01-01

    The data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy and new full-sky maps of the polarization. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. These and other aspects of the mission results will be discussed and commented on.

  7. A design study of a CMB polarization satellite S AMPAN and bolometric camera developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désert, F.-X.

    2007-03-01

    There is a strong theoretical case for measuring the primordial gravitational wave background that is expected in inflation-based Big Bang scenario. A promising route is via the polarization B-modes of the CMB anisotropies. We discuss a recent design study called S AMPAN for a moderate angular resolution (20 arcmin. at 217 GHz) but highly sensitive (5 μK arcmin.) polarization mapper satellite. In parallel, we describe recent efforts in France to build bolometric cameras.

  8. CMB anisotropy power spectrum using linear combinations of WMAP maps

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Rajib; Prunet, Simon; Jain, Pankaj; Souradeep, Tarun

    2008-07-15

    In recent years the goal of estimating different cosmological parameters precisely has set new challenges in the effort to accurately measure the angular power spectrum of the CMB. This has required removal of foreground contamination as well as detector noise bias with reliability and precision. Recently, a novel, model-independent method for the estimation of the CMB angular power spectrum solely from multifrequency observations has been proposed and implemented on the first year WMAP data by Saha et al. 2006. All previous estimates of the power spectrum of the CMB are based upon foreground templates using data sets from different experiments. However, our methodology demonstrates that the CMB angular spectrum can be reliably estimated with precision from a self-contained analysis of the WMAP data. In this work we provide a detailed description of this method. We also study and identify the biases present in our power spectrum estimate. We apply our methodology to extract the power spectrum from the WMAP data.

  9. Needlet estimation of cross-correlation between CMB lensing maps and LSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Federico; Renzi, Alessandro; Marinucci, Domenico

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we develop a novel needlet-based estimator to investigate the cross-correlation between cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing maps and large-scale structure (LSS) data. We compare this estimator with its harmonic counterpart and, in particular, we analyze the bias effects of different forms of masking. In order to address this bias, we also implement a MASTER-like technique in the needlet case. The resulting estimator turns out to have an extremely good signal-to-noise performance. Our analysis aims at expanding and optimizing the operating domains in CMB-LSS cross-correlation studies, similarly to CMB needlet data analysis. It is motivated especially by next generation experiments (such as Euclid) which will allow us to derive much tighter constraints on cosmological and astrophysical parameters through cross-correlation measurements between CMB and LSS.

  10. Polarized cosmic microwave background map recovery with sparse component separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobin, J.; Sureau, F.; Starck, J.-L.

    2015-11-01

    The polarization modes of the cosmological microwave background are an invaluable source of information for cosmology and a unique window to probe the energy scale of inflation. Extracting this information from microwave surveys requires distinguishing between foreground emissions and the cosmological signal, which means solving a component separation problem. Component separation techniques have been widely studied for the recovery of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies, but very rarely for the polarization modes. In this case, most component separation techniques make use of second-order statistics to distinguish between the various components. More recent methods, which instead emphasize the sparsity of the components in the wavelet domain, have been shown to provide low-foreground, full-sky estimates of the CMB temperature anisotropies. Building on sparsity, we here introduce a new component separation technique dubbed the polarized generalized morphological component analysis (PolGMCA), which refines previous work to specifically work on the estimation of the polarized CMB maps: i) it benefits from a recently introduced sparsity-based mechanism to cope with partially correlated components; ii) it builds upon estimator aggregation techniques to further yield a better noise contamination/non-Gaussian foreground residual trade-off. The PolGMCA algorithm is evaluated on simulations of full-sky polarized microwave sky simulations using the Planck Sky Model (PSM). The simulations show that the proposed method achieves a precise recovery of the CMB map in polarization with low-noise and foreground contamination residuals. It provides improvements over standard methods, especially on the Galactic center, where estimating the CMB is challenging.

  11. Cosmic string lens effects on CMB polarization patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabed, K.; Bernardeau, F.

    2000-06-01

    Extending the Kaiser-Stebbins mechanism we propose here a method for detecting relics of topological defects such as cosmic strings based on lens-induced small-scale B-type polarization in the cosmic microwave background. Models of inflation, in which large-scale structures of the Universe emerge from the inflaton fluctuations, do not exclude the formation of topological defects at the end of the inflationary phase. In such a case, we show that the lens effect of a string on the small-scale E-type polarization of the cosmic microwave background induces a significant amount of B-type polarization along the line of sight. The amplitude of the effect is estimated for different resolutions of cosmic microwave background experiments.

  12. Fast and precise map-making for massively multi-detector CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, D.; Zuntz, J. A.; Ferreira, P. G.; Brown, M. L.; Eriksen, H. K.; Johnson, B. R.; Kusaka, A.; Næss, S. K.; Wehus, I. K.

    2010-09-01

    Future cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments aim to measure an unprecedentedly small signal - the primordial gravity wave component of the polarization field B mode. To achieve this, they will analyse huge data sets, involving years of time-ordered data (TOD) from massively multi-detector focal planes. This creates the need for fast and precise methods to complement the maximum-likelihood (ML) approach in analysis pipelines. In this paper, we investigate fast map-making methods as applied to long duration, massively multi-detector, ground-based experiments, in the context of the search for B modes. We focus on two alternative map-making approaches: destriping and TOD filtering, comparing their performance on simulated multi-detector polarization data. We have written an optimized, parallel destriping code, the DEStriping CARTographer (DESCART), that is generalized for massive focal planes, including the potential effect of cross-correlated TOD 1/f noise. We also determine the scaling of computing time for destriping as applied to a simulated full-season data set for a realistic experiment. We find that destriping can outperform filtering in estimating both the large-scale E- and B-mode angular power spectra. In particular, filtering can produce significant spurious B-mode power via EB mixing. Whilst this can be removed, it contributes to the variance of B-mode bandpower estimates at scales near the primordial B-mode peak. For the experimental configuration we simulate, this has an effect on the possible detection significance for primordial B modes. Destriping is a viable alternative fast method to the full ML approach that does not cause the problems associated with filtering, and is flexible enough to fit into both ML and Monte Carlo pseudo-Cl pipelines.

  13. CMB and random flights: temperature and polarization in position space

    SciTech Connect

    Reimberg, Paulo H.F.; Abramo, L. Raul E-mail: abramo@fma.if.usp.br

    2013-06-01

    The fluctuations in the temperature and polarization of the cosmic microwave background are described by a hierarchy of Boltzmann equations. In its integral form, this Boltzmann hierarchy can be converted from the usual Fourier-space base into a position-space and causal description. We show that probability densities for random flights play a key role in this description. The integral system can be treated as a perturbative series in the number of steps of the random flights, and the properties of random flight probabilities impose constraints on the domains of dependence. We show that, as a result of these domains, a Fourier-Bessel decomposition can be employed in order to calculate the random flight probability densities. We also illustrate how the H-theorem applies to the cosmic microwave background: by using analytical formulae for the asymptotic limits of these probability densities, we show that, as the photon distribution approaches a state of equilibrium, both the temperature anisotropies and the net polarization must vanish.

  14. Mapping the CMB with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary F.

    2007-01-01

    The data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy and new full-sky maps of the polarization. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. These and other aspects of the mission results will be discussed and commented on. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30,200 1. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  15. A constraint on Planck-scale modifications to electrodynamics with CMB polarization data

    SciTech Connect

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Pagano, Luca; Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Cooray, Asantha E-mail: luca.pagano@roma1.infn.it E-mail: alessandro.melchiorri@roma1.infn.it

    2009-08-01

    We show that the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization data gathered by the BOOMERanG 2003 flight and WMAP provide an opportunity to investigate in-vacuo birefringence, of a type expected in some quantum pictures of space-time, with a sensitivity that extends even beyond the desired Planck-scale energy. In order to render this constraint more transparent we rely on a well studied phenomenological model of quantum-gravity-induced birefringence, in which one easily establishes that effects introduced at the Planck scale would amount to values of a dimensionless parameter, denoted by ξ, with respect to the Planck energy which are roughly of order 1. By combining BOOMERanG and WMAP data we estimate ξ ≅ −0.110±0.075 at the 68% c.l. Moreover, we forecast on the sensitivity to ξ achievable by future CMB polarization experiments (PLANCK, Spider, EPIC), which, in the absence of systematics, will be at the 1-σ confidence of 8.5 × 10{sup −4} (PLANCK), 6.1 × 10{sup −3} (Spider), and 1.0 × 10{sup −5} (EPIC) respectively. The cosmic variance-limited sensitivity from CMB is 6.1 × 10{sup −6}.

  16. 5,120 Superconducting Bolometers for the PIPER Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Jethava, Nikhil; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Rostem, Karwan; Sharp, Elmer H.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Voellmer, George M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We are constructing the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravity waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. The signal is faint and lies behind confusing foregrounds, both astrophysical and cosmological, and so many detectors are required to complete the measurement in a limited time. We will use four of our matured 1,280 pixel, high-filling-factor backshort-under-grid bolometer arrays for efficient operation at the PIPER CMB wavelengths. All four arrays observe at a common wavelength set by passband filters in the optical path. PIPER will fly four times to observe at wavelengths of 1500, 1100, 850, and 500 microns in order to separate CMB from foreground emission. The arrays employ leg-isolated superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers operated at 145 mK; tuned resonant backshorts for efficient optical coupling; and a second-generation superconducting quantum interference device multiplexer readout. We describe the design, development, and performance of PIPER bolometer array technology to achieve background-limited sensitivity for a cryogenic balloon-borne telescope.

  17. 5,120 Superconducting Bolometers for the PIPER Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Jethava, Nikhil S.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Mirel, Paul; Moseley, S. Harvey; Rostem, Karwan; Sharp, Elmer H.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Stiehl, gregory M.; Voellmer, George M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We are constructing the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization o[ the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravity waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. The signal is faint and lies behind confusing foregrounds, both astrophysical and cosmological, and so many detectors are required to complete the measurement in a limited time. We will use four of our matured 1,280 pixel, high-filling-factor backshort-under-grid bolometer arrays for efficient operation at the PIPER CMB wavelengths. All four arrays observe at a common wavelength set by passband filters in the optical path. PIPER will fly four times to observe at wavelengths of 1500, 1100, 850, and 500 microns in order to separate CMB from foreground emission. The arrays employ leg-isolated superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers operated at 128mK; tuned resonant backshorts for efficient optical coupling; and a second-generation superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer readout. We describe the design, development, and performance of PIPER bo|ometer array technology to achieve background-limited sensitivity for a cryogenic balloon-borne telescope.

  18. 5,120 Superconducting Bolometers for the PIPER Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Jethava, Nikhil S.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Mirel, Paul; Moseley, S. Harvey; hide

    2010-01-01

    We are constructing the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization o[ the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravity waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. The signal is faint and lies behind confusing foregrounds, both astrophysical and cosmological, and so many detectors are required to complete the measurement in a limited time. We will use four of our matured 1,280 pixel, high-filling-factor backshort-under-grid bolometer arrays for efficient operation at the PIPER CMB wavelengths. All four arrays observe at a common wavelength set by passband filters in the optical path. PIPER will fly four times to observe at wavelengths of 1500, 1100, 850, and 500 microns in order to separate CMB from foreground emission. The arrays employ leg-isolated superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers operated at 128mK; tuned resonant backshorts for efficient optical coupling; and a second-generation superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer readout. We describe the design, development, and performance of PIPER bo|ometer array technology to achieve background-limited sensitivity for a cryogenic balloon-borne telescope.

  19. 5,120 Superconducting Bolometers for the PIPER Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Jethava, Nikhil; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Rostem, Karwan; hide

    2010-01-01

    We are constructing the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravity waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. The signal is faint and lies behind confusing foregrounds, both astrophysical and cosmological, and so many detectors are required to complete the measurement in a limited time. We will use four of our matured 1,280 pixel, high-filling-factor backshort-under-grid bolometer arrays for efficient operation at the PIPER CMB wavelengths. All four arrays observe at a common wavelength set by passband filters in the optical path. PIPER will fly four times to observe at wavelengths of 1500, 1100, 850, and 500 microns in order to separate CMB from foreground emission. The arrays employ leg-isolated superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers operated at 145 mK; tuned resonant backshorts for efficient optical coupling; and a second-generation superconducting quantum interference device multiplexer readout. We describe the design, development, and performance of PIPER bolometer array technology to achieve background-limited sensitivity for a cryogenic balloon-borne telescope.

  20. Measuring the CMB Polarization at 94 GHz with the QUIET Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve, Raul

    2012-01-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) aims to limit or detect cosmic microwave background (CMB) divergence-free (B-mode) polarization from inflation. This talk is part 1 of a 3-talk series on QUIET. QUIET operated in the Chilean Atacama desert between August 2008 and December 2010. During its second season it observed with a 90-element W-band receiver at 94 GHz. QUIET's primary goal is the detection of the B-mode polarization of the CMB predicted by inflationary models. This is one of the great objectives of the current generation of cosmology experiments. In order to realize the extremely low signal levels necessary to detect B-mode polarization, QUIET has incorporated a number of novel design features that have combined to minimize systematic effects. Some of these include an all-enshrouding, absorbing ground screen, side-fed Dragonian optics, platelet arrays of corrugated feedhorns, low crosstalk septum polarizers, compact MMIC modules and a double demodulation scheme. The talk provides an overview of the science goals and a description of the instrument, scanning strategies and calibration techniques. It also presents a straightforward approach to extracting and understanding low level instrumental polarization which can ultimately hamper these types of measurements. The next talks will provide an overview of the two parallel pipelines used in the QUIET data analysis.

  1. Investigation of planar switches for large format CMB polarization instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, Paul K.; Yassin, Ghassan; Kuzmin, Leonid S.; Mauskopf, Phillip D.; Otto, Ernst; Jones, Michael E.; North, Chris E.

    2006-06-01

    Several technologies are now being considered for modulating the polarization in various B-mode instruments, including rotating quasioptical half-wave plates in front of the focal plane array, rotating waveguide half-wave plates and Faraday rotators. It is not at all clear that any of these techniques is feasible without heavy penalty in cost or performance. A potentially much more efficient method is to use a pseudo-correlation polarimeter in conjunction with a planar circuit phase switch. We investigate three different devices for use as mm-wave switches, SIS tunnel junctions, capacitively coupled superconducting nanostrips and RF MEMS. The SIS tunnel junction switches operate by switching between two different bias voltages, while the nanostrip switch operates by changing the impedance of a resonant circuit by driving the nanostrip from the superconducting to normal state. In each case the RF signal sees two substantially different complex impedance states, hence could be switched from one transmission line branch to another. In MEMS this is achieved by mechanical movement of one plate of a parallel plate capacitor system. Although RF MEMS have been reported at high microwave and low mm-wave frequencies, in this work we have investigated cryogenic MEMS for operation at high mm-wave frequencies (225 GHz) using superconducting transmission lines. We present and compare designs and simulations of the performance of phase switches based on all three switching technologies, as well as preliminary experimental results for each of the switches. Finally we also present designs of phase shift circuits that translates the on/off switching into phase modulation.

  2. Detecting anomalies in CMB maps: a new method

    SciTech Connect

    Neelakanta, Jayanth T.

    2015-10-01

    Ever since WMAP announced its first results, different analyses have shown that there is weak evidence for several large-scale anomalies in the CMB data. While the evidence for each anomaly appears to be weak, the fact that there are multiple seemingly unrelated anomalies makes it difficult to account for them via a single statistical fluke. So, one is led to considering a combination of these anomalies. But, if we ''hand-pick'' the anomalies (test statistics) to consider, we are making an a posteriori choice. In this article, we propose two statistics that do not suffer from this problem. The statistics are linear and quadratic combinations of the a{sub ℓ m}'s with random co-efficients, and they test the null hypothesis that the a{sub ℓ m}'s are independent, normally-distributed, zero-mean random variables with an m-independent variance. The motivation for considering multiple modes is this: because most physical models that lead to large-scale anomalies result in coupling multiple ℓ and m modes, the ''coherence'' of this coupling should get enhanced if a combination of different modes is considered. In this sense, the statistics are thus much more generic than those that have been hitherto considered in literature. Using fiducial data, we demonstrate that the method works and discuss how it can be used with actual CMB data to make quite general statements about the incompatibility of the data with the null hypothesis.

  3. Detecting anomalies in CMB maps: a new method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelakanta, Jayanth T.

    2015-10-01

    Ever since WMAP announced its first results, different analyses have shown that there is weak evidence for several large-scale anomalies in the CMB data. While the evidence for each anomaly appears to be weak, the fact that there are multiple seemingly unrelated anomalies makes it difficult to account for them via a single statistical fluke. So, one is led to considering a combination of these anomalies. But, if we ``hand-pick'' the anomalies (test statistics) to consider, we are making an a posteriori choice. In this article, we propose two statistics that do not suffer from this problem. The statistics are linear and quadratic combinations of the al m's with random co-efficients, and they test the null hypothesis that the al m's are independent, normally-distributed, zero-mean random variables with an m-independent variance. The motivation for considering multiple modes is this: because most physical models that lead to large-scale anomalies result in coupling multiple l and m modes, the ``coherence'' of this coupling should get enhanced if a combination of different modes is considered. In this sense, the statistics are thus much more generic than those that have been hitherto considered in literature. Using fiducial data, we demonstrate that the method works and discuss how it can be used with actual CMB data to make quite general statements about the incompatibility of the data with the null hypothesis.

  4. Excess B-modes extracted from the Planck polarization maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.

    2016-07-01

    One of the main obstacles for extracting the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from mm/submm observations is the pollution from the main Galactic components: synchrotron, free-free and thermal dust emission. The feasibility of using simple neural networks to extract CMB has been demonstrated on both temperature and polarization data obtained by the WMAP satellite. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of neural networks for extracting the CMB signal from the Planck polarization data with high precision. Both auto-correlation and cross-correlation power spectra within a mask covering about 63 % of the sky have been used together with a ``high pass filter'' in order to minimize the influence of the remaining systematic errors in the Planck Q and U maps. Using the Planck 2015 released polarization maps, a BB power spectrum have been extracted by Multilayer Perceptron neural networks. This spectrum contains a bright feature with signal to noise ratios ≃ 4.5 within 200 ≤ l ≤ 250. The spectrum is significantly brighter than the BICEP2 2015 spectrum, with a spectral behaviour quite different from the ``canonical'' models (weak lensing plus B-modes spectra with different tensor to scalar ratios). The feasibility of the neural network to remove the residual systematics from the available Planck polarization data to a high level has been demonstrated.

  5. A special kind of local structure in the CMB intensity maps: duel peak structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Li, Ti-Pei

    2009-03-01

    We study the local structure of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature maps released by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) team, and find a new kind of structure, which can be described as follows: a peak (or valley) of average temperature is often followed by a peak of temperature fluctuation that is 4° away. This structure is important for the following reasons: both the well known cold spot detected by Cruz et al. and the hot spot detected by Vielva et al. with the same technology (the third spot in their article) have such structure; more spots that are similar to them can be found on CMB maps and they also tend to be significant cold/hot spots; if we change the 4° characteristic into an artificial one, such as 3° or 5°, there will be less 'similar spots', and the temperature peaks or valleys will be less significant. The presented 'similar spots' have passed a strict consistency test which requires them to be significant on at least three different CMB temperature maps. We hope that this article could arouse some interest in the relationship of average temperature with temperature fluctuation in local areas; meanwhile, we are also trying to find an explanation for it which might be important to CMB observation and theory.

  6. QuickPol: Fast calculation of effective beam matrices for CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hivon, Eric; Mottet, Sylvain; Ponthieu, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Current and planned observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization anisotropies, with their ever increasing number of detectors, have reached a potential accuracy that requires a very demanding control of systematic effects. While some of these systematics can be reduced in the design of the instruments, others will have to be modeled and hopefully accounted for or corrected a posteriori. We propose QuickPol, a quick and accurate calculation of the full effective beam transfer function and of temperature to polarization leakage at the power spectra level, as induced by beam imperfections and mismatches between detector optical and electronic responses. All the observation details such as exact scanning strategy, imperfect polarization measurements, and flagged samples are accounted for. Our results are validated on Planck high frequency instrument (HFI) simulations. We show how the pipeline can be used to propagate instrumental uncertainties up to the final science products, and could be applied to experiments with rotating half-wave plates.

  7. Impact of the Q/U Imaging Experiment on CMB Polarization Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve, Raul

    2010-05-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is a cosmic microwave background polarization experiment operating from the Chajnantor Testbed Facility on Chile's Atacama plateau. QUIET's science goals are to make precise measurements of the CMB E-mode power spectrum and to detect or place limits on the CMB B-mode polarization. QUIET's primary technical goal is to demonstrate new, fully integrated and miniaturized pseudo-correlation polarimeter modules that use InP-based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifiers. It reuses the Cosmic Background Imager's 3-axis mount in combination with a 1.4 meter side fed Dragonian telescope to generate 27' and 12.7' FWHM beams at Q-band (43 GHz) and W-band (93 GHz), respectively. QUIET's 19 element Q-band polarimeter and 91 element W-band polarimeter represent the largest HEMT-based focal plane arrays ever deployed. The Q-band system operated from October 2008 until May 2009 and the W-band system has been operating since June 2009 and continues to operate. We'll describe the QUIET system and provide a brief summary of its current results.

  8. Constraints on the neutrino parameters by future cosmological 21 cm line and precise CMB polarization observations

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Yoshihiko; Kohri, Kazunori; Hazumi, Masashi E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp

    2016-02-01

    Observations of the 21 cm line radiation coming from the epoch of reionization have a great capacity to study the cosmological growth of the Universe. Besides, CMB polarization produced by gravitational lensing has a large amount of information about the growth of matter fluctuations at late time. In this paper, we investigate their sensitivities to the impact of neutrino property on the growth of density fluctuations, such as the total neutrino mass, the effective number of neutrino species (extra radiation), and the neutrino mass hierarchy. We show that by combining a precise CMB polarization observation such as Simons Array with a 21 cm line observation such as Square kilometer Array (SKA) phase 1 and a baryon acoustic oscillation observation (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument:DESI) we can measure effects of non-zero neutrino mass on the growth of density fluctuation if the total neutrino mass is larger than 0.1 eV. Additionally, the combinations can strongly improve errors of the bounds on the effective number of neutrino species σ (N{sub ν}) ∼ 0.06−0.09 at 95 % C.L.. Finally, by using SKA phase 2, we can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at 95 % C.L. if the total neutrino mass is similar to or smaller than 0.1 eV.

  9. Comparing and combining the Saskatoon, QMAP, and COBE CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yongzhong; Tegmark, Max; de Oliveira-Costa, Angelica; Devlin, Mark J.; Herbig, Thomas; Miller, Amber D.; Netterfield, C. Barth; Page, Lyman

    2001-05-15

    We present a method for comparing and combining maps with different resolutions and beam shapes, and apply it to the Saskatoon, QMAP, and COBE-DMR data sets. Although the Saskatoon and QMAP maps detect signals at the 21{sigma} and 40{sigma} levels, respectively, their difference is consistent with pure noise, placing strong limits on possible systematic errors. In particular, we obtain quantitative upper limits on relative calibration and pointing errors. Splitting the combined data by frequency shows similar consistency between the Ka and Q bands, placing limits on foreground contamination. The visual agreement between the maps is equally striking. Our combined QMAP+Saskatoon map, nicknamed QMASK, is publicly available on the web together with its 6495x6495 noise covariance matrix. This thoroughly tested data set covers a large enough area (648 square degrees -- currently the largest degree-scale map available) to allow a statistical comparison with COBE-DMR, showing good agreement.

  10. CMB map derived from the WMAP data through harmonic internal linear combination

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaiseung; Naselsky, Pavel; Christensen, Per Rex

    2008-05-15

    We are presenting an internal linear combination CMB map, in which the foreground is reduced through harmonic variance minimization. We have derived our method by converting a general form of pixel-space approach into spherical harmonic space, maintaining full correspondence. By working in spherical harmonic space, spatial variability of linear weights is incorporated in a self-contained manner and our linear weights are continuous functions of position over the entire sky. The full correspondence to pixel-space approach enables straightforward physical interpretation on our approach. In variance minimization of a linear combination map, the existence of a cross term between residual foregrounds and CMB makes the linear combination of minimum variance differ from that of minimum foreground. We have developed an iterative foreground reduction method, where perturbative correction is made for the cross term. Our CMB map derived from the WMAP data is in better agreement with the WMAP best-fit {lambda}CDM model than the WMAP team's internal linear combination map. We find that our method's capacity to clean foreground is limited by the availability of enough spherical harmonic coefficients of good signal-to-noise ratio.

  11. CMB map derived from the WMAP data through harmonic internal linear combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaiseung; Naselsky, Pavel; Christensen, Per Rex

    2008-05-01

    We are presenting an internal linear combination CMB map, in which the foreground is reduced through harmonic variance minimization. We have derived our method by converting a general form of pixel-space approach into spherical harmonic space, maintaining full correspondence. By working in spherical harmonic space, spatial variability of linear weights is incorporated in a self-contained manner and our linear weights are continuous functions of position over the entire sky. The full correspondence to pixel-space approach enables straightforward physical interpretation on our approach. In variance minimization of a linear combination map, the existence of a cross term between residual foregrounds and CMB makes the linear combination of minimum variance differ from that of minimum foreground. We have developed an iterative foreground reduction method, where perturbative correction is made for the cross term. Our CMB map derived from the WMAP data is in better agreement with the WMAP best-fit ΛCDM model than the WMAP team’s internal linear combination map. We find that our method’s capacity to clean foreground is limited by the availability of enough spherical harmonic coefficients of good signal-to-noise ratio.

  12. Emission-angle and polarization-rotation effects in the lensed CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Antony; Hall, Alex; Challinor, Anthony

    2017-08-01

    Lensing of the CMB is an important effect, and is usually modelled by remapping the unlensed CMB fields by a lensing deflection. However the lensing deflections also change the photon path so that the emission angle is no longer orthogonal to the background last-scattering surface. We give the first calculation of the emission-angle corrections to the standard lensing approximation from dipole (Doppler) sources for temperature and quadrupole sources for temperature and polarization. We show that while the corrections are negligible for the temperature and E-mode polarization, additional large-scale B-modes are produced with a white spectrum that dominates those from post-Born field rotation (curl lensing). On large scales about one percent of the total lensing-induced B-mode amplitude is expected to be due to this effect. However, the photon emission angle does remain orthogonal to the perturbed last-scattering surface due to time delay, and half of the large-scale emission-angle B modes cancel with B modes from time delay to give a total contribution of about half a percent. While not important for planned observations, the signal could ultimately limit the ability of delensing to reveal low amplitudes of primordial gravitational waves. We also derive the rotation of polarization due to multiple deflections between emission and observation. The rotation angle is of quadratic order in the deflection angle, and hence negligibly small: polarization typically rotates by less than an arcsecond, orders of magnitude less than a small-scale image rotates due to post-Born field rotation (which is quadratic in the shear). The field-rotation B modes dominate the other effects on small scales.

  13. Model-independent analyses of non-Gaussianity in Planck CMB maps using Minkowski functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchert, Thomas; France, Martin J.; Steiner, Frank

    2017-05-01

    Despite the wealth of Planck results, there are difficulties in disentangling the primordial non-Gaussianity of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from the secondary and the foreground non-Gaussianity (NG). For each of these forms of NG the lack of complete data introduces model-dependences. Aiming at detecting the NGs of the CMB temperature anisotropy δ T , while paying particular attention to a model-independent quantification of NGs, our analysis is based upon statistical and morphological univariate descriptors, respectively: the probability density function P(δ T) , related to v0, the first Minkowski Functional (MF), and the two other MFs, v1 and v2. From their analytical Gaussian predictions we build the discrepancy functions {{ Δ }k} (k  =  P, 0, 1, 2) which are applied to an ensemble of 105 CMB realization maps of the Λ CDM model and to the Planck CMB maps. In our analysis we use general Hermite expansions of the {{ Δ }k} up to the 12th order, where the coefficients are explicitly given in terms of cumulants. Assuming hierarchical ordering of the cumulants, we obtain the perturbative expansions generalizing the second order expansions of Matsubara to arbitrary order in the standard deviation {σ0} for P(δ T) and v0, where the perturbative expansion coefficients are explicitly given in terms of complete Bell polynomials. The comparison of the Hermite expansions and the perturbative expansions is performed for the Λ CDM map sample and the Planck data. We confirm the weak level of non-Gaussianity (1-2)σ of the foreground corrected masked Planck 2015 maps.

  14. Large scale alignment anomalies of CMB anisotropies: a new test for residuals applied to WMAP 5yr maps

    SciTech Connect

    Gruppuso, Alessandro; Burigana, Carlo E-mail: burigana@iasfbo.inaf.it

    2009-08-01

    We analyze the alignment of the low multipoles (quadrupole and octupole) of various maps of the WMAP 5yr release: the CMB maps obtained with ILC and MCMC methods, the CMB map in the V band after foreground reduction, and, for comparison, the (not cleaned) V band map. We study how much this alignment is polluted by residuals on the Galactic region. Among the considered maps, the WMAP-ILC turns out to be the most clean map from the point of view of the proposed test. This result has been found studying the redistribution (due to the masking process) of each bin of the probability distribution functions of the alignment estimators. By construction, our method, feasible through Monte Carlo simulations, works for any possible mask adopted in the analysis of data from current and forthcoming CMB anisotropy experiments and it can only exclude that the considered map is clean.

  15. Making cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization maps with MADAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Poutanen, T.; Sirviö, A.-S.

    2010-02-01

    MADAM is a CMB map-making code, designed to make temperature and polarization maps of time-ordered data of total power experiments like Planck. The algorithm is based on the destriping technique, but it also makes use of known noise properties in the form of a noise prior. The method in its early form was presented in an earlier work by Keihänen et al. (2005, MNRAS, 360, 390). In this paper we present an update of the method, extended to non-averaged data, and include polarization. In this method the baseline length is a freely adjustable parameter, and destriping can be performed at a different map resolution than that of the final maps. We show results obtained with simulated data. This study is related to Planck LFI activities.

  16. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Lensing of CMB Temperature and Polarization Derived from Cosmic Infrared Background Cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, Alexander; Sherwin, Blake D.; Sehgal, Neelima; Addison, Graeme E.; Allison, Rupert; Battaglia, Nick; de Bernardis, Francesco; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Coughlin, Kevin; Crichton, Devin; Datta, Rahul; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dünner, Rolando; Gallardo, Patricio; Grace, Emily; Gralla, Megan; Hajian, Amir; Hasselfield, Matthew; Henderson, Shawn; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renée; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Hughes, John P.; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Maurin, Loïc; McMahon, Jeff; Moodley, Kavilan; Munson, Charles; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nolta, Michael R.; Page, Lyman A.; Pappas, Christine; Partridge, Bruce; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Simon, Sara; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Switzer, Eric R.; Ward, Jonathan T.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2015-07-01

    We present a measurement of the gravitational lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature and polarization fields obtained by cross-correlating the reconstructed convergence signal from the first season of Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter data at 146 GHz with Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) fluctuations measured using the Planck satellite. Using an effective overlap area of 92.7 square degrees, we detect gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization by large-scale structure at a statistical significance of 4.5σ . Combining both CMB temperature and polarization data gives a lensing detection at 9.1σ significance. A B-mode polarization lensing signal is present with a significance of 3.2σ . We also present the first measurement of CMB lensing-CIB correlation at small scales corresponding to l\\gt 2000. Null tests and systematic checks show that our results are not significantly biased by astrophysical or instrumental systematic effects, including Galactic dust. Fitting our measurements to the best-fit lensing-CIB cross-power spectrum measured in Planck data, scaled by an amplitude A, gives A={1.02}-0.08+0.12(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.), consistent with the Planck results.

  17. GroundBIRD: observations of CMB polarization with fast scan modulation and MKIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, Shugo; Choi, Jihoon; Damayanthi, Thushara; Hattori, Makoto; Hazumi, Masashi; Ishitsuka, Hikaru; Kiuchi, Kenji; Koyano, Ryo; Kutsuma, Hiroki; Lee, Kyungmin; Mima, Satoru; Minowa, Makoto; Nagai, Makoto; Nagasaki, Taketo; Otani, Chiko; Sekimoto, Yutaro; Semoto, Munehisa; Suzuki, Jun'ya; Taino, Tohru; Tajima, Osamu; Tomita, Nozomu; Won, Eunil; Uchida, Tomohisa; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Polarized patterns in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation contains rich knowledge for early stage of the universe. In particular their odd-parity patterns at large angular scale (> 1°), primordial B-modes, are smoking-gun evidence for the cosmic inflation. The GroundBIRD experiment aims to detect these B-modes with a ground-based apparatus that includes several novel devices: a high-speed rotational scan system, cold optics, and microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). We plan to start observations in the Canary Islands in 2017. In this paper, we present the status of the development of our instruments. We established an environment that allows operation of our MKIDs in an optical configuration, in which the MKIDs observe radiations from the outside of the telescope aperture. We have also constructed MKID prototypes, and we are testing them in the optical configuration.

  18. Multichroic Antenna-Coupled Bolometers for CMB Polarization and Sub-mm Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Adrian

    We propose to develop planar antenna-coupled superconducting bolometer arrays for observations at sub-millimeter to millimeter wavelengths. Our pixel architecture features a dual-polarization log-periodic antenna with a 4:1-bandwidth ratio, followed by a filter bank that divides the total bandwidth into several broad photometric bands. The advantages of this approach, compared with those using conventional single-color pixels, include a combination of greatly reduced focal-plane mass, higher array sensitivity, and a larger number of spectral bands. These advantages have the potential to greatly reduce the cost and/or increase the performance of NASA missions in the sub-millimeter to millimeter bands. For CMB polarization measurements, a wide frequency range of roughly 30 to 300 GHz is required to subtract galactic foregrounds. The multichroic architecture we propose enables a relatively low-cost 30-cm aperture space mission to have sufficient sensitivity to probe below the tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0.01. For a larger aperture mission, such as the EPIC-IM concept, the proposed technology could reduce the focal-plane mass by a factor of 2-3, with great savings in required cryocooler performance and therefore cost. We have demonstrated the lens-coupled antenna concept in the POLARBEAR ground-based CMB polarization experiment now operating in Chile. That experiment uses a single-band planar antenna and produces excellent beam properties and optical efficiency. In the laboratory, we have measured two octaves of total bandwidth in the log-periodic sinuous antenna. We have built filter banks of 2, 3, and 7 bands with 4, 6, and 14 bolometers per pixel for two linear polarizations. Building on these accomplishments, the deliverables for the proposed work include: *Two pixel types that together cover the range from 30 to 300 GHz. The low-frequency pixel will have bands centered at 35, 50, and 80 GHz and the high frequency pixel will have bands centered at 120, 180, and 270

  19. Polarization of extragalactic radio sources: CMB foregrounds and telescope calibration issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massardi, Marcella; Galluzzi, Vincenzo; Paladino, Rosita; Burigana, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    Radio source observations play important roles in polarimetric cosmological studies. On the one hand, they constitute the main foregrounds for cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on scales smaller than 30 arcmin up to 100 GHz, on the other they can be used as targets for validation of products of polarimetric experiments dedicated to cosmology. Furthermore, extragalactic high-redshift sources have been used for cosmic polarization rotation (CPR) investigation. In this paper, we will discuss the support to cosmological studies from ground-based polarimetric observations in the radio and millimetric wavelength bands. Most of the limits to accuracy improvements arise from systematic effects and low calibration quality. We will discuss some details of interferometric calibration procedures and show some of the perspectives that the Atacama large millimeter array (ALMA) could offer for CPR studies.

  20. Non-Gaussian extrema counts for CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Pogosyan, Dmitri; Pichon, Christophe; Gay, Christophe

    2011-10-15

    In the context of the geometrical analysis of weakly non-Gaussian cosmic microwave background maps, the 2D differential extrema counts as functions of the excursion set threshold is derived from the full moments expansion of the joint probability distribution of an isotropic random field, its gradient, and invariants of the Hessian. Analytic expressions for these counts are given to second order in the non-Gaussian correction, while a Monte Carlo method to compute them to arbitrary order is presented. Matching count statistics to these estimators is illustrated on fiducial non-Gaussian Planck data.

  1. Measurements of the CMB Polarization with POLARBEAR and the Optical Performance of the Simons Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayuki Matsuda, Frederick; POLARBEAR Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    POLARBEAR is a ground-based polarization sensitive Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiment installed on the 2.5 m aperture Gregorian-Dragone type Huan Tran Telescope located in the Atacama desert in Chile. POLARBEAR is designed to conduct broad surveys at 150 GHz to measure the CMB B-mode polarization signal from inflationary gravitational waves at large angular scales and from gravitational lensing at small angular scales. POLARBEAR started observations in 2012. First season results on gravitational lensing B-mode measurements were published in 2014, and the data analysis of further seasons is in progress. In order to further increase measurement sensitivity, in 2018 the experiment will be upgraded to the Simons Array comprising of three telescopes, each with improved receiver optics using alumina lenses. In order to further expand the observational range, the second and third receiver optics designs were further modified for improved optical performance across the frequencies of 95, 150, 220, and 280 GHz. The diffraction limited field of view was increased especially for the higher frequencies to span a full 4.5 degrees diameter field of view of the telescope. The Simons Array will have a total of 22,764 detectors within this field of view. The Simons Array is projected to put strong constraints on both the measurements of the tensor-to-scalar ratio for inflationary cosmology and the sum of the neutrino masses. I will report on the status of current observations and analysis of the first two observation seasons of POLARBEAR as well as the optics design development of the Simons Array receivers.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CMB intensity map from WMAP and Planck PR2 data (Bobin+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobin, J.; Sureau, F.; Starck, J.-L.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a novel estimation of the CMB map reconstructed from the Planck 2015 data (PR2) and the WMAP nine-year data (Bennett et al., 2013ApJS..208...20B), which updates the CMB map we published in (Bobin et al., 2014A&A...563A.105B). This new map is based on the sparse component separation method L-GMCA (Bobin et al., 2013A&A...550A..73B). Additionally, the map benefits from the latest advances in this field (Bobin et al., 2015, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, 63, 1199), which allows us to accurately discriminate between correlated components. In this update to our previous work, we show that this new map presents significant improvements with respect to the available CMB map estimates. (3 data files).

  3. MAXIMA: Observations of CMB anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabii, Bahman

    This document describes the Millimeter Anisotropy eXperiment IMaging Array (MAXIMA), a balloon-borne experiment measuring the temperature anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) on angular scales of 10 ' to 5°. MAXIMA data are used to discriminate between cosmological models and to determine cosmological parameters. MAXIMA maps the CMB using 16 bolometric detectors observing in spectral bands centered at 150 GHz, 230 GHz, and 410 GHz, with 10 ' resolution at all frequencies. The combined receiver sensitivity to CMB anisotropy is ˜40 μK sec , the best reported by any CMB experiment. Systematic errors are rejected by using four uncorrelated spatial modulations, multiple independent CMB observations, heavily baffled optics, and strong spectral discrimination. Observation patterns are well cross-linked and optimized for the extraction of cosmological information. Pointing is reconstructed to an accuracy of 1'. Absolute calibration uncertainty of 3 4% is the best achieved by any sub-orbital CMB experiment. Two MAXIMA flights were launched from the National Scientific Balloon Facility in Palestine Texas in 1998 and 1999. During a total of 8.5 hours of CMB observations, 300 deg2 of the sky were mapped, with ˜50 deg2 overlap between the two flights. The observed region was selected for low foreground emission and post-flight data analysis confirms that foreground contamination is negligible. Cosmological results are presented from the 1998 flight, MAXIMA-I , in which 122 deg2 of sky were mapped over 3 hours. A maximum likelihood map with 3' pixelization is obtained from the three most sensitive and best tested detectors. The angular power spectrum derived from this map shows a narrow peak near ℓ = 200, and is consistent with inflationary Big Bang models. Within these models, cosmological parameters are estimated, including total density Ωtot = 0.9+0.18-0.16 , baryon density Ωbh2 = 0.033 ± 0.013, and power spectrum normalization C

  4. CMB signatures of metal-free star formation and Planck 2015 polarization data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Vinicius; Lidz, Adam; Heinrich, Chen He; Hu, Wayne

    2017-06-01

    Standard analyses of the reionization history of the Universe from Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization measurements consider only the overall optical depth to electron scattering (τ), and further assume a step-like reionization history. However, the polarization data contain information beyond the overall optical depth, and the assumption of a step-like function may miss high redshift contributions to the optical depth and leads to biased τ constraints. Accounting for its full reionization information content, we reconsider the interpretation of Planck 2015 Low-Frequency Instrument (LFI) polarization data using simple, yet physically motivated reionization models. We show that these measurements still, in fact, allow a non-negligible contribution from metal-free (Pop-III) stars forming in mini-haloes of mass M ˜ 105-106 M⊙ at z ≳ 15, provided this mode of star formation is fairly inefficient. We find that an early, self-regulated phase of Pop-III star formation with a gradual, plateau feature in the ionization history provides a good match to the Planck LFI measurements. In this case, as much as 20 per cent of the volume of the Universe is ionized by z ˜ 20. Although preferred when the full information content of the data is incorporated, this model would spuriously be disfavoured in the standard analysis. This preference is driven mostly by excess power from E-mode polarization at multipoles of 10 ≲ ℓ ≲ 20, which may reflect remaining systematic errors in the data, a statistical fluctuation or signatures of the first stars. Measurements from the Planck High-Frequency Instrument should be able to confirm or refute this hint and future cosmic-variance-limited E-mode polarization surveys can provide substantially more information on these signatures.

  5. CMB lensing power spectrum biases from galaxies and clusters using high-angular resolution temperature maps

    SciTech Connect

    Van Engelen, A.; Sehgal, N.; Bhattacharya, S.; Holder, G. P.; Zahn, O.; Nagai, D.

    2014-05-01

    The lensing power spectrum from cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps will be measured with unprecedented precision with upcoming experiments, including upgrades to the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and the South Pole Telescope. Achieving significant improvements in cosmological parameter constraints, such as percent level errors on σ{sub 8} and an uncertainty on the total neutrino mass of ∼50 meV, requires percent level measurements of the CMB lensing power. This necessitates tight control of systematic biases. We study several types of biases to the temperature-based lensing reconstruction signal from foreground sources such as radio and infrared galaxies and the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect from galaxy clusters. These foregrounds bias the CMB lensing signal due to their non-Gaussian nature. Using simulations as well as some analytical models we find that these sources can substantially impact the measured signal if left untreated. However, these biases can be brought to the percent level if one masks galaxies with fluxes at 150 GHz above 1 mJy and galaxy clusters with masses above M {sub vir} = 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉}. To achieve such percent level bias, we find that only modes up to a maximum multipole of l {sub max} ∼ 2500 should be included in the lensing reconstruction. We also discuss ways to minimize additional bias induced by such aggressive foreground masking by, for example, exploring a two-step masking and in-painting algorithm.

  6. CMB Lensing Power Spectrum Biases from Galaxies and Clusters Using High-angular Resolution Temperature Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Sehgal, N.; Holder, G. P.; Zahn, O.; Nagai, D.

    2014-05-01

    The lensing power spectrum from cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps will be measured with unprecedented precision with upcoming experiments, including upgrades to the Atacama Cosmology Telescope and the South Pole Telescope. Achieving significant improvements in cosmological parameter constraints, such as percent level errors on σ8 and an uncertainty on the total neutrino mass of ~50 meV, requires percent level measurements of the CMB lensing power. This necessitates tight control of systematic biases. We study several types of biases to the temperature-based lensing reconstruction signal from foreground sources such as radio and infrared galaxies and the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect from galaxy clusters. These foregrounds bias the CMB lensing signal due to their non-Gaussian nature. Using simulations as well as some analytical models we find that these sources can substantially impact the measured signal if left untreated. However, these biases can be brought to the percent level if one masks galaxies with fluxes at 150 GHz above 1 mJy and galaxy clusters with masses above M vir = 1014 M ⊙. To achieve such percent level bias, we find that only modes up to a maximum multipole of l max ~ 2500 should be included in the lensing reconstruction. We also discuss ways to minimize additional bias induced by such aggressive foreground masking by, for example, exploring a two-step masking and in-painting algorithm.

  7. Testing statistics of the CMB B -mode polarization toward unambiguously establishing quantum fluctuation of the vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Hikage, Chiaki; Namba, Ryo; Namikawa, Toshiya; Hazumi, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The B -mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies at large angular scales provides compelling evidence for the primordial gravitational waves (GWs). It is often stated that a discovery of the GWs establishes the quantum fluctuation of vacuum during the cosmic inflation. Since the GWs could also be generated by source fields, however, we need to check if a sizable signal exists due to such source fields before reaching a firm conclusion when the B mode is discovered. Source fields of particular types can generate non-Gaussianity (NG) in the GWs. Testing statistics of the B mode is a powerful way of detecting such NG. As a concrete example, we show a model in which gauge field sources chiral GWs via a pseudoscalar coupling and forecast the detection significance at the future CMB satellite LiteBIRD. Effects of residual foregrounds and lensing B mode are both taken into account. We find the B -mode bispectrum "BBB" is in particular sensitive to the source-field NG, which is detectable at LiteBIRD with a >3 σ significance. Therefore the search for the BBB will be indispensable toward unambiguously establishing quantum fluctuation of vacuum when the B mode is discovered. We also introduced the Minkowski functional to detect the NGs. While we find that the Minkowski functional is less efficient than the harmonic-space bispectrum estimator, it still serves as a useful cross-check. Finally, we also discuss the possibility of extracting clean information on parity violation of GWs and new types of parity-violating observables induced by lensing.

  8. Design of corrugated-horn-coupled MKID focal plane for CMB B-mode polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Yutaro; Sekiguchi, Shigeyuki; Shu, Shibo; Sekine, Masakazu; Nitta, Tom; Naruse, Masato; Dominjon, Agnes; Hasebe, Takashi; Shan, Wenlei; Noguchi, Takashi; Miyachi, Akihira; Mita, Makoto; Kawasaki, Shigeo

    2016-07-01

    A focal plane based on MKID has been designed for cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization experiments. We are designing and developing a focal plane with broadband corrugated horn array, planar OMT, 180 degree hybrid, bandpass filters, and MKIDs. The focal plane consists of 3 octave bands (55 - 108 GHz, 80 - 160 GHz, 160 - 320 GHz), 10 hexagonal modules. Broadband corrugated horn-array has been directly machined from an Al block and measured to have a good beam shape which is consistent with electromagnetic field simulations in octave bands. The horn array is designed to be low standing-wave, light weight, and electromagnetic shield. The broadband 4 probes ortho-mode transducer (OMT) is fabricated on Si membrane of an SOI wafer. A broadband 180 degree hybrid made with coplanar waveguide (CPW) is used to reduce higher modes of the circular waveguide. Two bandpass filters of each polarization are patterned with Nb microstrip. A prototype of the broadband corrugated horn coupled MKIDs has been fabricated and tested.

  9. A large angular scale CMB polarization experiment for Dome-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccirillo, L.

    The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) can be completely characterized by specifying its frequency spectrum as well as its spatial anisotropy and polarization spectra. After robust detections obtained by many experiments - COBE and WMAP satellite in particular - we are now looking towards a detection of the B-modes in the CMB polarization. This is a huge experimental challenge as the signal is incredibly weak (from zero to 1 part in 10 million). A detection of these elusive B-modes, however, will represent an indirect detection of the long-wavelength primordial gravitational wave background. In this paper we present a possible instrument capable, in principle, of detecting the B-modes. Researchers intending to collaborate to the experiment: F. Pajot, J.M. Lamarre, J. Delabrouille, Y. Giraud-Heraud, J. L. Puget, J. Bartlett, P. de Bernardis, S. Masi, G. Sironi, M. Gervasi, A. Lasenby, R. Saunders, S. Withington, G. Yassin, M. Jones, A. Challinor, M. P. Hobson, A. Taylor, P. Mauskopf, P. Ade, W. Gear, M. Griffin, S. Melhuish, C. Calderon, A. Orlando, G. Pisano, B. Maffei

  10. Lensing reconstruction from a patchwork of polarization maps

    SciTech Connect

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Nagata, Ryo E-mail: rnagata@post.kek.jp

    2014-09-01

    The lensing signals involved in CMB polarization maps have already been measured with ground-based experiments such as SPTpol and POLARBEAR, and would become important as a probe of cosmological and astrophysical issues in the near future. Sizes of polarization maps from ground-based experiments are, however, limited by contamination of long wavelength modes of observational noise. To further extract the lensing signals, we explore feasibility of measuring lensing signals from a collection of small sky maps each of which is observed separately by a ground-based large telescope, i.e., lensing reconstruction from a patchwork map of large sky coverage organized from small sky patches. We show that, although the B-mode power spectrum obtained from the patchwork map is biased due to baseline uncertainty, bias on the lensing potential would be negligible if the B-mode on scales larger than the blowup scale of 1/f noise is removed in the lensing reconstruction. As examples of cosmological applications, we also show 1) the cross-correlations between the reconstructed lensing potential and full-sky temperature/polarization maps from satellite missions such as PLANCK and LiteBIRD, and 2) the use of the reconstructed potential for delensing B-mode polarization of LiteBIRD observation.

  11. Statistical isotropy violation in WMAP CMB maps resulting from non-circular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Santanu; Mitra, Sanjit; Rotti, Aditya; Pant, Nidhi; Souradeep, Tarun

    2016-06-01

    Statistical isotropy (SI) of cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations is a key observational test to validate the cosmological principle underlying the standard model of cosmology. While a detection of SI violation would have immense cosmological ramification, it is important to recognise their possible origin in systematic effects of observations. The WMAP seven year (WMAP-7) release claimed significant deviation from SI in the bipolar spherical harmonic (BipoSH) coefficients and . Here we present the first explicit reproduction of the measurements reported in WMAP-7, confirming that beam systematics alone can completely account for the measured SI violation. The possibility of such a systematic origin was alluded to in WMAP-7 paper itself and other authors but not as explicitly so as to account for it accurately. We simulate CMB maps using the actual WMAP non-circular beams and scanning strategy. Our estimated BipoSH spectra from these maps match the WMAP-7 results very well. It is also evident that only a very careful and adequately detailed modelling, as carried out here, can conclusively establish that the entire signal arises from non-circular beam effect. This is important since cosmic SI violation signals are expected to be subtle and dismissing a large SI violation signal as observational artefact based on simplistic plausibility arguments run the serious risk of "throwing the baby out with the bathwater".

  12. Maps of CMB lensing deflection from N-body simulations in Coupled Dark Energy Cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Baldi, Marco; Baccigalupi, Carlo E-mail: marco.baldi5@unibo.it E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2013-09-01

    We produce lensing potential and deflection-angle maps in order to simulate the weak gravitational lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) via ray-tracing through the COupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations (CoDECS), the largest suite of N-body simulations to date for interacting Dark Energy cosmologies. The constructed maps faithfully reflect the N-body cosmic structures on a range of scales going from the arcminute to the degree scale, limited only by the resolution and extension of the simulations. We investigate the variation of the lensing pattern due to the underlying Dark Energy (DE) dynamics, characterised by different background and perturbation behaviours as a consequence of the interaction between the DE field and Cold Dark Matter (CDM). In particular, we study in detail the results from three cosmological models differing in the background and perturbations evolution at the epoch in which the lensing cross section is most effective, corresponding to a redshift of ∼ 1, with the purpose to isolate their imprints in the lensing observables, regardless of the compatibility of these models with present constraints. The scenarios investigated here include a reference ΛCDM cosmology, a standard coupled DE (cDE) scenario, and a ''bouncing'' cDE scenario. For the standard cDE scenario, we find that typical differences in the lensing potential result from two effects: the enhanced growth of linear CDM density fluctuations with respect to the ΛCDM case, and the modified nonlinear dynamics of collapsed structures induced by the DE-CDM interaction. As a consequence, CMB lensing highlights the DE impact in the cosmological expansion, even in the degenerate case where the amplitude of the linear matter density perturbations, parametrised through σ{sub 8}, is the same in both the standard cDE and ΛCDM cosmologies. For the ''bouncing'' scenario, we find that the two opposite behaviours of the lens density contrast and of the matter abundance lead to

  13. RECOVERY OF LARGE ANGULAR SCALE CMB POLARIZATION FOR INSTRUMENTS EMPLOYING VARIABLE-DELAY POLARIZATION MODULATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N. J.; Marriage, T. A.; Appel, J. W.; Bennett, C. L.; Eimer, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Harrington, K.; Rostem, K.; Watts, D. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Wollack, E. J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Moseley, S. H.; Switzer, E. R.

    2016-02-20

    Variable-delay Polarization Modulators (VPMs) are currently being implemented in experiments designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background on large angular scales because of their capability for providing rapid, front-end polarization modulation and control over systematic errors. Despite the advantages provided by the VPM, it is important to identify and mitigate any time-varying effects that leak into the synchronously modulated component of the signal. In this paper, the effect of emission from a 300 K VPM on the system performance is considered and addressed. Though instrument design can greatly reduce the influence of modulated VPM emission, some residual modulated signal is expected. VPM emission is treated in the presence of rotational misalignments and temperature variation. Simulations of time-ordered data are used to evaluate the effect of these residual errors on the power spectrum. The analysis and modeling in this paper guides experimentalists on the critical aspects of observations using VPMs as front-end modulators. By implementing the characterizations and controls as described, front-end VPM modulation can be very powerful for mitigating 1/f noise in large angular scale polarimetric surveys. None of the systematic errors studied fundamentally limit the detection and characterization of B-modes on large scales for a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r = 0.01. Indeed, r < 0.01 is achievable with commensurately improved characterizations and controls.

  14. Recovery of Large Angular Scale CMB Polarization for Instruments Employing Variable-Delay Polarization Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, N. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Marriage, T. A.; Wollack, E. J.; Appel, J. W.; Bennett, C. L.; Eimer, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Fixsen, D. J.; Harrington, K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Variable-delay Polarization Modulators (VPMs) are currently being implemented in experiments designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background on large angular scales because of their capability for providing rapid, front-end polarization modulation and control over systematic errors. Despite the advantages provided by the VPM, it is important to identify and mitigate any time-varying effects that leak into the synchronously modulated component of the signal. In this paper, the effect of emission from a 300 K VPM on the system performance is considered and addressed. Though instrument design can greatly reduce the influence of modulated VPM emission, some residual modulated signal is expected. VPM emission is treated in the presence of rotational misalignments and temperature variation. Simulations of time-ordered data are used to evaluate the effect of these residual errors on the power spectrum. The analysis and modeling in this paper guides experimentalists on the critical aspects of observations using VPMs as front-end modulators. By implementing the characterizations and controls as described, front-end VPM modulation can be very powerful for mitigating 1/ f noise in large angular scale polarimetric surveys. None of the systematic errors studied fundamentally limit the detection and characterization of B-modes on large scales for a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r= 0.01. Indeed, r less than 0.01 is achievable with commensurately improved characterizations and controls.

  15. Recovery of Large Angular Scale CMB Polarization for Instruments Employing Variable-Delay Polarization Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, N. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Marriage, T. A.; Wollack, E. J.; Appel, J. W.; Bennett, C. L.; Eimer, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Fixsen, D. J.; Harrington, K.; Moseley, S. H.; Rostem, K.; Switzer, E. R.; Watts, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Variable-delay Polarization Modulators (VPMs) are currently being implemented in experiments designed to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background on large angular scales because of their capability for providing rapid, front-end polarization modulation and control over systematic errors. Despite the advantages provided by the VPM, it is important to identify and mitigate any time-varying effects that leak into the synchronously modulated component of the signal. In this paper, the effect of emission from a 300 K VPM on the system performance is considered and addressed. Though instrument design can greatly reduce the influence of modulated VPM emission, some residual modulated signal is expected. VPM emission is treated in the presence of rotational misalignments and temperature variation. Simulations of time-ordered data are used to evaluate the effect of these residual errors on the power spectrum. The analysis and modeling in this paper guides experimentalists on the critical aspects of observations using VPMs as front-end modulators. By implementing the characterizations and controls as described, front-end VPM modulation can be very powerful for mitigating 1/ f noise in large angular scale polarimetric surveys. None of the systematic errors studied fundamentally limit the detection and characterization of B-modes on large scales for a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r= 0.01. Indeed, r less than 0.01 is achievable with commensurately improved characterizations and controls.

  16. Searching for hidden mirror symmetries in CMB fluctuations from WMAP 7 year maps

    SciTech Connect

    Finelli, Fabio; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Starobinsky, Alexey A. E-mail: gruppuso@iasfbo.inaf.it E-mail: alstar@landau.ac.ru

    2012-07-01

    We search for hidden mirror symmetries at large angular scales in the WMAP 7 year Internal Linear Combination map of CMB temperature anisotropies using global pixel based estimators introduced for this aim. Two different axes are found for which the CMB intensity pattern is anomalously symmetric (or anti-symmetric) under reflection with respect to orthogonal planes at the 99.84(99.96)% CL (confidence level), if compared to a result for an arbitrary axis in simulations without the symmetry. We have verified that our results are robust to the introduction of the galactic mask. The direction of such axes is close to the CMB kinematic dipole and nearly orthogonal to the ecliptic plane, respectively. If instead the real data are compared to those in simulations taken with respect to planes for which the maximal mirror symmetry is generated by chance, the confidence level decreases to 92.39(76.65)%. But when the effect in question translates into the anomalous alignment between normals to planes of maximal mirror (anti)-symmetry and these natural axes mentioned. We also introduce the representation of the above estimators in the harmonic domain, confirming the results obtained in the pixel one. The symmetry anomaly is shown to be almost entirely due to low multipoles, so it may have a cosmological and even primordial origin. Contrary, the anti-symmetry one is mainly due to intermediate multipoles that probably suggests its non-fundamental nature. We have demonstrated that these anomalies are not connected to the known issue of the low variance in WMAP observations and we have checked that axially symmetric parts of these anomalies are small, so that the axes are not the symmetry ones.

  17. First Results from QUIET: CMB Polarization Power Spectra by Pseudo-Cl Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinone, Yuji; QUIET Collaboration

    2011-05-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) is designed to detect the CMB B-mode polarization induced by primordial gravitational waves created during the inflation era. We use polarimeters based on coherent receiver technology with HEMT (High Electron Mobility Transistor) amplifiers. We developed two of the most sensitive polarimeter arrays today; one is composed of 19 modules for the Q-band (43GHz) and the other is composed of 90 modules for the W-band (95GHz). QUIET is located on the Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama desert in northern Chile at an altitude of 5,080m, where we collected over 10,000 hours of data from 2008 October to 2010 December. In this dissertation talk, I will discuss the Q-band analysis and results completed with the pseudo-Cl framework, which is one of the two analysis pipelines we developed. The analysis, including calibration, data selection and systematic error estimation, was validated and optimized with suites of null tests before the power spectra were obtained. From the Q-band data, we obtained the EE, BB and EB power spectra in the multipole range from 25 to 475. The E-mode signals are detected with more than 6 sigma significance in the range of the first peak. For the B-mode spectrum, we placed an upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r<2.2 at the 95% confidence level. We also detect the polarized foreground signal at the lowest multipole bin of the E-mode spectrum with 3 sigma significance, which is consistent with the Galactic synchrotron emission. All the systematic errors are much lower than the statistical errors. In particular, the contaminations to the primordial B-mode spectrum, at multipoles below 100, are lower than the level of r=0.1.

  18. Improved Diffuse Foreground Subtraction with the ILC Method: CMB Map and Angular Power Spectrum Using Planck and WMAP Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudevan, Vipin; Aluri, Pavan K.; Yadav, Sarvesh Kumar; Saha, Rajib; Souradeep, Tarun

    2017-06-01

    We report an improved technique for diffuse foreground minimization from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) maps using a new multiphase iterative harmonic space internal-linear-combination (HILC) approach. Our method nullifies a foreground leakage that was present in the old and usual iterative HILC method. In phase 1 of the multiphase technique, we obtain an initial cleaned map using the single iteration HILC approach over the desired portion of the sky. In phase 2, we obtain a final CMB map using the iterative HILC approach; however, now, to nullify the leakage, during each iteration, some of the regions of the sky that are not being cleaned in the current iteration are replaced by the corresponding cleaned portions of the phase 1 map. We bring all input frequency maps to a common and maximum possible beam and pixel resolution at the beginning of the analysis, which significantly reduces data redundancy, memory usage, and computational cost, and avoids, during the HILC weight calculation, the deconvolution of partial sky harmonic coefficients by the azimuthally symmetric beam and pixel window functions, which in a strict mathematical sense, are not well defined. Using WMAP 9 year and Planck 2015 frequency maps, we obtain foreground-cleaned CMB maps and a CMB angular power spectrum for the multipole range 2≤slant {\\ell }≤slant 2500. Our power spectrum matches the published Planck results with some differences at different multipole ranges. We validate our method by performing Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, we show that the weights for HILC foreground minimization have the intrinsic characteristic that they also tend to produce a statistically isotropic CMB map.

  19. GLESP package for full sky CMB maps data analysis and its realization in the FADPS data processing system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.; Doroshkevich, A. G.; Naselsky, P. D.; Novikov, D. I.; Turchaninov, V. I.; Novikov, I. D.; Christensen, P. R.; Chiang, L.-Y.

    2005-05-01

    A new scheme of sky pixelization GLESP (Gauss-LEgendre Sky Pixelization) is developed for CMB maps. The scheme is based on the Gauss-Legendre polynomials zeros and allows one to create strict orthogonal expansion of the map. A corresponding code has been implemented and comparison with other methods has been done. The package has been realized using basic principles of the FADPS data reduction system. The structure and the main procedures of the package are described.

  20. The topology and size of the universe from CMB temperature and polarization data

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, Grigor; Manohar, Aneesh V.; Yadav, Amit P.S. E-mail: amanohar@ucsd.edu

    2013-08-01

    We analyze seven year and nine year WMAP temperature maps for signatures of three finite flat topologies M{sub 0} = T{sup 3}, M{sub 1} = T{sup 2} × R{sup 1}, and M{sub 2} = S{sup 1} × R{sup 2}. We use Monte-Carlo simulations with the Feldman-Cousins method to obtain confidence intervals for the size of the topologies considered. We analyze the V, W, and Q frequency bands along with the ILC map and find no significant difference in the results. The 95.5% confidence level lower bound on the size of the topology is 1.5L{sub 0} for M{sub 0}, 1.4L{sub 0} for M{sub 1}, and 1.1L{sub 0} for M{sub 2}, where L{sub 0} is the radius of the last scattering surface. Our results agree very well with the recently released results from the Planck temperature data. We show that the likelihood function is not Gaussian in the size, and therefore simulations are important for obtaining accurate bounds on the size. We then introduce the formalism for including polarization data in the analysis. The improvement that we find from WMAP polarization maps is small because of the high level of instrumental noise, but our forecast for Planck maps shows a much better improvement on the lower bound for L. For the M{sub 0} topology we expect an improvement on the lower bound of L from 1.7L{sub 0} to 1.9L{sub 0} at 95.5% confidence level. Using both polarization and temperature data is important because it tests the hypothesis that deviations in the TT spectrum at small l originate in the primordial perturbation spectrum.

  1. North-South non-Gaussian asymmetry in Planck CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Bernui, A.; Oliveira, A.F.; Pereira, T.S. E-mail: adhimar@unifei.edu.br

    2014-10-01

    We report the results of a statistical analysis performed with the four foreground-cleaned Planck maps by means of a suitably defined local-variance estimator. Our analysis shows a clear dipolar structure in Planck's variance map pointing in the direction (l,b) ≅ (220°,-32°), thus consistent with the North-South asymmetry phenomenon. Surprisingly, and contrary to previous findings, removing the CMB quadrupole and octopole makes the asymmetry stronger. Our results show a maximal statistical significance, of 98.1% CL, in the scales ranging from ℓ=4 to ℓ=500. Additionally, through exhaustive analyses of the four foreground-cleaned and individual frequency Planck maps, we find unlikely that residual foregrounds could be causing this dipole variance asymmetry. Moreover, we find that the dipole gets lower amplitudes for larger masks, evidencing that most of the contribution to the variance dipole comes from a region near the galactic plane. Finally, our results are robust against different foreground cleaning procedures, different Planck masks, pixelization parameters, and the addition of inhomogeneous real noise.

  2. Statistical imprints of CMB B-type polarization leakage in an incomplete sky survey analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Larissa; Wang, Kai; Hu, Yangrui; Fang, Wenjuan; Zhao, Wen

    2017-01-01

    One of the main goals of modern cosmology is to search for primordial gravitational waves by looking on their imprints in the B-type polarization in the cosmic microwave background radiation. However, this signal is contaminated by various sources, including cosmic weak lensing, foreground radiations, instrumental noises, as well as the E-to-B leakage caused by the partial sky surveys, which should be well understood to avoid the misinterpretation of the observed data. In this paper, we adopt the E/B decomposition method suggested by Smith in 2006, and study the imprints of E-to-B leakage residuals in the constructed B-type polarization maps, Script B(hat n), by employing various statistical tools. We find that the effects of E-to-B leakage are negligible for the Script B-mode power spectrum, as well as the skewness and kurtosis analyses of Script B-maps. However, if employing the morphological statistical tools, including Minkowski functionals and/or Betti numbers, we find the effect of leakage can be detected at very high confidence level, which shows that in the morphological analysis, the leakage can play a significant role as a contaminant for measuring the primordial B-mode signal and must be taken into account for a correct explanation of the data.

  3. Constraints on primordial magnetic fields from Planck data combined with the South Pole Telescope CMB B -mode polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucca, Alex; Li, Yun; Pogosian, Levon

    2017-03-01

    A primordial magnetic field (PMF) present before recombination can leave specific signatures on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations. Of particular importance is its contribution to the B-mode polarization power spectrum. Indeed, vortical modes sourced by the PMF can dominate the B-mode power spectrum on small scales, as they survive damping up to a small fraction of the Silk length. Therefore, measurements of the B-mode polarization at high ℓ , such as the one recently performed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT), have the potential to provide stringent constraints on the PMF. We use the publicly released SPT B-mode polarization spectrum, along with the temperature and polarization data from the Planck satellite, to derive constraints on the magnitude, the spectral index and the energy scale at which the PMF was generated. We find that, while Planck data constrains the magnetic amplitude to B1 Mpc<3.3 nG at the 95% confidence level (C.L.), the SPT measurement improves the constraint to B1 Mpc<1.5 nG . The magnetic spectral index, nB, and the time of the generation of the PMF are unconstrained. For a nearly scale-invariant PMF, predicted by the simplest inflationary magnetogenesis models, the bound from Planck +SPT is B1 Mpc<1.2 nG at 95% C.L. For PMF with nB=2 , which is expected for fields generated in post-inflationary phase transitions, the 95% C.L. bound is B1 Mpc<0.002 nG , corresponding to the magnetic fraction of the radiation density ΩB γ<10-3 or the effective field Beff<100 nG . The patches for the Boltzmann code camb and the Markov chain Monte Carlo engine CosmoMC, incorporating the PMF effects on CMB, are made publicly available.

  4. A comparison of anisotropic statistical properties of CMB maps based on the WMAP and planck space mission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.; Naiden, Ya. V.

    2016-10-01

    We compare the anisotropic properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps constructed based on the data of NASA's WMAP (9th year of observations) and ESA's Planck (2015 release) space missions. In our analysis, we use two two-dimensional estimators of the scatter of the signal on a sphere, which amount to algorithms of mapping the ratio of the scatter in the Northern and Southern hemispheres depending on the method of dividing (specifically, rotating and cutting) the sky into hemispheres. The scatter is computed either as a standard deviation σ, or as the difference between the minimum and maximum values on a given hemisphere. Applying both estimators to the CMB anisotropy datameasured by two spacemissions, Planck and WMAP, we compared the variations of the background at different angular scales.Maps with a resolution of l ≤ 100 show that the division into regions with different levels of statistical anisotropy lies close to the ecliptic plane, and after preliminary removal of the l ≤ 20 harmonics from the CMB data, the anisotropic signal related to the Galaxy begins to dominate.

  5. Maximum a posteriori CMB lensing reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carron, Julien; Lewis, Antony

    2017-09-01

    Gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a valuable cosmological signal that correlates to tracers of large-scale structure and acts as a important source of confusion for primordial B -mode polarization. State-of-the-art lensing reconstruction analyses use quadratic estimators, which are easily applicable to data. However, these estimators are known to be suboptimal, in particular for polarization, and large improvements are expected to be possible for high signal-to-noise polarization experiments. We develop a method and numerical code, lensit, that is able to find efficiently the most probable lensing map, introducing no significant approximations to the lensed CMB likelihood, and applicable to beamed and masked data with inhomogeneous noise. It works by iteratively reconstructing the primordial unlensed CMB using a deflection estimate and its inverse, and removing residual lensing from these maps with quadratic estimator techniques. Roughly linear computational cost is maintained due to fast convergence of iterative searches, combined with the local nature of lensing. The method achieves the maximal improvement in signal to noise expected from analytical considerations on the unmasked parts of the sky. Delensing with this optimal map leads to forecast tensor-to-scalar ratio parameter errors improved by a factor ≃2 compared to the quadratic estimator in a CMB stage IV configuration.

  6. Fabrication of Large Dual-polarized Multichroic TES Bolometer Arrays for CMB Measurements with the SPT-3G Camera.

    SciTech Connect

    Posada, C. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J. E.; Bender, A. N.; Bleem, L. E.; Benson, B. A.; Byrum, K.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Ciocys, S. T.; Czaplewski, D.; Ding, J.; Divan, R.; Lendinez, S.; Miller, C. S.; Novosad, V.; Pearson, J.; Stan, L.; Wang, G.; Yefremenko, V.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents the procedures used by Argonne National Laboratory to fabricate large arrays of multichroic transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements. These detectors will be assembled into the focal plane for the SPT-3G camera, the third generation CMB camera to be installed in the South Pole Telescope. The complete SPT-3G camera will have approximately 2690 pixels, for a total of 16,140 TES bolometric detectors. Each pixel is comprised of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a Nb microstrip line. In-line filters are used to define the different band-passes before the millimeter-wavelength signal is fed to the respective Ti/Au TES bolometers. There are six TES bolometer detectors per pixel, which allow for measurements of three band-passes (95 GHz, 150 GHz and 220 GHz) and two polarizations. The steps involved in the monolithic fabrication of these detector arrays are presented here in detail. Patterns are defined using a combination of stepper and contact lithography. The misalignment between layers is kept below 200 nm. The overall fabrication involves a total of 16 processes, including reactive and magnetron sputtering, reactive ion etching, inductively coupled plasma etching and chemical etching.

  7. Map of Martian Polar Hydrogen

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-13

    This gamma ray spectrometer map centered on the north pole of Mars is based on gamma-rays from the element hydrogen. In this region, hydrogen is mainly in the form of water ice. Regions of high ice content are shown in red and those low in ice content are shown in blue. The very ice-rich region at the north pole is due to a permanent polar cap of water ice on the surface. Elsewhere in this region, the ice is buried under several to a few tens of centimeters of dry soil. The sub-surface ice is not uniformly distributed in the north, but varies with both latitude and longitude. In the north, the soil is well over 50 percent ice, which is more than can be accommodated by just filling the pore space in pre-existing soil. This high ice content implies that the ice may have been slowly co-deposited with dust in the past when conditions were wetter. Deposition of ice by this process means it is more likely that the ice deposits are very thick and may even be deep enough to have liquid water at their base. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04254

  8. Pure E and B polarization maps via Wiener filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunn, Emory F.; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    In order to draw scientific conclusions from observations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization, it is necessary to separate the contributions of the E and B components of the data. For data with incomplete sky coverage, there are ambiguous modes, which can be sourced by either E or B signals. Techniques exist for producing "pure" E and B maps, which are guaranteed to be free of cross-contamination, although the standard method, which involves constructing an eigenbasis, has a high computational cost. We show that such pure maps can be thought of as resulting from the application of a Wiener filter to the data. This perspective leads to far more efficient methods of producing pure maps. Moreover, by expressing the idea of purification in the general framework of Wiener filtering (i.e., maximization of a posterior probability), it leads to a variety of generalizations of the notion of pure E and B maps, e.g., accounting for noise or other contaminants in the data as well as correlations with temperature anisotropy.

  9. ANOMALOUS ANISOTROPIC CROSS-CORRELATIONS BETWEEN WMAP CMB MAPS AND SDSS GALAXY DISTRIBUTION AND IMPLICATIONS ON THE DARK FLOW SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhigang; Chen Xuelei; Zhang Pengjie E-mail: pjzhang@shao.ac.cn

    2012-10-20

    We search for the dark flow induced diffuse kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect through CMB-galaxy cross-correlation. Such angular correlation is anisotropic, with a unique cos ({theta}{sub DF}) angular dependence, and hence can be distinguished from other components. Here, {theta}{sub DF} is the angle between the opposite dark flow direction and the direction of the sky where the correlation is measured. We analyze the KIAS-VAGC galaxy catalog of SDSS-DR7 and the WMAP seven-year temperature maps, applying an unbiased optimal weighting scheme to eliminate any statistically isotropic components and to enhance the dark flow detection signal. Non-zero weighted cross-correlations are detected at 3.5 {sigma} for the redshift bin z < 0.1 and at 3 {sigma} for the bin 0.1 < z < 0.2, implying the existence of statistically anisotropic components in CMB. However, further analysis does not support the dark flow explanation. The observed directional dependence deviates from the {proportional_to}cos {theta}{sub DF} relation expected, and hence cannot be explained by the presence of a single dark flow, and if the observed cross-correlation is generated by the dark flow induced kSZ effect, the velocity would be too high ({approx}> 6000 km s{sup -1}). We report this work as the first attempt to search for dark flow through weighted CMB-galaxy cross-correlation and to draw the attention on the sources of the detected anomalous CMB-galaxy cross-correlation.

  10. Dione Polar Maps - December 2011

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-23

    This global map of Saturn moon Dione was created using images taken during flybys by NASA Cassini spacecraft. This global map of Saturn moon Dione was created using images taken during flybys by NASA Cassini spacecraft.

  11. Polar Maps of Thermal and Epithermal Neutrons

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-28

    Observations by NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft show views of the polar regions of Mars in thermal neutrons top and epithermal neutrons bottom. In these maps, deep blue indicates a low amount of neutrons and red indicates a high amount.

  12. The Kullback-Leibler divergence as an estimator of the statistical properties of CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-David, Assaf; Jackson, Andrew D.; Liu, Hao E-mail: liuhao@nbi.dk

    2015-06-01

    The identification of unsubtracted foreground residuals in the cosmic microwave background maps on large scales is of crucial importance for the analysis of polarization signals. These residuals add a non-Gaussian contribution to the data. We propose the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence as an effective, non-parametric test on the one-point probability distribution function of the data. With motivation in information theory, the KL divergence takes into account the entire range of the distribution and is highly non-local. We demonstrate its use by analyzing the large scales of the Planck 2013 SMICA temperature fluctuation map and find it consistent with the expected distribution at a level of 6%. Comparing the results to those obtained using the more popular Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, we find the two methods to be in general agreement.

  13. Motion induced second order temperature and y-type anisotropies after the subtraction of linear dipole in the CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Khatri, Rishi E-mail: khatri@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-03-01

    y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background allow us to detect clusters and groups of galaxies, filaments of hot gas and the non-uniformities in the warm hot intergalactic medium. Several CMB experiments (on small areas of sky) and theoretical groups (for full sky) have recently published y-type distortion maps. We propose to search for two artificial hot spots in such y-type maps resulting from the incomplete subtraction of the effect of the motion induced dipole on the cosmic microwave background sky. This dipole introduces, at second order, additional temperature and y-distortion anisotropy on the sky of amplitude few μK which could potentially be measured by Planck HFI and Pixie experiments and can be used as a source of cross channel calibration by CMB experiments. This y-type distortion is present in every pixel and is not the result of averaging the whole sky. This distortion, calculated exactly from the known linear dipole, can be subtracted from the final y-type maps, if desired.

  14. Bolometeric detector arrays for CMB polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, C. L.; Bock, J. J.; Day, P.; Goldin, A.; Golwala, S.; Holmes, W.; Irwin, K.; Kenyon, M.; Lange, A. E.; LeDuc, H. G.; Rossinot, P.; Sterb, J.; Vayonakis, A.; Wang, G.; Yun, M.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the development of antenna coupled bolometers for CMB polarization experiments. The necessary components of a bolometric CMB polarimeter - a beam forming element, a band defining filter, and detectors - are all fabricated on a silicon chip with photolithography.

  15. Next generation sub-millimeter wave focal plane array coupling concepts: an ESA TRP project to develop multichroic focal plane pixels for future CMB polarization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappe, N.; Bucher, M.; De Bernardis, P.; Delabrouille, J.; Deo, P.; DePetris, M.; Doherty, S.; Ghribi, A.; Gradziel, M.; Kuzmin, L.; Maffei, B.; Mahashabde, S.; Masi, S.; Murphy, J. A.; Noviello, F.; O'Sullivan, C.; Pagano, L.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Robinson, M.; Stompor, R.; Tartari, A.; van der Vorst, M.; Verhoeve, P.

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of this activity is to develop new focal plane coupling array concepts and technologies that optimise the coupling from reflector optics to the large number of detectors for next generation sub millimetre wave telescopes particularly targeting measurement of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). In this 18 month TRP programme the consortium are tasked with developing, manufacturing and experimentally verifying a prototype multichroic pixel which would be suitable for the large focal plane arrays which will be demanded to reach the required sensitivity of future CMB polarization missions. One major development was to have multichroic operation to potentially reduce the required focal plane size of a CMB mission. After research in the optimum telescope design and definition of requirements based on a stringent science case review, a number of compact focal plane architecture concepts were investigated before a pixel demonstrator consisting of a planar mesh lens feeding a backend Resonant Cold Electron Bolometer RCEB for filtering and detection of the dual frequency signal was planned for manufacture and test. In this demonstrator the frequencies of the channels was chosen to be 75 and 105 GHz in the w band close to the peak CMB signal. In the next year the prototype breadboards will be developed to test the beams produced by the manufactured flat lenses fed by a variety of antenna configurations and the spectral response of the RCEBs will also be verified.

  16. CAPMAP: A new instrument to measure the e-mode CMB polarization on angular scales of 4 feet to 40 feet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkats, Denis

    2004-08-01

    The CMB polarization is the Everest in the quest to characterize the earliest photons from the Universe. After a long list of ever-decreasing upper limits, a detection of polarization was made in 2002 by the DASI team at ℓ ≃ 500. The experiment described in this thesis is designed to make a more detailed measurements at higher angular resolution. The E-mode polarization power spectrum not only provides a more direct link to the properties of the last scattering surface than the temperature anisotropy but also offers complementary information which can be used to break various degeneracies in the determination of cosmological parameters. Most importantly, the existence of polarization is a robust prediction of the standard cosmological picture so a precise measurement of the CMB polarization should come as a confirmation of the standard model. However, polarization measurements represent an experimental challenge. The weakness of the polarization signal requires both a demanding instrumental sensitivity and focused attention to all sources of systematic error. This thesis describes the design, construction, and testing of a 90 GHz four-element array of correlation polarimeters to probe the E-mode polarization power spectrum at multipoles (ℓ) ranging from 500 to 1500. The array was fielded in Jan 2003 on the 7-meter Crawford Hill antenna, in Holmdel, New Jersey and observed for two months. The receiver calibration is described in detail, as well as the characterization of the pointing and beams. Preliminary analysis indicates that the instrument is sufficiently sensitive to detect the few-μK signal of the CMB polarization.

  17. Signature of patchy reionization in the polarization anisotropy of the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Dore, Olivier; Iliev, Ilian T.; Pen, Ue-Li; Holder, Gil; Alvarez, Marcelo; Mellema, Garrelt; Shapiro, Paul R.

    2007-08-15

    The inhomogeneous ionization state of the Universe when the first sources of ionizing radiation appeared should lead to anisotropies in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. We use cosmological simulations of the process by which the first sources ionized the intergalactic medium to study the induced polarization anisotropies. We find that the polarization anisotropies have rms of order {approx}0.01 {mu}K, and local peak values of {approx}0.1 {mu}K, smaller than those due to gravitational lensing on small scales. The polarization direction is highly coherent over degree scales. This directional coherence is not expected from either primary anisotropy or gravitational lensing effects, making the largest signals due to inhomogeneous ionization relatively easy to isolate, should experiments achieve the necessary very low noise levels.

  18. The Signature of Patchy Reionization in the Polarization Anisotropy of the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Dore, Olivier; Holder, Gil; Alvarez, Marcelo; Iliev, Ilian T.; Mellema, Garrelt; Pen, Ue-Li; Shapiro, Paul R.; /Texas U., Astron. Dept.

    2007-05-16

    The inhomogeneous ionization state of the universe when the first sources of ionizing radiation appeared should lead to anisotropies in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. We use cosmological simulations of the process by which the first sources ionized the intergalactic medium to study the induced polarization anisotropies. We find that the polarization anisotropies have rms of order {approx} 0.01 {mu}K, and local peak values of {approx} 0.1 {mu}K, smaller than those due to gravitational lensing on small scales. The polarization direction is highly coherent over degree scales. This directional coherence is not expected from either primary anisotropy or gravitational lensing effects, making the largest signals due to inhomogeneous ionization relatively easy to isolate, should experiments achieve the necessary very low noise levels.

  19. Large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic TES detectors for CMB measurements with the SPT-3G receiver

    DOE PAGES

    Holland, Wayne S.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Posada, Chrystian M.; ...

    2016-07-19

    Now, detectors for cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments are background limited, so a straightforward alternative to improve sensitivity is to increase the number of detectors. Large arrays of multichroic pixels constitute an economical approach to increasing the number of detectors within a given focal plane area. We present the fabrication of large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic transition-edge-sensor (TES) bolometers for the South Pole Telescope third-generation CMB receiver (SPT-3G). The complete SPT-3G receiver will have 2690 pixels, each with six detectors, allowing for individual measurement of three spectral bands (centered at 95 GHz, 150 GHz and 220 GHz) in two orthogonalmore » polarizations. In total, the SPT-3G focal plane will have 16140 detectors. Each pixel is comprised of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a niobium microstrip transmission line. In-line filters are used to define the different band-passes before the millimeter-wavelength signal is fed to the respective Ti/Au TES sensors. Detectors are read out using a 64x frequency domain multiplexing (fMux) scheme. The microfabrication of the SPT-3G detector arrays involves a total of 18 processes, including 13 lithography steps. Together with the fabrication process, the effect of processing on the Ti/Au TES's T-c is discussed. In addition, detectors fabricated with Ti/Au TES films with Tc between 400 mK 560 mK are presented and their thermal characteristics are evaluated. Optical characterization of the arrays is presented as well, indicating that the response of the detectors is in good agreement with the design values for all three spectral bands (95 GHz, 150 GHz, and 220 GHz). The measured optical efficiency of the detectors is between 0.3 and 0.8. Our results discussed here are extracted from a batch of research of development wafers used to develop the baseline process for the fabrication of the arrays of detectors to be deployed with the SPT-3G receiver. Results from

  20. Large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic TES detectors for CMB measurements with the SPT-3G receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Wayne S.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Posada, Chrystian M.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Anderson, Adam J.; Avva, Jessica; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Arnold, Kam S.; Austermann, Jason; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Byrum, Karen; Carlstrom, John E.; Carter, Faustin W.; Chang, Clarence; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Cukierman, Ari; Czaplewski, David A.; Ding, Junjia; Divan, Ralu N. S.; de Haan, Tijmen; Dobbs, Matt; Dutcher, Daniel; Everett, Wenderline; Gannon, Renae N.; Guyser, Robert J.; Halverson, Nils W.; Harrington, Nicholas L.; Hattori, Kaori; Henning, Jason W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Holzapfel, William L.; Huang, Nicholas; Irwin, Kent D.; Jeong, Oliver; Khaire, Trupti; Korman, Milo; Kubik, Donna L.; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lee, Adrian T.; Leitch, Erik M.; Lendinez Escudero, Sergi; Meyer, Stephan S.; Miller, Christina S.; Montgomery, Joshua; Nadolski, Andrew; Natoli, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Hogan; Novosad, Valentyn; Padin, Stephen; Pan, Zhaodi; Pearson, John E.; Rahlin, Alexandra; Reichardt, Christian L.; Ruhl, John E.; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Shirley, Ian; Sayre, James T.; Shariff, Jamil A.; Shirokoff, Erik D.; Stan, Liliana; Stark, Antony A.; Sobrin, Joshua; Story, Kyle; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tang, Qing Yang; Thakur, Ritoban B.; Thompson, Keith L.; Tucker, Carole E.; Vanderlinde, Keith; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Wang, Gensheng; Whitehorn, Nathan; Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Yoon, Ki Won

    2016-07-19

    Now, detectors for cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments are background limited, so a straightforward alternative to improve sensitivity is to increase the number of detectors. Large arrays of multichroic pixels constitute an economical approach to increasing the number of detectors within a given focal plane area. We present the fabrication of large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic transition-edge-sensor (TES) bolometers for the South Pole Telescope third-generation CMB receiver (SPT-3G). The complete SPT-3G receiver will have 2690 pixels, each with six detectors, allowing for individual measurement of three spectral bands (centered at 95 GHz, 150 GHz and 220 GHz) in two orthogonal polarizations. In total, the SPT-3G focal plane will have 16140 detectors. Each pixel is comprised of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a niobium microstrip transmission line. In-line filters are used to define the different band-passes before the millimeter-wavelength signal is fed to the respective Ti/Au TES sensors. Detectors are read out using a 64x frequency domain multiplexing (fMux) scheme. The microfabrication of the SPT-3G detector arrays involves a total of 18 processes, including 13 lithography steps. Together with the fabrication process, the effect of processing on the Ti/Au TES's T-c is discussed. In addition, detectors fabricated with Ti/Au TES films with Tc between 400 mK 560 mK are presented and their thermal characteristics are evaluated. Optical characterization of the arrays is presented as well, indicating that the response of the detectors is in good agreement with the design values for all three spectral bands (95 GHz, 150 GHz, and 220 GHz). The measured optical efficiency of the detectors is between 0.3 and 0.8. Our results discussed here are extracted from a batch of research of development wafers used to develop the baseline process for the fabrication of the arrays of detectors to be deployed with the SPT-3G receiver. Results from these

  1. Large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic TES detectors for CMB measurements with the SPT-3G receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, Chrystian M.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Anderson, Adam J.; Avva, Jessica; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Arnold, Kam S.; Austermann, Jason; Bender, Amy N.; Benson, Bradford A.; Bleem, Lindsey; Byrum, Karen; Carlstrom, John E.; Carter, Faustin W.; Chang, Clarence; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Cukierman, Ari; Czaplewski, David A.; Ding, Junjia; Divan, Ralu N. S.; de Haan, Tijmen; Dobbs, Matt; Dutcher, Daniel; Everett, Wenderline; Gannon, Renae N.; Guyser, Robert J.; Halverson, Nils W.; Harrington, Nicholas L.; Hattori, Kaori; Henning, Jason W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Holzapfel, William L.; Huang, Nicholas; Irwin, Kent D.; Jeong, Oliver; Khaire, Trupti; Korman, Milo; Kubik, Donna L.; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lee, Adrian T.; Leitch, Erik M.; Lendinez Escudero, Sergi; Meyer, Stephan S.; Miller, Christina S.; Montgomery, Joshua; Nadolski, Andrew; Natoli, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Hogan; Novosad, Valentyn; Padin, Stephen; Pan, Zhaodi; Pearson, John E.; Rahlin, Alexandra; Reichardt, Christian L.; Ruhl, John E.; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Shirley, Ian; Sayre, James T.; Shariff, Jamil A.; Shirokoff, Erik D.; Stan, Liliana; Stark, Antony A.; Sobrin, Joshua; Story, Kyle; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tang, Qing Yang; Thakur, Ritoban B.; Thompson, Keith L.; Tucker, Carole E.; Vanderlinde, Keith; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Wang, Gensheng; Whitehorn, Nathan; Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Yoon, Ki Won

    2016-07-01

    Detectors for cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments are now essentially background limited, so a straightforward alternative to improve sensitivity is to increase the number of detectors. Large arrays of multichroic pixels constitute an economical approach to increasing the number of detectors within a given focal plane area. Here, we present the fabrication of large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic transition-edge-sensor (TES) bolometers for the South Pole Telescope third-generation CMB receiver (SPT-3G). The complete SPT-3G receiver will have 2690 pixels, each with six detectors, allowing for individual measurement of three spectral bands (centered at 95 GHz, 150 GHz and 220 GHz) in two orthogonal polarizations. In total, the SPT-3G focal plane will have 16140 detectors. Each pixel is comprised of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a niobium microstrip transmission line. In-line filters are used to define the different band-passes before the millimeter-wavelength signal is fed to the respective Ti/Au TES sensors. Detectors are read out using a 64x frequency domain multiplexing (fMux) scheme. The microfabrication of the SPT-3G detector arrays involves a total of 18 processes, including 13 lithography steps. Together with the fabrication process, the effect of processing on the Ti/Au TES's Tc is discussed. In addition, detectors fabricated with Ti/Au TES films with Tc between 400 mK 560 mK are presented and their thermal characteristics are evaluated. Optical characterization of the arrays is presented as well, indicating that the response of the detectors is in good agreement with the design values for all three spectral bands (95 GHz, 150 GHz, and 220 GHz). The measured optical efficiency of the detectors is between 0.3 and 0.8. Results discussed here are extracted from a batch of research of development wafers used to develop the baseline process for the fabrication of the arrays of detectors to be deployed with the SPT-3G receiver. Results from

  2. Advanced Antenna-Coupled Superconducting Detector Arrays for CMB Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James

    2014-01-01

    We are developing high-sensitivity millimeter-wave detector arrays for measuring the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This development is directed to advance the technology readiness of the Inflation Probe mission in NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program. The Inflation Probe is a fourth-generation CMB satellite that will measure the polarization of the CMB to astrophysical limits, characterizing the inflationary polarization signal, mapping large-scale structure based on polarization induced by gravitational lensing, and mapping Galactic magnetic fields through measurements of polarized dust emission. The inflationary polarization signal is produced by a background of gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation, an exponential expansion of space-time in the early universe, with an amplitude that depends on the physical mechanism producing inflation. The inflationary polarization signal may be distinguished by its unique 'B-mode' vector properties from polarization from the density variations that predominantly source CMB temperature anisotropy. Mission concepts for the Inflation Probe are being developed in the US, Europe and Japan. The arrays are based on planar antennas that provide integral beam collimation, polarization analysis, and spectral band definition in a compact lithographed format that eliminates discrete fore-optics such as lenses and feedhorns. The antennas are coupled to transition-edge superconducting bolometers, read out with multiplexed SQUID current amplifiers. The superconducting sensors and readouts developed in this program share common technologies with NASA X-ray and FIR detector applications. Our program targets developments required for space observations, and we discuss our technical progress over the past two years and plans for future development. We are incorporating arrays into active sub-orbital and ground-based experiments, which advance technology readiness while producing state of the art CMB

  3. B -mode polarization of the CMB and the cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Rohoollah; Khodagholizadeh, Jafar; Sadegh, M.; Xue, She-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    It is known that in contrast with the E -mode polarization the B -mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background cannot be generated by the Compton scattering in the case of the scalar mode of metric perturbation. However, it is possible to generate the B mode by the Compton scattering in the case of the tensor mode of metric perturbation. For this reason, the ratio of tensor to scalar modes of metric perturbation (r ˜CB l/CE l ) is estimated by comparing the B -mode power spectrum with the E mode at least for small l . We study the cosmic microwave background polarization, especially the B mode due to the weak interaction of the cosmic neutrino background and cosmic microwave background, in addition to the Compton scattering in both cases of scalar and tensor metric perturbations. It is shown that the power spectrum CB l of the B -mode polarization receives some contributions from scalar and tensor modes, which have effects on the value of the r parameter. We also show that the B -mode polarization power spectrum can be used as an indirect probe into the cosmic neutrino background.

  4. CMB polarization power spectra contributions from a network of cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bevis, Neil; Hindmarsh, Mark; Urrestilla, Jon; Kunz, Martin

    2007-08-15

    We present the first calculation of the possible (local) cosmic string contribution to the cosmic microwave background polarization spectra from simulations of a string network (rather than a stochastic collection of unconnected string segments). We use field-theory simulations of the Abelian Higgs model to represent local U(1) strings, including their radiative decay and microphysics. Relative to previous estimates, our calculations show a shift in power to larger angular scales, making the chance of a future cosmic string detection from the B-mode polarization slightly greater. We explore a future ground-based polarization detector, taking the CLOVER project as our example. In the null hypothesis (that cosmic strings make a zero contribution) we find that CLOVER should limit the string tension {mu} to G{mu}<0.12x10{sup -6} (where G is the gravitational constant), above which it is likely that a detection would be possible.

  5. Design and fabrication of Argonne/KICP detectors for CMB polarization.

    SciTech Connect

    Yefremenko, V.; Datesman, A.; Wang, G.; Pearson, J.; Novosad, V.; Divan, R.; Bleem, L. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crites, A. T.; Everett, W.; McMahon, J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Ruhl, J.; Sayre, J.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Univ. of Chicago; Case Western Reserve Univ.

    2009-01-01

    We present the design, microfabrication and assembly of dual-polarization absorber-coupled Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometer detectors for cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization studies. The device consists of two separate dies incorporating suspended silicon nitride membranes within silicon frames, carefully aligned perpendicularly and fixtured face-to-face. Polarization sensitivity around 95 GHz is provided by a single dipole-like absorber element; we briefly analyze this absorber-in-waveguide configuration in closed form using the EMF method. Proximity effect Mo/Au bilayers provide control of the TES critical temperature between 400 mK and 600 mK, with a normal resistance R{sub n} {approx} 1{Omega}. DC magnetron sputtering, wet etching, and liftoff were employed for TES fabrication. Optimization of the superconducting Mo thin film utilized independent RF bias applied to the substrate during deposition in a confocal geometry. This technique allows outstanding thin film uniformity and stress to be achieved simultaneously over a 4-inch wafer surface, leading to excellent superconducting properties. Device thermal conductance in the range from 25-250pW/K was achieved using suspended silicon nitride membranes 1 micron thick. The value of the thermal conductance depends very strongly upon the surface roughness, and therefore in turn upon the treatment of the silicon nitride material during fabrication.

  6. A new model of the microwave polarized sky for CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervías-Caimapo, Carlos; Bonaldi, Anna; Brown, Michael L.

    2016-10-01

    We present a new model of the microwave sky in polarization that can be used to simulate data from cosmic microwave background polarization experiments. We exploit the most recent results from the Planck satellite to provide an accurate description of the diffuse polarized foreground synchrotron and thermal dust emission. Our model can include the two mentioned foregrounds, and also a constructed template of Anomalous Microwave Emission. Several options for the frequency dependence of the foregrounds can be easily selected, to reflect our uncertainties and to test the impact of different assumptions. Small angular scale features can be added to the foreground templates to simulate high-resolution observations. We present tests of the model outputs to show the excellent agreement with Planck and Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data. We determine the range within which the foreground spectral indices can be varied to be consistent with the current data. We also show forecasts for a high-sensitivity, high-resolution full-sky experiment such as the Cosmic ORigin Explorer. Our model is released as a PYTHON script that is quick and easy to use, available at http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/chervias.

  7. Design and development of an ambient-temperature continuously-rotating achromatic half-wave plate for CMB polarization modulation on the POLARBEAR-2 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Charles A.; Beckman, Shawn; Chinone, Yuji; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Hazumi, Masashi; Keating, Brian; Kusaka, Akito; Lee, Adrian T.; Matsuda, Frederick; Plambeck, Richard; Suzuki, Aritoki; Takakura, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    We describe the development of an ambient-temperature continuously-rotating half-wave plate (HWP) for study of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization by the POLARBEAR-2 (PB2) experiment. Rapid polarization modulation suppresses 1/f noise due to unpolarized atmospheric turbulence and improves sensitivity to degree-angular-scale CMB fluctuations where the inflationary gravitational wave signal is thought to exist. A HWP modulator rotates the input polarization signal and therefore allows a single polarimeter to measure both linear polarization states, eliminating systematic errors associated with differencing of orthogonal detectors. PB2 projects a 365-mm-diameter focal plane of 7,588 dichroic, 95/150 GHz transition-edge-sensor bolometers onto a 4-degree field of view that scans the sky at 1 degree per second. We find that a 500-mm-diameter ambient-temperature sapphire achromatic HWP rotating at 2 Hz is a suitable polarization modulator for PB2. We present the design considerations for the PB2 HWP, the construction of the HWP optical stack and rotation mechanism, and the performance of the fully-assembled HWP instrument. We conclude with a discussion of HWP polarization modulation for future Simons Array receivers.

  8. Making maps of cosmic microwave background polarization for B-mode studies: the POLARBEAR example

    DOE PAGES

    Poletti, Davide; Fabbian, Giulio; Le Jeune, Maude; ...

    2017-03-30

    Analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) datasets typically requires some filtering of the raw time-ordered data. For instance, in the context of ground-based observations, filtering is frequently used to minimize the impact of low frequency noise, atmospheric contributions and/or scan synchronous signals on the resulting maps. In this paper, we have explicitly constructed a general filtering operator, which can unambiguously remove any set of unwanted modes in the data, and then amend the map-making procedure in order to incorporate and correct for it. We show that such an approach is mathematically equivalent to the solution of a problem in whichmore » the sky signal and unwanted modes are estimated simultaneously and the latter are marginalized over. We investigated the conditions under which this amended map-making procedure can render an unbiased estimate of the sky signal in realistic circumstances. We then discuss the potential implications of these observations on the choice of map-making and power spectrum estimation approaches in the context of B-mode polarization studies. Specifically, we have studied the effects of time-domain filtering on the noise correlation structure in the map domain, as well as impact it may haveon the performance of the popular pseudo-spectrum estimators. We conclude that although maps produced by the proposed estimators arguably provide the most faithful representation of the sky possible given the data, they may not straightforwardly lead to the best constraints on the power spectra of the underlying sky signal and special care may need to be taken to ensure this is the case. By contrast, simplified map-makers which do not explicitly correct for time-domain filtering, but leave it to subsequent steps in the data analysis, may perform equally well and be easier and faster to implement. We focused on polarization-sensitive measurements targeting the B-mode component of the CMB signal and apply the proposed methods to

  9. Making maps of cosmic microwave background polarization for B-mode studies: the POLARBEAR example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, Davide; Fabbian, Giulio; Le Jeune, Maude; Peloton, Julien; Arnold, Kam; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Barron, Darcy; Beckman, Shawn; Borrill, Julian; Chapman, Scott; Chinone, Yuji; Cukierman, Ari; Ducout, Anne; Elleflot, Tucker; Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen; Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Groh, John; Hall, Grantland; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hazumi, Masashi; Hill, Charles; Howe, Logan; Inoue, Yuki; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Jeong, Oliver; Katayama, Nobuhiko; Keating, Brian; Keskitalo, Reijo; Kisner, Theodore; Kusaka, Akito; Lee, Adrian T.; Leon, David; Linder, Eric; Lowry, Lindsay; Matsuda, Frederick; Navaroli, Martin; Paar, Hans; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Reichardt, Christian L.; Ross, Colin; Siritanasak, Praween; Stebor, Nathan; Steinbach, Bryan; Stompor, Radek; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tajima, Osamu; Teply, Grant; Whitehorn, Nathan

    2017-04-01

    Analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) datasets typically requires some filtering of the raw time-ordered data. For instance, in the context of ground-based observations, filtering is frequently used to minimize the impact of low frequency noise, atmospheric contributions and/or scan synchronous signals on the resulting maps. In this work we have explicitly constructed a general filtering operator, which can unambiguously remove any set of unwanted modes in the data, and then amend the map-making procedure in order to incorporate and correct for it. We show that such an approach is mathematically equivalent to the solution of a problem in which the sky signal and unwanted modes are estimated simultaneously and the latter are marginalized over. We investigated the conditions under which this amended map-making procedure can render an unbiased estimate of the sky signal in realistic circumstances. We then discuss the potential implications of these observations on the choice of map-making and power spectrum estimation approaches in the context of B-mode polarization studies. Specifically, we have studied the effects of time-domain filtering on the noise correlation structure in the map domain, as well as impact it may haveon the performance of the popular pseudo-spectrum estimators. We conclude that although maps produced by the proposed estimators arguably provide the most faithful representation of the sky possible given the data, they may not straightforwardly lead to the best constraints on the power spectra of the underlying sky signal and special care may need to be taken to ensure this is the case. By contrast, simplified map-makers which do not explicitly correct for time-domain filtering, but leave it to subsequent steps in the data analysis, may perform equally well and be easier and faster to implement. We focused on polarization-sensitive measurements targeting the B-mode component of the CMB signal and apply the proposed methods to realistic

  10. CMB internal delensing with general optimal estimator for higher-order correlations

    DOE PAGES

    Namikawa, Toshiya

    2017-05-24

    We present here a new method for delensing B modes of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using a lensing potential reconstructed from the same realization of the CMB polarization (CMB internal delensing). The B -mode delensing is required to improve sensitivity to primary B modes generated by, e.g., the inflationary gravitational waves, axionlike particles, modified gravity, primordial magnetic fields, and topological defects such as cosmic strings. However, the CMB internal delensing suffers from substantial biases due to correlations between observed CMB maps to be delensed and that used for reconstructing a lensing potential. Since the bias depends on realizations, wemore » construct a realization-dependent (RD) estimator for correcting these biases by deriving a general optimal estimator for higher-order correlations. The RD method is less sensitive to simulation uncertainties. Compared to the previous ℓ -splitting method, we find that the RD method corrects the biases without substantial degradation of the delensing efficiency.« less

  11. The QUIJOTE CMB Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rebolo, R.; Tucci, M.; Génova-Santos, R.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hoyland, R.; Herreros, J. M.; Gómez-Reñasco, F.; Caraballo, C. López; Martínez-González, E.; Vielva, P.; Herranz, D.; Casas, F. J.; Artal, E.; Aja, B.; Fuente, L. dela; Cano, J. L.; Villa, E.; Mediavilla, A.; Pascual, J. P.; Piccirillo, L.; Maffei, B.; Pisano, G.; Watson, R. A.; Davis, R.; Davies, R.; Battye, R.; Saunders, R.; Grainge, K.; Scott, P.; Hobson, M.; Lasenby, A.; Murga, G.; Gómez, C.; Gómez, A.; Ariño, J.; Sanquirce, R.; Pan, J.; Vizcargüenaga, A.; Etxeita, B.

    We present the current status of the QUIJOTE (Q-U-I JOint TEnerife) CMB Experiment, a new instrument which will start operations early in 2009 at Teide Observatory with the aim of characterizing the polarization of the CMB and other processes of galactic and extragalactic emission in the frequency range 10-30GHz and at large angular scales. QUIJOTE will be a valuable complement at low frequencies for the PLANCK mission, and will have the required sensitivity to detect a primordial gravitational-wave component if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is larger than r = 0.05.

  12. Statistical nature of non-Gaussianity from cubic order primordial perturbations: CMB map simulations and genus statistic

    SciTech Connect

    Chingangbam, Pravabati; Park, Changbom E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr

    2009-12-01

    We simulate CMB maps including non-Gaussianity arising from cubic order perturbations of the primordial gravitational potential, characterized by the non-linearity parameter g{sub NL}. The maps are used to study the characteristic nature of the resulting non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations. We measure the genus and investigate how it deviates from Gaussian shape as a function of g{sub NL} and smoothing scale. We find that the deviation of the non-Gaussian genus curve from the Gaussian one has an antisymmetric, sine function like shape, implying more hot and more cold spots for g{sub NL} > 0 and less of both for g{sub NL} < 0. The deviation increases linearly with g{sub NL} and also exhibits mild increase as the smoothing scale increases. We further study other statistics derived from the genus, namely, the number of hot spots, the number of cold spots, combined number of hot and cold spots and the slope of the genus curve at mean temperature fluctuation. We find that these observables carry signatures of g{sub NL} that are clearly distinct from the quadratic order perturbations, encoded in the parameter f{sub NL}. Hence they can be very useful tools for distinguishing not only between non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations and Gaussian ones but also between g{sub NL} and f{sub NL} type non-Gaussianities.

  13. Polar Maps of Thermal and Epithermal Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft show views of the polar regions of Mars in thermal neutrons (top) and epithermal neutrons (bottom). In these maps, deep blue indicates a low amount of neutrons, and red indicates a high amount. Thermal neutrons are sensitive to the presence of hydrogen and the presence of carbon dioxide, in this case 'dry ice' frost. The red area in the upper right map indicates that about one meter (three feet) of carbon dioxide frost covers the surface around the north pole, as it does every Mars winter in the polar regions. An enhancement of thermal neutrons close to the south pole, seen as a light green color on the upper left map, indicates the presence of residual carbon dioxide in the south polar cap, even though the annual frost dissipated from that region during southern summer. Soil enriched with hydrogen is indicated by the deep blue colors on the epithermal maps (bottom), showing a low intensity of epithermal neutrons. The deep blue areas in the polar regions are believed to contain up to 50 percent water ice in the upper one meter (three feet) of the soil. The views shown here are of measurements made during the first three months of mapping using the neutron spectrometer instrument, part of the gamma ray spectrometer instrument suite. Topographic features are superimposed on the map for geographic reference.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson, and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The gamma-ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona in collaboration with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, which provided the high-energy neutron detector, and the Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico, which provided the neutron spectrometer. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime

  14. CMB component separation in the pixel domain

    SciTech Connect

    Doroshkevich, A.; Verkhodanov, O.

    2011-02-15

    We show that the popular internal linear combination approach is unstable with respect to division of the observed map pixels to a set of 'homogeneous' subsamples. For various choices of such subsamples we can obtain a restored CMB signal with amplitudes ranging from zero to the amplitude of the observed signal. We propose an approach which allows us to obtain corrected estimates of the CMB power spectrum C{sub l} at l{<=}30 and provides results similar to WMAP for larger l. Using this approach, we eliminate some anomalies of the WMAP results. In particular, our estimate of the quadrupole is consistent with the theoretically expected one. The effect of the 'axis of evil' is suppressed, and the symmetry of the north and south galactic hemispheres increases. These results can change estimates of quadrupole polarization and the redshift of reionization of the Universe. We also propose a new simple approach which can improve the WMAP estimates of the high l power spectrum.

  15. General parity-odd CMB bispectrum estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Liguori, Michele; Fergusson, James R. E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it

    2014-05-01

    We develop a methodology for estimating parity-odd bispectra in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This is achieved through the extension of the original separable modal methodology to parity-odd bispectrum domains (ℓ{sub 1}+ℓ{sub 2}+ℓ{sub 3} = odd). Through numerical tests of the parity-odd modal decomposition with some theoretical bispectrum templates, we verify that the parity-odd modal methodology can successfully reproduce the CMB bispectrum, without numerical instabilities. We also present simulated non-Gaussian maps produced by modal-decomposed parity-odd bispectra, and show the consistency with the exact results. Our new methodology is applicable to all types of parity-odd temperature and polarization bispectra.

  16. Detection of endometrial lesions by degree of linear polarization maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Fazleabas, Asgerally; Walsh, Joseph T.

    2010-02-01

    Endometriosis is one of the most common causes of chronic pelvic pain and infertility and is characterized by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside of the uterine cavity. A novel laparoscopic polarization imaging system was designed to detect endometriosis by imaging endometrial lesions. Linearly polarized light with varying incident polarization angles illuminated endometrial lesions. Degree of linear polarization image maps of endometrial lesions were constructed by using remitted polarized light. The image maps were compared with regular laparoscopy image. The degree of linear polarization map contributed to the detection of endometriosis by revealing structures inside the lesion. The utilization of rotating incident polarization angle (IPA) for the linearly polarized light provides extended understanding of endometrial lesions. The developed polarization system with varying IPA and the collected image maps could provide improved characterization of endometrial lesions via higher visibility of the structure of the lesions and thereby improve diagnosis of endometriosis.

  17. Problems of CMB Data Registration and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.

    In this short course, we consider some radio astronomical fundamentals and problems of radio astronomical observations. We discuss the main observational cosmological tests which are investigated with radio astronomy. The most crucial tests are connected with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Several radio telescopes for CMB study and their basic results are discussed. Some stages of the CMB data analysis pipeline are considered and examples of observational CMB anomalies are discussed. At the end of the course (Appendix 3), the short application of the GLESP package is presented for simulation of the CMB map.

  18. H i and cosmological constraints from intensity mapping, optical and CMB surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtsidou, Alkistis; Bacon, David; Crittenden, Robert

    2017-10-01

    We forecast constraints on neutral hydrogen (H i) and cosmological parameters using near-term intensity mapping surveys with instruments such as BINGO, MeerKAT and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), and Stages III and IV optical galaxy surveys. If foregrounds and systematic effects can be controlled - a problem that becomes much easier in cross-correlation - these surveys will provide exquisite measurements of the H i density and bias, as well as measurements of the growth of structure, the angular diameter distance and the Hubble rate, over a wide range of redshift. We also investigate the possibility of detecting the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect using the Planck satellite and forthcoming intensity mapping surveys, finding that a large sky survey with Phase 1 of the SKA can achieve a near-optimal detection.

  19. Planck intermediate results. XLIV. Structure of the Galactic magnetic field from dust polarization maps of the southern Galactic cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arzoumanian, D.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Le Jeune, M.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Neveu, J.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Soler, J. D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-01

    Using data from the Planck satellite, we study the statistical properties of interstellar dust polarization at high Galactic latitudes around the south pole (b < -60°). Our aim is to advance the understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM), and to provide a modelling framework of the polarized dust foreground for use in cosmic microwave background (CMB) component-separation procedures. We examine the Stokes I, Q, and U maps at 353 GHz, and particularly the statistical distribution of the polarization fraction (p) and angle (ψ), in order to characterize the ordered and turbulent components of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) in the solar neighbourhood. The Q and U maps show patterns at large angular scales, which we relate to the mean orientation of the GMF towards Galactic coordinates (l0,b0) = (70° ± 5°,24° ± 5°). The histogram of the observed p values shows a wide dispersion up to 25%. The histogram of ψ has a standard deviation of 12° about the regular pattern expected from the ordered GMF. We build a phenomenological model that connects the distributions of p and ψ to a statistical description of the turbulent component of the GMF, assuming a uniform effective polarization fraction (p0) of dust emission. To compute the Stokes parameters, we approximate the integration along the line of sight (LOS) as a sum over a set of N independent polarization layers, in each of which the turbulent component of the GMF is obtained from Gaussian realizations of a power-law power spectrum. We are able to reproduce the observed p and ψ distributions using a p0 value of 26%, a ratio of 0.9 between the strengths of the turbulent and mean components of the GMF, and a small value of N. The mean value of p (inferred from the fit of the large-scale patterns in the Stokes maps) is 12 ± 1%. We relate the polarization layers to the density structure and to the correlation length of the GMF along the LOS. We emphasize the simplicity of our model (involving only

  20. Dust-polarization Maps and Interstellar Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Robert R.; Hirata, Chris; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2017-04-01

    longitudinal, rather than transverse, modes in the random-displacement field, providing, perhaps, some clue to the mechanism that stirs the ISM. Future investigations involving the spatial dependence of the EE/BB ratio, TE correlation, and local departures from statistical isotropy in dust-polarization maps, as well as further tests of some of the assumptions in this analysis, are outlined. This work may also aid in the improvement of foreground-separation techniques for studies of cosmic microwave background polarization.

  1. The CMB-osis of Cosmic Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, J. R.

    2002-05-01

    The tiny fluctuations in the 3K photon afterglow of the Big Bang are geometrical mappings of sound waves when this ``oldest light in the Universe'' decoupled from matter some 14 Gigayears ago. In work spanning two decades, my collaborators and I have shown how these encode information on the many parameters that define cosmic structure formation theory. We have developed tools to analyze the sequence of heroic experiments that have always pushed technology to the edge, from even before the COBE satellite of the early 90s through Boomerang, the Cosmic Background Imager, and other recent experiments that have now directly imaged these acoustic patterns. The patterns appear to be Gaussian-distributed and their power spectra show multiple peaks and troughs and a damping tail. Our analyses support the remarkable neo-Big-Bang paradigm: that quantum noise generated during an ultra-early accelerated expansion amplified via gravitational instability to form the galaxies and their hierarchical clustering patterns that we observe as the interconnected ``cosmic web''. When combined with precise theoretical calculations, the CMB and cosmic web data have allowed us to accurately infer the mass-energy densities in ordinary (baryonic) matter, "cold" dark matter, and "vacuum" dark energy to be about 5%, 30% and 65%, summing to ensure a nearly flat large scale geometry. The dominance of dark energy is arguably the greatest mystery in physics. A host of new high precision CMB experiments, many targeting polarization and secondary CMB processes associated with nonlinear effects, will help to establish its properties.

  2. Planck CMB cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, François R.

    2015-08-01

    Sketched out in 1992, selected by ESA in 1996, launched in 2009, Planck delivered a "definitive" map of the anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) as well as information on their polarisation. The CMB anisotropies, of rms ~100 microK in temperature, reveal the imprint of the primordial fluctuations which initiate the growth of the large scale structures of the Universe, as transformed by their evolution, in particular during the first 370 000 years. This evolution is governed by the Universe content at this early epoch. I will confront what temperature and polarisation anisotropies teach us, both in terms of content of the universe and of characteristics of the primordial fluctuations. I will also discuss the extent of the agreement of Planck cosmology with lower redshift cosmological probes like BAO, Weak Lensing or redshift space distortions. Submitted on behalf of the Planck Collaboration.

  3. Assimilative Mapping of Interhemispheric Polar Ionospheric Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, T.; Richmond, A. D.; Knipp, D. J.; McGranaghan, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's main magnetic field is asymmetric between hemispheres due to its non-dipolar component, leading to various hemispherical differences in the coupling among the solar wind, magnetosphere and ionosphere. Manifestation of the asymmetric coupling through different electrodynamic parameters reported in past studies is considerably diverse. To fill the gap in our current understanding, obtained so far by analyzing individual parameters separately and comparing statistical behaviors of the parameters, we quantify the degree of instantaneous inter-hemispheric imbalance of electromagnetic energy deposition (Poynting flux), field-aligned currents, and convection electric fields though global and self-consistent analysis of electrodynamic variables at both polar regions, by means of data assimilation. Inter-hemispheric assimilative maps of different high-latitude electrodynamical parameters are obtained from simultaneous analysis of multiple types of space-based and ground-based observations made available though the AMPERE, SuperDARN, SuperMAG and DMSP programs with rigorous consideration of the uncertainty associated with each observation.

  4. Recent Geologic Mapping Results for the Polar Regions of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    tanaka, K. L.; Kolb, E. J.

    2008-01-01

    The polar regions of Mars include the densest data coverage for the planet because of the polar orbits of MGS, ODY, and MEX. Because the geology of the polar plateaus has been among the most dynamic on the planet in recent geologic time, the data enable the most detailed and complex geologic investigations of any regions on Mars, superseding previous, even recent, mapping efforts [e.g., 1-3]. Geologic mapping at regional and local scales is revealing that the stratigraphy and modificational histories of polar materials by various processes are highly complex at both poles. Here, we describe some of our recent results in polar geologic mapping and how they address the geologic processes involved and implications for polar climate history.

  5. How accurately can suborbital experiments measure the CMB?

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira-Costa, Angelica de; Tegmark, Max; Devlin, Mark J.; Page, Lyman; Miller, Amber D.; Netterfield, C. Barth; Xu Yongzhong

    2005-02-15

    Great efforts are currently being channeled into ground- and balloon-based CMB experiments, mainly to explore polarization and anisotropy on small angular scales. To optimize instrumental design and assess experimental prospects, it is important to understand in detail the atmosphere-related systematic errors that limit the science achievable with new instruments. As a step in this direction, we spatially compare the 648 square degree ground- and balloon-based QMASK map with the atmosphere-free WMAP map, finding beautiful agreement on all angular scales where both are sensitive. Although much work remains on quantifying atmospheric effects on CMB experiments, this is a reassuring quantitative assessment of the power of the state-of-the-art fast-Fourier-transform- and matrix-based mapmaking techniques that have been used for QMASK and virtually all subsequent experiments.

  6. CMB-S4 and the hemispherical variance anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dwyer, Márcio; Copi, Craig J.; Knox, Lloyd; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2017-09-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) full-sky temperature data show a hemispherical asymmetry in power nearly aligned with the Ecliptic. In real space, this anomaly can be quantified by the temperature variance in the Northern and Southern Ecliptic hemispheres, with the Northern hemisphere displaying an anomalously low variance while the Southern hemisphere appears unremarkable [consistent with expectations from the best-fitting theory, Lambda Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM)]. While this is a well-established result in temperature, the low signal-to-noise ratio in current polarization data prevents a similar comparison. This will change with a proposed ground-based CMB experiment, CMB-S4. With that in mind, we generate realizations of polarization maps constrained by the temperature data and predict the distribution of the hemispherical variance in polarization considering two different sky coverage scenarios possible in CMB-S4: full Ecliptic north coverage and just the portion of the North that can be observed from a ground-based telescope at the high Chilean Atacama plateau. We find that even in the set of realizations constrained by the temperature data, the low Northern hemisphere variance observed in temperature is not expected in polarization. Therefore, observing an anomalously low variance in polarization would make the hypothesis that the temperature anomaly is simply a statistical fluke more unlikely and thus increase the motivation for physical explanations. We show, within ΛCDM, how variance measurements in both sky coverage scenarios are related. We find that the variance makes for a good statistic in cases where the sky coverage is limited, however, full northern coverage is still preferable.

  7. Geomorphologic Map of Titan's Polar Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, S. P. D.; Hayes, A. G.; Malaska, M. J.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Schoenfeld, A.; Williams, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    Titan's lakes and seas contain vast amounts of information regarding the history and evolution of Saturn's largest moon. To understand this landscape, we created a geomorphologic map, and then used our map to develop an evolutionary model.

  8. BAYESIAN INFERENCE OF CMB GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Anderes, Ethan; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Lavaux, Guilhem

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite, along with several ground-based telescopes, has mapped the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at sufficient resolution and signal-to-noise so as to allow a detection of the subtle distortions due to the gravitational influence of the intervening matter distribution. A natural modeling approach is to write a Bayesian hierarchical model for the lensed CMB in terms of the unlensed CMB and the lensing potential. So far there has been no feasible algorithm for inferring the posterior distribution of the lensing potential from the lensed CMB map. We propose a solution that allows efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling from the joint posterior of the lensing potential and the unlensed CMB map using the Hamiltonian Monte Carlo technique. The main conceptual step in the solution is a re-parameterization of CMB lensing in terms of the lensed CMB and the “inverse lensing” potential. We demonstrate a fast implementation on simulated data, including noise and a sky cut, that uses a further acceleration based on a very mild approximation of the inverse lensing potential. We find that the resulting Markov Chain has short correlation lengths and excellent convergence properties, making it promising for applications to high-resolution CMB data sets in the future.

  9. The QUIJOTE-CMB Experiment: Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génova-Santos, Ricardo; Rebolo, R.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Aguiar, M.; Gómez-Reñasco, F.; Herreros, J. M.; Hildebrandt, S.; Hoyland, R.; López-Caraballo, C.; Rodríguez, R.; Tucci, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Barreiro, R. B.; Casas, F. J.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Herranz, D.; López-Caniego, M.; Vielva, P.; Artal, E.; Aja, B.; Cano, J. L.; de La Fuente, L.; Mediavilla, A.; Pascual, J. P.; Villa, E.; Piccirillo, L.; Battye, R.; Davies, R.; Davis, R.; Dickinson, C.; Maffei, B.; Pisano, G.; Watson, R. A.; Brown, M.; Challinor, A.; Grainge, K.; Hobson, M.; Lasenby, A.; Saunders, R.; Scott, P.; Ariño, J.; Etxeita, B.; Gómez, A.; Gómez, C.; Murga, G.; Pan, J.; Sanquirce, R.; Vizcargüenaga, A.

    We briefly discuss the scientific objectives of the QUIJOTE (Q-U-I JOint TEnerife) CMB experiment, and present the current status and future scheduling of this project. QUIJOTE is a new project to study the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and of the Galactic and extragalactic emission in the frequency range 10-30 GHz and with an angular resolution of 1°. It will start operations in summer 2010 from the Teide Observatory. The scientific goal of this experiment is twofold: i) to characterize at low frequencies the polarization of the synchrotron and anomalous emissions, making then possible the correction of these CMB contaminants in the data of similar experiments operating at higher frequencies; and ii) to detect (or to constrain) the imprint of the primordial gravitational-wave background in the polarization pattern of the CMB if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is larger (lower) than r = 0:05.

  10. Dasi and Future Iced Based CMB Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovac, John; Carlstrom, John E.; Leitch, Erik M.; Pryke, Clem; Halverson, Nils; Holzapfel, William

    The Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI) recently obtained the first detection of the polarization of Cosmic Microwave Background using data from 270 days of dedicated observations during its second and third seasons at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole research station. The observed polarization is found to have an amplitude and spatial pattern consistent with predictions offering a validation of the standard theoretical framework of CMB physics and lending confidence to the values of cosmological parameters that have been derived from CMB measurements. The results from DASI and ACBAR have proven that the South Pole is an exceptional site for conducting sensitive CMB measurements. In addition to presenting the DASI results this talk will briefly review planned CMB experiments to be deployed to the South Pole

  11. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  12. The CMB bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Fergusson, J.R.; Liguori, M.; Shellard, E.P.S. E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it

    2012-12-01

    We use a separable mode expansion estimator with WMAP7 data to estimate the bispectrum for all the primary families of non-Gaussian models, including non-scaling feature (periodic) models, the flat (trans-Planckian) model, DBI and ghost inflation, as well as previously constrained simple cases. We review the late-time mode expansion estimator methodology which can be applied to any non-separable primordial and CMB bispectrum model, and we demonstrate how the method can be used to reconstruct the CMB bispectrum from an observational map. We extend the previous validation of the general estimator using local map simulations. We apply the estimator to the coadded WMAP 7-year V and W channel maps, reconstructing the WMAP bispectrum using l < 500 multipoles and n = 50 orthonormal 3D eigenmodes; both the mode expansion parameters and the reconstructed 3D WMAP bispectrum are plotted. We constrain all popular nearly scale-invariant models, ensuring that the theoretical bispectrum is well-described by a convergent mode expansion. Constraints from the local model f{sub NL} = 20.31±27.64 and the equilateral model f{sub NL} = 10.19±127.38 (F{sub NL} = 1.90±23.79) are consistent with previously published results. (Here, we use a nonlinearity parameter F{sub NL} normalised to the local case, to allow more direct comparison between different models.) Notable new constraints from our method include those for the constant model F{sub NL} = 7.82±24.57, the flat model F{sub NL} = 7.31±26.22, and warm inflation F{sub NL} = 2.10±25.83. We investigate feature models, which break scale invariance, surveying a wide parameter range for both the scale and phase (scanning for feature models with an effective period l* > 150). We find no significant evidence of non-Gaussianity for all cases well-described by the given eigenmodes. In the overall non-Gaussian analysis, we find one anomalous mode n = 33 with a 3.39σ amplitude which could give rise to an oscillatory model signal with l*

  13. Planck 2015 results. XVI. Isotropy and statistics of the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Aluri, P. K.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casaponsa, B.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Liu, H.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Pant, N.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We test the statistical isotropy and Gaussianity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies using observations made by the Planck satellite. Our results are based mainly on the full Planck mission for temperature, but also include some polarization measurements. In particular, we consider the CMB anisotropy maps derived from the multi-frequency Planck data by several component-separation methods. For the temperature anisotropies, we find excellent agreement between results based on these sky maps over both a very large fraction of the sky and a broad range of angular scales, establishing that potential foreground residuals do not affect our studies. Tests of skewness, kurtosis, multi-normality, N-point functions, and Minkowski functionals indicate consistency with Gaussianity, while a power deficit at large angular scales is manifested in several ways, for example low map variance. The results of a peak statistics analysis are consistent with the expectations of a Gaussian random field. The "Cold Spot" is detected with several methods, including map kurtosis, peak statistics, and mean temperature profile. We thoroughly probe the large-scale dipolar power asymmetry, detecting it with several independent tests, and address the subject of a posteriori correction. Tests of directionality suggest the presence of angular clustering from large to small scales, but at a significance that is dependent on the details of the approach. We perform the first examination of polarization data, finding the morphology of stacked peaks to be consistent with the expectations of statistically isotropic simulations. Where they overlap, these results are consistent with the Planck 2013 analysis based on the nominal mission data and provide our most thorough view of the statistics of the CMB fluctuations to date.

  14. Planck 2015 results: XVI. Isotropy and statistics of the CMB

    DOE PAGES

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; ...

    2016-09-20

    In this paper, we test the statistical isotropy and Gaussianity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies using observations made by the Planck satellite. Our results are based mainly on the full Planck mission for temperature, but also include some polarization measurements. In particular, we consider the CMB anisotropy maps derived from the multi-frequency Planck data by several component-separation methods. For the temperature anisotropies, we find excellent agreement between results based on these sky maps over both a very large fraction of the sky and a broad range of angular scales, establishing that potential foreground residuals do not affect ourmore » studies. Tests of skewness, kurtosis, multi-normality, N-point functions, and Minkowski functionals indicate consistency with Gaussianity, while a power deficit at large angular scales is manifested in several ways, for example low map variance. The results of a peak statistics analysis are consistent with the expectations of a Gaussian random field. The “Cold Spot” is detected with several methods, including map kurtosis, peak statistics, and mean temperature profile. We thoroughly probe the large-scale dipolar power asymmetry, detecting it with several independent tests, and address the subject of a posteriori correction. Tests of directionality suggest the presence of angular clustering from large to small scales, but at a significance that is dependent on the details of the approach. We perform the first examination of polarization data, finding the morphology of stacked peaks to be consistent with the expectations of statistically isotropic simulations. Finally, where they overlap, these results are consistent with the Planck 2013 analysis based on the nominal mission data and provide our most thorough view of the statistics of the CMB fluctuations to date.« less

  15. Measuring galaxy cluster masses with CMB lensing using a Maximum Likelihood estimator: statistical and systematic error budgets for future experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Patil, Sanjaykumar; Baxter, Eric J.; Bianchini, Federico; Bleem, Lindsey E.; Crawford, Thomas M.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Manzotti, Alessandro; Reichardt, Christian L.

    2017-08-01

    We develop a Maximum Likelihood estimator (MLE) to measure the masses of galaxy clusters through the impact of gravitational lensing on the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We show that, at low noise levels in temperature, this optimal estimator outperforms the standard quadratic estimator by a factor of two. For polarization, we show that the Stokes Q/U maps can be used instead of the traditional E- and B-mode maps without losing information. We test and quantify the bias in the recovered lensing mass for a comprehensive list of potential systematic errors. Using realistic simulations, we examine the cluster mass uncertainties from CMB-cluster lensing as a function of an experiment's beam size and noise level. We predict the cluster mass uncertainties will be 3 - 6% for SPT-3G, AdvACT, and Simons Array experiments with 10,000 clusters and less than 1% for the CMB-S4 experiment with a sample containing 100,000 clusters. The mass constraints from CMB polarization are very sensitive to the experimental beam size and map noise level: for a factor of three reduction in either the beam size or noise level, the lensing signal-to-noise improves by roughly a factor of two.

  16. Measuring galaxy cluster masses with CMB lensing using a Maximum Likelihood estimator: statistical and systematic error budgets for future experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Patil, Sanjaykumar; Baxter, Eric J.; ...

    2017-08-25

    We develop a Maximum Likelihood estimator (MLE) to measure the masses of galaxy clusters through the impact of gravitational lensing on the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We show that, at low noise levels in temperature, this optimal estimator outperforms the standard quadratic estimator by a factor of two. For polarization, we show that the Stokes Q/U maps can be used instead of the traditional E- and B-mode maps without losing information. We test and quantify the bias in the recovered lensing mass for a comprehensive list of potential systematic errors. Using realistic simulations, wemore » examine the cluster mass uncertainties from CMB-cluster lensing as a function of an experiment’s beam size and noise level. We predict the cluster mass uncertainties will be 3 - 6% for SPT-3G, AdvACT, and Simons Array experiments with 10,000 clusters and less than 1% for the CMB-S4 experiment with a sample containing 100,000 clusters. The mass constraints from CMB polarization are very sensitive to the experimental beam size and map noise level: for a factor of three reduction in either the beam size or noise level, the lensing signal-to-noise improves by roughly a factor of two.« less

  17. Anomalous CMB north-south asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernui, Armando

    2008-09-15

    Several accurate analyses have revealed a statistically significant north-south ecliptic asymmetry in the large-angle correlations strength of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation temperature field data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). This asymmetry is inconsistent with the statistical isotropy expected in the concordance cosmological model {lambda}CDM. It has been suggested that a possible cause-effect relationship exists between this large-angle anisotropy and the anomalous CMB quadrupole-octopole planes alignment. In turn, this later phenomenon (or both) would be a consequence of one or more of the following undesired effects in CMB data: a systematic error in the data processing or in the instrument characterization, residual foregrounds, and large-angle correlations induced by the incomplete sky CMB data (cut-sky masks are needed to reject galactic foregrounds). Here, it is proved that the north-south asymmetry is unrelated to the quadrupole (l=2) and the octopole (l=3) properties because we find, at high confidence levels, such large-angle anisotropy in three- and five-year WMAP CMB maps containing only the multipole components 4{<=}l{<=}10. The statistical significance depends on both, the CMB map analyzed as well as the cut-sky mask applied to exclude foregrounds. In general, we obtain that the significance level of the north-south asymmetry is less in five-year WMAP data with KQ75 (> or approx. 90% CL) than it is in three-year data with Kp0 (> or approx. 96% CL). For instance, in the WMAP internal linear combination (ILC)-five-year map with the KQ75 mask (a sky cut of 28.4%) this phenomenon is observed at 92.7% CL, whereas for the WMAP ILC-three-year map with the Kp0 mask (a sky cut of 23.5%) this phenomenon appears at 96.5% CL. Moreover, it is also shown that this hemispherical asymmetry is unlikely due to systematics or foreground contaminants, because it is present in single-frequency, multifrequency, and cleaned ILC

  18. Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Notari, Alessio E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es

    2013-04-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles a{sub lm}'s via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

  19. Constraining compensated isocurvature perturbations using the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Tristan L.; Rhiannon Smith, Kyle Yee, Julian Munoz, Daniel Grin

    2017-01-01

    Compensated isocurvature perturbations (CIPs) are variations in the cosmic baryon fraction which leave the total non-relativistic matter (and radiation) density unchanged. They are predicted by models of inflation which involve more than one scalar field, such as the curvaton scenario. At linear order, they leave the CMB two-point correlation function nearly unchanged: this is why existing constraints to CIPs are so much more permissive than constraints to typical isocurvature perturbations. Recent work articulated an efficient way to calculate the second order CIP effects on the CMB two-point correlation. We have implemented this method in order to explore constraints to the CIP amplitude using current Planck temperature and polarization data. In addition, we have computed the contribution of CIPs to the CMB lensing estimator which provides us with a novel method to use CMB data to place constraints on CIPs. We find that Planck data places a constraint to the CIP amplitude which is competitive with other methods.

  20. Planned CMB Satellite Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Adrian

    2016-03-01

    I will summarize space missions that are in the planning stage to measure the polarized spatial fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Space missions are complementary to ground-based observatories. First, the absence of atmospheric emission results in a wider range of frequencies that can be observed, which in turn improves removal of galactic foreground emission. Second, the stable observations possible from space give high-fidelity measurements at angular scales of tens of degrees where inflation theory predicts a peak in the B-mode angular power spectrum. Robust detection of both this ``reionization'' peak and the ``recombination'' peak at degree angular scales will give the most convincing case that the fingerprints of inflation have been detected. CMB polarization space missions in the planning stage include CORE+, LiteBIRD, and PIXIE. Science goals for all these missions include the detection and characterization of inflation and the characterization of the reionization epoch. CORE+ and LiteBIRD are imaging telescopes with sub-Kelvin superconducting focal-plane detector arrays with several thousand detectors. PIXIE is a two-beam differential spectrometer that will measure the Planck spectrum of the CMB in addition to searching for inflation.

  1. 'Mapping' a Changing Earth through the Polar Lens - the USGS Contribution to the International Polar Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, P. P.

    2005-05-01

    USGS has a long tradition of scientific monitoring, assessment, and research in the polar regions. Beginning with geophysical and geological surveys in the Arctic in the early 1900's and joint work with the National Science Foundation in Antarctica after WWII, the USGS has had an extensive history of diverse activities such as topographic mapping and geodetic control in Antarctica; satellite and ground-based monitoring of glaciers and ice caps; research on movements, distribution patterns, and adaptation of polar wildlife; establishment and operation of a seismic array at the South Pole; estimations of energy resources of the circum-Arctic; mapping the occurrence and distribution of circum-Arctic vegetation; and the development of paleoclimate records from Alaskan sediments and polar ice cores. USGS participation in the 2007 - 2008 International Polar Year effort will both extend and enhance current activities and establish and integrate new activities into large-scale international monitoring and research efforts. We envision these efforts as 'mapping' the Earth in the broadest and most inclusive sense of the word - from mapping earth-system interactions to mapping genomic diversity, and from mapping at the largest scales utilizing remotely-sensed data acquired from satellite-based sensors to the smallest scales utilizing data acquired at the molecular level. By utilizing the full spectrum of USGS capabilities and by partnering with other federal and state agencies, NGOs, universities, and international consortia during IPY, the USGS seeks to be part of the global community that will lead scientific efforts to elucidate current physical, biological and chemical processes that operate in the polar regions and provide the fundamental science that will inform policy, land-use, and resource management decisions in the decades to come.

  2. A neural-network based estimator to search for primordial non-Gaussianity in Planck CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Novaes, C.P.; Bernui, A.; Ferreira, I.S.; Wuensche, C.A. E-mail: bernui@on.br E-mail: ca.wuensche@inpe.br

    2015-09-01

    We present an upgraded combined estimator, based on Minkowski Functionals and Neural Networks, with excellent performance in detecting primordial non-Gaussianity in simulated maps that also contain a weighted mixture of Galactic contaminations, besides real pixel's noise from Planck cosmic microwave background radiation data. We rigorously test the efficiency of our estimator considering several plausible scenarios for residual non-Gaussianities in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps, with the intuition to optimize the training procedure of the Neural Network to discriminate between contaminations with primordial and secondary non-Gaussian signatures. We look for constraints of primordial local non-Gaussianity at large angular scales in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps. For the SMICA map we found f{sub NL} = 33 ± 23, at 1σ confidence level, in excellent agreement with the WMAP-9yr and Planck results. In addition, for the other three Planck maps we obtain similar constraints with values in the interval f{sub NL}  element of  [33, 41], concomitant with the fact that these maps manifest distinct features in reported analyses, like having different pixel's noise intensities.

  3. A neural-network based estimator to search for primordial non-Gaussianity in Planck CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaes, C. P.; Bernui, A.; Ferreira, I. S.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2015-09-01

    We present an upgraded combined estimator, based on Minkowski Functionals and Neural Networks, with excellent performance in detecting primordial non-Gaussianity in simulated maps that also contain a weighted mixture of Galactic contaminations, besides real pixel's noise from Planck cosmic microwave background radiation data. We rigorously test the efficiency of our estimator considering several plausible scenarios for residual non-Gaussianities in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps, with the intuition to optimize the training procedure of the Neural Network to discriminate between contaminations with primordial and secondary non-Gaussian signatures. We look for constraints of primordial local non-Gaussianity at large angular scales in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps. For the SMICA map we found fNL = 33 ± 23, at 1σ confidence level, in excellent agreement with the WMAP-9yr and Planck results. In addition, for the other three Planck maps we obtain similar constraints with values in the interval fNL in [33, 41], concomitant with the fact that these maps manifest distinct features in reported analyses, like having different pixel's noise intensities.

  4. A MEASUREMENT OF THE CORRELATION OF GALAXY SURVEYS WITH CMB LENSING CONVERGENCE MAPS FROM THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bleem, L. E.; Becker, M. R.; Benson, B. A.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Van Engelen, A.; Holder, G. P.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Aird, K. A.; Armstrong, R.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Biesiadzinski, T.; Brodwin, M.; Busha, M. T.; Cho, H. M.; Desai, S.; Dore, O.; and others

    2012-07-01

    We compare cosmic microwave background lensing convergence maps derived from South Pole Telescope (SPT) data with galaxy survey data from the Blanco Cosmology Survey, WISE, and a new large Spitzer/IRAC field designed to overlap with the SPT survey. Using optical and infrared catalogs covering between 17 and 68 deg{sup 2} of sky, we detect a correlation between the SPT convergence maps and each of the galaxy density maps at >4{sigma}, with zero correlation robustly ruled out in all cases. The amplitude and shape of the cross-power spectra are in good agreement with theoretical expectations and the measured galaxy bias is consistent with previous work. The detections reported here utilize a small fraction of the full 2500 deg{sup 2} SPT survey data and serve as both a proof of principle of the technique and an illustration of the potential of this emerging cosmological probe.

  5. Geologic map of the north polar region of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Fortezzo, Corey M.

    2012-01-01

    The north polar region of Mars occurs within the central and lowest part of the vast northern plains of Mars and is dominated by the roughly circular north polar plateau, Planum Boreum. The northern plains formed very early in Martian time and have collected volcanic flows and sedimentary materials shed from highland sources. Planum Boreum has resulted from the accumulation of water ice and dust particles. Extensive, uncratered dune fields adjacent to Planum Boreum attest to the active and recent transport and accumulation of sand. Our geologic map of Planum Boreum is the first to record its entire observable stratigraphic record using the various post-Viking image and topography datasets released before 2009. We also provide much more detail in the map than previously published, including some substantial revisions based on new data and observations. The available data have increased and improved immensely in quantity, resolution, coverage, positional accuracy, and spectral range, enabling us to resolve previously unrecognized geomorphic features, stratigraphic relations, and compositional information. We also employ more carefully prescribed and effective mapping methodologies and digital techniques, as well as formatting guidelines. The foremost aspect to our mapping approach is how geologic units are discriminated based primarily on their temporal relations with other units as expressed in unit contacts by unconformities or by gradational relations. Whereas timing constraints of such activity in the north polar region are now better defined stratigraphically, they remain poorly constrained chronologically. The end result is a new reconstruction of the sedimentary, erosional, and structural histories of the north polar region and how they may have been driven by climate conditions, available geologic materials, and eolian, periglacial, impact, magmatic, hydrologic, and tectonic activity.

  6. Cosmic Microwave Background Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.; Doroshkevich, A. G.

    2012-03-01

    The last decade of research in cosmology was connected with the ambitious experiments including space and ground base observations. Among the most impressive results of these investigations are the measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation like WMAP* and Planck. Exactly from the CMB studies, we have started the epoch of the precision cosmology when generally the values of cosmological parameters have been known and present research is devoted to improvement of the precision. These achievements are connected with both the creation of the new facilities in millimeter and submillimeter astronomy (e.g., satellites, receivers, antennas, computers) and development of the methods for the CMB data analysis. Actually, the process of data analysis contains several technical stages including 1. Registration of time-ordered data (TOD) 2. Pixelization of the CMB data - map preparation 3. Component separation 4. Map statistics analysis 5. Map - spherical harmonics transformation 6. C(l)-spectrum calculation and spectrum statistics analysis 7. Cosmological parameters estimation Starting from the cosmic background explorer (COBE) experiment using the so-called Quadrilateralized Sky Cube Projection (see [1-3]), the problem of the whole sky CMB pixelization has attracted great interest and many such schemes were developed. Let us note however that accurate pixelization of the CMB data on the sphere is very important but not the final step of analysis. Usually, the next step implies the determination of the coefficients of the spherical harmonic decomposition of the CMB signal for both anisotropy and polarization. This means that some of the pixelization schemes provide a very accurate map but are inconvenient for further decomposition. This also means that the choice of suitable pixelization schemes depends upon the general goals of the investigation. In this review, we consider several of the most popular sky map pixelization schemes and link them with the

  7. COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AND TEMPERATURE POWER SPECTRA ESTIMATION USING LINEAR COMBINATION OF WMAP 5 YEAR MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Samal, Pramoda Kumar; Jain, Pankaj; Saha, Rajib; Prunet, Simon; Souradeep, Tarun

    2010-05-01

    We estimate cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization and temperature power spectra using Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 5 year foreground contaminated maps. The power spectrum is estimated by using a model-independent method, which does not utilize directly the diffuse foreground templates nor the detector noise model. The method essentially consists of two steps: (1) removal of diffuse foregrounds contamination by making linear combination of individual maps in harmonic space and (2) cross-correlation of foreground cleaned maps to minimize detector noise bias. For the temperature power spectrum we also estimate and subtract residual unresolved point source contamination in the cross-power spectrum using the point source model provided by the WMAP science team. Our TT, TE, and EE power spectra are in good agreement with the published results of the WMAP science team. We perform detailed numerical simulations to test for bias in our procedure. We find that the bias is small in almost all cases. A negative bias at low l in TT power spectrum has been pointed out in an earlier publication. We find that the bias-corrected quadrupole power (l(l + 1)C{sub l} /2{pi}) is 532 {mu}K{sup 2}, approximately 2.5 times the estimate (213.4 {mu}K{sup 2}) made by the WMAP team.

  8. Mapping TES Aerobreaking Data of The Martian Polar Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunaiji, E. S.; Edwards, C. S.; Smith, M. D.; AlShamsi, M. R.; AlJanaahi, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to create maps of the north and south Mars polar caps using Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) aerobreaking surface temperature data in south and north as well as Lambert albedo data in the south. TES is an instrument on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft. It has six detectors arranged in a 2x3 array with a nominal spot size of 3 × 6 km; however, given the elliptical nature of the orbit during aerobreaking the footprint can be significantly larger (10s of km), especially over the southern hemisphere. TES is a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer designed to study the Martian surface and atmosphere using thermal infrared emission spectroscopy. It is composed of 2 separate channels, a broadband visible/near-infrared bolometer and hyperspectral thermal infrared spectrometer with a broadband thermal infrared bolometer. TES aerobraking spectra were taken between Mars Year 23, Ls=180° and Mars Year 24, Ls=30°. To determine the footprint location on the surface, geometry is calculated using the Spacecraft Planet Instrument Camera Matrix and Event (SPICE) Toolkit. These data were then binned and mapped to surface in polar stereographic projection. While some early studies focused on these data, we have expanded upon the ranges, generated time-/seasonally-binned data, and re-examined this largely underutilized set of data from TES ultimately extending the record of polar science on Mars.

  9. H I maps of S0 galaxies with polar rings

    SciTech Connect

    Van gorkom, J.H.; Schechter, P.L.; Kristian, J.

    1987-03-01

    VLA maps in the 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen have been obtained for three S0 galaxies with polar rings, and an upper limit on H I has been obtained for a fourth system. Polar rings span a continuum, ranging from those in which the H I seems to be in a relatively stable configuration, producing stars throughout its extent, to those in which the H I is very asymmetric, with stars forming only at the inner edge of an H I disk. A deep CCD image of MGC -5-7-1 shows arcs and filaments, some of which coincide with the likewise chaotic H I. If the system formed as the result of the merger of a gas-rich system with an S0 galaxy, the gas-rich system must have included considerable numbers of stars. 25 references.

  10. On the Bispectrum of Cosmic String Seeded CMB Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landriau, M.

    2013-07-01

    I compute the bispectrum of maps of cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations seeded by cosmic strings from large to 30 arcminute scales. Examining the distribution of triangle configurations and comparing with Gaussian realizations with the same power spectrum, I conclude that the CMB bispectrum cannot pick up the mild non-Gaussianity present in the maps and thus that it cannot characterize cosmic string induced non-Gaussianity produced in the regimes probed by these maps.

  11. CMB Observables and Their Cosmological Implications 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wayne

    2003-05-01

    The tremendous experimental progress in cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropy studies over the last few years has helped establish a standard paradigm for cosmology at intermediate epochs and has simultaneously raised questions regarding the physical processes at the two opposite ends of time. We review the acoustic phenomenology that forms the cornerstone of the standard cosmological model and discuss internal consistency relations which lend credence to its interpretation. We touch on future milestones in the study of CMB anisotropy and their implications for inflationary and dark energy models.

  12. CMB Anisotropies Two Years after Cobe: Observations, Theory and the Future - Proceedings of the 1994 Cwru Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Lawrence M.

    1995-01-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * I. The Experimental Situation Two Years After COBE: Anisotropies, and the CMB Power Spectrum * COBE DMR Data, Signal and Noise: Color Plates * CMB Two Years After the COBE Discovery of Anisotropies * Comparison of Spectral Index Determinations * Two-Point Correlations in the COBE-DMR Two-Year Anisotropy Maps * A Preliminary Analysis of UCSB's South Pole 1993-94 Results * CMB Anisotropy Measurements During the Fourth Flight of MAX * Observations of the Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background by the Firs, SK93, and MSAM-I Experiments * The Python Microwave Background Anisotropy Experiment * II. Theoretical Implications and Cosmology: The Early Universe, Large Scale Structure and Dark Matter * Testing Inflationary Cosmology and Measuring Cosmological Parameters Using the Cosmic Microwave Background * Inflation Confronts the CMB: An Analysis Including the Effects of Foreground * Testing Inflation with MSAM, MAX Tenerife and COBE * CMBR Anisotropy Due to Gravitational Radiation in Inflationary Cosmologies * Black Holes From Blue Spectra * Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies and the Geometry of the Universe * Ω and Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies * CDM Cosmogony in an Open Universe * Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Anisotropy Induced by Cosmic Strings * Temperature Anisotropies in a Universe with Global Defects * The Nature Versus Nurture of Anisotropies * The Existence of Baryons at z = 1000 * Polarization-Temperature Correlations in the Microwave Background * III. Related Issues: BBN Limits on ΩB, and Comparing Theoretical Predictions and Observations * Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and ΩB: A Guide for CMB Interpreters * Quoting Experimental Information

  13. CMB B -mode non-Gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerburg, P. Daniel; Meyers, Joel; van Engelen, Alexander; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine

    2016-06-01

    We study the degree to which the cosmic microwave background (CMB) can be used to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity involving one tensor and two scalar fluctuations, focusing on the correlation of one polarization B mode with two temperature modes. In the simplest models of inflation, the tensor-scalar-scalar primordial bispectrum is nonvanishing and is of the same order in slow-roll parameters as the scalar-scalar-scalar bispectrum. We calculate the ⟨B T T ⟩ correlation arising from a primordial tensor-scalar-scalar bispectrum, and show that constraints from an experiment like CMB-Stage IV using this observable are more than an order of magnitude better than those on the same primordial coupling obtained from temperature measurements alone. We argue that B -mode non-Gaussianity opens up an as-yet-unexplored window into the early Universe, demonstrating that significant information on primordial physics remains to be harvested from CMB anisotropies.

  14. Mapping of magnetic chrons: paleomagnetic polarity map of East Iceland, 0-13 Myr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helgason, Johann

    2016-04-01

    Through data on palaeomagnetism, stratigraphy and radiometric age dating an immense database on magnetic chrons has been established for the lava succession in Iceland (e.g. Kristjánsson, 2008). Correlation of magnetic chrons with the geomagnetic time scale provides a reasonable age estimate for vast stratigraphic sequences. The basalt lava succession in Iceland has a thickness of tens of kilometers. The magnetostratigraphic data offer, through the help of paleomagnetism and radiometric dating, a detailed timing of events in the evolution of the Iceland mantle plume region. Yet a magnetic polarity map for Iceland has been lacking but during the last 50 years, comprehensive stratigraphic mapping has paved the way for a magnetic polarity map in various parts of Iceland. Here, such a map is presented for a segment of East Iceland, i.e. for lavas ranging in age from 0 to 13 M yr. The map is a compilation based on various studies into the cliff section and stratigraphic work performed by numerous research initiatives, both in relation to hydroelectric research as well as academic projects. References: Kristjánsson, L., 2008. Paleomagnetic research on Icelandic lava flows. Jökull, 58, 101-116. Helgason, J., Duncan, R.A., Franzson, H., Guðmundsson, Á., and M. Riishuus., 2015. Magnetic polarity map of Akrafjall and Skarðsheiði and new 40Ar-39Ar age dating from West Iceland., Presentation at the spring conference of the Icelandic Geological Society, held on March 13th 2015 at the University of Iceland.

  15. Asymmetric beams and CMB statistical anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Duncan; Lewis, Antony; Challinor, Anthony

    2010-05-15

    Beam asymmetries result in statistically anisotropic cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps. Typically, they are studied for their effects on the CMB power spectrum, however they more closely mimic anisotropic effects such as gravitational lensing and primordial power asymmetry. We discuss tools for studying the effects of beam asymmetry on general quadratic estimators of anisotropy, analytically for full-sky observations as well as in the analysis of realistic data. We demonstrate this methodology in application to a recently detected 9{sigma} quadrupolar modulation effect in the WMAP data, showing that beams provide a complete and sufficient explanation for the anomaly.

  16. CMB cold spot from inflationary feature scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Ma, Yin-Zhe

    2016-05-01

    We propose a ;feature-scattering; mechanism to explain the cosmic microwave background cold spot seen from WMAP and Planck maps. If there are hidden features in the potential of multi-field inflation, the inflationary trajectory can be scattered by such features. The scattering is controlled by the amount of isocurvature fluctuations, and thus can be considered as a mechanism to convert isocurvature fluctuations into curvature fluctuations. This mechanism predicts localized cold spots (instead of hot ones) on the CMB. In addition, it may also bridge a connection between the cold spot and a dip on the CMB power spectrum at ℓ ∼ 20.

  17. Mapping 180° polar domains using electron backscatter diffraction and dynamical scattering simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Burch, Matthew J.; Fancher, Chris M.; Patala, Srikanth; ...

    2016-11-18

    A novel technique, which directly and nondestructively maps polar domains using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is described and demonstrated. Through dynamical diffraction simulations and quantitative comparison to experimental EBSD patterns, the absolute orientation of a non-centrosymmetric crystal can be determined. With this information, the polar domains of a material can be mapped. The technique is demonstrated by mapping the non-ferroelastic, or 180°, ferroelectric domains in periodically poled LiNbO3 single crystals. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate the possibility of mapping polarity using this technique in other polar materials system.

  18. Mapping 180° polar domains using electron backscatter diffraction and dynamical scattering simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, Matthew J.; Fancher, Chris M.; Patala, Srikanth; De Graef, Marc; Dickey, Elizabeth C.

    2016-11-18

    A novel technique, which directly and nondestructively maps polar domains using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is described and demonstrated. Through dynamical diffraction simulations and quantitative comparison to experimental EBSD patterns, the absolute orientation of a non-centrosymmetric crystal can be determined. With this information, the polar domains of a material can be mapped. The technique is demonstrated by mapping the non-ferroelastic, or 180°, ferroelectric domains in periodically poled LiNbO3 single crystals. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate the possibility of mapping polarity using this technique in other polar materials system.

  19. Effects of Rayleigh scattering on the CMB and cosmic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Elham; Sigurdson, Kris; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2015-04-01

    During and after recombination, in addition to Thomson scattering with free electrons, photons also couple to neutral hydrogen and helium atoms through Rayleigh scattering. This coupling influences both cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and the distribution of matter in the Universe. The frequency dependence of the Rayleigh cross section breaks the thermal nature of CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies and effectively doubles the number of variables needed to describe CMB intensity and polarization statistics, while the additional atomic coupling changes the matter distribution and the lensing of the CMB. We introduce a new method to capture the effects of Rayleigh scattering on cosmological power spectra. Rayleigh scattering modifies CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies at the ˜1 % level at 35 GHz (scaling ∝ν4 ), and modifies matter correlations by as much as ˜0.3 %. We show the Rayleigh signal, especially the cross-spectra between the thermal (Rayleigh) E -polarization and Rayleigh (thermal) intensity signal, may be detectable with future CMB missions even in the presence of foregrounds, and how this new information might help to better constrain the cosmological parameters.

  20. CMBACT: CMB from ACTive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogosian, Levon; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2011-06-01

    This code is based on the cosmic string model described in this paper by Pogosian and Vachaspati, as well as on the CMBFAST code created by Uros Seljak and Matias Zaldarriaga. It contains an integrator for the vector contribution to the CMB temperature and polarization. The code is reconfigured to make it easier to use with or without active sources. To produce inflationary CMB spectra one simply sets the string tension to zero (gmu=0.0d0). For a non-zero value of tension only the string contribution is calculated. An option is added to randomize the directions of velocities of consolidated segments as they evolve in time. In the original segment model, which is still the default version (irandomv=0), each segment is given a random velocity initially, but then continues to move in a straight line for the rest of its life. The new option (irandomv=1) allows to additionally randomize velocities of each segment at roughly each Hubble time. However, the merits of this new option are still under investigation. The default version (irandomv=0) is strongly recommended, since it actually gives reasonable unequal time correlators. For each Fourier mode, k, the string stress-energy components are now evaluated on a time grid sufficiently fine for that k.

  1. Spectral Mapping of the Intermediate Polar DQ Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, R. K.; Baptista, R.; Horne, K.; Martell, P.

    2010-06-01

    We report an eclipse-mapping study of the intermediate polar DQ Her based on time-resolved optical spectroscopy (Δλ ~ 3800-5000 Å) covering four eclipses. The spectra were sliced into 295 narrow passbands in the continuum and in the lines, and the corresponding light curves were analyzed to solve for a set of monochromatic maps of the disk brightness distribution and for the flux of an additional uneclipsed component in each band. Eclipse maps of the He II λ4686 line indicate that an azimuthally and vertically extended bright spot at disk rim is an important source of the reprocessing of X-rays from the magnetic poles. The disk spectrum is flat with no Balmer or Helium lines in the inner regions, and shows double-peaked emission lines in the intermediate and outer disk regions, while the slope of the continuum becomes progressively redder with increasing radius. The inferred disk temperatures are in the range T ~= 13500-5000 K and can be reasonably well described by a steady-state disk with mass accretion rate of \\dot{M}=(2.7± 1.0)× 10^{-9} M_{⊙} yr^{-1}. A comparison of the radial intensity distribution for the Balmer lines reveals a linear correlation between the slope of the distribution and the transition energy. The spectrum of the uneclipsed light is dominated by Balmer and He I lines in emission (probably from the extended nova shell) with narrow absorption cores (likely from a collimated and optically thick wind from the accretion disk). The observed narrow and redshifted Ca II λ3934 absorption line in the total light spectra plus the inverse P-Cygni profiles of the Balmer and He II λ4686 emission lines in spectra of the asymmetric component indicate radial inflow of gas in the innermost disk regions and are best explained in terms of magnetically controlled accretion inside the white dwarf magnetosphere. We infer projected radial inflow velocities of ~200-500 km s-1, significantly lower than both the rotational and the free-fall velocities for

  2. SPECTRAL MAPPING OF THE INTERMEDIATE POLAR DQ HERCULIS

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, R. K.; Baptista, R.; Horne, K.; Martell, P.

    2010-06-15

    We report an eclipse-mapping study of the intermediate polar DQ Her based on time-resolved optical spectroscopy ({Delta}{lambda} {approx} 3800-5000 A) covering four eclipses. The spectra were sliced into 295 narrow passbands in the continuum and in the lines, and the corresponding light curves were analyzed to solve for a set of monochromatic maps of the disk brightness distribution and for the flux of an additional uneclipsed component in each band. Eclipse maps of the He II {lambda}4686 line indicate that an azimuthally and vertically extended bright spot at disk rim is an important source of the reprocessing of X-rays from the magnetic poles. The disk spectrum is flat with no Balmer or Helium lines in the inner regions, and shows double-peaked emission lines in the intermediate and outer disk regions, while the slope of the continuum becomes progressively redder with increasing radius. The inferred disk temperatures are in the range T {approx_equal} 13500-5000 K and can be reasonably well described by a steady-state disk with mass accretion rate of M-dot =(2.7{+-}1.0)x10{sup -9} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. A comparison of the radial intensity distribution for the Balmer lines reveals a linear correlation between the slope of the distribution and the transition energy. The spectrum of the uneclipsed light is dominated by Balmer and He I lines in emission (probably from the extended nova shell) with narrow absorption cores (likely from a collimated and optically thick wind from the accretion disk). The observed narrow and redshifted Ca II {lambda}3934 absorption line in the total light spectra plus the inverse P-Cygni profiles of the Balmer and He II {lambda}4686 emission lines in spectra of the asymmetric component indicate radial inflow of gas in the innermost disk regions and are best explained in terms of magnetically controlled accretion inside the white dwarf magnetosphere. We infer projected radial inflow velocities of {approx}200-500 km s{sup -1}, significantly

  3. CMB probes on the correlated axion isocurvature perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Kadota, Kenji; Gong, Jinn-Ouk; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Matsubara, Takahiko E-mail: jinn-ouk.gong@apctp.org E-mail: taka@kmi.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2015-03-01

    We explore the possible cosmological consequence of the gravitational coupling between the inflaton and axion-like fields. In view of the forthcoming cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization and lensing data, we study the sensitivity of the CMB data on the cross-correlation between the curvature and axion isocurvature perturbations. Through a concrete example, we illustrate the explicit dependence of the scale dependent cross-correlation power spectrum on the axion parameters.

  4. Constraints on CPT violation from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe three year polarization data: A wavelet analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cabella, Paolo; Silk, Joseph; Natoli, Paolo

    2007-12-15

    We perform a wavelet analysis of the temperature and polarization maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) delivered by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe experiment in search for a parity-violating signal. Such a signal could be seeded by new physics beyond the standard model, for which the Lorentz and CPT symmetries may not hold. Under these circumstances, the linear polarization direction of a CMB photon may get rotated during its cosmological journey, a phenomenon also called cosmological birefringence. Recently, Feng et al. have analyzed a subset of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and BOOMERanG 2003 angular power spectra of the CMB, deriving a constraint that mildly favors a nonzero rotation. By using wavelet transforms we set a tighter limit on the CMB photon rotation angle {delta}{alpha}=-2.5{+-}3.0 ({delta}{alpha}=-2.5{+-}6.0) at the one (two) {sigma} level, consistent with a null detection.

  5. Circularly polarized near-field optical mapping of spin-resolved quantum Hall chiral edge states.

    PubMed

    Mamyouda, Syuhei; Ito, Hironori; Shibata, Yusuke; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masumi; Akazaki, Tatsushi; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Ootuka, Youiti; Nomura, Shintaro

    2015-04-08

    We have successfully developed a circularly polarized near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) that enables us to irradiate circularly polarized light with spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. As a demonstration, we perform real-space mapping of the quantum Hall chiral edge states near the edge of a Hall-bar structure by injecting spin polarized electrons optically at low temperature. The obtained real-space mappings show that spin-polarized electrons are injected optically to the two-dimensional electron layer. Our general method to locally inject spins using a circularly polarized NSOM should be broadly applicable to characterize a variety of nanomaterials and nanostructures.

  6. Thermal and albedo mapping of the north and south polar regions of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paige, D. A.; Keegan, K. D.

    1991-01-01

    The first maps of the thermal properties of the north and south polar region of Mars are presented. The maps complete the mapping of the entire planet. The maps for the north polar region were derived from Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) observations obtained from 10 Jun. to 30 Sep. 1978. This period corresponds to the early summer season in the north, when the north residual water ice cap was exposed, and the polar surface temperatures were near their maximum. The maps in the south were derived from observations obtained between 24 Aug. to 23 Sep. 1977. This period corresponds to the late summer season in the south, when the seasonal polar cap had retreated to close to its residual configuration, and the second global dust storm of 1977 had largely subsided. The major results concerning the following topics are summarized: (1) surface water ice; (2) polar dune material; and (3) dust deposits.

  7. Why CMB Physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    The aim of the lectures in this paper is to introduce some basic problems arising in gravitation and modern cosmology. All along the discussion the guiding theme is provided by the phenomenological and theoretical properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). These lectures have been prepared for a regular PhD course of the University of Milan-Bicocca.

  8. Rayleigh scattering: blue sky thinking for future CMB observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Antony

    2013-08-01

    Rayleigh scattering from neutral hydrogen during and shortly after recombination causes the CMB anisotropies to be significantly frequency dependent at high frequencies. This may be detectable with Planck, and would be a strong signal in any future space-based CMB missions. The later peak of the Rayleigh visibility compared to Thomson scattering gives an increased large-scale CMB polarization signal that is a greater than 4% effect for observed frequencies ν ∼> 500GHz. There is a similar magnitude suppression on small scales from additional damping. Due to strong correlation between the Rayleigh and primary signal, measurement of the Rayleigh component is limited by noise and foregrounds, not cosmic variance of the primary CMB, and should observable over a wide range of angular scales at frequencies 200GHz ∼< ν ∼< 800GHz. I give new numerical calculations of the temperature and polarization power spectra, and show that future CMB missions could measure the temperature Rayleigh cross-spectrum at high precision, detect the polarization from Rayleigh scattering, and also accurately determine the cross-spectra between the Rayleigh temperature signal and primary polarization. The Rayleigh scattering signal may provide a powerful consistency check on recombination physics. In principle it can be used to measure additional horizon-scale primordial perturbation modes at recombination, and distinguish a significant tensor mode B-polarization signal from gravitational lensing at the power spectrum level.

  9. Planck 2015 results: XVI. Isotropy and statistics of the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Aluri, P. K.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Casaponsa, B.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Liu, H.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Pant, N.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-20

    In this paper, we test the statistical isotropy and Gaussianity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies using observations made by the Planck satellite. Our results are based mainly on the full Planck mission for temperature, but also include some polarization measurements. In particular, we consider the CMB anisotropy maps derived from the multi-frequency Planck data by several component-separation methods. For the temperature anisotropies, we find excellent agreement between results based on these sky maps over both a very large fraction of the sky and a broad range of angular scales, establishing that potential foreground residuals do not affect our studies. Tests of skewness, kurtosis, multi-normality, N-point functions, and Minkowski functionals indicate consistency with Gaussianity, while a power deficit at large angular scales is manifested in several ways, for example low map variance. The results of a peak statistics analysis are consistent with the expectations of a Gaussian random field. The “Cold Spot” is detected with several methods, including map kurtosis, peak statistics, and mean temperature profile. We thoroughly probe the large-scale dipolar power asymmetry, detecting it with several independent tests, and address the subject of a posteriori correction. Tests of directionality suggest the presence of angular clustering from large to small scales, but at a significance that is dependent on the details of the approach. We perform the first examination of polarization data, finding the morphology of stacked peaks to be consistent with the expectations of statistically isotropic simulations. Finally, where they overlap, these results are consistent with the Planck 2013 analysis based on the nominal mission data and provide our most thorough view of the statistics of the CMB fluctuations to date.

  10. Cosmic microwave background: Polarization and temperature anisotropies from symmetric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccigalupi, Carlo

    1999-06-01

    sources, because of their angular extension and amplitude. Also, the marked analogy between polarization and temperature signals offers cross correlation possibilities for the future detection instruments. It would be interesting to detect these signals in the next 10 arc min CMB map provided by the Planck Surveyor satellite experiment.

  11. Affine Maps of the Polarization Vector for Quantum Systems of Arbitrary Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Mark; Bishop, C. Allen; Ou, Yong-Cheng

    2011-03-01

    The operator-sum decomposition (OS) of a mapping from one density matrix to another has many applications in quantum information science. To this mapping there corresponds an affine map which provides a geometric description of the density matrix in terms of the polarization vector representation. This has been thoroughly explored for qubits since the components of the polarization vector are measurable quantities (corresponding to expectation values of Hermitian operators) and also because it enables the description of map domains geometrically. Here we extend the OS-affine map correspondence to qudits, briefly discuss general properties of the map, the form for particular important cases, and provide several explicit results for qutrit maps. We use the affine map and a singular-value-like decomposition, to find positivity constraints that provide a symmetry for small polarization vector magnitudes (states which are closer to the maximally mixed state) which is broken as the polarization vector increases in magnitude (a state becomes more pure). The dependence of this symmetry on the magnitude of the polarization vector implies the polar decomposition of the map can not be used as it can for the qubit case. However, it still leads us to a connection between positivity and purity for general d-state systems. This material is based upon work supported by NSF-Grant No. 0545798 to MSB.

  12. Full covariance of CMB and lensing reconstruction power spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peloton, Julien; Schmittfull, Marcel; Lewis, Antony; Carron, Julien; Zahn, Oliver

    2017-02-01

    CMB and lensing reconstruction power spectra are powerful probes of cosmology. However, they are correlated, since the CMB power spectra are lensed, and the lensing reconstruction is constructed using CMB multipoles. We perform a full analysis of the auto- and cross-covariances, including polarization power spectra and minimum-variance lensing estimators, and compare with simulations of idealized future CMB-S4 observations. Covariances sourced by fluctuations in the unlensed CMB and instrumental noise can largely be removed by using a realization-dependent subtraction of lensing reconstruction noise, leaving a relatively simple covariance model that is dominated by lensing-induced terms and well described by a small number of principal components. The correlations between the CMB and lensing power spectra will be detectable at the level of ˜5 σ for a CMB-S4 mission, and neglecting them could underestimate some parameter error bars by several tens of percent. However, we found that the inclusion of external priors or data sets to estimate parameter error bars can make the impact of the correlations almost negligible.

  13. Measuring primordial gravitational waves from CMB B−modes in cosmologies with generalized expansion histories

    SciTech Connect

    Antolini, Claudia; Martinelli, Matteo; Fantaye, Yabebal; Baccigalupi, Carlo E-mail: mmartin@sissa.it E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2013-02-01

    We evaluate our capability to constrain the abundance of primordial tensor perturbations (primordial gravitational waves, PGWs) in cosmologies with generalized expansion histories in the epoch of cosmic acceleration. Forthcoming satellite and sub-orbital experiments probing polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) are expected to measure the B−mode power in CMB polarization, coming from PGWs on the degree scale, as well as gravitational lensing on arcminute scales; the latter is the main competitor for the measurement of PGWs, and is directly affected by the underlying expansion history, determined by the presence of a Dark Energy (DE) component. In particular, we consider early DE possible scenarios, in which the expansion history is substantially modified at the epoch in which the CMB lensing is most relevant. We show that the introduction of a parametrized DE may induce a variation as large as 30% in the ratio of the power of lensing and PGWs on the degree scale. We find that adopting the nominal specifications of upcoming satellite measurements, the constraining power on PGWs is weakened by the inclusion of the extra degrees of freedom, resulting in a reduction of about 10% of the upper limits on r in fiducial models with no GWs, as well as a comparable increase in the error bars in models with non-zero tensor power. Moreover, we find that the inclusion of sub-orbital CMB experiments, capable of mapping the B−mode power up to the angular scales which are affected by lensing, has the effect of restoring the forecasted performances with a fixed cosmological expansion history corresponding to a cosmological constant. Finally, we show how the combination of CMB data with Type Ia SuperNovae (SNe), Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and Hubble constant allows to constrain simultaneously the primordial tensor power and the DE quantities in the parametrization we consider, consisting of present abundance and first redshift derivative of the energy

  14. BICEP2/Keck - Planck joint analysis and prospects for Galactic foreground removal from CMB observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crill, Brendan

    2015-08-01

    The joint analysis of 150 GHz polarized maps from BICEP2 and Keck Array at 150 GHz with Planck data at 353 GHzallowed the removal of Galactic dust contamination from the measurement of lensed B-modes in the deep (57 nK deg)BICEP2/Keck maps as well as setting an upper limit on the primordial gravitational wave background from inflation. We present this analysis, describe prospects for polarized foreground cleaning of future suborbitalmeasurements of CMB, and additionally describe Planck's measurements of the spatial correlation of polarizedemission from synchrotron and dust at high galactic latitude, which complicates the removal of Galactic foregrounds at the foregroundminimum of 70-100 GHz.

  15. Planck intermediate results. L. Evidence of spatial variation of the polarized thermal dust spectral energy distribution and implications for CMB B-mode analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patrizii, L.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Stanco, L.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2017-03-01

    The characterization of the Galactic foregrounds has been shown to be the main obstacle in thechallenging quest to detect primordial B-modes in the polarized microwave sky. We make use of the Planck-HFI 2015 data release at high frequencies to place new constraints on the properties of the polarized thermal dust emission at high Galactic latitudes. Here, we specifically study the spatial variability of the dust polarized spectral energy distribution (SED), and its potential impact on the determination of the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r. We use the correlation ratio of the angular power spectra between the 217 and 353 GHz channels as a tracer of these potential variations, computed on different high Galactic latitude regions, ranging from 80% to 20% of the sky. The new insight from Planck data is a departure of the correlation ratio from unity that cannot be attributed to a spurious decorrelation due to the cosmic microwave background, instrumental noise, or instrumental systematics. The effect is marginally detected on each region, but the statistical combination of all the regions gives more than 99% confidence for this variation in polarized dust properties. In addition, we show that the decorrelation increases when there is a decrease in the mean column density of the region of the sky being considered, and we propose a simple power-law empirical model for this dependence, which matches what is seen in the Planck data. We explore the effect that this measured decorrelation has on simulations of the BICEP2-Keck Array/Planck analysis and show that the 2015 constraints from these data still allow a decorrelation between the dust at 150 and 353 GHz that is compatible with our measured value. Finally, using simplified models, we show that either spatial variation of the dust SED or of the dust polarization angle are able to produce decorrelations between 217 and 353 GHz data similar to the values we observe in the data.

  16. Large-Angle Anomalies in the CMB

    DOE PAGES

    Copi, Craig J.; Huterer, Dragan; Schwarz, Dominik J.; ...

    2010-01-01

    We review the recently found large-scale anomalies in the maps of temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. These include alignments of the largest modes of CMB anisotropy with each other and with geometry and direction of motion of the solar ssystem, and the unusually low power at these largest scales. We discuss these findings in relation to expectation from standard inflationary cosmology, their statistical significance, the tools to study them, and the various attempts to explain them.

  17. CMB anisotropies: Total angular momentum method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wayne; White, Martin

    1997-07-01

    A total angular momentum representation simplifies the radiation transport problem for temperature and polarization anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Scattering terms couple only the quadrupole moments of the distributions and each moment corresponds directly to the observable angular pattern on the sky. We develop and employ these techniques to study the general properties of anisotropy generation from scalar, vector, and tensor perturbations to the metric and the matter, both in the cosmological fluids and from any seed perturbations (e.g., defects) that may be present. The simpler, more transparent form and derivation of the Boltzmann equations brings out the geometric and model-independent aspects of temperature and polarization anisotropy formation. Large angle scalar polarization provides a robust means to distinguish between isocurvature and adiabatic models for structure formation in principle. Vector modes have the unique property that the CMB polarization is dominated by magnetic-type parity at small angles (a factor of 6 in power compared with 0 for the scalars and 8/13 for the tensors) and hence potentially distinguishable independent of the model for the seed. The tensor modes produce a different sign from the scalars and vectors for the temperature-polarization correlations at large angles. We explore conditions under which one perturbation type may dominate over the others including a detailed treatment of the photon-baryon fluid before recombination.

  18. Thermal and albedo mapping of the north and south polar regions of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paige, D. A.; Keegan, K. D.

    1991-01-01

    The first maps are presented of the north and south polar regions of Mars. The thermal properties of the midlatitude regions from -60 deg to +60 deg latitude were mapped in previous studies. The presented maps complete the mapping of entire planet. The maps for the north and south polar regions were derived from Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) observations. Best fit thermal inertias were determined by comparing the available IRTM 20 micron channel brightness within a given region to surface temperatures computed by a diurnal and seasonal thermal model. The model assumes no atmospheric contributions to the surface heat balance. The resulting maps of apparent thermal inertia and average IRTM measured solar channel lambert albedo for the north and south polar regions from the poles to +/- 60 deg latitude.

  19. Constraining fundamental physics with future CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Silvia; Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Sherwin, Blake D.; Spergel, David N.

    2010-12-01

    The Planck experiment will soon provide a very accurate measurement of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. This will let cosmologists determine most of the cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. Future experiments will improve and complement the Planck data with better angular resolution and better polarization sensitivity. This unexplored region of the CMB power spectrum contains information on many parameters of interest, including neutrino mass, the number of relativistic particles at recombination, the primordial helium abundance, and the injection of additional ionizing photons by dark matter self-annihilation. We review the imprint of each parameter on the CMB and forecast the constraints achievable by future experiments by performing a Monte Carlo analysis on synthetic realizations of simulated data. We find that next generation satellite missions such as CMBPol could provide valuable constraints with a precision close to that expected in current and near future laboratory experiments. Finally, we discuss the implications of this intersection between cosmology and fundamental physics.

  20. Constraining fundamental physics with future CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Sherwin, Blake D.; Spergel, David N.

    2010-12-15

    The Planck experiment will soon provide a very accurate measurement of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. This will let cosmologists determine most of the cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. Future experiments will improve and complement the Planck data with better angular resolution and better polarization sensitivity. This unexplored region of the CMB power spectrum contains information on many parameters of interest, including neutrino mass, the number of relativistic particles at recombination, the primordial helium abundance, and the injection of additional ionizing photons by dark matter self-annihilation. We review the imprint of each parameter on the CMB and forecast the constraints achievable by future experiments by performing a Monte Carlo analysis on synthetic realizations of simulated data. We find that next generation satellite missions such as CMBPol could provide valuable constraints with a precision close to that expected in current and near future laboratory experiments. Finally, we discuss the implications of this intersection between cosmology and fundamental physics.

  1. Planck intermediate results: L. Evidence of spatial variation of the polarized thermal dust spectral energy distribution and implications for CMB B-mode analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; ...

    2017-02-28

    The characterization of the Galactic foregrounds has been shown to be the main obstacle in thechallenging quest to detect primordial B-modes in the polarized microwave sky. In this paper, we make use of the Planck-HFI 2015 data release at high frequencies to place new constraints on the properties of the polarized thermal dust emission at high Galactic latitudes. Here, we specifically study the spatial variability of the dust polarized spectral energy distribution (SED), and its potential impact on the determination of the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r. We use the correlation ratio of the CBBℓ angular power spectra between the 217 andmore » 353 GHz channels as a tracer of these potential variations, computed on different high Galactic latitude regions, ranging from 80% to 20% of the sky. The new insight from Planck data is a departure of the correlation ratio from unity that cannot be attributed to a spurious decorrelation due to the cosmic microwave background, instrumental noise, or instrumental systematics. The effect is marginally detected on each region, but the statistical combination of all the regions gives more than 99% confidence for this variation in polarized dust properties. In addition, we show that the decorrelation increases when there is a decrease in the mean column density of the region of the sky being considered, and we propose a simple power-law empirical model for this dependence, which matches what is seen in the Planck data. We explore the effect that this measured decorrelation has on simulations of the BICEP2-Keck Array/Planck analysis and show that the 2015 constraints from these data still allow a decorrelation between the dust at 150 and 353 GHz that is compatible with our measured value. In conclusion, using simplified models, we show that either spatial variation of the dust SED or of the dust polarization angle are able to produce decorrelations between 217 and 353 GHz data similar to the values we observe in the data.« less

  2. Application of beam deconvolution technique to power spectrum estimation for CMB measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keihänen, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Reinecke, M.

    2017-04-01

    We present two novel methods for the estimation of the angular power spectrum of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. We assume an absolute CMB experiment with arbitrary asymmetric beams and arbitrary sky coverage. The methods differ from the earlier ones in that the power spectrum is estimated directly from the time-ordered data, without first compressing the data into a sky map, and they take into account the effect of asymmetric beams. In particular, they correct the beam-induced leakage from temperature to polarization. The methods are applicable to a case where part of the sky has been masked out to remove foreground contamination, leaving a pure CMB signal, but incomplete sky coverage. The first method (deconvolution quadratic maximum likelihood) is derived as the optimal quadratic estimator, which simultaneously yields an unbiased spectrum estimate and minimizes its variance. We successfully apply it to multipoles up to ℓ = 200. The second method is derived as a weak-signal approximation from the first one. It yields an unbiased estimate for the full multipole range, but relaxes the requirement of minimal variance. We validate the methods with simulations for the 70 GHz channel of Planck surveyor, and demonstrate that we are able to correct the beam effects in the TT, EE, BB and TE spectra up to multipole ℓ = 1500. Together, the two methods cover the complete multipole range with no gap in between.

  3. To the problem of the secondary CMB anisotropy separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhodanov, Oleg; Solovyov, Dmitrij; Majorova, Elena; Khabibullina, Margarita

    2016-10-01

    We study contribution to the secondary anisotropy maps of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation which difficult to account for faint sources. Two effects are investigated. They are the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect connected with the inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons on hot electrons of cluster of galaxies, and contamination of the background by weak extragalctic sources. First, we study fields of the Planck CMB maps around radio sources of the RATAN-600 catalog. We see weak microwave sources which make an additional contribution to the secondary anisotropy on angular small scales (< 7'). An algorithm for selecting candidate objects with the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect was proposed, based on the use of data on the radio spectral indices and the signal in cosmic-microwave background maps. Second, applying the stacking method, we examine the areas of the CMB maps, constructed according to the Planck Space Observatory data in the neighborhood of different populations of radio sources and giant elliptical galaxies. The samples of objects include giant radio galaxies (GRG), radio sources, selected by the radio spectral index and redshift, as well as the gammaray bursts, used as a secondary comparative sample. The signal from this objects exists on CMB maps and its difference in the neighborhood of GRGs from the other types of objects was discovered.

  4. CMB lensing from SPT+Planck and cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Yuuki; SPT Collaboration; DES Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) SZ survey has observed 2500 square degrees of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to high accuracy down to 1 arcminute resolution at 150GHz. The Planck satellite has also observed the same patch of the CMB sky at 143GHz, but the two experiments were designed to measure temperature anisotropies optimally at different angular scales. By combining data from these two experiments, we are able to produce a temperature map that has an improved signal-to-noise ratio at all scales. This combined temperature map is used to produce a CMB weak lensing map, which we use for cosmological parameter and cross-correlation analyses. In particular, the SPT footprint has significant overlap with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) observing region, which allows us to cross-correlate the CMB lensing map with galaxy density and galaxy shear measurements obtained by DES. In this talk, I will present the SPT+Planck combining procedure, the CMB lensing reconstruction pipeline, tests performed to verify the lensing map, and finally the cross-correlation measurements.

  5. GLESP 2.0: Gauss-Legendre Sky Pixelization for CMB Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, A. G.; Naselsky, P. D.; Verkhodanov, O. V.; Novikov, D. I.; Turchaninov, V. I.; Novikov, I. D.; Christensen, P. R.; Chiang, L.-Y.

    2011-03-01

    GLESP is a pixelization scheme for the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation maps. This scheme is based on the Gauss-Legendre polynomials zeros and allows one to create strict orthogonal expansion of the map.

  6. Evidence for gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background polarization from cross-correlation with the cosmic infrared background.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Borys, C; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Linder, E; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2014-04-04

    We reconstruct the gravitational lensing convergence signal from cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data taken by the Polarbear experiment and cross-correlate it with cosmic infrared background maps from the Herschel satellite. From the cross spectra, we obtain evidence for gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization at a statistical significance of 4.0σ and indication of the presence of a lensing B-mode signal at a significance of 2.3σ. We demonstrate that our results are not biased by instrumental and astrophysical systematic errors by performing null tests, checks with simulated and real data, and analytical calculations. This measurement of polarization lensing, made via the robust cross-correlation channel, not only reinforces POLARBEAR auto-correlation measurements, but also represents one of the early steps towards establishing CMB polarization lensing as a powerful new probe of cosmology and astrophysics.

  7. Mapping of all polarization-singularity C-point morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, E. J.; Rojec, B. L.; Beach, K.

    2014-02-01

    We present theoretical descriptions and measurements of optical beams carrying isolated polarization-singularity C-points. Our analysis covers all types of C-points, including asymmetric lemons, stars and monstars. They are formed by the superposition of a circularly polarized mode carrying an optical vortex and a fundamental Gaussian mode in the opposite state of polarization. The type of C-point can be controlled experimentally by varying two parameters controlling the asymmetry of the optical vortex. This was implemented via a superposition of modes with singly charged optical vortices of opposite sign, and varying the relative amplitude and phase. The results are in excellent agreement with the predictions.

  8. Status of CMB Observations in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The 2.725 K cosmic microwave background has played a key role in the development of modern cosmology by providing a solid observational foundation for constraining possible theories of what happened at very large redshifts and theoretical speculation reaching back almost to the would-be big bang initial singularity. After recounting some of the lesser known history of this area, I summarize the current observational situation and also discuss some exciting challenges that lie ahead: the search for B modes, the precision mapping of the CMB gravitational lensing potential, and the ultra-precise characterization of the CMB frequency spectrum, which would allow the exploitation of spectral distortions to probe new physics.

  9. CMB lens sample covariance and consistency relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motloch, Pavel; Hu, Wayne; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien

    2017-02-01

    Gravitational lensing information from the two and higher point statistics of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization fields are intrinsically correlated because they are lensed by the same realization of structure between last scattering and observation. Using an analytic model for lens sample covariance, we show that there is one mode, separately measurable in the lensed CMB power spectra and lensing reconstruction, that carries most of this correlation. Once these measurements become lens sample variance dominated, this mode should provide a useful consistency check between the observables that is largely free of sampling and cosmological parameter errors. Violations of consistency could indicate systematic errors in the data and lens reconstruction or new physics at last scattering, any of which could bias cosmological inferences and delensing for gravitational waves. A second mode provides a weaker consistency check for a spatially flat universe. Our analysis isolates the additional information supplied by lensing in a model-independent manner but is also useful for understanding and forecasting CMB cosmological parameter errors in the extended Λ cold dark matter parameter space of dark energy, curvature, and massive neutrinos. We introduce and test a simple but accurate forecasting technique for this purpose that neither double counts lensing information nor neglects lensing in the observables.

  10. Phases of new physics in the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Daniel; Wallisch, Benjamin; Green, Daniel; Meyers, Joel E-mail: drgreen@cita.utoronto.ca E-mail: b.wallisch@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuations in the cosmic neutrino background are known to produce a phase shift in the acoustic peaks of the cosmic microwave background. It is through the sensitivity to this effect that the recent CMB data has provided a robust detection of free-streaming neutrinos. In this paper, we revisit the phase shift of the CMB anisotropy spectrum as a probe of new physics. The phase shift is particularly interesting because its physical origin is strongly constrained by the analytic properties of the Green's function of the gravitational potential. For adiabatic fluctuations, a phase shift requires modes that propagate faster than the speed of fluctuations in the photon-baryon plasma. This possibility is realized by free-streaming relativistic particles, such as neutrinos or other forms of dark radiation. Alternatively, a phase shift can arise from isocurvature fluctuations. We present simple models to illustrate each of these effects. We then provide observational constraints from the Planck temperature and polarization data on additional forms of radiation. We also forecast the capabilities of future CMB Stage IV experiments. Whenever possible, we give analytic interpretations of our results.

  11. TESTING CPT SYMMETRY WITH CURRENT AND FUTURE CMB MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Si-Yu; Zhang, Xinmin; Xia, Jun-Qing; Li, Hong; Li, Mingzhe

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we use the current and future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments to test the Charge-Parity-Time Reversal (CPT) symmetry. We consider a CPT-violating interaction in the photon sector L{sub cs}∼p{sub μ}A{sub ν} F-tilde {sup μν}, which gives rise to a rotation of the polarization vectors of the propagating CMB photons. By combining the 9 yr WMAP, BOOMERanG 2003, and BICEP1 observations, we obtain the current constraint on the isotropic rotation angle α-bar =−2.12±1.14 (1σ), indicating that the significance of the CPT violation is about 2σ. Here, we particularly take the systematic errors of CMB measurements into account. Then, we study the effects of the anisotropies of the rotation angle [Δα( n-hat )] on the CMB polarization power spectra in detail. Due to the small effects, the current CMB polarization data cannot constrain the related parameters very well. We obtain the 95% C.L. upper limit of the variance of the anisotropies of the rotation angle C {sup α}(0) < 0.035 from all of the CMB data sets. More interestingly, including the anisotropies of rotation angle could lower the best-fit value of r and relax the tension on the constraints of r between BICEP2 and Planck. Finally, we investigate the capabilities of future Planck polarization measurements on α-bar and Δα( n-hat ). Benefited from the high precision of Planck data, the constraints of the rotation angle can be significantly improved.

  12. Suppressing CMB low multipoles with ISW effect

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santanu; Souradeep, Tarun E-mail: tarun@iucaa.ernet.in

    2014-02-01

    Recent results of Planck data reveal that the power [1,2] in the low multipoles of the CMB angular power spectrum, approximately up to l = 30, is significantly lower than the theoretically predicted in the best fit ΛCDM model. There are different known physical effects that can affect the power at low multipoles, such as features in the primordial power spectrum (PPS) in some models of inflation and ISW effect. In this paper we investigate the possibility of invoking the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect to explain the power deficit at low multipoles. The ISW effect that originates from the late time expansion history of the universe is rich in possibilities given the limited understanding of the origin of dark energy (DE). It is a common understanding that the ISW effect adds to the power at the low multipoles of the CMB angular power spectrum. In this paper we carry out an analytic study to show that there are some expansion histories in which the ISW effect, instead of adding power, provides negative contribution to the power at low multipoles. Guided by the analytic study, we present examples of the features required in the late time expansion history of the universe that could explain the power deficiency through the ISW effect. We also show that an ISW origin of power deficiency is consistent, at present, with other cosmological observations that probe the expansion history such as distance modulus, matter power spectrum and the evolution of cluster number count. We also show that the ISW effect may be distinguished from power deficit originating from features in the PPS using the measurements of the CMB polarization spectrum at low multipoles expected from Planck. We conclude that the power at low multipoles of the CMB anisotropy could well be closely linked to Dark Energy puzzle in cosmology and this observation could be actually pointing to richer phenomenology of DE beyond the cosmological constant Λ.

  13. External priors for the next generation of CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzotti, Alessandro; Dodelson, Scott; Park, Youngsoo

    2016-03-01

    Planned cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments will improve what we know about neutrino physics, inflation, and dark energy. The low level of noise, together with improved angular resolution, will increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the CMB polarized data as well as the reconstructed lensing potential of large scale structure. Projected constraints on cosmological parameters are tight, but these can be improved even further with information from external experiments. Here, we examine quantitatively the extent to which external priors can lead to improvement in projected constraints from a CMB-Stage IV (S4) experiment on neutrino and dark energy properties. We find that CMB S4 constraints on neutrino mass could be strongly enhanced by external constraints on the cold dark matter density Ωch2 and the Hubble constant H0. If polarization on the largest scales (ℓ<50 ) will not be measured, an external prior on the primordial amplitude As or the optical depth τ will also be important. A CMB constraint on the number of relativistic degrees of freedom, Neff, will benefit from an external prior on the spectral index ns and the baryon energy density Ωbh2. Finally, an external prior on H0 will help constrain the dark energy equation of state (w ).

  14. External priors for the next generation of CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Manzotti, Alessandro; Dodelson, Scott; Park, Youngsoo

    2016-03-01

    Planned cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments can dramatically improve what we know about neutrino physics, inflation, and dark energy. The low level of noise, together with improved angular resolution, will increase the signal to noise of the CMB polarized signal as well as the reconstructed lensing potential of high redshift large scale structure. Projected constraints on cosmological parameters are extremely tight, but these can be improved even further with information from external experiments. Here, we examine quantitatively the extent to which external priors can lead to improvement in projected constraints from a CMB-Stage IV (S4) experiment on neutrino and dark energy properties. We find that CMB S4 constraints on neutrino mass could be strongly enhanced by external constraints on the cold dark matter density $\\Omega_{c}h^{2}$ and the Hubble constant $H_{0}$. If polarization on the largest scales ($\\ell<50$) will not be measured, an external prior on the primordial amplitude $A_{s}$ or the optical depth $\\tau$ will also be important. A CMB constraint on the number of relativistic degrees of freedom, $N_{\\rm eff}$, will benefit from an external prior on the spectral index $n_{s}$ and the baryon energy density $\\Omega_{b}h^{2}$. Finally, an external prior on $H_{0}$ will help constrain the dark energy equation of state ($w$).

  15. Tracking algorithms using log-polar mapped image coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiman, Carl F. R.; Juday, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    The use of log-polar image sampling coordinates rather than conventional Cartesian coordinates offers a number of advantages for visual tracking and docking of space vehicles. Pixel count is reduced without decreasing the field of view, with commensurate reduction in peripheral resolution. Smaller memory requirements and reduced processing loads are the benefits in working environments where bulk and energy are at a premium. Rotational and zoom symmetries of log-polar coordinates accommodate range and orientation extremes without computational penalties. Separation of radial and rotational coordinates reduces the complexity of several target centering algorithms, described below.

  16. An α-stable approach to the study of the P(D) distribution of unresolved point sources in CMB sky maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herranz, D.; Kuruoğlu, E. E.; Toffolatti, L.

    2004-09-01

    We present a new approach to the statistical study and modelling of number counts of faint point sources in astronomical images, i.e. counts of sources whose flux falls below the detection limit of a survey. The approach is based on the theory of α-stable distributions. We show that the non-Gaussian distribution of the intensity fluctuations produced by a generic point source population - whose number counts follow a simple power law - belongs to the α-stable family of distributions. Even if source counts do not follow a simple power law, we show that the α-stable model is still useful in many astrophysical scenarios. With the α-stable model it is possible to totally describe the non-Gaussian distribution with a few parameters which are closely related to the parameters describing the source counts, instead of an infinite number of moments. Using statistical tools available in the signal processing literature, we show how to estimate these parameters in an easy and fast way. We demonstrate that the model proves valid when applied to realistic point source number counts at microwave frequencies. In the case of point extragalactic sources observed at CMB frecuencies, our technique is able to successfully fit the P(D) distribution of deflections and to precisely determine the main parameters which describe the number counts. In the case of the Planck mission, the relative errors on these parameters are small either at low and at high frequencies. We provide a way to deal with the presence of Gaussian noise in the data using the empirical characteristic function of the P(D). The formalism and methods here presented can be very useful also for experiments in other frequency ranges, e.g. X-ray or radio Astronomy.

  17. Antenna-coupled TES bolometer arrays for CMB polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. L.; Bock, J. J.; Bonetti, J. A.; Brevik, J.; Chattopadhyay, G.; Day, P. K.; Golwala, S.; Kenyon, M.; Lange, A. E.; LeDuc, H. G.; Nguyen, H.; Ogburn, R. W.; Orlando, A.; Transgrud, A.; Turner, A.; Wang, G.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2008-07-01

    We describe the design and performance of polarization selective antenna-coupled TES arrays that will be used in several upcoming Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments: SPIDER, BICEP-2/SPUD. The fully lithographic polarimeter arrays utilize planar phased-antennas for collimation (F/4 beam) and microstrip filters for band definition (25% bandwidth). These devices demonstrate high optical efficiency, excellent beam shapes, and well-defined spectral bands. The dual-polarization antennas provide well-matched beams and low cross polarization response, both important for high-fidelity polarization measurements. These devices have so far been developed for the 100 GHz and 150 GHz bands, two premier millimeter-wave atmospheric windows for CMB observations. In the near future, the flexible microstrip-coupled architecture can provide photon noise-limited detection for the entire frequency range of the CMBPOL mission. This paper is a summary of the progress we have made since the 2006 SPIE meeting in Orlando, FL.

  18. The Needlet CMB Trispectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troja, Antonino; Donzelli, Simona; Maino, Davide; Marinucci, Domenico

    2014-05-01

    We propose a computationally feasible estimator for the needlet trispectrum, which develops earlier work on the bispectrum by Donzelli et al. (2012). Our proposal seems to enjoy a number of useful properties, in particular a) the construction exploits the localization properties of the needlet system, and hence it automatically handles masked regions; b) the procedure incorporates a quadratic correction term to correct for the presence of instrumental noise and sky-cuts; c) it is possible to provide analytic results on its statistical properties, which can serve as a guidance for simulations. The needlet trispectrum we present here provides the natural building blocks for the efficient estimation of nonlinearity parameters on CMB data, and in particular for the third order constants gNL and τNL .

  19. Rapid mapping of polarization switching through complete information acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somnath, Suhas; Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    Polarization switching in ferroelectric and multiferroic materials underpins a broad range of current and emergent applications, ranging from random access memories to field-effect transistors, and tunnelling devices. Switching in these materials is exquisitely sensitive to local defects and microstructure on the nanometre scale, necessitating spatially resolved high-resolution studies of these phenomena. Classical piezoresponse force microscopy and spectroscopy, although providing necessary spatial resolution, are fundamentally limited in data acquisition rates and energy resolution. This limitation stems from their two-tiered measurement protocol that combines slow (~1 s) switching and fast (~10 kHz-1 MHz) detection waveforms. Here we develop an approach for rapid probing of ferroelectric switching using direct strain detection of material response to probe bias. This approach, facilitated by high-sensitivity electronics and adaptive filtering, enables spectroscopic imaging at a rate 3,504 times faster the current state of the art, achieving high-veracity imaging of polarization dynamics in complex microstructures.

  20. Rapid mapping of polarization switching through complete information acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Somnath, Suhas; Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-12-02

    Polarization switching in ferroelectric and multiferroic materials underpins a broad range of current and emergent applications, ranging from random access memories to field-effect transistors, and tunnelling devices. Switching in these materials is exquisitely sensitive to local defects and microstructure on the nanometre scale, necessitating spatially resolved high-resolution studies of these phenomena. Classical piezoresponse force microscopy and spectroscopy, although providing necessary spatial resolution, are fundamentally limited in data acquisition rates and energy resolution. This limitation stems from their two-tiered measurement protocol that combines slow (~1 s) switching and fast (~10 kHz–1 MHz) detection waveforms. Here we develop an approach for rapid probing of ferroelectric switching using direct strain detection of material response to probe bias. This approach, facilitated by high-sensitivity electronics and adaptive filtering, enables spectroscopic imaging at a rate 3,504 times faster the current state of the art, achieving high-veracity imaging of polarization dynamics in complex microstructures.

  1. Low-Frequency Measurements of the CMB Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Bensadoun, M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Levin, S.; Limon,M.; Smoot, George F.; Sironi, G.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonelli, G.

    1989-10-01

    As part of an extended program to characterize the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at low frequencies, we have performed multiple measurements from a high-altitude site in California. On average, these measurements suggest a CMB temperature slightly lower than measurements at higher frequencies. Atmospheric conditions and the encroachment of civilization are now significant limitations from our present observing site. In November 1989, we will make new measurements from the South Pole Amundsen-Scott Station at frequencies 0.82, 1.5, 2.5, 3.8, 7.5, and 90 GHz. We discuss recent measurements and indicate improvements possible from a polar observing site.

  2. Low-frequency measurements of the CMB spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Bensadoun, M.; Amici, G.D.; Levin, S.; Limon, M.; Smoot, G. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA ); Sironi, G. ); Bersanelli, M.; Bonelli, G. )

    1990-01-15

    As part of an extended program to characterize the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at low frequencies, we have performed multiple measurements from a high-altitude site in Calfornia. On average, these measurements suggests a CMB temperature slightly lower than measurements at higher frequencies. Atmospheric conditions and the encroachment of civilization are now significant limitations from our present observing site. In November 1989, we will make new measurements from the South Pole Amundsen-Scott Station at frequencies 0.82, 1.5, 2.5, 3.8, 7.5, and 90 GHz. We discuss recent measurements and indicate improvements possible from a polar observing site.

  3. CMB in a box: Causal structure and the Fourier-Bessel expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramo, L. Raul; Reimberg, Paulo H.; Xavier, Henrique S.

    2010-08-01

    This paper makes two points. First, we show that the line-of-sight solution to cosmic microwave anisotropies in Fourier space, even though formally defined for arbitrarily large wavelengths, leads to position-space solutions which only depend on the sources of anisotropies inside the past light cone of the observer. This foretold manifestation of causality in position (real) space happens order by order in a series expansion in powers of the visibility γ=e-μ, where μ is the optical depth to Thomson scattering. We show that the contributions of order γN to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are regulated by spacetime window functions which have support only inside the past light cone of the point of observation. Second, we show that the Fourier-Bessel expansion of the physical fields (including the temperature and polarization momenta) is an alternative to the usual Fourier basis as a framework to compute the anisotropies. The viability of the Fourier-Bessel series for treating the CMB is a consequence of the fact that the visibility function becomes exponentially small at redshifts z≫103, effectively cutting off the past light cone and introducing a finite radius inside which initial conditions can affect physical observables measured at our position x→=0 and time t0. Hence, for each multipole ℓ there is a discrete tower of momenta kiℓ (not a continuum) which can affect physical observables, with the smallest momenta being k1ℓ˜ℓ. The Fourier-Bessel modes take into account precisely the information from the sources of anisotropies that propagates from the initial value surface to the point of observation—no more, no less. We also show that the physical observables (the temperature and polarization maps), and hence the angular power spectra, are unaffected by that choice of basis. This implies that the Fourier-Bessel expansion is the optimal scheme with which one can compute CMB anisotropies.

  4. CMB lensing and giant rings

    SciTech Connect

    Rathaus, Ben; Itzhaki, Nissan E-mail: ben.rathaus@gmail.com

    2012-05-01

    We study the CMB lensing signature of a pre-inationary particle (PIP), assuming it is responsible for the giant rings anomaly that was found recently in the WMAP data. Simulating Planck-like data we find that generically the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio associated with such a PIP is quite small and it would be difficult to cross correlate the temperature giant rings with the CMB lensing signal. However, if the pre-inationary particle is also responsible for the bulk flow measured from the local large scale structure, which happens to point roughly at the same direction as the giant rings, then the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio is fairly significant.

  5. Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) Model

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA-CMB Version 8.2 uses source profiles and speciated ambient data to quantify source contributions. Contributions are quantified from chemically distinct source-types rather than from individual emitters.

  6. Rapid mapping of polarization switching through complete information acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Somnath, Suhas; Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Polarization switching in ferroelectric and multiferroic materials underpins a broad range of current and emergent applications, ranging from random access memories to field-effect transistors, and tunnelling devices. Switching in these materials is exquisitely sensitive to local defects and microstructure on the nanometre scale, necessitating spatially resolved high-resolution studies of these phenomena. Classical piezoresponse force microscopy and spectroscopy, although providing necessary spatial resolution, are fundamentally limited in data acquisition rates and energy resolution. This limitation stems from their two-tiered measurement protocol that combines slow (∼1 s) switching and fast (∼10 kHz–1 MHz) detection waveforms. Here we develop an approach for rapid probing of ferroelectric switching using direct strain detection of material response to probe bias. This approach, facilitated by high-sensitivity electronics and adaptive filtering, enables spectroscopic imaging at a rate 3,504 times faster the current state of the art, achieving high-veracity imaging of polarization dynamics in complex microstructures. PMID:27910941

  7. Rapid mapping of polarization switching through complete information acquisition

    DOE PAGES

    Somnath, Suhas; Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; ...

    2016-12-02

    Polarization switching in ferroelectric and multiferroic materials underpins a broad range of current and emergent applications, ranging from random access memories to field-effect transistors, and tunnelling devices. Switching in these materials is exquisitely sensitive to local defects and microstructure on the nanometre scale, necessitating spatially resolved high-resolution studies of these phenomena. Classical piezoresponse force microscopy and spectroscopy, although providing necessary spatial resolution, are fundamentally limited in data acquisition rates and energy resolution. This limitation stems from their two-tiered measurement protocol that combines slow (~1 s) switching and fast (~10 kHz–1 MHz) detection waveforms. Here we develop an approach for rapidmore » probing of ferroelectric switching using direct strain detection of material response to probe bias. This approach, facilitated by high-sensitivity electronics and adaptive filtering, enables spectroscopic imaging at a rate 3,504 times faster the current state of the art, achieving high-veracity imaging of polarization dynamics in complex microstructures.« less

  8. Thermal and albedo mapping of the polar regions of Mars using Viking thermal mapper observations: 2. South polar region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paige, David A.; Keegan, Kenneth D.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first maps of the apparent thermal inertia and albedo of the south polar region of Mars. The observations used to create these maps were acquired by the infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) instruments on the two Viking Orbiters over a 30-day period in 1977 during the Martian late southern summer season. The maps cover the region from 60 deg S to the south pole at a spatial resolution of 1 deg of latitude, thus completing the initial thermal mapping of the entire planet. The analysis and interpretation of these maps is aided by the results of a one-dimensional radiative convective model, which is used to calculate diurnal variations in surface and atmospheric temperatures, and brightness temperatures at the top of the atmosphere for a range of assumptions concerning dust optical properties and dust optical depths. The maps show that apparent thermal inertias of bare ground regions decrease systematically from 60 deg S to the south pole. In unfrosted regions close to the south pole, apparent thermal inertias are among the lowest observed anywhere on the planet. On the south residual cap, apparent thermal inertias are very high due to the presence of CO2 frost. In most other regions of Mars, best fit apparent albedos based on thermal emission measurements are generally in good agreement with actual surface albedos based on broadband solar reflectance measurements. The one-dimensional atmospheric model calculations also predict anomalously cold brightness temperatures close to the pole during late summer, and after considering a number of alternatives, it is concluded that the net surface cooling due to atmospheric dust is the best explanation for this phenomenon. The region of lowest apparent thermal inertia close to the pole, which includes the south polar layered deposits, is interpreted to be mantled by a continuous layer of aeolian material that must be at least a few millimeters thick. The low thermal inertias mapped in the south polar region imply an

  9. Probing the largest scale structure in the universe with polarization map of galaxy clusters.

    PubMed

    Seto, Naoki; Pierpaoli, Elena

    2005-09-02

    We introduce a new formalism to describe the polarization signal of galaxy clusters on the whole sky. We show that a sparsely sampled, half-sky map of the cluster polarization at z approximately 1 would allow us to better characterize the very large scale density fluctuations. While the horizon length is smaller in the past, two other competing effects significantly remove the contribution of the small scale fluctuations from the quadrupole polarization pattern at z approximately 1. For the standard LambdaCDM universe with vanishing tensor mode, the quadrupole moment of the temperature anisotropy at z = 0 is expected to have an approximately 32% contribution from fluctuations on scales below 6.3 h(-1) Gpc. This percentage would be reduced to approximately 2% level for the quadrupole moment of polarization pattern at z approximately 1. A cluster polarization would shed light on the potentially anomalous features of the largest scale fluctuations.

  10. Using CMB data to constrain non-isotropic Planck-scale modifications to Electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Migliaccio, Marina; Pagano, Luca; Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo; Polenta, Gianluca E-mail: Marina.Migliaccio@roma2.infn.it E-mail: giovanni.amelino-camelia@roma1.infn.it E-mail: paolo.natoli@roma2.infn.it

    2011-11-01

    We develop a method to constrain non-isotropic features of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization, of a type expected to arise in some models describing quantum gravity effects on light propagation. We describe the expected signatures of this kind of anomalous light propagation on CMB photons, showing that it will produce a non-isotropic birefringence effect, i.e. a rotation of the CMB polarization direction whose observed amount depends in a peculiar way on the observation direction. We also show that the sensitivity levels expected for CMB polarization studies by the Planck satellite are sufficient for testing these effects if, as assumed in the quantum-gravity literature, their magnitude is set by the minute Planck length.

  11. CMB Telescopes and Optical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Shaul; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman

    The cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) is now firmly establishedas a fundamental and essential probe of the geometry, constituents, and birth ofthe observable universe. The CMB is a potent observable because it can bemeasured with precision and accuracy. Just as importantly, theoretical models ofthe universe can predict the characteristics of the CMB to high accuracy, andthose predictions can be directly compared to observations. There are multipleaspects associated with making a precise measurement. In this chapter, we focuson optical components for the instrumentation used to measure the CMBpolarization and temperature anisotropy. We begin with an overview of generalconsiderations for CMB observations and discuss common concepts used inthe community. We next consider a variety of alternatives available for adesigner of a CMB telescope. Our discussion is guided by the ground- andballoon-based instruments that have been implemented over the years. In thesame vein, we compare the arc-minute resolution Atacama CosmologyTelescope (ACT) and the South Pole Telescope (SPT). CMB interferometersare presented briefly. We conclude with a comparison of the four CMBsatellites, Relikt, COBE, WMAP, and Planck, to demonstrate a remarkableevolution in design, sensitivity, resolution, and complexity over the past30 years.

  12. CMB all-scale blackbody distortions induced by linearizing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notari, Alessio; Quartin, Miguel

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments, such as WMAP and Planck, measure intensity anisotropies and build maps using a linearized formula for relating them to the temperature blackbody fluctuations. However, this procedure also generates a signal in the maps in the form of y -type distortions which is degenerate with the thermal Sunyaev Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect. These are small effects that arise at second order in the temperature fluctuations not from primordial physics but from such a limitation of the map-making procedure. They constitute a contaminant for measurements of our peculiar velocity, the tSZ and primordial y -distortions. They can nevertheless be well modeled and accounted for. We show that the distortions arise from a leakage of the CMB dipole into the y -channel which couples to all multipoles, mostly affecting the range ℓ≲400 . This should be visible in Planck's y -maps with an estimated signal-to-noise ratio of about 12. We note however that such frequency-dependent terms carry no new information on the nature of the CMB dipole. This implies that the real significance of Planck's Doppler coupling measurements is actually lower than reported by the collaboration. Finally, we quantify the level of contamination in tSZ and primordial y -type distortions and show that it is above the sensitivity of proposed next-generation CMB experiments.

  13. Thermal and albedo mapping of the polar regions of Mars using Viking thermal mapper observations: 1. North polar region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paige, David A.; Bachman, Jennifer E.; Keegan, Kenneth D.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first maps of the apparent thermal inertia and albedo of the north polar region of Mars. The observations used to create these maps were acquired by the infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) instruments on the two Viking orbiters over a 50-day period in 1978 during the Martian early northern summer season. The maps cover the region from 60 deg N to the north pole at a spatial resolution of 1/2 deg of latitude. The analysis and interpretation of these maps is aided by the results of a one-dimensional radiative convective model, which is used to calculate diurnal variations in surface and atmospheric temperatures, and brightness temperatures at the top of the atmospphere for a wide range of assumptions concerning aerosol optical properties and aerosol optical depths. The results of these calculations show that the effects of the Martian atmosphere on remote determinations of surface thermal inertia are more significant than have been indicated in previous studies. The maps of apparent thermal inertia and albedo show a great deal of spatial structure that is well correlated with surface features.

  14. To the horizon and beyond: Weak lensing of the CMB and binary inspirals into horizonless objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesden, Michael

    This thesis examines two predictions of general relativity: weak lensing and gravitational waves. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) is gravitationally lensed by the large-scale structure between the observer and the last- scattering surface. This weak lensing induces non-Gaussian correlations that can be used to construct estimators for the deflection field. The error and bias of these estimators are derived and used to analyze the viability of lensing reconstruction for future CMB experiments. Weak lensing also affects the one-point probability distribution function of the CMB. The skewness and kurtosis induced by lensing and the Sunayev- Zel'dovich (SZ) effect are calculated as functions of the angular smoothing scale of the map. While these functions offer the advantage of easy computability, only the skewness from lensing-SZ correlations can potentially be detected, even in the limit of the largest amplitude fluctuations allowed by observation. Lensing estimators are also essential to constrain inflation, the favored explanation for large-scale isotropy and the origin of primordial perturbations. B-mode polarization is considered to be a "smoking-gun" signature of inflation, and lensing estimators can be used to recover primordial B-modes from lensing-induced contamination. The ability of future CMB experiments to constrain inflation is assessed as functions of survey size and instrumental sensitivity. A final application of lensing estimators is to constrain a possible cutoff in primordial density perturbations on near-horizon scales. The paucity of independent modes on such scales limits the statistical certainty of such a constraint. Measurements of the deflection field can be used to constrain at the 3s level the existence of a cutoff large enough to account for current CMB observations. A final chapter of this thesis considers an independent topic: the gravitational-wave (GW) signature of a binary inspiral into a horizonless object. If the supermassive

  15. CMB anomalies after Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Dominik J.; Copi, Craig J.; Huterer, Dragan; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2016-09-01

    Several unexpected features have been observed in the microwave sky at large angular scales, both by WMAP and by Planck. Among those features is a lack of both variance and correlation on the largest angular scales, alignment of the lowest multipole moments with one another and with the motion and geometry of the solar system, a hemispherical power asymmetry or dipolar power modulation, a preference for odd parity modes and an unexpectedly large cold spot in the Southern hemisphere. The individual p-values of the significance of these features are in the per mille to per cent level, when compared to the expectations of the best-fit inflationary ΛCDM model. Some pairs of those features are demonstrably uncorrelated, increasing their combined statistical significance and indicating a significant detection of CMB features at angular scales larger than a few degrees on top of the standard model. Despite numerous detailed investigations, we still lack a clear understanding of these large-scale features, which seem to imply a violation of statistical isotropy and scale invariance of inflationary perturbations. In this contribution we present a critical analysis of our current understanding and discuss several ideas of how to make further progress.

  16. CMB hemispherical asymmetry: long mode modulation and non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein; Baghram, Shant; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Abolhasani, Ali Akbar E-mail: abolhasani@ipm.ir E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir

    2014-08-01

    The observed hemispherical asymmetry in CMB map can be explained by modulation from a long wavelength super horizon mode which non-linearly couples to the CMB modes. We address the criticism in [1] about the role of non-Gaussianities in squeezed and equilateral configurations in generating hemispherical asymmetry from the long mode modulation. We stress that the modulation is sensitive to the non-Gaussianity in the squeezed limit. In addition, we demonstrate the validity of our approach in providing a consistency condition relating the amplitude of dipole asymmetry to f{sub NL} in the squeezed limit.

  17. Automated system to acquire fluorescence, polarization and anisotropy maps within liquid flows

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Cristiane C.; Pepe, Iuri; Lima, Angelo M. V.; Musse, Ana Paula S.

    2002-01-01

    Maps of polarization and anisotropy can be helpful for flow analysis systems (FIA, CFA, etc.) with reactions dependent on the intermolecular alignment as well as for dispersion control. Maps can be acquired manually, but when a scan over a sample area is required, the acquisition becomes tiresome and has low precision. The paper describes an automatic flexible system for high-precision sample positioning with closed loop self control, remote data acquisition and storage controlled by a BASIC program. The system was developed to acquire maps up to 850 mm2 of the sample (liquid flows, solids, interfaces, etc.), with up to 100 μm2 precision. To evaluate the equipment, performance is presented as the scan of a thin liquid film of monoethylene glycol (MEG) flowing on borosilicate. Tests were performed with and without surfactantes at submicellar concentrations: two concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and one of polyethylene oxide (PEO). For pure MEG, the intermolecular alignment initially increased, then decreased. When SDS was added, both polarization and anisotropy only increased progressively with the flow. This might be explained by the surfactant decrease of interfacial interaction. When PEO was added, both polarization and anisotropy decreased pronouncedly over the entire map, which might be due to macromolecular aggregates within the bulk generating misaligned molecular domains. The system presented as sample positioning repeatability of 0.1% and a high polarization reproducibility (error margin < 6 in 1000). PMID:18924741

  18. Evaluation of Rigid-Body Motion Compensation in Cardiac Perfusion SPECT Employing Polar-Map Quantification.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, P Hendrik; Johnson, Karen L; King, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    We have recently been successful in the development and testing of rigid-body motion tracking, estimation and compensation for cardiac perfusion SPECT based on a visual tracking system (VTS). The goal of this study was to evaluate in patients the effectiveness of our rigid-body motion compensation strategy. Sixty-four patient volunteers were asked to remain motionless or execute some predefined body motion during an additional second stress perfusion acquisition. Acquisitions were performed using the standard clinical protocol with 64 projections acquired through 180 degrees. All data were reconstructed with an ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) algorithm using 4 projections per subset and 5 iterations. All physical degradation factors were addressed (attenuation, scatter, and distance dependent resolution), while a 3-dimensional Gaussian rotator was used during reconstruction to correct for six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) rigid-body motion estimated by the VTS. Polar map quantification was employed to evaluate compensation techniques. In 54.7% of the uncorrected second stress studies there was a statistically significant difference in the polar maps, and in 45.3% this made a difference in the interpretation of segmental perfusion. Motion correction reduced the impact of motion such that with it 32.8 % of the polar maps were statistically significantly different, and in 14.1% this difference changed the interpretation of segmental perfusion. The improvement shown in polar map quantitation translated to visually improved uniformity of the SPECT slices.

  19. Evaluation of Rigid-Body Motion Compensation in Cardiac Perfusion SPECT Employing Polar-Map Quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A.

    2016-06-01

    We have recently been successful in the development and testing of rigid-body motion tracking, estimation and compensation for cardiac perfusion SPECT based on a visual tracking system (VTS). The goal of this study was to evaluate in patients the effectiveness of our rigid-body motion compensation strategy. Sixty-four patient volunteers were asked to remain motionless or execute some predefined body motion during an additional second stress perfusion acquisition. Acquisitions were performed using the standard clinical protocol with 64 projections acquired through 180 degrees. All data were reconstructed with an ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) algorithm using 4 projections per subset and 5 iterations. All physical degradation factors were addressed (attenuation, scatter, and distance dependent resolution), while a 3-dimensional Gaussian rotator was used during reconstruction to correct for six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) rigid-body motion estimated by the VTS. Polar map quantification was employed to evaluate compensation techniques. In 54.7% of the uncorrected second stress studies there was a statistically significant difference in the polar maps, and in 45.3% this made a difference in the interpretation of segmental perfusion. Motion correction reduced the impact of motion such that with it 32.8% of the polar maps were statistically significantly different, and in 14.1% this difference changed the interpretation of segmental perfusion. The improvement shown in polar map quantitation translated to visually improved uniformity of the SPECT slices.

  20. PIPER: Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazear, Justin; Ade, P.; Benford, D. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Chuss, D. T.; Dotson, J. L.; Eimer, J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Halpern, M.; Hinderks, J.; Hinshaw, G. F.; Irwin, K.; Jhabvala, C.; Johnson, B.; Kogut, A. J.; Mirel, P.; Moseley, S. H.; Staguhn, J.; Switzer, E.; Tucker, C. E.; Weston, A.; Wollack, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Polarization ExploreR (PIPER) is a balloon-borne cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment searching for large-angular scale B-mode polarization to constrain Inflation in the early universe. The Inflationary Big Bang theory predicts that the epoch of inflation will result in a background of gravitational waves. These gravitational waves imprinted their unique B-mode signature on the CMB polarization, two features of which are a peak at ell ~ 80 and a "bump" below ell ~ 10 in the B-mode angular power spectrum. The ell ~ 80 "recombination" peak is the first peak caused by gravitational waves imprinting tensor (B-mode) perturbations onto the CMB spectrum during recombination. Gravitational waves at larger scales have not yet entered the horizon and may not contribute, and at smaller scales have decayed away by other interactions, giving rise to a peak at horizon scale. The ell ~ 10 "reionization" bump is caused by a similar mechanism as the recombination peak, where gravitational waves imprint B-mode perturbations into the spectrum, now at larger horizon scales. PIPER will target the reionization bump while keeping enough angular resolution to measure the recombination peak, with sensitivity down to tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0.007. A series of flights alternating between north and south will produce nearly full-sky temperature and polarization maps and measure the low-ell spectra. 5120 transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers each with 20 arcmin beamwidth, distributed into 4 rectangular close-packed arrays maintained at 150 mK will provide small-scale resolution and sensitivity. PIPER consists of two co-aligned telescopes, each with a front-end variable-delay polarization modulator rapidly modulating either the Q or U Stokes parameters to provide polarization sensitivity and mitigate systematic errors. To achieve background-limited sensitivity, the entire instrument is enclosed in an open bucket dewar maintained at 1.5 K. PIPER

  1. Ir Spectral Mapping of the Martian South Polar Residual CAP Using Crism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Jacqueline; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are considered to be important in theories of abiogenesis (Allamandola, 2011) . There is evidence that PAHs have been detected on two icy Saturnian satellites using the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cassini spacecraft (Cruikshank et al., 2007). The hypothesised presence of PAHs in Mars south polar cap has not been systematically examined even though the Mars south polar cap may allow the preservation of organic molecules that are typically destroyed at the Martian surface by UV radiation (Dartnell et al. 2012). This hypothesis is supported by recent analyses of South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC) structural evolution (Thomas et al., 2009) that suggest the possibility that seasonal and long term sublimation may excavate dust particles from within the polar ice. Periodic sublimation is believed to be responsible for the formation of so-called "Swiss Cheese Terrain", a unique surface feature found only in the Martian south polar residual cap consisting of flat floored, circular depressions (Byrne, 2009). We show the first examples of work towards the detection of PAHs in Swiss Cheese Terrain, using data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM), on board NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). CRISM is designed to search for mineralogical indications of past and present water, thus providing extensive coverage of the south polar cap. In this work, we discuss whether CRISM infrared spectra can be used to detect PAHs in Swiss Cheese Terrain and demonstrate a number of maps showing shifts in spectral profiles over the SPRC.

  2. Quantifying tensions between CMB and distance data sets in models with free curvature or lensing amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandis, S.; Rapetti, D.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Dietrich, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Recent measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the Planck Collaboration have produced arguably the most powerful observational evidence in support of the standard model of cosmology, i.e. the spatially flat ΛCDM paradigm. In this work, we perform model selection tests to examine whether the base CMB temperature and large scale polarization anisotropy data from Planck 2015 (P15; Planck Collaboration XIII) prefer any of eight commonly used one-parameter model extensions with respect to flat ΛCDM. We find a clear preference for models with free curvature, ΩK, or free amplitude of the CMB lensing potential, AL. We also further develop statistical tools to measure tension between data sets. We use a Gaussianization scheme to compute tensions directly from the posterior samples using an entropy-based method, the surprise, as well as a calibrated evidence ratio presented here for the first time. We then proceed to investigate the consistency between the base P15 CMB data and six other CMB and distance data sets. In flat ΛCDM we find a 4.8σ tension between the base P15 CMB data and a distance ladder measurement, whereas the former are consistent with the other data sets. In the curved ΛCDM model we find significant tensions in most of the cases, arising from the well-known low power of the low-ℓ multipoles of the CMB data. In the flat ΛCDM+AL model, however, all data sets are consistent with the base P15 CMB observations except for the CMB lensing measurement, which remains in significant tension. This tension is driven by the increased power of the CMB lensing potential derived from the base P15 CMB constraints in both models, pointing at either potentially unresolved systematic effects or the need for new physics beyond the standard flat ΛCDM model.

  3. Planck intermediate results. XLVI. Reduction of large-scale systematic effects in HFI polarization maps and estimation of the reionization optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carron, J.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirri, G.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the identification, modelling, and removal of previously unexplained systematic effects in the polarization data of the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) on large angular scales, including new mapmaking and calibration procedures, new and more complete end-to-end simulations, and a set of robust internal consistency checks on the resulting maps. These maps, at 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz, are early versions of those that will be released in final form later in 2016. The improvements allow us to determine the cosmic reionization optical depth τ using, for the first time, the low-multipole EE data from HFI, reducing significantly the central value and uncertainty, and hence the upper limit. Two different likelihood procedures are used to constrain τ from two estimators of the CMB E- and B-mode angular power spectra at 100 and 143 GHz, after debiasing the spectra from a small remaining systematic contamination. These all give fully consistent results. A further consistency test is performed using cross-correlations derived from the Low Frequency Instrument maps of the Planck 2015 data release and the new HFI data. For this purpose, end-to-end analyses of systematic effects from the two instruments are used to demonstrate the near independence of their dominant systematic error residuals. The tightest result comes from the HFI-based τ posterior distribution using the maximum likelihood power spectrum estimator from EE data only, giving a value 0.055 ± 0.009. In a companion paper these results are discussed in the context of the best-fit PlanckΛCDM cosmological model and recent models of reionization.

  4. Planck intermediate results: XLVI. Reduction of large-scale systematic effects in HFI polarization maps and estimation of the reionization optical depth

    DOE PAGES

    Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; ...

    2016-12-12

    This study describes the identification, modelling, and removal of previously unexplained systematic effects in the polarization data of the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) on large angular scales, including new mapmaking and calibration procedures, new and more complete end-to-end simulations, and a set of robust internal consistency checks on the resulting maps. These maps, at 100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz, are early versions of those that will be released in final form later in 2016. The improvements allow us to determine the cosmic reionization optical depth τ using, for the first time, the low-multipole EE data from HFI, reducingmore » significantly the central value and uncertainty, and hence the upper limit. Two different likelihood procedures are used to constrain τ from two estimators of the CMB E- and B-mode angular power spectra at 100 and 143 GHz, after debiasing the spectra from a small remaining systematic contamination. These all give fully consistent results. A further consistency test is performed using cross-correlations derived from the Low Frequency Instrument maps of the Planck 2015 data release and the new HFI data. For this purpose, end-to-end analyses of systematic effects from the two instruments are used to demonstrate the near independence of their dominant systematic error residuals. The tightest result comes from the HFI-based τ posterior distribution using the maximum likelihood power spectrum estimator from EE data only, giving a value 0.055 ± 0.009. Finally, in a companion paper these results are discussed in the context of the best-fit PlanckΛCDM cosmological model and recent models of reionization.« less

  5. The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer: Science from Circular Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer, Eric; Ade, P.; Benford, D. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Chuss, D. T.; Dotson, J. L.; Eimer, J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Halpern, M.; Hinshaw, G. F.; Irwin, K.; Jhabvala, C.; Johnson, B.; Kogut, A. J.; Lazear, J.; Mirel, P.; Moseley, S. H.; Staguhn, J.; Tucker, C. E.; Weston, A.; Wollack, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) is a balloon-borne CMB polarimeter designed to constrain the B-mode signature of cosmological inflation. Sequential one-day flights from Northern- and Southern- Hemisphere sites will yield maps of Stokes I, Q, U and V at 200, 270, 350 and 600 GHz over 85% of the sky. The full optical path is cooled to 1.5 K by liquid helium in the ARCADE bucket dewar, and a variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) at the front of the optics modulates the polarization response. Independent Q and U cameras each have two 32x40 Transition Edge Sensor array receivers. In addition to its primary inflationary science goal, PIPER will also measure the circular (Stokes V) polarization to a depth similar to that of the primary linear polarization. The circular polarization has received relatively little attention in large-area surveys, with constraints from the 1980’s and recent results by the Milan Polarimeter. Astrophysical circular polarization is generally tied to the presence of magnetic fields, either in relativistic plasmas or Zeeman splitting of resonances. These effects are thought to be undetectable at PIPER's frequencies and resolution, despite the depth. The expectation of a null result makes the deep Stokes V map a good cross-check for experimental systematics. More fundamentally, the fact that the sky is expected to be dark in Stokes V makes it a sector sensitive to processes such as Lorentz-violating terms in the standard model or magnetic fields in the CMB era.

  6. The Polar Cap Tongue of Ionization: A survey of GPS TEC mappings from 2000 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, M.; Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Coster, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The tongue of ionization (TOI) is a sporadic large-scale feature of the F-region polar ionosphere; a volume of high density plasma transported anti-sunward across the polar cap by the magnetospheric convection electric field. Sometimes the TOI may exist in the form of polar cap patches, owing to the solar wind and M-I coupling causing variations in convection, breaking up the TOI into discrete patchy structures. Figure 1 shows an example of a TOI under quiet geomagnetic conditions, from the GPS TEC map for 1637 UT on 05 Nov 2012, a day on which the Kp index was never higher than 1.7. The data is taken from Millstone Hill's on-line Madrigal data base. The TOI is often thought of as a storm-time phenomenon; this work challenges that assumption by examining observations from all levels of geomagnetic activity throughout the period of availability of the GPS TEC maps (2000-2014).Sojka et al [1994] carried out a modeling study to determine the seasonal and universal time dependence of the tongue of ionization (and polar cap patches); Figure 2 is reproduced from that paper. In essence, this figure is intended to indicate the times when a TOI may and may not exist. A notable feature is the "hole" that is seen during winter days between 0600 and 1200 UT. At the time of that publication it was not possible to test the prediction, but there now exists a wealth of data in the form of maps of total electron content (TEC), available from the on-line Madrigal data base. These TEC maps, especially in the northern hemisphere, cover the mid-latitude and polar cap regions with sufficient resolution to determine whether or not a TOI exists, for nearly every day from the year 2000 to the present time, at 5 minute intervals. In this study we make a comprehensive survey of this immense data base and outline the conditions under which TOIs have been seen in the northern hemisphere, based on seasonal and UT dependencies, as well as levels of geomagnetic disturbance. The winter "hole" in

  7. Testing cosmic microwave background polarization data using position angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Michael; Battye, Richard A.

    2014-10-01

    We consider a novel null test for contamination which can be applied to cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data that involves analysis of the statistics of the polarization position angles. Specifically, we will concentrate on using histograms of the measured position angles to illustrate the idea. Such a test has been used to identify systematics in the NRAO-VLA Sky Survey point source catalogue with an amplitude well below the noise level. We explore the statistical properties of polarization angles in CMB maps. If the polarization angle is not correlated between pixels, then the errors follow a simple √{N_{pix}} law. However, this is typically not the case for CMB maps since these have correlations which result in an increase in the variance as the effective number of independent pixels is reduced. Then, we illustrate how certain classes of systematic errors can result in very obvious patterns in these histograms, and thus that these errors could possibly be identified using this method. We discuss how this idea might be applied in a realistic context, and make a preliminary analysis of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7 data, finding evidence of a systematic error in the Q- and W- band data, consistent with a constant offset in Q and U.

  8. QUIJOTE-CMB experiment: a technical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-de-Taoro, M. R.; Aguiar-González, M.; Génova-Santos, R.; Gómez-Reñasco, F.; Hoyland, R.; López-Caraballo, C.; Peláez-Santos, A.; Poidevin, F.; Tramonte, D.; Rebolo-López, R.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Sánchez-de la Rosa, V.; Vega-Moreno, A.; Viera-Curbelo, T.; Vignaga, R.; Martínez-Gonzalez, E.; Aja, B.; Artal, E.; Cagigas, J.; Cano-de-Diego, J. L.; Cuerno, E. M.; de-la-Fuente, L.; Pérez, A.; Terán, J. V.; Villa, E.; Piccirillo, L.; Lasenby, A.

    2014-07-01

    The QUIJOTE-CMB experiment (Q-U-I JOint TEnerife CMB experiment) is an ambitious project to obtain polarization measurements of the sky microwave emission in the 10 to 47 GHz range. With this aim, a pair of 2,5μm telescopes and three instruments are being sited at the Teide Observatory, in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). The first telescope and the first instrument (the MFI: Multi Frequency Instrument) are both already operating in the band from 10 to 20 GHz, since November 2012. The second telescope and the second instrument (TGI: Thirty GHz instrument) is planned to be in commissioning by the end of summer 2014, covering the range of 26 to 36 GHz. After that, a third instrument named FGI (Forty GHz instrument) will be designed and manufactured to complete the sky survey in the frequency range from 37 to 47 GHz. In this paper we present an overview of the whole project current status, from the technical point of view.

  9. Log-polar mapping-based scale space tracking with adaptive target response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongdong; Wen, Gongjian; Kuai, Yangliu; Zhang, Ximing

    2017-05-01

    Correlation filter-based tracking has exhibited impressive robustness and accuracy in recent years. Standard correlation filter-based trackers are restricted to translation estimation and equipped with fixed target response. These trackers produce an inferior performance when encountered with a significant scale variation or appearance change. We propose a log-polar mapping-based scale space tracker with an adaptive target response. This tracker transforms the scale variation of the target in the Cartesian space into a shift along the logarithmic axis in the log-polar space. A one-dimensional scale correlation filter is learned online to estimate the shift along the logarithmic axis. With the log-polar representation, scale estimation is achieved accurately without a multiresolution pyramid. To achieve an adaptive target response, a variance of the Gaussian function is computed from the response map and updated online with a learning rate parameter. Our log-polar mapping-based scale correlation filter and adaptive target response can be combined with any correlation filter-based trackers. In addition, the scale correlation filter can be extended to a two-dimensional correlation filter to achieve joint estimation of the scale variation and in-plane rotation. Experiments performed on an OTB50 benchmark demonstrate that our tracker achieves superior performance against state-of-the-art trackers.

  10. Insights into bird wing evolution and digit specification from polarizing region fate maps.

    PubMed

    Towers, Matthew; Signolet, Jason; Sherman, Adrian; Sang, Helen; Tickle, Cheryll

    2011-08-09

    The proposal that birds descended from theropod dinosaurs with digits 2, 3 and 4 was recently given support by short-term fate maps, suggesting that the chick wing polarizing region-a group that Sonic hedgehog-expressing cells-gives rise to digit 4. Here we show using long-term fate maps that Green fluorescent protein-expressing chick wing polarizing region grafts contribute only to soft tissues along the posterior margin of digit 4, supporting fossil data that birds descended from theropods that had digits 1, 2 and 3. In contrast, digit IV of the chick leg with four digits (I-IV) arises from the polarizing region. To determine how digit identity is specified over time, we inhibited Sonic hedgehog signalling. Fate maps show that polarizing region and adjacent cells are specified in parallel through a series of anterior to posterior digit fates-a process of digit specification that we suggest is involved in patterning all vertebrate limbs with more than three digits.

  11. CMB temperature bispectrum induced by cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Ringeval, Christophe; Suyama, Teruaki

    2009-10-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) bispectrum of the temperature anisotropies induced by a network of cosmic strings is derived for small angular scales, under the assumption that the principal cause of temperature fluctuations is the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We provide analytical expressions for all isosceles triangle configurations in Fourier space. Their overall amplitude is amplified as the inverse cube of the angle and diverges for flat triangles. The isosceles configurations generically lead to a negative bispectrum with a power-law decay ℓ-6 for large multipole ℓ. However, collapsed triangles are found to be associated with a positive bispectrum whereas the squeezed triangles still exhibit negative values. We then compare our analytical estimates to a direct computation of the bispectrum from a set of 300 statistically independent temperature maps obtained from Nambu-Goto cosmic string simulations in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe. We find good agreement for the overall amplitude, the power-law behavior, and the angle dependency of the various triangle configurations. At ℓ˜500 the cosmic string Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect contributes approximately the same equilateral CMB bispectrum amplitude as an inflationary model with |fNLloc|≃103, if the strings contribute about 10% of the temperature power spectrum at ℓ=10. Current bounds on fNL are not derived using cosmic string bispectrum templates, and so our fNL estimate cannot be used to derive bounds on strings. However it does suggest that string bispectrum templates should be included in the search of CMB non-Gaussianities.

  12. Optimized Large-scale CMB Likelihood and Quadratic Maximum Likelihood Power Spectrum Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerløw, E.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Eriksen, H. K.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Jewell, J. B.; Plaszczynski, S.; Wehus, I. K.

    2015-11-01

    We revisit the problem of exact cosmic microwave background (CMB) likelihood and power spectrum estimation with the goal of minimizing computational costs through linear compression. This idea was originally proposed for CMB purposes by Tegmark et al., and here we develop it into a fully functioning computational framework for large-scale polarization analysis, adopting WMAP as a working example. We compare five different linear bases (pixel space, harmonic space, noise covariance eigenvectors, signal-to-noise covariance eigenvectors, and signal-plus-noise covariance eigenvectors) in terms of compression efficiency, and find that the computationally most efficient basis is the signal-to-noise eigenvector basis, which is closely related to the Karhunen-Loeve and Principal Component transforms, in agreement with previous suggestions. For this basis, the information in 6836 unmasked WMAP sky map pixels can be compressed into a smaller set of 3102 modes, with a maximum error increase of any single multipole of 3.8% at ℓ ≤ 32 and a maximum shift in the mean values of a joint distribution of an amplitude-tilt model of 0.006σ. This compression reduces the computational cost of a single likelihood evaluation by a factor of 5, from 38 to 7.5 CPU seconds, and it also results in a more robust likelihood by implicitly regularizing nearly degenerate modes. Finally, we use the same compression framework to formulate a numerically stable and computationally efficient variation of the Quadratic Maximum Likelihood implementation, which requires less than 3 GB of memory and 2 CPU minutes per iteration for ℓ ≤ 32, rendering low-ℓ QML CMB power spectrum analysis fully tractable on a standard laptop.

  13. The ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Implications for Spectral Line Intensity Mapping at Millimeter Wavelengths and CMB Spectral Distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Chluba, J.; Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Aravena, M.; Wagg, J.; Popping, G.; Cortes, P.; Hodge, J.; Weiss, A.; Bertoldi, F.; Riechers, D.

    2016-12-01

    We present direct estimates of the mean sky brightness temperature in observing bands around 99 and 242 GHz due to line emission from distant galaxies. These values are calculated from the summed line emission observed in a blind, deep survey for spectral line emission from high redshift galaxies using ALMA (the ALMA spectral deep field observations “ASPECS” survey). In the 99 GHz band, the mean brightness will be dominated by rotational transitions of CO from intermediate and high redshift galaxies. In the 242 GHz band, the emission could be a combination of higher order CO lines, and possibly [C ii] 158 μm line emission from very high redshift galaxies (z ˜ 6-7). The mean line surface brightness is a quantity that is relevant to measurements of spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background, and as a potential tool for studying large-scale structures in the early universe using intensity mapping. While the cosmic volume and the number of detections are admittedly small, this pilot survey provides a direct measure of the mean line surface brightness, independent of conversion factors, excitation, or other galaxy formation model assumptions. The mean surface brightness in the 99 GHZ band is: T B = 0.94 ± 0.09 μK. In the 242 GHz band, the mean brightness is: T B = 0.55 ± 0.033 μK. These should be interpreted as lower limits on the average sky signal, since we only include lines detected individually in the blind survey, while in a low resolution intensity mapping experiment, there will also be the summed contribution from lower luminosity galaxies that cannot be detected individually in the current blind survey.

  14. Optical polarization map of the Polaris Flare with RoboPol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panopoulou, G.; Tassis, K.; Blinov, D.; Pavlidou, V.; King, O. G.; Paleologou, E.; Ramaprakash, A.; Angelakis, E.; Baloković, M.; Das, H. K.; Feiler, R.; Hovatta, T.; Khodade, P.; Kiehlmann, S.; Kus, A.; Kylafis, N.; Liodakis, I.; Mahabal, A.; Modi, D.; Myserlis, I.; Papadakis, I.; Papamastorakis, I.; Pazderska, B.; Pazderski, E.; Pearson, T. J.; Rajarshi, C.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reig, P.; Zensus, J. A.

    2015-09-01

    The stages before the formation of stars in molecular clouds are poorly understood. Insights can be gained by studying the properties of quiescent clouds, such as their magnetic field structure. The plane-of-the-sky orientation of the field can be traced by polarized starlight. We present the first extended, wide-field (˜10 deg2) map of the Polaris Flare cloud in dust-absorption induced optical polarization of background stars, using the Robotic Polarimeter (RoboPol) polarimeter at the Skinakas Observatory. This is the first application of the wide-field imaging capabilities of RoboPol. The data were taken in the R band and analysed with the automated reduction pipeline of the instrument. We present in detail optimizations in the reduction pipeline specific to wide-field observations. Our analysis resulted in reliable measurements of 641 stars with median fractional linear polarization 1.3 per cent. The projected magnetic field shows a large-scale ordered pattern. At high longitudes it appears to align with faint striations seen in the Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) map of dust emission (250 μm), while in the central 4-5 deg2 it shows an eddy-like feature. The overall polarization pattern we obtain is in good agreement with large-scale measurements by Planck of the dust emission polarization in the same area of the sky.

  15. Geomorphologic mapping of titan's polar terrains: Constraining surface processes and landscape evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, S. P. D.; Hayes, A. G.; Dietrich, W. E.; Howard, A. D.; Bristow, C. S.; Malaska, M. J.; Moore, J. M.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Hofgartner, J. D.; Williams, D. A.; White, O. L.; Soderblom, J. M.; Barnes, J. W.; Turtle, E. P.; Lunine, J. I.; Wood, C. A.; Neish, C. D.; Kirk, R. L.; Stofan, E. R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Lopes, R. M. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present a geomorphologic map of Titan's polar terrains. The map was generated from a combination of Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and Imaging Science Subsystem imaging products, as well as altimetry, SARTopo and radargrammetry topographic datasets. In combining imagery with topographic data, our geomorphologic map reveals a stratigraphic sequence from which we infer process interactions between units. In mapping both polar regions with the same geomorphologic units, we conclude that processes that formed the terrains of the north polar region also acted to form the landscape we observe at the south. Uniform, SAR-dark plains are interpreted as sedimentary deposits, and are bounded by moderately dissected uplands. These plains contain the highest density of filled and empty lake depressions, and canyons. These units unconformably overlay a basement rock that outcrops as mountains and SAR-bright dissected terrains at various elevations across both poles. All these units are then superposed by surficial units that slope towards the seas, suggestive of subsequent overland transport of sediment. From estimates of the depths of the embedded empty depressions and canyons that drain into the seas, the SAR-dark plains must be >600 m thick in places, though the thickness may vary across the poles. At the lowest elevations of each polar region, there are large seas, which are currently liquid methane/ethane filled at the north and empty at the south. The large plains deposits and the surrounding hillslopes may represent remnant landforms that are a result of previously vast polar oceans, where larger liquid bodies may have allowed for a sustained accumulation of soluble and insoluble sediments, potentially forming layered sedimentary deposits. Coupled with vertical crustal movements, the resulting layers would be of varying solubilities and erosional resistances, allowing formation of the complex landscape that we observe today.

  16. The CMB - Contemporary Measurements and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. D.

    2002-09-01

    Since the discovery of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) in 1965, characterization of the CMB anisotropy angular power spectrum has become somewhat of a holy grail for experimental cosmology. Because CMB anisotropy measurements are difficult, the full potential of the CMB is only now being realized. Improvements in experimental techniques and detector technology have yielded an explosion of progress in the past couple of years resulting in the ability to use measurements of the CMB to place meaningful constraints on cosmological parameters. In this review, I discuss the theory behind the CMB but focus primarily on the experiments, reviewing briefly the history of CMB anisotropy measurements and focusing on the recent experiments that have revolutionized this field. Results from these modern experiments are reviewed and the cosmological implications discussed. I conclude with brief comments about the future of CMB physics.

  17. Mapping Vesta Mid-Latitude Quadrangle V-12EW: Mapping the Edge of the South Polar Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogenboom, T.; Schenk, P.; Williams, D. A.; Hiesinger, H.; Garry, W. B.; Yingst, R.; Buczkowski, D.; McCord, T. B.; Jaumann, R.; Pieters, C. M.; Gaskell, R. W.; Neukum, G.; Schmedemann, N.; Marchi, S.; Nathues, A.; Le Corre, L.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; White, O. L.; DeSanctis, C.; Filacchione, G.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2011-12-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft arrived at the asteroid 4Vesta on July 15, 2011, and is now collecting imaging, spectroscopic, and elemental abundance data during its one-year orbital mission. As part of the geological analysis of the surface, a series of 15 quadrangle maps are being produced based on Framing Camera images (FC: spatial resolution: ~65 m/pixel) along with Visible & Infrared Spectrometer data (VIR: spatial resolution: ~180 m/pixel) obtained during the High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO). This poster presentation concentrates on our geologic analysis and mapping of quadrangle V-12EW. This quadrangle is dominated by the arcuate edge of the large 460+ km diameter south polar topographic feature first observed by HST (Thomas et al., 1997). Sparsely cratered, the portion of this feature covered in V-12EW is characterized by arcuate ridges and troughs forming a generalized arcuate pattern. Mapping of this terrain and the transition to areas to the north will be used to test whether this feature has an impact or other (e.g., internal) origin. We are also using FC stereo and VIR images to assess whether their are any compositional differences between this terrain and areas further to the north, and image data to evaluate the distribution and age of young impact craters within the map area. The authors acknowledge the support of the Dawn Science, Instrument and Operations Teams.

  18. Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (Phase 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, Alan

    This is the Lead Proposal for the investigation "Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (Phase 3)". We propose to complete and fly the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravitational waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. Detection of the inflationary signal would have profound consequences for both cosmology and high-energy physics. Not only would it establish inflation as a physical reality, it would provide a direct, model-independent determination of the relevant energy scale, shedding light on physics at energies twelve orders of magnitude beyond those accessible to direct experimentation in particle accelerators. The recent detection of CMB polarization by the BICEP2 instrument brings new urgency to the field. The BICEP2 detection at degree angular scales is consistent with inflation, but the amplitude is a factor of two higher than upper limits set by unpolarized data. A critical test is the rise in power at large angular scales predicted by inflation. Detecting this rise would confirm the signal's inflationary origin, fulfilling a long quest for cosmology while providing new insight into physics at the highest energies. PIPER is the only suborbital instrument capable of measuring CMB polarization on the large angular scales needed to test an inflationary origin for the BICEP2 detection. PIPER is a balloon-borne instrument, optimized to detect the inflationary signal on large angular scales. It consists of two co-aligned telescopes cooled to 1.5 K within a large liquid helium bucket dewar. A variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) on each telescope chops between linear and circular polarization to isolate the polarized signal while rejecting the much brighter unpolarized emission. Four 32 x 40 element detector arrays provide background-limited sensitivity. A series of flights from mid-latitude sites will map

  19. Probing cosmic strings with satellite CMB measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, E.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Smoot, G. F.

    2010-09-01

    We study the problem of searching for cosmic string signal patterns in the present high resolution and high sensitivity observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This article discusses a technique capable of recognizing Kaiser-Stebbins effect signatures in total intensity anisotropy maps from isolated strings. We derive the statistical distributions of null detections from purely Gaussian fluctuations and instrumental performances of the operating satellites, and show that the biggest factor that produces confusion is represented by the acoustic oscillation features of the scale comparable to the size of horizon at recombination. Simulations show that the distribution of null detections converges to a χ2 distribution, with detectability threshold at 99% confidence level corresponding to a string induced step signal with an amplitude of about 100 μK which corresponds to a limit of roughly Gμ ~ 1.5 × 10-6. We implement simulations for deriving the statistics of spurious detections caused by extra-Galactic and Galactic foregrounds. For diffuse Galactic foregrounds, which represents the dominant source of contamination, we construct sky masks outlining the available region of the sky where the Galactic confusion is sub-dominant, specializing our analysis to the case represented by the frequency coverage and nominal sensitivity and resolution of the Planck experiment. As for other CMB measurements, the maximum available area, corresponding to 7%, is reached where the foreground emission is expected to be minimum, in the 70-100 GHz interval.

  20. Polarization properties of extragalactic radio sources and their contribution to microwave polarization fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, D.; Baccigalupi, C.; De Zotti, G.; Gregorini, L.; Mack, K.-H.; Vigotti, M.; Klein, U.

    2002-12-01

    We investigate the statistical properties of the polarized emission of extragalactic radio sources and estimate their contribution to the power spectrum of polarization fluctuations in the microwave region. The basic ingredients of our analysis are the NVSS polarization data, the multifrequency study of polarization properties of the B3-VLA sample (Mack et al. \\cite{Mack2002}) which has allowed us to quantify Faraday depolarization effects, and the 15 GHz survey by Taylor et al. (\\cite{Taylor2001}), which has provided strong constraints on the high-frequency spectral indices of sources. The polarization degree of both steep- and flat-spectrum sources at 1.4 GHz is found to be anti-correlated with the flux density. The median polarization degree at 1.4 GHz of both steep- and flat-spectrum sources brighter than S(1.4 GHz)=80 mJy is =~ 2.2%. The data by Mack et al. (\\cite{Mack2002}) indicate a substantial mean Faraday depolarization at 1.4 GHz for steep spectrum sources, while the depolarization is undetermined for most flat/inverted-spectrum sources. Exploiting this complex of information we have estimated the power spectrum of polarization fluctuations due to extragalactic radio sources at microwave frequencies. We confirm that extragalactic sources are expected to be the main contaminant of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization maps on small angular scales. At frequencies <30 GHz the amplitude of their power spectrum is expected to be comparable to that of the E-mode of the CMB. At higher frequencies, however, the CMB dominates.

  1. Crystallite orientation maps in starch granules from polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS) data.

    PubMed

    Galvis, Leonardo; Bertinetto, Carlo G; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Montesanti, Nicole; Vuorinen, Tapani

    2016-12-10

    In this work, polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS) was used to determine orientation maps of crystallites present in Phajus grandifolius starch granules based on the anisotropic response of the glycosidic Raman band at 865cm(-1). The response of this band was preliminarily evaluated using model A-amylose crystals as standard. The A-amylose crystals oriented "in plane" showed a maximal intensity ratio of ∼3.0 for bands 865/1343cm(-1) when the polarization of the laser was along the chain axis of the crystal, i.e., parallel to the axis of the amylose double helices, and a minimal intensity ratio of ∼0.25 when perpendicular. The orientation maps of Phajus grandifolius starch granules showed two distinct regions: one isotropic and the other with a highly anisotropic response. The origin of the difference might be changes in both organization/concentration and orientation of the crystallites across the starch granules.

  2. Quantitative mapping of collagen fiber alignment in thick tissue samples using transmission polarized-light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, Dmitry D.; Shvachkina, Marina E.; Sherman, Maria M.; Spivak, Andrey V.; Pravdin, Alexander B.; Yakovlev, Dmitry A.

    2016-07-01

    Immersion optical clearing makes it possible to use transmission polarized-light microscopy for characterization of thick (200 to 2000 μm) layers of biological tissues. We discuss polarization properties of thick samples in the context of the problem of characterization of collagen fiber alignment in connective tissues such as sclera and dermis. Optical chirality caused by azimuthal variations of the macroscopic (effective) optic axis of the medium across the sample thickness should be considered in polarization mapping of thick samples of these tissues. We experimentally evaluate to what extent the optical chirality affects the measurement results in typical situations and show under what conditions it can be easily taken into account and does not hinder, but rather helps, in characterization of collagen fiber alignment.

  3. Optimal scan strategies for future CMB satellite experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, Christopher G. R.; Brown, Michael L.; Battye, Richard A.; Delabrouille, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    The B-mode polarization power spectrum in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is about four orders of magnitude fainter than the CMB temperature power spectrum. Any instrumental imperfections that couple temperature fluctuations to B-mode polarization must therefore be carefully controlled and/or removed. We investigate the role that a scan strategy can have in mitigating certain common systematics by averaging systematic errors down with many crossing angles. We present approximate analytic forms for the error on the recovered B-mode power spectrum that would result from differential gain, differential pointing and differential ellipticity for the case where two detector pairs are used in a polarization experiment. We use these analytic predictions to search the parameter space of common satellite scan strategies in order to identify those features of a scan strategy that have most impact in mitigating systematic effects. As an example, we go on to identify a scan strategy suitable for the CMB satellite proposed for the European Space Agency M5 call, considering the practical considerations of fuel requirement, data rate and the relative orientation of the telescope to the earth. Having chosen a scan strategy we then go on to investigate the suitability of the scan strategy.

  4. Orbital mapping of energy bands and the truncated spin polarization in three-dimensional Rashba semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qihang; Zhang, Xiuwen; Waugh, J. A.; Dessau, D. S.; Zunger, Alex

    2016-09-01

    Associated with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and inversion symmetry breaking, Rashba spin polarization opens an avenue for spintronic applications that was previously limited to ordinary magnets. However, spin-polarization effects in actual Rashba systems are far more complicated than what conventional single-orbital models would suggest. By studying via density functional theory and a multiorbital k .p model a three-dimensional bulk Rashba system (free of complications by surface effects), BiTeI, we find that the physical origin of the leading spin-polarization effects is SOC-induced hybridization between spin and multiple orbitals, especially those with nonzero orbital angular momenta. In this framework we establish a general understanding of the orbital mapping, common to the surface of topological insulators and the Rashba system. Consequently, the intrinsic mechanism of various spin-polarization effects—which pertain to all Rashba systems, even those with global inversion symmetry—is understood as a manifestation of the orbital textures. This finding suggests a route for designing high-spin-polarization materials by considering the atomic-orbital content.

  5. Monitoring of persistent organic pollutants in the polar regions: knowledge gaps & gluts through evidence mapping.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Maria Cristina; Sarà, Gianluca; Corsolini, Simonetta

    2017-04-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are widespread compounds that accumulating in polar regions canalise through trophic webs. Although several dozens of studies have been carried out in the last decades, the information is generally scattered across a large number of literature sources. This does not allow an efficient synthesis and constraints our understanding on how address future monitoring plans and environmental conservation strategies on the Polar Regions with respect to POPs. Thus, here, we present the outcome of a systematic map (SM) to scope, screen and chart evidences from literature dealing with POPs in Polar regions. The SMs strive to produce rigorous guidelines and have recently been proposed as useful and effective tools to summarise growing bodies of research that seek to reduce bias and increase reliability, particularly in the case of high priority and controversial topics. Our SM was based on 125 polar studies, focussing on the most studied target species among those listed in the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List (IUCN Red List). To facilitate analysis of evidence, the studies were classified into Accumulation Monitoring (accounting for POP monitoring through sub-organismal, functional and population levels) and Food Web Monitoring approaches (accounting for contaminants monitoring through food webs). Our SM allowed us to assess and visualise, a set of both knowledge gaps and gluts and lastly a list was provided to address future research on POPs in Polar Regions.

  6. Multilocus analysis for gene-centromere mapping using first polar bodies and secondary oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Da, Y.; Jarrell, V.L.; Wang, T.; Fernando, R.L.; Wheeler, M.B.; Lewin, H.A.

    1995-02-01

    Polar body and oocyte typing is a new technique for gene-centromere mapping and for generating female linkage maps. A maximum likelihood approach is presented for ordering multiple markers relative to the centromere and for estimating recombination frequencies between markers and between the centromere and marker loci. Three marker-centromere orders are possible for each pair of markers: two orders when the centromere flanks the two markers and one order when the centromere is flanked by the two markers. For each possible order, the likelihood was expressed as a function of recombination frequencies for two adjacent intervals. LOD score for recombination frequency between markers or between the centromere and a marker locus was derived based on the likelihood for each gene-centromere order. The methods developed herein provide a general solution to the problem of multilocus gene-centromere mapping that involves all theoretical crossover possibilities, including four-strand double crossovers. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Multilocus Analysis for Gene-Centromere Mapping Using First Polar Bodies and Secondary Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Da, Y.; Jarrell, V. L.; Wang, T.; Fernando, R. L.; Wheeler, M. B.; Lewin, H. A.

    1995-01-01

    Polar body and oocyte typing is a new technique for gene-centromere mapping and for generating female linkage maps. A maximum likelihood approach is presented for ordering multiple markers relative to the centromere and for estimating recombination frequencies between markers and between the centromere and marker loci. Three marker-centromere orders are possible for each pair of markers: two orders when the centromere flanks the two markers and one order when the centromere is flanked by the two markers. For each possible order, the likelihood was expressed as a function of recombination frequencies for two adjacent intervals. LOD score for recombination frequency between markers or between the centromere and a marker locus was derived based on the likelihood for each gene-centromere order. The methods developed herein provide a general solution to the problem of multilocus genecentromere mapping that involves all theoretical crossover possibilities, including four-strand double crossovers. PMID:7713411

  8. What will we learn from the CMB?

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, S.

    1997-10-01

    Within the next decade, experiments measuring the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) will add greatly to our knowledge of the universe. There are dozens of experiments scheduled to take data over the next several years, capped by the satellite missions of NASA (MAP) and ESA (PLANCK). What will we learn from these experiments? I argue that the potential pay-off is immense: We are quite likely to determine cosmological parameters to unprecedented accuracy. This will provide key information about the theory of structure formation and even about the physics behind inflation. If the experiments succeed, can anything spoil this pay-off? I focus on three possible spoilers - foregrounds, reionization, and defect models - and argue that we have every reason to be optimistic.

  9. Improved method for detecting local discontinuities in CMB data by finite differencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Jude; Jaffe, Andrew H.

    2011-01-01

    An unexpected distribution of temperatures in the CMB could be a sign of new physics. In particular, the existence of cosmic defects could be indicated by temperature discontinuities via the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. In this paper, we show how performing finite differences on a CMB map, with the noise regularized in harmonic space, may expose such discontinuities, and we report the results of this process on the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data.

  10. Can CMB Experiments Find Planet Nine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    authors propose that CMB experiments with high enough resolution (~5m telescopes and larger) could have the ability to detect Planet Nine!Theres one major catch: how can we differentiate between Planet Nine and the ~4000 foreground asteroids that are brighter than 30 mJy at millimeter wavelengths?Cowan and collaborators argue that this can be done using a combination of asteroid databases and parallax measurements. The authors calculate that Planet Nine should move roughly a few arcseconds per day, mostly due to parallax. In comparison, asteroids will move ~10 arcminutes per day in a combination of proper motion and parallax an order of magnitude faster than Planet Nine.Resolution ConstraintsTo hunt down Planet Nine, we therefore need telescopes that can not only resolve a 30 mJy point source, but can also resolve an annual parallax motion of ~5 arcminutes per year.The authors demonstrate that several current and planned CMB experiments have the resolution and ability to detect Planet Nine, provided that they map large swatches of the sky and return to the same regions every few months. These experiments include CCAT, the South Pole Telescope, the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, CMB-S4, and even possibly Planck.With the astronomical community coming together to brainstormwaysto trackdown this elusive possible planet, the use of CMB experiments is an intriguing option. And even if Planet Nine is discovered by other means, measuring its heat signaturewillteach usmore about the internal workings of giant planets.CitationNicolas B. Cowan et al 2016 ApJ 822 L2. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/822/1/L2

  11. MAP kinase signaling antagonizes PAR-1 function during polarization of the early Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Spilker, Annina C; Rabilotta, Alexia; Zbinden, Caroline; Labbé, Jean-Claude; Gotta, Monica

    2009-11-01

    PAR proteins (partitioning defective) are major regulators of cell polarity and asymmetric cell division. One of the par genes, par-1, encodes a Ser/Thr kinase that is conserved from yeast to mammals. In Caenorhabditis elegans, par-1 governs asymmetric cell division by ensuring the polar distribution of cell fate determinants. However the precise mechanisms by which PAR-1 regulates asymmetric cell division in C. elegans remain to be elucidated. We performed a genomewide RNAi screen and identified six genes that specifically suppress the embryonic lethal phenotype associated with mutations in par-1. One of these suppressors is mpk-1, the C. elegans homolog of the conserved mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase ERK. Loss of function of mpk-1 restored embryonic viability, asynchronous cell divisions, the asymmetric distribution of cell fate specification markers, and the distribution of PAR-1 protein in par-1 mutant embryos, indicating that this genetic interaction is functionally relevant for embryonic development. Furthermore, disrupting the function of other components of the MAPK signaling pathway resulted in suppression of par-1 embryonic lethality. Our data therefore indicates that MAP kinase signaling antagonizes PAR-1 signaling during early C. elegans embryonic polarization.

  12. Optimal cosmic microwave background map-making in the presence of cross-correlated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gasperis, G.; Buzzelli, A.; Cabella, P.; de Bernardis, P.; Vittorio, N.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We present an extension of the ROMA map-making algorithm for the generation of optimal cosmic microwave background polarization maps. The new code allows for a possible cross-correlated noise component among the detectors of a CMB experiment. A promising application is the forthcoming LSPE balloon-borne experiment, which is devoted to the accurate observation of CMB polarization at large angular scales. Methods: We generalized the noise covariance matrix in time domain to account for all the off-diagonal terms due to the detector cross-talk. Hence, we performed preliminary forecasts of the LSPE-SWIPE instrument. Results: We found that considering the noise cross-correlation among the detectors results in a more realistic estimate of the angular power spectra. In particular, the extended ROMA algorithm has provided a considerable reduction of the spectra error bars. We expect that this improvement could be crucial in constraining the B-mode polarization at the largest scales.

  13. The quintessential CMB, past & future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, J. Richard; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Prunet, Simon; Sigurdson, Kris; Maxiboom Collaboration

    2001-02-01

    The past, present and future of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy research is discussed, with emphasis on the Boomerang and Maxima balloon experiments. These data are combined with large scale structure (LSS) information derived from local cluster abundances and galaxy clustering and high redshift supernova (SN1) observations to explore the inflation-based cosmic structure formation paradigm. Here we primarily focus on a simplified inflation parameter set, {ωb,ωcdm,Ωtot,ΩQ,wQ,ns,τC,σ8}. After marginalizing over the other cosmic and experimental variables, we find the current CMB+LSS+SN1 data gives Ωtot=1.04+/-0.05, consistent with (non-baroque) inflation theory. Restricting to Ωtot=1, we find a nearly scale invariant spectrum, ns=1.03+/-0.07. The CDM density, ωcdm=0.17+/-0.02, is in the expected range, but the baryon density, ωb≡Ωbh2=0.030+/-0.004, is slightly larger than the current 0.019+/-0.002 Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimate. Substantial dark (unclustered) energy is inferred, ΩQ~0.68+/-0.05, and CMB+LSS ΩQ values are compatible with the independent SN1 estimates. The dark energy equation of state, parameterized by a quintessence-field pressure-to-density ratio wQ, is not well determined by CMB+LSS (wQ<-0.3 at 95% CL), but when combined with SN1 the resulting wQ<-0.7 limit is quite consistent with the wQ=-1 cosmological constant case. Though forecasts of statistical errors on parameters for current and future experiments are rosy, rooting out systematic errors will define the true progress. .

  14. Statistics of the fractional polarization of compact radio sources in Planck maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonavera, Laura; González-Nuevo, Joaquin; Argüeso, Francisco; Toffolatti, Luigi

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we apply the stacking technique to estimate the average fractional polarization from 30 to 353 GHz of a primary sample of 1560 compact sources - essentially all radio sources - detected in the 30 GHz Planck all-sky map and listed in the second version of the Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2). We divide our primary sample in two subsamples according to whether the sources lay (679 sources) or not (881 sources) inside the sky region defined by the Planck Galactic mask (fsky ∼ 60 per cent) and the area around the Magellanic Clouds. We find that the average fractional polarization of compact sources is approximately constant (with frequency) in both samples (with a weighted mean over all the channels of 3.08 per cent outside and 3.54 per cent inside the Planck mask). In the sky region outside the adopted mask, we also estimate the μ and σ parameters for the lognormal distribution of the fractional polarization, finding a weighted mean value over all the Planck frequency range of 1.0 for σ and 0.7 for μ (that would imply a weighted mean value for the median fractional polarization of 1.9 per cent).

  15. Orientation-resolved domain mapping in tetragonal SrTiO3 using polarized Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Dodd J.; Merz, Tyler A.; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Hwang, Harold Y.; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    We present microscopically resolved, polarized spectroscopy of Raman scattering collected from tetragonal SrTiO3. The anisotropic response of first-order Raman peaks within a single tetragonal domain has been measured. From these data, we assign symmetries to the phonons seen in the first-order Raman spectrum which is normally complicated by uncontrolled domain structure. Using a translation stage, we map the local domain orientation of a 3 -μ m3 crystal volume near the laser focus and compare it to wide-field polarized images. This technique can be performed with readily available instruments and is relevant to the study of a wide range of related materials, interfaces, and devices.

  16. CMB-S4 Science Book, First Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Abazajian, Kevork N.

    2016-10-09

    This book lays out the scientific goals to be addressed by the next-generation ground-based cosmic microwave background experiment, CMB-S4, envisioned to consist of dedicated telescopes at the South Pole, the high Chilean Atacama plateau and possibly a northern hemisphere site, all equipped with new superconducting cameras. CMB-S4 will dramatically advance cosmological studies by crossing critical thresholds in the search for the B-mode polarization signature of primordial gravitational waves, in the determination of the number and masses of the neutrinos, in the search for evidence of new light relics, in constraining the nature of dark energy, and in testing general relativity on large scales.

  17. Hierarchical Bayesian method for mapping biogeochemical hot spots using induced polarization imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, Haruko M.; Flores Orozco, Adrian; Bücker, Matthias; Dafflon, Baptiste; Chen, Jinsong; Hubbard, Susan S.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    In floodplain environments, a naturally reduced zone (NRZ) is considered to be a common biogeochemical hot spot, having distinct microbial and geochemical characteristics. Although important for understanding their role in mediating floodplain biogeochemical processes, mapping the subsurface distribution of NRZs over the dimensions of a floodplain is challenging, as conventional wellbore data are typically spatially limited and the distribution of NRZs is heterogeneous. In this study, we present an innovative methodology for the probabilistic mapping of NRZs within a three-dimensional (3-D) subsurface domain using induced polarization imaging, which is a noninvasive geophysical technique. Measurements consist of surface geophysical surveys and drilling-recovered sediments at the U.S. Department of Energy field site near Rifle, CO (USA). Inversion of surface time domain-induced polarization (TDIP) data yielded 3-D images of the complex electrical resistivity, in terms of magnitude and phase, which are associated with mineral precipitation and other lithological properties. By extracting the TDIP data values colocated with wellbore lithological logs, we found that the NRZs have a different distribution of resistivity and polarization from the other aquifer sediments. To estimate the spatial distribution of NRZs, we developed a Bayesian hierarchical model to integrate the geophysical and wellbore data. In addition, the resistivity images were used to estimate hydrostratigraphic interfaces under the floodplain. Validation results showed that the integration of electrical imaging and wellbore data using a Bayesian hierarchical model was capable of mapping spatially heterogeneous interfaces and NRZ distributions thereby providing a minimally invasive means to parameterize a hydrobiogeochemical model of the floodplain.

  18. Multi-Wavelength, Multi-Beam, and Polarization-Sensitive Laser Transmitter for Surface Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Harding, David; Huss, Tim

    2011-01-01

    A multi-beam, multi-color, polarized laser transmitter has been developed for mapping applications. It uses commercial off-the-shelf components for a lowcost approach for a ruggedized laser suitable for field deployment. The laser transmitter design is capable of delivering dual wavelengths, multiple beams on each wavelength with equal (or variable) intensities per beam, and a welldefined state of polarization. This laser transmitter has been flown on several airborne campaigns for the Slope Imaging Multi-Polarization Photon Counting Lidar (SIMPL) instrument, and at the time of this reporting is at a technology readiness level of between 5 and 6. The laser is a 1,064-nm microchip high-repetition-rate laser emitting energy of about 8 microjoules per pulse. The beam was frequency-doubled to 532 nm using a KTP (KTiOPO4) nonlinear crystal [other nonlinear crystals such as LBO (LiB3O5) or periodically poled lithium niobiate can be used as well, depending on the conversion efficiency requirements], and the conversion efficiency was approximately 30 percent. The KTP was under temperature control using a thermoelectric cooler and a feedback monitoring thermistor. The dual-wavelength beams were then spectrally separated and each color went through its own optical path, which consisted of a beam-shaping lens, quarterwave plate (QWP), and a birefringent crystal (in this case, a calcite crystal, but others such as vanadate can be used). The QWP and calcite crystal set was used to convert the laser beams from a linearly polarized state to circularly polarized light, which when injected into a calcite crystal, will spatially separate the circularly polarized light into the two linear polarized components. The spatial separation of the two linearly polarized components is determined by the length of the crystal. A second set of QWP and calcite then further separated the two beams into four. Additional sets of QWP and calcite can be used to further split the beams into multiple

  19. Probing gravity at large scales through CMB lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Alam, Shadab; Ho, Shirley

    2015-06-01

    We describe a methodology to probe gravity with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence κ, specifically by measuring EG, the ratio of the Laplacian of the gravitational scalar potential difference to the velocity divergence. Using CMB lensing instead of galaxy-galaxy lensing avoids intrinsic alignments while also lacking a hard limit on the lens redshift and significant uncertainties in the source plane. We model EG for general relativity and modified gravity, finding that EG for f(R) gravity should be scale dependent due to the scale dependence of the growth rate f. Next, we construct an estimator for EG in terms of the galaxy-CMB lensing and galaxy clustering angular power spectra, along with the redshift-space distortion parameter β. We also forecast statistical errors for EG from the current Planck CMB lensing map and the spectroscopic galaxy and quasar samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 11, being 9 per cent with galaxies and 8 per cent when quasars are included. We also find that upcoming spectroscopic and photometric surveys, combined with the final Planck lensing map, can measure precisely the redshift- and scale dependence of EG out to redshifts z = 2 and higher, with photometric surveys having an advantage due to their high number densities. Advanced ACTPol's lensing map will increase the EG sensitivity even further. Finally, we find that Advanced ACTPol cross-correlated with spectroscopic (photometric) surveys can differentiate between general relativity and f(R) gravity at the level of 3σ (13σ). Performing a <1 per cent measurement of EG requires a 10 per cent precision in β from Euclid or Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, currently achievable with a spectroscopic survey but difficult with only a photometric survey.

  20. GeoMapApp as a platform for visualizing marine data from Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, F. O.; Ryan, W. B.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V.; Goodwillie, A. M.; O'hara, S. H.; Weissel, R.; McLain, K.; Chinhong, C.; Arko, R. A.; Chan, S.; Morton, J. J.; Pomeroy, D.

    2012-12-01

    To maximize the investment in expensive fieldwork the resulting data should be re-used as much as possible. In addition, unnecessary duplication of data collection effort should be avoided. This becomes even more important if access to field areas is as difficult and expensive as it is in Polar Regions. Making existing data discoverable in an easy to use platform is key to improve re-use and avoid duplication. A common obstacle is that use of existing data is often limited to specialists who know of the data existence and also have the right tools to view and analyze these data. GeoMapApp is a free, interactive, map based tool that allows users to discover, visualize, and analyze a large number of data sets. In addition to a global view, it provides polar map projections for displaying data in Arctic and Antarctic areas. Data that have currently been added to the system include Arctic swath bathymetry data collected from the USCG icebreaker Healy. These data are collected almost continuously including from cruises where bathymetry is not the main objective and for which existence of the acquired data may not be well known. In contrast, existence of seismic data from the Antarctic continental margin is well known in the seismic community. They are archived at and can be accessed through the Antarctic Seismic Data Library System (SDLS). Incorporating these data into GeoMapApp makes an even broader community aware of these data and the custom interface, which includes capabilities to visualize and explore these data, allows users without specific software or knowledge of the underlying data format to access the data. In addition to investigating these datasets, GeoMapApp provides links to the actual data sources to allow specialists the opportunity to re-use the original data. Important identification of data sources and data references are achieved on different levels. For access to the actual Antarctic seismic data GeoMapApp links to the SDLS site, where users have

  1. High-resolution tomography of CMB and lowermost mantle coupled by geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldati, G.; Boschi, L.; Forte, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Despite the fast advances of seismic tomography in the last decades provided us with very clear and reliable images of the Earth’s mantle,seismically and/or geodynamically inferred models of core-mantle boundary topography are still poorly correlated both in pattern and amplitude. A major cause for these discrepancies is the difficulty to separate, in travel-time anomalies, the contribution of CMB topography from that of lowermost-mantle and D" heterogeneities. As an attempt to reconcile the contrasting views of the Earth's CMB, we propose an innovative approach to mapping CMB topography from seismic travel-time inversions: instead of treating mantle velocity and CMB topography as independent parameters, as has been done so far (e.g., Soldati et al., 2003), we plan to account for their coupling by mantle flow, as formulated by e.g. Forte & Peltier (1991). In practice, we shall invert direct P waves, and core-sensitive phases, with coefficients of mantle (and, possibly, core) velocity structure as the only free parameters. CMB undulations will not be treated as free parameters, but accounted for via a modification of the tomographic matrix based on the estimated physical relationship between them and mantle velocities. For the first time, the resulting tomographic maps of CMB topography will be, by construction, physically sound, while explaining the inverted seismic data.

  2. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background polarization lensing power spectrum with the POLARBEAR experiment.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Linder, E; Leitch, E M; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2014-07-11

    Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale B-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity E- and B-mode polarization mapped over ∼30 square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing B modes is found at 4.2σ (stat+sys) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of 27%, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda cold dark matter cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing B-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves.

  3. Re-evaluation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, R.

    2009-12-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) has an almost perfect black-body spectrum, with polarization. These characteristics are inconsistent with the Standard Big Bang (SBB) model. An almost perfect spectrum can arise only from a surface of last scattering which is an almost perfect black-body. Thermodynamically, this is matter in thermal equilibrium, absorbing almost 100% of incident radiation and re-emitting it as black-body radiation. By definition, a perfect black-body is matter at zero kelvin, and cold matter better approaches this perfection. SBB theory describes the CMB as originating from a hydrogen-helium plasma, condensing at a temperature of about 3,000 K. Such a surface would exhibit a continuous radiation spectrum, not unlike that of the sun, which is shown to have a spectrum similar, but not identical to, a black-body spectrum. An imperfect spectrum, even stretched 1100 fold as in the SBB model, remains an imperfect spectrum. Also, a plasma would not support the orientation required to impart polarization to the CMB. A better explanation of the observational evidence is possible if one views the observable universe as part of, and originating from, a much larger structure. Here we propose a defined physical description for such a model. It is shown how a "cosmic fabric" of spin-oriented atomic hydrogen, at zero kelvin, surrounding a matter-depletion zone and the observable universe, would produce the CMB observations. The cosmic fabric would be a perfect black-body and subsequently re-emit an almost perfect black-body spectrum. The radiation would be almost perfectly isotropic, imposed by the spherical distribution of the surface of last scattering, and spin-oriented hydrogen would impart the observed polarization. This geometry also obviates the so-called "horizon problem" of the SBB, why the CMB radiation is essentially isotropic when coming from points of origin with no apparent causal contact. This problem was supposedly "solved" with the

  4. Non-Gaussianity and CMB aberration and Doppler

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Liguori, Michele; Renzi, Alessandro; Notari, Alessio E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it E-mail: arenzi@pd.infn.it

    2013-09-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces a deflection in the arrival direction of the observed photons (also known as CMB aberration) and a Doppler shift in the measured photon frequencies. As a consequence, aberration and Doppler effects induce non trivial correlations between the harmonic coefficients of the observed CMB temperature maps. In this paper we investigate whether these correlations generate a bias on non-Gaussianity estimators f{sub NL}. We perform this analysis simulating a large number of temperature maps with Planck-like resolution (lmax = 2000) as different realizations of the same cosmological fiducial model (WMAP7yr). We then add to these maps aberration and Doppler effects employing a modified version of the HEALPix code. We finally evaluate a generalization of the Komatsu, Spergel and Wandelt non-Gaussianity estimator for all the simulated maps, both when peculiar velocity effects have been considered and when these phenomena have been neglected. Using the value v/c = 1.23 × 10{sup −3} for our peculiar velocity, we found that the aberration/Doppler induced non-Gaussian signal is at most of about half of the cosmic variance σ for f{sub NL} both in a full-sky and in a cut-sky experimental configuration, for local, equilateral and orthogonal estimators. We conclude therefore that when estimating f{sub NL} it is safe to ignore aberration and Doppler effects if the primordial map is already Gaussian. More work is necessary however to assess whether a map which contains non-Gaussianity can be significantly distorted by a peculiar velocity.

  5. A CMB GIBBS SAMPLER FOR LOCALIZED SECONDARY ANISOTROPIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Philip; Eriksen, Hans Kristian; Fuskeland, Unni; Wehus, Ingunn K.; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Górski, Krzysztof M.; Jewell, Jeffrey B.

    2015-07-20

    In addition to primary fluctuations, cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps contain a wealth of additional information in the form of secondary anisotropies. However, secondary effects that can be identified with individual objects, such as the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (TSZ–KSZ) effects due to galaxy clusters, are difficult to unambiguously disentangle from foreground contamination and the primary CMB. We develop a Bayesian formalism to rigorously characterize anisotropies that are localized on the sky, taking the TSZ and KSZ effects as an example. Using a Gibbs sampling scheme, we are able to efficiently sample from the joint posterior distribution for a multi-component model of the sky with many thousands of correlated physical parameters. The posterior can then be exactly marginalized to estimate the properties of the secondary anisotropies, fully taking into account degeneracies with the other signals in the CMB map. We show that this method is computationally tractable using a simple implementation based on the existing Commander component separation code and discuss how other types of secondary anisotropy can be accommodated within our framework.

  6. Modeling the Corona and Solar Wind Using Polar Field Corrected Synoptic Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arge, Charles; de Toma, G.; Owens, M.; Pizzo, V.

    2006-06-01

    Measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) photospheric field near the Sun's poles are often highly unreliable because of their close proximity to the limb (i.e., only a small component of the field vector is directed toward the observer) and because the Sun's rotation axis is inclined 7.25° to the ecliptic plane. Regions located within 7.25° of the poles are in fact not even observable from Earth for up to six months at a time. The least reliable LOS photospheric field measurements thus tend to be those located near the poles. Photospheric field observations serve as a key driver to all coronal and solar wind models. These models (both simple and advanced) are especially sensitive to the field values at the Sun's poles, and therefore, it is crucial that they are determined as reliably as possible. In this study, we apply a polar field correction technique that we have developed [Arge and Pizzo, 2000] to a solar cycles worth of LOS photospheric magnetic field Carrington maps from Mount Wilson Solar observatory. We then use both the polar corrected as well as the uncorrected maps in the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model, which is a simple physics and empirical based coronal and solar wind model. The WSA solar wind predictions at L1 are then compared with each other as well as with the observations from the WIND and ACE spacecraft.

  7. The binned bispectrum estimator: template-based and non-parametric CMB non-Gaussianity searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Martin; Racine, Benjamin; van Tent, Bartjan

    2016-05-01

    We describe the details of the binned bispectrum estimator as used for the official 2013 and 2015 analyses of the temperature and polarization CMB maps from the ESA Planck satellite. The defining aspect of this estimator is the determination of a map bispectrum (3-point correlation function) that has been binned in harmonic space. For a parametric determination of the non-Gaussianity in the map (the so-called fNL parameters), one takes the inner product of this binned bispectrum with theoretically motivated templates. However, as a complementary approach one can also smooth the binned bispectrum using a variable smoothing scale in order to suppress noise and make coherent features stand out above the noise. This allows one to look in a model-independent way for any statistically significant bispectral signal. This approach is useful for characterizing the bispectral shape of the galactic foreground emission, for which a theoretical prediction of the bispectral anisotropy is lacking, and for detecting a serendipitous primordial signal, for which a theoretical template has not yet been put forth. Both the template-based and the non-parametric approaches are described in this paper.

  8. Mapping Vesta South Polar Quadrangle V-15SP: A Complex Geological Structure Dominates Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, R.; Yingst, R.; Schenk, P.; Schmedemann, N.; Williams, D. A.; Pieters, C. M.; Buczkowski, D.; Stephan, K.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Neukum, G.; O'Brien, D. P.; Mest, S. C.; Krohn, K.; Marchi, S.; Filacchione, G.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; De Sanctis, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    Images of the asteroid and protoplanet 4Vesta by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1994 and 1996 revealed a ~460 km diameter feature at its south pole that was interpreted to be a large impact structure. NASA's Dawn spacecraft arrived at the asteroid Vesta on July 15, 2011 and collected science data during the approach to Vesta, a circular polar orbit at an altitude of 2700 km providing ~ 230 m/pix camera resolution and a lower main mapping orbit, at 700 km altitude with a camera resolution of ~ 65 m/pixel. As part of the geological analysis of Vesta's surface, a series of 15 quadrangle maps are being produced. We present the results of the geological mapping achieved for quadrangle V-15SP. Unit boundaries and feature characteristics were determined primarily using morphologic data. Color and spectral data was utilized to refine unit contacts and to separate compositional or mineralogical distinctions. Those units that could be discerned both in morphology and in the color data were interpreted as geologically derived units. The south polar feature is a semi-circular structure with a central hill that is characterized by a white-grey color and smoother texture distinctive from the surrounding terrain. Some images show patches of bright, smooth terrain on the central hill, perhaps indicative of impact melt or ponded volcanic flows. A complex network of deep grooves and ridges is the primary characteristic on the feature floor; these grooves appear radial to the central mound or trend along a north-south line. The structure also has a distinctive color from both the central hill and surrounding terrain, consistent with a different composition or texture. A steep semi-arcuate scarp bounds part of the outer perimeter of the south polar feature. Although asymmetric in general form, these characteristics do not contradict an impact origin but may also allow endogenic processes like convective downwelling or hybrid modification of an impact. Rapid rotation of Vesta during

  9. Detection of degree-scale B-mode polarization and studying cosmic polarization rotation with the BICEP1 and BICEP2 telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Jonathan Philip

    The BICEP1 and BICEP2 telescopes studied the temperature and polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from 2006 -- 2008 and 2010 -- 2012, respectively, producing the deepest maps of polarization created to date. From BICEP2 three-year data, we detect B-mode polarization at the degree-scale above the expectation from lensed-ΛCDM to greater than 5sigma significance, consistent with that expected from gravitational waves created during Inflation. Instrumental systematic effects have been characterized and ruled out, and galactic foreground contamination is disfavored by the data. Additionally, correlations between temperature and B-mode polarization and between E-mode and B-mode polarization show evidence of polarization rotation of --1° to 5sigma significance; however, adding systematic uncertainty reduces this significance to ˜ 2sigma. These measurements, combined with other CMB and astrophysical measurements, point to possible parity violating physics like cosmic birefringence, but more precise calibration techniques are required to break the degeneracy between cosmic polarization rotation and systematic effects. Improved calibration is possible with current generation technology and may be achieved within the next few years. In this work, I present experimental and analysis techniques employed for BICEP1 and BICEP2 to measure B-mode polarization and temperature and polarization correlations, as well as the scientific motivation, results, and a path forward for future measurements.

  10. Planck 2015 results. XI. CMB power spectra, likelihoods, and robustness of parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Gerbino, M.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rouillé d'Orfeuil, B.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Serra, P.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    likelihood results against specific extensions to the baseline cosmology, which are particularly sensitive to data at high multipoles. For instance, the effective number of neutrino species remains compatible with the canonical value of 3.046. For this first detailed analysis of Planck polarization spectra, we concentrate at high multipoles on the E modes, leaving the analysis of the weaker B modes to future work. At low multipoles we use temperature maps at all Planck frequencies along with a subset of polarization data. These data take advantage of Planck's wide frequency coverage to improve the separation of CMB and foreground emission. Within the baseline ΛCDM cosmology this requires τ = 0.078 ± 0.019 for the reionization optical depth, which is significantly lower than estimates without the use of high-frequency data for explicit monitoring of dust emission. At high multipoles we detect residual systematic errors in E polarization, typically at the μK2 level; we therefore choose to retain temperature information alone for high multipoles as the recommended baseline, in particular for testing non-minimal models. Nevertheless, the high-multipole polarization spectra from Planck are already good enough to enable a separate high-precision determination of the parameters of the ΛCDM model, showing consistency with those established independently from temperature information alone.

  11. Planck 2015 results: XI. CMB power spectra, likelihoods, and robustness of parameters

    DOE PAGES

    Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; ...

    2016-09-20

    of the likelihood results against specific extensions to the baseline cosmology, which are particularly sensitive to data at high multipoles. For instance, the effective number of neutrino species remains compatible with the canonical value of 3.046. For this first detailed analysis of Planck polarization spectra, we concentrate at high multipoles on the E modes, leaving the analysis of the weaker B modes to future work. At low multipoles we use temperature maps at all Planck frequencies along with a subset of polarization data. These data take advantage of Planck’s wide frequency coverage to improve the separation of CMB and foreground emission. Within the baseline ΛCDM cosmology this requires τ = 0.078 ± 0.019 for the reionization optical depth, which is significantly lower than estimates without the use of high-frequency data for explicit monitoring of dust emission. At high multipoles we detect residual systematic errors in E polarization, typically at the μK2 level; we therefore choose to retain temperature information alone for high multipoles as the recommended baseline, in particular for testing non-minimal models. Finally and nevertheless, the high-multipole polarization spectra from Planck are already good enough to enable a separate high-precision determination of the parameters of the ΛCDM model, showing consistency with those established independently from temperature information alone.« less

  12. Planck 2015 results: XI. CMB power spectra, likelihoods, and robustness of parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Gerbino, M.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rouillé d’Orfeuil, B.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Serra, P.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-20

    robustness of the likelihood results against specific extensions to the baseline cosmology, which are particularly sensitive to data at high multipoles. For instance, the effective number of neutrino species remains compatible with the canonical value of 3.046. For this first detailed analysis of Planck polarization spectra, we concentrate at high multipoles on the E modes, leaving the analysis of the weaker B modes to future work. At low multipoles we use temperature maps at all Planck frequencies along with a subset of polarization data. These data take advantage of Planck’s wide frequency coverage to improve the separation of CMB and foreground emission. Within the baseline ΛCDM cosmology this requires τ = 0.078 ± 0.019 for the reionization optical depth, which is significantly lower than estimates without the use of high-frequency data for explicit monitoring of dust emission. At high multipoles we detect residual systematic errors in E polarization, typically at the μK2 level; we therefore choose to retain temperature information alone for high multipoles as the recommended baseline, in particular for testing non-minimal models. Finally and nevertheless, the high-multipole polarization spectra from Planck are already good enough to enable a separate high-precision determination of the parameters of the ΛCDM model, showing consistency with those established independently from temperature information alone.

  13. Optimal constraint on g{sub NL} from CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi E-mail: naoshi@nagoya-u.jp

    2013-09-01

    An optimal method to constrain the non-linearity parameter g{sub NL} of the local-type non-Gaussianity from CMB data is proposed. Our optimal estimator for g{sub NL} is separable and can be efficiently computed in real space. Combining the exact filtering of CMB maps with the full covariance matrix, our method allows us to extract cosmological information from observed data as much as possible and obtain a tighter constraint on g{sub NL} than previous studies. Applying our method to the WMAP 9-year data, we obtain the constraint g{sub NL} = (−3.3±2.2) × 10{sup 5}, which is a few times tighter than previous ones. We also make a forecast for PLANCK data by using the Fisher matrix analysis.

  14. The RWP-RK factor GROUNDED promotes embryonic polarity by facilitating YODA MAP kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sangho; Palmer, Travis M; Lukowitz, Wolfgang

    2011-08-09

    The division of plant zygotes is typically asymmetric, generating daughter cells with different developmental fates. In Arabidopsis, the apical daughter cell produces the proembryo, whereas the basal daughter cell forms the mostly extraembryonic suspensor. Establishment of apical and basal fates is known to depend on the YODA (YDA) mitogen-associated protein (MAP) kinase cascade and WUSCHEL-LIKE HOMEOBOX (WOX) homeodomain transcription factors. Mutations in GROUNDED (GRD) cause anatomical defects implying a partial loss of developmental asymmetry in the first division. Subsequently, suspensor-specific WOX8 expression disappears while proembryo-specific ZLL expression expands in the mutants, revealing that basal fates are confounded. GRD encodes a small nuclear protein of the RWP-RK family and is broadly transcribed in the early embryo. Loss of GRD eliminates the dominant effects of hyperactive YDA variants, indicating that GRD is required for YDA-dependent signaling in the embryo. However, GRD function is not regulated via direct phosphorylation by MAP kinases, and forced expression of GRD does not suppress the effect of yda mutations. In a strong synthetic interaction, grd;wox8;wox9 triple mutants arrest as zygotes or one-cell embryos lacking apparent polarity. The predicted transcription factor GRD acts cooperatively with WOX homeodomain proteins to establish embryonic polarity in the first division. Like YDA, GRD promotes zygote elongation and basal cell fates. GRD function is required for YDA-dependent signaling but apparently not regulated by the YDA MAP kinase cascade. Similarity of GRD to Chlamydomonas MID suggests a conserved role for small RWP-RK proteins in regulating the transcriptional programs of generative cells and the zygote. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CMB lensing and primordial squeezed non-gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Ruth; Lewis, Antony; Regan, Donough E-mail: antony@cosmologist.info

    2012-03-01

    Squeezed primordial non-Gaussianity can strongly constrain early-universe physics, but it can only be observed on the CMB after it has been gravitationally lensed. We give a new simple non-perturbative prescription for accurately calculating the effect of lensing on any squeezed primordial bispectrum shape, and test it with simulations. We give the generalization to polarization bispectra, and discuss the effect of lensing on the trispectrum. We explain why neglecting the lensing smoothing effect does not significantly bias estimators of local primordial non-Gaussianity, even though the change in shape can be ∼>10%. We also show how τ{sub NL} trispectrum estimators can be well approximated by much simpler CMB temperature modulation estimators, and hence that there is potentially a ∼ 10–30% bias due to very large-scale lensing modes, depending on the range of modulation scales included. Including dipole sky modulations can halve the τ{sub NL} error bar if kinematic effects can be subtracted using known properties of the CMB temperature dipole. Lensing effects on the g{sub NL} trispectrum are small compared to the error bar. In appendices we give the general result for lensing of any primordial bispectrum, and show how any full-sky squeezed bispectrum can be decomposed into orthogonal modes of distinct angular dependence.

  16. Robust likelihoods for inflationary gravitational waves from maps of cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer, Eric R.; Watts, Duncan J.

    2016-09-01

    The B -mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background provides a unique window into tensor perturbations from inflationary gravitational waves. Survey effects complicate the estimation and description of the power spectrum on the largest angular scales. The pixel-space likelihood yields parameter distributions without the power spectrum as an intermediate step, but it does not have the large suite of tests available to power spectral methods. Searches for primordial B -modes must rigorously reject and rule out contamination. Many forms of contamination vary or are uncorrelated across epochs, frequencies, surveys, or other data treatment subsets. The cross power and the power spectrum of the difference of subset maps provide approaches to reject and isolate excess variance. We develop an analogous joint pixel-space likelihood. Contamination not modeled in the likelihood produces parameter-dependent bias and complicates the interpretation of the difference map. We describe a null test that consistently weights the difference map. Excess variance should either be explicitly modeled in the covariance or be removed through reprocessing the data.

  17. CMB constraints on cosmic strings and superstrings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnock, Tom; Avgoustidis, Anastasios; Copeland, Edmund J.; Moss, Adam

    2016-06-01

    We present the first complete Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of cosmological models with evolving cosmic (super)string networks, using the unconnected segment model in the unequal-time correlator formalism. For ordinary cosmic string networks, we derive joint constraints on Λ cold dark matter (CDM) and string network parameters, namely the string tension G μ , the loop-chopping efficiency cr, and the string wiggliness α . For cosmic superstrings, we obtain joint constraints on the fundamental string tension G μF, the string coupling gs, the self-interaction coefficient cs, and the volume of compact extra dimensions w . This constitutes the most comprehensive CMB analysis of Λ CDM cosmology+strings to date. For ordinary cosmic string networks our updated constraint on the string tension, obtained using Planck2015 temperature and polarization data, is G μ <1.1 ×10-7 in relativistic units, while for cosmic superstrings our constraint on the fundamental string tension after marginalizing over gs, cs, and w is G μF<2.8 ×10-8.

  18. Precision CMB measurements with long-duration stratospheric balloons: activities in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; OLIMPO and LSPE Teams

    2013-01-01

    We report on the activities preparing long duration stratospheric flights, suitable for CMB (Cosmic Microwave Background) measurements, in the Arctic region. We focus on pathfinder flights, and on two forthcoming experiments to be flown from Longyearbyen (Svalbard islands): the OLIMPO Sunyaev-Zeldovich spectrometer, and the Large-Scale Polarization Explorer (LSPE).

  19. PETROLEUM RESIDUA SOLUBILITY PARAMETER/POLARITY MAP: STABILITY STUDIES OF RESIDUA PYROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; A. Troy Pauli; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.

    1999-04-30

    A new molecular weight/polarity map based on the Scatchard-Hildebrand solubility equation has been developed for petroleum residua. A series of extractions are performed with solvents of increasing solubility parameter, and the fractions are analyzed by vapor pressure osmometry for number average molecular weight and by analytical-scale size exclusion chromatography for molecular weight spread. Work was performed for a heavy oil material subjected to three increasing severities of thermal treatment prior to and through the onset of coke formation. The results are diagnostic of the layers of solvations by resin-type molecules around a central asphaltene core. Two additional stability diagnostic methods were also used. These were the Heithaus titration ''P-index'' and Gaestel ''G'' index, which have been applied to paving asphalts for decades. The Heithaus titration involves the titration of three toluene solutions of a residuum at three concentrations with a poor solvent, such as isooctane, to the point of asphaltene flocculation. In the present work, the significance of the data are developed in terms of the Hildebrand solubility parameter. The Heithaus results are combined with data from the new molecular weight/polarity map. The solubility parameters for the toluene-soluble asphaltene components are measured, and the solubility parameters of the maltenes can be calculated. As thermal treatment progresses, the solubility parameters of asphaltene materials increase and the molecular weights decrease. A new coking index is proposed based on Heithaus titration data. Preliminary results suggest that an alternative, simpler coking index may be developed by measuring the weight percent of cyclohexane solubles in heptane asphaltenes. Coking onset appears to coincide with the depletion of these resin-type asphaltene solubilizing components of residua. The objective of the present study was to develop a mapping tool that will enhance understanding of the changes that occur

  20. Mapping 3D fiber orientation in tissue using dual-angle optical polarization tractography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Ravanfar, M; Zhang, K; Duan, D; Yao, G

    2016-10-01

    Optical polarization tractography (OPT) has recently been applied to map fiber organization in the heart, skeletal muscle, and arterial vessel wall with high resolution. The fiber orientation measured in OPT represents the 2D projected fiber angle in a plane that is perpendicular to the incident light. We report here a dual-angle extension of the OPT technology to measure the actual 3D fiber orientation in tissue. This method was first verified by imaging the murine extensor digitorum muscle placed at various known orientations in space. The accuracy of the method was further studied by analyzing the 3D fiber orientation of the mouse tibialis anterior muscle. Finally we showed that dual-angle OPT successfully revealed the unique 3D "arcade" fiber structure in the bovine articular cartilage.

  1. Mapping 3D fiber orientation in tissue using dual-angle optical polarization tractography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Ravanfar, M.; Zhang, K.; Duan, D.; Yao, G.

    2016-01-01

    Optical polarization tractography (OPT) has recently been applied to map fiber organization in the heart, skeletal muscle, and arterial vessel wall with high resolution. The fiber orientation measured in OPT represents the 2D projected fiber angle in a plane that is perpendicular to the incident light. We report here a dual-angle extension of the OPT technology to measure the actual 3D fiber orientation in tissue. This method was first verified by imaging the murine extensor digitorum muscle placed at various known orientations in space. The accuracy of the method was further studied by analyzing the 3D fiber orientation of the mouse tibialis anterior muscle. Finally we showed that dual-angle OPT successfully revealed the unique 3D “arcade” fiber structure in the bovine articular cartilage. PMID:27867698

  2. Mapping spin coherence of a single rare-earth ion in a crystal onto a single photon polarization state.

    PubMed

    Kolesov, Roman; Xia, Kangwei; Reuter, Rolf; Jamali, Mohammad; Stöhr, Rainer; Inal, Tugrul; Siyushev, Petr; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2013-09-20

    We report on optical detection of a single photostable Ce(3+) ion in an yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) crystal and on its magneto-optical properties at room temperature. The spin quantum state of the emitting level of a single cerium ion in YAG can be initialized by a circularly polarized laser pulse. Coherent precession of the electron spin is read out by observing temporal behavior of circularly polarized fluorescence of the ion. This implies direct mapping of the spin quantum state of Ce(3+) ion onto the polarization state of the emitted photon and represents the quantum interface between a single spin and a single photon.

  3. Planck intermediate results: XXXVIII. E- and B-modes of dust polarization from the magnetized filamentary structure of the interstellar medium

    DOE PAGES

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; ...

    2016-02-09

    The quest for a B-mode imprint from primordial gravity waves on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) requires the characterization of foreground polarization from Galactic dust. In this paper, we present a statistical study of the filamentary structure of the 353 GHz Planck Stokes maps at high Galactic latitude, relevant to the study of dust emission as a polarized foreground to the CMB. We filter the intensity and polarization maps to isolate filaments in the range of angular scales where the power asymmetry between E-modes and B-modes is observed. Using the Smoothed Hessian Major Axis Filament Finder (SMAFF),more » we identify 259 filaments at high Galactic latitude, with lengths larger or equal to 2° (corresponding to 3.5 pc in length for a typical distance of 100 pc). Thesefilaments show a preferred orientation parallel to the magnetic field projected onto the plane of the sky, derived from their polarization angles. We present mean maps of the filaments in Stokes I, Q, U, E, and B, computed by stacking individual images rotated to align the orientations of the filaments. Combining the stacked images and the histogram of relative orientations, we estimate the mean polarization fraction of the filaments to be 11%. Furthermore, we show that the correlation between the filaments and the magnetic field orientations may account for the E and B asymmetry and the CℓTE/CℓEE ratio, reported in the power spectra analysis of the Planck353 GHz polarization maps. Finally, future models of the dust foreground for CMB polarization studies will need to take into account the observed correlation between the dust polarization and the structure of interstellar matter.« less

  4. Planck intermediate results. XXXVIII. E- and B-modes of dust polarization from the magnetized filamentary structure of the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Serra, P.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    The quest for a B-mode imprint from primordial gravity waves on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) requires the characterization of foreground polarization from Galactic dust. We present a statistical study of the filamentary structure of the 353 GHz Planck Stokes maps at high Galactic latitude, relevant to the study of dust emission as a polarized foreground to the CMB. We filter the intensity and polarization maps to isolate filaments in the range of angular scales where the power asymmetry between E-modes and B-modes is observed. Using the Smoothed Hessian Major Axis Filament Finder (SMAFF), we identify 259 filaments at high Galactic latitude, with lengths larger or equal to 2° (corresponding to 3.5 pc in length for a typical distance of 100 pc). Thesefilaments show a preferred orientation parallel to the magnetic field projected onto the plane of the sky, derived from their polarization angles. We present mean maps of the filaments in Stokes I, Q, U, E, and B, computed by stacking individual images rotated to align the orientations of the filaments. Combining the stacked images and the histogram of relative orientations, we estimate the mean polarization fraction of the filaments to be 11%. Furthermore, we show that the correlation between the filaments and the magnetic field orientations may account for the E and B asymmetry and the CℓTE/CℓEE ratio, reported in the power spectra analysis of the Planck353 GHz polarization maps. Future models of the dust foreground for CMB polarization studies will need to take into account the observed correlation between the dust polarization and the structure of interstellar matter.

  5. The shape of the CMB lensing bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Antony; Challinor, Anthony; Hanson, Duncan E-mail: adc1000@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2011-03-01

    Lensing of the CMB generates a significant bispectrum, which should be detected by the Planck satellite at the 5-sigma level and is potentially a non-negligible source of bias for f{sub NL} estimators of local non-Gaussianity. We extend current understanding of the lensing bispectrum in several directions: (1) we perform a non-perturbative calculation of the lensing bispectrum which is ∼ 10% more accurate than previous, first-order calculations; (2) we demonstrate how to incorporate the signal variance of the lensing bispectrum into estimates of its amplitude, providing a good analytical explanation for previous Monte-Carlo results; and (3) we discover the existence of a significant lensing bispectrum in polarization, due to a previously-unnoticed correlation between the lensing potential and E-polarization as large as 30% at low multipoles. We use this improved understanding of the lensing bispectra to re-evaluate Fisher-matrix predictions, both for Planck and cosmic variance limited data. We confirm that the non-negligible lensing-induced bias for estimation of local non-Gaussianity should be robustly treatable, and will only inflate f{sub NL} error bars by a few percent over predictions where lensing effects are completely ignored (but note that lensing must still be accounted for to obtain unbiased constraints). We also show that the detection significance for the lensing bispectrum itself is ultimately limited to 9 sigma by cosmic variance. The tools that we develop for non-perturbative calculation of the lensing bispectrum are directly relevant to other calculations, and we give an explicit construction of a simple non-perturbative quadratic estimator for the lensing potential and relate its cross-correlation power spectrum to the bispectrum. Our numerical codes are publicly available as part of CAMB and LensPix.

  6. Spectral Distortions of the CMB Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashev, S. A.; Kholupenko, E. E.; Chluba, J.; Ivanchik, A. V.; Varshalovich, D. A.

    2015-09-01

    We consider the distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) dipole anisotropy related to primordial recombination radiation (PRR) and primordial y- and μ-distortions. The signals arise due to our motion relative to the CMB restframe and appear as a frequency-dependent distortion of the CMB temperature dipole. To leading order, the expected relative distortion of the CMB dipole does not depend on the particular observation directions and reaches the level of 10-6 for the PRR- and μ-distortions and 10-5 for the y-distortion in the frequency range 1-700 GHz. The temperature differences arising from the dipole anisotropy of the relic CMB distortions depend on the observation directions. For mutually opposite directions, collinear to the CMB dipole axis, the temperature differences due to the PRR- and μ-dipole anisotropy attain values {{Δ }}T≃ 10 {nK} in the considered range. The temperature difference arising from the y-dipole anisotropy may reach values of up to 1 μ {{K}}. The key features of the considered effect are as follow: (i) an observation of the effect does not require absolute calibration; (ii) patches of sky with minimal foreground contamination can be chosen. Future measurements of the CMB dipole distortion thus will provide an alternative method for direct detection of the PRR-, y-, and μ-distortions. The y-distortion dipole may be detectable with PIXIE at a few standard deviations.

  7. A note on the birefringence angle estimation in CMB data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruppuso, A.; Maggio, G.; Molinari, D.; Natoli, P.

    2016-05-01

    Parity violating physics beyond the standard model of particle physics induces a rotation of the linear polarization of photons. This effect, also known as cosmological birefringence (CB), can be tested with the observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies which are linearly polarized at the level of 5-10%. In particular CB produces non-null CMB cross correlations between temperature and B mode-polarization, and between E- and B-mode polarization. Here we study the properties of the so called D-estimators, often used to constrain such an effect. After deriving the framework of both frequentist and Bayesian analysis, we discuss the interplay between birefringence and weak-lensing, which, albeit parity conserving, modifies pre-existing TB and EB cross correlation.

  8. Disformal transformations on the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrage, Clare; Cespedes, Sebastian; Davis, Anne-Christine

    2016-08-01

    In this work we study the role of disformal transformation on cosmological backgrounds and its relation to the speed of sound for tensor modes. A speed different from one for tensor modes can arise in several contexts, such as Galileons theories or massive gravity, nevertheless the speed is very constrained to be one by observations of gravitational wave emission. It has been shown that in inflation a disformal transformation allows to set the speed for tensor modes to one without making changes to the curvature power spectrum. Here we show that this invariance does not hold when considering the CMB anisotropy power spectrum. It turns out that the after doing the transformation there is an imprint on the acoustic peaks and the diffusion damping. This has interesting consequences; here we explore quartic galileon theories which allow a modified speed for tensor modes. For these theories the transformation can be used to constraint the parameter space in different regimes.

  9. IRTM brightness temperature maps of the Martian south polar region during the polar night: The cold spots don't move

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paige, D. A.; Crisp, D.; Santee, M. L.; Richardson, M. I.

    1993-01-01

    A series of infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) south polar brightness temperature maps obtained by Viking Orbiter 2 during a 35-day period during the southern fall season in 1978 was examined. The maps show a number of phenomena that have been identified in previous studies, including day to day brightness temperature variations in individual low temperature regions and the tendency for IRTM 11-micron channel brightness temperatures to also decrease in regions where low 20-micron channel brightness temperatures are observed. The maps also show new phenomena, the most striking of which is a clear tendency for the low brightness temperature regions to occur at fixed geographic regions. During this season, the coldest low brightness temperatures appear to be concentrated in distinct regions, with spatial scales ranging from 50 to 300 km. There are approximately a dozen of these concentrations, with the largest centered near the location of the south residual polar cap. Other concentrations are located at Cavi Angusti and close to the craters Main, South, Lau, and Dana. Broader, less intense regions appear to be well correlated with the boundaries of the south polar layered deposits and the Mountains of Mitchell. No evidence for horizontal motion of any of these regions has been detected.

  10. Mapping polar bear maternal denning habitat in the National Petroleum Reserve -- Alaska with an IfSAR digital terrain model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durner, George M.; Simac, Kristin S.; Amstrup, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The National Petroleum Reserve–Alaska (NPR-A) in northeastern Alaska provides winter maternal denning habitat for polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and also has high potential for recoverable hydrocarbons. Denning polar bears exposed to human activities may abandon their dens before their young are able to survive the severity of Arctic winter weather. To ensure that wintertime petroleum activities do not threaten polar bears, managers need to know the distribution of landscape features in which maternal dens are likely to occur. Here, we present a map of potential denning habitat within the NPR-A. We used a fine-grain digital elevation model derived from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IfSAR) to generate a map of putative denning habitat. We then tested the map’s ability to identify polar bear denning habitat on the landscape. Our final map correctly identified 82% of denning habitat estimated to be within the NPR-A. Mapped denning habitat comprised 19.7 km2 (0.1% of the study area) and was widely dispersed. Though mapping denning habitat with IfSAR data was as effective as mapping with the photogrammetric methods used for other regions of the Alaskan Arctic coastal plain, the use of GIS to analyze IfSAR data allowed greater objectivity and flexibility with less manual labor. Analytical advantages and performance equivalent to that of manual cartographic methods suggest that the use of IfSAR data to identify polar bear maternal denning habitat is a better management tool in the NPR-A and wherever such data may be available.

  11. Modeling CMB lensing cross correlations with CLEFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Chirag; White, Martin; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2017-08-01

    A new generation of surveys will soon map large fractions of sky to ever greater depths and their science goals can be enhanced by exploiting cross correlations between them. In this paper we study cross correlations between the lensing of the CMB and biased tracers of large-scale structure at high z. We motivate the need for more sophisticated bias models for modeling increasingly biased tracers at these redshifts and propose the use of perturbation theories, specifically Convolution Lagrangian Effective Field Theory (CLEFT). Since such signals reside at large scales and redshifts, they can be well described by perturbative approaches. We compare our model with the current approach of using scale independent bias coupled with fitting functions for non-linear matter power spectra, showing that the latter will not be sufficient for upcoming surveys. We illustrate our ideas by estimating σ8 from the auto- and cross-spectra of mock surveys, finding that CLEFT returns accurate and unbiased results at high z. We discuss uncertainties due to the redshift distribution of the tracers, and several avenues for future development.

  12. Feedhorn-Coupled TES Polarimeters for Next-Generation CMB Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, K. W.; Appel, J. W.; Austermann, J. E.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Britton, J.; Chang, C. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Cho, H.-M.; Crites, A. T.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Everett, W.; Halverson, N. W.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; McMahon, J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Moseley, S.; Niemack, M. D.; Parker, L. P.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; U-yen, K.; Visnjic, C.; Wollack, E.; Zhao, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The next generation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments targeting the signatures of inflation will require unprecedented sensitivities in addition to careful control of systematics. With existing detector technologies approaching the photon noise limit, improvements in system sensitivities must come from ever-larger focal plane arrays of millimeter-wave detectors. We report on the design and performance of microfabricated planar orthomode transducer (OMT) coupled TES polarimeters and silicon micromachined platelet feedhorns optimized for scaling to large monolithic arrays. Future versions of these detectors are targeted for deployment in a number of upcoming CMB experiments, including ABS, SPTpol, and ACTpol.

  13. Cosmology with the cosmic microwave background temperature-polarization correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couchot, F.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Perdereau, O.; Plaszczynski, S.; Rouillé d'Orfeuil, B.; Spinelli, M.; Tristram, M.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate that the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature-polarization cross-correlation provides accurate and robust constraints on cosmological parameters. We compare them with the results from temperature or polarization and investigate the impact of foregrounds, cosmic variance, and instrumental noise. This analysis makes use of the Planck high-ℓ HiLLiPOP likelihood based on angular power spectra, which takes into account systematics from the instrument and foreground residuals directly modelled using Planck measurements. The temperature-polarization correlation (TE) spectrum is less contaminated by astrophysical emissions than the temperature power spectrum (TT), allowing constraints that are less sensitive to foreground uncertainties to be derived. For ΛCDM parameters, TE gives very competitive results compared to TT. For basic ΛCDM model extensions (such as AL, ∑mν, or Neff), it is still limited by the instrumental noise level in the polarization maps.

  14. Parametric Dielectric Map of the Martian North Polar Layered Deposits in Support of the MARSIS and SHARAD data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosmidis, J.; Heggy, E.; Clifford, S. M.

    2007-12-01

    Laboratory dielectric characterizations of Ice-dust mixtures are crucial for the quantitative analysis of radar sounding data as for the case of the MARSIS and SHARAD experiments. Understanding the range of the dielectric properties of the Martian northmen Polar layer deposits as well as their geographical an vertical distribution result in a better topographical mapping of the basement material below the northern polar cap and help constrain the ambiguities on the identification of layering and any potential subglaciar melting. In order to achieve this task, we constructed first order modeled maps of the surface dielectric properties oh the NPLD. We first used the recent Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) thermal inertia observations in order to derive a map of the dust mass fraction in the ice at the top of the permanent cap. Then we used parametric laboratory measurements of the dielectric properties of Martian polar ice analogs with various temperatures, radar frequencies and mass fractions and compositions of dust in order to obtain the parametric dielectric maps. Thermal inertia maps have been derived from recent TES observations of the surface temperatures of Mars taken over three Mars-years from orbit 1583 to 24346. Laboratory dielectric characterization of ice-dust mixtures has been performed using TES dust calibration samples provided by the ARES group at NASA JSC. Our Maps suggest that surface dielectric properties of the northern Polar cap ranges from 2.72 to 3.23 in the 2-20 MHz band for a dust inclusion typical of Martian basalt. Parametric maps of loss tangent, penetration depth for several dust types will be presented at the conference.

  15. Vectorial mapping of noncollinear antiferromagnetic structure of semiconducting FeSe surface with spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, K. F.; Yang, Fang; Song, Y. R.; Zhang, Xiaole; Chen, Xianfeng; Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Gao, C. L. Jia, Jin-Feng; Luo, Weidong

    2016-02-08

    Antiferromagnetic semiconductors gain increasing interest due to their possible application in spintronics. Using spin polarized scanning tunneling microscopy operating in a vector field, we mapped the noncollinear antiferromagnetic spin structure of a semiconducting hexagonal FeSe surface on the atomic scale. The surface possesses an in-plane compensated Néel structure which is further confirmed by first-principles calculations.

  16. Atomically-resolved mapping of polarization and electric fields across ferroelectric-oxide interfaces by Z-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hye Jung; Kalinin, Sergei; Morozovska, A. N.; Huijben, Mark; Chu, Ying-Hao; Yu, P; Ramesh, R.; Eliseev, E. A.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Pennycook, Stephen J; Borisevich, Albina Y

    2011-01-01

    Direct atomic displacement mapping at ferroelectric interfaces by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy(STEM) (a-STEM image, b-corresponding displacement profile) is combined with Landau-Ginsburg-Devonshire theory to obtain the complete interface electrostatics in real space, including separate estimates for the polarization and intrinsic interface charge contributions.

  17. A CMB foreground study in WMAP data: Extragalactic point sources and zodiacal light emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It serves as a primary tool to understand the global properties, content and evolution of the universe. Since 2001, NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite has been napping the full sky anisotropy with unprecedented accuracy, precision and reliability. The CMB angular power spectrum calculated from the WMAP full sky maps not only enables accurate testing of cosmological models, but also places significant constraints on model parameters. The CMB signal in the WMAP sky maps is contaminated by microwave emission from the Milky Way and from extragalactic sources. Therefore, in order to use the maps reliably for cosmological studies, the foreground signals must be well understood and removed from the maps. This thesis focuses on the separation of two foreground contaminants from the WMAP maps: extragalactic point sources and zodiacal light emission. Extragalactic point sources constitute the most important foreground on small angular scales. Various methods have been applied to the WMAP single frequency maps to extract sources. However, due to the limited angular resolution of WMAP, it is possible to confuse positive CMB excursions with point sources or miss sources that are embedded in negative CMB fluctuations. We present a novel CMB-free source finding technique that utilizes the spectrum difference of point sources and CMB to form internal linear combinations of multifrequency maps to suppress the CMB and better reveal sources. When applied to the WMAP 41, 64 and 94 GHz maps, this technique has not only enabled detection of sources that are previously cataloged by independent methods, but also allowed disclosure of new sources. Without the noise contribution from the CMB, this method responds rapidly with the integration time. The number of detections varies as 0( t 0.72 in the two-band search and 0( t 0.70 in the three-band search from one year to five years

  18. Parity violation in the CMB bispectrum by a rolling pseudoscalar

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo; Saga, Shohei E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it

    2013-11-01

    We investigate parity-violating signatures of temperature and polarization bispectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in an inflationary model where a rolling pseudoscalar produces large equilateral tensor non-Gaussianity. By a concrete computation based on full-sky formalism, it is shown that resultant CMB bispectra have nonzero signals in both parity-even (ℓ{sub 1}+ℓ{sub 2}+ℓ{sub 3} = even) and parity-odd (ℓ{sub 1}+ℓ{sub 2}+ℓ{sub 3} = odd) spaces, and are almost uncorrelated with usual scalar-mode equilateral bispectra. These characteristic signatures and polarization information help to detect such tensor non-Gaussianity. Use of both temperature and E-mode bispectra potentially improves of 400% the detectability with respect to an analysis with temperature bispectrum alone. Considering B-mode bispectrum, the signal-to-noise ratio may be able to increase by 3 orders of magnitude. We present the 1σ uncertainties of a parameter depending on a coupling constant and a rolling condition for the pseudoscalar expected in the Planck and the proposed PRISM experiments.

  19. CMB anisotropies generated by a stochastic background of primordial magnetic fields with non-zero helicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ballardini, Mario

    2015-10-01

    We consider the impact of a stochastic background of primordial magnetic fields with non-vanishing helicity on CMB anisotropies in temperature and polarization. We compute the exact expressions for the scalar, vector and tensor part of the energy-momentum tensor including the helical contribution, by assuming a power-law dependence for the spectra and a comoving cutoff which mimics the damping due to viscosity. We also compute the parity-odd correlator between the helical and non-helical contribution which generate the TB and EB cross-correlation in the CMB pattern. We finally show the impact of including the helical term on the power spectra of CMB anisotropies up to multipoles with ℓ ∼ O(10{sup 3})

  20. Mapping and characterization of non-polar permanent shadows on the lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, J. Andrew; Bussey, D. Benjamin; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Paige, David A.; Cahill, Joshua T. S.; Spudis, Paul D.

    2013-03-01

    We present the first globally complete inventory of permanent shadows on the lunar surface that are detectable with the current global instrument datasets, including discovery of regions with persistent shadows over geologic time periods as close to the equator as ±58° of latitude. These results were obtained through application of a ray tracing technique to the latest global topographic datasets from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Our analysis reveals that 13,361 km2 of surface in the northern hemisphere and 17,698 km2 in the southern hemisphere are permanently shadowed. We present maps showing the locations of all the permanent shadows detectable using these datasets then turn our focus toward the permanent shadows farthest from the poles. Each permanent shadow on the equator side of ±65° of latitude is shown in detail. Surface brightness temperature data derived from the Diviner mid-infrared radiometer on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter have been analyzed for four of these locations and found to have mid-day temperatures 75-120 K less than nearby comparison locations that experience direct daytime illumination. In some cases the permanently shadowed locations have nighttime temperatures 10-25 K lower than surroundings. The temperature results support our finding that these non-polar craters are permanently shadowed. The surface brightness temperature results also raise interesting questions about their ability to cold trap volatiles. Discovery of these non-polar permanently shadowed regions increases possible locations of water resources and high priority exploration targets on the Moon.

  1. Analysing the Effect on CMB in a Parity and Charge Parity Violating Varying Alpha Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Debaprasad; Chen, Pisin; /NCTS, Taipei /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-09-14

    In this paper we study in detail the effect of our recently proposed model of parity and charge-parity (PCP) violating varying alpha on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photon passing through the intra galaxy-cluster medium (ICM). The ICM is well known to be composed of magnetized plasma. According to our model, the polarization and intensity of the CMB would be affected when traversing through the ICM due to non-trivial scalar photon interactions. We have calculated the evolution of such polarization and intensity collectively, known as the stokes parameters of the CMB photon during its journey through the ICM and tested our results against the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) measurement on Coma galaxy cluster. Our model contains a PCP violating parameter, {beta}, and a scale of alpha variation {omega}. Using the derived constrained on the photon-to-scalar conversion probability, {bar P}{sub {gamma}{yields}{phi}}, for Coma cluster in ref.[34] we found a contour plot in the ({omega},{beta}) parameter plane. The {beta} = 0 line in this parameter space corresponds to well-studied Maxwell-dilaton type models which has lower bound on {omega} {approx}> 6.4 x 10{sup 9} GeV. In general, as the absolute value of {beta} increases, lower bound on {omega} also increases. Our model in general predicts the modification of the CMB polarization with a non-trivial dependence on the parity violating coupling parameter {beta}. However, it is unconstrained in this particular study. We show that this effect can in principle be detected in the future measurements on CMB polarization such that {beta} can also be constrained.

  2. Quantitative Mapping of Surface Texture on the Northern Polar Residual Cap of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milkovich, S. M.; Byrne, S.; Russell, P. S.

    2010-12-01

    The northern polar residual cap (NPRC) of Mars is a water ice deposit with a rough surface made up of pits, knobs, and linear depressions on scales of tens of meters [1]. This roughness manifests as a series of bright and dark patches in visible images. Spectral data indicate that the surface of the NPRC is composed of large-grained (and therefore old) water ice. Due to the presence of this old ice, it is thought that the NPRC is in a current state of net loss of material [2]. The NPRC provides a link between the current martian climate and the historical climate recorded within the layers of the underlying north polar layered deposits. By characterizing and mapping the variations in surface texture of the NPRC, we seek to understand what factors (distance from the pole, GCM and mesoscale wind direction predictions, etc) are currently at work in resurfacing the deposit, and may have been at work in shaping the layers below. Maps of NPRC texture wavelength and orientation are being produced from HiRISE images. Two-dimensional Fourier analysis is performed upon a 256 meter x 256 meter region (corresponding to 512 x 512 pixels in 0.5 cm/pxl images, or 1024 x 1024 pixels in 0.25 cm/pxl images) within each image analyzed. The dominant wavelength of the resulting peak power spectrum corresponds to the average size of a pit-knob pair in the image, and so is a proxy for the scale of the surface roughness. The orientation of the surface roughness (i.e., the orientation of a chain of pits and mounds) is measured from a narrow range of wavelengths encompassing the dominant wavelength. We will report on how the dominant wavelengths and orientations of this surface texture vary with location and what that implies for the processes currently shaping this landscape. [1] P. C. Thomas et al, Nature 404, 161-164, 2000 [2]Y. Langevin et al, Science 307, 5715, 1581-1584, 2005.

  3. Measuring our peculiar velocity on the CMB with high-multipole off-diagonal correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendola, Luca; Catena, Riccardo; Masina, Isabella; Notari, Alessio; Quartin, Miguel; Quercellini, Claudia

    2011-07-01

    Our peculiar velocity with respect to the CMB rest frame is known to induce a large dipole in the CMB. However, the motion of an observer has also the effect of distorting the anisotropies at all scales, as shown by Challinor and Van Leeuwen (2002), due to aberration and Doppler effects. We propose to measure independently our local motion by using off-diagonal two-point correlation functions for high multipoles. We study the observability of the signal for temperature and polarization anisotropies. We point out that Planck can measure the velocity β with an error of about 30% and the direction with an error of about 20°. This method constitutes a cross-check, which can be useful to verify that our CMB dipole is due mainly to our velocity or to disentangle the velocity from other possible intrinsic sources. Although in this paper we focus on our peculiar velocity, a similar effect would result also from other intrinsic vectorial distortion of the CMB which would induce a dipolar lensing. Measuring the off-diagonal correlation terms is therefore a test for a preferred direction on the CMB sky.

  4. Microfabrication of Arrays of Superconducting Transition Edge Sensors for CMB Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, Chrystian; Ding, Junjia; Bender, Amy; Khaire, Trupti; Lendinez, Sergi; Ciocys, Samuel; Wang, Gensheng; Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Padin, Steve; Carlstrom, John; Chang, Clarence; Novosad, Valentine; Spt3G Collaboration

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) provides a unique window for exploring fundamental physics. Increasing the sensitivity of CMB experiments requires fabricating focal planes with orders of magnitude more detectors than current instruments. This work presents the procedures used at Argonne National Laboratory for the fabrication of large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic detectors for CMB measurements. The detectors are composed of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a Nb microstrip transmission line. In-line filters define the spectral response, allowing for individual measurement of three band-passes (95 GHz, 150GHz and 220 GHz). A Ti /Au termination resistor is used to couple the mm-wave signal to Ti/Au transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. There are six bolometers per pixel, for a total of 16,140 detectors in the CMB receiver being fabricated. The monolithic microfabrication of the detector arrays will be presented and discussed in detail. The SPT3G collaboration is developing the thrid-generation camera for CMB measurements with the South Pole Telescope. Additional information can be found in the following link: https://pole.uchicago.edu/spt/.

  5. Mapping the Antarctic Polar Front: weekly realizations from 2002 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Natalie M.; Lovenduski, Nicole S.

    2016-05-01

    We map the weekly position of the Antarctic Polar Front (PF) in the Southern Ocean over a 12-year period (2002-2014) using satellite sea surface temperature (SST) estimated from cloud-penetrating microwave radiometers. Our study advances previous efforts to map the PF using hydrographic and satellite data and provides a unique realization of the PF at weekly resolution across all longitudes (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.855640). The mean path of the PF is asymmetric; its latitudinal position spans from 44 to 64° S along its circumpolar path. SST at the PF ranges from 0.6 to 6.9 °C, reflecting the large spread in latitudinal position. The average intensity of the front is 1.7 °C per 100 km, with intensity ranging from 1.4 to 2.3 °C per 100 km. Front intensity is significantly correlated with the depth of bottom topography, suggesting that the front intensifies over shallow bathymetry. Realizations of the PF are consistent with the corresponding surface expressions of the PF estimated using expendable bathythermograph data in the Drake Passage and Australian and African sectors. The climatological mean position of the PF is similar, though not identical, to previously published estimates. As the PF is a key indicator of physical circulation, surface nutrient concentration, and biogeography in the Southern Ocean, future studies of physical and biogeochemical oceanography in this region will benefit from the provided data set.

  6. The CMB modulation from inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Lyth, David H.

    2013-08-01

    Erickcek, Kamionkowski and Carroll proposed in 2008 that the dipole modulation of the CMB could be due to a very large scale perturbation of the field φ causing the primordial curvature perturbation. We repeat their calculation using weaker assumptions and the current data. If φ is the inflaton of any single-field inflation with the attractor behaviour, the asymmetry is almost certainly too small. If instead φ is any curvaton-type field (ie. one with the canonical kinetic term and a negligible effect during inflation) the asymmetry can agree with observation if |f{sub NL}| in the equilateral configuration is ≅ 10 for k{sup −1} = 1Gpc and ∼<3 for k{sup −1} = 1Mpc. An f{sub NL} with these properties can apparently be obtained from the curvaton with an axionic potential. Within any specific curvaton-type model, the function f{sub NL}(k{sub 1},k{sub 2},k{sub 3}) required to generate the asymmetry would be determined, and could perhaps already be confirmed or ruled out using existing Planck or WMAP data.

  7. The CMB modulation from inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyth, David H.

    2013-08-01

    Erickcek, Kamionkowski and Carroll proposed in 2008 that the dipole modulation of the CMB could be due to a very large scale perturbation of the field phi causing the primordial curvature perturbation. We repeat their calculation using weaker assumptions and the current data. If phi is the inflaton of any single-field inflation with the attractor behaviour, the asymmetry is almost certainly too small. If instead phi is any curvaton-type field (ie. one with the canonical kinetic term and a negligible effect during inflation) the asymmetry can agree with observation if |fNL| in the equilateral configuration is simeq 10 for k-1 = 1Gpc and lesssim3 for k-1 = 1Mpc. An fNL with these properties can apparently be obtained from the curvaton with an axionic potential. Within any specific curvaton-type model, the function fNL(k1,k2,k3) required to generate the asymmetry would be determined, and could perhaps already be confirmed or ruled out using existing Planck or WMAP data.

  8. Automated three-dimensional spatial standardization and quantification of myocardial perfusion tomography: alternative to polar maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slomka, Piotr J.; Radau, Perry E.; Hurwitz, Gilbert; Dey, Damini

    2000-04-01

    We developed a novel clinical tool (PERFIT) for automated 3-D voxel-based quantification of myocardial perfusion, validated it with a wide spectrum of angiographically correlated cases, compared it to previous approaches, and tested its agreement with visual expert reading. A multistage, 3-D iterative inter- subject registration of patient images to normal stress and rest cardiac templates was applied, including automated masking of external activity before final fit. The reference templates were adjusted to the individual left ventricles by template erosion, for further shape correction. 125 angiographically correlated cases including multi-vessel disease, infarction, and dilated ventricles were tested. In addition, standard polar maps were generated automatically from the registered data. Results of consensus visual reading (V) and PERFIT (P) were compared. The iterative fitting was successful in 245/250 (99%) stress and rest images. PERFIT found defects on stress in 2/29 normal patients and 95/96 abnormal patients. Overall correlation between V and P findings was r equals 0.864. In all abnormal groups (n equals 96), PERFIT average defect sizes expressed as the percentage the myocardial volume were 9.6% for rest and 22.3% for stress, versus 11.4% (rest) and 23% (stress) for visual reading. Automatic quantification by PERFIT is consistent with visual analysis; it can be applied to the analysis whole spectrum of clinical images, and can aid physicians in interpretation of myocardial perfusion.

  9. Robust focus measure operator using adaptive log-polar mapping for three-dimensional shape recovery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ik-Hyun; Mahmood, Muhammad Tariq; Choi, Tae-Sun

    2015-04-01

    Shape from focus (SFF) is a passive optical technique that reconstructs object shape from a sequence of image taken at different focus levels. In SFF techniques, computing focus measurement for each pixel in the image sequence, through a focus measure operator, is the fundamental step. Commonly used focus measure operators compute focus quality in Cartesian space and suffer from erroneous focus quality and lack in robustness. Thus, they provide erroneous depth maps. In this paper, we introduce a new focus measure operator that computes focus quality in log-polar transform (LPT) Properties of LPT, such as biological inspiration, data selection, and edge invariance, enable computation of better focus quality in the presence of noise. Moreover, instead of using a fixed patch of the image, we suggest the use of an adaptive window. The focus quality is assessed by computing variation in LPT. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is evaluated by conducting experiments using image sequences of different simulated and real objects. The comparative analysis shows that the proposed method is robust and effective in the presence of various types of noise.

  10. Planck intermediate results: XXXVIII. E- and B-modes of dust polarization from the magnetized filamentary structure of the interstellar medium

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Serra, P.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-09

    The quest for a B-mode imprint from primordial gravity waves on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) requires the characterization of foreground polarization from Galactic dust. In this paper, we present a statistical study of the filamentary structure of the 353 GHz Planck Stokes maps at high Galactic latitude, relevant to the study of dust emission as a polarized foreground to the CMB. We filter the intensity and polarization maps to isolate filaments in the range of angular scales where the power asymmetry between E-modes and B-modes is observed. Using the Smoothed Hessian Major Axis Filament Finder (SMAFF), we identify 259 filaments at high Galactic latitude, with lengths larger or equal to 2° (corresponding to 3.5 pc in length for a typical distance of 100 pc). Thesefilaments show a preferred orientation parallel to the magnetic field projected onto the plane of the sky, derived from their polarization angles. We present mean maps of the filaments in Stokes I, Q, U, E, and B, computed by stacking individual images rotated to align the orientations of the filaments. Combining the stacked images and the histogram of relative orientations, we estimate the mean polarization fraction of the filaments to be 11%. Furthermore, we show that the correlation between the filaments and the magnetic field orientations may account for the E and B asymmetry and the CTE/CEE ratio, reported in the power spectra analysis of the Planck353 GHz polarization maps. Finally, future models of the dust foreground for CMB polarization studies will need to take into account the observed correlation between the dust polarization and the structure of interstellar matter.

  11. Hierarchical Phased Array Antenna Focal Plane for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization and Sub-mm Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Adrian

    We propose to develop planar-antenna-coupled superconducting bolometer arrays for observations at sub-millimeter to millimeter wavelengths. Our pixel architecture features a dual-polarization, log-periodic antenna with a 5:1 bandwidth ratio, followed by a filter bank that divides the total bandwidth into several broad photometric bands. We propose to develop an hierarchical phased array of our basic pixel type that gives optimal mapping speed (sensitivity) over a much broader range of frequencies. The advantage of this combination of an intrinsically broadband pixel with hierarchical phase arraying include a combination of greatly reduced focal-plane mass, higher array sensitivity, and a larger number of spectral bands compared to focal-plane designs using conventional single-color pixels. These advantages have the potential to greatly reduce cost and/or increase performance of NASA missions in the sub-millimeter to millimeter bands. For CMB polarization, a wide frequency range of about 30 to 400 GHz is required to subtract galactic foregrounds. As an example, the multichroic architecture we propose could reduce the focal plane mass of the EPIC-IM CMB polarization mission study concept by a factor of 4, with great savings in required cryocooler performance and therefore cost. We have demonstrated the lens-coupled antenna concept in the POLARBEAR groundbased CMB polarization experiment which is now operating in Chile. That experiment uses a single-band planar antenna that gives excellent beam properties and optical efficiency. POLARBEAR recently succeeded in detecting gravitational lensing B-modes in the CMB polarization. In the laboratory, we have measured two octaves of total bandwidth in the log-periodic sinuous antenna. We have built filter banks of 2, 3, and 7 bands with 4, 6, and 14 bolometers per pixel for two linear polarizations. Pixels of this type are slated to be deployed on the ground in POLARBEAR and SPT-3G and proposed to be used on a balloon by EBEX

  12. A search for the large angular scale polarization of the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Brian Gregory

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is one of the three observational pillars of modern cosmology, along with the Hubble Expansion Law and the measured abundances of the light elements. Being the fossil radiation from the Big Bang, it probes the conditions of the early universe. Three properties are necessary to fully characterize the CMB: its spectrum, spatial isotropy, and polarization. The first two properties have been measured, whereas the polarization state of the CMB remains undetected. Detection of, or an improved upper limit on, the polarization of the CMB at large scales holds great promise for the determination of several fundamental properties of the standard cosmological model, such as the ionization history of the Universe and the contribution of gravitational waves to the spectrum of primordial perturbations. Most models predict that the magnitude of the polarization of the CMB at large angular scales is less than 1muK. This is at least an order of magnitude below both the large scale anisotropy level of the CMB, as well as the best existing upper limits on its polarization. In this thesis I calculate the magnitude of the CMB polarization in various cosmological scenarios, and outline the fundamental challenges to measuring these signals. Following, I describe the design of the POLAR Polarization Observations of Large Angular Regions) experiment, which is the first dedicated polarimeter to study the CMB in more than a decade. POLAR is a ground-based, centimeter-wavelength correlation polarimeter designed to detect the polarization of the CMB at 28, 31, & 33 GHz. POLAR is the first correlation polarimeter ever used for CMB work and has the widest bandwidth of any correlation radiometer ever used for investigations of the CMB. POLAR has been constructed and is currently acquiring data at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  13. Constraining the evolution of the CMB temperature with SZ measurements from Planck data

    SciTech Connect

    Luzzi, G.; Petris, M. De; Lamagna, L.; Génova-Santos, R.T.

    2015-09-01

    The CMB temperature-redshift relation, T{sub CMB}(z)=T{sub 0}(1+z), is a key prediction of the standard cosmology but is violated in many non-standard models. Constraining possible deviations from this law is an effective way to test the ΛCDM paradigm and to search for hints of new physics. We have determined T{sub CMB}(z), with a precision up to 3%, for a subsample (103 clusters) of the Planck SZ cluster catalog, at redshifts in the range 0.01–0.94, using measurements of the spectrum of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect obtained from Planck temperature maps at frequencies from 70 to 353 GHz. The method adopted to provide individual determinations of T{sub CMB}(z) at cluster redshift relies on the use of SZ intensity change, Δ I{sub SZ}(ν) at different frequencies and on a Monte Carlo Markov chain approach. By applying this method to the sample of 103 clusters, we limit possible deviations of the form T{sub CMB}(z)=T{sub 0}(1+z){sup 1−β} to be β= 0.012 ± 0.016, at 1σ uncertainty, consistent with the prediction of the standard model. Combining these measurements with previously published results, we get β=0.013±0.011.

  14. Kinetic inductance detectors for CMB polarimetry at 100 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowitz, Amy E.

    Kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) are a promising technology for astronomical observations over a wide range of wavelengths in the mm and submm regime. Simple fabrication, in as little as one lithographic layer, and passive frequency-domain multiplexing, with readout of up to ˜1000 pixels on a single line with a single cold amplifier, make KIDs an attractive solution for high pixel-count detector arrays. Described in this dissertation is the design, fabrication, and testing of a 20-pixel prototype array of kinetic inductance detectors intended for cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimetry in a band centered at 3 mm (100 GHz), which is an important band for CMB observations from the ground. We first show that the theoretical performance of idealized KIDs rivals that of their primary competitor detector technology, superconducting transition edge sensors (TESs). Next, we describe the design process, which employed both simulation and semianalytic calculations to optimize the resonant frequencies and optical coupling. Where a specific observing scenario was required to motivate design choices, we have used the QUBIC telescope, a bolometric interferometer designed to study the CMB polarization anisotropy initially from Alto Chorillos, Argentina and later from Dome C, Antarctica. Finally, we describe the fabrication and testing of three prototype arrays made with different materials and geometries. In two iterations of the device geometry, we demonstrate response to mm-wave illumination and improvements in control of pixel center frequencies and coupling quality factors. Additionally, we find that molybdenum is not well-suited to mm-wave KIDs because of excessive thermal dissipation resulting from double-gap behavior of superconducting molybdenum. Titanium nitride trilayers perform better, but exhibit complex and poorly-understood non-Mattis-Bardeen behavior. The superconducting properties of this material will need to be better understood before it can be used

  15. MEASUREMENT OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRA FROM TWO YEARS OF BICEP DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, H. C.; Barkats, D.; Bock, J. J.; Hristov, V. V.; Jones, W. C.; Kovac, J. M.; Lange, A. E.; Mason, P. V.; Matsumura, T.; Ade, P. A. R.; Battle, J. O.; Dowell, C. D.; Nguyen, H. T.; Bierman, E. M.; Keating, B. G.; Duband, L.; Hivon, E. F.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.

    2010-03-10

    Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP) is a bolometric polarimeter designed to measure the inflationary B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at degree angular scales. During three seasons of observing at the South Pole (2006 through 2008), BICEP mapped {approx}2% of the sky chosen to be uniquely clean of polarized foreground emission. Here, we present initial results derived from a subset of the data acquired during the first two years. We present maps of temperature, Stokes Q and U, E and B modes, and associated angular power spectra. We demonstrate that the polarization data are self-consistent by performing a series of jackknife tests. We study potential systematic errors in detail and show that they are sub-dominant to the statistical errors. We measure the E-mode angular power spectrum with high precision at 21 <= l <= 335, detecting for the first time the peak expected at l {approx} 140. The measured E-mode spectrum is consistent with expectations from a LAMBDACDM model, and the B-mode spectrum is consistent with zero. The tensor-to-scalar ratio derived from the B-mode spectrum is r = 0.02{sup +0.31}{sub -0.26}, or r < 0.72 at 95% confidence, the first meaningful constraint on the inflationary gravitational wave background to come directly from CMB B-mode polarization.

  16. Quantifying the Effect of Component Covariances in CMB Extraction from Multi-frequency Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Nicholas G.

    2008-01-01

    Linear combination methods provide a global method for component separation of multi-frequency data. We present such a method that allows for consideration of possible covariances between the desired cosmic microwave background signal and various foreground signals that are also present. We also recover information on the foregrounds including the number of foregrounds, their spectra and templates. In all this, the covariances, which we would only expect to vanish 'in the mean' are included as parameters expressing the fundamental uncertainty due to this type of cosmic variance. When we make the reasonable assumption that the CMB is Gaussian, we can compute both a mean recovered CMB map and also an RMS error map, The mean map coincides with WMAP's Internal Linear Combination map.

  17. The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.

    2010-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) is a ba1loon-borne instrument designed to search for the faint signature of inflation in the polarized component of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). PIPER will measure the CMB polarization at 4 frequencies (l per flight) using a pair of cryogenic telescopes, one for measuring each of Stokes Q and U in the instrument frame. Each telescope receives both linear orthogonal polarizations in two 32 by 40 element planar arrays that utilize Transition-Edge Sensors (TES). The first element in each telescope is a variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) that fully modulates the Stokes parameter to which the telescope is sensitive.

  18. The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.

    2010-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) is a ba1loon-borne instrument designed to search for the faint signature of inflation in the polarized component of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). PIPER will measure the CMB polarization at 4 frequencies (l per flight) using a pair of cryogenic telescopes, one for measuring each of Stokes Q and U in the instrument frame. Each telescope receives both linear orthogonal polarizations in two 32 by 40 element planar arrays that utilize Transition-Edge Sensors (TES). The first element in each telescope is a variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) that fully modulates the Stokes parameter to which the telescope is sensitive.

  19. SWIR spectral mapping of the Martian South Polar Residual Cap using CRISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Jacqueline; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-10-01

    The Martian South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC) exhibits unique CO2 ice sublimation features that cover the surface. These flat floored, circular depressions are highly dynamic, with scarp retreat rates of up to 8m per Martian Year. As the scarps sublimate in Martian Southern Hemisphere spring, they expose dust particles previously trapped within the ice during winter. This allows a window of opportunity to analyse the dust for fragile organic molecules that might otherwise be rapidly destroyed when subjected to ultraviolet radiation at the Martian surface. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are one such type of organic compound that have not yet been reported as detected on Mars. PAHs are considered to be important in astrobiology as they potentially play a role in abiogenesis, and are a biomarker for extant life. PAHs are abundant on Earth, in deep space and in recent years have been identified on the Saturnian moons Iapetus and Phoebe.Utilising data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on board NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), SPRC features have been spectrally mapped, the effects of H2O and CO2 ice on infrared spectra eliminated, and regions with obvious dust particles analysed to establish their mineral composition, and signatures indicative of PAHs compared to Mars data.Spectral mapping has identified compositional differences between depression rims and the majority of the SPRC, allowing regions of spectral interest to be selected for in-depth analysis. CRISM spectra have been compared with known Martian mineralogy and PAH laboratory data, with results suggesting Magnesium Carbonate dust content in depression rims, and rims have been found to have higher water content than regions of featureless ice. CO2 ice has been found to be the most limiting factor in looking for PAH diagnostic signatures on the SPRC. Further work is being undertaken with more detailed results to be presented in the future.The research leading

  20. The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazear, Justin Scott; Ade, Peter A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Bennett, Charles L.; Chuss, David T.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Eimer, Joseph R.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Halpern, Mark; Hinderks, James; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Polarization ExploreR (Piper) is a balloon-borne cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimeter designed to search for evidence of inflation by measuring the large-angular scale CMB polarization signal. Bicep2 recently reported a detection of B-mode power corresponding to the tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0.2 on approximately 2 degree scales. If the Bicep2 signal is caused by inflationary gravitational waves (IGWs), then there should be a corresponding increase in B-mode power on angular scales larger than 18 degrees. Piper is currently the only suborbital instrument capable of fully testing and extending the Bicep2 results by measuring the B-mode power spectrum on angular scales theta ? = approximately 0.6 deg to 90 deg, covering both the reionization bump and recombination peak, with sensitivity to measure the tensor-to-scalar ratio down to r = 0.007, and four frequency bands to distinguish foregrounds. Piper will accomplish this by mapping 85% of the sky in four frequency bands (200, 270, 350, 600 GHz) over a series of 8 conventional balloon flights from the northern and southern hemispheres. The instrument has background-limited sensitivity provided by fully cryogenic (1.5 K) optics focusing the sky signal onto four 32×40-pixel arrays of time-domain multiplexed Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers held at 140 milli-Kelvin. Polarization sensitivity and systematic control are provided by front-end Variabledelay Polarization Modulators (VPMs), which rapidly modulate only the polarized sky signal at 3 Hz and allow Piper to instantaneously measure the full Stokes vector (I,Q,U,0V) for each pointing. We describe the Piper instrument and progress towards its first flight.

  1. Impact of post-Born lensing on the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratten, Geraint; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Lensing of the CMB is affected by post-Born lensing, producing corrections to the convergence power spectrum and introducing field rotation. We show numerically that the lensing convergence power spectrum is affected at the lesssim 0.2% level on accessible scales, and that this correction and the field rotation are negligible for observations with arcminute beam and noise levels gtrsim 1 μK arcmin. The field rotation generates ~ 2.5% of the total lensing B-mode polarization amplitude (0.2% in power on small scales), but has a blue spectrum on large scales, making it highly subdominant to the convergence B modes on scales where they are a source of confusion for the signal from primordial gravitational waves. Since the post-Born signal is non-linear, it also generates a bispectrum with the convergence. We show that the post-Born contributions to the bispectrum substantially change the shape predicted from large-scale structure non-linearities alone, and hence must be included to estimate the expected total signal and impact of bispectrum biases on CMB lensing reconstruction quadratic estimators and other observables. The field-rotation power spectrum only becomes potentially detectable for noise levels ll 1 μK arcmin, but its bispectrum with the convergence may be observable at ~ 3σ with Stage IV observations. Rotation-induced and convergence-induced B modes are slightly correlated by the bispectrum, and the bispectrum also produces additional contributions to the lensed BB power spectrum.

  2. MODELING ATMOSPHERIC EMISSION FOR CMB GROUND-BASED OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Errard, J.; Borrill, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Chinone, Y.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Elleflot, T.; Baccigalupi, C.; Fabbian, G.; Boettger, D.; Chapman, S.; Cukierman, A.; Delabrouille, J.; Ducout, A.; Feeney, S.; Feng, C.; and others

    2015-08-10

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3D-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive a new analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using an original numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the polarbear-i project first season data set. We derive a new 1.0% upper limit on the linear polarization fraction of atmospheric emission. We also compare our results to previous studies and weather station measurements. The proposed model can be used for realistic simulations of future ground-based CMB observations.

  3. Modeling Atmospheric Emission for CMB Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errard, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Baccigalupi, C.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Cukierman, A.; Delabrouille, J.; Dobbs, M.; Ducout, A.; Elleflot, T.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Feeney, S.; Gilbert, A.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Hill, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jeong, O.; Katayama, N.; Kaufman, J.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Leon, D.; Linder, E.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Miller, N. J.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Okamura, T.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Puglisi, G.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Rotermund, K. M.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B. D.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Tajima, O.; Takakura, S.; Tikhomirov, A.; Tomaru, T.; Whitehorn, N.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.

    2015-08-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3D-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive a new analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using an original numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the polarbear-i project first season data set. We derive a new 1.0% upper limit on the linear polarization fraction of atmospheric emission. We also compare our results to previous studies and weather station measurements. The proposed model can be used for realistic simulations of future ground-based CMB observations.

  4. Planck 2013 results. XXIII. Isotropy and statistics of the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frommert, M.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hansen, M.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Räth, C.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The two fundamental assumptions of the standard cosmological model - that the initial fluctuations are statistically isotropic and Gaussian - are rigorously tested using maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy from the Planck satellite. The detailed results are based on studies of four independent estimates of the CMB that are compared to simulations using a fiducial ΛCDM model and incorporating essential aspects of the Planck measurement process. Deviations from isotropy have been found and demonstrated to be robust against component separation algorithm, mask choice, and frequency dependence. Many of these anomalies were previously observed in the WMAP data, and are now confirmed at similar levels of significance (about 3σ). However, we find little evidence of non-Gaussianity, with the exception of a few statistical signatures that seem to be associated with specific anomalies. In particular, we find that the quadrupole-octopole alignment is also connected to a low observed variance in the CMB signal. A power asymmetry is now found to persist on scales corresponding to about ℓ = 600 and can be described in the low-ℓ regime by a phenomenological dipole modulation model. However, any primordial power asymmetry is strongly scale-dependent and does not extend toarbitrarily small angular scales. Finally, it is plausible that some of these features may be reflected in the angular power spectrum of the data, which shows a deficit of power on similar scales. Indeed, when the power spectra of two hemispheres defined by a preferred direction are considered separately, one shows evidence of a deficit in power, while its opposite contains oscillations between odd and even modes that may be related to the parity violation and phase correlations also detected in the data. Although these analyses represent a step forward in building an understanding of the anomalies, a satisfactory explanation based on physically motivated models is still lacking.

  5. CMB μ distortion from primordial gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ota, Atsuhisa; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Takahashi, Tomo; Tashiro, Hiroyuki E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp E-mail: gucci@phys.titech.ac.jp

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new mechanism of generating the μ distortion in cosmic microwave background (CMB) originated from primordial gravitational waves. Such μ distortion is generated by the damping of the temperature anisotropies through the Thomson scattering, even on scales larger than that of Silk damping. This mechanism is in sharp contrast with that from the primordial curvature (scalar) perturbations, in which the temperature anisotropies mainly decay by Silk damping effects. We estimate the size of the μ distortion from the new mechanism, which can be used to constrain the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves on smaller scales independently from the CMB anisotropies, giving more wide-range constraint on their spectral index by combining the amplitude from the CMB anisotropies.

  6. Statistical simulations of the dust foreground to cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vansyngel, F.; Boulanger, F.; Ghosh, T.; Wandelt, B.; Aumont, J.; Bracco, A.; Levrier, F.; Martin, P. G.; Montier, L.

    2017-07-01

    The characterization of the dust polarization foreground to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a necessary step toward the detection of the B-mode signal associated with primordial gravitational waves. We present a method to simulate maps of polarized dust emission on the sphere that is similar to the approach used for CMB anisotropies. This method builds on the understanding of Galactic polarization stemming from the analysis of Planck data. It relates the dust polarization sky to the structure of the Galactic magnetic field and its coupling with interstellar matter and turbulence. The Galactic magnetic field is modeled as a superposition of a mean uniform field and a Gaussian random (turbulent) component with a power-law power spectrum of exponent αM. The integration along the line of sight carried out to compute Stokes maps is approximated by a sum over a small number of emitting layers with different realizations of the random component of the magnetic field. The model parameters are constrained to fit the power spectra of dust polarization EE, BB, and TE measured using Planck data. We find that the slopes of the E and B power spectra of dust polarization are matched for αM = -2.5, an exponent close to that measured for total dust intensity but larger than the Kolmogorov exponent - 11/3. The model allows us to compute multiple realizations of the Stokes Q and U maps for different realizations of the random component of the magnetic field, and to quantify the variance of dust polarization spectra for any given sky area outside of the Galactic plane. The simulations reproduce the scaling relation between the dust polarization power and the mean total dust intensity including the observed dispersion around the mean relation. We also propose a method to carry out multifrequency simulations, including the decorrelation measured recently by Planck, using a given covariance matrix of the polarization maps. These simulations are well suited to optimize

  7. Planck CMB anomalies: astrophysical and cosmological secondary effects and the curse of masking

    SciTech Connect

    Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.; Paykari, P.; Sureau, F.; Bobin, J. E-mail: jstarck@cea.fr E-mail: florent.sureau@cea.fr

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale anomalies have been reported in CMB data with both WMAP and Planck data. These could be due to foreground residuals and or systematic effects, though their confirmation with Planck data suggests they are not due to a problem in the WMAP or Planck pipelines. If these anomalies are in fact primordial, then understanding their origin is fundamental to either validate the standard model of cosmology or to explore new physics. We investigate three other possible issues: 1) the trade-off between minimising systematics due to foreground contamination (with a conservative mask) and minimising systematics due to masking, 2) astrophysical secondary effects (the kinetic Doppler quadrupole and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect), and 3) secondary cosmological signals (the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect). We address the masking issue by considering new procedures that use both WMAP and Planck to produce higher quality full-sky maps using the sparsity methodology (LGMCA maps). We show the impact of masking is dominant over that of residual foregrounds, and the LGMCA full-sky maps can be used without further processing to study anomalies. We consider four official Planck PR1 and two LGMCA CMB maps. Analysis of the observed CMB maps shows that only the low quadrupole and quadrupole-octopole alignment seem significant, but that the planar octopole, Axis of Evil, mirror parity and cold spot are not significant in nearly all maps considered. After subtraction of astrophysical and cosmological secondary effects, only the low quadrupole may still be considered anomalous, meaning the significance of only one anomaly is affected by secondary effect subtraction out of six anomalies considered. In the spirit of reproducible research all reconstructed maps and codes will be made available for download here http://www.cosmostat.org/anomaliesCMB.html.

  8. Planck intermediate results. XLI. A map of lensing-induced B-modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-01

    The secondary cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-modes stem from the post-decoupling distortion of the polarization E-modes due to the gravitational lensing effect of large-scale structures. These lensing-induced B-modes constitute both a valuable probe of the dark matter distribution and an important contaminant for the extraction of the primary CMB B-modes from inflation. Planck provides accurate nearly all-sky measurements of both the polarization E-modes and the integrated mass distribution via the reconstruction of the CMB lensing potential. By combining these two data products, we have produced an all-sky template map of the lensing-induced B-modes using a real-space algorithm that minimizes the impact of sky masks. The cross-correlation of this template with an observed (primordial and secondary) B-mode map can be used to measure the lensing B-mode power spectrum at multipoles up to 2000. In particular, when cross-correlating with the B-mode contribution directly derived from the Planck polarization maps, we obtain lensing-induced B-mode power spectrum measurement at a significance level of 12σ, which agrees with the theoretical expectation derived from the Planck best-fit Λ cold dark matter model. This unique nearly all-sky secondary B-mode template, which includes the lensing-induced information from intermediate to small (10 ≲ ℓ ≲ 1000) angular scales, is delivered as part of the Planck 2015 public data release. It will be particularly useful for experiments searching for primordial B-modes, such as BICEP2/Keck Array or LiteBIRD, since it will enable an estimate to be made of the lensing-induced contribution to the measured total CMB B-modes.

  9. Planck intermediate results: XLI. A map of lensing-induced B-modes

    DOE PAGES

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; ...

    2016-12-12

    The secondary cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-modes stem from the post-decoupling distortion of the polarization E-modes due to the gravitational lensing effect of large-scale structures. These lensing-induced B-modes constitute both a valuable probe of the dark matter distribution and an important contaminant for the extraction of the primary CMB B-modes from inflation. Planck provides accurate nearly all-sky measurements of both the polarization E-modes and the integrated mass distribution via the reconstruction of the CMB lensing potential. By combining these two data products, we have produced in this paper an all-sky template map of the lensing-induced B-modes using a real-space algorithmmore » that minimizes the impact of sky masks. The cross-correlation of this template with an observed (primordial and secondary) B-mode map can be used to measure the lensing B-mode power spectrum at multipoles up to 2000. In particular, when cross-correlating with the B-mode contribution directly derived from the Planck polarization maps, we obtain lensing-induced B-mode power spectrum measurement at a significance level of 12σ, which agrees with the theoretical expectation derived from the Planck best-fit Λ cold dark matter model. This unique nearly all-sky secondary B-mode template, which includes the lensing-induced information from intermediate to small (10 ≲ ℓ ≲ 1000) angular scales, is delivered as part of the Planck 2015 public data release. Finally, it will be particularly useful for experiments searching for primordial B-modes, such as BICEP2/Keck Array or LiteBIRD, since it will enable an estimate to be made of the lensing-induced contribution to the measured total CMB B-modes.« less

  10. Mapping the Polarization of the Radio-Loud Lyα Nebula B3 J2330+3927

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Chang; Zabludoff, Ann; Smith, Paul; Yang, Yujin; Kim, Eunchong; Jannuzi, Buell; Prescott, Moire K. M.; Matsuda, Yuichi; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2017-01-01

    Lyα nebulae, or "Lyα blobs," are extended (up to ˜100 kpc), bright (LLyα ≳ 1043 erg s-1) clouds of Lyα emitting gas that tend to lie in overdense regions at z ˜ 2-5. The origin of the Lyα emission remains unknown, but recent theoretical work suggests that measuring the polarization might discriminate among powering mechanisms. Here we present the first narrowband imaging polarimetry of a radio-loud Lyα nebula, B3 J2330+3927, at z = 3.09, with an embedded active galactic nucleus (AGN). The AGN lies near the blob’s Lyα emission peak, and its radio lobes align roughly with the blob's major axis. With the SPOL polarimeter on the 6.5 m MMT telescope, we map the total (Lyα + continuum) polarization in a grid of circular apertures of a radius of 0.″6 (4.4 kpc), detecting a significant (>2σ) polarization fraction P% in nine apertures and achieving strong upper limits (as low as 2%) elsewhere. P% increases from <2% at ˜5 kpc from the blob center to 17% at ˜15-25 kpc. The detections are distributed asymmetrically, roughly along the nebula's major axis. The polarization angles θ are mostly perpendicular to this axis. Comparing the Lyα flux to that of the continuum and conservatively assuming that the continuum is highly polarized (20%-100%) and aligned with the total polarization, we place lower limits on the polarization of the Lyα emission P%,Lyα ranging from no significant polarization at ˜5 kpc from the blob center to 3%-17% at 10-25 kpc. Like the total polarization, the Lyα polarization detections occur more often along the blob's major axis. The observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution.

  11. Oxygen spectroscopy and polarization-dependent imaging contrast (PIC)-mapping of calcium carbonate minerals and biominerals.

    PubMed

    DeVol, Ross T; Metzler, Rebecca A; Kabalah-Amitai, Lee; Pokroy, Boaz; Politi, Yael; Gal, Assaf; Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Demichelis, Raffaella; Gale, Julian D; Ihli, Johannes; Meldrum, Fiona C; Blonsky, Adam Z; Killian, Christopher E; Salling, C B; Young, Anthony T; Marcus, Matthew A; Scholl, Andreas; Doran, Andrew; Jenkins, Catherine; Bechtel, Hans A; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2014-07-17

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy have been extensively used to characterize biominerals. Using either Ca or C spectra, unique information has been obtained regarding amorphous biominerals and nanocrystal orientations. Building on these results, we demonstrate that recording XANES spectra of calcium carbonate at the oxygen K-edge enables polarization-dependent imaging contrast (PIC) mapping with unprecedented contrast, signal-to-noise ratio, and magnification. O and Ca spectra are presented for six calcium carbonate minerals: aragonite, calcite, vaterite, monohydrocalcite, and both hydrated and anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate. The crystalline minerals reveal excellent agreement of the extent and direction of polarization dependences in simulated and experimental XANES spectra due to X-ray linear dichroism. This effect is particularly strong for aragonite, calcite, and vaterite. In natural biominerals, oxygen PIC-mapping generated high-magnification maps of unprecedented clarity from nacre and prismatic structures and their interface in Mytilus californianus shells. These maps revealed blocky aragonite crystals at the nacre-prismatic boundary and the narrowest calcite needle-prisms. In the tunic spicules of Herdmania momus, O PIC-mapping revealed the size and arrangement of some of the largest vaterite single crystals known. O spectroscopy therefore enables the simultaneous measurement of chemical and orientational information in CaCO3 biominerals and is thus a powerful means for analyzing these and other complex materials. As described here, PIC-mapping and spectroscopy at the O K-edge are methods for gathering valuable data that can be carried out using spectromicroscopy beamlines at most synchrotrons without the expense of additional equipment.

  12. Early geomorphological evolution of the North Polar Layered Deposits, Mars, from SHARAD radar-facies mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerozzi, Stefano; Holt, John W.

    2014-05-01

    The north polar layered deposits (NPLD) are the largest accumulation of water ice in the northern hemisphere of Mars. Since their discovery, they are thought to hold a valuable record of recent climate change within their stratigraphy (Murray et al., Icarus, 1972; Cutts, JGR, 1973b), yet little is known about their age and accumulation history. Due to exposures in trough walls, detailed stratigraphy of the uppermost layers and their evolution have been studied extensively since the first Mariner 9 images of the NPLD (e.g. Soderblom et al., JGR, 1973). However, large portions of the polar cap are still unmapped and no detailed studies of the lowermost layered deposits have been performed to date, primarily due to a general lack of visible exposures. Correlation of reflectors within radargrams acquired by the Shallow Radar (SHARAD) (Seu et al., Planet. Space Sci., 2004) onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter makes a detailed stratigraphic reconstruction of the NPLD possible. An extensive set of radargrams is available over Planum Boreum and individual reflectors can be traced over hundreds of kilometers (Seu et al., JGR, 2007a; Putzig et al., Icarus, 2009; Holt et al., Nature, 2010) with a theoretical vertical resolution of ~9 m in water ice (Seu et al., JGR, 2007a). In this study, we present a highly-detailed stratigraphic reconstruction of the first ~500 m of the NPLD at a scale down to the single reflector. A set of 8 horizons was tracked across 700+ radargrams, and thicknesses were calculated for each stratigraphic interval assuming a bulk composition of water ice. Along with the quantitative analysis of derived isopach maps, this study is based on the qualitative comparison of "radar facies" in different locations of Planum Boreum with techniques borrowed from traditional sequence stratigraphy. In general, the NPLD is characterized by uniform layering. However, important layer extent and thickness variations are observed within the lowermost sequence. Limited

  13. Overview of Current and Planned CMB Ballooning Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Shaul

    2016-03-01

    Balloon-borne experiments have a unique role in probing the polarization of the CMB. They enable access to frequencies that can not be probed by ground-based instruments, they can straight-forwardly measure signals on large angular scales, and they serve as test-beds for technologies that are ultimately used on space missions. With these roles in mind, I will discuss the status of the three NASA-funded experiments EBEX, SPIDER and PIPER, and their complementarity with ground-based efforts. I will also discuss plans for next generation instruments, with which the detector count is expected to increase by another factor of 10 to about 10,000.

  14. Large scale CMB anomalies from thawing cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Ringeval, Christophe; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi; Bouchet, François R. E-mail: yamauchi@resceu.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: bouchet@iap.fr

    2016-02-01

    Cosmic strings formed during inflation are expected to be either diluted over super-Hubble distances, i.e., invisible today, or to have crossed our past light cone very recently. We discuss the latter situation in which a few strings imprint their signature in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies after recombination. Being almost frozen in the Hubble flow, these strings are quasi static and evade almost all of the previously derived constraints on their tension while being able to source large scale anisotropies in the CMB sky. Using a local variance estimator on thousand of numerically simulated Nambu-Goto all sky maps, we compute the expected signal and show that it can mimic a dipole modulation at large angular scales while being negligible at small angles. Interestingly, such a scenario generically produces one cold spot from the thawing of a cosmic string loop. Mixed with anisotropies of inflationary origin, we find that a few strings of tension GU = O(1) × 10{sup −6} match the amplitude of the dipole modulation reported in the Planck satellite measurements and could be at the origin of other large scale anomalies.

  15. CMB (And Other) Challenges To BBN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, G.; Kneller, J. P.; Zentner, A.

    2002-02-01

    Primordial nucleosynthesis provides a probe of the universal abundance of baryons when the universe was only a few minutes old. Recent observations of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) probe the baryon abundance when the universe was several hundred thousand years old. Observations of type Ia supernovae and clusters of galaxies in the very recent past, when the universe is several billion years old and older, provide a complementary measure of the baryon density in excellent agreement with the early universe values. The general agreement among the three measurements represents an impressive confirmation of the standard model of cosmology. However, there is a hint that the CMB observations may not be in perfect agreement with those from big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). If this ``tension" between BBN and the CMB persists, the standard model of cosmology may need to be modified. Here, in a contribution dedicated to Silvia Torres-Peimbert and Manuel Peimbert, we describe how an asymmetry between neutrinos and antineutrinos (``neutrino degeneracy") has the potential for resolving this possible conflict between BBN and the CMB.

  16. Extreme data compression for the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablocki, Alan; Dodelson, Scott

    2016-04-01

    We apply the Karhunen-Loéve methods to cosmic microwave background (CMB) data sets, and show that we can recover the input cosmology and obtain the marginalized likelihoods in Λ cold dark matter cosmologies in under a minute, much faster than Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. This is achieved by forming a linear combination of the power spectra at each multipole l , and solving a system of simultaneous equations such that the Fisher matrix is locally unchanged. Instead of carrying out a full likelihood evaluation over the whole parameter space, we need evaluate the likelihood only for the parameter of interest, with the data compression effectively marginalizing over all other parameters. The weighting vectors contain insight about the physical effects of the parameters on the CMB anisotropy power spectrum Cl . The shape and amplitude of these vectors give an intuitive feel for the physics of the CMB, the sensitivity of the observed spectrum to cosmological parameters, and the relative sensitivity of different experiments to cosmological parameters. We test this method on exact theory Cl as well as on a Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP)-like CMB data set generated from a random realization of a fiducial cosmology, comparing the compression results to those from a full likelihood analysis using CosmoMC. After showing that the method works, we apply it to the temperature power spectrum from the WMAP seven-year data release, and discuss the successes and limitations of our method as applied to a real data set.

  17. Control of polarization and mode mapping of small volume high Q micropillars

    SciTech Connect

    Daraei, A.; Sanvitto, D.; Timpson, J. A.; Fox, A. M.; Whittaker, D. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Guimaraes, P. S. S.; Vinck, H.; Tahraoui, A.; Fry, P. W.; Liew, S. L.; Hopkinson, M.

    2007-08-15

    We show that the polarization of the emission of a single quantum dot embedded within a microcavity pillar of elliptical cross section can be completely controlled and even switched between two orthogonal linear polarizations by changing the coupling of the dot emission with the polarized photonic modes. We also measure the spatial profile of the emission of a series of pillars with different ellipticities and show that the results can be well described by simple theoretical modeling of the modes of an infinite length elliptical cylinder.

  18. Primordial features and Planck polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar; Shafieloo, Arman; Smoot, George F.; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2016-09-01

    With the Planck 2015 Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature and polarization data, we search for possible features in the primordial power spectrum (PPS). We revisit the Wiggly Whipped Inflation (WWI) framework and demonstrate how generation of some particular primordial features can improve the fit to Planck data. WWI potential allows the scalar field to transit from a steeper potential to a nearly flat potential through a discontinuity either in potential or in its derivatives. WWI offers the inflaton potential parametrizations that generate a wide variety of features in the primordial power spectra incorporating most of the localized and non-local inflationary features that are obtained upon reconstruction from temperature and polarization angular power spectrum. At the same time, in a single framework it allows us to have a background parameter estimation with a nearly free-form primordial spectrum. Using Planck 2015 data, we constrain the primordial features in the context of Wiggly Whipped Inflation and present the features that are supported both by temperature and polarization. WWI model provides more than 13 improvement in χ2 fit to the data with respect to the best fit power law model considering combined temperature and polarization data from Planck and B-mode polarization data from BICEP and Planck dust map. We use 2-4 extra parameters in the WWI model compared to the featureless strict slow roll inflaton potential. We find that the differences between the temperature and polarization data in constraining background cosmological parameters such as baryon density, cold dark matter density are reduced to a good extent if we use primordial power spectra from WWI. We also discuss the extent of bispectra obtained from the best potentials in arbitrary triangular configurations using the BI-spectra and Non-Gaussianity Operator (BINGO).

  19. Radio polarization maps of shell-type SNRs - II. Sedov models with evolution of turbulent magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruk, O.; Bandiera, R.; Beshley, V.; Orlando, S.; Miceli, M.

    2017-09-01

    Polarized radio emission has been mapped with great detail in several Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs), but has not yet been exploited to the extent it deserves. We have developed a method to model maps of the Stokes parameters for shell-like SNRs during their Sedov evolution phase. At first, three-dimensional structure of an SNR has been computed, by modelling the distribution of the magnetohydrodynamic parameters and of the accelerated particles. The generation and dissipation of the turbulent component of magnetic field everywhere in SNR are also considered taking into account its interaction with accelerated particles. Then, in order to model the emission, we have used a generalization of the classical synchrotron theory, valid for the case in which the magnetic field has ordered and disordered components. Finally, two-dimensional projected maps have been derived, for different orientations of SNR and of interstellar magnetic field with respect to the observer. An important effect to consider is the Faraday rotation of the polarization planes inside the SNR interior. In this paper, we present details of the model, and describe general properties of the images.

  20. Fluorescence polarization of tetracycline derivatives as a technique for mapping nonmelanoma skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Yaroslavsky, Anna N; Salomatina, Elena V; Neel, Victor; Anderson, Rox; Flotte, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer, often resulting in high morbidity. Low visual contrast of these tumors makes their delineation a challenging problem. Employing a linearly polarized monochromatic light source and a wide-field CCD camera, we have developed a technique for fluorescence polarization imaging of the nonmelanoma cancers stained using antibiotics from the tetracycline family. To determine the feasibility of the method, fluorescence polarization images of 86 thick, fresh cancer excisions were studied. We found that the level of endogenous fluorescence polarization was much lower than that of exogenous, and that the average values of fluorescence polarization of tetracycline derivatives were significantly higher in cancerous as compared to normal tissue. Out of 86 tumors [54 stained in demeclocycline (DMN) and 32 in tetracycline (TCN)], in 79 cases (51-DMN, 28-TCN) the location, size, and shape of the lesions were identified accurately. The results of this trial indicate that nonmelanoma skin tumors can be distinguished from healthy tissue based on the differences in exogenous fluorescence polarization of TCN and/or DMN. Therefore, the developed technique can provide an important new tool for image-guided cancer surgery.

  1. Detection of thermal SZ-CMB lensing cross-correlation in Planck nominal mission data

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J. Colin; Spergel, David N. E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-02-01

    The nominal mission maps from the Planck satellite contain a wealth of information about secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), including those induced by the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect and gravitational lensing. As both the tSZ and CMB lensing signals trace the large-scale matter density field, the anisotropies sourced by these processes are expected to be correlated. We report the first detection of this cross-correlation signal, which we measure at 6.2σ significance using the Planck data. We take advantage of Planck's multifrequency coverage to construct a tSZ map using internal linear combination techniques, which we subsequently cross-correlate with the publicly-released Planck CMB lensing potential map. The cross-correlation is subject to contamination from the cosmic infrared background (CIB), which is known to correlate strongly with CMB lensing. We correct for this contamination via cross-correlating our tSZ map with the Planck 857 GHz map and confirm the robustness of our measurement using several null tests. We interpret the signal using halo model calculations, which indicate that the tSZ-CMB lensing cross-correlation is a unique probe of the physics of intracluster gas in high-redshift, low-mass groups and clusters. Our results are consistent with extrapolations of existing gas physics models to this previously unexplored regime and show clear evidence for contributions from both the one- and two-halo terms, but no statistically significant evidence for contributions from diffuse, unbound gas outside of collapsed halos. We also show that the amplitude of the signal depends rather sensitively on the amplitude of fluctuations (σ{sub 8}) and the matter density (Ω{sub m}), scaling as σ{sub 8}{sup 6.1}Ω{sub m}{sup 1.5} at ℓ = 1000. We constrain the degenerate combination σ{sub 8}(Ω{sub m}/0.282){sup 0.26} = 0.824±0.029, a result that is in less tension with primordial CMB constraints than some recent t

  2. Mapping the open/closed boundary in Jupiter's polar cap with a 2-D equatorial magnetic field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Marissa; Kivelson, Margaret; Khurana, Krishan; Walker, Raymond

    2010-05-01

    How much of Jupiter's polar cap is open to the solar wind? Where do the auroral active, dark, and swirl regions map within (or outside) the magnetosphere? With a good global magnetic field model, one could map field lines from the equator to the ionosphere and answer these and similar questions. However, such a model does not exist for Jupiter, so we have taken a different approach in mapping magnetospheric sources to auroral features. Rather than following along a model field, we map equatorial field lines to the ionosphere by requiring that the magnetic flux in some specified region at the equator equal the magnetic flux in the area to which it maps in the ionosphere (flux conservation). The equatorial flux is calculated by using a two-dimensional fit to the north-south component of the measured magnetic field at the equator. This fit accounts for changes with radial distance and local time. To estimate the internal Jovian field in the ionosphere we use a version of the VIP4 model [Connerney et al., 1998] with magnetic anomaly [Grodent et al., 2008] that has been modified to include the effects of the current sheet [Khurana, 1997]. Equating the fluxes in this way allows us to link a given position in the magnetosphere to a position in the ionosphere and to gain insight into the source of different auroral features. We will discuss the results of our mapping in the northern and southern hemispheres, particularly the locations that map to beyond the dayside magnetopause and are likely regions of open flux. We will also compare our calculations to the available auroral observations.

  3. A Bayesian Estimate of the CMB-Large-scale Structure Cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura-Santos, E.; Carvalho, F. C.; Penna-Lima, M.; Novaes, C. P.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    Evidences for late-time acceleration of the universe are provided by multiple probes, such as Type Ia supernovae, the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and large-scale structure (LSS). In this work, we focus on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, i.e., secondary CMB fluctuations generated by evolving gravitational potentials due to the transition between, e.g., the matter and dark energy (DE) dominated phases. Therefore, assuming a flat universe, DE properties can be inferred from ISW detections. We present a Bayesian approach to compute the CMB-LSS cross-correlation signal. The method is based on the estimate of the likelihood for measuring a combined set consisting of a CMB temperature and galaxy contrast maps, provided that we have some information on the statistical properties of the fluctuations affecting these maps. The likelihood is estimated by a sampling algorithm, therefore avoiding the computationally demanding techniques of direct evaluation in either pixel or harmonic space. As local tracers of the matter distribution at large scales, we used the Two Micron All Sky Survey galaxy catalog and, for the CMB temperature fluctuations, the ninth-year data release of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9). The results show a dominance of cosmic variance over the weak recovered signal, due mainly to the shallowness of the catalog used, with systematics associated with the sampling algorithm playing a secondary role as sources of uncertainty. When combined with other complementary probes, the method presented in this paper is expected to be a useful tool to late-time acceleration studies in cosmology.

  4. EBEX: A Balloon-Borne Telescope for Measuring Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    EBEX is a long-duration balloon-borne (LDB) telescope designed to probe polarization signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It is designed to measure or place an upper limit on the inflationary B-mode signal, a signal predicted by inflationary theories to be imprinted on the CMB by gravitational waves, to detect the effects of gravitational lensing on the polarization of the CMB, and to characterize polarized Galactic foreground emission. The payload consists of a pointed gondola that houses the optics, polarimetry, detectors and detector readout systems, as well as the pointing sensors, control motors, telemetry sytems, and data acquisition and flight control computers. Polarimetry is achieved with a rotating half-wave plate and wire grid polarizer. The detectors are sensitive to frequency bands centered on 150, 250, and 410 GHz. EBEX was flown in 2009 from New Mexico as a full system test, and then flown again in December 2012 / January 2013 over Antarctica in a long-duration flight to collect scientific data. In the instrumentation part of this thesis we discuss the pointing sensors and attitude determination algorithms. We also describe the real-time map making software, "QuickLook", that was custom-designed for EBEX. We devote special attention to the design and construction of the primary pointing sensors, the star cameras, and their custom-designed flight software package, "STARS" (the Star Tracking Attitude Reconstruction Software). In the analysis part of this thesis we describe the current status of the post-flight analysis procedure. We discuss the data structures used in analysis and the pipeline stages related to attitude determination and map making. We also discuss a custom-designed software framework called "LEAP" (the LDB EBEX Analysis Pipeline) that supports most of the analysis pipeline stages.

  5. Applications of the Gaussian kinematic formula to CMB data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantaye, Yabebal; Marinucci, Domenico; Hansen, Frode; Maino, Davide

    2015-03-01

    The Gaussian kinematic formula (GKF) [R. J. Adler and J. E. Taylor, Random Fields and Geometry (Springer, New York, 2007).] is an extremely powerful tool allowing for explicit analytic predictions of expected values of Minkowski functionals under realistic experimental conditions for cosmological data collections. In this paper, we implement Minkowski functionals on multipoles and needlet components of CMB fields, thus allowing a better control of cosmic variance and extraction of information on both harmonic and real domains; we then exploit the GKF to provide their expected values on spherical maps, in the presence of arbitrary sky masks, and under non-Gaussian circumstances. All our results are validated by numerical experiments, which show a perfect agreement between theoretical predictions and Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Planck intermediate results: XLI. A map of lensing-induced B-modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-12

    The secondary cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-modes stem from the post-decoupling distortion of the polarization E-modes due to the gravitational lensing effect of large-scale structures. These lensing-induced B-modes constitute both a valuable probe of the dark matter distribution and an important contaminant for the extraction of the primary CMB B-modes from inflation. Planck provides accurate nearly all-sky measurements of both the polarization E-modes and the integrated mass distribution via the reconstruction of the CMB lensing potential. By combining these two data products, we have produced in this paper an all-sky template map of the lensing-induced B-modes using a real-space algorithm that minimizes the impact of sky masks. The cross-correlation of this template with an observed (primordial and secondary) B-mode map can be used to measure the lensing B-mode power spectrum at multipoles up to 2000. In particular, when cross-correlating with the B-mode contribution directly derived from the Planck polarization maps, we obtain lensing-induced B-mode power spectrum measurement at a significance level of 12σ, which agrees with the theoretical expectation derived from the Planck best-fit Λ cold dark matter model. This unique nearly all-sky secondary B-mode template, which includes the lensing-induced information from intermediate to small (10 ≲ ℓ ≲ 1000) angular scales, is delivered as part of the Planck 2015 public data release. Finally, it will be particularly useful for experiments searching for primordial B-modes, such as BICEP2/Keck Array or LiteBIRD, since it will enable an estimate to be made of the lensing-induced contribution to the measured total CMB B-modes.

  7. CMB lensing beyond the power spectrum: Cosmological constraints from the one-point probability distribution function and peak counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Hill, J. Colin; Sherwin, Blake D.; Petri, Andrea; Böhm, Vanessa; Haiman, Zoltán

    2016-11-01

    Unprecedentedly precise cosmic microwave background (CMB) data are expected from ongoing and near-future CMB stage III and IV surveys, which will yield reconstructed CMB lensing maps with effective resolution approaching several arcminutes. The small-scale CMB lensing fluctuations receive non-negligible contributions from nonlinear structure in the late-time density field. These fluctuations are not fully characterized by traditional two-point statistics, such as the power spectrum. Here, we use N -body ray-tracing simulations of CMB lensing maps to examine two higher-order statistics: the lensing convergence one-point probability distribution function (PDF) and peak counts. We show that these statistics contain significant information not captured by the two-point function and provide specific forecasts for the ongoing stage III Advanced Atacama Cosmology Telescope (AdvACT) experiment. Considering only the temperature-based reconstruction estimator, we forecast 9 σ (PDF) and 6 σ (peaks) detections of these statistics with AdvACT. Our simulation pipeline fully accounts for the non-Gaussianity of the lensing reconstruction noise, which is significant and cannot be neglected. Combining the power spectrum, PDF, and peak counts for AdvACT will tighten cosmological constraints in the Ωm-σ8 plane by ≈30 %, compared to using the power spectrum alone.

  8. THE TWO- AND THREE-POINT CORRELATION FUNCTIONS OF THE POLARIZED FIVE-YEAR WMAP SKY MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Gjerloew, E.; Eriksen, H. K.; Lilje, P. B.; Banday, A. J.; Gorski, K. M. E-mail: h.k.k.eriksen@astro.uio.n E-mail: Anthony.Banday@cesr.f

    2010-02-10

    We present the two- and three-point real space correlation functions of the five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) sky maps and compare the observed functions to simulated LAMBDACDM concordance model ensembles. In agreement with previously published results, we find that the temperature correlation functions are consistent with expectations. However, the pure polarization correlation functions are acceptable only for the 33 GHz band map; the 41, 61, and 94 GHz band correlation functions all exhibit significant large-scale excess structures. Further, these excess structures very closely match the correlation functions of the two (synchrotron and dust) foreground templates used to correct the WMAP data for galactic contamination, with a cross-correlation statistically significant at the 2sigma-3sigma confidence level. The correlation is slightly stronger with respect to the thermal dust template than with the synchrotron template.

  9. First measurement of the cross-correlation of CMB lensing and galaxy lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, Nick; Leauthaud, Alexie; Das, Sudeep; Sherwin, Blake D.; Addison, Graeme E.; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Charbonnier, Aldee; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Erben, Thomas; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Harnois-Deraps, Joachim; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hincks, Adam D.; Kneib, Jean -Paul; Kosowsky, Arthur; Makler, Martin; Miller, Lance; Moodley, Kavilan; Moraes, Bruno; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Sehgal, Neelima; Shan, Huanyuan; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Switzer, Eric R.; Taylor, James E.; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Welker, Charlotte; Wollack, Edward J.

    2015-03-02

    Here, we measure the cross-correlation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence maps derived from Atacama Cosmology Telescope data with galaxy lensing convergence maps as measured by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey. The CMB-galaxy lensing cross power spectrum is measured for the first time with a significance of 4.2 sigma, which corresponds to a 12% constraint on the amplitude of density fluctuations at redshifts ~0.9. With upcoming improved lensing data, this novel type of measurement will become a powerful cosmological probe, providing a precise measurement of the mass distribution at intermediate redshifts and serving as a calibrator for systematic biases in weak lensing measurements.

  10. First measurement of the cross-correlation of CMB lensing and galaxy lensing

    DOE PAGES

    Hand, Nick; Leauthaud, Alexie; Das, Sudeep; ...

    2015-03-02

    Here, we measure the cross-correlation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence maps derived from Atacama Cosmology Telescope data with galaxy lensing convergence maps as measured by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey. The CMB-galaxy lensing cross power spectrum is measured for the first time with a significance of 4.2 sigma, which corresponds to a 12% constraint on the amplitude of density fluctuations at redshifts ~0.9. With upcoming improved lensing data, this novel type of measurement will become a powerful cosmological probe, providing a precise measurement of the mass distribution at intermediate redshifts and serving as a calibrator for systematicmore » biases in weak lensing measurements.« less

  11. CMB anisotropies at all orders: the non-linear Sachs-Wolfe formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldan, Omar

    2017-08-01

    We obtain the non-linear generalization of the Sachs-Wolfe + integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) formula describing the CMB temperature anisotropies. Our formula is valid at all orders in perturbation theory, is also valid in all gauges and includes scalar, vector and tensor modes. A direct consequence of our results is that the maps of the logarithmic temperature anisotropies are much cleaner than the usual CMB maps, because they automatically remove many secondary anisotropies. This can for instance, facilitate the search for primordial non-Gaussianity in future works. It also disentangles the non-linear ISW from other effects. Finally, we provide a method which can iteratively be used to obtain the lensing solution at the desired order.

  12. Ali Observatory in Tibet: a unique northern site for future CMB ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Meng

    2015-08-01

    Ground-based CMB observations have been performed at the South Pole and the Atacama desert in Chile. However, a significant fraction of the sky can not be observed from just these two sites. For a full sky coverage from the ground in the future, a northern site for CMB observation, in particular CMB polarization, is required. Besides the long-thought site in Greenland, the high altitude Tibet plateau provides another opportunity. I will describe the Ali Observatory in Tibet, located at N32°19', E80°01', as a potential site for ground-based CMB observations. The new site is located on almost 5100m mountain, near Gar town, where is an excellent site for both infrared and submillimeter observations. Study with the long-term database of ground weather stations and archival satellite data has been performed. The site has enough relative height on the plateau and is accessible by car. The Shiquanhe town is 40 mins away by driving, and a recently opened airport with 40 mins driving, the site also has road excess, electricity, and optical fiber with fast internet. Preliminary measurement of the Precipitable Water Vapor is ~one quarter less than 0.5mm per year and the long term monitoring is under development. In addition, surrounding higher sites are also available and could be further developed if necessary. Ali provides unique northern sky coverage and together with the South Pole and the Atacama desert, future CMB observations will be able to cover the full sky from ground.

  13. Planck 2015 results. X. Diffuse component separation: Foreground maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A. W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    Planck has mapped the microwave sky in temperature over nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz and in polarization over seven frequency bands between 30 and 353 GHz in polarization. In this paper we consider the problem of diffuse astrophysical component separation, and process these maps within a Bayesian framework to derive an internally consistent set of full-sky astrophysical component maps. Component separation dedicated to cosmic microwave background (CMB) reconstruction is described in a companion paper. For the temperature analysis, we combine the Planck observations with the 9-yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) sky maps and the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map, to derive a joint model of CMB, synchrotron, free-free, spinning dust, CO, line emission in the 94 and 100 GHz channels, and thermal dust emission. Full-sky maps are provided for each component, with an angular resolution varying between 7.´5 and 1deg. Global parameters (monopoles, dipoles, relative calibration, and bandpass errors) are fitted jointly with the sky model, and best-fit values are tabulated. For polarization, the model includes CMB, synchrotron, and thermal dust emission. These models provide excellent fits to the observed data, with rms temperature residuals smaller than 4μK over 93% of the sky for all Planck frequencies up to 353 GHz, and fractional errors smaller than 1% in the remaining 7% of the sky. The main limitations of the temperature model at the lower frequencies are internal degeneracies among the spinning dust, free-free, and synchrotron components; additional observations from external low-frequency experiments will be essential to break these degeneracies. The main limitations of the temperature model at the higher frequencies are uncertainties in the 545 and 857 GHz calibration and zero-points. For polarization, the main outstanding issues are instrumental systematics in the 100-353 GHz bands on large angular scales in the form of temperature-to-polarization

  14. Planck 2015 results: X. Diffuse component separation: Foreground maps

    DOE PAGES

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; ...

    2016-09-20

    We report that Planck has mapped the microwave sky in temperature over nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz and in polarization over seven frequency bands between 30 and 353 GHz in polarization. In this paper we consider the problem of diffuse astrophysical component separation, and process these maps within a Bayesian framework to derive an internally consistent set of full-sky astrophysical component maps. Component separation dedicated to cosmic microwave background (CMB) reconstruction is described in a companion paper. For the temperature analysis, we combine the Planck observations with the 9-yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) sky maps andmore » the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map, to derive a joint model of CMB, synchrotron, free-free, spinning dust, CO, line emission in the 94 and 100 GHz channels, and thermal dust emission. Full-sky maps are provided for each component, with an angular resolution varying between 7.5 and 1deg. Global parameters (monopoles, dipoles, relative calibration, and bandpass errors) are fitted jointly with the sky model, and best-fit values are tabulated. For polarization, the model includes CMB, synchrotron, and thermal dust emission. These models provide excellent fits to the observed data, with rms temperature residuals smaller than 4μK over 93% of the sky for all Planck frequencies up to 353 GHz, and fractional errors smaller than 1% in the remaining 7% of the sky. The main limitations of the temperature model at the lower frequencies are internal degeneracies among the spinning dust, free-free, and synchrotron components; additional observations from external low-frequency experiments will be essential to break these degeneracies. The main limitations of the temperature model at the higher frequencies are uncertainties in the 545 and 857 GHz calibration and zero-points. For polarization, the main outstanding issues are instrumental systematics in the 100–353 GHz bands on large angular scales in the form of

  15. On the CMB kurtosis from cosmic strings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangui, A.

    1996-02-01

    The author reports on some recent work based on a simple analytical model for computing correlations in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation temperature field. Under simple assumptions on the way in which CMB photons get perturbed by cosmic strings he is able to derive an expression for the q-point temperature correlation function. The analysis is sensible specially for large angular scales where the Kaiser-Stebbins effect is dominant. The author then concentrates his analysis on the excess kurtosis parameter. He also estimates the cosmic variance for the kurtosis due to a Gaussian fluctuation field, showing its dependence on the primordial spectral index of density fluctuations n and finding agreement with previous published results for the particular case of a flat Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum.

  16. Reconciling the local void with the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Nadathur, Seshadri; Sarkar, Subir

    2011-03-15

    In the standard cosmological model, the dimming of distant Type Ia supernovae is explained by invoking the existence of repulsive ''dark energy'' which is causing the Hubble expansion to accelerate. However, this may be an artifact of interpreting the data in an (oversimplified) homogeneous model universe. In the simplest inhomogeneous model which fits the SNe Ia Hubble diagram without dark energy, we are located close to the center of a void modeled by a Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi metric. It has been claimed that such models cannot fit the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and other cosmological data. This is, however, based on the assumption of a scale-free spectrum for the primordial density perturbation. An alternative physically motivated form for the spectrum enables a good fit to both SNe Ia (Constitution/Union2) and CMB (WMAP 7-yr) data, and to the locally measured Hubble parameter. Constraints from baryon acoustic oscillations and primordial nucleosynthesis are also satisfied.

  17. Foreword: Dark energy and CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Huterer, Dragan

    2015-03-01

    Maps of the Universe when it was 400,000 years old from observations of the cosmic microwave background and over the last ten billion years from galaxy surveys point to a compelling cosmological model. This model requires a very early epoch of accelerated expansion, inflation, during which the seeds of structure were planted via quantum mechanical fluctuations. These seeds began to grow via gravitational instability during the epoch in which dark matter dominated the energy density of the universe, transforming small perturbations laid down during inflation into nonlinear structures such as million light-year sized clusters, galaxies, stars, planets, and people. Over the past few billion years, we have entered a new phase, during which the expansion of the Universe is accelerating presumably driven by yet another substance, dark energy.

  18. Mapping the open/closed boundary in Jupiter’s polar cap with a 2-D equatorial magnetic field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, M. F.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Walker, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    The main auroral oval emissions at Jupiter are not associated with the open/closed flux boundary in the polar cap as they are at the Earth, but with the breakdown of plasma corotation in the middle magnetosphere. As a result, the boundary between open and closed flux in the ionosphere is not well defined, though the region of open flux is generally thought to be small. We have mapped contours of constant radial distance from the magnetic equator to the ionosphere with the objective of understanding how auroral features relate to magnetospheric sources. Instead of following along a model field, we map equatorial field lines to the ionosphere by requiring that the magnetic flux in some specified region at the equator equal the magnetic flux in the area to which it maps in the ionosphere. We represent the north-south component of the measured magnetic field (Bθ) at the equator as a function of radial distance and local time by fitting equatorial field measurements to a two-dimensional functional form. From the equatorial field function, we calculate the flux through the equator in pixels of radial increment 5 RJ and a fixed longitudinal. We start by identifying the ionospheric footprint of an equatorial curve at 20 RJ where field models are reasonably accurate. The pixels at 20 RJ are traced to the ionosphere using the field bend back from Khurana and Schwarzl (2005) to determine the corresponding surface longitude. Using a version of the VIP4 model (Connerney et al., 1998) that has been modified to include the effects of the current sheet (Khurana, 1997) to estimate the internal Jovian field in the ionosphere, we then displace the auroral boundary poleward until the ionospheric flux equals the flux in the equatorial pixel. With iteration, we obtain the ionospheric mapping of the 25 RJ circle at the equator. Further iteration provides the mapping of successively distant circles. Equating the fluxes in this way allows us to link a given position in the magnetosphere

  19. Comparison of CMB lensing efficiency of gravitational waves and large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Rotti, Aditya; Souradeep, Tarun

    2013-09-01

    We provide a detailed treatment and comparison of the weak lensing effects due to large scale structure (LSS), or scalar density perturbations and those due to gravitational waves (GWs) or tensor perturbations, on the temperature and polarization power spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We carry out the analysis both in real space by using the correlation function method, as well as in the spherical harmonic space. We find an intriguing similarity between the lensing kernels associated with LSS lensing and GW lensing. It is found that the lensing kernels only differ in relative negative signs and their form is very reminiscent of even and odd parity bipolar spherical harmonic coefficients. Through a numerical study of these lensing kernels, we establish that lensing due to GW is more efficient at distorting the CMB spectra as compared to LSS lensing, particularly for the polarization power spectra. Finally we argue that the CMB B-mode power spectra measurements can be used to place interesting constraints on GW energy densities.

  20. Mapping tree root system in dikes using induced polarization: Focus on the influence of soil water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mary, Benjamin; Saracco, Ginette; Peyras, Laurent; Vennetier, Michel; Mériaux, Patrice; Camerlynck, Christian

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we assessed induced polarization as potential non-destructive method for root detection in dike embankments. We used both laboratory and field experiment to describe the electrical signal with a focus on soil water content. Our objective was to determine in which hydric state of the soil, and related electrical properties, roots could be accurately discriminated. We hypothesized that preferential water zone absorption near the roots could, in some conditions, contribute to locate them. During the laboratory experiments, we compared the response of containers filled with the same homogeneous silty clay bare material, and without (A) or with freshly cut root (B) at different levels of soil water content. Resistivity and phase variations with soil water content indicated that it was preferable to work in dry conditions since the contrast was higher. Interactions and overlapping between polarization effects of both root and soil made it difficult to interpret first chargeability maps. This led us to study temporal-spatial variations by considering the dynamics of water absorption during a field experiment. High resolution time lapses images showed a correlation between root location and complex resistivity anomalies. Although these first results have to be confirmed by further measurements, induced polarization seems to add useful information to interpret anomalies produced by woody roots.

  1. Extreme data compression for the CMB

    DOE PAGES

    Zablocki, Alan; Dodelson, Scott

    2016-04-28

    We apply the Karhunen-Loéve methods to cosmic microwave background (CMB) data sets, and show that we can recover the input cosmology and obtain the marginalized likelihoods in Λ cold dark matter cosmologies in under a minute, much faster than Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. This is achieved by forming a linear combination of the power spectra at each multipole l, and solving a system of simultaneous equations such that the Fisher matrix is locally unchanged. Instead of carrying out a full likelihood evaluation over the whole parameter space, we need evaluate the likelihood only for the parameter of interest, with themore » data compression effectively marginalizing over all other parameters. The weighting vectors contain insight about the physical effects of the parameters on the CMB anisotropy power spectrum Cl. The shape and amplitude of these vectors give an intuitive feel for the physics of the CMB, the sensitivity of the observed spectrum to cosmological parameters, and the relative sensitivity of different experiments to cosmological parameters. We test this method on exact theory Cl as well as on a Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP)-like CMB data set generated from a random realization of a fiducial cosmology, comparing the compression results to those from a full likelihood analysis using CosmoMC. Furthermore, after showing that the method works, we apply it to the temperature power spectrum from the WMAP seven-year data release, and discuss the successes and limitations of our method as applied to a real data set.« less

  2. Transfer matrices for magnetized CMB anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2006-05-15

    Large-scale magnetic fields can affect scalar cosmological perturbations whose evolution is described in the conformally Newtonian gauge and within the tight coupling approximation. The magnetized curvature perturbations present after matter-radiation equality (and prior to decoupling) are computed in terms of an appropriate transfer matrix allowing a general estimate of the Sachs-Wolfe plateau. From the observation that CMB initial conditions should be (predominantly) adiabatic, the contribution of the magnetic field intensity can be constrained.

  3. Extreme data compression for the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Zablocki, Alan; Dodelson, Scott

    2016-04-28

    We apply the Karhunen-Loéve methods to cosmic microwave background (CMB) data sets, and show that we can recover the input cosmology and obtain the marginalized likelihoods in Λ cold dark matter cosmologies in under a minute, much faster than Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. This is achieved by forming a linear combination of the power spectra at each multipole l, and solving a system of simultaneous equations such that the Fisher matrix is locally unchanged. Instead of carrying out a full likelihood evaluation over the whole parameter space, we need evaluate the likelihood only for the parameter of interest, with the data compression effectively marginalizing over all other parameters. The weighting vectors contain insight about the physical effects of the parameters on the CMB anisotropy power spectrum Cl. The shape and amplitude of these vectors give an intuitive feel for the physics of the CMB, the sensitivity of the observed spectrum to cosmological parameters, and the relative sensitivity of different experiments to cosmological parameters. We test this method on exact theory Cl as well as on a Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP)-like CMB data set generated from a random realization of a fiducial cosmology, comparing the compression results to those from a full likelihood analysis using CosmoMC. Furthermore, after showing that the method works, we apply it to the temperature power spectrum from the WMAP seven-year data release, and discuss the successes and limitations of our method as applied to a real data set.

  4. Extreme data compression for the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Zablocki, Alan; Dodelson, Scott

    2016-04-28

    We apply the Karhunen-Loéve methods to cosmic microwave background (CMB) data sets, and show that we can recover the input cosmology and obtain the marginalized likelihoods in Λ cold dark matter cosmologies in under a minute, much faster than Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. This is achieved by forming a linear combination of the power spectra at each multipole l, and solving a system of simultaneous equations such that the Fisher matrix is locally unchanged. Instead of carrying out a full likelihood evaluation over the whole parameter space, we need evaluate the likelihood only for the parameter of interest, with the data compression effectively marginalizing over all other parameters. The weighting vectors contain insight about the physical effects of the parameters on the CMB anisotropy power spectrum Cl. The shape and amplitude of these vectors give an intuitive feel for the physics of the CMB, the sensitivity of the observed spectrum to cosmological parameters, and the relative sensitivity of different experiments to cosmological parameters. We test this method on exact theory Cl as well as on a Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP)-like CMB data set generated from a random realization of a fiducial cosmology, comparing the compression results to those from a full likelihood analysis using CosmoMC. Furthermore, after showing that the method works, we apply it to the temperature power spectrum from the WMAP seven-year data release, and discuss the successes and limitations of our method as applied to a real data set.

  5. Working Group Report: Dark Energy and CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, S.; Honscheid, K.; Abazajian, K.; Carlstrom, J.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Kim, A.; Kirkby, D.; Lee, A.; Padmanabhan, N.; Rhodes, J.; Weinberg, D.

    2013-09-20

    The American Physical Society's Division of Particles and Fields initiated a long-term planning exercise over 2012-13, with the goal of developing the community's long term aspirations. The sub-group "Dark Energy and CMB" prepared a series of papers explaining and highlighting the physics that will be studied with large galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background experiments. This paper summarizes the findings of the other papers, all of which have been submitted jointly to the arXiv.

  6. Including birefringence into time evolution of CMB: current and future constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Gubitosi, G.; Pagano, L.; Martinelli, M. E-mail: martinelli@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2014-12-01

    We introduce birefringence effects within the propagation history of CMB, considering the two cases of a constant effect and of an effect that increases linearly in time, as the rotation of polarization induced by birefringence accumulates during photon propagation. Both cases result into a mixing of E and B modes before lensing effects take place, thus leading to the fact that lensing is acting on spectra that are already mixed because of birefringence. Moreover, if the polarization rotation angle increases during propagation, birefringence affects more the large scales that the small scales. We put constraints on the two cases using data from WMAP 9yr and BICEP 2013 and compare these results with the constraints obtained when the usual procedure of rotating the final power spectra is adopted, finding that this dataset combination is unable to distinguish between effects, but it nevertheless hints for a non vanishing value of the polarization rotation angle. We also forecast the sensitivity that will be obtained using data from Planck and PolarBear, highlighting how this combination is capable to rule out a vanishing birefringence angle, but still unable to distinguish the different scenarios. Nevertheless, we find that the combination of Planck and PolarBear is sensitive enough to highlight the existence of degeneracies between birefringence rotation and gravitational lensing of CMB photons, possibly leading to false detection of non standard lensing effects if birefringence is neglected.

  7. Probing neutrino masses with CMB lensing extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lesgourgues, Julien; Perotto, Laurence; Pastor, Sergio; Piat, Michel

    2006-02-15

    We evaluate the ability of future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments to measure the power spectrum of large scale structure using quadratic estimators of the weak lensing deflection field. We calculate the sensitivity of upcoming CMB experiments such as BICEP, QUaD, BRAIN, ClOVER and Planck to the nonzero total neutrino mass M{sub {nu}} indicated by current neutrino oscillation data. We find that these experiments greatly benefit from lensing extraction techniques, improving their one-sigma sensitivity to M{sub {nu}} by a factor of order four. The combination of data from Planck and the SAMPAN mini-satellite project would lead to {sigma}(M{sub {nu}}){approx}0.1 eV, while a value as small as {sigma}(M{sub {nu}}){approx}0.035 eV is within the reach of a space mission based on bolometers with a passively cooled 3-4 m aperture telescope, representative of the most ambitious projects currently under investigation. We show that our results are robust not only considering possible difficulties in subtracting astrophysical foregrounds from the primary CMB signal but also when the minimal cosmological model ({lambda} Mixed Dark Matter) is generalized in order to include a possible scalar tilt running, a constant equation-of-state parameter for the dark energy and/or extra relativistic degrees of freedom.

  8. What is the distance to the CMB?

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, Chris; Umeh, Obinna; Maartens, Roy; Durrer, Ruth E-mail: umeobinna@gmail.com E-mail: Ruth.Durrer@unige.ch

    2014-11-01

    The success of precision cosmology depends not only on accurate observations, but also on the theoretical model --- which must be understood to at least the same level of precision. Subtle relativistic effects can lead to biased measurements if they are neglected. One such effect gives a systematic shift in the distance-redshift relation away from its background value, due to the non-linear relativistic conservation of total photon flux. We also show directly how this shift follows from a fully relativistic analysis of the geodesic deviation equation. We derive the expectation value of the shift using second-order perturbations about a concordance background, and show that the distance to last scattering is increased by 1%. We argue that neglecting this shift could lead to a significant bias in the background cosmological parameters, because it alters the meaning of the background model. A naive adjustment of CMB parameter estimation if this shift is really a correction to the background would raise the H{sub 0} value inferred from the CMB by 5%, potentially removing the tension with local measurements of H{sub 0}. Other CMB parameters which depend on the distance would also be shifted by ∼ 1σ when combined with local H{sub 0} data. While our estimations rely on a simplistic analysis, they nevertheless illustrate that accurately defining the background model in terms of the expectation values of observables is critical when we aim to determine the model parameters at the sub-percent level.

  9. Low-frequency measurements of the CMB (cosmic microwave background) spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Bensadoun, M.; De Amici, G.; Levin, S.; Limon, M.; Smoot, G. ); Sironi, G. . Dipt. di Fisica); Bersanelli, M.; Bonelli, G. )

    1989-10-01

    As part of an extended program to characterize the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at low frequencies, we have performed multiple measurements from a high-altitude site in California. On average, these measurements suggest a CMB temperature slightly lower than measurements at higher frequencies. Atmospheric conditions and the encroachment of civilization are now significant limitations from our present observing site. In November 1989, we will make new measurements from the South Pole Amnudsen-Scott Station at frequencies 0.82 1.5, 2.5, 3.8, 7.5, and 90 GHz. We discuss recent measurements and indicate improvements from a polar observing site. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant. J.

    2010-08-01

    A primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large scale structure(LSS). In this article, we demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales as follows, We also report the newest constraints on the PMF amplitude Bλ and the power spectral index nB which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework and the Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In particular we find that |Bλ|<2.10(68%CL) nG and < 2.98(95%CL) nG and nB<-1.19(68%CL) and <-0.25(95%CL) at a present scale of 1 Mpc.

  11. Forecast constraints on inflation from combined CMB and gravitational wave direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Gordon, Christopher; Silk, Joseph; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2010-04-15

    We study how direct detection of the inflationary gravitational wave background constrains inflationary parameters and complements CMB polarization measurements. The error ellipsoids calculated using the Fisher information matrix approach with Planck and the direct detection experiment, Big Bang Observer (BBO), show different directions of parameter degeneracy, and the degeneracy is broken when they are combined. For a slow-roll parametrization, we show that BBO could significantly improve the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio compared with Planck alone. We also look at a quadratic and a natural inflation model. In both cases, if the temperature of reheating is also treated as a free parameter, then the addition of BBO can significantly improve the error bars. In the case of natural inflation, we find that the addition of BBO could even partially improve the error bars of a cosmic variance-limited CMB experiment.

  12. PF2 fit: Polar Fast Fourier Matched Alignment of Atomistic Structures with 3D Electron Microscopy Maps

    PubMed Central

    Bettadapura, Radhakrishna; Rasheed, Muhibur; Vollrath, Antje; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2015-01-01

    There continue to be increasing occurrences of both atomistic structure models in the PDB (possibly reconstructed from X-ray diffraction or NMR data), and 3D reconstructed cryo-electron microscopy (3D EM) maps (albeit at coarser resolution) of the same or homologous molecule or molecular assembly, deposited in the EMDB. To obtain the best possible structural model of the molecule at the best achievable resolution, and without any missing gaps, one typically aligns (match and fits) the atomistic structure model with the 3D EM map. We discuss a new algorithm and generalized framework, named PF2 fit (Polar Fast Fourier Fitting) for the best possible structural alignment of atomistic structures with 3D EM. While PF2 fit enables only a rigid, six dimensional (6D) alignment method, it augments prior work on 6D X-ray structure and 3D EM alignment in multiple ways: Scoring. PF2 fit includes a new scoring scheme that, in addition to rewarding overlaps between the volumes occupied by the atomistic structure and 3D EM map, rewards overlaps between the volumes complementary to them. We quantitatively demonstrate how this new complementary scoring scheme improves upon existing approaches. PF2 fit also includes two scoring functions, the non-uniform exterior penalty and the skeleton-secondary structure score, and implements the scattering potential score as an alternative to traditional Gaussian blurring. Search. PF2 fit utilizes a fast polar Fourier search scheme, whose main advantage is the ability to search over uniformly and adaptively sampled subsets of the space of rigid-body motions. PF2 fit also implements a new reranking search and scoring methodology that considerably improves alignment metrics in results obtained from the initial search. PMID:26469938

  13. Needlet detection of features in the WMAP CMB sky and the impact on anisotropies and hemispherical asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pietrobon, Davide; Amblard, Alexandre; Cooray, Asantha; Balbi, Amedeo; Cabella, Paolo; Marinucci, Domenico

    2008-11-15

    We apply spherical needlets to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-year cosmic microwave background (CMB) data set, to search for imprints of nonisotropic features in the CMB sky. We use the needlets' localization properties to resolve peculiar features in the CMB sky and to study how these features contribute to the anisotropy power spectrum of the CMB. In addition to the now well-known 'cold spot' of the CMB map in the southern hemisphere, we also find two hot spots at greater than 99% confidence level, again in the southern hemisphere and closer to the Galactic plane. While the cold spot contributes to the anisotropy power spectrum in the multipoles between l=6 to l=33, the hot spots are found to be dominating the anisotropy power in the range between l=6 and l=18. Masking both the cold and the two hot spots results in a reduction by about 15% in the amplitude of the angular power spectrum of CMB around l=10. The resulting changes to the cosmological parameters when the power spectrum is estimated masking these features (in addition to the WMAP team's KQ85 mask) are within the 1{sigma} errors published with the WMAP mask only. We also study the asymmetry between the angular power spectra evaluated on the northern and southern hemispheres. When the features detected by needlets are masked, we find that the difference in the power, measured in terms of the anisotropy variance between l=4 and l=18, is reduced by a factor 2. We make available a mask related to needlet features for more detailed studies on asymmetries in the CMB anisotropy sky.

  14. Spatial variations in the spectral index of polarized synchrotron emission in the 9 yr WMAP sky maps

    SciTech Connect

    Fuskeland, U.; Eriksen, H. K.; Næss, S. K.; Wehus, I. K. E-mail: h.k.k.eriksen@astro.uio.no E-mail: i.k.wehus@fys.uio.no

    2014-08-01

    We estimate the spectral index, β, of polarized synchrotron emission as observed in the 9 yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe sky maps using two methods, linear regression ({sup T}-T plot{sup )} and maximum likelihood. We partition the sky into 24 disjoint sky regions and evaluate the spectral index for all polarization angles between 0° and 85° in steps of 5°. Averaging over polarization angles, we derive a mean spectral index of β{sup all-sky} = –2.99 ± 0.01 in the frequency range of 23-33 GHz. We find that the synchrotron spectral index steepens by 0.14 from low to high Galactic latitudes, in agreement with previous studies, with mean spectral indices of β{sup plane} = –2.98 ± 0.01 and β{sup high-lat} = –3.12 ± 0.04. In addition, we find a significant longitudinal variation along the Galactic plane with a steeper spectral index toward the Galactic center and anticenter than toward the Galactic spiral arms. This can be well modeled by an offset sinusoidal, β(l) = –2.85 + 0.17sin (2l – 90°). Finally, we study synchrotron emission in the BICEP2 field, in an attempt to understand whether the claimed detection of large-scale B-mode polarization could be explained in terms of synchrotron contamination. Adopting a spectral index of β = –3.12, typical for high Galactic latitudes, we find that the most likely bias corresponds to about 2% of the reported signal (r = 0.003). The flattest index allowed by the data in this region is β = –2.5, and under the assumption of a straight power-law frequency spectrum, we find that synchrotron emission can account for at most 20% of the reported BICEP2 signal.

  15. Microwave maps of the polar ice of the earth. [from Nimbus-5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Chang, T. C.; Nordberg, W.; Campbell, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Synoptic views of the entire polar regions of earth were obtained free of the usual persistent cloud cover using a scanning microwave radiometer operating at a wavelength of 1.55 cm on board the Nimbus-5 satellite. Three different views at each pole are presented utilizing data obtained at approximately one-month intervals during the winter of 1972-1973. The major discoveries resulting from an analysis of these data are as follows: (1) Large discrepancies exist between the climatic norm ice cover depicted in various atlases and the actual extent of the canopies. (2) The distribution of multiyear ice in the north polar region is markedly different from that predicted by existing ice dynamics models. (3) Irregularities in the edge of the Antarctic sea ice pack occur that have neither been observed previously nor anticipated. (4) The brightness temperatures of the Greenland and Antarctica glaciers show interesting contours probably related to the ice and snow morphologic structure.

  16. Joint seismic-geodynamic-mineral physical constraints on heat flux across the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.

    2009-05-01

    The dynamics and thermal evolution of the Earth's interior is strongly dependent on the relative contributions from internal heating in the mantle (due to radioactivity and secular cooling) and from bottom heating across the core-mantle boundary (CMB). The dynamical style of the thermal convective flow, in particular the relative importance of active, thermally buoyant upwellings and mantle cooling due to descending lithospheric plates is also strongly dependent on the amplitude of heat flux across the CMB. We are able to provide new constraints on the convectively maintained heat flux across the CMB thanks to recent progress in mapping the lateral variations in mantle temperature by jointly inverting global seismic and geodynamic data sets, in which mineral physical constraints on mantle thermal heterogeneity are also imposed (Simmons et al. 2009). We present here new models of the present-day global mantle convective flow predicted on the basis of the thermal and non-thermal (compositional) density perturbations derived from the new tomography model and using the inferences of depth-dependent, horizontally averaged mantle viscosity derived from joint inversions of glacial isostatic adjustment and mantle convection data (Forte and Mitrovica 2004). We employ this tomography- geodynamics based mantle convection model to explore the convective transport of mass (buoyancy flux) and heat (advected heat flux) across the lower and upper mantle. We show that the predictions of advected heat flux at the top of the seismic D" layer provide direct constraints on the heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Our current best estimates of the present-day CMB heat flux are in excess of 10 TW. We present a sensitivity analysis showing the degree of robustness of this inference, depending on the inferred variation of mantle viscosity in the lower mantle. We also present new predictions of the present-day distribution of secular heating and cooling at different depths in

  17. Mapping the chemical potential dependence of current-induced spin polarization in a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Sue; Richardella, Anthony; Hickey, Danielle Reifsnyder; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Samarth, Nitin

    2015-10-01

    We report electrical measurements of the current-induced spin polarization of the surface current in topological insulator devices where contributions from bulk and surface conduction can be disentangled by electrical gating. The devices use a ferromagnetic tunnel junction (permalloy/Al 2O3 ) as a spin detector on a back-gated (Bi,Sb ) 2Te3 channel. We observe hysteretic voltage signals as the magnetization of the detector ferromagnet is switched parallel or antiparallel to the spin polarization of the surface current. The amplitude of the detected voltage change is linearly proportional to the applied dc bias current in the (Bi,Sb ) 2Te3 channel. As the chemical potential is tuned from the bulk bands into the surface state band, we observe an enhancement of the spin-dependent voltages up to 300% within the range of the electrostatic gating. Using a simple model, we extract the spin polarization near charge neutrality (i.e., the Dirac point).

  18. Planck CMB Anomalies: Astrophysical and Cosmological Secondary Effects and the Curse of Masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassat, Anais

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale anomalies have been reported in CMB data with both WMAP and Planck data. These could be due to foreground residuals and or systematic effects, though their confirmation with Planck data suggests they are not due to a problem in the WMAP or Planck pipelines. If these anomalies are in fact primordial, then understanding their origin is fundamental to either validate the standard model of cosmology or to explore new physics. We investigate three other possible issues: 1) the trade-off between minimising systematics due to foreground contamination (with a conservative mask) and minimising systematics due to masking, 2) astrophysical secondary effects (the kinetic Doppler quadrupole and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect), and 3) secondary cosmological signals (the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect). We address the masking issue by considering new procedures that use both WMAP and Planck to produce higher quality full-sky maps using the sparsity methodology (LGMCA maps). We show the impact of masking is dominant over that of residual foregrounds, and the LGMCA full-sky maps can be used without further processing to study anomalies. We consider four official Planck PR1 and two LGMCA CMB maps. Analysis of the observed CMB maps shows that only the low quadrupole and quadrupole-octopole alignment seem significant, but that the planar octopole, Axis of Evil, mirror parity and cold spot are not significant in nearly all maps considered. After subtraction of astrophysical and cosmological secondary effects, only the low quadrupole may still be considered anomalous, meaning the significance of only one anomaly is affected by secondary effect subtraction out of six anomalies considered. In the spirit of reproducible research all reconstructed maps and codes are available online.

  19. Planck 2013 results. XV. CMB power spectra and likelihood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Paykari, P.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rahlin, A.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the Planck 2013 likelihood, a complete statistical description of the two-point correlation function of the CMB temperature fluctuations that accounts for all known relevant uncertainties, both instrumental and astrophysical in nature. We use this likelihood to derive our best estimate of the CMB angular power spectrum from Planck over three decades in multipole moment, ℓ, covering 2 ≤ ℓ ≤ 2500. The main source of uncertainty at ℓ ≲ 1500 is cosmic variance. Uncertainties in small-scale foreground modelling and instrumental noise dominate the error budget at higher ℓs. For ℓ < 50, our likelihood exploits all Planck frequency channels from 30 to 353 GHz, separating the cosmological CMB signal from diffuse Galactic foregrounds through a physically motivated Bayesian component separation technique. At ℓ ≥ 50, we employ a correlated Gaussian likelihood approximation based on a fine-grained set of angular cross-spectra derived from multiple detector combinations between the 100, 143, and 217 GHz frequency channels, marginalising over power spectrum foreground templates. We validate our likelihood through an extensive suite of consistency tests, and assess the impact of residual foreground and instrumental uncertainties on the final cosmological parameters. We find good internal agreement among the high-ℓ cross-spectra with residuals below a few μK2 at ℓ ≲ 1000, in agreement with estimated calibration uncertainties. We compare our results with foreground-cleaned CMB maps derived from all Planck frequencies, as well as with cross-spectra derived from the 70 GHz Planck map, and find broad agreement in terms of spectrum residuals and cosmological parameters. We further show that the best-fit ΛCDM cosmology is in excellent agreement with preliminary PlanckEE and TE polarisation spectra. We find that the standard ΛCDM cosmology is well constrained by Planck from the measurements at ℓ ≲ 1500. One specific example is the

  20. Polar microwave brightness temperatures from Nimbus-7 SMMR: Time series of daily and monthly maps from 1978 to 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Zwally, H. Jay

    1989-01-01

    A time series of daily brightness temperature gridded maps (October 25, 1978 through August 15, 1987) were generated from all ten channels of the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer orbital data. This unique data set can be utilized in a wide range of applications including heat flux, ocean circulation, ice edge productivity, and climate studies. Two sets of data in polar stereographic format are created for the Arctic region: one with a grid size of about 30 km on a 293 by 293 array similar to that previously utilized for the Nimbus-5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer, while the other has a grid size of about 25 km on a 448 by 304 array identical to what is now being used for the DMSP Scanning Multichannel Microwave Imager. Data generated for the Antaractic region are mapped using the 293 by 293 grid only. The general technique for mapping, and a quality assessment of the data set are presented. Monthly and yearly averages are also generated from the daily data and sample geophysical ice images and products derived from the data are given. Contour plots of monthly ice concentrations derived from the data for October 1978 through August 1987 are presented to demonstrate spatial and temporal detail which this data set can offer, and to show potential research applications.

  1. Optimal bispectrum estimator and simulations of the CMB lensing-integrated Sachs Wolfe non-Gaussian signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangilli, A.; Wandelt, B.; Elsner, F.; Liguori, M.

    2013-07-01

    We present the tools to optimally extract the lensing-integrated Sachs Wolfe (L-ISW) bispectrum signal from future cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. We implemented two different methods to simulate the non-Gaussian CMB maps with the L-ISW signal: a non-perturbative method based on the FLINTS lensing code and the separable mode-expansion method. We implemented the Komatsu, Spergel, and Wandelt (KSW) optimal estimator analysis for the L-ISW bispectrum and tested it on the non-Gaussian simulations for realistic CMB experimental settings with an inhomogeneous sky coverage. We show that the estimator approaches the Cramer-Rao bound and that Wiener filtering the L-ISW simulations slightly improves the estimate of fNLL-ISW by ≤ 10%. For a realistic CMB experimental setting that accounts for anisotropic noise and masked sky, we show that the linear term of the estimator is highly correlated to the cubic term and it is necessary to recover the signal and the optimal error bars. We also show that the L-ISW bispectrum, if not correctly accounted for, yields an underestimation of the fNLlocal error bars of ≃ 4%. A joint analysis of the non-Gaussian shapes and/or L-ISW template subtraction is needed to recover unbiased results of the primordial non-Gaussian signal from ongoing and future CMB experiments.

  2. The Polar Maps of the Moon with AMIE/SMART-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despan, Daniela; Erard, S.; Barucci, A.; Josset, J. L.; Beauvivre, S.; Koschny, D.; Almeida, M.; Grieger, B.; Foing, B.; AMIE Team

    2009-09-01

    The AMIE camera on SMART-1, the first European lunar mission, provided a large data set, including the north and the south pole regions. SMART-1 was in a 300 x 3000 km elliptical orbit, with perilune over the south pole. The Moon surface displays two major types of terrain: the bright and rugged highlands and darker, smoother plains. The lunar north pole is in a highland region and spread out in between three large impact craters: Peary, 88,6° N, 33° E, Hermite , 86° N, 89,9° W and Rozhdestvensky, 85,2° N, 155,4° W. The quantitative map around the north pole shows news details of surface topography. The floor of the Peary crater is smooth and presents only few meteoritic bombardment formations most of them being near the rim. Similar technics were applied to construct maps of the South pole region. The southern highlands of the Moon are rugged and heavily cratered terrains with geology dominated by the South pole -Aitken (SPA) basin. Abundant basin secondary craters are scattered across the area, mostly created by the Orientale basin impact to the west and north. A particular interest has been carried to the topography surrounding the Shackleton crater, which is nearly coincident with the South pole, at 89.9° latitude and 0° longitude, with 19 km diameter, according to USGS coordinates. The AMIE mosaic of Shackleton crater spreads among 88,80 ° and 90 ° S in latitude. The high resolution mosaic give details about the complete rim of this crater with different illumination angles. The mosaic of Shackleton crater was extended in a global map of the south pole region. Eventually, the method used will be applied to mapping all areas of interest where AMIE has provided high resolution observations. The AMIE maps of the north and south pole of the Moon are presented.

  3. Statistical analysis of polarizing maps of blood plasma laser images for the diagnostics of malignant formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungurian, V. P.; Ivashchuk, O. I.; Ushenko, V. O.

    2012-01-01

    This work is aimed at searching the interconnections between the statistic structure of blood plasma microscopic images and manifestations of optical anisotropy of liquid crystal protein network. The model of linear birefringence of albumin and globulin crystals underlies in the ground of this work. The results of investigating the interrelation between statistical moments of the 1st-4th order are presented that characterize the coordinate distributions of polarization ellipticity of laser images of blood plasma smears and pathological changes in human organism. The diagnostic criteria of breast cancer nascency and its severity degree differentiation are determined.

  4. Requirements assessment and operational demands for a resource mapping rover mission to the lunar polar regions

    SciTech Connect

    KLARER,PAUL R.; BINDER,ALAN B.; LENARD,ROGER X.

    2000-01-26

    A preliminary set of requirements for a robotic rover mission to the lunar polar region are described and assessed. Tasks to be performed by the rover include core drill sample acquisition, mineral and volatile soil content assay, and significant wide area traversals. Assessment of the postulated requirements is performed using first order estimates of energy, power, and communications throughput issues. Two potential rover system configurations are considered, a smaller rover envisioned as part of a group of multiple rovers, and a larger single rover envisioned along more traditional planetary surface rover concept lines.

  5. Characterization of Detectors and Instrument Systematics for the SPIDER CMB Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Rebecca Suzanne

    We know from the CMB and observations of large-scale structure that the universe is extremely flat, homogenous, and isotropic. The current favored mechanism for generating these characteristics is inflation, a theorized period of exponential expansion of the universe that occurred shortly after the Big Bang. Most theories of inflation generically predict a background of stochastic gravitational waves. These gravitational waves should leave their unique imprint on the polarization of the CMB via Thompson scattering. Scalar perturbations of the metric will cause a pattern of polarization with no curl (E-mode). Tensor perturbations (gravitational waves) will cause a unique pattern of polarization on the CMB that includes a curl component (B-mode). A measurement of the ratio of the tensor to scalar perturbations (r ) tells us the energy scale of inflation. Recent measurements by the BICEP2 team detect the B-mode spectrum with a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r=0.2 (+0.05, -0.07). An independent confirmation of this result is the next step towards understanding the inflationary universe. This thesis describes my work on a balloon-borne polarimeter called SPIDER, which is designed to illuminate the physics of the early universe through measurements of the cosmic microwave background polarization. SPIDER consists of six single-frequency, on-axis refracting telescopes contained in a shared-vacuum liquid-helium cryostat. Its large format arrays of millimeter-wave detectors and tight control of systematics will give it unprecedented sensitivity. This thesis describes how the SPIDER detectors are characterized and calibrated for flight, as well as how the systematics requirements for the SPIDER system are simulated and measured.

  6. Primordial non-Gaussianity with μ-type and y-type spectral distortions: exploiting Cosmic Microwave Background polarization and dealing with secondary sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenni, Andrea; Liguori, Michele; Bartolo, Nicola; Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2017-09-01

    Cross-correlations between Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature and y-spectral distortion anisotropies have been previously proposed as a way to measure the local bispectrum parameter fNLloc. in a range of scales inaccessible to either CMB (T, E) bispectra or μ T correlations. This is useful e.g. to test scale dependence of primordial non-Gaussianity. Unfortunately, the primordial y T signal is strongly contaminated by the late-time correlation between the Integrated Sachs Wolfe and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effects. Moreover, SZ itself generates a large noise contribution in the y-parameter map. We consider two original ways to address these issues. In order to remove the bias due to the SZ-CMB temperature coupling, while also providing additional signal, we include in the analysis the cross-correlation between y-distortions and CMB polarization. In order to reduce the noise, we propose to clean the y-map by subtracting a SZ template, reconstructed via cross-correlation with external tracers (CMB and galaxy-lensing signals). We combine this SZ template subtraction with the previously suggested solution of directly masking detected clusters. Our final forecasts show that, using y-distortions, a PRISM-like survey can achieve 1σ(fNLloc.) = 300, while an ideal experiment will achieve 1σ(fNLloc.) = 130 with improvements of a factor between 2.1 and 3.8, depending on the considered survey, from adding the y E signal, and a further 20–30 % from template cleaning. These forecasts are much worse than current fNLloc. boundaries from Planck, but we stress that they refer to completely different scales.

  7. Raman mapping of hexagonal hillocks in N-polar GaN grown on c-plane sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Teng; Lin, Zhiyu; Zhang, Jincheng; Xu, Shengrui; Huang, Jun; Niu, Mutong; Gao, Xiaodong; Guo, Lixin; Hao, Yue

    2017-04-01

    A large amount of huge hexagonal hillocks were observed on the surface of N-polar GaN film grown on c-plane sapphire substrate by MOCVD. The distribution of residual stress and dislocation density in a typical hexagonal hillock was investigated by the mapping measurement of Micro-Raman and Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. It is found that the residual stress at the top region of the hillock is much smaller than that of the sidewall region and the region around the hillock. Meanwhile, the CL images confirmed that the dislocation density around the hexagonal hillock is higher than the top region of the hillock. The bending and annihilation of the dislocations during the growth of the hexagonal hillock result in the relaxation of residual stress which should be responsible for the spatial variation of dislocation density and residual stress.

  8. Correlation of Lunar South Polar Epithermal Neutron Maps: Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector and Lunar Prospector Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Sagdeev, R.; Trombka, J. I.; Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Chin, G.; Garvin, J.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's (LRO), Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) was developed to refine the lunar surface hydrogen (H) measurements generated by the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer. LPNS measurements indicated a approx.4,6% decrease in polar epithermal fluxes equivalent to (1.5+/-0,8)% H concentration and are direct geochemical evidence indicating water /high H at the poles. Given the similar operational and instrumental objectives of the LEND and LPNS systems, an important science analysis step for LEND is to test correlation with existing research including LPNS measurements. In this analysis, we compare corrected low altitude epithermal rate data from LPNS available via NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) with calibrated LEND epithermal maps using a cross-correlation technique

  9. Planck intermediate results. XXXIII. Signature of the magnetic field geometry of interstellar filaments in dust polarization maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Berné, O.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    Planck observations at 353 GHz provide the first fully sampled maps of the polarized dust emission towards interstellar filaments and their backgrounds (i.e., the emission observed in the surroundings of the filaments). The data allow us to determine the intrinsic polarization properties of the filaments and therefore to provide insight into the structure of their magnetic field (B). We present the polarization maps of three nearby (several parsecs long) star-forming filaments of moderate column density (NH about 1022 cm-2): Musca, B211, and L1506. These three filaments are detected above the background in dust total and polarized emission. We use the spatial information to separate Stokes I, Q, and U of the filaments from those of their backgrounds, an essential step in measuring the intrinsic polarization fraction (p) and angle (ψ) of each emission component. We find that the polarization angles in the three filaments (ψfil) are coherent along their lengths and not the same as in their backgrounds (ψbg). The differences between ψfil and ψbg are 12° and 54° for Musca and L1506, respectively, and only 6° in the case of B211. These differences forMusca and L1506 are larger than the dispersions of ψ, both along the filaments and in their backgrounds. The observed changes of ψ are direct evidence of variations of the orientation of the plane of the sky (POS) projection of the magnetic field. As in previous studies, we find a decrease of several per cent in p with NH from the backgrounds to the crest of the filaments. We show that the bulk of the drop in p within the filaments cannot be explained by random fluctuations of the orientation of the magnetic field because they are too small (σψ< 10°). We recognize the degeneracy between the dust alignment efficiency (by, e.g., radiative torques) and the structure of the B-field in causing variations in p, but we argue that the decrease in p from the backgrounds to the filaments results in part from

  10. Planck intermediate results: XXXIII. Signature of the magnetic field geometry of interstellar filaments in dust polarization maps

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Berné, O.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-09

    Planck observations at 353 GHz provide the first fully sampled maps of the polarized dust emission towards interstellar filaments and their backgrounds (i.e., the emission observed in the surroundings of the filaments). The data allow us to determine the intrinsic polarization properties of the filaments and therefore to provide insight into the structure of their magnetic field (B). In this paper, we present the polarization maps of three nearby (several parsecs long) star-forming filaments of moderate column density (NH about 1022 cm-2): Musca, B211, and L1506. These three filaments are detected above the background in dust total and polarized emission. We use the spatial information to separate Stokes I, Q, and U of the filaments from those of their backgrounds, an essential step in measuring the intrinsic polarization fraction (p) and angle (ψ) of each emission component. We find that the polarization angles in the three filaments (ψfil) are coherent along their lengths and not the same as in their backgrounds (ψbg). The differences between ψfil and ψbg are 12° and 54° for Musca and L1506, respectively, and only 6° in the case of B211. These differences forMusca and L1506 are larger than the dispersions of ψ, both along the filaments and in their backgrounds. The observed changes of ψ are direct evidence of variations of the orientation of the plane of the sky (POS) projection of the magnetic field. As in previous studies, we find a decrease of several per cent in p with NH from the backgrounds to the crest of the filaments. We show that the bulk of the drop in p within the filaments cannot be explained by random fluctuations of the orientation of the magnetic field because they are too small (σψ< 10°). We recognize the degeneracy between the dust alignment efficiency (by, e.g., radiative torques) and the structure of the B-field in causing variations

  11. Planck intermediate results: XXXIII. Signature of the magnetic field geometry of interstellar filaments in dust polarization maps

    DOE PAGES

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; ...

    2016-02-09

    Planck observations at 353 GHz provide the first fully sampled maps of the polarized dust emission towards interstellar filaments and their backgrounds (i.e., the emission observed in the surroundings of the filaments). The data allow us to determine the intrinsic polarization properties of the filaments and therefore to provide insight into the structure of their magnetic field (B). In this paper, we present the polarization maps of three nearby (several parsecs long) star-forming filaments of moderate column density (NH about 1022 cm-2): Musca, B211, and L1506. These three filaments are detected above the background in dust total and polarized emission.more » We use the spatial information to separate Stokes I, Q, and U of the filaments from those of their backgrounds, an essential step in measuring the intrinsic polarization fraction (p) and angle (ψ) of each emission component. We find that the polarization angles in the three filaments (ψfil) are coherent along their lengths and not the same as in their backgrounds (ψbg). The differences between ψfil and ψbg are 12° and 54° for Musca and L1506, respectively, and only 6° in the case of B211. These differences forMusca and L1506 are larger than the dispersions of ψ, both along the filaments and in their backgrounds. The observed changes of ψ are direct evidence of variations of the orientation of the plane of the sky (POS) projection of the magnetic field. As in previous studies, we find a decrease of several per cent in p with NH from the backgrounds to the crest of the filaments. We show that the bulk of the drop in p within the filaments cannot be explained by random fluctuations of the orientation of the magnetic field because they are too small (σψ< 10°). We recognize the degeneracy between the dust alignment efficiency (by, e.g., radiative torques) and the structure of the B-field in causing variations in p, but we argue that the decrease in p from the backgrounds to the filaments results in

  12. Mapping orientational order in a bulk heterojunction solar cell with polarization-dependent photoconductive atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takacs, Christopher J; Collins, Samuel D; Love, John A; Mikhailovsky, Alexander A; Wynands, David; Bazan, Guillermo C; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Heeger, Alan J

    2014-08-26

    New methods connecting molecular structure, self-organization, and optoelectronic performance are important for understanding the current generation of organic photovoltaic (OPV) materials. In high power conversion efficiency (PCE) OPVs, light-harvesting small-molecules or polymers are typically blended with fullerene derivatives and deposited in thin films, forming a bulk heterojunction (BHJ), a self-assembled three-dimensional nanostructure of electron donors and acceptors that separates and transports charges. Recent data suggest micrometer-scale orientational order of donor domains exists within this complex nanomorphology, but the link to the optoelectronic properties is yet unexplored. Here we introduce polarization-dependent, photoconductive atomic force microscopy (pd-pcAFM) as a combined probe of orientational order and nanoscale optoelectronic properties (∼20 nm resolution). Using the donor 7,7'-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl)bis(6-fluoro-4-(5'-hexyl[2,2'-bithiophen]-5-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole), p-DTS(FBTTh2)2, we show significant spatial dependence of the nanoscale photocurrent with polarized light in both pristine and BHJ blends (up to 7.0% PCE) due to the local alignment of the molecular transition dipoles. By mapping the polarization dependence of the nanoscale photocurrent, we estimate the molecular orientation and orientational order parameter. Liquid crystalline disclinations are observed in all films, in agreement with complementary electron microscopy experiments, and the order parameter exceeds 0.3. The results demonstrate the utility of pd-pcAFM to investigate the optical/structural anisotropy that exists within a well-performing BHJ system and its relationship to optoelectronic properties on both the nanometer and micrometer length scales.

  13. CLOUD AND HAZE IN THE WINTER POLAR REGION OF TITAN OBSERVED WITH VISUAL AND INFRARED MAPPING SPECTROMETER ON BOARD CASSINI

    SciTech Connect

    Rannou, P.; Le Mouelic, S.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R. H.

    2012-03-20

    A large cloud in the north polar region of Titan was first observed by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) in 2005 and then in 2006. This cloud, confined beyond the latitude 62 Degree-Sign N, is surrounded by a mixture of aerosol and mist probably lying in the low stratosphere and troposphere. Subsequent images of this region of Titan show a gradual vanishing of this cloud which was reported previously. In this paper, we characterize the physical properties of this cloud, haze, and mist as well as their time evolutions. We note several details on the images such as a secondary cloud above the main cloud and latitudes beyond 70 Degree-Sign N. We also show that the cloud disappearance leaves the polar region poorly loaded in aerosols, yielding an annular zone of aerosols between 50 Degree-Sign N and 65 Degree-Sign N. Our analysis suggests that this structure observed by VIMS in the near-IR is an annular structure observed by ISS on board Voyager one Titan year ago in 1980.

  14. A human homologue of the Drosophila polarity gene frizzled has been identified and mapped to 17q21.1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.; Lee, C.C.; Baldini, A.

    1995-05-20

    The frizzled (fz) locus in Drosophila is required for the transmission of polarity signals across the plasma membrane in epidermal cells, as well as to their neighboring cells in the developing wing. The identification of a tissue polarity gene from the fz locus in Drosophila melanogaster has been reported. The fz gene encodes a protein (Fz) with seven putative transmembrane domains, which was suggested to function as a G-protein-coupled receptor. Here the authors report the identification of a human homologue for the fz gene (FZD2). The FZD2 gene was isolated from a human ovarian cDNA library and mapped to 17q21.1 by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a corresponding cosmid. The full-length cDNA of human FZD2 encodes a protein (FZD-2) of 565 amino acids that shares 56% sequence identity with Drosophila Fz. The expression of