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Sample records for cme activity cluster

  1. CME Productivity of Active Regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J.; Shen, C.; Ye, P.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, R.; Wang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are the major sources of two kinds of the most violent solar eruptions, namely flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Although they are believed to be two phenomena in the same eruptive process, the productivity of them could be quiet different for various ARs. Why is an AR productive? And why is a flare-rich AR CME-poor? To answer these questions, we compared the recent super flare-rich but CME-poor AR 12192, with other four ARs; two were productive in both flares and CMEs and the other two were inert to produce any M-class or intenser flares or CMEs. By investigating the photospheric parameters based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram, we find the three productive ARs have larger magnetic flux, current and free magnetic energy than the inert ARs. Furthermore, the two ARs productive in both flares and CMEs contain higher current helicity, concentrating along both sides of the flaring neutral lines, indicating the presence of a seed magnetic structure( that is highly sheared or twisted) of a CME; they also have higher decay index in the low corona, showing weak constraint. The results suggest that productive ARs are always large and have strong current system and sufficient free energy to power flares, and more importantly whether or not a flare is accompanied by a CME is seemingly related to (1) if there is significant sheared or twisted core field serving as the seed of the CME and (2) if the constraint of the overlying arcades is weak enough. Moreover, some productive ARs may frequently produce more than one CME. How does this happen? We do a statistical investigation of waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs ( CME ssuccessive originating from the same ARs within short intervals) from super ARs in solar cycle 23 to answer this question. The waiting times of quasi-homologous CMEs have a two-component distribution with a separation at about 18 hours, the first component peaks at 7 hours. The correlation analysis among CME waiting times

  2. Prediction of Active-Region CME Productivity from Magnetograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We report results of an expanded evaluation of whole-active-region magnetic measures as predictors of active-region coronal mass ejection (CME) productivity. Previously, in a sample of 17 vector magnetograms of 12 bipolar active regions observed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph, from each magnetogram we extracted a measure of the size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux a) and four measures of the nonpotentiality of the active region: the strong-shear length L(sub SS), the strong-gradient length L(sub SG), the net vertical electric current I(sub N), and the net-current magnetic twist parameter alpha (sub IN). This sample size allowed us to show that each of the four nonpotentiality measures was statistically significantly correlated with active-region CME productivity in time windows of a few days centered on the day of the magnetogram. We have now added a fifth measure of active-region nonpotentiality (the best-constant-alpha magnetic twist parameter (alpha sub BC)), and have expanded the sample to 36 MSFC vector magnetograms of 31 bipolar active regions. This larger sample allows us to demonstrate statistically significant correlations of each of the five nonpotentiality measures with future CME productivity, in time windows of a few days starting from the day of the magnetogram. The two magnetic twist parameters (alpha (sub 1N) and alpha (sub BC)) are normalized measures of an active region s nonpotentially in that they do not depend directly on the size of the active region, while the other three nonpotentiality measures (L(sub SS), L(sub SG), and I(sub N)) are non-normalized measures in that they do depend directly on active-region size. We find (1) Each of the five nonpotentiality measures is statistically significantly correlated (correlation confidence level greater than 95%) with future CME productivity and has a CME prediction success rate of approximately 80%. (2) None of the nonpotentiality

  3. Evolution of two Flaring Active Regions With CME Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2008-12-01

    We study the coronal magnetic field structure of two active regions, one during solar activity minimum (June 2007) and another one during a more active time (January 2004). The temporal evolution was explored with the help of nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolations of SOLIS/VSM and NAOJ/SFT photospheric vector magnetograms. We study the active region NOAA 10960 observed on 2007 June 7 with three SOLIS/VSM snapshots taken during a small C1.0 flare of time cadence 10 minutes and six snapshots during a quiet period. The total magnetic energy in the active region was approximately 3 × 1025 J. Before the flare the free magnetic energy was about 5~% of the potential field energy. A part of this excess energy was released during the flare, producing almost a potential configuration at the beginning of the quiet period. The return to an almost potential structure can be assigned to a CME as recorded by the SoHO/LASCO instrument on 2007 June 07 around 10 minutes after the flare peaked, so that whatever magnetic helicity was bodily removed from the structure. This was compared with active region 10540 observed on 2004 January 18 -- 21, which was analyzed with the help of vector magnetograph data from the Solar Flare Telescope in Japan of time cadence of about 1 day. The free energy was Efree≈ 66~% of the total energy which was sufficiently high to power a M6.1 flare on January 20, which was associated with a CME 20 minutes later. The activity of AR 10540 was significantly higher than for AR 10960, as was the total magnetic energy. Furthermore, we found the common feature that magnetic energy accumulates before the flare/CME and a significant part of the excess energy is released during the eruption.

  4. Haze activity of different barley trypsin inhibitors of the chloroform/methanol type (BTI-CMe).

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingzhen; Huang, Lu; Huang, Yuqing; Wu, Dezhi; Hu, Hongliang; Li, Chengdao; Zhang, Guoping

    2014-12-15

    Our previous study found that the critical protein in SE (silica eluted) proteins is BTI-CMe, and assumed that SE-ve malt for brewing may improve the haze stability in beer. In this study, we investigated the difference in gene sequence and corresponding amino acid sequence of BTI-CMe between SE+ve and SE-ve types. The results showed that there were 7 amino acid differences between Yerong (SE-ve) and Franklin (SE+ve). Two types BTI-CMe were expressed in vitro and purified successfully. By adding the purified BTI-CMe into commercial beer, we found that both original turbidity and alcohol chill haze degree of beer were increased. BTI-CMe of SE-ve haplotype showed a lower level of haze formation in beer than SE+ve haplotype. Response surface methodology (RSM) was conducted to determine the relationship between BTI-CMe and tannic acid, and their effects on haze formation. It was found that (1) higher content of BTI-CMe and/or tannic acid in beer would give rise to higher turbidity; (2) there was a significant interaction between BTI-CMe and tannic acid; (3) haze activity disparity of BTI-CMe between two types was significantly and positively correlated with the tannic acid concentration.

  5. Suppression of Active-Region CME Production by the Presence of Other Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser; Khazanov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    From the SOHO mission s data base of MDI full-disk magnetograms spanning solar cycle 23, we have obtained a set of 40,000 magnetograms of 1,300 active regions, tracking each active region across the 30 degree central solar disk. Each active region magnetogram is cropped from the full-disk magnetogram by an automated code. The cadence is 96 minutes. From each active-region magnetogram, we have measured two whole-active-region magnetic quantities: (1) the magnetic size of the active region (the active region s total magnetic flux), and (2) a gauge of the active region s free magnetic energy (part of the free energy is released in the production of a flare and/or CME eruption). From NOAA Flare/CME catalogs, we have obtained the event (Flare/CME/SEP event) production history of each active region. Using all these data, we find that for each type of eruptive event, an active region s expected rate of event production increases as a power law of our gauge of active-region free magnetic energy. We have also found that, among active regions having nearly the same free energy, the rate of the CME production is less when there are many other active regions on the disk than when there are few or none, but there is no significant discernible suppression of the rate of flare production. This indicates that the presence of other active regions somehow tends to inhibit an active region s flare-producing magnetic explosions from becoming CMEs, contrary to the expectation from the breakout model for the production of CMEs.

  6. Treatment of Viscosity in the Shock Waves Observed After Two Consecutive Coronal Mass Ejection Activities CME08/03/2012 and CME15/03/2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavus, Huseyin

    2016-07-01

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) is one of the most the powerful activities of the Sun. There is a possibility to produce shocks in the interplanetary medium after CMEs. Shock waves can be observed when the solar wind changes its velocity from being supersonic nature to being subsonic nature. The investigations of such activities have a central place in space weather purposes, since; the interaction of shocks with viscosity is one of the most important problems in the supersonic and compressible gas flow regime (Blazek in Computational fluid dynamics: principles and applications. Elsevier, Amsterdam 2001). The main aim of present work is to achieve a search for the viscosity effects in the shocks occurred after two consecutive coronal mass ejection activities in 2012 (i.e. CME08/03/2012 and CME15/03/2012).

  7. Why is a Flare-rich Active Region CME-poor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijuan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Jingxiu; Shen, Chenglong; Ye, Pinzhong; Liu, Rui; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Quanhao; Wang, S.

    2016-08-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are the major sources of two of the most violent solar eruptions, namely flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The largest AR in the past 24 years, NOAA AR 12192, which crossed the visible disk from 2014 October 17 to 30, unusually produced more than one hundred flares, including 32 M-class and 6 X-class ones, but only one small CME. Flares and CMEs are believed to be two phenomena in the same eruptive process. Why is such a flare-rich AR so CME-poor? We compared this AR with other four ARs; two were productive in both and two were inert. The investigation of the photospheric parameters based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram reveals that the flare-rich AR 12192, as with the other two productive ARs, has larger magnetic flux, current, and free magnetic energy than the two inert ARs but, in contrast to the two productive ARs, it has no strong, concentrated current helicity along both sides of the flaring neutral line, indicating the absence of a mature magnetic structure consisting of highly sheared or twisted field lines. Furthermore, the decay index above the AR 12192 is relatively low, showing strong constraint. These results suggest that productive ARs are always large and have enough current and free energy to power flares, but whether or not a flare is accompanied by a CME is seemingly related to (1) the presence of a mature sheared or twisted core field serving as the seed of the CME, or (2) a weak enough constraint of the overlying arcades.

  8. Why Is the Great Solar Active Region 12192 Flare-rich but CME-poor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Bobra, Monica G.; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu, Yang; Li, Yan; Shen, Chenglong; Couvidat, Sebastien; Norton, Aimee A.; Fisher, George H.

    2015-05-01

    Solar active region (AR) 12192 of 2014 October hosts the largest sunspot group in 24 years. It is the most prolific flaring site of Cycle 24 so far, but surprisingly produced no coronal mass ejection (CME) from the core region during its disk passage. Here, we study the magnetic conditions that prevented eruption and the consequences that ensued. We find AR 12192 to be “big but mild” its core region exhibits weaker non-potentiality, stronger overlying field, and smaller flare-related field changes compared to two other major flare-CME-productive ARs (11429 and 11158). These differences are present in the intensive-type indices (e.g., means) but generally not the extensive ones (e.g., totals). AR 12192's large amount of magnetic free energy does not translate into CME productivity. The unexpected behavior suggests that AR eruptiveness is limited by some relative measure of magnetic non-potentiality over the restriction of background field, and that confined flares may leave weaker photospheric and coronal imprints compared to their eruptive counterparts.

  9. Why Is the Great Solar Active Region 12192 CME-Poor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Bobra, Monica G.; Hoeksema, Todd; Liu, Yang; Li, Yan; Shen, Chenglong; Couvidat, Sebastien; Norton, Aimee A.; Fisher, George H.

    2015-04-01

    Solar active region (AR) 12192 of October 2014 hosts the largest sunspot group in 24 years. It is the most prolific flaring site of Cycle 24, but surprisingly produced no coronal mass ejection (CME) from the core region during its disk passage. Here, we study the magnetic conditions that prevented eruption and the consequences that ensued. We find AR 12192 to be "big but mild"; its core region exhibits weaker non-potentiality, stronger overlying field, and smaller flare-related field changes compared to two other major flare-CME-productive ARs (11429 and 11158). These differences are present in the intensive-type indices (e.g., means) but generally not the extensive ones (e.g., totals). AR 12192's large amount of magnetic free energy does not translate into CME productivity. The unexpected behavior suggests that AR eruptiveness is limited by some relative measure of magnetic non-potentiality over the restriction of background field, and that confined flares may leave weaker photospheric and coronal imprints compared to their eruptive counterparts.

  10. WHY IS THE GREAT SOLAR ACTIVE REGION 12192 FLARE-RICH BUT CME-POOR?

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xudong; Bobra, Monica G.; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu, Yang; Couvidat, Sebastien; Norton, Aimee A.; Li, Yan; Fisher, George H.; Shen, Chenglong

    2015-05-10

    Solar active region (AR) 12192 of 2014 October hosts the largest sunspot group in 24 years. It is the most prolific flaring site of Cycle 24 so far, but surprisingly produced no coronal mass ejection (CME) from the core region during its disk passage. Here, we study the magnetic conditions that prevented eruption and the consequences that ensued. We find AR 12192 to be “big but mild”; its core region exhibits weaker non-potentiality, stronger overlying field, and smaller flare-related field changes compared to two other major flare-CME-productive ARs (11429 and 11158). These differences are present in the intensive-type indices (e.g., means) but generally not the extensive ones (e.g., totals). AR 12192's large amount of magnetic free energy does not translate into CME productivity. The unexpected behavior suggests that AR eruptiveness is limited by some relative measure of magnetic non-potentiality over the restriction of background field, and that confined flares may leave weaker photospheric and coronal imprints compared to their eruptive counterparts.

  11. Solar Back-sided Halo CME

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Sun erupted with several CMEs (coronal mass ejections) during a period just over a day (Nov. 8-9, 2012), the largest of which was a halo CME. This CME appears to have originated from an active ...

  12. Photospheric Vector Magnetic Field Evolution of NOAA Active Region 11504 and the Ensuing CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Alexander; Green, Lucie; Valori, Gherardo; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Baker, Deborah; Brooks, David; Palmerio, Erika

    2016-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are eruptions of billions of tonnes of plasma from the Sun that drive the most severe space weather effects we observe. In order to be able to produce forecasts of space weather with lead times of the order of days, accurate predictions of the occurrence of CMEs must be developed. The eruptive active-region studied in this work (NOAA 11504) is complex, featuring fragmentation of penumbral magnetic field in the days prior to eruption, as well as rotation of the leading sunspot. SDO/HMI vector photospheric magnetic field measurements are utilised alongside SDO/AIA multi-wavelength extreme ultra-violet (EUV) observations to study the dynamics of the photospheric and coronal structures, as well as Hinode/EIS spectroscopic measurements, including elemental composition data. The EUV data show flare ribbons as well as coronal dimmings, which are used to infer the orientation of the erupting flux rope. This flux rope orientation is then compared to in situ measurements of the flux rope. The vector magnetic field data is used to determine the possible contributions the field fragmentation and sunspot rotation may have made to the formation of the flux rope and the triggering of the CME.

  13. Real-Time CME Forecasting Using HMI Active-Region Magnetograms and Flare History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2011-01-01

    We have recently developed a method of predicting an active region s probability of producing a CME, an X-class Flare, an M-class Flare, or a Solar Energetic Particle Event from a free-energy proxy measured from SOHO/MDI line-of-sight magnetograms. This year we have added three major improvements to our forecast tool: 1) Transition from MDI magnetogram to SDO/HMI magnetogram allowing us near-real-time forecasts, 2) Automation of acquisition and measurement of HMI magnetograms giving us near-real-time forecasts (no older than 2 hours), and 3) Determination of how to improve forecast by using the active region s previous flare history in combination with its free-energy proxy. HMI was turned on in May 2010 and MDI was turned off in April 2011. Using the overlap period, we have calibrated HMI to yield what MDI would measure. This is important since the value of the free-energy proxy used for our forecast is resolution dependent, and the forecasts are made from results of a 1996-2004 database of MDI observations. With near-real-time magnetograms from HMI, near-real-time forecasts are now possible. We have augmented the code so that it continually acquires and measures new magnetograms as they become available online, and updates the whole-sun forecast from the coming day. The next planned improvement is to use an active region s previous flare history, in conjunction with its free-energy proxy, to forecast the active region s event rate. It has long been known that active regions that have produced flares in the past are likely to produce flares in the future, and that active regions that are nonpotential (have large free-energy) are more likely to produce flares in the future. This year we have determined that persistence of flaring is not just a reflection of an active region s free energy. In other words, after controlling for free energy, we have found that active regions that have flared recently are more likely to flare in the future.

  14. Use of Yohkoh SXT in Measuring the Net Current and CME Productivity of Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In our investigation of the correlation of global nonpotentiality of active regions to their CME productivity (Falconer, D.A. 2001, JGR, in press, and Falconer, Moore, & Gary, 2000, EOS 82, 20 S323), we use Yohkoh SXT images for two purposes. The first use is to help resolve the 180 degree ambiguity in the direction of the observed transverse magnetic field. Resolution of the 180 degree ambiguity is important, since the net current, one of our measures of global nonpotentiality, is derived from integrating the dot product of the transverse field around a contour (I(sub N)=(integral)BT(raised dot)dl). The ambiguity results from the observed transverse field being determined from the linear polarization, which gives the plane of the direction, but leaves a 180 degrees ambiguity. Automated methods to resolve the ambiguity ranging from the simple acute angle rule (Falconer, D.A. 2001) to the more sophisticated annealing method (Metcalf T.R. 1994). For many active regions, especially ones that are nearly potential these methods work well. But for very nonpotential active regions where the shear angle (the angle between the observed and potential transverse field) is near 90 degrees throughout large swaths along the main neutral line, both methods can resolve the ambiguity incorrectly for long segments of the neutral line. By determining from coronal images, such as those from Yohkoh/SXT, the sense of shear along the main neutral line in the active region, these cases can be identified and corrected by a modification of the acute angle rule described here. The second use of Yohkoh/SXT in this study is to check for the cusped coronal arcades of long-duration eruptive flares. This signature is an excellent proxy for CMEs, and was used by Canfield, Hudson, and McKenzie (1999 GRL V26, 6, 627-630). This work is funded by NSF through the Space Weather Program and by NASA through the Solar Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program.

  15. Correlation of the CME Productivity of Solar Active Regions with Measures of their Global Nonpotentiality from Vector Magnetograms: Baseline Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ron L.; Gary, G. Allen; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    From conventional magnetograms and chromospheric and coronal images, it is known qualitatively that the fastest coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are magnetic explosions from sunspot active regions in which the magnetic field is globally strongly sheared and twisted from its minimum-energy potential configuration. In this paper, we present measurements from active-region vector magnetograms that begin to quantify the dependence of the CME productivity of an active region on the global nonpotentiality of its magnetic field. From each of 17 magnetograms of 12 bipolar active regions, we obtain a measure of the size of the active region (the magnetic flux content, phi) and three different measures of the global nonpotentiality (L(sub SS), the length of strong-shear, strong-field main neutral line; I(sub N), the net electric current arching from one polarity to the other; and alpha = muI(subN/phi), a flux-normalized measure of the field twist).

  16. Coronal mass ejection (CME) activity of low mass M stars as an important factor for the habitability of terrestrial exoplanets. I. CME impact on expected magnetospheres of Earth-like exoplanets in close-in habitable zones.

    PubMed

    Khodachenko, Maxim L; Ribas, Ignasi; Lammer, Helmut; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Leitner, Martin; Selsis, Franck; Eiroa, Carlos; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Biernat, Helfried K; Farrugia, Charles J; Rucker, Helmut O

    2007-02-01

    Low mass M- and K-type stars are much more numerous in the solar neighborhood than solar-like G-type stars. Therefore, some of them may appear as interesting candidates for the target star lists of terrestrial exoplanet (i.e., planets with mass, radius, and internal parameters identical to Earth) search programs like Darwin (ESA) or the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph/Inferometer (NASA). The higher level of stellar activity of low mass M stars, as compared to solar-like G stars, as well as the closer orbital distances of their habitable zones (HZs), means that terrestrial-type exoplanets within HZs of these stars are more influenced by stellar activity than one would expect for a planet in an HZ of a solar-like star. Here we examine the influences of stellar coronal mass ejection (CME) activity on planetary environments and the role CMEs may play in the definition of habitability criterion for the terrestrial type exoplanets near M stars. We pay attention to the fact that exoplanets within HZs that are in close proximity to low mass M stars may become tidally locked, which, in turn, can result in relatively weak intrinsic planetary magnetic moments. Taking into account existing observational data and models that involve the Sun and related hypothetical parameters of extrasolar CMEs (density, velocity, size, and occurrence rate), we show that Earth-like exoplanets within close-in HZs should experience a continuous CME exposure over long periods of time. This fact, together with small magnetic moments of tidally locked exoplanets, may result in little or no magnetospheric protection of planetary atmospheres from a dense flow of CME plasma. Magnetospheric standoff distances of weakly magnetized Earth-like exoplanets at orbital distances

  17. Coronal mass ejection (CME) activity of low mass M stars as an important factor for the habitability of terrestrial exoplanets. II. CME-induced ion pick up of Earth-like exoplanets in close-in habitable zones.

    PubMed

    Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Kulikov, Yuri N; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Terada, N; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Biernat, Helfried K; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Ribas, Ignasi; Penz, Thomas; Selsis, Franck

    2007-02-01

    Atmospheric erosion of CO2-rich Earth-size exoplanets due to coronal mass ejection (CME)-induced ion pick up within close-in habitable zones of active M-type dwarf stars is investigated. Since M stars are active at the X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) wave-lengths over long periods of time, we have applied a thermal balance model at various XUV flux input values for simulating the thermospheric heating by photodissociation and ionization processes due to exothermic chemical reactions and cooling by the CO2 infrared radiation in the 15 microm band. Our study shows that intense XUV radiation of active M stars results in atmospheric expansion and extended exospheres. Using thermospheric neutral and ion densities calculated for various XUV fluxes, we applied a numerical test particle model for simulation of atmospheric ion pick up loss from an extended exosphere arising from its interaction with expected minimum and maximum CME plasma flows. Our results indicate that the Earth-like exoplanets that have no, or weak, magnetic moments may lose tens to hundreds of bars of atmospheric pressure, or even their whole atmospheres due to the CME-induced O ion pick up at orbital distances CME plasma erosion. Therefore, we suggest that larger and more massive terrestrial-type exoplanets may better protect their

  18. Assessment of Barriers to Changing Practice as CME Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, David W.; Miller, Elaine K.; Rahm, Alanna Kulchak; Brace, Nancy E.; Larson, R. Sam

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing medical education (CME) is meant to drive and support improvements in practice. To achieve this goal, CME activities must move beyond simply purveying knowledge, instead helping attendees to contextualize information and to develop strategies for implementing new learning. CME attendees face different barriers to…

  19. Improved Cardiovascular Prevention Using Best CME Practices: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laprise, Rejean; Thivierge, Robert; Gosselin, Gilbert; Bujas-Bobanovic, Maja; Vandal, Sylvie; Paquette, Daniel; Luneau, Micheline; Julien, Pierre; Goulet, Serge; Desaulniers, Jean; Maltais, Paule

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: It was hypothesized that after a continuing medical education (CME) event, practice enablers and reinforcers addressing main clinical barriers to preventive care would be more effective in improving general practitioners' (GPs) adherence to cardiovascular guidelines than a CME event only. Methods: A cluster-randomized trial was…

  20. CME - Coming At You

    NASA Video Gallery

    An oldie but goody: The September 12, 2000 coronal mass ejection (CME), which moves directly from the sun's surface toward the viewer. This was recorded by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (S...

  1. 24-Hour Forecasting of CME/Flare Eruptions from Active-Region Magnetograms (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Barghouty, A.; Khazanov, I. G.; Moore, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed an automated tool for forecasting severe space weather from full-disk magnetograms. This tool is now being used on a trial basis by NASA’s Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) at JSC. SRAG is responsible for the monitoring and forecasting of exposure the astronauts to particle radiation. The tool is described in Falconer, Barghouty, Khazanov, and Moore (2010), submitted to Space Weather. The new software tool is designed for the empirical forecasting of M- and X-class flares, coronal mass ejections, and solar energetic particle events. For each of these event types, the algorithm is based on the empirical relationship between the event rate and a proxy of the active region’s free magnetic energy. The relationship is determined from ~40,000 active-region magnetograms from ~1,300 active regions that were observed within 30 heliographic degrees from disk center by SOHO/MDI, and that have known histories of flare, coronal mass ejection, and solar energetic particle event production during disk passage. The tool automatically extracts each strong-field magnetic areas from an MDI full-disk magnetogram, identifies each as a NOAA active region, and measures the proxy of the active region’s free magnetic energy from the extracted magnetogram. For each active region, the empirical relationship is then used to convert the free magnetic energy proxy into the active region’s expected event rate (see figure). The expected event rate in turn can be readily converted into the probability that the active region will produce such an event in a given forward time window. We can make this tool applicable to the full-disk line-of-sight magnetograms from SDO/HMI or as a backup, from NSO/GONG. By empirically determining the conversion of the value of free-energy proxy measured from an HMI magnetogram to that which would be measured from an MDI magnetogram, we can use the HMI magnetograms with the empirical relationships determined from our MDI data base to make

  2. The characteristic analysis of an active region producing a number of CME's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Z. G.; Wang, M.; Zhang, B. R.; Yan, Y. H.

    2001-11-01

    There are 6 successive major burst events in the AR 8210 on the solar disk during April and May, 1998.The data are collected for this active region including the observation on soft X ray, UV, type II and IV radio bursts and radio-heliograph. It is found the energy accumulation process is fast and there is similarity among the time profile of the 3 SXR bursts. When CMEs are there on the disk, the magnetic loop opens only partially and soon contracts into closed. The loop is then reheated through bombarding by non-thermal electrons and produces strong X ray bursts, radio types II and IV bursts. The frail part of the loop just like a volcanic crater from where bursts could be taking place again and again. The turning point between a non-thermal process and a thermal process may be found from investigating the time profiles of SXR on which it displays as an catastrophe point of the slope. Furthermore the existence of type III bursts could be a corresponding signature. The appearance of type II radio bursts coming from the different coronal layers can be a convincing evidence for the occurring of CMEs and a criterion for judging the speed of CMEs' motion.

  3. Active matter clusters at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development and flocks of birds. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit whose movement depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed clusters which exert forces but no active torques, encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds and clusters with active torques, they show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times, becoming trapped at the interface and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection of the low velocity clusters. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  4. Active matter clusters at interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development, cancerous cells during tumor formation and metastasis, colonies of bacteria in a biofilm, or even flocks of birds and schools of fish at the macro-scale. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit that moves in two dimensions by exerting a force/torque per unit area whose magnitude depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed (overdamped) clusters encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds (underdamped), where inertia dominates, the clusters show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection for the low velocity clusters. We then present an extreme limit of the model in the absence of rotational damping where clusters can become stuck spiraling along the interface or move in large circular trajectories after leaving the interface. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  5. Getting Under a CME's Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Koning, C. A.

    2014-05-01

    We present a new reconstruction technique for investigating the internal and global structure of a coronal mass ejection (CME). This technique, which we call CME Hull&Innards from Polarimetric Imaging (CHI-PI or χ-π), uses Thomson-scattered polarization measurements to locate CME structures in three-dimensional space, along with total brightness measurements to characterize the mass distribution of these structures. We apply χ-π reconstruction to the CME of 2008 December 12. Preliminary results clearly indicate sub-structure within the CME. There is also evidence for a lower-density cavity that may be associated with the CME's internal magnetic field.

  6. The CME Flare Arcade and the Width of the CME in the Outer Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007, ApJ, 668, 1221) present evidence that (1) a CME is typically a magnetic bubble, a low-beta gplasmoid with legs h having roughly the 3D shape of a light bulb, and (2) in the outer corona the CME plasmoid is in lateral pressure equilibrium with the ambient magnetic field. They present three CMEs observed by SOHO/LASCO, each from a very different source located near the limb. One of these CMEs came from a compact ejective eruption from a small part of a sunspot active region, another came from a large quiet-region filament eruption, and the third CME, an extremely large and fast one, was produced in tandem with an X20 flare arcade that was centered on a huge delta sunspot. Each of these CMEs had more or less the classic lightbulb silhouette and attained a constant heliocentric angular width in the outer corona. This indicates that the CME plasmoid attained lateral magnetic pressure balance with the ambient radial magnetic field in the outer corona. This lateral pressure balance, together with the standard scenario for CME production by the eruption of a sheared-core magnetic arcade, yields the following simple estimate of the strength B(sub Flare) of the magnetic field in the flare arcade produced together with the CME: B(sub Flare) 1.4(theta CME/theta Flare)sup 2 G, where theta (sub CME) is the heliocentric angular width of the CME plasmoid in the outer corona and theta (sub Flare) is the heliocentric angular width of the full-grown flare arcade. Conversely, theta (sub CME) approximately equal to (R(sub Sun)sup -1(phi(sub Flare)/1.4)sup 1/2 radians, where Flare is the magnetic flux covered by the full-grown flare arcade. In addition to presenting the three CMEs of Moore, Sterling, & Suess (2007) and their agreement with this relation between CME and Flare, we present a further empirical test of this relation. For CMEs that erupt from active regions, the co-produced flare arcade seldom if ever covers the entire active region: if AR is

  7. 01.22.12: SOHO's View of Earth-directed CME

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory captured the coronal mass ejection (CME) in this video (which shows the sun's activity from January 19 to January 23). The CME is associate with an M8.7 class sol...

  8. Characteristics That Predict Physician Participation in a Web-Based CME Activity: The MI-Plus Study

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, Michael J.; Tipton, Edmond F.; Houston, Thomas K.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Levine, Deborah A.; Estrada, Carlos A.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Williams, O. Dale; Kiefe, Catarina I.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Physician use of the Internet for practice improvement has increased dramatically over the last decade, but research shows that many physicians choose not to participate. The current study investigated the association of specific physician characteristics with enrollment rates and intensity of participation in a specific Internet-delivered educational intervention to improve care to post–myocardial infarction (MI) patients. Methods Primary-care physicians were recruited for participation in a randomized controlled trial designed to compare effectiveness of an intervention Web site versus a control Web site in the management of adult chronic disease. Physicians were informed that the intervention focused on ambulatory post–myocardial infarction patients. Physician characteristics were obtained from a commercial vendor with data merged from the American Medical Association and Alabama State Licensing Board. Enrollment and Web use were tracked electronically. Results Out of a sample of 1337 eligible physicians, 177 (13.2%) enrolled in the study. Enrollment was higher for physicians with more post-MI patients (≥20 vs < 20 patients, 15.3% vs 9.3%, P = .002) and for those practicing in rural compared to urban areas (16.3% vs 12.1%, P = .046). Intensity of use of the Internet courses after initial enrollment was not predicted by physician characteristics in the current sample. Discussion Physicians with more post-MI patients and rural practice location were found to predict enrollment in an Internet-delivered continuing medical education (CME) intervention designed to improve care for post-MI patients. These factors predicted program interest but not program use. More research is needed to replicate these findings to investigate variables that determine physician engagement in Internet CME. PMID:19998447

  9. Active constrained clustering by examining spectral Eigenvectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; desJardins, Marie; Xu, Qianjun

    2005-01-01

    This work focuses on the active selection of pairwise constraints for spectral clustering. We develop and analyze a technique for Active Constrained Clustering by Examining Spectral eigenvectorS (ACCESS) derived from a similarity matrix.

  10. On Flare and CME Predictability Based on Sunspot Group Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsós, M. B.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    We propose to apply the weighted horizontal magnetic gradient (WGM), introduced in Korsós et al. (2015), for analysing the pre-flare and pre-CME behaviour and evolution of Active Regions (ARs) using the SDO/HMI-Debrecen Data catalogue. To demonstrate the power of investigative capabilities of the WGM method in terms of flare/CME eruptions, we show the results of studying three typical active regions, namely, AR11818, AR12017 and AR11495. The choice of ARs represent typical cases of flaring with a fast CME, flare eruption without a CME and non-flaring cases, respectively. AR11818 produced an M1.4 energetic flare with a fast "halo" CME (vlinear=1202 km/s) while in AR12017 occurred an X1.0 flare without a CME. The AR11495 is a good example for non-flaring ARs. The value and temporal variation of WGM is found to possess potentially important diagnostic information about the intensity of expected flares. However, this test turns out not only to provide information about the intensity of expected flares but may also show whether a flare will occur with/without a fast CME.

  11. CME impact on comet 67P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, Niklas J. T.; Andrews, David J.; Burch, Jim L.; Carr, Christopher M.; Cupido, Emanuele; Eriksson, Anders I.; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Goldstein, Ray; Henri, Pierre; Koenders, Christoph; Mandt, Kathy; Nilsson, Hans; Odelstad, Elias; Stenberg Wieser, Gabriella; Vigren, Erik

    2016-04-01

    We present observations from the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) of an impact of a coronal mass ejection (CMEs) on comet 67P. The CME impacted during a dayside excursion in early October 2015 when Rosetta slowly moved from a distance of ~300 km to 1500 km from the comet nucleus. Although this was still deep down in the cometary coma, the CME impact caused a significant disturbance to the plasma environment. As the CME impacted, the magnetic field strength increased to reach a maximum of 250 nT, which is the highest magnetic field strength ever observed at 67P. Lots of magnetic field oscillations and increased fluxes of energized (~100 eV) electrons and ions were observed concurrently, and the ionospheric low-energy plasma density increased by roughly one order of magnitude. An interesting phenomenon that could occur during a CME impact is a so-called tail disconnection event, when magnetic reconnection, either on the dayside of the comet or in the tail, causes a large fraction of the tail to be disconnected from the comet. Rosetta, being relatively close to the nucleus, can at best directly observe signatures of dayside reconnection when draped interplanetary magnetic fields of different polarities convects through the plasma environment and reconnects at the location of Rosetta. Rosetta cannot directly observe any tail-side disconnection event due to the orbit constraints. However, signatures of such events might resemble substorm effects in the terrestrial ionosphere with increased wave activity, increased ionization, energization of electrons and possibly ions. We discuss the RPC measurements during the October CME in this context and try to determine if a tail disconnection event could have occurred at this time.

  12. Distinctive activation and functionalization of hydrocarbon C-H bonds initiated by Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl)(CH2CMe3) complexes.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Rhett A; Legzdins, Peter

    2014-02-18

    Converting hydrocarbon feedstocks into value-added chemicals continues to offer challenges to contemporary preparative chemists. A particularly important remaining challenge is the selective activation and functionalization of the C(sp(3))-H linkages of alkanes, which are relatively abundant but chemically inert. This Account outlines the discovery and development of C-H bond functionalization mediated by a family of tungsten organometallic nitrosyl complexes. Specifically, it describes how gentle thermolyses of any of four 18-electron Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl)(CH2CMe3) complexes (Cp* = η(5)-C5Me5; η(3)-allyl = η(3)-H2CCHCHMe, η(3)-H2CCHCHSiMe3, η(3)-H2CCHCHPh, or η(3)-H2CCHCMe2) results in the loss of neopentane and the transient formation of a 16-electron intermediate species, Cp*W(NO)(η(2)-allene) and/or Cp*W(NO)(η(2)-diene). We have never detected any of these species spectroscopically, but we infer their existence based on trapping experiments with trimethylphosphine (PMe3) and labeling experiments using deuterated hydrocarbon substrates. This Account first summarizes the syntheses and properties of the four chiral Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl)(CH2CMe3) complexes. It then outlines the various types of C-H activations we have effected with each of the 16-electron (η(2)-allene) or (η(2)-diene) intermediate nitrosyl complexes, and presents the results of mechanistic investigations of some of these processes. It next describes the characteristic chemical properties of the Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl)(η(1)-hydrocarbyl) compounds formed by the single activations of C(sp(3))-H bonds, with particular emphasis on those reactions that result in the selective functionalization of the original hydrocarbon substrate. We are continuing development of methods to release the acyl ligands from the metal centers while keeping the Cp*W(NO)(η(3)-allyl) fragments intact, with the ultimate aim of achieving these distinctive conversions of alkanes into functionalized organics in a

  13. The Role of Flares Cme's and CME Shocks in the Generation of Solar Energetic Proton Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Enríquez, R.; Mendoza, B.

    1995-09-01

    We examined solar energetic proton (SEP) events associated with intense Hα flares. We located these flares on the solar disk and obtained their distribution in heliographic longitude as well as their angular distance distribution with respect to the neutral lines corresponding to the heliospheric current sheet at 2.5R⊙. We found that the SEP-associated Hα flares tend to occur in active regions at the feet of those helmet streamers which form the heliomagnetic equator and are related to coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and CME shocks. We discuss the possible role of flares, CMEs and CME shocks in generating SEPs.

  14. Dual Repression of the Multidrug Efflux Pump CmeABC by CosR and CmeR in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Grinnage-Pulley, Tara; Mu, Yang; Dai, Lei; Zhang, Qijing

    2016-01-01

    During transmission and intestinal colonization, Campylobacter jejuni, a major foodborne human pathogen, experiences oxidative stress. CosR, a response regulator in C. jejuni, modulates the oxidative stress response and represses expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. CmeABC, a key component in resistance to toxic compounds including antimicrobials and bile salts, is also under negative regulation by CmeR, a TetR family transcriptional regulator. How CosR and CmeR interact in binding to the cmeABC promoter and how CosR senses oxidative stress are still unknown. To answer these questions, we conducted various experiments utilizing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and transcriptional fusion assays. CosR and CmeR bound independently to two separate sites of the cmeABC promoter, simultaneously repressing cmeABC expression. This dual binding of CosR and CmeR is optimal with a 17 base pair space between the two binding sites as mutations that shortened the distance between the binding sites decreased binding by CmeR and enhanced cmeABC expression. Additionally, the single cysteine residue (C218) of CosR was sensitive to oxidation, which altered the DNA-binding activity of CosR and dissociated CosR from the cmeABC promoter as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Replacement of C218 with serine rendered CosR insensitive to oxidation, suggesting a potential role of C218 in sensing oxidative stress and providing a possible mechanism for CosR-mediated response to oxidative stress. These findings reveal a dual regulatory role of CosR and CmeR in modulating cmeABC expression and suggest a potential mechanism that may explain overexpression of cmeABC in response to oxidative stress. Differential expression of cmeABC mediated by CmeR and CosR in response to different signals may facilitate adaptation of Campylobacter to various environmental conditions. PMID:27468281

  15. Dual Repression of the Multidrug Efflux Pump CmeABC by CosR and CmeR in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Grinnage-Pulley, Tara; Mu, Yang; Dai, Lei; Zhang, Qijing

    2016-01-01

    During transmission and intestinal colonization, Campylobacter jejuni, a major foodborne human pathogen, experiences oxidative stress. CosR, a response regulator in C. jejuni, modulates the oxidative stress response and represses expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. CmeABC, a key component in resistance to toxic compounds including antimicrobials and bile salts, is also under negative regulation by CmeR, a TetR family transcriptional regulator. How CosR and CmeR interact in binding to the cmeABC promoter and how CosR senses oxidative stress are still unknown. To answer these questions, we conducted various experiments utilizing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and transcriptional fusion assays. CosR and CmeR bound independently to two separate sites of the cmeABC promoter, simultaneously repressing cmeABC expression. This dual binding of CosR and CmeR is optimal with a 17 base pair space between the two binding sites as mutations that shortened the distance between the binding sites decreased binding by CmeR and enhanced cmeABC expression. Additionally, the single cysteine residue (C218) of CosR was sensitive to oxidation, which altered the DNA-binding activity of CosR and dissociated CosR from the cmeABC promoter as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Replacement of C218 with serine rendered CosR insensitive to oxidation, suggesting a potential role of C218 in sensing oxidative stress and providing a possible mechanism for CosR-mediated response to oxidative stress. These findings reveal a dual regulatory role of CosR and CmeR in modulating cmeABC expression and suggest a potential mechanism that may explain overexpression of cmeABC in response to oxidative stress. Differential expression of cmeABC mediated by CmeR and CosR in response to different signals may facilitate adaptation of Campylobacter to various environmental conditions.

  16. Dual Repression of the Multidrug Efflux Pump CmeABC by CosR and CmeR in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Grinnage-Pulley, Tara; Mu, Yang; Dai, Lei; Zhang, Qijing

    2016-01-01

    During transmission and intestinal colonization, Campylobacter jejuni, a major foodborne human pathogen, experiences oxidative stress. CosR, a response regulator in C. jejuni, modulates the oxidative stress response and represses expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. CmeABC, a key component in resistance to toxic compounds including antimicrobials and bile salts, is also under negative regulation by CmeR, a TetR family transcriptional regulator. How CosR and CmeR interact in binding to the cmeABC promoter and how CosR senses oxidative stress are still unknown. To answer these questions, we conducted various experiments utilizing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and transcriptional fusion assays. CosR and CmeR bound independently to two separate sites of the cmeABC promoter, simultaneously repressing cmeABC expression. This dual binding of CosR and CmeR is optimal with a 17 base pair space between the two binding sites as mutations that shortened the distance between the binding sites decreased binding by CmeR and enhanced cmeABC expression. Additionally, the single cysteine residue (C218) of CosR was sensitive to oxidation, which altered the DNA-binding activity of CosR and dissociated CosR from the cmeABC promoter as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Replacement of C218 with serine rendered CosR insensitive to oxidation, suggesting a potential role of C218 in sensing oxidative stress and providing a possible mechanism for CosR-mediated response to oxidative stress. These findings reveal a dual regulatory role of CosR and CmeR in modulating cmeABC expression and suggest a potential mechanism that may explain overexpression of cmeABC in response to oxidative stress. Differential expression of cmeABC mediated by CmeR and CosR in response to different signals may facilitate adaptation of Campylobacter to various environmental conditions. PMID:27468281

  17. Global Trends of CME Deflections Based on CME and Solar Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, C.; Opher, M.; Evans, R. M.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate space weather forecasting requires knowledge of the trajectory of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), including any deflections close to the Sun or through interplanetary space. Kay et al. introduced ForeCAT, a model of CME deflection resulting from the background solar magnetic field. For a magnetic field solution corresponding to Carrington Rotation (CR) 2029 (declining phase, 2005 April-May), the majority of the CMEs deflected to the Heliospheric Current Sheet, the minimum in magnetic pressure on global scales. Most of the deflection occurred below 4 {{R}⊙ }. Here we extend ForeCAT to include a three-dimensional description of the deflecting CME. We attempt to answer the following questions: (1) do all CMEs deflect to the magnetic minimum? and (2) does most deflection occur within the first few solar radii (4 {{R}⊙ })? Results for solar minimum and declining-phase CMEs show that not every CME deflects to the magnetic minimum and that typically the majority of the deflection occurs below 10 {{R}⊙ }. Slow, wide, low-mass CMEs in declining-phase solar backgrounds with strong magnetic field and magnetic gradients exhibit the largest deflections. Local gradients related to active regions tend to cause the largest deviations from the deflection predicted by global magnetic gradients, but variations can also be seen for CMEs in the quiet-Sun regions of the declining-phase CR. We show the torques due to differential forces along the CME can cause rotation about the CME’s toroidal axis.

  18. Cluster Wideband Data Products in the Cluster Active Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, J. S.; Seeberger, J. M.; Christopher, I. W.; Santolík, O.; Sigsbee, K. M.

    Cluster Wideband Data (WBD) plasma wave receivers are mounted on all four of the Cluster spacecraft providing approximately 4-7% orbit coverage since mission operations began in February 2001. Data obtained by the WBD instruments are downlinked in real time to various Deep Space Network (DSN) and Panska Ves (PV) ground stations. The strengths of the WBD instruments lie in their high time and frequency resolution data, which allow analysis of the wave fine structure in order to more accurately investigate the linear and nonlinear nature of the waves, and in their use in carrying out Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) investigations to locate and characterize remote wave sources and their characteristics. The WBD team has already archived at the Cluster Active Archive (CAA) the documentation, software and data plots required for carrying on an independent scientific investigation. A document on interpretation issues has also been archived to help ensure that signals which are not naturally in the plasma are not misinterpreted. The WBD team also plans to archive digital, calibrated data files for the entire mission in cdf format at NASA's CDAWeb and submit these files for conversion to the Cluster standard cef format and archiving at the CAA. In order to ensure that the calibration of the WBD data has been done properly, WBD has taken part in Cluster cross calibration activities with the other wave instruments with regard to wave amplitudes in the time and frequency domains and with the PEACE instruments with regard to low density measurements.

  19. Modelling of Solar Wind, CME Initiation and CME Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Holst, B.; Poedts, S.; Chané, E.; Jacobs, C.; Dubey, G.; Kimpe, D.

    2005-11-01

    Simulations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) evolving in the interplanetary (IP) space from the Sun up to 1 AU are performed in the framework of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) by the means of a finite-volume, explicit solver. The aim is to quantify the effect of the background solar wind and of the CME initiation parameters, such as the initial magnetic polarity, on the evolution and on the geo-effectiveness of CMEs. First, three different solar wind models are reconstructed using the same numerical grid and the same numerical scheme. Then, different CME initiation models are considered: Magnetic foot point shearing and magnetic flux emergence. For the fast CME evolution studies, a very simple CME model is considered: A high-density and high-pressure magnetized plasma blob is superposed on a background steady state solar wind model with an initial velocity and launch direction. The simulations show that the initial magnetic polarity substantially affects the IP evolution of the CMEs influencing the propagation velocity, the shape, the trajectory (and thus, the geo-effectiveness).

  20. Initiation and Eruption Process of Magnetic Flux Rope from Solar Active Region NOAA 11719 to Earth-directed CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemareddy, P.; Zhang, J.

    2014-12-01

    An eruption event launched from the solar active region (AR) NOAA 11719 is investigated based on coronal EUV observations and photospheric magnetic field measurements obtained from the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The AR consists of a filament channel originating from a major sunspot and its south section is associated with an inverse-S sigmoidal system as observed in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly passbands. We regard the sigmoid as the main body of the flux rope (FR). There also exists a twisted flux bundle crossing over this FR. This overlying flux bundle transforms in shape similar to kink-rise evolution, which corresponds with the rise motion of the FR. The emission measure and temperature along the FR exhibits an increasing trend with its rising motion, indicating reconnection in the thinning current sheet underneath the FR. Net magnetic flux of the AR, evaluated at north and south polarities, showed decreasing behavior whereas the net current in these fluxes exhibits an increasing trend. Because the negative (positive) flux has a dominant positive (negative) current, the chirality of AR flux system is likely negative (left handed) in order to be consistent with the chirality of inverse S-sigmoidal FR. This analysis of magnetic fields of the source AR suggests that the cancelling fluxes are prime factors of the monotonous twisting of the FR system, reaching to a critical state to trigger kink instability and rise motion. This rise motion may have led to the onset of the torus instability, resulting in an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection, and the progressive reconnection in the thinning current sheet beneath the rising FR led to the M6.5 flare.

  1. INITIATION AND ERUPTION PROCESS OF MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE FROM SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11719 TO EARTH-DIRECTED CME

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.; Zhang, J.

    2014-12-20

    An eruption event launched from the solar active region (AR) NOAA 11719 is investigated based on coronal EUV observations and photospheric magnetic field measurements obtained from the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The AR consists of a filament channel originating from a major sunspot and its south section is associated with an inverse-S sigmoidal system as observed in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly passbands. We regard the sigmoid as the main body of the flux rope (FR). There also exists a twisted flux bundle crossing over this FR. This overlying flux bundle transforms in shape similar to kink-rise evolution, which corresponds with the rise motion of the FR. The emission measure and temperature along the FR exhibits an increasing trend with its rising motion, indicating reconnection in the thinning current sheet underneath the FR. Net magnetic flux of the AR, evaluated at north and south polarities, showed decreasing behavior whereas the net current in these fluxes exhibits an increasing trend. Because the negative (positive) flux has a dominant positive (negative) current, the chirality of AR flux system is likely negative (left handed) in order to be consistent with the chirality of inverse S-sigmoidal FR. This analysis of magnetic fields of the source AR suggests that the cancelling fluxes are prime factors of the monotonous twisting of the FR system, reaching to a critical state to trigger kink instability and rise motion. This rise motion may have led to the onset of the torus instability, resulting in an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection, and the progressive reconnection in the thinning current sheet beneath the rising FR led to the M6.5 flare.

  2. The State of the Art in CME.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Robert K.

    1983-01-01

    The author describes major trends and directions related to continuing medical education (CME). The rapid changes he observed in the state of the art in CME are presented in relation to three historical periods in the past 16 years. (SSH)

  3. Cluster of solar active regions and onset of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, JingXiu; Zhang, YuZong; He, Han; Chen, AnQin; Jin, ChunLan; Zhou, GuiPing

    2015-09-01

    Abstract round-the-clock solar observations with full-disk coverage of vector magnetograms and multi-wavelength images demonstrate that solar active regions (ARs) are ultimately connected with magnetic field. Often two or more ARs are clustered, creating a favorable magnetic environment for the onset of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In this work, we describe a new type of magnetic complex: cluster of solar ARs. An AR cluster is referred to as the close connection of two or more ARs which are located in nearly the same latitude and a narrow span of longitude. We illustrate three examples of AR clusters, each of which has two ARs connected and formed a common dome of magnetic flux system. They are clusters of NOAA (i.e., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) ARs 11226 & 11227, 11429 & 11430, and 11525 & 11524. In these AR clusters, CME initiations were often tied to the instability of the magnetic structures connecting two partner ARs, in the form of inter-connecting loops and/or channeling filaments between the two ARs. We show the evidence that, at least, some of the flare/CMEs in an AR cluster are not a phenomenon of a single AR, but the result of magnetic interaction in the whole AR cluster. The observations shed new light on understanding the mechanism(s) of solar activity. Instead of the simple bipolar topology as suggested by the so-called standard flare model, a multi-bipolar magnetic topology is more common to host the violent solar activity in solar atmosphere.

  4. CME Prediction Using SDO, SoHO, and STEREO data with a Machine Learning Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobra, M.; Ilonidis, S.

    2015-12-01

    It is unclear whether a flaring active region will also produce a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). Usually, active regions that produce large flares will also produce a CME, but this is not always the case. For example, the largest active region from the last 24 years, NOAA Active Region 12192 of October 2014, produced many X-class flares but not a single CME. We attempt to forecast whether an active region that produces an M- or X-class flare will also produce a CME. We do this by analyzing data from three solar observatories -- SDO, STEREO, and SoHO -- using a machine-learning algorithm. We find that the role of horizontal component of the photospheric magnetic field plays a crucial component in driving a CME, a result corroborated by Sun et al. (2015). We present the success rate of our method and the potential applications to space weather forecasts.

  5. SPE in Solar Cycle 24 : Flare and CME characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neflia, Neflia

    SPE is one of the most severe hazards in the space environment. Such events, tend to occur during periods of intense solar activity, and can lead to high radiation doses in short time intervals. The proton enhancements produced by these solar events may last several days and are very hard to predict in advance and they also can cause harm to both satellite and human in space. The most significant sources of proton in the interplanetary medium are both solar flares and interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In this study, I try to find the characteristic of Flare and CME that can cause the proton events in interplanetary medium. For my preliminary study, I will search flare characteristic such as class and position as an SPE causes. I also did the research with CME characteristic such as Angular Width (AW) and linier velocity. During solar cycle 24, the solar activity remain very low with several large flare and Halo CME. This low activity also occur on solar proton events in interplanetary medium. From January 2009 to May 2013, there are 25 SPEs with flux range from 12 - 6530 sfu (10 MeV). The solar flare during these events varies from C to X- class flare. From 27 X-class flare that occur during 2009 - May 2013, only 7 flares cause the SPE. Most of active region location are at solar Western Hemisphere (16/25). only 24 from 139 halo CME (AW=360) cause SPE. Although the probability of SPE from all flare and CME during this range of time is small but they have 3 common characteristics, ie, most of the SPE have active region position at Solar Western Hemisphere, the CME have AW=360 and they have a high linier velocity.

  6. PEACE Data in the Cluster Active Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazakerley, A. N.; Lahiff, A. D.; Wilson, R. J.; Rozum, I.; Anekallu, C.; West, M.; Bacai, H.

    We describe the data products of the Cluster Plasma Electron and Current Experiment (PEACE) instruments which have been produced for the Cluster Active Archive. This article is intended to introduce the PEACE instruments, the measured data and the data products provided through the CAA. We aim to help the researcher to choose the data products most suited to their needs and to avoid inadvertent misuse of the data.

  7. Controlling Quality in CME/CPD by Measuring and Illuminating Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, David; Takhar, Jatinder; Macnab, Jennifer; Eadie, Jason; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Stenerson, Heather; Francois, Jose; Bell, Mary; Monette, Celine; Campbell, Craig; Marlow, Bernie

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: There has been a surge of interest in the area of bias in industry-supported continuing medical education/continuing professional development (CME/CPD) activities. In 2007, we published our first study on measuring bias in CME, demonstrating that our assessment tool was valid and reliable. In light of the increasing interest in this…

  8. Italy. [CME Country Reports].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Documentation Center for Education in Europe.

    Ever since 1946, increased emigration in Italy has been paralleled by a slow but steady increase in educational activity. In 1971, Law No. 153 was adopted which provides for special educational arrangements to be made for migrant workers and their spouses adopted by the Italian Government are based on the need for Italian children to: (1) be…

  9. The deflection of 2008 December 12 CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.; Wang, Y.; Liu, J.; Ye, P.; Wang, S.

    2010-12-01

    The deflection of CME, which would significant influence the CME's geoeffectiveness, is an important topic of space weather study. In this work, the deflection of 2008 December 12 CME during it propagated from the Sun to Earth will be detailed studied based on the combination of remote and in situ observations. First, the 3-dimensions parameters reconstructed by Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) model based on the STEREO observations were used to study the propagation direction evolution of this CME during it propagated in near solar space. During this phase, this CME deflect from high latitude region to equator in meridian plane but propagated almost along the longitude of W7 in ecliptic plane. Further, whether this CME deflected during it propagated in interplanetary space has also been checked. Based on the remote observations, if this CME propagated radially during it propagated in interplanetary space, it may arrived the Earth and then hit the STEREO A rather than hit STEREO B. But, the in situ observations show contrary results that this CME arrived the Earth and hit the STEREO B but missed STEREO A. This result show direct evidence that this CME deflected to east in ecliptic plane during it propagated in interplanetary space. The kinematic deflection model developed by Wang et. al (2004) has been applied on this CME. The calculation results of this model correspond well with the observational results.

  10. PROPAGATION OF THE 2014 JANUARY 7 CME AND RESULTING GEOMAGNETIC NON-EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, M. L.; Collinson, G.; Taktakishvili, A.; Thompson, B. J.; Jian, L. K.; Savani, N. P.; MacNeice, P. J.; Zheng, Y.; Colaninno, R. C.; Odstrcil, D.; Möstl, C.; Temmer, M.

    2015-10-20

    On 2014 January 7 an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) with a radial speed ≈2500 km s{sup −1} was observed from near an active region close to disk center. This led many forecasters to estimate a rapid arrival at Earth (≈36 hr) and predict a strong geomagnetic storm. However, only a glancing CME arrival was observed at Earth with a transit time of ≈49 hr and a K{sub P} geomagnetic index of only 3−. We study the interplanetary propagation of this CME using the ensemble Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)–ENLIL+Cone model, that allows a sampling of CME parameter uncertainties. We explore a series of simulations to isolate the effects of the background solar wind solution, CME shape, tilt, location, size, and speed, and the results are compared with observed in situ arrivals at Venus, Earth, and Mars. Our results show that a tilted ellipsoid CME shape improves the initial real-time prediction to better reflect the observed in situ signatures and the geomagnetic storm strength. CME parameters from the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model used as input to WSA–ENLIL+Cone, along with a tilted ellipsoid cloud shape, improve the arrival-time error by 14.5, 18.7, 23.4 hr for Venus, Earth, and Mars respectively. These results highlight that CME orientation and directionality with respect to observatories play an important role in understanding the propagation of this CME, and for forecasting other glancing CME arrivals. This study also demonstrates the importance of three-dimensional CME fitting made possible by multiple viewpoint imaging.

  11. Propagation of the 7 January 2014 CME and Resulting Geomagnetic Non-event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. L.; Thompson, B. J.; Jian, L. K.; Colaninno, R. C.; Odstrcil, D.; Möstl, C.; Temmer, M.; Savani, N. P.; Collinson, G.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P. J.; Zheng, Y.

    2015-10-01

    On 2014 January 7 an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) with a radial speed ≈2500 km s-1 was observed from near an active region close to disk center. This led many forecasters to estimate a rapid arrival at Earth (≈36 hr) and predict a strong geomagnetic storm. However, only a glancing CME arrival was observed at Earth with a transit time of ≈49 hr and a K P geomagnetic index of only 3-. We study the interplanetary propagation of this CME using the ensemble Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)-ENLIL+Cone model, that allows a sampling of CME parameter uncertainties. We explore a series of simulations to isolate the effects of the background solar wind solution, CME shape, tilt, location, size, and speed, and the results are compared with observed in situ arrivals at Venus, Earth, and Mars. Our results show that a tilted ellipsoid CME shape improves the initial real-time prediction to better reflect the observed in situ signatures and the geomagnetic storm strength. CME parameters from the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model used as input to WSA-ENLIL+Cone, along with a tilted ellipsoid cloud shape, improve the arrival-time error by 14.5, 18.7, 23.4 hr for Venus, Earth, and Mars respectively. These results highlight that CME orientation and directionality with respect to observatories play an important role in understanding the propagation of this CME, and for forecasting other glancing CME arrivals. This study also demonstrates the importance of three-dimensional CME fitting made possible by multiple viewpoint imaging.

  12. Propagation of the 7 January 2014 CME and Resulting Geomagnetic Non-event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. L.; Thompson, B. J.; Jian, L. K.; Colaninno, R. C.; Odstrcil, D.; Möstl, C.; Temmer, M.; Savani, N. P.; Collinson, G.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P. J.; Zheng, Y.

    2015-10-01

    On 2014 January 7 an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) with a radial speed ≈2500 km s‑1 was observed from near an active region close to disk center. This led many forecasters to estimate a rapid arrival at Earth (≈36 hr) and predict a strong geomagnetic storm. However, only a glancing CME arrival was observed at Earth with a transit time of ≈49 hr and a K P geomagnetic index of only 3‑. We study the interplanetary propagation of this CME using the ensemble Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA)–ENLIL+Cone model, that allows a sampling of CME parameter uncertainties. We explore a series of simulations to isolate the effects of the background solar wind solution, CME shape, tilt, location, size, and speed, and the results are compared with observed in situ arrivals at Venus, Earth, and Mars. Our results show that a tilted ellipsoid CME shape improves the initial real-time prediction to better reflect the observed in situ signatures and the geomagnetic storm strength. CME parameters from the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model used as input to WSA–ENLIL+Cone, along with a tilted ellipsoid cloud shape, improve the arrival-time error by 14.5, 18.7, 23.4 hr for Venus, Earth, and Mars respectively. These results highlight that CME orientation and directionality with respect to observatories play an important role in understanding the propagation of this CME, and for forecasting other glancing CME arrivals. This study also demonstrates the importance of three-dimensional CME fitting made possible by multiple viewpoint imaging.

  13. Implications of CME Deflections on the Habitability of Planets Around M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Christina; Opher, Merav

    2014-06-01

    Solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are known to produce adverse space weather effects at Earth. These effects include geomagnetically induced currents and energetic particles accelerated by CME-driven shocks. Significant non-radial motions are observed for solar CMEs with the CME path deviating as much as 30 degrees within 20 solar radii. We have developed a model, Forecasting a CME's Altered Trajectory (ForeCAT), which predicts the deflected path of a CME according to the magnetic forces of the background solar wind. In Kay et al (2013), we show that these magnetic forces cause CMEs to deflect towards the region of minimum magnetic field strength. For the Sun, this magnetic minimum corresponds to the Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS). We predict that the Earth is most likely to be impacted by a deflected CME when its orbit brings it near the HCS. M dwarfs can have magnetic field strengths several orders of magnitude larger than the Sun which will strongly affect CME deflections. We explore stellar CME deflections with ForeCAT. We present results for M4V star V374 Peg. We determine potential impacts caused by CME deflections for a planet located within the habitable zone of V374 Peg 20-40 solar radii). We discuss future extensions as including variations in solar cycle, capturing small structures such as active regions, and extensions for other M dwarf stars.

  14. Speed of Compression of Magnetosphere by CME Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanan, B.; Alleyne, H.; Walker, S.; Lucek, E.; Reme, H.; Fazakerley, A.

    2007-12-01

    The multi-point Cluster observations provide the opportunity to study the speed of compression of the magnetosphere at the impact of extreme solar events such as CMEs. The four-point Cluster FGM (high resolution), CIS and PEACE data during the passage of 17 CME clouds during 2001-2005, together with models of magnetosphere and magnetopause, are used to obtain the speed of compression of the dayside magnetosphere. The study shows that the speed of compression (within three seconds of impact) increases with the dynamic pressure of the CMEs, and that this speed exceeds the speed of the CMEs in some (five) cases (suggesting impulsive response) when the dynamic pressure of the CMEs exceed about 20 nPa. The magnetosphere is also found to undergo damped oscillations for about two minutes after the impact of some extreme CMEs (24 October 2003 and 29 October 2003) until the magnetic pressure outside and inside the magnetopause balances. The speed of compression is also found to increase with the negative IMF Bz of the CME suggesting that part of the compression is due to CME pressure and another part is due to magnetic reconnection. The plasma data (PEACE and CIS), though of low resolution (4 seconds), are being analysed to check if the magnetic field and plasma move together or do they undergo differential motion (important for magnetic field-plasma interactions at short time scales).

  15. Egocentric daily activity recognition via multitask clustering.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Ricci, Elisa; Liu, Gaowen; Sebe, Nicu

    2015-10-01

    Recognizing human activities from videos is a fundamental research problem in computer vision. Recently, there has been a growing interest in analyzing human behavior from data collected with wearable cameras. First-person cameras continuously record several hours of their wearers' life. To cope with this vast amount of unlabeled and heterogeneous data, novel algorithmic solutions are required. In this paper, we propose a multitask clustering framework for activity of daily living analysis from visual data gathered from wearable cameras. Our intuition is that, even if the data are not annotated, it is possible to exploit the fact that the tasks of recognizing everyday activities of multiple individuals are related, since typically people perform the same actions in similar environments, e.g., people working in an office often read and write documents). In our framework, rather than clustering data from different users separately, we propose to look for clustering partitions which are coherent among related tasks. In particular, two novel multitask clustering algorithms, derived from a common optimization problem, are introduced. Our experimental evaluation, conducted both on synthetic data and on publicly available first-person vision data sets, shows that the proposed approach outperforms several single-task and multitask learning methods. PMID:26067371

  16. CME Ensemble Forecasting - A Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzo, V. J.; de Koning, C. A.; Cash, M. D.; Millward, G. H.; Biesecker, D. A.; Codrescu, M.; Puga, L.; Odstrcil, D.

    2014-12-01

    SWPC has been evaluating various approaches for ensemble forecasting of Earth-directed CMEs. We have developed the software infrastructure needed to support broad-ranging CME ensemble modeling, including composing, interpreting, and making intelligent use of ensemble simulations. The first step is to determine whether the physics of the interplanetary propagation of CMEs is better described as chaotic (like terrestrial weather) or deterministic (as in tsunami propagation). This is important, since different ensemble strategies are to be pursued under the two scenarios. We present the findings of a comprehensive study of CME ensembles in uniform and structured backgrounds that reveals systematic relationships between input cone parameters and ambient flow states and resulting transit times and velocity/density amplitudes at Earth. These results clearly indicate that the propagation of single CMEs to 1 AU is a deterministic process. Thus, the accuracy with which one can forecast the gross properties (such as arrival time) of CMEs at 1 AU is determined primarily by the accuracy of the inputs. This is no tautology - it means specifically that efforts to improve forecast accuracy should focus upon obtaining better inputs, as opposed to developing better propagation models. In a companion paper (deKoning et al., this conference), we compare in situ solar wind data with forecast events in the SWPC operational archive to show how the qualitative and quantitative findings presented here are entirely consistent with the observations and may lead to improved forecasts of arrival time at Earth.

  17. The Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Luke

    2015-04-01

    Since the launch of the twin STEREO satellites in late 2006, the Heliospheric Imagers have been used, with good results, in tracking transients of solar origin, such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), out through the inner heliosphere. A frequently used approach is to build a "J-Map", in which multiple elongation profiles along a constant position angle are stacked in time, building an image in which radially propagating transients form curved tracks in the J-Map. From this the time-elongation profile of a solar transient can be manually identified. This is a time consuming and laborious process, and the results are subjective, depending on the skill and expertise of the investigator. With the Heliospheric Imager data it is possible to follow CMEs from the outer limits of the solar corona all the way to 1AU. Solar Stormwatch is a citizen science project that employs the power of thousands of volunteers to both identify and track CMEs in the Heliospheric Imager data. The CMEs identified by Solar Stormwatch are tracked many times by multiple users and this allows the calculation of consensus time-elongation profiles for each event and also provides an estimate of the error in the consensus profile. Therefore this system does not suffer from the potential subjectivity of individual researchers identifying and tracking CMEs. In this sense, the Solar Stormwatch system can be thought of as providing a middle ground between manually identified CME catalogues, such as the CDAW list, and CME catalogues generated through fully automated algorithms, such as CACtus and ARTEMIS etc. We provide a summary of the reduction of the Solar Stormwatch data into a catalogue of CMEs observed by STEREO-A and STEREO-B through the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and review some key statistical properties of these CMEs. Through some case studies of the propagation of CMEs out into the inner heliosphere we argue that the Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue, which publishes the time

  18. Pattern Activity Clustering and Evaluation (PACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik; Banas, Christopher; Paul, Michael; Bussjager, Becky; Seetharaman, Guna

    2012-06-01

    With the vast amount of network information available on activities of people (i.e. motions, transportation routes, and site visits) there is a need to explore the salient properties of data that detect and discriminate the behavior of individuals. Recent machine learning approaches include methods of data mining, statistical analysis, clustering, and estimation that support activity-based intelligence. We seek to explore contemporary methods in activity analysis using machine learning techniques that discover and characterize behaviors that enable grouping, anomaly detection, and adversarial intent prediction. To evaluate these methods, we describe the mathematics and potential information theory metrics to characterize behavior. A scenario is presented to demonstrate the concept and metrics that could be useful for layered sensing behavior pattern learning and analysis. We leverage work on group tracking, learning and clustering approaches; as well as utilize information theoretical metrics for classification, behavioral and event pattern recognition, and activity and entity analysis. The performance evaluation of activity analysis supports high-level information fusion of user alerts, data queries and sensor management for data extraction, relations discovery, and situation analysis of existing data.

  19. CME Prediction from Line-of-Sight Magnetogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    We have previously shown for bipolar active regions that measures of active-region nonpotentiality from vector magnetograms are correlated with active-region CME productivity. We have now obtained a measure from line-of-sight magnetograms that is well correlated both with our measures of active-region nonpotentiality from vector magnetograms and with active-region CME productivity. The measure is the length of strong-gradient main neutral line (L(sub G)). This is the length of the bipolar region's main neutral line on which the potential transverse field is greater than 150G, and the gradient in the line-of-sight field is greater than 50G/Mm. From the sample of 17 MSFC magnetograms of 12 basically bipolar active regions used in our previous paper, we find that L(sub G) is strongly correlated with one of our vector-magnetogram measures of nonpotentiality, the length of strong-gradient main neutral line L(sub SS) (99.7%). We also find that L(sub G) is as strongly correlated with CME productivity (99.7%) as is L(sub SS). Being obtainable from line-of-sight magnetograms, L(sub G) makes the much larger data set of line-of-sight magnetograms (i.e. from SOHO/MDI and Kitt Peak) available for CME prediction study. This is especially important for evolutionary studies, with SOHO/MDI having no daylight, cloudy weather, or atmospheric seeing problems. This work was supported by funding from NSF's division of Atmospheric Sciences (Space Weather and Shine Programs) and by NASA's office of Space Science (Living with a Star program Solar and Heliospheric Physics Supporting Research and Technology program).

  20. Numerical simulation of the 12 May 1997 CME Event: The role of magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, O.; Attrill, G. D. R.; Schwadron, N. A.; Crooker, N. U.; Owens, M. J.; Downs, C.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2010-10-01

    We perform a numerical study of the evolution of a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) and its interaction with the coronal magnetic field based on the 12 May 1997, CME event using a global MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) model for the solar corona. The ambient solar wind steady-state solution is driven by photospheric magnetic field data, while the solar eruption is obtained by superimposing an unstable flux rope onto the steady-state solution. During the initial stage of CME expansion, the core flux rope reconnects with the neighboring field, which facilitates lateral expansion of the CME footprint in the low corona. The flux rope field also reconnects with the oppositely orientated overlying magnetic field in the manner of the breakout model. During this stage of the eruption, the simulated CME rotates counter-clockwise to achieve an orientation that is in agreement with the interplanetary flux rope observed at 1 AU. A significant component of the CME that expands into interplanetary space comprises one of the side lobes created mainly as a result of reconnection with the overlying field. Within 3 hours, reconnection effectively modifies the CME connectivity from the initial condition where both footpoints are rooted in the active region to a situation where one footpoint is displaced into the quiet Sun, at a significant distance (≈1R$\\odot$) from the original source region. The expansion and rotation due to interaction with the overlying magnetic field stops when the CME reaches the outer edge of the helmet streamer belt, where the field is organized on a global scale. The simulation thus offers a new view of the role reconnection plays in rotating a CME flux rope and transporting its footpoints while preserving its core structure.

  1. December 2008 CME as Viewed by Spacecraft

    NASA Video Gallery

    Newly reprocessed images from NASA's STEREO-A spacecraft, allow scientists to trace the anatomy of the December 2008 CME as it moves and changes on its journey from the Sun to the Earth, identify t...

  2. A Kinetic Model for the Radio CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongwoo; Gary, D. E.

    2009-05-01

    Current studies on Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are mostly concentrated on their macroscopic properties as measured on White-Light images. On the other hand, radio emissions from CMEs carry the information of high energy particles associated with them, but usually without spatial information. In this regard, the rare radio maps of the 1998 April 20 CME obtained with the Nancay radioheliograph between 164 and 432 MHz (called a radio CME by Bastian et al. in 2001) offer an exceptional opportunity to explore the spatial distribution of high energy electrons inside the CME loop. We present a detailed kinetic model for the radio CME employing the lower hybrid (LH) waves excited by the CME shock as the primary electron acceleration mechanism, and magnetic mirroring and Coulomb collisions as the propagation effects inside the expanding loop. The main constraint in this modeling comes from the fact that the LH waves accelerate electrons parallel to the magnetic field and the accelerated electrons should gain, during propagation, sufficient amount of the perpendicular momentum to emit the synchrotron radiation as observed. The relative magnetic field variation responsible for the magnetic mirroring is inferred from the geometrical shape of the CME on the images of the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO), and the field strength and the amplitude of the LH waves are determined from the observed radio spectra. The modeling is focused on the spatial distribution of the LH waves most plausible to explain the radio maps, and the result is discussed in relation to the associated shock property.

  3. HELCATS Prediction of Planetary CME arrival times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boakes, Peter; Moestl, Christian; Davies, Jackie; Harrison, Richard; Byrne, Jason; Barnes, David; Isavnin, Alexey; Kilpua, Emilia; Rollett, Tanja

    2015-04-01

    We present the first results of CME arrival time prediction at different planetary locations and their comparison to the in situ data within the HELCATS project. The EU FP7 HELCATS (Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis & Techniques Service) is a European effort to consolidate the exploitation of the maturing field of heliospheric imaging. HELCATS aims to catalogue solar wind transients, observed by the NASA STEREO Heliospheric Imager (HI) instruments, and validate different methods for the determination of their kinematic properties. This validation includes comparison with arrivals at Earth, and elsewhere in the heliosphere, as well as onsets at the Sun (http://www.helcats-fp7.eu/). A preliminary catalogue of manually identified CMEs, with over 1000 separate events, has been created from observations made by the STEREO/HI instruments covering the years 2007-2013. Initial speeds and directions of each CME have been derived through fitting the time elongation profile to the state of the art Self-Similar Expansion Fitting (SSEF) geometric technique (Davies et al., 2012). The technique assumes that, in the plane corresponding to the position angle of interest, CMEs can be modelled as circles subtending a fixed angular width to Sun-center and propagating anti-sunward in a fixed direction at a constant speed (we use an angular width of 30 degrees in our initial results). The model has advantages over previous geometric models (e.g. harmonic mean or fixed phi) as it allows one to predict whether a CME will 'hit' a specific heliospheric location, as well as to what degree (e.g. direct assault or glancing blow). We use correction formulae (Möstl and Davies, 2013) to convert CME speeds, direction and launch time to speed and arrival time at any in situ location. From the preliminary CME dataset, we derive arrival times for over 400 Earth-directed CMEs, and for over 100 Mercury-, Venus-, Mars- and Saturn-directed CMEs predicted to impact each planet. We present statistics of

  4. Space Weather Model of July 22-23, 2012 CME

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Space Weather Research Center modeled the July 23, 2012 CME using a modeling program called ENLIL. The CME can be seen to expand dramatically as it travels through space. By comparing how we...

  5. Direct imaging in radio of CME development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, D.; Pick, M.; Kerdraon, A.; Mercier, C.

    2003-04-01

    On April 15 2001, the Nançay Radioheliograph observed fast moving, expanding loops, in images taken in the wavelength range between 164 and 432 MHz. We were able to follow the progression of the radio loops, starting from a few tenth to almost one solar radii above the solar limb, with a time cadence on the order of the second. The loops seen in radio agree very well with the features of the coronal mass ejection (CME) seen later, more than 1.5 solar radii above the limb, in white light images by the Large-Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) experiment, on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. This is the first time that a "radio CME" is seen so low in the corona, making possible a detailed study on the initiation and main characteristics of the "radio CME" phenomenon. Quite remarkable in this event is the fact that, simultaneous with the radio loops, the Nançay Radioheliograph imaged also strong radio bursts, seen only at the lowest frequencies. This events provides thus a unique opportunity to directly compare the positions, and timing, of the electron acceleration sites, associated with the radio bursts, to the progression, and development, of the CME.

  6. STEREO Captures Fastest CME to Date

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows a coronal mass ejection (CME) on the sun from July 22, 2012 at 10:00 PM EDT until 2 AM on July 23 as captured by NASA's Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A). Be...

  7. CME and Change in Practice: An Alternative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wergin, Jon F.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Results of a study by the American College of Cardiology revealed that continuing medical education (CME) courses contain relatively little information that is new to the audience, that other influences on practice interact with CME content, and that change attributable to CME is subtle and often delayed. (JOW)

  8. Learning to Collaborate: A Case Study of Performance Improvement CME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shershneva, Marianna B.; Mullikin, Elizabeth A.; Loose, Anne-Sophie; Olson, Curtis A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Performance Improvement Continuing Medical Education (PI CME) is a mechanism for joining quality improvement (QI) in health care to continuing medical education (CME) systems together. Although QI practices and CME approaches have been recognized for years, what emerges from their integration is largely unfamiliar, because it…

  9. Sharing Collaborative Designs of Tobacco Cessation Performance Improvement CME Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullikin, Elizabeth A.; Ales, Mary W.; Cho, Jane; Nelson, Teena M.; Rodrigues, Shelly B.; Speight, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Performance Improvement Continuing Medical Education (PI CME) provides an important opportunity for CME providers to combine educational and quality health care improvement methodologies. Very few CME providers take on the challenges of planning this type of intervention because it is still a new practice and there are limited…

  10. Scaling of cluster growth for coagulating active particles.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Peet; Löwen, Hartmut

    2014-02-01

    Cluster growth in a coagulating system of active particles (such as microswimmers in a solvent) is studied by theory and simulation. In contrast to passive systems, the net velocity of a cluster can have various scalings dependent on the propulsion mechanism and alignment of individual particles. Additionally, the persistence length of the cluster trajectory typically increases with size. As a consequence, a growing cluster collects neighboring particles in a very efficient way and thus amplifies its growth further. This results in unusual large growth exponents for the scaling of the cluster size with time and, for certain conditions, even leads to "explosive" cluster growth where the cluster becomes macroscopic in a finite amount of time.

  11. Probability of CME Impact on Exoplanets Orbiting M Dwarfs and Solar-like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, C.; Opher, M.; Kornbleuth, M.

    2016-08-01

    Solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce adverse space weather effects at Earth. Planets in the close habitable zone of magnetically active M dwarfs may experience more extreme space weather than at Earth, including frequent CME impacts leading to atmospheric erosion and leaving the surface exposed to extreme flare activity. Similar erosion may occur for hot Jupiters with close orbits around solar-like stars. We have developed a model, Forecasting a CME's Altered Trajectory (ForeCAT), which predicts a CME's deflection. We adapt ForeCAT to simulate CME deflections for the mid-type M dwarf V374 Peg and hot Jupiters with solar-type hosts. V374 Peg's strong magnetic fields can trap CMEs at the M dwarfs's Astrospheric Current Sheet, that is, the location of the minimum in the background magnetic field. Solar-type CMEs behave similarly, but have much smaller deflections and do not become trapped at the Astrospheric Current Sheet. The probability of planetary impact decreases with increasing inclination of the planetary orbit with respect to the Astrospheric Current Sheet: 0.5–5 CME impacts per day for M dwarf exoplanets, 0.05–0.5 CME impacts per day for solar-type hot Jupiters. We determine the minimum planetary magnetic field necessary to shield a planet's atmosphere from CME impacts. M dwarf exoplanets require values between tens and hundreds of Gauss. Hot Jupiters around a solar-type star, however, require a more reasonable <30 G. These values exceed the magnitude required to shield a planet from the stellar wind, suggesting that CMEs may be the key driver of atmospheric losses.

  12. Probability of CME Impact on Exoplanets Orbiting M Dwarfs and Solar-like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, C.; Opher, M.; Kornbleuth, M.

    2016-08-01

    Solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce adverse space weather effects at Earth. Planets in the close habitable zone of magnetically active M dwarfs may experience more extreme space weather than at Earth, including frequent CME impacts leading to atmospheric erosion and leaving the surface exposed to extreme flare activity. Similar erosion may occur for hot Jupiters with close orbits around solar-like stars. We have developed a model, Forecasting a CME's Altered Trajectory (ForeCAT), which predicts a CME's deflection. We adapt ForeCAT to simulate CME deflections for the mid-type M dwarf V374 Peg and hot Jupiters with solar-type hosts. V374 Peg's strong magnetic fields can trap CMEs at the M dwarfs's Astrospheric Current Sheet, that is, the location of the minimum in the background magnetic field. Solar-type CMEs behave similarly, but have much smaller deflections and do not become trapped at the Astrospheric Current Sheet. The probability of planetary impact decreases with increasing inclination of the planetary orbit with respect to the Astrospheric Current Sheet: 0.5-5 CME impacts per day for M dwarf exoplanets, 0.05-0.5 CME impacts per day for solar-type hot Jupiters. We determine the minimum planetary magnetic field necessary to shield a planet's atmosphere from CME impacts. M dwarf exoplanets require values between tens and hundreds of Gauss. Hot Jupiters around a solar-type star, however, require a more reasonable <30 G. These values exceed the magnitude required to shield a planet from the stellar wind, suggesting that CMEs may be the key driver of atmospheric losses.

  13. The SCEC Community Modeling Environment (SCEC/CME) - An Overview of its Architecture and Current Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Minster, B.; Moore, R.; Kesselman, C.; SCEC ITR Collaboration

    2004-12-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), in collaboration with the San Diego Supercomputer Center, the USC Information Sciences Institute, the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology, and the U.S. Geological Survey, is developing the Southern California Earthquake Center Community Modeling Environment (CME) under a five-year grant from the National Science Foundation's Information Technology Research (ITR) Program jointly funded by the Geosciences and Computer and Information Science & Engineering Directorates. The CME system is an integrated geophysical simulation modeling framework that automates the process of selecting, configuring, and executing models of earthquake systems. During the Project's first three years, we have performed fundamental geophysical and information technology research and have also developed substantial system capabilities, software tools, and data collections that can help scientist perform systems-level earthquake science. The CME system provides collaborative tools to facilitate distributed research and development. These collaborative tools are primarily communication tools, providing researchers with access to information in ways that are convenient and useful. The CME system provides collaborators with access to significant computing and storage resources. The computing resources of the Project include in-house servers, Project allocations on USC High Performance Computing Linux Cluster, as well as allocations on NPACI Supercomputers and the TeraGrid. The CME system provides access to SCEC community geophysical models such as the Community Velocity Model, Community Fault Model, Community Crustal Motion Model, and the Community Block Model. The organizations that develop these models often provide access to them so it is not necessary to use the CME system to access these models. However, in some cases, the CME system supplements the SCEC community models with utility codes that make it easier to use or access

  14. CHARACTERISTICS OF KINEMATICS OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION DURING THE 2010 AUGUST 1 CME-CME INTERACTION EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, Manuela; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; Moestl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M.; Flor, Olga; Vrsnak, Bojan; Zic, Tomislav; De Koning, Curt A.; Liu, Ying; Bosman, Eckhard; Davies, Jackie A.; Bothmer, Volker; Harrison, Richard; Nitta, Nariaki; Bisi, Mario; Eastwood, Jonathan; Forsyth, Robert; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2012-04-10

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and heliospheric imager (HI) data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field of view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; {approx}1200 km s{sup -1}) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; {approx}700 km s{sup -1}). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2, suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  15. Characteristics of Kinematics of a Coronal Mass Ejection During the 2010 August 1 CME-CME Interaction Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temmer, Manuela; Vrsnak, Bojan; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; de Koning, Curt A.; Liu, Ying; Bosman, Eckhard; Davies, Jackie A.; Mostl, Christian; Zic, Tomislav; Veronig, Astrid M.; Bothmer, Volker; Harrison, Richard; Nitta, Nariaki; Bisi, Mario; Flor, Olga; Eastwood, Jonathan; Odstrcil, Dusan; Forsyth, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and HI data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field-of-view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; (is) approximately 1200 km s-1) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; (is) approximately 700 km s-1). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2 suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  16. Numerical Simulation of a "Stealth" CME: Why Slow and Simple is Not Mysterious

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, B. J.; Li, Y.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Luhmann, J. G.; Fisher, G. H.

    2011-12-01

    The stereoscopic viewing and improvements in coronagraph observations by STEREO/SECCHI and low corona EUV and X-ray observations at multiple wavelengths by STEREO, Hinode, and SDO -- combined with this solar minimum's exceptionally low activity -- have given rise to the community's interest in so-called "stealth" CMEs. A "stealth" CME is one in which there are almost no low coronal signatures of the CME eruption but often a very well resolved slow, flux-rope like eruption seen in the coronagraph data. The fact that the in situ observations of "stealth" CMEs have shown many of the signatures of magnetic clouds (including the interplanetary flux rope structure) poses the question, "Just how different these events are from normal CMEs?" We present a 3D numerical MHD simulation of the 2008 Jun 2 gradual streamer blowout CME which had virtually no identifiable low coronal signatures. We energize the field by simple footpoint shearing along the source region's polarity inversion line (PIL) and model the background solar wind structure using an ~2MK isothermal wind and a low-order PFSS representation of the CR2070 synoptic magnetogram. Our results will show that the CME "initiation" is obtained by slowly disrupting the quasi-steady-state configuration of the helmet streamer, resulting in the standard eruptive flare picture (albeit, on a large scale) that ejects the sheared fields and lowers the magnetic energy stored in filament channel. We obtain a relatively slow CME eruption and argue that these "stealth" CMEs are no different than the standard quasi-2D picture but are simply at the low end of the CME energy distribution. We will show preliminary comparisons between the simulation results and the coronagraph observations of the low coronal evolution of the CME.

  17. Active dipole clusters: From helical motion to fission.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andreas; Popowa, Katarina; Löwen, Hartmut

    2015-07-01

    The structure of a finite particle cluster is typically determined by total energy minimization. Here we consider the case where a cluster of soft-sphere dipoles becomes active, i.e., when the individual particles exhibit an additional self-propulsion along their dipole moments. We numerically solve the overdamped equations of motion for soft-sphere dipoles in a solvent. Starting from an initial metastable dipolar cluster, the self-propulsion generates a complex cluster dynamics. The final cluster state has in general a structure widely different to the initial one, the details depend on the model parameters and on the protocol of how the self-propulsion is turned on. The center of mass of the cluster moves on a helical path, the details of which are governed by the initial cluster magnetization. An instantaneous switch to a high self-propulsion leads to fission of the cluster. However, fission does not occur if the self-propulsion is increased slowly to high strengths. Our predictions can be verified through experiments with self-phoretic colloidal Janus particles and for macroscopic self-propelled dipoles in a highly viscous solvent.

  18. Homologous CME: a multispacecraft approach supported by simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, L.; Lapenta, G.; Steed, K.; Olshevsky, V.; Restante, A.

    2012-12-01

    Using in situ and remote observations from multiple space crafts (STEREO, SDO and Venus Express) provides the opportunity to to study homologous CMEs. For example, on 7 August 2010, a halo CME originating from NOAA AR11093 was observed remotely by STEREO B. Seven days later this active region erupted again, and a halo CME was observed remotely by STEREO A on 14 August 2010. In this and in similar other examples, we show that multiple eruptions are associated with reverse S-shaped flux rope structures and display a number of typical large-scale features related to CMEs, including coronal dimmings and EUV waves. By combining remote sensing and in situ observations of the ejecta, we consider the structure and heliospheric evolution of these CMEs and their interplanetary counterparts. The work is complemented by a theoretical investigation where observed features are replicated and clarified by simulation. This work is part of the eHeroes project (www.eheroes.eu), funded by the European Commission, under the grant agreement eHeroes (project n° 284461)

  19. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies

    PubMed Central

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Clarke, T. E.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Randall, Scott W.; McNamara, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves. PMID:20351250

  20. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  1. Active transport and cluster formation on 2D networks.

    PubMed

    Greulich, P; Santen, L

    2010-06-01

    We introduce a model for active transport on inhomogeneous networks embedded in a diffusive environment which is motivated by vesicular transport on actin filaments. In the presence of a hard-core interaction, particle clusters are observed that exhibit an algebraically decaying distribution in a large parameter regime, indicating the existence of clusters on all scales. The scale-free behavior can be understood by a mechanism promoting preferential attachment of particles to large clusters. The results are compared with a diffusion-limited aggregation model and active transport on a regular network. For both models we observe aggregation of particles to clusters which are characterized by a finite size scale if the relevant time scales and particle densities are considered. PMID:20556462

  2. Interrater Reliability to Assure Valid Content in Peer Review of CME-Accredited Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Mark; Lado, Fred A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) provides guidelines for continuing medical education (CME) materials to mitigate problems in the independence or validity of content in certified activities; however, the process of peer review of materials appears largely unstudied and the reproducibility of…

  3. Radio active galactic nuclei in galaxy clusters: Feedback, merger signatures, and cluster tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno-Mahler, Rachel Beth

    Galaxy clusters, the largest gravitationally-bound structures in the universe, are composed of 50-1000s of galaxies, hot X-ray emitting gas, and dark matter. They grow in size over time through cluster and group mergers. The merger history of a cluster can be imprinted on the hot gas, known as the intracluster medium (ICM). Merger signatures include shocks, cold fronts, and sloshing of the ICM, which can form spiral structures. Some clusters host double-lobed radio sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN). First, I will present a study of the galaxy cluster Abell 2029, which is very relaxed on large scales and has one of the largest continuous sloshing spirals yet observed in the X-ray, extending outward approximately 400 kpc. The sloshing gas interacts with the southern lobe of the radio galaxy, causing it to bend. Energy injection from the AGN is insufficient to offset cooling. The sloshing spiral may be an important additional mechanism in preventing large amounts of gas from cooling to very low temperatures. Next, I will present a study of Abell 98, a triple system currently undergoing a merger. I will discuss the merger history, and show that it is causing a shock. The central subcluster hosts a double-lobed AGN, which is evacuating a cavity in the ICM. Understanding the physical processes that affect the ICM is important for determining the mass of clusters, which in turn affects our calculations of cosmological parameters. To further constrain these parameters, as well as models of galaxy evolution, it is important to use a large sample of galaxy clusters over a range of masses and redshifts. Bent, double-lobed radio sources can potentially act as tracers of galaxy clusters over wide ranges of these parameters. I examine how efficient bent radio sources are at tracing high-redshift (z>0.7) clusters. Out of 646 sources in our high-redshift Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN (COBRA) sample, 282 are candidate new, distant clusters of galaxies based on

  4. Filament-Prominence-Cme Magnetic Evolution Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagala', L. G.; Mandrini, C. H.; Fernandez Borda, R.; de Pontieu, B.; Rovira, M. G.; Rank, G.

    1999-10-01

    The first results of the SOHO Joint Observation Program JOP 99 are outlined. JOP 99 involve several SOHO instruments (CDS, LASCO, MDI), together with TRACE, and two new ground-based instruments: HASTA (Hα Solar Telescope for Argentina) and MICA (Mirror Coronagraph for Argentina). The proposed program have a new motivation in taking advantage of the capabilities of the TRACE instrument, together with our experience in magnetic reconnection. The objective here is focused on the investigation of the conditions of the eruption of a prominence, often associated with the CME. JOP 99 is running at the moment that this abstract is submitted. It is a 5-days study of the filament/prominence, with 3-4 days observing the disk and 1-2 days observing the limb. While on disk, we will look for the eruption signatures in two ways: by studying the physical conditions in the filament and its surroundings (densities, temperature, abundances), and by looking at the magnetic topology changes. While at the limb, we will wait with luck for an eruption. If it does happen, LASCO and MICA observations will study if there exists an associated CME.

  5. Homologous Flare-CME Events and Their Metric Type II Radio Burst Association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yashiro, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Uddin, W.; Srivastava, A. K.; Joshi, N. C.; Chandra, R.; Manoharan, P. K.; Mahalakshmi, K.; Dwivedi, V. C.; Jain, R.; Awasthi, A. K.; Nitta, N. V.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Choudhary, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    Active region NOAA 11158 produced many flares during its disk passage. At least two of these flares can be considered as homologous: the C6.6 flare at 06:51 UT and C9.4 flare at 12:41 UT on February 14, 2011. Both flares occurred at the same location (eastern edge of the active region) and have a similar decay of the GOES soft X-ray light curve. The associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were slow (334 and 337 km/s) and of similar apparent widths (43deg and 44deg), but they had different radio signatures. The second event was associated with a metric type II burst while the first one was not. The COR1 coronagraphs on board the STEREO spacecraft clearly show that the second CME propagated into the preceding CME that occurred 50 min before. These observations suggest that CME-CME interaction might be a key process in exciting the type II radio emission by slow CMEs.

  6. Feasibility of a Knowledge Translation CME Program: "Courriels Cochrane"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland; Granikov, Vera; Theriault, Guylene; Fremont, Pierre; Burnand, Bernard; Mercer, Jay; Marlow, Bernard; Arroll, Bruce; Luconi, Francesca; Legare, France; Labrecque, Michel; Ladouceur, Roger; Bouthillier, France; Sridhar, Soumya Bindiganavile; Moscovici, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Systematic literature reviews provide best evidence, but are underused by clinicians. Thus, integrating Cochrane reviews into continuing medical education (CME) is challenging. We designed a pilot CME program where summaries of Cochrane reviews ("Courriels Cochrane") were disseminated by e-mail. Program participants automatically…

  7. Attendees' Perceptions of Commercial Influence in Noncommercially Funded CME Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, Elizabeth; Baer, Lee; Fromson, John A.; Gorrindo, Tristan; Iodice, Kristin E.; Birnbaum, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The controversy surrounding commercial support for continuing medical education (CME) programs has led to policy changes, but data show no significant difference in perceived bias between commercial and noncommercial CME. Indeed, what attendees perceive as commercial influence is not fully understood. We sought to clarify what…

  8. Evaluating Conflicts of Interest in Research Presented in CME Venues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Nancy L.; Galliher, James M.; Spano, Mindy S.; Main, Deborah S.; Brannigan, Michael; Pace, Wilson D.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: There is much in the literature regarding the potential for commercial bias in clinical research and in continuing medical education (CME), but no studies were found regarding the potential for bias in reporting original research in CME venues. This pilot study investigated the presence of perceived bias in oral and print content of…

  9. Developing an Instrument to Measure Bias in CME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takhar, Jatinder; Dixon, Dave; Donahue, Jill; Marlow, Bernard; Campbell, Craig; Silver, Ivan; Eadie, Jason; Monette, Celine; Rohan, Ivan; Sriharan, Abi; Raymond, Kathryn; Macnab, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The pharmaceutical industry, by funding over 60% of programs in the United States and Canada, plays a major role in continuing medical education (CME), but there are concerns about bias in such CME programs. Bias is difficult to define, and currently no tool is available to measure it. Methods: Representatives from industry and…

  10. Unsupervised active learning based on hierarchical graph-theoretic clustering.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiming; Hu, Wei; Xie, Nianhua; Maybank, Steve

    2009-10-01

    Most existing active learning approaches are supervised. Supervised active learning has the following problems: inefficiency in dealing with the semantic gap between the distribution of samples in the feature space and their labels, lack of ability in selecting new samples that belong to new categories that have not yet appeared in the training samples, and lack of adaptability to changes in the semantic interpretation of sample categories. To tackle these problems, we propose an unsupervised active learning framework based on hierarchical graph-theoretic clustering. In the framework, two promising graph-theoretic clustering algorithms, namely, dominant-set clustering and spectral clustering, are combined in a hierarchical fashion. Our framework has some advantages, such as ease of implementation, flexibility in architecture, and adaptability to changes in the labeling. Evaluations on data sets for network intrusion detection, image classification, and video classification have demonstrated that our active learning framework can effectively reduce the workload of manual classification while maintaining a high accuracy of automatic classification. It is shown that, overall, our framework outperforms the support-vector-machine-based supervised active learning, particularly in terms of dealing much more efficiently with new samples whose categories have not yet appeared in the training samples. PMID:19336318

  11. Acceleration of Fast CME: A Parametric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. T.; Zhang, T. X.; Tan, A.

    2003-12-01

    The analysis of LASCO/SOHO, Skylab and Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) observations show that there are many CMEs initiated with streamer and flux-rope magnetic topology (Dere et al. 1999; St. Cyr et al., 1999; Plunkett et al., 2000). Two types of CMEs have been distinguished with different kinematic characteristics (MacQueen and Fisher, 1983; Andrews and Howard, 2001). These are fast CMEs with high initial speeds (i.e. constant speed) and slow CMEs with low initial speeds but gradual acceleration (i.e. accelerated CMEs). Efforts have been made to probe the underlying physics responsible for these dual characteristics. Low and Zhang (2002) proposed that fast and slow CMEs result from initial topology of the magnetic field characterized by normal and inverse quiescent prominences, respectively. Liu et al. have successfully performed a numerical MHD simulation for this scenario. In this presentation, we explore other possible processes using a 2.5D, time-dependent streamer and flux-rope MHD model (Wu and Guo, 1997) to investigate the dual kinematic properties of the CMEs by specifying the different initiation processes with a particular magnetic topology (i.e. inverse quiescent prominence magnetic topology). Two typical initiation processes are tested; (1) injection of the magnetic flux into the flux-rope causes additional Lorentz force to destabilize the streamer launching a CME (Wu et al., 1997) resulting in a category slow CME and (2) draining the plasma from the flux-rope together with flux injection leads to a balloon instability due to the magnetic buoyancy force which results in a impulsive eruption and launches a fast CME. References Andrews, M.D. and Howard, R.A., Space Sci. Rev., 95, 147, 2001 Dere, K.P. et al., Ap. J., 529, 575, 1999 Lin, et al., Proceedings of ICSC 2003: Solar Variability as an Input to the Earth's Environemnt, ESA-SP-535, 2003 (in press). Low, B.C. and Zhang, M., Ap. J., 564, L53, 2002. MacQueen, R.M. and Fisher, R.R., Solar Phys. 89, 89

  12. Modeling Extreme Space Weather Scenarios: July 23, 2012 Rare-Type CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwira, C. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Space weather is a major concern for modern day society because of its adverse impacts on technological infrastructure such as power grids, oil pipelines, and global navigation systems. Particularly, earth directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main drivers of the most extreme geomagnetic storms in the near-Earth space environment. On 23 July 2012, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft observed in situ an extremely fast CME that traveled 0.96 astronomical units (~1 AU) in about 19 h. In our study, we use the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), a 3-D MHD based code, to perform simulations of this rare CME by considering STEREO-A in situ observations to represent the upstream L1 solar wind boundary conditions. The goal of the study is to investigate what would have happened if this Rare-type CME was Earth-bound. Global SWMF-generated ground geomagnetic field perturbations are used to compute the simulated induced geoelectric field at specific ground-based active magnetometer sites. Simulation results show that the July 23 CME would have produced ground effects comparable to previously observed extreme geomagnetic storms such as the Halloween 2003 storm. In addition, we discuss how this study compares to other independent studies on this same event.

  13. Digital Wave Processor Products in the Cluster Active Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yearby, K. H.; Alleyne, H. St. C.; Walker, S. N.; Bates, I.; Gough, M. P.; Buckley, A.; Carozzi, T. D.

    The Digital Wave Processor (DWP) is the central control and data processing instrument for the Cluster Wave Experiment Consortium. DWP products in the Cluster Active Archive (CAA) provide a mainly supporting function for the rest of the consortium. This includes a time correction dataset which allows the standard timing accuracy of 2 ms to be improved to around 20 μs, and experiment command and status datasets which show what commands have been sent to the experiments, and the resulting status. DWP also contains a particle correlator experiment that computes the auto-correlation of electron counts received by the PEACE electron experiment via an inter-experiment link.

  14. CME impact on Mercury's sputtered exospheric environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfleger, M.; Lichtenegger, H. I. M.; Lammer, H.; Mura, A.; Wurz, P.; Martin-Fernandez, J. A.

    2013-09-01

    Solar wind and magnetospheric plasma precipitation onto the surface of Mercury triggers the formation of exospheric particle populations by sputtering processes. Numerical modeling of Mercury's magnetosphere has shown that the weak intrinsic magnetic field of the planet is sufficient to prevent the equatorial regions from being impacted by solar wind ions during moderate solar wind conditions. However, intense fluxes of protons are expected to hit the auroral regions, giving rise to the release of surface elements at high latitudes by ion sputtering. During high solar wind dynamic pressure conditions in the case of CME events, the solar wind protons will have access to Mercury's entire dayside surface, which may result in a considerable filling of the exosphere by sputtered surface material.

  15. Multiscale time activity data exploration via temporal clustering visualization spreadsheet.

    PubMed

    Woodring, Jonathan; Shen, Han-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Time-varying data is usually explored by animation or arrays of static images. Neither is particularly effective for classifying data by different temporal activities. Important temporal trends can be missed due to the lack of ability to find them with current visualization methods. In this paper, we propose a method to explore data at different temporal resolutions to discover and highlight data based upon time-varying trends. Using the wavelet transform along the time axis, we transform data points into multi-scale time series curve sets. The time curves are clustered so that data of similar activity are grouped together, at different temporal resolutions. The data are displayed to the user in a global time view spreadsheet where she is able to select temporal clusters of data points, and filter and brush data across temporal scales. With our method, a user can interact with data based on time activities and create expressive visualizations. PMID:19008560

  16. Activity and Rotation in the Young Cluster h Per

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argiroffi, C.; Caramazza, M.; Micela, G.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.

    2014-08-01

    We study the rotation-activity relationship for low-mass members of the young cluster h Persei, a ~13 Myr old cluster. h Per, thanks to its age, allows us to link the rotation-activity relation observed for main-sequence stars to the still unexplained activity levels of very young clusters. We constrained the activity levels of h Per members by analyzing a deep Chandra/ACIS-I observation pointed to the central field of h Per. We combined this X-ray catalog with the catalog of h Per members with measured rotational period, presented by Moraux et al. (2013). We obtained a final catalog of 202 h Per members with measured X-ray luminosity and rotational period. We investigate the rotation-activity relation of h Per members considering different mass ranges. We find that stars with 1.3 M⊙ > M 1.4 M⊙ show significant evidence of supersaturation for short periods. This phenomenon is instead not observed for lower mass stars.

  17. What Do EUV Dimmings Tell Us About CME Topology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, B. J.; DeRosa, M. L.; Fisher, R. R.; Krista, L. D.; Kwon, R. Y.; Mason, J. P.; Mays, M. L.; Nitta, N.; Savani, N.; West, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale coronal EUV dimmings, developing on timescales of minutes to hours in association with a flare or filament eruption, are known to exhibit a high correlation with coronal mass ejections. However, it is not clear why some CMEs have dimmings and some do not, nor is it clear how these dimmings relate to CME topology. The inner coronal coverage of SDO AIA and STEREO EUVI, combined with the extended field of view of PROBA2's SWAP imager, allow us the opportunity to map the topology of a dimming region in three dimensions into an erupting CME. Although the location and extent of a dimming region appears to be the best indicator of the inner "footprint" of a CME, the correlation is far from perfect. However, dimmings can provide vital clues about the development and 3D kinematics of a CME. This is particularly important as we are entering an extended period of time where STEREO coronagraph images will not always be available, and therefore the 3D properties of a CME will be difficult to deduce. Therefore, understanding the inner coronal manifestations of a CME can provide clues to its structure and dynamics, even without multi-viewpoint coronagraph observations. We present the results of this combined analysis effort, along with a discussion of how dimmings can be used in forecasting CME directions.

  18. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN CLASH BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-10

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ∼350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ∼0.5–1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  19. CME Interaction with Large-Scale Coronal Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswarny, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This talk presents some key observations that highlight the importance of CME interaction with other large scale structures such as CMEs and coronal holes . Such interactions depend on the phase of the solar cycle: during maximum, CMEs are ejected more frequently, so CME-CME interaction becomes dominant. During the rise phase, the polar coronal holes are strong, so the interaction between polar coronal holes and CMEs is important, which also leads to a possible increase in the number of interplanetary CMEs observed as magnetic clouds. During the declining phase, there are more equatorial coronal holes, so CMEs originating near these coronal holes are easily deflected. CMEs can be deflected toward and away from the Sun-Earth line resulting in interesting geospace consequences. For example, the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 23 was due to a CME that was deflected towards the Sun-earth line from E22. CME deflection away from the Sun-Earth line diminishes the chance of a CME producing a geomagnetic storm. CME interaction in the coronagraphic field of view was first identified using enhanced radio emission, which is an indication of acceleration of low energy (approx.10 keV) electrons in the interaction site. CME interaction, therefore, may also have implications for proton acceleration. For example, solar energetic particle events typically occur with a higher intensity, whenever multiple CMEs occur in quick succession from the same source region. CME deflection may also have implications to the arrival of energetic particles to earth because magnetic connectivity may be changed by the interaction. I illustrate the above points using examples from SOHO, STEREO, Wind, and ACE data .

  20. Pre-CME Onset Fuses - Do the STEREO Heliospheric Imagers Hold the Clues to the CME Onset Process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Richard A.; Davis, Christopher J.; Davies, Jackie A.

    2009-10-01

    Understanding the onset of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is surely one of the holy grails of solar physics today. Inspection of data from the Heliospheric Imagers (HI), which are part of the SECCHI instrument suite aboard the two NASA STEREO spacecraft, appears to have revealed pre-eruption signatures which may provide valuable evidence for identifying the CME onset mechanism. Specifically, an examination of the HI images has revealed narrow rays comprised of a series of outward-propagating plasma blobs apparently forming near the edge of the streamer belt prior to many CME eruptions. In this pilot study, we inspect a limited dataset to explore the significance of this phenomenon, which we have termed a pre-CME ‘fuse’. Although, the enhanced expulsion of blobs may be consistent with an increase in the release of outward-propagating blobs from the streamers themselves, it could also be interpreted as evidence for interchange reconnection in the period leading to a CME onset. Indeed, it is argued that the latter could even have implications for the end-of-life of CMEs. Thus, the presence of these pre-CME fuses provides evidence that the CME onset mechanism is either related to streamer reconnection processes or the reconnection between closed field lines in the streamer belt and adjacent, open field lines. We investigate the nature of these fuses, including their timing and location with respect to CME launch sites, as well as their speed and topology.

  1. Clues to galaxy activity from rich cluster simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evrard, August E.

    1990-01-01

    New simulations of rich cluster evolution are used to evaluate the first infall hypothesis of Gunn and Dressler - the idea that the enhanced fraction of active galaxies seen in high redshift clusters is due to a one-time burst of star formation triggered by the rapid rise in external pressure as a galaxy plows into the hot intracluster medium (ICM). Using three-dimensional simulations which contain both baryonic gas and collisionless dark material, local static pressure histories for test orbits of galaxies are generated and a simple trigger threshold based on dP/dt/P sub ISM is applied to define an active fraction of the population. The results lend qualitative and quantitative support to the first infall interpretation.

  2. Active spacecraft potential control: An ion emitter experiment. [Cluster mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedler, W.; Goldstein, R.; Hamelin, M.; Maehlum, B. N.; Troim, J.; Olsen, R. C.; Pedersen, A.; Grard, R. J. L.; Schmidt, R.; Rudenauer, F.

    1988-01-01

    The cluster spacecraft are instrumented with ion emitters for charge neutralization. The emitters produce indium ions at 6 keV. The ion current is adjusted in a feedback loop with instruments measuring the spacecraft potential. The system is based on the evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. The design of the active spacecraft potential control instruments, and the ion emitters is presented.

  3. Composition and topology of activity cliff clusters formed by bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-02-24

    The assessment of activity cliffs has thus far mostly focused on compound pairs, although the majority of activity cliffs are not formed in isolation but in a coordinated manner involving multiple active compounds and cliffs. However, the composition of coordinated activity cliff configurations and their topologies are unknown. Therefore, we have identified all activity cliff configurations formed by currently available bioactive compounds and analyzed them in network representations where activity cliff configurations occur as clusters. The composition, topology, frequency of occurrence, and target distribution of activity cliff clusters have been determined. A limited number of large cliff clusters with unique topologies were identified that were centers of activity cliff formation. These clusters originated from a small number of target sets. However, most clusters were of small to moderate size. Three basic topologies were sufficient to describe recurrent activity cliff cluster motifs/topologies. For example, frequently occurring clusters with star topology determined the scale-free character of the global activity cliff network and represented a characteristic activity cliff configuration. Large clusters with complex topology were often found to contain different combinations of basic topologies. Our study provides a first view of activity cliff configurations formed by currently available bioactive compounds and of the recurrent topologies of activity cliff clusters. Activity cliff clusters of defined topology can be selected, and from compounds forming the clusters, SAR information can be obtained. The SAR information of activity cliff clusters sharing a/one specific activity and topology can be compared.

  4. CME front and severe space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Skoug, R.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Rajesh, P. K.; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Batista, I. S.; Ebihara, Y.; Nakamura, T.

    2014-12-01

    Thanks to the work of a number of scientists who made it known that severe space weather can cause extensive social and economic disruptions in the modern high-technology society. It is therefore important to understand what determines the severity of space weather and whether it can be predicted. We present results obtained from the analysis of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), solar energetic particle (SEP) events, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), CME-magnetosphere coupling, and geomagnetic storms associated with the major space weather events since 1998 by combining data from the ACE and GOES satellites with geomagnetic parameters and the Carrington event of 1859, the Quebec event of 1989, and an event in 1958. The results seem to indicate that (1) it is the impulsive energy mainly due to the impulsive velocity and orientation of IMF Bz at the leading edge of the CMEs (or CME front) that determine the severity of space weather. (2) CMEs having high impulsive velocity (sudden nonfluctuating increase by over 275 km s-1 over the background) caused severe space weather (SvSW) in the heliosphere (failure of the solar wind ion mode of Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor in ACE) probably by suddenly accelerating the high-energy particles in the SEPs ahead directly or through the shocks. (3) The impact of such CMEs which also show the IMF Bz southward from the leading edge caused SvSW at the Earth including extreme geomagnetic storms of mean DstMP < -250 nT during main phases, and the known electric power outages happened during some of these SvSW events. (4) The higher the impulsive velocity, the more severe the space weather, like faster weather fronts and tsunami fronts causing more severe damage through impulsive action. (5) The CMEs having IMF Bz northward at the leading edge do not seem to cause SvSW on Earth, although, later when the IMF Bz turns southward, they can lead to super geomagnetic storms of intensity (Dstmin) less than even -400 nT.

  5. SOHO Captures CME From X5.4 Solar Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this movie of the sun's coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with an X5.4 solar flare on the evening of March 6, 2012. The extremely fast and en...

  6. Chandra Finds Surprising Black Hole Activity In Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    Scientists at the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, California, have uncovered six times the expected number of active, supermassive black holes in a single viewing of a cluster of galaxies, a finding that has profound implications for theories as to how old galaxies fuel the growth of their central black holes. The finding suggests that voracious, central black holes might be as common in old, red galaxies as they are in younger, blue galaxies, a surprise to many astronomers. The team made this discovery with NASA'S Chandra X-ray Observatory. They also used Carnegie's 6.5-meter Walter Baade Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile for follow-up optical observations. "This changes our view of galaxy clusters as the retirement homes for old and quiet black holes," said Dr. Paul Martini, lead author on a paper describing the results that appears in the September 10 issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. "The question now is, how do these black holes produce bright X-ray sources, similar to what we see from much younger galaxies?" Typical of the black hole phenomenon, the cores of these active galaxies are luminous in X-ray radiation. Yet, they are obscured, and thus essentially undetectable in the radio, infrared and optical wavebands. "X rays can penetrate obscuring gas and dust as easily as they penetrate the soft tissue of the human body to look for broken bones," said co-author Dr. Dan Kelson. "So, with Chandra, we can peer through the dust and we have found that even ancient galaxies with 10-billion-year-old stars can have central black holes still actively pulling in copious amounts of interstellar gas. This activity has simply been hidden from us all this time. This means these galaxies aren't over the hill after all and our theories need to be revised." Scientists say that supermassive black holes -- having the mass of millions to billions of suns squeezed into a region about the size of our Solar System -- are the engines in the cores of

  7. Comparisons of Remote And In-situ CME Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinard, Alysha; Mulligan, T.; Lynch, B.

    2011-05-01

    We present a comparison of remote and in-situ CME ejecta using data from the Ulysses and SOHO missions. Quadrature occurs when two spacecraft form a 90 degree angle with the Sun. Quadrature studies allow the comparison of visible features of limb CMEs and and in-situ ICME properties. We investigate several events, including so-called "cannibal" CMEs, and compare the relationship between CME morphology and in-situ structures such as magnetic field, composition, and plasma properties.

  8. The Nature of CME-flare-Associated Coronal Dimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. X.; Qiu, J.

    2016-07-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming that is evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As the emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect the properties of CMEs in the early phase of their eruption. In this study, we analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on 2011 December 26. We use the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory for disk observations of the dimming, and analyze images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory to obtain the height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also measure the magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to the flare ribbons, and it is observed in multiple EUV passbands. Rapid dimming starts after the onset of fast reconnection and CME acceleration, and its evolution tracks the CME height and flare reconnection. The spatial distribution of dimming exhibits cores of deep dimming with a rapid growth, and their light curves are approximately linearly scaled with the CME height profile. From the dimming analysis we infer the process of the CME expansion, and estimate properties of the CME.

  9. What Do EUV Dimmings Tell Us About CME Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Barbara J.; DeRosa, Marc L.; Fisher, Richard R.; Krista, Larisza D.; Kwon, Ryun Young; Mason, James P.; Mays, Mona L.; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Webb, David F.; West, Matthew J.

    2015-04-01

    Large-scale coronal EUV dimmings develop on timescales of hours in association with a flare or filament eruption, and are known to be well correlated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). However, it is not clear why some CMEs have dimmings and some do not, nor is it clear how these dimmings relate to CME topology. The inner coronal coverage of SDO AIA and STEREO EUVI, combined with the extended field of view of PROBA2's SWAP imager, allow us the opportunity to map the topology of a dimming region in three dimensions into an erupting CME. Although the location and extent of a dimming region appears to be the best indicator of the inner "footprint" of a CME, the correlation is far from perfect. However, dimmings can provide vital clues about the development and 3D kinematics of CMEs. This is particularly important as we are currently in an extended period where the STEREO coronagraph images are not always available and are increasingly "mirroring" LASCO images, and therefore the 3D properties of a CME will be difficult to deduce. Thus, understanding the inner coronal manifestations of a CME can provide clues to its structure and dynamics, even without multi-viewpoint coronagraph observations. We present the results of this combined analysis effort, along with a discussion of how dimmings can be used to forecast CME trajectories.

  10. Analysis of Cluster spacecraft potential during active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkar, K.; Fehringer, M.; Escoubet, C. P.; André, M.; Pedersen, A.; Svenes, K. R.; Décréau, P. M. E.

    The floating potential of a spacecraft is determined by an equilibrium between photo-electron emission from the sunlit spacecraft surfaces and the plasma electron current, while other currents play a secondary role. On the Cluster spacecraft, the presence of the experiment ASPOC to control the potential by an ion beam with currents up to several tens of microamperes and energies of several keV provides an opportunity to study the interaction between the spacecraft and the ambient plasma with the current of the artificial ion beam as an additional parameter. The effect of active control on the Cluster spacecraft potential in the various plasma environments is presented in an overall statistics. Changes of the potential resulting from switching the ion beam current to different levels serve to calibrate the density-potential relationship.

  11. The SCEC Community Modeling Environment(SCEC/CME): A Collaboratory for Seismic Hazard Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Minster, J. B.; Moore, R.; Kesselman, C.

    2005-12-01

    The SCEC Community Modeling Environment (SCEC/CME) Project is an NSF-supported Geosciences/IT partnership that is actively developing an advanced information infrastructure for system-level earthquake science in Southern California. This partnership includes SCEC, USC's Information Sciences Institute (ISI), the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), the Incorporated Institutions for Research in Seismology (IRIS), and the U.S. Geological Survey. The goal of the SCEC/CME is to develop seismological applications and information technology (IT) infrastructure to support the development of Seismic Hazard Analysis (SHA) programs and other geophysical simulations. The SHA application programs developed on the Project include a Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis system called OpenSHA. OpenSHA computational elements that are currently available include a collection of attenuation relationships, and several Earthquake Rupture Forecasts (ERFs). Geophysicists in the collaboration have also developed Anelastic Wave Models (AWMs) using both finite-difference and finite-element approaches. Earthquake simulations using these codes have been run for a variety of earthquake sources. Rupture Dynamic Model (RDM) codes have also been developed that simulate friction-based fault slip. The SCEC/CME collaboration has also developed IT software and hardware infrastructure to support the development, execution, and analysis of these SHA programs. To support computationally expensive simulations, we have constructed a grid-based scientific workflow system. Using the SCEC grid, project collaborators can submit computations from the SCEC/CME servers to High Performance Computers at USC and TeraGrid High Performance Computing Centers. Data generated and archived by the SCEC/CME is stored in a digital library system, the Storage Resource Broker (SRB). This system provides a robust and secure system for maintaining the association between the data seta and their metadata. To provide an easy

  12. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  13. CME-related particle acceleration regions during a simple eruptive event near solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Matamoros, Carolina; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Rouillard, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    An intriguing feature of many solar energetic particle (SEP) events is the detection of particles over a very extended range of longitudes in the Heliosphere. This may be due to peculiarities of the magnetic field in the corona, to a broad accelerator, to cross-field transport of the particles, or to a combination of these processes. The eruptive flare of the 26th of April 2008 offered an opportunity to study relevant processes under particularly favorable conditions, since it occurred in a very quiet solar and interplanetary environment. This allowed us to investigate the physical link between a single well-identified Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), electron acceleration as traced by radio emission, and the production of SEPs. We conduct a detailed analysis combining radio observations (Nançay Radioheliograph and Decameter Array, Wind/WAVES spectrograph) with remote-sensing observations of the corona in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white light as well as in-situ measurements of energetic particles near 1AU (SoHO and STEREO spacecraft). By combining images taken from multiple vantage points we were able to derive the time-dependent evolution of the 3-D pressure front developing around the erupting CME. Magnetic reconnection in the post-CME current sheet accelerated electrons that remained confined in closed magnetic fields in the corona, while the acceleration of escaping particles can be attributed to the pressure front generated ahead of the expanding CME. The CME accelerated electrons remotely from the parent active region, due to the interaction of its laterally expanding flank, traced by an EUV wave, with the ambient corona. SEPs detected at one STEREO spacecraft and SoHO were accelerated later, when the frontal shock of the CME intercepted the spacecraft-connected interplanetary magnetic field line. The injection regions into the Heliosphere inferred from the radio and SEP observations are separated in longitude by about 140°. The observations for this event

  14. Asymmetry in the CME-CME interaction process for the events from 2011 February 14-15

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Peinhart, V.; Vršnak, B.

    2014-04-20

    We present a detailed study of the interaction process of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) successively launched on 2011 February 14 (CME1) and 2011 February 15 (CME2). Reconstructing the three-dimensional shape and evolution of the flux ropes, we verify that the two CMEs interact. The frontal structure of both CMEs, measured along different position angles (PAs) over the entire latitudinal extent, reveals differences in the kinematics for the interacting flanks and the apexes. The interaction process is strongly PA-dependent in terms of timing as well as kinematical evolution. The central interaction occurs along PA-100°, which shows the strongest changes in kinematics. During interaction, CME1 accelerates from ∼400 km s{sup –1} to ∼700 km s{sup –1} and CME2 decelerates from ∼1300 km s{sup –1} to ∼600 km s{sup –1}. Our results indicate that a simplified scenario such as inelastic collision may not be sufficient to describe the CME-CME interaction. The magnetic field structures of the intertwining flux ropes and the momentum transfer due to shocks each play an important role in the interaction process.

  15. Analysis of Cluster spacecraft potential during active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkar, K.; Fehringer, M.; Escoubet, C.; Andre, M.; Pedersen, A.; Svenes, K.; Décréau, P.

    The floating potential of a spacecraft is determined by an equilibrium between photo-electron emission from the sunlit spacecraft surfaces, plasma electron current, and secondary effects. Without spacecraft potential control, the result largely reflects the density and temperature of the ambient plasma. On the Cluster spacecraft, the presence of the experiment ASPOC to control the potential by an ion beam with currents up to several tens of microamperes and energies of several keV provides an opportunity to study the interaction between the spacecraft and the ambient plasma with the current of the artificial ion beam as an additional parameter. Changes of the potential resulting from switching the ion beam current to different levels serve to calibrate the density-potential relationship. Wave data are used to obtain independent information on plasma density. The measurements onboard Cluster are compared with models and data from other spacecraft. After describing the principle of the interaction and showing some events out of the first 1.5 years of operation, an overall statistic is presented, describing the effect of active control on the Cluster spacecraft potential in the various plasma environments.

  16. Solar Flare, CME, and Proton Event Rates Correlated with Sunspot Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, L. M.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Pernak, R.

    2015-12-01

    The newly revised sunspot number series allows for placing historical geoeffective storms in the context of several hundred years of solar activity. Using statistical analyses of the GOES X-ray and differential particle observations from the past ~30 years and the SOHO/LASCO CME catalog (1996-present), we present sunspot number dependent predictions for expected flare, SEP, and CME rates. In particular, we present X-ray flare rates as a function of sunspot number for the past three cycles. We also show, as in the attached figure, that the 1-8 Angstrom background flux is strongly correlated with sunspot number across solar cycles. Similarly, we show that the CME properties (e.g., velocity and width) are also correlated with sunspot number for cycles 23 and 24. Finally, SEP rates and background proton flux levels are also scaled to sunspot number. These rates will enable future predictions for geoeffective events and place historical storms in context of present solar activity.

  17. CME impact on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, Niklas J. T.; Alho, M.; André, M.; Andrews, D. J.; Behar, E.; Burch, J. L.; Carr, C. M.; Cupido, E.; Engelhardt, I. A. D.; Eriksson, A. I.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Goetz, C.; Goldstein, R.; Henri, P.; Johansson, F. L.; Koenders, C.; Mandt, K.; Nilsson, H.; Odelstad, E.; Richter, I.; Simon Wedlund, C.; Stenberg Wieser, G.; Szego, K.; Vigren, E.; Volwerk, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present Rosetta observations from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the impact of a coronal mass ejection (CME). The CME impacted on 5-6 Oct 2015, when Rosetta was about 800 km from the comet nucleus, and 1.4 AU from the Sun. Upon impact, the plasma environment is compressed to the level that solar wind ions, not seen a few days earlier when at 1500 km, now reach Rosetta. In response to the compression, the flux of suprathermal electrons increases by a factor of 5-10 and the background magnetic field strength increases by a factor of ˜2.5. The plasma density increases by a factor of 10 and reaches 600 cm-3, due to increased particle impact ionisation, charge exchange and the adiabatic compression of the plasma environment. We also observe unprecedentedly large magnetic field spikes at 800 km, reaching above 200 nT, which are interpreted as magnetic flux ropes. We suggest that these could possibly be formed by magnetic reconnection processes in the coma as the magnetic field across the CME changes polarity, or as a consequence of strong shears causing Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the plasma flow. Due to the limited orbit of Rosetta, we are not able to observe if a tail disconnection occurs during the CME impact, which could be expected based on previous remote observations of other CME-comet interactions.

  18. Numerical Simulation of a Slow Streamer-Blowout CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Benjamin J.; Masson, Sophie; Li, Yan; DeVore, C. Richard; Luhmann, Janet; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-06-01

    We present a 3D numerical MHD simulation of the 2008 Jun 2 gradual streamer blowout CME that had virtually no identifiable low coronal signatures. We energize the field by simple footpoint shearing along the source region's polarity inversion line and model the background solar wind structure using an ˜2MK isothermal wind and a low-order potential field source surface representation of the CR2070 synoptic magnetogram. Our results show that the CME ``initiation’’ is obtained by slowly disrupting the quasi-steady-state configuration of the helmet streamer, resulting in the standard eruptive flare picture that ejects the sheared fields, but very slowly, on a relatively large scale, and with very little magnetic energy release. We obtain a relatively slow CME eruption of order the background solar wind speed and argue that these slow streamer blowout CMEs (now also known as ``stealth CMEs’’) are simply at the lowest end of the CME energy distribution. We present comparisons of the CME propagation through the corona (≤15Rs) in synthetic white-light images derived from the simulation density structure with multi-spacecraft coronagraph data from STEREO/SECCHI and SOHO/LASCO.

  19. On the Accurate Prediction of CME Arrival At the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Hess, Phillip

    2016-07-01

    We will discuss relevant issues regarding the accurate prediction of CME arrival at the Earth, from both observational and theoretical points of view. In particular, we clarify the importance of separating the study of CME ejecta from the ejecta-driven shock in interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). For a number of CME-ICME events well observed by SOHO/LASCO, STEREO-A and STEREO-B, we carry out the 3-D measurements by superimposing geometries onto both the ejecta and sheath separately. These measurements are then used to constrain a Drag-Based Model, which is improved through a modification of including height dependence of the drag coefficient into the model. Combining all these factors allows us to create predictions for both fronts at 1 AU and compare with actual in-situ observations. We show an ability to predict the sheath arrival with an average error of under 4 hours, with an RMS error of about 1.5 hours. For the CME ejecta, the error is less than two hours with an RMS error within an hour. Through using the best observations of CMEs, we show the power of our method in accurately predicting CME arrival times. The limitation and implications of our accurate prediction method will be discussed.

  20. Topological Evolution of a Fast Magnetic Breakout CME in 3-Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, B. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Luhmann, J. G.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    W present the extension of the magnetic breakout model for CME initiation to a fully 3-dimensional, spherical geometry. Given the increased complexity of the dynamic magnetic field interactions in 3-dimensions, we first present a summary of the well known axisymmetric breakout scenario in terms of the topological evolution associated with the various phases of the eruptive process. In this context, we discuss the completely analogous topological evolution during the magnetic breakout CME initiation process in the simplest 3-dimensional multipolar system. We show that an extended bipolar active region embedded in an oppositely directed background dipole field has all the necessary topological features required for magnetic breakout, i.e. a fan separatrix surface between the two distinct flux systems, a pair of spine fieldlines, and a true 3-dimensional coronal null point at their intersection. We then present the results of a numerical MHD simulation of this 3-dimensional system where boundary shearing flows introduce free magnetic energy, eventually leading to a fast magnetic breakout CME. The eruptive flare reconnection facilitates the rapid conversion of this stored free magnetic energy into kinetic energy and the associated acceleration causes the erupting field and plasma structure to reach an asymptotic eruption velocity of greater than or approx. equal to 1100 km/s over an approx.15 minute time period. The simulation results are discussed using the topological insight developed to interpret the various phases of the eruption and the complex, dynamic, and interacting magnetic field structures.

  1. Can We Predict CME Deflections Based on Solar Magnetic Field Configuration Alone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, C.; Opher, M.; Evans, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate space weather forecasting requires knowledge of the trajectory of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), including predicting CME deflections close to the Sun and through interplanetary space. Deflections of CMEs occur due to variations in the background magnetic field or solar wind speed, magnetic reconnection, and interactions with other CMEs. Using our newly developed model of CME deflections due to gradients in the background solar magnetic field, ForeCAT (Kay et al. 2013), we explore the questions: (a) do all simulated CMEs ultimately deflect to the minimum in the background solar magnetic field? (b) does the majority of the deflection occur in the lower corona below 4 Rs? ForeCAT does not include temporal variations in the magnetic field of active regions (ARs), spatial variations in the background solar wind speed, magnetic reconnection, or interactions with other CMEs. Therefore we focus on the effects of the steady state solar magnetic field. We explore two different Carrington Rotations (CRs): CR 2029 (April-May 2005) and CR 2077 (November-December 2008). Little is known about how the density and magnetic field fall with distance in the lower corona. We consider four density models derived from observations (Chen 1996, Mann et al. 2003, Guhathakurta et al. 2006, Leblanc et al. 1996) and two magnetic field models (PFSS and a scaled model). ForeCAT includes drag resulting from both CME propagation and deflection through the background solar wind. We vary the drag coefficient to explore the effect of drag on the deflection at 1 AU.

  2. Capillary microextraction (CME) and its application to trace elements analysis and their speciation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Zheng, Fei; He, Man; Zhang, Nan

    2009-09-14

    As a solvent-free miniaturized sample preparation technique, capillary microextraction (CME) has been hyphenated with different analytical instruments for trace elements analysis of environmental, biological, food and pharmaceutical samples. This review discusses the fundamentals and recent development of CME, including the theoretical basis, extraction modes (packed, open-tubular and monolithic CME) and capillary materials for CME. The emphasis is placed on the application of CME to trace/ultra-trace elements analysis and their speciation. Existing coating/monolithic materials used for CME are summarized together with a detailed overview of their preparation methods. PMID:19720168

  3. Source Regions of the Type II Radio Burst Observed During a CME-CME Interaction on 2013 May 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, P.; Gopalswamy, N.; Reiner, M. J.; Akiyama, S.; Krupar, V.

    2016-08-01

    We report on our study of radio source regions during the type II radio burst on 2013 May 22 based on direction-finding analysis of the Wind/WAVES and STEREO/WAVES (SWAVES) radio observations at decameter-hectometric wavelengths. The type II emission showed an enhancement that coincided with the interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) launched in sequence along closely spaced trajectories. The triangulation of the SWAVES source directions posited the ecliptic projections of the radio sources near the line connecting the Sun and the STEREO-A spacecraft. The WAVES and SWAVES source directions revealed shifts in the latitude of the radio source, indicating that the spatial location of the dominant source of the type II emission varies during the CME-CME interaction. The WAVES source directions close to 1 MHz frequencies matched the location of the leading edge of the primary CME seen in the images of the LASCO/C3 coronagraph. This correspondence of spatial locations at both wavelengths confirms that the CME-CME interaction region is the source of the type II enhancement. Comparison of radio and white-light observations also showed that at lower frequencies scattering significantly affects radio wave propagation.

  4. A Gamblers Clustering Based on Their Favorite Gambling Activity.

    PubMed

    Challet-Bouju, Gaëlle; Hardouin, Jean-Benoit; Renard, Noëlle; Legauffre, Cindy; Valleur, Marc; Magalon, David; Fatséas, Mélina; Chéreau-Boudet, Isabelle; Gorsane, Mohamed-Ali; Vénisse, Jean-Luc; Grall-Bronnec, Marie

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify profiles of gamblers to explain the choice of preferred gambling activity among both problem and non-problem gamblers. 628 non-problem and problem gamblers were assessed with a structured interview including "healthy" (sociodemographic characteristics, gambling habits and personality profile assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory-125) and "pathological" [diagnosis of pathological gambling, gambling-related cognitions (GRCs) and psychiatric comorbidity] variables. We performed a two-step cluster analysis based solely on "healthy" variables to identify gamblers' profiles which typically reflect the choice of preferred gambling activity. The obtained classes were then described using both "healthy" and "pathological" variables, by comparing each class to the rest of the sample. Clusters were generated. Class 1 (Electronic Gaming Machines gamblers) showed high cooperativeness, a lower level of GRC about strategy and more depressive disorders. Class 2 (games with deferred results gamblers) were high novelty seekers and showed a higher level of GRC about strategy and more addictive disorders. Class 3 (roulette gamblers) were more often high rollers and showed a higher level of GRC about strategy and more manic or hypomanic episodes and more obsessive-compulsive disorders. Class 4 (instant lottery gamblers) showed a lower tendency to suicide attempts. Class 5 (scratch cards gamblers) were high harm avoiders and showed a lower overall level of GRC and more panic attacks and eating disorders. The preference for one particular gambling activity may concern different profiles of gamblers. This study highlights the importance of considering the pair gambler-game rather than one or the other separately, and may provide support for future research on gambling and preventive actions directed toward a particular game.

  5. Validation of CME Detection Software (CACTus) by Means of Simulated Data, and Analysis of Projection Effects on CME Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, K.; Jacobs, C.; Robbrecht, E.; de Groof, A.; Berghmans, D.; Poedts, S.

    2011-05-01

    In the context of space weather forecasting, an automated detection of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) becomes more and more important for efficiently handling a large data flow which is expected from recently-launched and future solar missions. In this paper we validate the detection software package "CACTus" by applying the program to synthetic data from our 3D time-dependent CME simulations instead of observational data. The main strength of this study is that we know in advance what should be detected. We describe the sensitivities and strengths of automated detection, more specific for the CACTus program, resulting in a better understanding of CME detection on one hand and the calibration of the CACTus software on the other hand, suggesting possible improvements of the package. In addition, the simulation is an ideal tool to investigate projection effects on CME velocity measurements.

  6. Simulation of the 23 July 2012 Extreme Space Weather Event: What if This Extremely Rare CME Was Earth Directed?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Mays, M. Leila; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, Kristin; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Zheng, Yihua; Glocer, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Extreme space weather events are known to cause adverse impacts on critical modern day technological infrastructure such as high-voltage electric power transmission grids. On 23 July 2012, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft observed in situ an extremely fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that traveled 0.96 astronomical units (approx. 1 AU) in about 19 h. Here we use the SpaceWeather Modeling Framework (SWMF) to perform a simulation of this rare CME.We consider STEREO-A in situ observations to represent the upstream L1 solar wind boundary conditions. The goal of this study is to examine what would have happened if this Rare-type CME was Earth-bound. Global SWMF-generated ground geomagnetic field perturbations are used to compute the simulated induced geoelectric field at specific ground-based active INTERMAGNET magnetometer sites. Simulation results show that while modeled global SYM-H index, a high-resolution equivalent of the Dst index, was comparable to previously observed severe geomagnetic storms such as the Halloween 2003 storm, the 23 July CME would have produced some of the largest geomagnetically induced electric fields, making it very geoeffective. These results have important practical applications for risk management of electrical power grids.

  7. The Successive CME on 13th; 14th and 15th February 2011 and Forbush decrease on 18 February 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maričić, D.; Bostasyan, N.; Dumbović, M.; Chilingarian, A.; Mailyan, B.; Rostomyan, H.; Arakelyan, K.; Vršnak, B.; Roša, D.; Hržina, D.; Romštajn, I.; Veronig, A.

    2013-02-01

    Aims. We analyze the kinematics of three interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) that occurred on 13th, 14th and 15th February 2011 in the active region AR 11155 and have shown that they appeared at the Earth orbit on February, 18th and caused Forbush decrease (FD). Methods. The solar coordinates of flares are (S19W03), (S20W14) and (S21W18). The kinematic curves were obtained using STEREO (A&B) data. Additionally, we explore the possibility of the CME-CME interaction for these three events. We compare obtained estimates of ICME arrival with the in-situ measurements from WIND satellite at L1 point and with ground-based cosmic ray data obtained from SEVAN network. Results. The acceleration of each CME is highly correlated with the associated SXR flares energy release. CMEs that erupted at 13 and 14 Feb 2011 are not associated with prominence eruption; maximum velocity was vmax550 ± 50 km/s and vmax400 ± 50 km/s, respectively. However, 15 Feb 2011 CME is connected with much more violent eruption associated with a prominence, with maximum velocity of vmax 1400 ± 50 km/s. The last overtakes 13th and 14th Feb CMEs at distances of 32 and 160 Rsolar, respectively.

  8. Simulation of the 23 July 2012 extreme space weather event: What if this extremely rare CME was Earth directed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Leila Mays, M.; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, Kristin; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Zheng, Yihua; Glocer, Alex

    2013-12-01

    Extreme space weather events are known to cause adverse impacts on critical modern day technological infrastructure such as high-voltage electric power transmission grids. On 23 July 2012, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft observed in situ an extremely fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that traveled 0.96 astronomical units (˜1 AU) in about 19 h. Here we use the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) to perform a simulation of this rare CME. We consider STEREO-A in situ observations to represent the upstream L1 solar wind boundary conditions. The goal of this study is to examine what would have happened if this Rare-type CME was Earth-bound. Global SWMF-generated ground geomagnetic field perturbations are used to compute the simulated induced geoelectric field at specific ground-based active INTERMAGNET magnetometer sites. Simulation results show that while modeled global SYM-H index, a high-resolution equivalent of the Dst index, was comparable to previously observed severe geomagnetic storms such as the Halloween 2003 storm, the 23 July CME would have produced some of the largest geomagnetically induced electric fields, making it very geoeffective. These results have important practical applications for risk management of electrical power grids.

  9. Quality framework proposal for Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Naomi G.; Arfman, John F.; Limary, Siviengxay

    2008-09-01

    This report proposes the first stage of a Quality Framework approach that can be used to evaluate and document Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects. The first stage of the Quality Framework defines two tools that will be used to evaluate a CME project. The first tool is used to decompose a CME project into its essential elements. These elements can then be evaluated for inherent quality by looking at the subelements that impact their level of quality maturity or rigor. Quality Readiness Levels (QRLs) are used to valuate project elements for inherent quality. The Framework provides guidance for the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders for CME project prerequisites that help to ensure the proper level of confidence in the deliverable given its intended use. The Framework also Provides a roadmap that defined when and how the Framework tools should be applied. Use of these tools allow the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders to understand what elements the project will use to execute the project, the inherent quality of the elements, which of those are critical to the project and why, and the risks associated to the project's elements.

  10. Determining CME-driven shock parameters from remote sensing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, L.; Bothmer, V.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large scale eruptions of magnetized plasma propagating from the Sun into interplanetary space with speeds varying from a few tens to more than 2500 km s-1. They cause large-scale turbulence in the heliosphere and are the major drivers of space weather. Fast CMEs drive strong shocks in the corona and interplanetary medium and generate plasma turbulence in the post-shock regions ahead of the CME bodies. In this work results from the detailed analysis of a strong CME and shock event on April 3, 2010 are summarized. For this event the solar source region is identified and the CME and shock kinematics are determined from time series of white light images obtained by the SECCHI suite on board the STEREO spacecrafts. The shock's standoff distance, compression ratio and Mach number are derived. A comparison of the derived values with the in-situ measurements shows good agreement. Further comparison of the shock MHD parameters determined from remote sensing observations with in-situ data, including the calculation of power-spectra, will help validating the results and provide new insights into CME generated turbulence. The study will be extended to further events identified in STEREO observations.

  11. Acceleration and Deceleration of Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, F.; Wu, S.; Feng, X. S.; Wu, C.

    2011-12-01

    A major challenge to the space weather forecasting community is accurate prediction of coronal mass ejections (CME) induced Shock Arrival Time (SAT) at Earth's environment. In order to improve the current accuracy, it is necessary to understand the physical processes of the acceleration and deceleration of the CME propagation in the heliosphere. We present a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the evolution of two interacting CMEs in a realistic ambient solar wind for the March 28-31, 2001 event. The forces which caused the acceleration and deceleration are analyzed in detail. The force which caused the acceleration are Lorenz force and pressure gradient and the forces which caused the deceleration are aerodynamic drag and the Sun's gravity. In addition the momentum exchange between the solar wind and the moving CMEs can cause acceleration and deceleration of the CME which are now analyzed. In this specific CME event (March 28-31, 2001), we also investigate the interactions of two CMEs causing the acceleration and deceleration of the CMEs.

  12. Improving CME: Using Participant Satisfaction Measures to Specify Educational Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivieri, Jason J.; Regala, Roderick P.

    2013-01-01

    Imagine having developed a continuing medical education (CME) initiative to educate physicians on updated guidelines regarding high cholesterol in adults. This initiative consisted of didactic presentations and case-based discussions offered in 5 major US cities, followed by a Web-based enduring component to distill key points of the live…

  13. Initial-Condition Influences on CME Expansion and Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, G. L.; Crooker, N. U.; Elliott, H. A.

    2006-12-01

    A general-purpose melon-seed-overpressure-expansion (MSOE) model is used to examine the dependence of the expansion and propagation of fast CMEs on average initial values of the magnetic field inside the CME, the magnetic field outside the CME, and the CME mass. The MSOE model extracts from the real situation only features that are essential in determining the expansion and propagation processes and idealizes them to obtain an adaptable “minimalist” set of equations that governs these processes yet retains enough relevant physics to give useful results. This minimalist set is used to carry out a systematic comparison of solutions against four sets of observed correlations between CME and ICME parameters in which the input parameters to the MSOE model are varied to achieve simultaneous fits to all four correlations. The fits impose relations between the three independent input variables: initial internal field strength, initial external field strength, and initial density. For example, light CMEs ( e.g., those with no prominences) require the external field strength to nearly equal the internal field strength. However, heavy CMEs ( e.g., those with prominences) require the external field strength to be much weaker than the internal field strength.

  14. Didactic CME and Practice Change: Don't Throw that Baby out Quite yet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Curtis A.; Tooman, Tricia R.

    2012-01-01

    Skepticism exists regarding the role of continuing medical education (CME) in improving physician performance. The harshest criticism has been reserved for didactic CME. Reviews of the scientific literature on the effectiveness of CME conclude that formal or didactic modes of education have little or no impact on clinical practice. This has led…

  15. Obstetrician/Gynecologists and Postpartum Mental Health: Differences between CME Course Takers and Nontakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leddy, Meaghan A.; Farrow, Victoria A.; Joseph, Gerald F., Jr.; Schulkin, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing medical education (CME) courses are an essential component of professional development. Research indicates a continued need for understanding how and why physicians select certain CME courses, as well as the differences between CME course takers and nontakers. Purpose: Obstetrician-gynecologists (OB-GYNs) are health care…

  16. Accurate and Timely Forecasting of CME-Driven Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Kunkel, V.; Skov, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Wide-spread and severe geomagnetic storms are primarily caused by theejecta of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that impose long durations ofstrong southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on themagnetosphere, the duration and magnitude of the southward IMF (Bs)being the main determinants of geoeffectiveness. Another importantquantity to forecast is the arrival time of the expected geoeffectiveCME ejecta. In order to accurately forecast these quantities in atimely manner (say, 24--48 hours of advance warning time), it isnecessary to calculate the evolving CME ejecta---its structure andmagnetic field vector in three dimensions---using remote sensing solardata alone. We discuss a method based on the validated erupting fluxrope (EFR) model of CME dynamics. It has been shown using STEREO datathat the model can calculate the correct size, magnetic field, and theplasma parameters of a CME ejecta detected at 1 AU, using the observedCME position-time data alone as input (Kunkel and Chen 2010). Onedisparity is in the arrival time, which is attributed to thesimplified geometry of circular toroidal axis of the CME flux rope.Accordingly, the model has been extended to self-consistently includethe transverse expansion of the flux rope (Kunkel 2012; Kunkel andChen 2015). We show that the extended formulation provides a betterprediction of arrival time even if the CME apex does not propagatedirectly toward the earth. We apply the new method to a number of CMEevents and compare predicted flux ropes at 1 AU to the observed ejectastructures inferred from in situ magnetic and plasma data. The EFRmodel also predicts the asymptotic ambient solar wind speed (Vsw) foreach event, which has not been validated yet. The predicted Vswvalues are tested using the ENLIL model. We discuss the minimum andsufficient required input data for an operational forecasting systemfor predicting the drivers of large geomagnetic storms.Kunkel, V., and Chen, J., ApJ Lett, 715, L80, 2010. Kunkel, V., Ph

  17. Mapping brain activity at scale with cluster computing.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jeremy; Vladimirov, Nikita; Kawashima, Takashi; Mu, Yu; Sofroniew, Nicholas J; Bennett, Davis V; Rosen, Joshua; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Looger, Loren L; Ahrens, Misha B

    2014-09-01

    Understanding brain function requires monitoring and interpreting the activity of large networks of neurons during behavior. Advances in recording technology are greatly increasing the size and complexity of neural data. Analyzing such data will pose a fundamental bottleneck for neuroscience. We present a library of analytical tools called Thunder built on the open-source Apache Spark platform for large-scale distributed computing. The library implements a variety of univariate and multivariate analyses with a modular, extendable structure well-suited to interactive exploration and analysis development. We demonstrate how these analyses find structure in large-scale neural data, including whole-brain light-sheet imaging data from fictively behaving larval zebrafish, and two-photon imaging data from behaving mouse. The analyses relate neuronal responses to sensory input and behavior, run in minutes or less and can be used on a private cluster or in the cloud. Our open-source framework thus holds promise for turning brain activity mapping efforts into biological insights.

  18. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns.

  19. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E

    2015-12-18

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns.

  20. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E

    2015-12-18

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns. PMID:26722949

  1. Ion acceleration near CME-driven interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir; Dayeh, Maher; Smith, Charles; Mason, Glenn; Lee, Martin

    2012-05-01

    We have surveyed properties of the magnetic field power spectral densities and energetic ions and compared them with the shock normal angles of 74 CME-driven IP shocks observed at ACE and Wind during solar cycle 23. We searched for events that exhibited clear signatures of first-order Fermi acceleration at quasi-parallel shocks and shock-drift acceleration at quasi-perpendicular shocks as predicted by the diffusive shock acceleration theory. Our results show that events with clear signatures of either shock-drift or first-order Fermi acceleration at 1 AU are rare, with 64 of the 74 IP shocks (~87%) exhibiting mixed signatures. We classify the remaining ten events as follows. (1) Four quasi-perpendicular shocks with θBn>70° exhibit no enhancements in the magnetic field power spectrum around the proton gyro-frequency and a slight hardening or no change in the ~80-300 keV/nucleon CNO spectral index across the shocks, indicating the absence of upstream wave activity and the re-acceleration of a pre-existing suprathermal seed spectrum. (2) Six quasi-parallel or oblique IP shocks with θBn<70° exhibit significant enhancements in the power spectral densities around the proton gyro-frequency and are accompanied by unfolding (softening) of the ~80-300 keV/nucleon CNO spectral index across the shocks, indicating the acceleration and efficient trapping of <300 keV/nucleon CNO ions by the Alfvén waves that were most likely excited by the accelerated protons as they streamed away from the shocks. In this paper, we present contrasting energetic particle and magnetic field observations near 2 IP shocks at 1 AU to highlight the complex signatures associated with the two distinct types of shock acceleration mechanisms.

  2. A Tiny Eruptive Filament as a Flux-Rope Progenitor and Driver of a Large-Scale CME and Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Kochanov, A. A.; Kuzmenko, I. V.; Prosovetsky, D. V.; Egorov, Y. I.; Fainshtein, V. G.; Kashapova, L. K.

    2016-04-01

    A solar eruptive event SOL2010-06-13 observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has been extensively discussed in the contexts of the CME development and an associated extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave-like transient in terms of a shock driven by the apparent CME rim. Continuing the analysis of this event, we have revealed an erupting flux rope, studied its properties, and detected wave signatures inside the developing CME. These findings have allowed us to establish new features in the genesis of the CME and associated EUV wave and to reconcile all of the episodes into a single causally related sequence. i) A hot 11 MK flux rope developed from the structures initially associated with a compact filament system. The flux rope expanded with an acceleration of up to 3 km s-2 one minute before a hard X-ray burst and earlier than any other structures, reached a velocity of 420 km s-1, and then decelerated to about 50 km s-1. ii) The CME development was driven by the expanding flux rope. Closed coronal structures above the rope got sequentially involved in the expansion from below upwards, came closer together, and apparently disappeared to reveal their common envelope, the visible rim, which became the outer boundary of the cavity. The rim was probably associated with the separatrix surface of a magnetic domain, which contained the pre-eruptive filament. iii) The rim formation was associated with a successive compression of the upper active-region structures into the CME frontal structure (FS). When the rim was formed, it resembled a piston. iv) The disturbance responsible for the consecutive CME formation episodes was excited by the flux rope inside the rim, and then propagated outward. EUV structures arranged at different heights started to accelerate, when their trajectories in the distance-time diagram were crossed by that of the fast front of this disturbance. v) Outside the rim and FS, the disturbance propagated like

  3. A Full Study on the Sun-Earth Connection of an Earth-directed CME Magnetic Flux Rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemareddy, Panditi; Mishra, Wageesh

    2015-11-01

    We present an investigation of an eruption event of a coronal mass ejection (CME) magnetic flux rope (MFR) from the source active region (AR) NOAA 11719 on 2013 April 11 utilizing observations from the Solar Dynamic Observatory, the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and the WIND spacecraft. The source AR consists of a pre-existing sigmoidal structure stacked over a filament channel which is regarded as an MFR system. EUV observations of low corona suggest further development of this MFR system by added axial flux through tether-cutting reconnection of loops at the middle of the sigmoid under the influence of continuous slow flux motions for two days. Our study implies that the MFR system in the AR is initiated to upward motion by kink instability and further driven by torus instability. The CME morphology, captured in simultaneous three-point coronagraph observations, is fitted with a Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) model and discerns an MFR topology with its orientation aligning with a magnetic neutral line in the source AR. This MFR expands self-similarly and is found to have source AR twist signatures in the associated near-Earth magnetic cloud (MC). We further derived the kinematics of this CME propagation by employing a plethora of stereoscopic as well as single-spacecraft reconstruction techniques. While stereoscopic methods perform relatively poorly compared to other methods, fitting methods worked best in estimating the arrival time of the CME compared to in situ measurements. Supplied with the values of constrained solar wind velocity, drag parameter, and three-dimensional kinematics from the GCS fit, we construct CME kinematics from the drag-based model consistent with in situ MC arrival.

  4. A Full Study on the Sun–Earth Connection of an Earth-directed CME Magnetic Flux Rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemareddy, Panditi; Mishra, Wageesh

    2015-11-01

    We present an investigation of an eruption event of a coronal mass ejection (CME) magnetic flux rope (MFR) from the source active region (AR) NOAA 11719 on 2013 April 11 utilizing observations from the Solar Dynamic Observatory, the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and the WIND spacecraft. The source AR consists of a pre-existing sigmoidal structure stacked over a filament channel which is regarded as an MFR system. EUV observations of low corona suggest further development of this MFR system by added axial flux through tether-cutting reconnection of loops at the middle of the sigmoid under the influence of continuous slow flux motions for two days. Our study implies that the MFR system in the AR is initiated to upward motion by kink instability and further driven by torus instability. The CME morphology, captured in simultaneous three-point coronagraph observations, is fitted with a Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) model and discerns an MFR topology with its orientation aligning with a magnetic neutral line in the source AR. This MFR expands self-similarly and is found to have source AR twist signatures in the associated near-Earth magnetic cloud (MC). We further derived the kinematics of this CME propagation by employing a plethora of stereoscopic as well as single-spacecraft reconstruction techniques. While stereoscopic methods perform relatively poorly compared to other methods, fitting methods worked best in estimating the arrival time of the CME compared to in situ measurements. Supplied with the values of constrained solar wind velocity, drag parameter, and three-dimensional kinematics from the GCS fit, we construct CME kinematics from the drag-based model consistent with in situ MC arrival.

  5. A FULL STUDY ON THE SUN–EARTH CONNECTION OF AN EARTH-DIRECTED CME MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, Panditi; Mishra, Wageesh E-mail: wageesh@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-11-20

    We present an investigation of an eruption event of a coronal mass ejection (CME) magnetic flux rope (MFR) from the source active region (AR) NOAA 11719 on 2013 April 11 utilizing observations from the Solar Dynamic Observatory, the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and the WIND spacecraft. The source AR consists of a pre-existing sigmoidal structure stacked over a filament channel which is regarded as an MFR system. EUV observations of low corona suggest further development of this MFR system by added axial flux through tether-cutting reconnection of loops at the middle of the sigmoid under the influence of continuous slow flux motions for two days. Our study implies that the MFR system in the AR is initiated to upward motion by kink instability and further driven by torus instability. The CME morphology, captured in simultaneous three-point coronagraph observations, is fitted with a Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) model and discerns an MFR topology with its orientation aligning with a magnetic neutral line in the source AR. This MFR expands self-similarly and is found to have source AR twist signatures in the associated near-Earth magnetic cloud (MC). We further derived the kinematics of this CME propagation by employing a plethora of stereoscopic as well as single-spacecraft reconstruction techniques. While stereoscopic methods perform relatively poorly compared to other methods, fitting methods worked best in estimating the arrival time of the CME compared to in situ measurements. Supplied with the values of constrained solar wind velocity, drag parameter, and three-dimensional kinematics from the GCS fit, we construct CME kinematics from the drag-based model consistent with in situ MC arrival.

  6. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Natalia P.; Bulteau, Anne Laure; Salazar, Julio; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Nunez, Marco T.

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  7. Circadian secretion of cortisol and melatonin in cluster headache during active cluster periods and remission.

    PubMed Central

    Waldenlind, E; Gustafsson, S A; Ekbom, K; Wetterberg, L

    1987-01-01

    The cyclic nature of cluster headache warranted a study of the 24-hour rhythms of serum cortisol and melatonin. They were both altered during cluster periods as compared with periods of remission and healthy controls. The 24-hour mean and maximal cortisol levels were higher and the timing of the cortisol minimum was delayed as compared to the same patients in remission. Although there was no relation between the cortisol and melatonin levels and headaches, the rise of cortisol following many attacks might in part represent an adaptive response to pain. The nocturnal melatonin maximum was lower during cluster periods than in remission. This finding, and the dysautonomic signs during attacks, may reflect a change of the vegetative tone in a hyposympathetic direction. Images PMID:3572435

  8. Coronal magnetic reconnection driven by CME expansion—the 2011 June 7 event

    SciTech Connect

    Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Baker, D.; Green, L. M.; Williams, D. R.; Carlyle, J.; Kliem, B.; Long, D. M.; Matthews, S. A.; Török, T.; Pariat, E.; Valori, G.; Démoulin, P.; Malherbe, J.-M.

    2014-06-10

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) erupt and expand in a magnetically structured solar corona. Various indirect observational pieces of evidence have shown that the magnetic field of CMEs reconnects with surrounding magnetic fields, forming, e.g., dimming regions distant from the CME source regions. Analyzing Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations of the eruption from AR 11226 on 2011 June 7, we present the first direct evidence of coronal magnetic reconnection between the fields of two adjacent active regions during a CME. The observations are presented jointly with a data-constrained numerical simulation, demonstrating the formation/intensification of current sheets along a hyperbolic flux tube at the interface between the CME and the neighboring AR 11227. Reconnection resulted in the formation of new magnetic connections between the erupting magnetic structure from AR 11226 and the neighboring active region AR 11227 about 200 Mm from the eruption site. The onset of reconnection first becomes apparent in the SDO/AIA images when filament plasma, originally contained within the erupting flux rope, is redirected toward remote areas in AR 11227, tracing the change of large-scale magnetic connectivity. The location of the coronal reconnection region becomes bright and directly observable at SDO/AIA wavelengths, owing to the presence of down-flowing cool, dense (10{sup 10} cm{sup –3}) filament plasma in its vicinity. The high-density plasma around the reconnection region is heated to coronal temperatures, presumably by slow-mode shocks and Coulomb collisions. These results provide the first direct observational evidence that CMEs reconnect with surrounding magnetic structures, leading to a large-scale reconfiguration of the coronal magnetic field.

  9. Night-time neuronal activation of Cluster N in a day- and night-migrating songbird

    PubMed Central

    Zapka, Manuela; Heyers, Dominik; Liedvogel, Miriam; Jarvis, Erich D; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic compass orientation in a night-migratory songbird requires that Cluster N, a cluster of forebrain regions, is functional. Cluster N, which receives input from the eyes via the thalamofugal pathway, shows high neuronal activity in night-migrants performing magnetic compass-guided behaviour at night, whereas no activation is observed during the day, and covering up the birds’ eyes strongly reduces neuronal activation. These findings suggest that Cluster N processes light-dependent magnetic compass information in night-migrating songbirds. The aim of this study was to test if Cluster N is active during daytime migration. We used behavioural molecular mapping based on ZENK activation to investigate if Cluster N is active in the meadow pipit (Anthus pratensis), a day- and night-migratory species. We found that Cluster N of meadow pipits shows high neuronal activity under dim-light at night, but not under full room-light conditions during the day. These data suggest that, in day- and night-migratory meadow pipits, the light-dependent magnetic compass, which requires an active Cluster N, may only be used during night-time, whereas another magnetosensory mechanism and/or other reference system(s), like the sun or polarized light, may be used as primary orientation cues during the day. PMID:20618826

  10. Removing Cool Cores and Central Metallicity Peaks in Galaxy Clusters with Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ~1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  11. Extraction of SAR information from activity cliff clusters via matching molecular series.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-11-24

    The vast majority of activity cliffs that occur is sets of bioactive compounds are formed in a coordinated manner. This means that multiple and overlapping cliffs are formed by groups of structural analogs with varying activity. In network representations, coordinated activity cliffs emerge as clusters of varying size and topology. Activity cliff clusters are typically rich in structure-activity relationship (SAR) information but often difficult to analyze from a medicinal chemistry viewpoint. A key question is how to best access SAR information contained in activity cliff clusters without the need to evaluate many different clusters individually. Herein, we introduce a methodology for the systematic extraction of SAR information from activity cliff clusters that utilizes the concept of matching molecular series (MMS). Sequences of activity cliff-forming compounds are isolated from clusters that follow a activity gradient and series spanning large activity differences are preferentially selected. In addition to its systematic nature, an attractive feature of the approach is that SAR information associated with extracted series is readily interpretable. We show that MMS are abundant in activity cliff clusters from the current spectrum of bioactive compounds and that many MMS share compounds. The resulting pairs of connected MMS contain compounds with closely related structural cores and alternative substitution sites that reveal SAR determinants and preferred substituents.

  12. Career Cluster Activity Book, Intermediate Level. Learn About the Fifteen Career Clusters and Color the Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White Hawk, Sharon, Ed.

    Simple black and white illustrations portray one occupation for each of 15 career clusters. Directed toward the Indian student and showing Indians at work in the occupations depicted, the illustrations are intended to create an awareness, understanding, and motivation for Indian students to become involved in work, both on and off the reservation.…

  13. Reactivity and Catalytic Activity of Hydrogen Atom Chemisorbed Silver Clusters.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Dar; Pal, Sourav

    2015-06-18

    Metal clusters of silver have attracted recent interest of researchers as a result of their potential in different catalytic applications and low cost. However, due to the completely filled d orbital and very high first ionization potential of the silver atom, the silver-based catalysts interact very weakly with the reacting molecules. In the current work, density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrogen atom chemisorption on the reactivity and catalytic properties of inert silver clusters. Our results affirm that the hydrogen atom chemisorption leads to enhancement in the binding energy of the adsorbed O2 molecule on the inert silver clusters. The increase in the binding energy is also characterized by the decrease in the Ag-O and increase in the O-O bond lengths in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Pertinent to the increase in the O-O bond length, a significant red shift in the O-O stretching frequency is also noted in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Moreover, the hydrogen atom chemisorbed silver clusters show low reaction barriers and high heat of formation of the final products for the environmentally important CO oxidation reaction as compared to the parent catalytically inactive clusters. The obtained results were compared with those of the corresponding gold and hydrogen atom chemisorbed gold clusters obtained at the same level of theory. It is expected the current computational study will provide key insights for future advances in the design of efficient nanosilver-based catalysts through the adsorption of a small atom or a ligand.

  14. Dynamical quorum sensing and clustering dynamics in a population of spatially distributed active rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Maeyama, Satomi

    2013-02-01

    A model of clustering dynamics is proposed for a population of spatially distributed active rotators. A transition from excitable to oscillatory dynamics is induced by the increase of the local density of active rotators. It is interpreted as dynamical quorum sensing. In the oscillation regime, phase waves propagate without decay, which generates an effectively long-range interaction in the clustering dynamics. The clustering process becomes facilitated and only one dominant cluster appears rapidly as a result of the dynamical quorum sensing. An exact localized solution is found to a simplified model equation, and the competitive dynamics between two localized states is studied numerically.

  15. Moreton and EUV Waves Associated with an X1.0 Flare and CME Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francile, Carlos; López, Fernando M.; Cremades, Hebe; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Luoni, María Luisa; Long, David M.

    2016-09-01

    A Moreton wave was detected in active region (AR) 12017 on 29 March 2014 with very high cadence with the H-Alpha Solar Telescope for Argentina (HASTA) in association with an X1.0 flare (SOL2014-03-29T17:48). Several other phenomena took place in connection with this event, such as low-coronal waves and a coronal mass ejection (CME). We analyze the association between the Moreton wave and the EUV signatures observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. These include their low-coronal surface-imprint, and the signatures of the full wave and shock dome propagating outward in the corona. We also study their relation to the white-light CME. We perform a kinematic analysis by tracking the wavefronts in several directions. This analysis reveals a high-directional dependence of accelerations and speeds determined from data at various wavelengths. We speculate that a region of open magnetic field lines northward of our defined radiant point sets favorable conditions for the propagation of a coronal magnetohydrodynamic shock in this direction. The hypothesis that the Moreton wavefront is produced by a coronal shock-wave that pushes the chromosphere downward is supported by the high compression ratio in that region. Furthermore, we propose a 3D geometrical model to explain the observed wavefronts as the chromospheric and low-coronal traces of an expanding and outward-traveling bubble intersecting the Sun. The results of the model are in agreement with the coronal shock-wave being generated by a 3D piston that expands at the speed of the associated rising filament. The piston is attributed to the fast ejection of the filament-CME ensemble, which is also consistent with the good match between the speed profiles of the low-coronal and white-light shock waves.

  16. Prediction of Type II Radio Bursts Associated with Large CME Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, Iver; Schmidt, Joachim

    Type II radio bursts are associated with shocks in the corona and solar wind, either driven by CMEs or else by blast waves. Recently we coupled the advanced 3D MHD BATS-R-US code of Toth, Gombosi, and colleagues with our kinetic ``bolt-on'' theory for type II emission. Initialising the simulation code with event specific coronal and CME data, the combined code can be used to predict the dynamic spectrum of type II emission for a specific radio event. We demonstrate very good agreement with Wind spacecraft observations for three type II bursts, one on 15 February 2011 and two on 7 March 2012 (associated with successive CMEs from different sides of the same active region). The intensities, frequencies, and times of fundamental and harmonic type II emission are predicted very well from the high corona to 1 AU (frequencies ~ 20 MHz - 30 kHz). The islands of increased emission correspond to different regions of the shock interacting with coronal structures, with streamers typically corresponding to reduced emission. The results provide strong evidence that both the type II theory and the BATS-R-US (driven with event-specific data) are accurate. They also provide strong evidence that the observation and detailed theoretical modelling of type II bursts can in principle provide warnings with lead-times of over a day for large and fast CMEs that might produce space weather at Earth. The MHD code can also predict whether the CME will hit Earth's magnetopause and the magnetic field direction at the magnetopause as the shock, sheath, and CME, vital quantities for predicting space weather at Earth.

  17. Activation of Methane Promoted by Adsorption of CO on Mo2 C2 (-) Cluster Anions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Yu; Ma, Jia-Bi; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Chongyang; Ning, Chuan-Gang; Chen, Hui; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-05-01

    Atomic clusters are being actively studied for activation of methane, the most stable alkane molecule. While many cluster cations are very reactive with methane, the cluster anions are usually not very reactive, particularly for noble metal free anions. This study reports that the reactivity of molybdenum carbide cluster anions with methane can be much enhanced by adsorption of CO. The Mo2 C2 (-) is inert with CH4 while the CO addition product Mo2 C3 O(-) brings about dehydrogenation of CH4 under thermal collision conditions. The cluster structures and reactions are characterized by mass spectrometry, photoelectron spectroscopy, and quantum chemistry calculations, which demonstrate that the Mo2 C3 O(-) isomer with dissociated CO is reactive but the one with non-dissociated CO is unreactive. The enhancement of cluster reactivity promoted by CO adsorption in this study is compared with those of reported systems of a few carbonyl complexes. PMID:27060286

  18. Charge separation promoted activation of molecular oxygen by neutral gold clusters.

    PubMed

    Woodham, Alex P; Meijer, Gerard; Fielicke, André

    2013-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles and sub-nanoparticles famously act as highly efficient and selective low-temperature oxidation catalysts with molecular oxygen, in stark contrast to the nobility of the bulk phase. The origins of this activity and the nature of the active species remain open questions. Gas-phase studies of isolated gold clusters hold promise for disentangling these problems. Here we address the interaction of neutral gold clusters (Au(n); 4 ≤ n ≤ 21) with molecular oxygen by probing the highly characteristic O-O vibrational stretch frequencies. This reveals that for selected cluster sizes the oxygen is highly activated with respect to the free moiety. Complementary quantum chemical calculations provide evidence for substantial electron transfer to the O(2) unit and concomitant rearrangement of the parent gold cluster structure upon binding and activation. This gives evidence for a model of the interaction between neutral gold clusters and molecular oxygen.

  19. Type II Radio Bursts as an Indicator of CME Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, C. A.; St Cyr, O. C.; Henning, C.; Xie, H.; Gilbert, H. R.; Orlove, M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Odstrcil, D.

    2011-12-01

    We examined a subset of nine low-frequency radio events with type II radio bursts that drifted below 2 megahertz and were detected by the WAVES investigation on the WIND spacecraft. For each event, we identified the associated coronal mass ejection (CME) and derived the electron density using a model of solar wind plasma frequency (fp ≈ 9 * ne1/2, where fp is plasma frequency in kHz and ne is electron density in cm-3) . We also used the pb_inverter program in SolarSoft developed by Howard and Hayes to examine the electron density structure. Expanding on the Van De Hulst process of inverting polarized brightness measurements, the program inverts total brightness measurements from SOHO LASCO images to extract electron density information. From the electron density inferred from radio spectra, we derived the location of the CME using five standard electron density to height models (Leblanc, 1996; Saito, 1977; Bougeret, 1984; Alvarez, 1973; and Fainberg, 1971). Using images from the LASCO instrument on SOHO and the SECCHI instrument on STEREO, we extracted locations of the leading edge of the CME and compared the heights and velocities to those found using the frequency data. For the lowest frequency events, we also compared our results to the outputs of ENLIL, a time-dependent, three-dimensional, MHD model of the heliosphere hosted by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  20. Spontaneous cluster activity in the inferior olivary nucleus in brainstem slices from postnatal mice.

    PubMed

    Rekling, Jens C; Jensen, Kristian H R; Jahnsen, Henrik

    2012-04-01

    A distinctive property of the cerebellar system is olivocerebellar modules, where synchronized electrical activity in neurons in the inferior olivary nucleus (IO) evokes organized activity in the cerebellar cortex. However, the exact function of these modules, and how they are developed, is still largely unknown. Here we show that the IO in in vitro slices from postnatal mice spontaneously generates clusters of neurons with synchronous Ca(2+) transients. Neurons in the principal olive (PO), and the vestibular-related dorsomedial cell column (dmcc), showed an age-dependent increase in spontaneous calcium transients. The spatiotemporal activity pattern was occasionally organized in clusters of co-active neighbouring neurons,with regular (16 min-1) and irregular (2-3 min(-1)) repeating cluster activity in the dmcc and PO, respectively. IO clusters had a diameter of 100-170 μm, lasted~1 s, and increased in occurrence from postnatal day P5.5 to P12.5, followed by a sharp drop to near zero at P15.5. IO clusters were overlapping, and comprised nearly identical neurons at some time points, and a varied subset of neurons at others. Some neurons had hub-like properties, being co-active with many other neighbours, and some were co-active with separate clusters at different times. The coherence between calcium transients in IO neurons decreased with Euclidean distance between the cells reaching low values at 100-200 μm distances. Intracellular recordings from IO neurons during cluster formation revealed the presence of spikelet-like potentials, suggesting that electrical coupling between neighbouring IO neurons may serve as a synchronizing mechanism. In conclusion, the IO shows spontaneous cluster activity under in vitro conditions, coinciding with a critical postnatal period in olivocerebellar development. We propose that these clusters may be forerunners of the ensembles of IO neurons shown to be co-active in adult animals spontaneously and during motor acts.

  1. Space Weather and confined CME events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, Julia; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid; Su, Yang

    2016-04-01

    The unusually large NOAA active region (AR) 2192, observed in October and November 2014, was outstanding in its productivity of major flares (GOES class M5 and larger). During the time when the AR faced Earth, major Space Weather events would have been expected. However, none of the X-flares was associated to a coronal mass ejection. Observational evidence for the confinement of the flare are large initial separation of the flare ribbons, together with an almost absent growth in ribbon separation. The low dynamic of the ribbons also suggests a reconnection site high up in the corona. From NLFF modeling we show that the arcade overlying the AR had a predominantly north-south oriented magnetic system, which served as a strong, also lateral, confinement for the flares at the core of the active region. From the magnetic field modeling we derived the decay of the constraining background, and it was found that the overlying field was only slowly decaying with height. We conclude that observational data of the solar surface, especially of flare ribbon dynamics as well as magnetic field models support Space Weather predictions.

  2. Selenate reductase activity in Escherichia coli requires Isc iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Yee, Nathan; Choi, Jessica; Porter, Abigail W; Carey, Sean; Rauschenbach, Ines; Harel, Arye

    2014-12-01

    The selenate reductase in Escherichia coli is a multi-subunit enzyme predicted to bind Fe-S clusters. In this study, we examined the iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis genes that are required for selenate reductase activity. Mutants devoid of either the iscU or hscB gene in the Isc iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis pathway lost the ability to reduce selenate. Genetic complementation by the wild-type sequences restored selenate reductase activity. The results indicate the Isc biosynthetic system plays a key role in selenate reductase Fe-S cofactor assembly and is essential for enzyme activity.

  3. STUDY OF THE 2007 APRIL 20 CME-COMET INTERACTION EVENT WITH AN MHD MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y. D.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Manchester, W. B.; Cohen, O.; Hansen, K. C.; Combi, M. R.; Gombosi, T. I.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-05-01

    This study examines the tail disconnection event on 2007 April 20 on comet 2P/Encke, caused by a coronal mass ejection (CME) at a heliocentric distance of 0.34 AU. During their interaction, both the CME and the comet are visible with high temporal and spatial resolution by the STEREO-A spacecraft. Previously, only current sheets or shocks have been accepted as possible reasons for comet tail disconnections, so it is puzzling that the CME caused this event. The MHD simulation presented in this work reproduces the interaction process and demonstrates how the CME triggered a tail disconnection in the April 20 event. It is found that the CME disturbs the comet with a combination of a 180 deg. sudden rotation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), followed by a 90 deg. gradual rotation. Such an interpretation applies our understanding of solar wind-comet interactions to determine the in situ IMF orientation of the CME encountering Encke.

  4. X-Ray Activity in the Open Cluster IC 4665

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giamapapa, Mark S.; Prosser, Charles F.; Fleming, Thomas A.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of a joint ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) and optical investigation of the open cluster IC 4665. The ROSAT data contains detections for 28 stellar sources in the field, including 22 cluster members and candidate members spanning the color range -0.18 less than or equal to (B - V(sub o)) less than or equal to +1.63 (approx. B3 - M3). Upper limits are given for the remaining members (or candidate members) in the HRI field. Keck HIRES spectra have been obtained that yield radial and rotational velocity measures, respectively, for faint, low mass candidate members located within the field of the ROSAT HRI observation. In addition, photometry of possible optical counterparts to previously uncatalogued X-ray sources in the HRI field is presented. The trends in X-ray properties with (B - V) color in IC 4665 are found to be quite similar to that for other, more nearby young clusters such as the Pleiades and alpha Persei. In particular, a maximum in normalized X-ray luminosity of log (L(sub x)/L(sub bol)) approx. equal 3 is observed, beginning in the color range of (B - V)(sub o) = 0.7 - 0.8. This is similar to the corresponding color range among Pleiades members, in agreement with the earlier estimate, that the age of IC 4665 is similar to the age of the Pleiades. The correlation of rotation and X-ray emission levels is consistent with that in other young clusters. Among the high mass stars in IC 4665, five B stars are detected as X-ray sources. Of these, one is a spectroscopic binary while the remaining objects are apparently single staxs. The level of intrinsic X-ray emission observed in the rapidly rotating (v sini greater than 200 km/ s), single B stars is consistent with an origin due to shock heating of the ambient medium by radiatively driven, rotationally enhanced winds. On the basis of these observations and the results for other clusters, we argue that observed levels of X-ray emission in high mass stars of log (L(sub x)/L(sub bol

  5. A cluster expansion model for predicting activation barrier of atomic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Tafizur; Jaipal, M.; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2013-06-15

    We introduce a procedure based on cluster expansion models for predicting the activation barrier of atomic processes encountered while studying the dynamics of a material system using the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method. Starting with an interatomic potential description, a mathematical derivation is presented to show that the local environment dependence of the activation barrier can be captured using cluster interaction models. Next, we develop a systematic procedure for training the cluster interaction model on-the-fly, which involves: (i) obtaining activation barriers for handful local environments using nudged elastic band (NEB) calculations, (ii) identifying the local environment by analyzing the NEB results, and (iii) estimating the cluster interaction model parameters from the activation barrier data. Once a cluster expansion model has been trained, it is used to predict activation barriers without requiring any additional NEB calculations. Numerical studies are performed to validate the cluster expansion model by studying hop processes in Ag/Ag(100). We show that the use of cluster expansion model with KMC enables efficient generation of an accurate process rate catalog.

  6. Activation and Characterization of a Cryptic Polycyclic Tetramate Macrolactam Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yunzi; Huang, Hua; Liang, Jing; Wang, Meng; Lu, Lu; Shao, Zengyi; Cobb, Ryan E.; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic tetramate macrolactams (PTMs) are a widely distributed class of natural products with important biological activities. However, many of them have not been characterized. Here we apply a plug and play synthetic biology strategy to activate a cryptic PTM biosynthetic gene cluster SGR810-815 from Streptomyces griseus and discover three potential PTMs. This gene cluster is highly conserved in phylogenetically diverse bacterial strains and contains an unusual hybrid polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) which resembles iterative PKSs known in fungi. To further characterize this gene cluster, we use the same synthetic biology approach to create a series of gene deletion constructs and elucidate the biosynthetic steps for the formation of the polycyclic system. The strategy we employ bypasses the traditional laborious processes to elicit gene cluster expression and should be generally applicable to many other silent or cryptic gene clusters for discovery and characterization of new natural products. PMID:24305602

  7. Crystal Structure of the Transcriptional Regulator CmeR From Campylobacter Jejuni

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, R.; Su, C.-C.; Shi, F.; McDermott, G.; Zhang, Q.; Yu, E.W.

    2009-06-01

    The CmeABC multidrug efflux pump, which belongs to the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) family, recognizes and extrudes a broad range of antimicrobial agents and is essential for Campylobacter jejuni colonization of the animal intestinal tract by mediating the efflux of bile acids. The expression of CmeABC is controlled by the transcriptional regulator CmeR, whose open reading frame is located immediately upstream of the cmeABC operon. To understand the structural basis of CmeR regulation, we have determined the crystal structure of CmeR to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, revealing a dimeric two-domain molecule with an entirely helical architecture similar to members of the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. Unlike the rest of the TetR regulators, CmeR has a large center-to-center distance (54 {angstrom}) between two N termini of the dimer, and a large flexible ligand-binding pocket in the C-terminal domain. Each monomer forms a 20 {angstrom} long tunnel-like cavity in the ligand-binding domain of CmeR and is occupied by a fortuitous ligand that is identified as glycerol. The binding of glycerol to CmeR induces a conformational state that is incompatible with target DNA. As glycerol has a chemical structure similar to that of potential ligands of CmeR, the structure obtained mimics the induced form of CmeR. These findings reveal novel structural features of a TetR family regulator, and provide new insight into the mechanisms of ligand binding and CmeR regulation.

  8. Living Clusters and Crystals from Low-Density Suspensions of Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mognetti, B. M.; Šarić, A.; Angioletti-Uberti, S.; Cacciuto, A.; Valeriani, C.; Frenkel, D.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies aimed at investigating artificial analogs of bacterial colonies have shown that low-density suspensions of self-propelled particles confined in two dimensions can assemble into finite aggregates that merge and split, but have a typical size that remains constant (living clusters). In this Letter, we address the problem of the formation of living clusters and crystals of active particles in three dimensions. We study two systems: self-propelled particles interacting via a generic attractive potential and colloids that can move toward each other as a result of active agents (e.g., by molecular motors). In both cases, fluidlike “living” clusters form. We explain this general feature in terms of the balance between active forces and regression to thermodynamic equilibrium. This balance can be quantified in terms of a dimensionless number that allows us to collapse the observed clustering behavior onto a universal curve. We also discuss how active motion affects the kinetics of crystal formation.

  9. Scientific goals of the Cooperative Multiscale Experiment (CME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, William

    1993-01-01

    Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) form the focus of CME. Recent developments in global climate models, the urgent need to improve the representation of the physics of convection, radiation, the boundary layer, and orography, and the surge of interest in coupling hydrologic, chemistry, and atmospheric models of various scales, have emphasized the need for a broad interdisciplinary and multi-scale approach to understanding and predicting MCS's and their interactions with processes at other scales. The role of mesoscale systems in the large-scale atmospheric circulation, the representation of organized convection and other mesoscale flux sources in terms of bulk properties, and the mutually consistent treatment of water vapor, clouds, radiation, and precipitation, are all key scientific issues concerning which CME will seek to increase understanding. The manner in which convective, mesoscale, and larger scale processes interact to produce and organize MCS's, the moisture cycling properties of MCS's, and the use of coupled cloud/mesoscale models to better understand these processes, are also major objectives of CME. Particular emphasis will be placed on the multi-scale role of MCS's in the hydrological cycle and in the production and transport of chemical trace constituents. The scientific goals of the CME consist of the following: understand how the large and small scales of motion influence the location, structure, intensity, and life cycles of MCS's; understand processes and conditions that determine the relative roles of balanced (slow manifold) and unbalanced (fast manifold) circulations in the dynamics of MCS's throughout their life cycles; assess the predictability of MCS's and improve the quantitative forecasting of precipitation and severe weather events; quantify the upscale feedback of MCS's to the large-scale environment and determine interrelationships between MCS occurrence and variations in the large-scale flow and surface forcing; provide a data base

  10. Particle Acceleration by Cme-driven Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic particle (SEP) events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Peak particle intensities are a strong function of CME speed, although the intensities, spectra, and angular distributions of particles escaping the shock are highly modified by scattering on Alfven waves produced by the streaming particles themselves. Element abundances vary in complex ways because ions with different values of Q/A resonate with different parts of the wave spectrum, which varies with space and time. Just recently, we have begun to model these systematic variations theoretically and to explore other consequences of proton-generated waves.

  11. Communication: CO oxidation by silver and gold cluster cations: Identification of different active oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Popolan, Denisia M.; Bernhardt, Thorsten M.

    2011-03-07

    The oxidation of carbon monoxide with nitrous oxide on mass-selected Au{sub 3}{sup +} and Ag{sub 3}{sup +} clusters has been investigated under multicollision conditions in an octopole ion trap experiment. The comparative study reveals that for both gold and silver cations carbon dioxide is formed on the clusters. However, whereas in the case of Au{sub 3}{sup +} the cluster itself acts as reactive species that facilitates the formation of CO{sub 2} from N{sub 2}O and CO, for silver the oxidized clusters Ag{sub 3}O{sub x}{sup +} (n= 1-3) are identified as active in the CO oxidation reaction. Thus, in the case of the silver cluster cations N{sub 2}O is dissociated and one oxygen atom is suggested to directly react with CO, whereas a second kind of oxygen strongly bound to silver is acting as a substrate for the reaction.

  12. THE EVOLUTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES TO REDSHIFT 1.3

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, Paul; Sivakoff, Gregory R.; Mulchaey, John S.

    2009-08-10

    We have measured the luminous active galactic nucleus (AGN) population in a large sample of clusters of galaxies and find evidence for a substantial increase in the cluster AGN population from z {approx} 0.05 to z {approx} 1.3. The present sample now includes 32 clusters of galaxies, including 15 clusters above z = 0.4, which corresponds to a three-fold increase compared to our previous work at high redshift. At z < 0.4, we have obtained new observations of AGN candidates in six additional clusters and found no new luminous AGN in cluster members. Our total sample of 17 low-redshift clusters contains only two luminous AGNs, while at high redshifts there are 18 such AGNs, or an average of more than one per cluster. We have characterized the evolution of luminous X-ray AGNs as the fraction of galaxies with M{sub R} < M* {sub R}(z) + 1 that host AGNs with rest-frame, hard X-ray [2-10 keV] luminosities L {sub X,H} {>=} 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}. The AGN fraction increases from f{sub A} = 0.134{sup +0.18} {sub -0.087}% at a median z = 0.19 to f{sub A} = 1.00{sup +0.29} {sub -0.23}% at a median z = 0.72. Our best estimate of the evolution is a factor of 8 increase to z = 1 and the statistical significance of the increase is 3.8{sigma}. This dramatic evolution is qualitatively similar to the evolution of the star-forming galaxy population in clusters known as the Butcher-Oemler effect. We discuss the implications of this result for the coevolution of black holes and galaxies in clusters, the evolution of AGN feedback, searches for clusters with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, and the possible detection of environment-dependent downsizing.

  13. 76 FR 30364 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... required to complete continuing medical education (CME) accepted by accrediting organizations recognized by... activities and data collections will be implemented: 1. Provide continuing medical education (CME) or... collection project: ``Comparative Effectiveness Research-Continuing Education.'' In accordance with...

  14. SEP acceleration in CME driven shocks using a hybrid code

    SciTech Connect

    Gargaté, L.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-09-01

    We perform hybrid simulations of a super-Alfvénic quasi-parallel shock, driven by a coronal mass ejection (CME), propagating in the outer coronal/solar wind at distances of between 3 to 6 solar radii. The hybrid treatment of the problem enables the study of the shock propagation on the ion timescale, preserving ion kinetics and allowing for a self-consistent treatment of the shock propagation and particle acceleration. The CME plasma drags the embedded magnetic field lines stretching from the sun, and propagates out into interplanetary space at a greater velocity than the in situ solar wind, driving the shock, and producing very energetic particles. Our results show that electromagnetic Alfvén waves are generated at the shock front. The waves propagate upstream of the shock and are produced by the counter-streaming ions of the solar wind plasma being reflected at the shock. A significant fraction of the particles are accelerated in two distinct phases: first, particles drift from the shock and are accelerated in the upstream region, and second, particles arriving at the shock get trapped and are accelerated at the shock front. A fraction of the particles diffused back to the shock, which is consistent with the Fermi acceleration mechanism.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of CME Deflections in the Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Bin; Shen, Chenglong; Wang, Yuming; Ye, Pinzhong; Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Xuepu

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, ten CME events viewed by the STEREO twin spacecraft are analyzed to study the deflections of CMEs during their propagation in the corona. Based on the three-dimensional information of the CMEs derived by the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model (Thernisien, Howard, and Vourlidas in Astrophys. J. 652, 1305, 2006), it is found that the propagation directions of eight CMEs had changed. By applying the theoretical method proposed by Shen et al. ( Solar Phys. 269, 389, 2011) to all the CMEs, we found that the deflections are consistent, in strength and direction, with the gradient of the magnetic energy density. There is a positive correlation between the deflection rate and the strength of the magnetic energy density gradient and a weak anti-correlation between the deflection rate and the CME speed. Our results suggest that the deflections of CMEs are mainly controlled by the background magnetic field and can be quantitatively described by the magnetic energy density gradient (MEDG) model.

  16. Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares and Associated CME Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahé

    2016-10-01

    Observations relating the characteristics of electrons seen near Earth (solar energetic particles [SEPs]) and those producing flare radiation show that in certain (prompt) events the origin of both populations appears to be the flare site, which shows strong correlation between the number and spectral index of SEP and hard X-ray radiating electrons, but in others (delayed), which are associated with fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), this relation is complex and SEPs tend to be harder. Prompt event spectral relation disagrees with that expected in thick or thin target models. We show that using a more accurate treatment of the transport of the accelerated electrons to the footpoints and to Earth can account for this discrepancy. Our results are consistent with those found by Chen & Petrosian for two flares using nonparametric inversion methods, according to which we have weak diffusion conditions, and trapping mediated by magnetic field convergence. The weaker correlations and harder spectra of delayed events can come about by reacceleration of electrons in the CME shock environment. We describe under what conditions such a hardening can be achieved. Using this (acceleration at the flare and reacceleration in the CME) scenario, we show that we can describe the similar dichotomy that exists between the so-called impulsive, highly enriched (3He and heavy ions), and softer SEP events and stronger, more gradual SEP events with near-normal ionic abundances and harder spectra. These methods can be used to distinguish the acceleration mechanisms and to constrain their characteristics.

  17. Effect on the Lunar Exosphere of a CME Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Hurley, Dana M.; Farrell, William M.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that solar wind bombardment onto exposed surfaces in the solar system will produce an energetic component to the exospheres about those bodies. Laboratory experiments have shown that the sputter yield can be noticeably increased in the case of a good insulating surface. It is now known that the solar wind composition is highly dependent on the origin of the particular plasma. Using the measured composition of the slow wind, fast wind, solar energetic particle (SEP) population, and coronal mass ejection (CME), broken down into its various components, we have estimated the total sputter yield for each type of solar wind. The heavy ion component, especially the He++ component, greatly enhances the total sputter yield during times when the heavy ion population is enhanced, most notably during a coronal mass ejection. To simulate the effect on the lunar exosphere of a CME passage past the Moon, we ran a Monte Carlo code for the species Na, K, Mg and Ca.

  18. Morphology and Density Structure of Post-CME Current Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrsnak, B.; Poletto, G.; Vujic, E.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is believed to drag and open the coronal magnetic field, presumably leading to the formation of a large-scale current sheet and field relaxation by magnetic reconnection. This paper analyzes the physical characteristics of ray-like coronal features formed in the aftermath of CMEs, to confirm whether interpreting such phenomena in terms of a reconnecting current sheet is consistent with observations. Methods: The study focuses on UVCS/SOHO and LASCO/SOHO measurements of the ray width, density excess, and coronal velocity field as a function of the radial distance. The morphology of the rays implies that they are produced by Petschek-like reconnection in the large-scale current sheet formed in the wake of CME. The hypothesis is supported by the flow pattern, often showing outflows along the ray, and sometimes also inflows into the ray. The inferred inflow velocities range from 3 to 30 km/s, and are consistent with the narrow opening-angle of rays, which add up to a few degrees. The density of rays is an order of magnitude higher than in the ambient corona. The model results are consistent with the observations, revealing that the main cause of the density excess in rays is a transport of the dense plasma from lower to higher heights by the reconnection outflow.

  19. Effect on the Lunar Exosphere of a CME Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Roseamry M.; Hurley, Dana M.; Farrell, William M.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that solar wind bombardment onto exposed surfaces in the solar system will produce an energetic component to the exospheres about those bodies. Laboratory experiments have shown that the sputter yield can be noticeably increased in the case of a good insulating surface. It is now known that the solar wind composition is highly dependent on the origin of the particular plasma. Using the measured composition of the slow wind. fast wind. solar energetic particle (SEP) population. and coronal mass ejection (CME), broken down into its various components, we have estimated the total sputter yield for each type of solar wind. The heavy ion component, especially the He(++) component, greatly enhances the total sputter yield during times when the heavy ion population is enhanced, most notably during a coronal mass ejection. To simulate the etfect on the lunar exosphere of a CME passage past the Moon, we ran a Monte Carlo code for the species Na, K, Mg and Ca.

  20. The Relationship between Cortisol Activity during Cognitive Task and Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Hongxia; Wang, Li; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Kan; Wu, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Background The latest development in the dimensional structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a novel 6-factor model, which builds on the newly released DSM-5. One notable gap in the literature is that little is known about how distinct symptom clusters of PTSD are related to hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activity when people perform a relatively less stressful cognitive task. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cortisol activity when individuals perform cognitive tasks in the laboratory and a contemporary phenotypic model of posttraumatic stress symptomatology in earthquake survivors. Methods Salivary cortisol while performing cognitive tasks was collected and analyzed in 89 adult earthquake survivors. The PTSD Checklist for the DSM-5 (PCL-5) was used to assess the severity of total PTSD as well as six distinct symptom clusters. Regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations between the six distinct PTSD symptom clusters and cortisol profiles. Results The results showed that the score of the negative affect symptom cluster, but not anhedonia or other clusters, was positively associated with cortisol levels before and during the cognitive tasks. Conclusion The results showed that higher cortisol levels before and during cognitive tasks might be specifically linked to a distinct symptom cluster of PTSD—negative affect symptomatology. This suggests that a distinction should be made between negative affect and anhedonia symptom clusters, as the 6-factor model proposed. PMID:26630485

  1. AWM 4: a sharp look at the core of a poor cluster stirred by AGN activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtilek, Jan

    2007-09-01

    The central regions of galaxy clusters, frequently occupied by massive elliptical galaxies with strong radio sources interacting with dense, X-ray emitting gas, are among the most interesting and physically active regions in the Universe. We here propose a deep observation of AWM 4, a poor cluster of relaxed appearance without a cooling core but with strong evidence of AGN-driven heating and gas mixing. In this unusual object we will examine the interaction between cluster gas and radio source at high resolution, measure the properties of the gas and constrain the energy budget of the radio source, and clarify the nature of the observed abundance irregularities.

  2. Cluster Analysis of the Rat Olfactory Bulb Activity in Response to Different Odorants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falasconi, M.; Gutierrez, A.; Auffarth, B.; Sberveglieri, G.; Marco, S.

    2009-05-01

    With the goal of deepen in the understanding of coding of chemical information in the olfactory system, a large data set consisting of rat's olfactory bulb activity values in response to several different volatile compounds has been analyzed by fuzzy c-means clustering methods. Clustering should help to discover groups of glomeruli that are similary activated according to their response profiles across the odorants. To investigate the significance of the achieved fuzzy partitions we developed and applied a novel validity approach based on cluster stability. Our results show certain level of glomerular clustering in the olfactory bulb and indicate that exist a main chemo-topic subdivision of the glomerular layer in few macro-area which are rather specific to particular functional groups of the volatile molecules.

  3. Preliminary structural studies of the transcriptional regulator CmeR from Campylobacter jejuni

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Chih-Chia; Shi, Feng; Gu, Ruoyu; Li, Ming; McDermott, Gerry; Yu, Edward W.; Zhang, Qijing

    2007-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator CmeR from C. jejuni has been purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to a resolution of 2.2 Å. In Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans, the CmeR regulatory protein controls transcription of the multidrug transporter gene operon cmeABC. CmeR belongs to the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. The 210-residue CmeR consists of two functional motifs: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal ligand-binding domain. It is predicted that the DNA-binding domain interacts directly with target promoters, while the C-terminal motif interacts with inducing ligands (such as bile salts). As an initial step towards confirming this structural model, recombinant CmeR protein containing a 6×His tag at the N-terminus was crystallized. Crystals of ligand-free CmeR belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.4, b = 57.6, c = 93.3 Å. Diffraction was observed to at least 2.2 Å at 100 K. Analysis of the detailed CmeR structure is currently in progress.

  4. Promoting Free Online CME for Intimate Partner Violence: What Works at What Cost?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John M., Jr.; Novalis-Marine, Cheryl; Amend, Robert W.; Surprenant, Zita J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: There is a need to provide practicing physicians with training on the recognition and management of intimate partner violence (IPV). Online continuing medical education (CME) could help meet this need, but there is little information on the costs and effectiveness of promoting online CME to physicians. This lack of information may…

  5. Measuring Classroom Management Expertise (CME) of Teachers: A Video-Based Assessment Approach and Statistical Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    König, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The study aims at developing and exploring a novel video-based assessment that captures classroom management expertise (CME) of teachers and for which statistical results are provided. CME measurement is conceptualized by using four video clips that refer to typical classroom management situations in which teachers are heavily challenged…

  6. Effect of CME on Primary Care and OB/GYN Treatment of Breast Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, David W.; Xu, Stanley; McClure, David

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: CME program planners are being asked to move beyond assessments of knowledge to assessing the impact of CME on practice and patient outcomes. Methods: We conducted a pre-post analysis of administrative data from 107 physicians, nurse practitioners (NPs), or physician's assistants (PAs) who attended one or two continuing medical…

  7. Clustering patterns of physical activity, sedentary and dietary behavior among European adolescents: The HELENA study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests possible synergetic effects of multiple lifestyle behaviors on health risks like obesity and other health outcomes. A better insight in the clustering of those behaviors, could help to identify groups who are at risk in developing chronic diseases. This study examines the prevalence and clustering of physical activity, sedentary and dietary patterns among European adolescents and investigates if the identified clusters could be characterized by socio-demographic factors. Methods The study comprised a total of 2084 adolescents (45.6% male), from eight European cities participating in the HELENA (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) study. Physical activity and sedentary behavior were measured using self-reported questionnaires and diet quality was assessed based on dietary recall. Based on the results of those three indices, cluster analyses were performed. To identify gender differences and associations with socio-demographic variables, chi-square tests were executed. Results Five stable and meaningful clusters were found. Only 18% of the adolescents showed healthy and 21% unhealthy scores on all three included indices. Males were highly presented in the cluster with high levels of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and low quality diets. The clusters with low levels of MVPA and high quality diets comprised more female adolescents. Adolescents with low educated parents had diets of lower quality and spent more time in sedentary activities. In addition, the clusters with high levels of MVPA comprised more adolescents of the younger age category. Conclusion In order to develop effective primary prevention strategies, it would be important to consider multiple health indices when identifying high risk groups. PMID:21586158

  8. Interaction between CME and surrounding magnetic fields producing multiple flaring sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia M.

    2015-08-01

    L. van Driel-Gesztelyi (1,2,3), D. Baker (1), T. Török (4), E. Pariat (2), L.M. Green (1),D.R. Williams (1), J. Carlyle (1,5) G. Valori (1, 2), P. Démoulin (2), B. Kliem (1,7,8),D. Long (1), S.A. Matthews (1), J.-M. Malherbe (2)(1) UCL/MSSL, UK, (2) Paris Observatory, LESIA, CNRS, France, (3) Konkoly Observatory, Hungary, (4) Predictive Science, Dan Diego, USA, (5) Max Planck Inst., Göttingen, Germany, (6) INAF, Obs. Roma, Italy, (7) Potsdam Univ., Germany, (8) Yunnan Observatories, Kunming, ChinaAnalyzing Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations of the spectacular Coronal Mass Ejection eruption on 7 June 2011, we present evidence of coronal magnetic reconnection between the expanding magnetic structure of the CME and the magnetic fields of an adjacent active region (AR). The onset of reconnection first became apparent in the SDO/AIA images when filament plasma, originally contained within the erupting flux rope, was re-directed towards remote areas in the neighboring AR, tracing the change of large-scale magnetic connectivity. The observations are presented jointly with a topological analysis of the pre-eruption magnetic configuration, and a data-constrained numerical simulation of the three-AR complex, demonstrating the formation/intensification of current sheets along a pre-existing hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) at the interface between the CME and the neighboring AR, where a secondary flare ribbon was created. Reconnection across this current sheet resulted in the formation of new magnetic connections between the erupting magnetic structure and a neighboring AR about 200 Mm from the eruption site, in strong qualitative agreement with the observations. In addition, the CME temporarily created unusually dense plasma conditions around a reconnection region at high coronal altitudes, enabling us to observe emission resulting from it. We argue that this exceptional observation of a coronal brightening was directly observable at SDO/AIA wavelengths owing to the

  9. Prediction of in vitro and in vivo oestrogen receptor activity using hierarchical clustering

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, hierarchical clustering classification models were developed to predict in vitro and in vivo oestrogen receptor (ER) activity. Classification models were developed for binding, agonist, and antagonist in vitro ER activity and for mouse in vivo uterotrophic ER bindi...

  10. Earthquake cluster activity beneath the Tanzawa Mountains region, Japan: Migration of hypocenters and low stress drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.; Yukutake, Y.

    2013-12-01

    An earthquake cluster activity was observed beneath the Tanzawa Mountains region, Japan with a depth of 20 km in the end of January, 2012. Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) determined hypocenters of 76 earthquakes with M > 2 in the area within 50 hours. Five of them had magnitudes greater than 4 and the largest one was 5.4. Four out of the five earthquakes had the reverse-type focal mechanisms with the P axis in the NW-SE direction. First we relocated hypocenters of the activity following the method of Yukutake et al. (2012). We estimated relative arrival times of P and S waves by calculating the coefficients of the cross correlation and relocated hypocenters with the double-difference relocation method (Waldhauser and Ellsworth, 2000). We found that the cluster activity showed a migration from the first earthquake of the activity. The parabolic migration speed was consistent with the migration speed of the deep tremor sources (Ide et al., 2010) for which the fluid activity would play an important role. We then analyzed stress drops of 17 earthquakes with M > 3.5 that occurred from January, 2000 to June, 2012 in the area of the cluster activity. We calculated empirical Green's functions from waveforms of earthquakes with magnitudes of 3.0 to 3.2 and estimated stress drops of the earthquakes assuming that the source spectra can be expressed as the omega-squared model. We found that earthquakes of the cluster activity had smaller stress drops by an order of magnitude than the values of earthquakes that occurred in the same area before the cluster activity. These results suggest that the fluid played an important role for the earthquake cluster activity. That is, the fluid increased the pore pressure, decreased the effective normal stress and triggered the cluster activity. The difference of the rupture speed and the change of the rigidity might also be candidates that account for our results. They, however, can hardly explain the results quantitatively. Fig

  11. Automatic CME front edge detection from STEREO white-light coronagraph images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirnosov, Vladimir; Chang, Lin-Ching; Pulkkinen, Antti

    2015-08-01

    The coronagraph images captured by a Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) Ahead/Behind (A/B) spacecraft allow tracking of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from two different viewpoints and reconstructing its propagation in three-dimensional space. The reconstruction can be done using a triangulation technique that requires a CME front edge location. There are currently no robust automatic CME front edge detection methods that can be integrated with the triangulation technique. In this paper, we propose a novel automatic method to detect the front edge of the CME using STEREO coronagraph 2 red-colored Red, Green, Blue color model images. Our method consists of two modules: preprocessing and classification. The preprocessing module decomposes each coronagraph image into its three channels and uses only the red channel image for CME segmentation. The output of the preprocessing module is a set of segmented running-difference binary images which is fed into the classification module. These images are then transformed into polar coordinates followed by CME front edge detection based on the distance that CME travels in the field of view. The proposed method was validated against a manual method using total 56 CME events, 28 from STEREO A and 28 from STEREO B, captured in the period from 1 January 2008 to 16 August 2009. The results show that the proposed method is effective for CME front edge detection. The proposed method is useful in quantitative CME processing and analysis and will be immediately applicable to assist automatic triangulation method for real-time space weather forecasting.

  12. An Extended Membrane System with Active Membranes to Solve Automatic Fuzzy Clustering Problems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Wang, Jun; Shi, Peng; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J; Riscos-Núñez, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    This paper focuses on automatic fuzzy clustering problem and proposes a novel automatic fuzzy clustering method that employs an extended membrane system with active membranes that has been designed as its computing framework. The extended membrane system has a dynamic membrane structure; since membranes can evolve, it is particularly suitable for processing the automatic fuzzy clustering problem. A modification of a differential evolution (DE) mechanism was developed as evolution rules for objects according to membrane structure and object communication mechanisms. Under the control of both the object's evolution-communication mechanism and the membrane evolution mechanism, the extended membrane system can effectively determine the most appropriate number of clusters as well as the corresponding optimal cluster centers. The proposed method was evaluated over 13 benchmark problems and was compared with four state-of-the-art automatic clustering methods, two recently developed clustering methods and six classification techniques. The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method in terms of effectiveness and robustness. PMID:26790484

  13. Early signatures of large-scale field line opening. Multi-wavelength analysis of features connected with a "halo" CME event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohjolainen, S.; Vilmer, N.; Khan, J. I.; Hillaris, A. E.

    2005-04-01

    A fast "halo"-type coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with a two-ribbon flare, GOES class M 1.3, was observed on February 8, 2000. Soft X-ray and EUV images revealed several loop ejections and one wave-like moving front that started from a remote location, away from the flare core region. A radio type-II burst was observed near the trajectory of the moving soft X-ray front, although association with the CME itself cannot be ruled out. Large-scale dimmings were observed in EUV and soft X-rays, both in the form of disappearing transequatorial loops. We can pinpoint the time and the location of the first large-scale field-line opening by tracing the electron propagation paths above the active region and along the transequatorial loop system, in which large-scale mass depletion later took place. The immediate start of a type-IV burst (interpreted as an upward moving structure) which was located over a soft X-ray dimming region, confirms that the CME had lifted off. We compare these signatures with those of another halo CME event observed on May 2, 1998, and discuss the possible connections with the "magnetic breakout" model.

  14. Systematic assessment of coordinated activity cliffs formed by kinase inhibitors and detailed characterization of activity cliff clusters and associated SAR information.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-27

    From currently available kinase inhibitors and their activity data, clusters of coordinated activity cliffs were systematically derived and subjected to cluster index and index map analysis. Type I-like inhibitors with well-defined IC50 measurements were found to provide a large knowledge base of activity cliff clusters for 266 targets from nine kinase groups. On the basis of index map analysis, these clusters were systematically organized according to structural similarity of inhibitors and activity cliff diversity and prioritized for structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis. From prioritized clusters, interpretable SAR information can be extracted. It is also shown that activity cliff clusters formed by ATP site-directed inhibitors often represent local SAR environments of rather different complexity and interpretability. In addition, activity cliff clusters including promiscuous kinase inhibitors have been determined. Only a small subset of inhibitors was found to change activity cliff roles in different clusters. The activity cliff clusters described herein and their index map organization substantially enrich SAR information associated with kinase inhibitors in compound subsets of limited size. The cluster and index map information is made available upon request to provide opportunities for further SAR exploration. On the basis of our analysis and the data provided, activity cliff clusters and corresponding inhibitor series for kinase targets of interest can be readily selected.

  15. Influence of support hydroxides on the catalytic activity of oxidized gold clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Gabriel M; Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J; Dudney, Nancy J

    2010-01-01

    Gold oxide nanoparticles were prepared on the native surface and a hydroxylated surface of a non-porous TiO2 support (Degussa P25). Scanning transmission electron microscopy results show the formation of similarly sized clusters on both support materials (1.86 and 1.61 nm clusters on the native oxide and the hydroxylated oxide respectively). X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy clearly indicate the formation of Au3+ rich oxide nanoparticles. Despite the similar cluster sizes and oxidation states the gold oxide clusters grown on the hydroxylated surface were at least 180 times more catalytically active for the oxidation of carbon monoxide then those grown on the native oxide surface. These hydroxides are conveniently introduced during the solution phase synthesis of gold catalysts and play a dominate, but previously unrecognized, role in the catalytic properties of both oxidized and metallic gold particles.

  16. Clustering-based ensemble learning for activity recognition in smart homes.

    PubMed

    Jurek, Anna; Nugent, Chris; Bi, Yaxin; Wu, Shengli

    2014-01-01

    Application of sensor-based technology within activity monitoring systems is becoming a popular technique within the smart environment paradigm. Nevertheless, the use of such an approach generates complex constructs of data, which subsequently requires the use of intricate activity recognition techniques to automatically infer the underlying activity. This paper explores a cluster-based ensemble method as a new solution for the purposes of activity recognition within smart environments. With this approach activities are modelled as collections of clusters built on different subsets of features. A classification process is performed by assigning a new instance to its closest cluster from each collection. Two different sensor data representations have been investigated, namely numeric and binary. Following the evaluation of the proposed methodology it has been demonstrated that the cluster-based ensemble method can be successfully applied as a viable option for activity recognition. Results following exposure to data collected from a range of activities indicated that the ensemble method had the ability to perform with accuracies of 94.2% and 97.5% for numeric and binary data, respectively. These results outperformed a range of single classifiers considered as benchmarks.

  17. Combined Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares and Associated CME Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2016-07-01

    I will review some observations of the characteristics of accelerated electrons seen near Earth (as SEPs) and those producing flare radiation in the low corona and chromosphere. The similarities and differences between the numbers, spectral distribution, etc. of the two population can shed light on the mechanism and sites of the acceleration. I will show that in some events the origin of both population appears to be the flare site while in others, with harder SEP spectra, in addition to acceleration at the flare site, there appears to be a need for a second stage re-acceleration in the associated fast Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) environment. This scenario can also describe a similar dichotomy that exists between the so called impulsive, highly enriched (3He and heavy ions) and softer SEP ion events, and stronger more gradual SEP events with near normal ionic abundances and harder spectra. I will also describe under what conditions such hardening can be achieved.

  18. E-learning for occupational physicians' CME: a study case.

    PubMed

    Mazzoleni, M Cristina; Rognoni, Carla; Finozzi, Enrico; Gri, Tommaso; Pagani, Marco; Imbriani, Marcello

    2011-01-01

    The present study reports the results of the evaluation of an e-learning CME course in the field of Occupational Medicine. In particular the following aspects have been investigated: If and how the course contents have met the educational users' needs; The effectiveness of the course in terms of knowledge improvement; Users' behaviour. Attendance data and results of a sample of 1128 attendees have been analyzed via ad hoc developed tools for direct inspection of Moodle CMS database. The results document the effectiveness of the e-learning course, as regards meeting the educational needs of physicians and also the improvement in terms of knowledge and problem solving skill acquisition. Users' behaviour has revealed a certain tendency for passing the tests, more than for pursuing the best possible result. Interaction with the tutor is low. PMID:21685595

  19. A Redox Active [2Fe-2S] Cluster on the Hydrogenase Maturase HydF.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Eric M; Byer, Amanda S; Betz, Jeremiah N; Peters, John W; Broderick, Joan B

    2016-06-28

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are nature's most prolific hydrogen catalysts, excelling at facilely interconverting H2 and protons. The catalytic core common to all [FeFe]-hydrogenases is a complex metallocofactor, referred to as the H-cluster, which is composed of a standard [4Fe-4S] cluster linked through a bridging thiolate to a 2Fe subcluster harboring dithiomethylamine, carbon monoxide, and cyanide ligands. This 2Fe subcluster is synthesized and inserted into [FeFe]-hydrogenase by three maturase enzymes denoted HydE, HydF, and HydG. HydE and HydG are radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes and synthesize the nonprotein ligands of the H-cluster. HydF is a GTPase that functions as a scaffold or carrier for 2Fe subcluster production. Herein, we utilize UV-visible, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies to establish the existence of redox active [4Fe-4S] and [2Fe-2S] clusters bound to HydF. We have used spectroelectrochemical titrations to assign iron-sulfur cluster midpoint potentials, have shown that HydF purifies with a reduced [2Fe-2S] cluster in the absence of exogenous reducing agents, and have tracked iron-sulfur cluster spectroscopic changes with quaternary structural perturbations. Our results provide an important foundation for understanding the maturation process by defining the iron-sulfur cluster content of HydF prior to its interaction with HydE and HydG. We speculate that the [2Fe-2S] cluster of HydF either acts as a placeholder for HydG-derived Fe(CO)2CN species or serves as a scaffold for 2Fe subcluster assembly. PMID:27232385

  20. Forecasting Geomagnetic Storm with the Energetic Proton Accompanying CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, B. X.

    Solar flares are popular events on the solar disk while most of them being non-geo-effective The key factors that they could become geo-effective are weather they have CMEs accompanying them and the features of CME as well But among the hundreds of CMEs only few of them could cause significant geomagnetic disturbances which mainly depended on whether they headed the earth Several works have proved that CMEs could accelerate ionized particle in the shock wave in front of them that the amount of accelerated particles were the largest on the direction of CMEs moving The face that most of the SPEs would be followed by geomagnetic storms was a good example As the CMEs that moved toward the earth could accelerate particles the enhancement of energetic particle flux could be an omen for the geomagnetic storm caused by CMEs In this work the relationship between the geomagnetic disturbance and the energetic proton flux ACE-EPAM data together with the parameter of the solar flares that related to the CME was carefully investigated The preliminary result is that more than 90 of the enhancement in of the particle flux followed by shock that could be measured by ACE But the correlation between scale of the particle and that of the geomagnetic disturbance was not much significant Other factors that related to the characters of the CMEs had also to be taken into consideration The position of the flare which may affect the direction of the CMEs the flare scale which may decide the velocity and the duration which could relate to the magnetic

  1. CME Interaction with Coronal Holes and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.

    2008-01-01

    A significant number of interplanetary (IP) shocks (-17%) during cycle 23 were not followed by drivers. The number of such "driverless" shocks steadily increased with the solar cycle with 15%, 33%, and 52% occurring in the rise, maximum, and declining phase of the solar cycle. The solar sources of 15% of the driverless shocks were very close the central meridian of the Sun (within approx.15deg), which is quite unexpected. More interestingly, all the driverless shocks with their solar sources near the solar disk center occurred during the declining phase of solar cycle 23. When we investigated the coronal environment of the source regions of driverless shocks, we found that in each case there was at least one coronal hole nearby suggesting that the coronal holes might have deflected the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) away from the Sun-Earth line. The presence of abundant low-latitude coronal holes during the declining phase further explains why CMEs originating close to the disk center mimic the limb CMEs, which normally lead to driverless shocks due to purely geometrical reasons. We also examined the solar source regions of shocks with drivers. For these, the coronal holes were located such that they either had no influence on the CME trajectories. or they deflected the CMEs towards the Sun-Earth line. We also obtained the open magnetic field distribution on the Sun by performing a potential field source surface extrapolation to the corona. It was found that the CMEs generally move away from the open magnetic field regions. The CME-coronal hole interaction must be widespread in the declining phase, and may have a significant impact on the geoeffectiveness of CMEs.

  2. Clustering of diet- and activity-related parenting practices: cross-sectional findings of the INPACT study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Various diet- and activity-related parenting practices are positive determinants of child dietary and activity behaviour, including home availability, parental modelling and parental policies. There is evidence that parenting practices cluster within the dietary domain and within the activity domain. This study explores whether diet- and activity-related parenting practices cluster across the dietary and activity domain. Also examined is whether the clusters are related to child and parental background characteristics. Finally, to indicate the relevance of the clusters in influencing child dietary and activity behaviour, we examined whether clusters of parenting practices are related to these behaviours. Methods Data were used from 1480 parent–child dyads participating in the Dutch IVO Nutrition and Physical Activity Child cohorT (INPACT). Parents of children aged 8–11 years completed questionnaires at home assessing their diet- and activity-related parenting practices, child and parental background characteristics, and child dietary and activity behaviours. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to identify clusters of parenting practices. Backward regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between child and parental background characteristics with cluster scores, and partial correlations to examine associations between cluster scores and child dietary and activity behaviours. Results PCA revealed five clusters of parenting practices: 1) high visibility and accessibility of screens and unhealthy food, 2) diet- and activity-related rules, 3) low availability of unhealthy food, 4) diet- and activity-related positive modelling, and 5) positive modelling on sports and fruit. Low parental education was associated with unhealthy cluster 1, while high(er) education was associated with healthy clusters 2, 3 and 5. Separate clusters were related to both child dietary and activity behaviour in the hypothesized directions: healthy clusters

  3. Raft coalescence and FcγRIIA activation upon sphingomyelin clustering induced by lysenin.

    PubMed

    Kulma, Magdalena; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Sobota, Andrzej

    2012-08-01

    Activation of immunoreceptor FcγRIIA by cross-linking with antibodies is accompanied by coalescence of sphingolipid/cholesterol-rich membrane rafts leading to the formation of signaling platforms of the receptor. In this report we examined whether clustering of the raft lipid sphingomyelin can reciprocally induce partition of FcγRIIA to rafts. To induce sphingomyelin clustering, cells were exposed to non-lytic concentrations of GST-lysenin which specifically recognizes sphingomyelin. The lysenin/sphingomyelin complexes formed microscale assemblies composed of GST-lysenin oligomers engaging sphingomyelin of rafts. Upon sphingomyelin clustering, non-cross-linked FcγRIIA associated with raft-derived detergent-resistant membrane fractions as revealed by density gradient centrifugation. Pretreatment of cells with GST-lysenin also increased the size of detergent-insoluble molecular complexes of activated FcγRIIA. Sphingomyelin clustering triggered tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor and its accompanying proteins, Cbl and NTAL, in the absence of receptor ligands and enhanced phosphorylation of these proteins in the ligand presence. These data indicate that clustering of plasma membrane sphingomyelin induces coalescence of rafts and triggers signaling events analogous to those caused by FcγRIIA activation.

  4. Identification of Solar Processes During A Halo-cme On May 2, 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, F.; Dudok de Wit, T.

    The trigger mechanism for Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are not understood beyond a rudimentary level. Radio observations are an important tool for understanding the relationship between flares and CMEs, their individual develop- ment, and their respective role in the production of energetic particles. Each radio solar phenomenon may be observed at several wavelenghts from ground- based instruments. Observations reveal that radio sources differ, at each frequency, in locations on the solar disk, in temporal duration, and spatial size. From the statistical properties of these physical processes, we want to identify them and, if possible, to separate them by a systematic approach. In this study we consider the 10-second resolution multi-wavelength (164, 236, 327, 410 and 432 Mhz) radio data of a halo-CME observed on May 2, 1998 provided by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) and we use a spatio-temporal decomposition technique to split the data set into series of spatio-temporal modes. The salient features of radio data are captured by a limited number of modes only. A cluster analysis of these few modes permits to identify different processes such as a background radio emission, the pre-flash phase of flare, the radio flash and an intense continuum source.

  5. Identification of seven hydrophobic clusters in GCN4 making redundant contributions to transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, B M; Drysdale, C M; Natarajan, K; Hinnebusch, A G

    1996-01-01

    GCN4 is a transcriptional activator in the bZIP family that regulates amino acid biosynthetic genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The N-terminal 100 amino acids of GCN4 contains a potent activation function that confers high-level transcription in the absence of the centrally located acidic activation domain (CAAD) delineated in previous studies. To identify specific amino acids important for activation by the N-terminal domain, we mutagenized a GCN4 allele lacking the CAAD and screened alleles in vivo for reduced expression of the HIS3 gene. We found four pairs of closely spaced phenylalanines and a leucine residue distributed throughout the N-terminal 100 residues of GCN4 that are required for high-level activation in the absence of the CAAD. Trp, Leu, and Tyr were highly functional substitutions for the Phe residue at position 45. Combined with our previous findings, these results indicate that GCN4 contains seven clusters of aromatic or bulky hydrophobic residues which make important contributions to transcriptional activation at HIS3. None of the seven hydrophobic clusters is essential for activation by full-length GCN4, and the critical residues in two or three clusters must be mutated simultaneously to observe a substantial reduction in GCN4 function. Numerous combinations of four or five intact clusters conferred high-level transcription of HIS3. We propose that many of the hydrophobic clusters in GCN4 act independently of one another to provide redundant means of stimulating transcription and that the functional contributions of these different segments are cumulative at the HIS3 promoter. On the basis of the primacy of bulky hydrophobic residues throughout the activation domain, we suggest that GCN4 contains multiple sites that mediate hydrophobic contacts with one or more components of the transcription initiation machinery. PMID:8816468

  6. Radio Observations of the CME-poor region AR2192: a type II burst with no CME driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Vilmer, Nicole; Wakeford, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The remarkable sunspot group NOAA AR 2192 (October 2014) produced X-class flares without CMEs, and in general was large and powerful but with little heliospheric interaction. We discuss radio perspectives on the development of this region. In particular there were decametric type II bursts observed in association with jet-like flares SOL2014-10-21T12:28 (C4.4) and SOL2014-10-21T13:38 (M1.2), as first noted in the Glasgow Callisto observatory and confirmed via the Meudon decametric array. In cases such as this, the global coronal wave responsible for the type II emission seems to originate from an ejection of material flowing along a previously established field structure, rather than perpendicular to it as in a CME.

  7. The Width of a CME and the Source of the Driving Magnetic Explosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Sterling, A. C.; Suess, S. T.

    2007-01-01

    We show that the strength of the magnetic field in the area covered by the flare arcade following a CME-producing ejective solar eruption can be estimated from the final angular width of the CME in the outer corona and the final angular width of the flare arcade. We assume (1) the flux-rope plasmoid ejected from the flare site becomes the interior of the CME plasmoid, (2) in the outer corona the CME is roughly a "spherical plasmoid with legs" shaped like a light bulb, and (3) beyond some height in or below the outer corona the CME plasmoid is in lateral pressure balance with the surrounding magnetic field. The strength of the nearly radial magnetic field in the outer corona is estimated from the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field measured by Ulysses. We apply this model to three well-observed CMEs that exploded from flare regions of extremely different size and magnetic setting. In each event, the estimated source-region field strength is appropriate for the magnetic setting of the flare. This agreement indicates via the model that CMEs (1) are propelled by the magnetic field of the CME plasmoid pushing against the surrounding magnetic field, and (2) can explode from flare regions that are laterally far offset from the radial path of the CME in the outer corona.

  8. Preparation of Aun quantum clusters with catalytic activity in β-cyclodextrin polyurethane nanosponges.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Diego Andrade; Kubota, Tatiana; Santos, Douglas C; Araujo, Marcia V G; Teixeira, Zaine; Gimenez, Iara F

    2016-01-20

    Here we report the use of β-cyclodextrin polyurethane nanosponges cross-linked with 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate as a template for the preparation of Aun quantum clusters, by the core-etching of glutathione-capped Au nanoparticles. The study of temporal evolution of the core-etching process using different Au concentrations indicated that formation of Aun clusters embedded in the nanosponge is favored by the use of lower Au concentrations, since it began at shorter times and lead to higher cluster loading. An estimation of the number of Au atoms based on the maximum photoluminescence wavelength suggested that, depending on the Au concentration and the core etching time, clusters with 11-15 atoms were formed. After excluding the possibility of an inclusion complex formation, evaluation of the catalytic activity of nanosponge-loaded Aun clusters toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol has shown that the reaction is catalyzed by the Aun clusters with no induction time, following the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model.

  9. Preparation of Aun quantum clusters with catalytic activity in β-cyclodextrin polyurethane nanosponges.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Diego Andrade; Kubota, Tatiana; Santos, Douglas C; Araujo, Marcia V G; Teixeira, Zaine; Gimenez, Iara F

    2016-01-20

    Here we report the use of β-cyclodextrin polyurethane nanosponges cross-linked with 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate as a template for the preparation of Aun quantum clusters, by the core-etching of glutathione-capped Au nanoparticles. The study of temporal evolution of the core-etching process using different Au concentrations indicated that formation of Aun clusters embedded in the nanosponge is favored by the use of lower Au concentrations, since it began at shorter times and lead to higher cluster loading. An estimation of the number of Au atoms based on the maximum photoluminescence wavelength suggested that, depending on the Au concentration and the core etching time, clusters with 11-15 atoms were formed. After excluding the possibility of an inclusion complex formation, evaluation of the catalytic activity of nanosponge-loaded Aun clusters toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol has shown that the reaction is catalyzed by the Aun clusters with no induction time, following the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model. PMID:26572328

  10. Clustering and rule-based classifications of chemical structures evaluated in the biological activity space.

    PubMed

    Schuffenhauer, Ansgar; Brown, Nathan; Ertl, Peter; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Selzer, Paul; Hamon, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Classification methods for data sets of molecules according to their chemical structure were evaluated for their biological relevance, including rule-based, scaffold-oriented classification methods and clustering based on molecular descriptors. Three data sets resulting from uniformly determined in vitro biological profiling experiments were classified according to their chemical structures, and the results were compared in a Pareto analysis with the number of classes and their average spread in the profile space as two concurrent objectives which were to be minimized. It has been found that no classification method is overall superior to all other studied methods, but there is a general trend that rule-based, scaffold-oriented methods are the better choice if classes with homogeneous biological activity are required, but a large number of clusters can be tolerated. On the other hand, clustering based on chemical fingerprints is superior if fewer and larger classes are required, and some loss of homogeneity in biological activity can be accepted.

  11. 3D Numerical Study of Typical CME Event: The 2010-04-03 Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Feng, X. S.; Zhao, X.

    2014-12-01

    The coronal mass ejection (CME) event on April 3, 2010 is the first fast CME observed by STEREO SECCHI/HI for the full Sun-Earth line. Such an event provides us a good opportunity to study the propagation and evolution of CME from the Sun up to 1 AU. In this paper, we study the time-dependent evolution and propagation of this event from the Sun to Earth using the 3D SIP-CESE MHD model. The CME is initiated by a simple spherical plasmoid model: a spheromak magnetic structure with high speed, high pressure and high plasma density plasmoid. We find that the results can successfully reproduce the observations in the STEREO A/B COR1 and COR2 field of view and generate many basic structures of the in situ measurement: such as the similar curves of the plasma density and velocity, an increase in the magnetic field magnitude, the large-scale smooth magnetic field rotation and prolonged southward IMF (a well known source of magnetic storms). The MHD model gives the shock arrival time at Earth with an error of ˜ 1.5 hours. Finally, we analyze in detail the propagation velocity, the spread angle, the trajectory of CME. The speed of the CME rapidly increases from near the Sun, then decreases due to interaction with the solar wind ambient. The spread angle of the CME quickly increases due to lateral material expansion by the pressure gradients within the realistic solar wind background, then the expansion decreases with distance and ends until a pressure equilibrium is established. We also study the CME deflection and find that the CME almost does not deflects in the latitudinal and longitudinal direction during its propagation from the Sun to 1 AU.

  12. Relationship between a CME-driven shock and a coronal metric type II burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Luhmann, J.; Bale, S.; Lin, R.

    2008-12-01

    It has been a long-standing controversy whether coronal metric type II bursts are generated by CME-driven shocks or flare blast waves. Using unprecedented high-cadence observations from STEREO/SECCHI, we investigate the relationship between a metric type II event and a shock driven by the 2007 December 31 CME. The CME occurs at the east limb and its evolution is observed from about 1.1 to several tens of solar radii. The existence of the CME-driven shock is indicated by the deflection of coronal structures before the CME impinges on them, the best evidence for shocks in imaging observations. The earliest deflection of distant coronal structures occurs at 00:51:22 UT, about 2.6 min before the metric type II onset. The CME- driven shock emerges from the corona and produces a break point in the streamer north of the CME, which allows us to follow the shock propagation in imaging observations for the first time. We also have a continuous frequency coverage of the radio dynamic spectrum by combining observations from STEREO/SWAVES, BIRS and Learmonth, which successfully establishes the connection between the metric and decametric-hectometric (DH) type II bursts. The CME speed is about 600 km/s at the time of the metric type II onset, larger than the Alfven speed 420 - 490 km/s determined from the band splitting of the metric type II burst. The shock height-time curve determined from the metric and DH type II bands is consistent with the shock propagation obtained from the streamer deflection. These results provide unambiguous evidence that the metric type II burst is caused by the CME-driven shock. Implications are also discussed for particle acceleration and space weather forecasting.

  13. a Three-Step Spatial-Temporal Clustering Method for Human Activity Pattern Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Li, S.; Xu, S.

    2016-06-01

    How people move in cities and what they do in various locations at different times form human activity patterns. Human activity pattern plays a key role in in urban planning, traffic forecasting, public health and safety, emergency response, friend recommendation, and so on. Therefore, scholars from different fields, such as social science, geography, transportation, physics and computer science, have made great efforts in modelling and analysing human activity patterns or human mobility patterns. One of the essential tasks in such studies is to find the locations or places where individuals stay to perform some kind of activities before further activity pattern analysis. In the era of Big Data, the emerging of social media along with wearable devices enables human activity data to be collected more easily and efficiently. Furthermore, the dimension of the accessible human activity data has been extended from two to three (space or space-time) to four dimensions (space, time and semantics). More specifically, not only a location and time that people stay and spend are collected, but also what people "say" for in a location at a time can be obtained. The characteristics of these datasets shed new light on the analysis of human mobility, where some of new methodologies should be accordingly developed to handle them. Traditional methods such as neural networks, statistics and clustering have been applied to study human activity patterns using geosocial media data. Among them, clustering methods have been widely used to analyse spatiotemporal patterns. However, to our best knowledge, few of clustering algorithms are specifically developed for handling the datasets that contain spatial, temporal and semantic aspects all together. In this work, we propose a three-step human activity clustering method based on space, time and semantics to fill this gap. One-year Twitter data, posted in Toronto, Canada, is used to test the clustering-based method. The results show that the

  14. ISOTROPIC HEATING OF GALAXY CLUSTER CORES VIA RAPIDLY REORIENTING ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Babul, Arif; Sharma, Prateek; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2013-05-01

    Active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets carry more than sufficient energy to stave off catastrophic cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the cores of cool-core clusters. However, in order to prevent catastrophic cooling, the ICM must be heated in a near-isotropic fashion and narrow bipolar jets with P{sub jet} = 10{sup 44-45} erg s{sup -1}, typical of radio AGNs at cluster centers, are inefficient in heating the gas in the transverse direction to the jets. We argue that due to existent conditions in cluster cores, the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) will, in addition to accreting gas via radiatively inefficient flows, experience short stochastic episodes of enhanced accretion via thin disks. In general, the orientation of these accretion disks will be misaligned with the spin axis of the black holes (BHs) and the ensuing torques will cause the BH's spin axis (and therefore the jet axis) to slew and rapidly change direction. This model not only explains recent observations showing successive generations of jet-lobes-bubbles in individual cool-core clusters that are offset from each other in the angular direction with respect to the cluster center, but also shows that AGN jets can heat the cluster core nearly isotropically on the gas cooling timescale. Our model does require that the SMBHs at the centers of cool-core clusters be spinning relatively slowly. Torques from individual misaligned disks are ineffective at tilting rapidly spinning BHs by more than a few degrees. Additionally, since SMBHs that host thin accretion disks will manifest as quasars, we predict that roughly 1-2 rich clusters within z < 0.5 should have quasars at their centers.

  15. Effects of the 5 October 1996 CME at 4.4 AU: Ulysses observations

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, R.G.; Desai, M.I.; Sanderson, T.R.; Forsyth, R.J.; Gosling, J.T.

    1997-09-01

    The authors present observations from Ulysses associated with a large coronal mass ejection (CME) that lifted off the west limb of the Sun on 5 October, 1996. The study focuses on the effects of the interplanetary counterpart of the CME on the energetic particle populations at the location of Ulysses, in particular the effect on the sequence of corotating enhancements that had been observed prior to its arrival. They conclude that, despite its large spatial extent, the CME caused no permanent deformation of the heliospheric current sheet.

  16. ON A CORONAL BLOWOUT JET: THE FIRST OBSERVATION OF A SIMULTANEOUSLY PRODUCED BUBBLE-LIKE CME AND A JET-LIKE CME IN A SOLAR EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-02-01

    The coronal blowout jet is a peculiar category among various jet phenomena, in which the sheared base arch, often carrying a small filament, experiences a miniature version of blowout eruption that produces large-scale coronal mass ejection (CME). In this paper, we report such a coronal blowout jet with high-resolution multi-wavelength and multi-angle observations taken from Solar Dynamics Observatory, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, and Big Bear Solar Observatory. For the first time, we find that simultaneous bubble-like and jet-like CMEs were dynamically related to the blowout jet that showed cool and hot components next to each other. Our observational results indicate that (1) the cool component resulted from the eruption of the filament contained within the jet's base arch, and it further caused the bubble-like CME; (2) the jet-like CME was associated with the hot component, which was the outward moving heated plasma generated by the reconnection of the base arch and its ambient open field lines. On the other hand, bifurcation of the jet's cool component was also observed, which resulted from the uncoupling of the erupting filament's two legs that were highly twisted at the very beginning. Based on these results, we propose a model to interpret the coronal blowout jet, in which the external reconnection not only produces the jet-like CME, but also leads to the rising of the filament. Subsequently, internal reconnection starts underneath the rising filament and thereby causes the bubble-like CME.

  17. User Activity Recognition in Smart Homes Using Pattern Clustering Applied to Temporal ANN Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bourobou, Serge Thomas Mickala; Yoo, Younghwan

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of recognizing and predicting user activities in the IoT (Internet of Things) based smart environment. The activity recognition is usually done through two steps: activity pattern clustering and activity type decision. Although many related works have been suggested, they had some limited performance because they focused only on one part between the two steps. This paper tries to find the best combination of a pattern clustering method and an activity decision algorithm among various existing works. For the first step, in order to classify so varied and complex user activities, we use a relevant and efficient unsupervised learning method called the K-pattern clustering algorithm. In the second step, the training of smart environment for recognizing and predicting user activities inside his/her personal space is done by utilizing the artificial neural network based on the Allen's temporal relations. The experimental results show that our combined method provides the higher recognition accuracy for various activities, as compared with other data mining classification algorithms. Furthermore, it is more appropriate for a dynamic environment like an IoT based smart home. PMID:26007738

  18. User Activity Recognition in Smart Homes Using Pattern Clustering Applied to Temporal ANN Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bourobou, Serge Thomas Mickala; Yoo, Younghwan

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of recognizing and predicting user activities in the IoT (Internet of Things) based smart environment. The activity recognition is usually done through two steps: activity pattern clustering and activity type decision. Although many related works have been suggested, they had some limited performance because they focused only on one part between the two steps. This paper tries to find the best combination of a pattern clustering method and an activity decision algorithm among various existing works. For the first step, in order to classify so varied and complex user activities, we use a relevant and efficient unsupervised learning method called the K-pattern clustering algorithm. In the second step, the training of smart environment for recognizing and predicting user activities inside his/her personal space is done by utilizing the artificial neural network based on the Allen's temporal relations. The experimental results show that our combined method provides the higher recognition accuracy for various activities, as compared with other data mining classification algorithms. Furthermore, it is more appropriate for a dynamic environment like an IoT based smart home.

  19. Activation Energies and Potentials of Mean Force for Water Cluster Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Kathmann, Shawn M.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Garrett, Bruce C.

    2008-02-11

    Activation energies for water cluster evaporation are of interest in many areas of chemical physics. We present the first computation of activation energies for small waters clusters using the formalism of Dynamical Nucleation Theory (DNT). To this end, individual evaporation rate constants are computed for water clusters (H2O)i, where i = 2 to 10 for temperatures ranging from 243 to 333K. These calculations employ a parallel sampling technique utilizing the Global Arrays Toolkit developed at PNNL. The resulting evaporation rate constants for each cluster are then fit to Arrhenius equations to obtain activation energies. We discuss DNT evaporation rate constants and their relation to potentials of mean force, activation energies, and how to account for non-separability of the reaction coordinate in the reactant state partition function. This work was supported by the PNNL Computational Science and Engineering LDRD Program and the Chemical and Material Sciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Department of Energy. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  20. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. PMID:26150486

  1. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

  2. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this “dead” cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. PMID:26150486

  3. Magnetic Field-Induced T Cell Receptor Clustering by Nanoparticles Enhances T Cell Activation and Stimulates Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iron–dextran nanoparticles functionalized with T cell activating proteins have been used to study T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. However, nanoparticle triggering of membrane receptors is poorly understood and may be sensitive to physiologically regulated changes in TCR clustering that occur after T cell activation. Nano-aAPC bound 2-fold more TCR on activated T cells, which have clustered TCR, than on naive T cells, resulting in a lower threshold for activation. To enhance T cell activation, a magnetic field was used to drive aggregation of paramagnetic nano-aAPC, resulting in a doubling of TCR cluster size and increased T cell expansion in vitro and after adoptive transfer in vivo. T cells activated by nano-aAPC in a magnetic field inhibited growth of B16 melanoma, showing that this novel approach, using magnetic field-enhanced nano-aAPC stimulation, can generate large numbers of activated antigen-specific T cells and has clinically relevant applications for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:24564881

  4. Submillimetre observations of galaxy clusters with the BLAST: the star formation activity in Abell 3112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braglia, Filiberto G.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Devlin, Mark J.; Edge, Alastair; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C.; Hughes, David H.; Klein, Jeff; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ngo, Henry; Olmi, Luca; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D. P.; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S.; Valiante, Elisabetta; Viero, Marco P.; Wiebe, Donald V.

    2011-04-01

    We present observations at 250, 350 and 500 μm of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 3112 (z= 0.075) carried out with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope. Five cluster members are individually detected as bright submillimetre (submm) sources. Their far-infrared spectral energy distributions and optical colours identify them as normal star-forming galaxies of high mass, with globally evolved stellar populations. They all have (B-R) colours of 1.38 ± 0.08, transitional between the blue, active population and the red, evolved galaxies that dominate the cluster core. We stack to estimate the mean submm emission from all cluster members, which is determined to be 16.6 ± 2.5, 6.1 ± 1.9 and 1.5 ± 1.3 mJy at 250, 350 and 500 μm, respectively. Stacking analyses of the submm emission of cluster members reveal trends in the mean far-infrared luminosity with respect to clustercentric radius and KS-band magnitude. We find that a large fraction of submm emission comes from the boundary of the inner, virialized region of the cluster, at clustercentric distances around R500. Stacking also shows that the bulk of the submm emission arises in intermediate-mass galaxies with KS magnitude ˜1 mag fainter than the characteristic magnitude ?. The results and constraints obtained in this work will provide a useful reference for the forthcoming surveys to be conducted on galaxy clusters by Herschel.

  5. Hemoglobin–Albumin Cluster Incorporating a Pt Nanoparticle: Artificial O2 Carrier with Antioxidant Activities

    PubMed Central

    Hosaka, Hitomi; Haruki, Risa; Yamada, Kana; Böttcher, Christoph; Komatsu, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    A covalent core–shell structured protein cluster composed of hemoglobin (Hb) at the center and human serum albumins (HSA) at the periphery, Hb-HSAm, is an artificial O2 carrier that can function as a red blood cell substitute. Here we described the preparation of a novel Hb-HSA3 cluster with antioxidant activities and its O2 complex stable in aqueous H2O2 solution. We used an approach of incorporating a Pt nanoparticle (PtNP) into the exterior HSA unit of the cluster. A citrate reduced PtNP (1.8 nm diameter) was bound tightly within the cleft of free HSA with a binding constant (K) of 1.1×107 M−1, generating a stable HSA-PtNP complex. This platinated protein showed high catalytic activities for dismutations of superoxide radical anions (O2•–) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), i.e., superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Also, Hb-HSA3 captured PtNP into the external albumin unit (K = 1.1×107 M−1), yielding an Hb-HSA3(PtNP) cluster. The association of PtNP caused no alteration of the protein surface net charge and O2 binding affinity. The peripheral HSA-PtNP shell prevents oxidation of the core Hb, which enables the formation of an extremely stable O2 complex, even in H2O2 solution. PMID:25310133

  6. Cluster B personality disorders are associated with allelic variation of monoamine oxidase A activity.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Christian P; Müller, Johannes; Schmidt, Michael; Hohenberger, Katrin; Gutknecht, Lise; Reif, Andreas; Schmidtke, Armin; Mössner, Rainald; Lesch, Klaus Peter

    2005-09-01

    Genetic variants of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) have been associated with aggression-, anxiety-, and addiction-related behavior in several nonclinical and clinical populations. Here, we investigated the influence of allelic variation of MAOA activity on aggression-related personality traits and disease risk in patients with personality disorders. Personality disorders were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview of DSM-IV and were allocated to cluster A, B, and C. Personality features were assessed by the revised NEO Personality Inventory and the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire. The genotype of the MAOA gene-linked polymorphic region (MAOA-LPR) was determined in 566 patients with personality disorders and in 281 healthy controls. MAOA genotype was significantly associated with cluster B personality disorders (chi2=7.77, p=0.005, df=1) but not with cluster C personality disorders. In total, 26.0% of cluster B patients were hemi- or homozygous for the low-activity variant of the MAOA genotype, compared to 16.4% in the control group. Associations between MAOA variants and personality domains related to impulsivity and aggressiveness were inconsistent. Our findings further support the notion that allelic variation of MAOA activity contributes modestly to the balance of hyper- (impulsive-aggressive) and hyporeactive (anxious-depressive) traits.

  7. RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS: IS THERE A LINK BETWEEN LUMINOSITY AND CLUSTER ENVIRONMENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Ineson, J.; Croston, J. H.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kraft, R. P.; Evans, D. A.

    2013-06-20

    We present here the first results from the Chandra ERA (Environments of Radio-loud AGN) Large Project, characterizing the cluster environments of a sample of 26 radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z {approx} 0.5 that covers three decades of radio luminosity. This is the first systematic X-ray environmental study at a single epoch, and has allowed us to examine the relationship between radio luminosity and cluster environment without the problems of Malmquist bias. We have found a weak correlation between radio luminosity and host cluster X-ray luminosity, as well as tentative evidence that this correlation is driven by the subpopulation of low-excitation radio galaxies, with high-excitation radio galaxies showing no significant correlation. The considerable scatter in the environments may be indicative of complex relationships not currently included in feedback models.

  8. CME on Oct. 21, 2011 Caused Red Aurora in U.S.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The SOlar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this "coronograph" – so-called because the images block the sun, and only show the sun's atmosphere, or corona. The coronal mass ejection (CME)...

  9. Active learning for semi-supervised clustering based on locally linear propagation reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Chun; Lin, Po-Yi

    2015-03-01

    The success of semi-supervised clustering relies on the effectiveness of side information. To get effective side information, a new active learner learning pairwise constraints known as must-link and cannot-link constraints is proposed in this paper. Three novel techniques are developed for learning effective pairwise constraints. The first technique is used to identify samples less important to cluster structures. This technique makes use of a kernel version of locally linear embedding for manifold learning. Samples neither important to locally linear propagation reconstructions of other samples nor on flat patches in the learned manifold are regarded as unimportant samples. The second is a novel criterion for query selection. This criterion considers not only the importance of a sample to expanding the space coverage of the learned samples but also the expected number of queries needed to learn the sample. To facilitate semi-supervised clustering, the third technique yields inferred must-links for passing information about flat patches in the learned manifold to semi-supervised clustering algorithms. Experimental results have shown that the learned pairwise constraints can capture the underlying cluster structures and proven the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  10. X-ray and EUV Observations of CME Eruption Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Why Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) erupt is a major outstanding puzzle of solar physics. Signatures observable at the earliest stages of eruption onset may hold precious clues about the onset mechanism. We present observations from SOHO/EIT and from TRACE in EUV, and from Yohkoh/SXT in soft X-rays of the pre-eruption and eruption phases of CME expulsion, along with the eruption's magnetic setting found from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. Most of our events involve clearly-observable filament eruptions and multiple neutral lines, and we use the magnetic settings and motions of the filaments to help infer the geometry and behavior of the associated erupting magnetic fields. Pre-eruption and early-eruption signatures include a relatively slow filament rise prior to eruption, and intensity "dimmings" and brightenings, both in the immediate neighborhood of the "core" (location of greatest magnetic shear) of the erupting fields and at locations remote from the core. These signatures and their relative timings place observational constraints on eruption mechanisms; our recent work has focused on implications for the so-called "tether cutting" and "breakout" models, but the same observational constraints are applicable to any model.

  11. CME Eruption Onset Observations from EIT and SXT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Why CMEs erupt is a major outstanding puzzle of solar physics. Signatures observable at the earliest stages of eruption onset may hold precious clues about the onset mechanism. We present observations in EUV from SOHO/EIT and in soft X-rays from Yohkoh/SXT of the re-eruption and eruption phases of CME expulsion, along with the eruption's magnetic setting found from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. Most of our events involve clearly-observable filament eruptions and multiple neutral lines, and we use the magnetic settings and motions of the filaments to help infer the geometry and behavior of the associated erupting magnetic fields. Pre-eruption and early-eruption signatures include a relatively slow filament rise prior to eruption, and intensity "dimmings" and brightenings, both in the immediate neighborhood of the "core" (location of greatest magnetic shear) of the erupting fields and at locations remote from the core. These signatures and their relative timings place observational constraints on eruption mechanisms; our recent work has focused on implications for the so-called "tether cutting" and "breakout" models, but the same observational constraints are applicable to any model.

  12. CME-Associated Radio Bursts from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are closely associated with various types of radio bursts from the Sun. All radio bursts are due to nonthermal electrons, which are accelerated during the eruption of CMEs. Radio bursts at frequencies below about 15 MHz are of particular interest because they are associated with energetic CMEs that contribute to severe space weather. The low-frequency bursts need to be observed primarily from space because of the ionospheric cutoff. The main CME-related radio bursts are associated are: type III bursts due to accelerated electrons propagating along open magnetic field lines, type II bursts due to electrons accelerated in shocks, and type IV bursts due to electrons trapped in post-eruption arcades behind CMEs. This paper presents a summary of results obtained during solar cycle 23 primarily using the white-light coronagraphic observations from the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the WAVES experiment on board Wind. Particular emphasis will be placed on what we can learn about particle acceleration in the coronal and interplanetary medium by analyzing the CMEs and the associated radio bursts.

  13. Kinematic Treatment of CME Evolution in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Pete; Crooker, N. U.

    2004-01-01

    We present a kinematic study of the evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the solar wind. Specifically, we consider the effects of: (1) spherical expansion; and (2) uniform expansion due to pressure gradients between the Interplanetary CME (ICME) and the ambient solar wind. We compare these results with an MHD model, which allows us to isolate these effects from the combined kinematic and dynamical effects, which are included in MHD models. They also provide compelling evidence that the fundamental cross section of so-called "force-free" flux ropes (or magnetic clouds) is neither circular or elliptical, but rather a convex-outward, "pancake" shape. We apply a force-free fitting to the magnetic vectors from the MHD simulation to assess how the distortion of the flux rope affects the fitting. In spite of these limitations, force-free fittings, which are straightforward to apply, do provide an important description of a number of parameters, including the radial dimension, orientation and chirality of the ICME.

  14. Relaxed active space: Fixing tailored-CC with high order coupled cluster. II

    SciTech Connect

    Melnichuk, Ann Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2014-02-14

    Due to the steep increase in computational cost with the inclusion of higher-connected cluster operators in coupled-cluster applications, it is usually not practical to use such methods for larger systems or basis sets without an active space partitioning. This study generates an active space subject to unambiguous statistical criteria to define a space whose size permits treatment at the CCSDT level. The automated scheme makes it unnecessary for the user to judge whether a chosen active space is sufficient to correctly solve the problem. Two demanding applications are presented: twisted ethylene and the transition states for the bicyclo[1,1,0]butane isomerization. As bi-radicals both systems require at least a CCSDT level of theory for quantitative results, for the geometries and energies.

  15. Is the cluster environment quenching the Seyfert activity in elliptical and spiral galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, R. S.; Dantas, M. L. L.; Krone-Martins, A.; Cameron, E.; Coelho, P.; Hattab, M. W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Hilbe, J. M.; Elliott, J.; Hagen, A.; COIN Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We developed a hierarchical Bayesian model (HBM) to investigate how the presence of Seyfert activity relates to their environment, herein represented by the galaxy cluster mass, M200, and the normalized cluster centric distance, r/r200. We achieved this by constructing an unbiased sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with morphological classifications provided by the Galaxy Zoo Project. A propensity score matching approach is introduced to control the effects of confounding variables: stellar mass, galaxy colour, and star formation rate. The connection between Seyfert-activity and environmental properties in the de-biased sample is modelled within an HBM framework using the so-called logistic regression technique, suitable for the analysis of binary data (e.g. whether or not a galaxy hosts an AGN). Unlike standard ordinary least square fitting methods, our methodology naturally allows modelling the probability of Seyfert-AGN activity in galaxies on their natural scale, i.e. as a binary variable. Furthermore, we demonstrate how an HBM can incorporate information of each particular galaxy morphological type in an unified framework. In elliptical galaxies our analysis indicates a strong correlation of Seyfert-AGN activity with r/r200, and a weaker correlation with the mass of the host cluster. In spiral galaxies these trends do not appear, suggesting that the link between Seyfert activity and the properties of spiral galaxies are independent of the environment.

  16. Didactic CME and practice change: don't throw that baby out quite yet.

    PubMed

    Olson, Curtis A; Tooman, Tricia R

    2012-08-01

    Skepticism exists regarding the role of continuing medical education (CME) in improving physician performance. The harshest criticism has been reserved for didactic CME. Reviews of the scientific literature on the effectiveness of CME conclude that formal or didactic modes of education have little or no impact on clinical practice. This has led some to argue that didactic CME is a highly questionable use of organizational and financial resources, and a cause of lost opportunities for physicians to engage in meaningful learning. The authors' current program of research has forced them to reconsider the received wisdom regarding the relationship between didactic modes of education and learning, and the role frank dissemination can play in bringing about practice change. The authors argued that the practice of assessing and valuing educational methods based only on their capacity to directly influence practice reflects an impoverished understanding of how change in clinical practice actually occurs. Drawing on case studies research, examples were given of the functions didactic CME served in the interest of improved practice. Reasons were then explored as to why the contribution of didactic CME is often missed or dismissed. The goal was not to advocate for a return to the status quo ante where lecture-based education is the dominant modality, but rather to acknowledge both the limits and potential of this longstanding approach to delivering continuing education.

  17. Membership and Coronal Activity in the NGC 2232 and Cr 140 Open Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, Brian M.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This is the second annual performance report for our grant "Membership and Coronal Activity in the NGC 2232 and Cr 140 Open Clusters." We propose to identify X-ray sources and extract net source counts in 8 archival ROSAT HRI images in the regions of the NGC 2232 and Cr 140 open clusters. These X-ray data will be combined with ground-based photometry and spectroscopy in order to identify G, K, and early-M type cluster members. At present, no members later than approximately F5 are currently known for either cluster. With ages of approximately 25 Myr and at a distance of just 320 - 360 pc, the combined late-type membership of the NGC 2232 and Cr 140 clusters will yield an almost unique sample of solar-type stars in the post-T Tauri/pre-main sequence phase of evolution. These stars will be used to assess the level and dispersion in coronal activity levels, as part of a probe of the importance of magnetic braking and the level of magnetic dynamo activity, for solar-type stars just before they reach the ZAMS. Over the past year we have successfully acquired all of the ground-based data necessary to support the analysis of the archival ROSAT X-ray data in the regions around both of these clusters. By the end of 2001 we expect to have completed the reduction and analysis of the ground-based photometry and spectroscopy and will begin the integration of these data with the ROSAT X-ray data. A certain amount of pressure to complete the work on NGC 2232 is coming from the SIRTF project, as this cluster may be a key component to a circumstellar disk evolution GTO program. We are only too happy to try to help and have worked to speed the analysis as much as possible. The primary activity to be undertaken in the next few months is the integration of the groundbased photometry and spectroscopy with the archival ROSAT X-ray data and then writing the paper summarizing our results. The most time consuming portion of this next phase is, of course, seeing the paper through

  18. Membership and Coronal Activity in the NGC 2232 and Cr 140 Open Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Patten, Brian M.

    2004-01-01

    Making use of eight archival ROSAT HRI images in the regions of the NGC 2232 and Cr 140, this project's primary focus is to identify X-ray sources and to extract net source counts for these sources in these two open clusters. These X-ray data would be combined with ground-based photometry and spectroscopy in order to identify G, K, and early-M type cluster members. Such membership data are important because, at present, no members later than spectral type approx. F5 are currently known for either cluster. With ages estimated to be approx. 25 Myr and at distances of just approx. 350 pc, the combined late-type membership of the NGC 2232 and Cr 140 clusters would yield an almost unique sample of solar-type stars in the post-T Tauri/pre-main sequence phase of evolution. These stars could be used to assess the level and dispersion of coronal activity levels, as a part of a probe of the importance of magnetic braking and the level of magnetic dynamo activity, for solar-type stars just before they reach the zero-age main sequence.

  19. Role of hydroxyl groups on the stability and catalytic activity of Au clusters on rutile surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxyls are present as surface terminations of transition metal oxides under ambient conditions and may modify the properties of supported catalysts. We perform first-principles density functional theory calculations to investigate the role of hydroxyls on the catalytic activity of supported gold clusters on TiO{sub 2} (rutile). We find that they have a long-range effect increasing the adhesion of gold clusters on rutile. While hydroxyls make one gold atom more electronegative, a more complex charge-transfer scenario is observed on larger clusters which are important for catalytic applications. This enhances the molecular adsorption and coadsorption energies of CO and O{sub 2}, thereby increasing the catalytic activity of gold clusters for CO oxidation, consistent with reported experiments. Hydroxyls at the interface between gold and rutile surface are most important to this process, even when not directly bound to gold. As such, accurate models of catalytic processes on gold and other catalysts should include the effect of surface hydroxyls.

  20. Using Light-at-Night (LAN) Satellite Data for Identifying Clusters of Economic Activities in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybnikova, N. A.; Portnov, B. A.

    2015-04-01

    Enterprises organized in clusters are often efficient in stimulating urban development, productivity and profit outflows. Identifying clusters of economic activities (EAs) thus becomes an important step in devising regional development policies, aimed at facilitating regional economic development. However, a major problem with cluster identification stems from limited reporting of specific EAs by individual countries and administrative entities. Even Eurostat, which maintains most advances regional databases, provides data for less than 50% of all regional subdivisions of the 3rd tier of the Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS3). Such poor reporting impedes identification of EA clusters and economic forces behind them. In this study, we test a possibility that missing data on geographic concentrations of EAs can be reconstructed using Light-at-Night (LAN) satellite measurements, and that such reconstructed data can then be used for the identification of EA clusters. As we hypothesize, LAN, captured by satellite sensors, is characterized by different intensity, depending on its source - production facilities, services, etc., - and this information can be used for EA identification. The study was carried out in three stages. First, using nighttime satellite images, we determined what types of EAs can be identified, with a sufficient degree of accuracy, by LAN they emit. Second, we calculated multivariate statistical models, linking EAs concentrations with LAN intensities and several locational and development attributes of NUTS3 regions in Europe. Next, using the obtained statistical models, we restored missing data on EAs across NUTS3 regions in Europe and identified clusters of EAs, using spatial analysis tools.

  1. A multiwavelength photometric census of AGN and star formation activity in the brightest cluster galaxies of X-ray selected clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, T. S.; Edge, A. C.; Stott, J. P.; Ebeling, H.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-09-01

    Despite their reputation as being `red and dead', the unique environment inhabited by brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) can often lead to a self-regulated feedback cycle between radiatively cooling intracluster gas and star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in the BCG. However the prevalence of `active' BCGs, and details of the feedback involved, are still uncertain. We have performed an optical, UV and mid-IR photometric analysis of the BCGs in 981 clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.5, selected from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Using Pan-STARRS PS1 3π, GALEX and WISE survey data we look for BCGs with photometric colours which deviate from that of the bulk population of passive BCGs - indicative of AGN and/or star formation activity within the BCG. We find that whilst the majority of BCGs are consistent with being passive, at least 14 per cent of our BCGs show a significant colour offset from passivity in at least one colour index. And, where available, supplementary spectroscopy reveals the majority of these particular BCGs show strong optical emission lines. On comparing BCG `activity' with the X-ray luminosity of the host cluster, we find that BCGs showing a colour offset are preferentially found in the more X-ray luminous clusters, indicative of the connection between BCG `activity' and the intracluster medium.

  2. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PARENTS' MOTIVATION FOR PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND THEIR BELIEFS, AND SUPPORT OF THEIR CHILDREN'S PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: A CLUSTER ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Naisseh, Matilda; Martinent, Guillaume; Ferrand, Claude; Hautier, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have neglected the multivariate nature of motivation. The purpose of the current study was to first identify motivational profiles of parents' own physical activity. Second, the study examined if such profiles differ in the way in which parents perceive their children's competence in physical activity and the importance and support given to their children's physical activity. 711 physically active parents (57% mothers; M age = 39.7 yr.; children 6-11 years old) completed the Situational Motivation Scale, the Parents' Perceptions of Physical Activity Importance and their Children's Ability Questionnaire, and the Parental Support for Physical Activity Scale. Cluster analyses indicated four motivational profiles: Highly self-determined, Moderately self-determined, Non-self-determined, and Externally motivated profiles. Parents' beliefs and support toward their children's physical activity significantly differed across these profiles. It is the first study using Self-Determination Theory that provides evidence for the interpersonal outcomes of motivation.

  3. AGN ACTIVITY AND IGM HEATING IN THE FOSSIL CLUSTER RX J1416.4+2315

    SciTech Connect

    Miraghaei, H.; Khosroshahi, H. G.; Abbassi, S.; Sengupta, C.; Raychaudhury, S.

    2015-12-15

    We study active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in the fossil galaxy cluster RX J1416.4+2315. Radio observations were carried out using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at two frequencies, 1420 and 610 MHz. A weak radio lobe that extends from the central nucleus is detected in the 610 MHz map. Assuming the radio lobe originated from the central AGN, we show that the energy injection into the intergalactic medium is only sufficient to heat up the central 50 kpc within the cluster core, while the cooling radius is larger (∼130 kpc). In the hardness ratio map, three low energy cavities have been identified. No radio emission is detected for these regions. We evaluated the power required to inflate the cavities and showed that the total energy budget is sufficient to offset the radiative cooling. We showed that the initial conditions would change the results remarkably. Furthermore, the efficiency of the Bondi accretion in powering the AGN has been estimated.

  4. Ring opening and carbonylation of 3,3-dimethylthietane ligands in ruthenium carbonyl cluster complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.D.; Belinski, J.A.; Yamamoto, J.H.

    1992-10-01

    When heated to 97{degrees}C, the complex Ru{sub 4}(CO){sub 12}[{mu}-SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}]2 (1) was transformed into two new hexaruthenium cluster complexes, Ru{sub 6}(CO){sub 13}({mu}{sub 3}-SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 4} (2) and Ru{sub 6}(CO){sub 12}({mu}-SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2})({mu}{sub 3}-SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub 3}[{mu}{sub 3}-SCH{sub 2}C(Me)(CH{sub 2})CH{sub 2}] ({mu}-H) (3), that contain four and five ring-opened 3,3-dimethylthietane (3,3-DMT) ligands, respectively. In compound 3 one of the ring-opened DMT ligands has also undergone a CH activation on one of the methyl groups. Compound 2 reacts with additional 3,3-DMT at 97{degrees}C to form 3 in 18% yield. When treated with CO at 95{degrees}C (500 psi), compound 2 yielded 4,4-dimethylthiobutyrolactone and Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}. It was also found that the complex Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 11-}(SCH{sub 2}CMe{sub 2}CH{sub 2}C{double_bond}O) (4) yields 4,4-dimethylthiobutyrolactone when treated with CO at 120{degrees}C (1200 psi). Crystal data for 2: space group P2{sub 1}/n, {alpha} = 22.652 (7) A, {beta} = 11.712 (2) A, c = 19.965 (6) A, {Beta} = 115.75 (2){degrees} Z = 4, 3665 reflections, R = 0.021. Crystal data for 3: space group P2{sub 1}/c, {alpha} = 17.332 (8) A, {Beta} = 14.668 (9) A, c = 19.823 (9) A, {Beta} = 91.27 (4){degrees}, Z = 4, 1875 reflections, R = 0.050. 13 refs., 2 figs., 13 refs.

  5. Supersaturation and activity-rotation relation in PMS stars: the young cluster h Persei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argiroffi, C.; Caramazza, M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Flaccomio, E.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Several studies showed that the magnetic activity of late-type main-sequence (MS) stars is characterized by different regimes and that their activity levels are well described by the Rossby number, Ro, defined as the ratio between the rotational period Prot and the convective turnover time. Very young pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars show, similarly to MS stars, intense magnetic activity. However, they do not show clear activity-rotation trends, and it still debated which stellar parameters determine their magnetic activity levels. Aims: To bridge the gap between MS and PMS stars, we studied the activity-rotation relation in the young cluster h Persei, a ~13 Myr old cluster, that contains both fast and slow rotators. The cluster members have ended their accretion phase and have developed a radiative core. It therefore offers us the opportunity of studying the activity level of intermediate-age PMS stars with different rotational velocities, excluding any interactions with the circumstellar environment. Methods: We constrained the magnetic activity levels of h Per members by measuring their X-ray emission from a Chandra observation, while rotational periods were obtained previously in the framework of the MONITOR project. By cross-correlating these data, we collected a final catalog of 414 h Per members with known rotational period, effective temperature, and mass. In 169 of these, X-ray emission has also been detected. Results: We found that h Per members with 1.0 M⊙activity regimes: fast rotators clearly show supersaturation, while slower rotators have activity levels compatible to the non-saturated regime. At 13 Myr, h Per is therefore the youngest cluster showing activity-rotation regimes analogous to those of MS stars, indicating that at this age, magnetic field production is most likely regulated by the αΩ type dynamo. Moreover, we observed that supersaturation is better described by Prot than Ro, and that the

  6. Cooperativity between Integrin Activation and Mechanical Stress Leads to Integrin Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Ali, O.; Guillou, H.; Destaing, O.; Albigès-Rizo, C.; Block, M.R.; Fourcade, B.

    2011-01-01

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors involved in crucial cellular biological functions such as migration, adhesion, and spreading. Upon the modulation of integrin affinity toward their extracellular ligands by cytoplasmic proteins (inside-out signaling) these receptors bind to their ligands and cluster into nascent adhesions. This clustering results in the increase in the mechanical linkage among the cell and substratum, cytoskeleton rearrangements, and further outside-in signaling. Based on experimental observations of the distribution of focal adhesions in cells attached to micropatterned surfaces, we introduce a physical model relying on experimental numerical constants determined in the literature. In this model, allosteric integrin activation works in synergy with the stress build by adhesion and the membrane rigidity to allow the clustering to nascent adhesions independently of actin but dependent on the integrin diffusion onto adhesive surfaces. The initial clustering could provide a template to the mature adhesive structures. Predictions of our model for the organization of focal adhesions are discussed in comparison with experiments using adhesive protein microarrays. PMID:21641304

  7. Determining Distance, Age, and Activity in a New Benchmark Cluster: Ruprecht 147

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jason T.

    2009-08-01

    This proposal seeks 0.7 night of time on Hectochelle to observe the F, G, and K dwarfs of Ruprecht 147, recently identified as the closest old stellar cluster. At only ~ 200 pc and at an age of ~ 1-2 Gyr, this will be an important benchmark in stellar astrophysics, providing the only sample of spectroscopically accessible old, late-type stars of determinable age. Hectochelle is the ideal instrument to study this cluster, with a FOV, fiber count, and telescope aperture well matched to the cluster's diameter (~ 1°), richness (~ 100 identified members), and distance modulus (6.5-7 mag., putting the G and K dwarfs at B=11-15). Hectochelle will measure the Ca II line strengths of members to establish, for the first time, the chromospheric activity levels of a statistically significant sample of single, G and K dwarfs of this modest age. Hectochelle will also vet background stars for suitability as astrometric reference stars for a forthcoming HST FGS proposal to robustly measure the cluster's distance.

  8. Role of lattice defects in catalytic activities of graphene clusters for fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lipeng; Xu, Quan; Niu, Jianbing; Xia, Zhenhai

    2015-07-14

    Defects are common but important in graphene, which could significantly tailor the electronic structures and physical and chemical properties. In this study, the density functional theory (DFT) method was applied to study the electronic structure and catalytic properties of graphene clusters containing various point and line defects. The electron transfer processes in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on perfect and defective graphene clusters in fuel cells was simulated, and the free energy and reaction energy barrier of the elementary reactions were calculated to determine the reaction pathways. It was found that the graphene cluster with the point defect having pentagon rings at the zigzag edge, or line defects (grain boundaries) consisting of pentagon-pentagon-octagon or pentagon-heptagon chains also at the edges, shows the electrocatalytic capability for ORR. Four-electron and two-electron transfer processes could occur simultaneously on graphene clusters with certain types of defects. The energy barriers of the reactions are comparable to that of platinum(111). The catalytic active sites were determined on the defective graphene. PMID:26033301

  9. Iron binding activity is essential for the function of IscA in iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Landry, Aaron P; Cheng, Zishuo; Ding, Huangen

    2013-03-01

    Iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis requires coordinated delivery of iron and sulphur to scaffold proteins, followed by transfer of the assembled clusters from scaffold proteins to target proteins. This complex process is accomplished by a group of dedicated iron-sulphur cluster assembly proteins that are conserved from bacteria to humans. While sulphur in iron-sulphur clusters is provided by L-cysteine via cysteine desulfurase, the iron donor(s) for iron-sulphur cluster assembly remains largely elusive. Here we report that among the primary iron-sulphur cluster assembly proteins, IscA has a unique and strong binding activity for mononuclear iron in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the ferric iron centre tightly bound in IscA can be readily extruded by l-cysteine, followed by reduction to ferrous iron for iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis. Substitution of the highly conserved residue tyrosine 40 with phenylalanine (Y40F) in IscA results in a mutant protein that has a diminished iron binding affinity but retains the iron-sulphur cluster binding activity. Genetic complementation studies show that the IscA Y40F mutant is inactive in vivo, suggesting that the iron binding activity is essential for the function of IscA in iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis.

  10. Spi-1/PU.1 activates transcription through clustered DNA occupancy in erythroleukemia.

    PubMed

    Ridinger-Saison, Maya; Boeva, Valentina; Rimmelé, Pauline; Kulakovskiy, Ivan; Gallais, Isabelle; Levavasseur, Benjamin; Paccard, Caroline; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Morlé, François; Nicolas, Alain; Hupé, Philippe; Barillot, Emmanuel; Moreau-Gachelin, Françoise; Guillouf, Christel

    2012-10-01

    Acute leukemias are characterized by deregulation of transcriptional networks that control the lineage specificity of gene expression. The aberrant overexpression of the Spi-1/PU.1 transcription factor leads to erythroleukemia. To determine how Spi-1 mechanistically influences the transcriptional program, we combined a ChIP-seq analysis with transcriptional profiling in cells from an erythroleukemic mouse model. We show that Spi-1 displays a selective DNA-binding that does not often cause transcriptional modulation. We report that Spi-1 controls transcriptional activation and repression partially through distinct Spi-1 recruitment to chromatin. We revealed several parameters impacting on Spi-1-mediated transcriptional activation. Gene activation is facilitated by Spi-1 occupancy close to transcriptional starting site of genes devoid of CGIs. Moreover, in those regions Spi-1 acts by binding to multiple motifs tightly clustered and with similar orientation. Finally, in contrast to the myeloid and lymphoid B cells in which Spi-1 exerts a physiological activity, in the erythroleukemic cells, lineage-specific cooperating factors do not play a prevalent role in Spi-1-mediated transcriptional activation. Thus, our work describes a new mechanism of gene activation through clustered site occupancy of Spi-1 particularly relevant in regard to the strong expression of Spi-1 in the erythroleukemic cells.

  11. Cloning of a Chryseobacterium (Flavobacterium) meningosepticum chromosomal gene (blaA(CME)) encoding an extended-spectrum class A beta-lactamase related to the Bacteroides cephalosporinases and the VEB-1 and PER beta-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Rossolini, G M; Franceschini, N; Lauretti, L; Caravelli, B; Riccio, M L; Galleni, M; Frère, J M; Amicosante, G

    1999-09-01

    In addition to the BlaB metallo-beta-lactamase, Chryseobacterium (Flavobacterium) meningosepticum CCUG 4310 (NCTC 10585) constitutively produces a 31-kDa active-site serine beta-lactamase, named CME-1, with an alkaline isoelectric pH. The blaA(CME) gene that encodes the latter enzyme was isolated from a genomic library constructed in the Escherichia coli plasmid vector pACYC184 by screening for cefuroxime-resistant clones. Sequence analysis revealed that the CME-1 enzyme is a new class A beta-lactamase structurally divergent from the other members of this class, being most closely related to the VEB-1 (also named CEF-1) and PER beta-lactamases and the Bacteroides chromosomal cephalosporinases. The blaA(CME) determinant is located on the chromosome and exhibits features typical of those of C. meningosepticum resident genes. The CME-1 protein was purified from an E. coli strain that overexpresses the cloned gene via a T7-based expression system by means of an anion-exchange chromatography step followed by a gel permeation chromatography step. Kinetic parameters for several substrates were determined. CME-1 is a clavulanic acid-susceptible extended-spectrum beta-lactamase that hydrolyzes most cephalosporins, penicillins, and monobactams but that does not hydrolyze cephamycins and carbapenems. The enzyme exhibits strikingly different kinetic parameters for different classes of beta-lactams, with both K(m) and k(cat) values much higher for cephalosporins than for penicillins and monobactams. However, the variability of both kinetic parameters resulted in overall similar acylation rates (k(cat)/K(m) ratios) for all types of beta-lactam substrates.

  12. A Cluster-Analytical Approach towards Physical Activity and Eating Habits among 10-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabbe, Dieter; De Bourdeaudhuij, I.; Legiest, E.; Maes, L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate whether clusters--based on physical activity (PA) and eating habits--can be found among children, and to explore subgroups' characteristics. A total of 1725 10-year olds completed a self-administered questionnaire. K-means cluster analysis was based on the weekly quantity of vigorous and moderate PA, the excess index…

  13. ANISOTROPIC METAL-ENRICHED OUTFLOWS DRIVEN BY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.; Cavagnolo, K. W.

    2011-04-20

    We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of metal-rich gas in 10 galaxy clusters using deep observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) have experienced recent active galactic nucleus activity in the forms of bright radio emission, cavities, and shock fronts embedded in the hot atmospheres. The heavy elements are distributed anisotropically and are aligned with the large-scale radio and cavity axes. They are apparently being transported from the halo of the BCG into the intracluster medium along large-scale outflows driven by the radio jets. The radial ranges of the metal-enriched outflows are found to scale with jet power as R{sub Fe} {proportional_to} P {sup 0.42}{sub jet}, with a scatter of only 0.5 dex. The heavy elements are transported beyond the extent of the inner cavities in all clusters, suggesting that this is a long-lasting effect sustained over multiple generations of outbursts. Black holes in BCGs will likely have difficulty ejecting metal-enriched gas beyond 1 Mpc unless their masses substantially exceed 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}.

  14. MHD SIMULATIONS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JETS IN A DYNAMIC GALAXY CLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Mendygral, P. J.; Jones, T. W.; Dolag, K.

    2012-05-10

    We present a pair of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of intermittent jets from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a galaxy cluster extracted from a high-resolution cosmological simulation. The selected cluster was chosen as an apparently relatively relaxed system, not having undergone a major merger in almost 7 Gyr. Despite this characterization and history, the intracluster medium (ICM) contains quite active 'weather'. We explore the effects of this ICM weather on the morphological evolution of the AGN jets and lobes. The orientation of the jets is different in the two simulations so that they probe different aspects of the ICM structure and dynamics. We find that even for this cluster, which can be characterized as relaxed by an observational standard, the large-scale, bulk ICM motions can significantly distort the jets and lobes. Synthetic X-ray observations of the simulations show that the jets produce complex cavity systems, while synthetic radio observations reveal bending of the jets and lobes similar to wide-angle tail radio sources. The jets are cycled on and off with a 26 Myr period using a 50% duty cycle. This leads to morphological features similar to those in 'double-double' radio galaxies. While the jet and ICM magnetic fields are generally too weak in the simulations to play a major role in the dynamics, Maxwell stresses can still become locally significant.

  15. Plasmoid instability in a large post-CME current sheet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Huang, Y.; CenterIntegrated Computation; Analysis of Reconnection; Turbulence

    2011-12-01

    Solar flares and CME that cause violent space weather change have been studied for years. The standard model suggests that there is a current sheet connecting the CME and the site of the post-CME flare after the eruption, but understanding of the detailed physical mechanism of dynamical processes in the current sheet remains incomplete. Recently, the secondary plasmoid instabilities of large scale current sheet in high Lundquist number environment such as solar corona and the change of magnetic topology in such a current sheet system has become a subject of great interest (Bhattacharjee et al. 2009). In our work, we study a post-CME current sheet via both observation and simulation. We use SOHO/LASCO observations of a fast halo CME as well as a slow CME. After the fast halo CME event on January 8, 2002, we observe a long, thin current sheet which connects the CME to a flare site on the surface of the sun. In this current sheet we identify over 60 bright plasmoid-like blobs in 39 hours. In the slow CME event on June 25, 2005, we observe 32 such blobs in 18 hours after the formation of the current sheet. We simulate both cases using high-Lundquist-number resistive MHD simulations of the model of Lin & Forbes (2000), and demonstrate that the distribution of plasmoid size in both cases appears to conform well to a distribution function that is independent of the Lundquist number and predicted by theory. The average observed plasmoid speed in both cases is a fraction of the typical Alfven speed, qualitatively consistent with the simulations. Thus, we propose that these observations can be plausibly accounted for by the plasmoid instability of the large-scale current sheet. The observed bright blobs are probably evidence of large-scale plasmoids, and their behavior appears to be qualitatively consistent with high-Lundquist-number MHD simulations.
    observation case summary

  16. Phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion suppression and activation enhancement with cluster carbon co-implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Onoda, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Carbon co-implantation is well known as an effective method for suppressing boron/phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion (TED). Germanium pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) is usually applied prior to carbon co-implantation for suppressing channeling tail of dopants. In this study, cluster carbon was applied instead of the combination of germanium PAI and monomer carbon co-implantation prior to phosphorous implantation. Dependence of phosphorous activation and TED on amorphous layer thickness, carbon dose, carbon distribution and substrate temperature have been investigated. Cluster carbon implantation enables thick amorphous layer formation and TED suppression at the same time and low temperature implantation enhances the ability of amorphous layer formation so that shallow junction and low Rs can be achieved without Ge implantation.

  17. Phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion suppression and activation enhancement with cluster carbon co-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Onoda, Hiroshi

    2012-11-06

    Carbon co-implantation is well known as an effective method for suppressing boron/phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion (TED). Germanium pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) is usually applied prior to carbon co-implantation for suppressing channeling tail of dopants. In this study, cluster carbon was applied instead of the combination of germanium PAI and monomer carbon co-implantation prior to phosphorous implantation. Dependence of phosphorous activation and TED on amorphous layer thickness, carbon dose, carbon distribution and substrate temperature have been investigated. Cluster carbon implantation enables thick amorphous layer formation and TED suppression at the same time and low temperature implantation enhances the ability of amorphous layer formation so that shallow junction and low Rs can be achieved without Ge implantation.

  18. Interplay of cytoskeletal activity and lipid phase stability in dynamic protein recruitment and clustering

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Llobregat, Jordi; Buceta, Javier; Reigada, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Recent experiments have revealed that some membrane proteins aggregate to form clusters. This type of process has been proven to be dynamic and to be actively maintained by external kinetics. Additionally, this dynamic recruiting is cholesterol- and actin-dependent, suggesting that raft organization and cytoskeleton rearrangement play a crucial role. In the present study, we propose a simple model that provides a general framework to describe the dynamical behavior of lipid-protein assemblies. Our results suggest that lipid-mediated interactions and cytoskeleton-anchored proteins contribute to the modulation of such behavior. In particular, we find a resonant condition between the membrane protein and cytoskeleton dynamics that results in the invariance of the ratio of clustered proteins that is found in in vivo experimental observations. PMID:24018870

  19. In Situ Generation of Active Molybdenum Octahedral Clusters for Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production from Water.

    PubMed

    Feliz, Marta; Puche, Marta; Atienzar, Pedro; Concepción, Patricia; Cordier, Stéphane; Molard, Yann

    2016-08-01

    The photocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) from water under homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions is explored for the {Mo6 Br(i) 8 }(4+) cluster core based unit starting from (TBA)2 [Mo6 Br(i) 8 F(a) 6 ] (TBA=tetra-n-butylammonium; "i" and "a" refer to the face-capping inner and terminal apical ligand, respectively). The catalytic activity of {Mo6 Br(i) 8 }(4+) is enhanced by the in situ generation of [Mo6 Br(i) 8 F(a) 5 (OH)(a) ](2-) , [Mo6 Br(i) 8 F(a) 3 (OH)(a) 3 ](2-) , and [Mo6 Br(i) 8 (OH)(a) 6 ](2-) , which are identified by ESIMS, luminescence, and NMR techniques. Full substitution of F(-) by OH(-) leads to the formation of (H3 O)2 [Mo6 Br(i) 8 (OH)(a) 6 ]⋅10 H2 O; its structure was determined by single-crystal XRD. The immobilization of the active {Mo6 Br(i) 8 }(4+) onto graphene oxide (GO) surfaces enhances its stability under catalytic conditions. The catalytic activity of the resulting (TBA)2 Mo6 Br(i) 8 @GO material is improved with respect to GO, but is reduced compared to the activity under homogeneous conditions because of changes in the GO semiconducting properties as well as lower activity and/or accessibility of the anchored cluster. PMID:27314221

  20. Multi-wavelength study of X-ray luminous clusters at z ~ 0.3. I. Star-formation activity of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braglia, F. G.; Pierini, D.; Biviano, A.; Böhringer, H.

    2009-06-01

    Context: The current paradigm of cosmic formation and evolution of galaxy clusters foresees growth mostly through merging. Galaxies in the infall region or in the core of a cluster undergo transformations owing to different environmental stresses. Aims: For two X-ray luminous clusters at redshift z 0.3 with opposite X-ray morphologies (i.e., dynamical states), RXCJ 0014.3-3022 and RXCJ 2308.3-0211, we assess differences in galaxy populations as a function of cluster topography. This is a pilot study for the joint X-ray and optical analysis of the REFLEX-DXL cluster sample. Methods: Cluster large-scale structure and substructure are determined from the combined photometry in the B, V, and R bands, and from multi-object optical spectroscopy at low resolution. Photometric redshifts and broad-band optical colours are determined. A spectral index analysis is performed, based on the [O II](λλ3726, 3728 Å) and Hδ(λ4102 Å) features, and the D4000 break, which are available for more than 100 member galaxies per cluster. Additional far-ultraviolet (FUV) photometry is retrieved from the GALEX archive. Combination of spectral indices and FUV-optical colours provides a picture of the star-formation history in galaxies. Results: In spite of the potential presence of a small fraction of galaxies with obscured star-formation activity, the average star-formation history of cluster members is found to depend on clustercentric distance and, more interestingly, on cluster substructure. The core regions of both clusters mainly host galaxies dominated by old, passively evolving stellar populations, which define the same red sequence in a (B-R) colour-R magnitude diagram. However, a sharp increase in star-formation activity is found along two clearly evident filamentary structures of the merging cluster RXCJ 0014.3-3022, out to its virial radius and beyond. It is produced by luminous (i.e., LR ≥ LRstar) and sub-Lstar galaxies. In contrast, the regular cool-core cluster RXCJ 2308

  1. Predicting Water Activity for Complex Wastes with Solvation Cluster Equilibria (SCE) - 12042

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, S.F.; Reynolds, J.G.; Johnston, C.T.

    2012-07-01

    Predicting an electrolyte mixture's water activity, i.e. the ratio of water vapor pressure over a solution with that of pure water, in principle reveals both boiling point and solubilities for that mixture. Better predictions of these properties helps support the ongoing missions to concentrate complex nuclear waste mixtures in order to conserve tank space and improved predictions of water activity will help. A new approach for predicting water activity, the solvation cluster equilibria (SCE) model, uses pure electrolyte water activities to predict water activity for a complex mixture of those electrolytes. An SCE function based on electrolyte hydration free energy and a standard Debye- Hueckel (DH) charge compression fits each pure electrolyte's water activity with three parameters. Given these pure electrolyte water activities, the SCE predicts any mixture water activity over a large range of concentration with an additional parameter for each mixture vector, the multinarity. In contrast to ionic strength, which scales with concentration, multinarity is related to the relative proportion of electrolytes in a mixture and can either increase or decrease the water activity prediction over a broad range of concentration for that mixture. The SCE model predicts water activity for complex electrolyte mixtures based on the water activities of pure electrolytes. Three parameter SCE functions fit the water activities of pure electrolytes and along with a single multinarity parameter for each mixture vector then predict the mixture water activity. Predictions of water activity can in principle predict solution electrolyte activity and this relationship will be explored in the future. Predicting electrolyte activities for complex mixtures provides a means of determining solubilities for each electrolyte. Although there are a number of reports [9, 10, 11] of water activity models for pure and binary mixtures of electrolytes, none of them compare measured versus calculated

  2. Strong coronal deflection of a CME and its interplanetary evolution to Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möstl, Christian; Rollett, Tanja; Frahm, Rudy A.; Liu, Ying D.; Long, David M.; Colaninno, Robin C.; Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela; Farrugia, Charles J.; Posner, Arik; Dumbovic, Mateja; Janvier, Miho; Demoulin, Pascal; Boakes, Peter; Devos, Andy; Kraaikamp, Emil; Mays, Mona L.; Vrsnak, Bojan

    2015-04-01

    We discuss multipoint imaging and in situ observations of the coronal mass ejection (CME) on January 7 2014 which resulted in a major false alarm. While the source region was almost at disk center facing Earth, the eruption was strongly deflected in the corona, and in conjunction with its particular orientation this CME missed Earth almost entirely, leading to no significant geomagnetic effects. We demonstrate this by a synthesis of data from 7 different heliospheric and planetary space missions (STEREO-A/B, SOHO, SDO, Wind, Mars Express, Mars Science Laboratory). The CMEs ecliptic part was deflected by 37 ± 10° in heliospheric longitude, a value larger than previously thought. Multipoint in situ observations at Earth and Mars confirm the deflection, and are consistent with an elliptical interplanetary shock shape of aspect ratio 1.4 ± 0.4. We also discuss our new method, the Ellipse Evolution (ElEvo) model, which allows us to optimize the global shape of the CME shock with multipoint in situ observations of the interplanetary CME arrival. ElEvo, which is an extension to the Drag-Based-Model by Vrsnak et al., may also be used for real time space weather forecasting. The presented results enhance our understanding of CME deflection and shape, which are fundamental ingredients for improving space weather forecasts.

  3. Teaching tools useful to understand the Space Weather, through kinematic analysis of some CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amazo-Gomez, Eliana

    The earth is a planet belonging to a medium dynamic, interacting, is not restricted a closed system, but it is affected by her multiple external phenomena, storms geomagnetic, coronal mass ejections, spatial tremors, changes in the environment plasma and magnetic fields near the sun and affecting the planet and overall radiation from other parts of space are subject study space weather. In this work I teach to my school students some tools and main ideas about some things about the Space Weather, through the analysis to five CME events and the localization the CMEs sources. We use Stereo and ISWA tools and datasets, also SOHO and STEREO Within the missions (Cor 1.2, HI 1.2, of A & B and SOHO spacecraft/LASCO C2 & C3), we proceed to calibrate the data, and make movies of the CME seen from of all 3 spacecrafts, then we can estimate the CME front (position), calculate the velocity of the CME and plot the velocity/time diagram, create J-plots, and finally, we Infer the velocity of the CME out of the J-plot. The coronal mass ejections measures were compared with records and this got us some a description of the stage in which the dynamic system is they belong to the earth and the sun, the idea of this work was show and describe some of the measurements that are used to develop the study of Space Weather.

  4. The CORIMP CME Catalogue: Automatically Detecting and Tracking CMEs in Coronagraph Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jason; Morgan, H.; Habbal, S. R.

    2012-05-01

    Studying CMEs in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, and user-specific biases may be introduced through visual inspection of the images. The large amount of data available from the SOHO and STEREO missions also makes manual cataloguing of CMEs tedious, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required. This has led to the development of automated CME detection and cataloguing packages such as CACTus, SEEDS and ARTEMIS. Here we present the development of the CORIMP (coronal image processing) Catalogue: a new, automated, multiscale, CME detection and tracking catalogue, that overcomes many of the drawbacks of current catalogues. It works by first employing a dynamic CME separation technique to remove the static background, and then characterizing CME structure via a multiscale edge-detection algorithm. The detections are chained through time to determine the CME kinematics and morphological changes as it propagates across the plane-of-sky. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by its application to a selection of SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI images, as well as to synthetic coronagraph images created from a model corona with a variety of CMEs. These algorithms are being applied to the whole LASCO and SECCHI datasets, and a CORIMP catalogue of results will soon be available to the community.

  5. Evolution of Piled Up Compressions in Modeled CME Sheaths and the Resulting Sheath Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, I.; Opher, M.; Evans, R. M.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2010-12-01

    We study Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) driven shocks and the resulting post shock structures in the lower corona (~ 2-7 Rsun). Two CMEs are erupted by modified Titov-Demoulin (TD) and Gibson-Low (GL) type flux ropes with Space Weather Modeling Framework. We observe a substantial pile up of density compression and a narrow region of plasma depletion layer (PDL) in the simulations. As the CME/flux rope moves and expands in solar wind medium, it pushes the magnetized material laying ahead of it. Hence, the magnetic field lines draping around the CME front are compressed in the sheath just ahead of the CME. These compressed field lines squeeze out the plasma sideways forming PDL in the region. Solar plasma being pushed and displaced from behind, forms a strong piled up compression (PUC) of density downstream of the PDL. Both CMEs have comparable propagation speeds while GL has larger expansion speed than TD due to its higher initial magnetic pressure. We argue that high CME expansion speed along with high solar wind density in the region are responsible for the large PUC found in the lower corona. In case of GL the PUC is much wider although the density compression ratio for both the cases are comparable. Although these simulations artificially initiate out-of-equilibrium CMEs and drive them in an artificial solar wind solution, we predict that PUCs, in general, will be large in the lower corona. This should affect the ion profiles of the accelerated solar energetic particles.

  6. Particle Acceleration at Oblique CME-driven Shock Using Improved PATH Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Li, G.; Parker, L. N.; Zank, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    .Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are generally accepted to be caused by particle acceleration at coronal mass ejection(CME)-driven shocks. In this work we improved the PATH(Particle Acceleration and Transport in the Heliosphere) model by initiating a 2D CME-driven shock to investigate particle acceleration at different locations of an oblique CME-drive shock, where the shock has different obliquity angle(θBN). Thus we can study problems like whether quasi-perpendicular or quasi-parallel shock is more efficient in particle acceleration.The PATH model is based on the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. The core of the model consists of a 3D Zeus module, which computes numerically the background solar wind and the CME-drive shock as inputs; and a shell module where the convection and diffusion of accelerated particles within the shock complex are followed. The 2D CME-driven shock is generated by perturbing the boundary condition of a steady background solar wind in certain patterns.

  7. Dependence of Sunspot Properties on Flare Occurrence and Flare-CME Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ya-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies showed that the intense flares tend to erupt from the large sunspot region with complex magnetic configuration and strong magnetic field. However, note that not all the active regions (ARs) classified as βγδ would produce X-class flares. To clarify the significance of sunspot properties on solar explosive events, we reexamine the dependence of flare magnitude on sunspot size and magnetic type during 1996-2014 based on the report of NOAA Solar Region Summary and the measurements of GOES soft X-ray flux. In particular, we focus on the βγδ-type ARs to relate the flare productivity to the sunspot area and magnetic field strength by means of the line-of-sight magnetograms from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. Two flare-productive ARs, 10486 and 12192, with βγδ magnetic configuration during most periods of their disk passages are further investigated to characterize the sunspots and flare-CME association.

  8. Post Alpbach-summerschool project: CARRINGTON MISSION FOR CME DETECTION TO IMPROVE SPACE WEATHER FORECAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheucher, Markus; Urbar, Jaroslav; Musset, Sophie; Andersson, Viktor; Gini, Francesco; Gorski, Jedrzej; Jüstel, Peter; Kiefer, René; Lee, Arrow; Meskers, Arjan; Miles, Oscar; Perakis, Nikolas; Rußwurm, Michael; Scully, Stephen; Seifert, Bernhard; Sorba, Arianna

    2014-05-01

    The effects of solar activity, especially Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), on Earth- and satellite-based systems are well-known and can cause major damage to space-dependent infrastructure. The main problem in current space weather forecasting is the inability to determine necessary forecast parameters of CMEs and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) early enough to react. We present the design for a novel space mission consisting of two spacecraft that is aimed to perform stereoscopic measurements on Earth-directed CMEs and in-situ measurements of CIRs. The magnetic field orientation and structure of CMEs will be measured close to the Sun, using spectro-polarimetry. Geoeffectiveness will be derived by remote sensing the CMEs magnetic field at 0.64AU from the Sun, determining the full magnetic field vector of a CME. This will be achieved by the novel concept of measuring its polarising effects on spacecraft to spacecraft laser beams based upon heterodyne interferometry. Overall structure and trajectory of CMEs will also be monitored by heliospheric imagers and in-situ plasma instruments. To achieve the mission objectives, the orbit is heliocentric at 1AU with a separation angle from the Earth of ±50°. The operational mission lifetime is 6 years with a proposed 6 year extension. If implemented, Carrington will serve as a forecast system which will significantly improve the minimum forecast time for the fastest CMEs with 2000 km/s, from 13 minutes based on current L1 satellites, to around 3 hours.

  9. Activation of conventional kinesin motors in clusters by Shaw voltage-gated K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Joshua; Xu, Mingxuan; Gu, Yuanzheng; Dangel, Andrew W.; Jukkola, Peter; Shrestha, Chandra; Gu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Summary The conventional kinesin motor transports many different cargos to specific locations in neurons. How cargos regulate motor function remains unclear. Here we focus on KIF5, the heavy chain of conventional kinesin, and report that the Kv3 (Shaw) voltage-gated K+ channel, the only known tetrameric KIF5-binding protein, clusters and activates KIF5 motors during axonal transport. Endogenous KIF5 often forms clusters along axons, suggesting a potential role of KIF5-binding proteins. Our biochemical assays reveal that the high-affinity multimeric binding between the Kv3.1 T1 domain and KIF5B requires three basic residues in the KIF5B tail. Kv3.1 T1 competes with the motor domain and microtubules, but not with kinesin light chain 1 (KLC1), for binding to the KIF5B tail. Live-cell imaging assays show that four KIF5-binding proteins, Kv3.1, KLC1 and two synaptic proteins SNAP25 and VAMP2, differ in how they regulate KIF5B distribution. Only Kv3.1 markedly increases the frequency and number of KIF5B-YFP anterograde puncta. Deletion of Kv3.1 channels reduces KIF5 clusters in mouse cerebellar neurons. Therefore, clustering and activation of KIF5 motors by Kv3 regulate the motor number in carrier vesicles containing the channel proteins, contributing not only to the specificity of Kv3 channel transport, but also to the cargo-mediated regulation of motor function. PMID:23487040

  10. C-H Bond Activation by Early Transition Metal Carbide Cluster Anion MoC3 (-).

    PubMed

    Li, Zi-Yu; Hu, Lianrui; Liu, Qing-Yu; Ning, Chuan-Gang; Chen, Hui; He, Sheng-Gui; Yao, Jiannian

    2015-12-01

    Although early transition metal (ETM) carbides can activate CH bonds in condensed-phase systems, the electronic-level mechanism is unclear. Atomic clusters are ideal model systems for understanding the mechanisms of bond activation. For the first time, CH activation of a simple alkane (ethane) by an ETM carbide cluster anion (MoC3 (-) ) under thermal-collision conditions has been identified by using high-resolution mass spectrometry, photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, and high-level quantum chemical calculations. Dehydrogenation and ethene elimination were observed in the reaction of MoC3 (-) with C2 H6 . The CH activation follows a mechanism of oxidative addition that is much more favorable in the carbon-stabilized low-spin ground electronic state than in the high-spin excited state. The reaction efficiency between the MoC3 (-) anion and C2 H6 is low (0.23±0.05) %. A comparison between the anionic and a highly efficient cationic reaction system (Pt(+) +C2 H6 ) was made. It turned out that the potential-energy surfaces for the entrance channels of the anionic and cationic reaction systems can be very different. PMID:26490554

  11. Stereoscopic Analysis of STEREO/SECCHI Data for CME Trajectory Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liewer, P. C.; Hall, J. R.; Howard, R. A.; DeJong, E. M.; Thompson, W. T.; Thernisten, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) coronagraphs on the twin Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft provide simultaneous views of the corona and coronal mass ejections from two view points. Here, we analyze simultaneous image pairs using the technique of tie-pointing and triangulation (T&T) to determine the three-dimensional trajectory of seven coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The bright leading edge of a CME seen in coronagraph images results from line-of-sight integration through the CME front; the two STEREO coronagraphs see different apparent leading edges, leading to a systematic error in its three-dimensional reconstruction. We analyze this systematic error using a simple geometric model of a CME front. We validate the technique and analysis by comparing T&T trajectory determinations for seven CMEs with trajectories determined by Thernisien et al. (2009) using a forward modeling technique not susceptible to this systematic effect.

  12. Subnanometer platinum clusters highly active and selective catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.

    SciTech Connect

    Vajda, S; Pellin, M. J.; Greeley, J. P.; Marshall, C. L.; Curtiss, L. A.; Ballentine, G. A.; Elam, J. W.; Catillon-Mucherie, S.; Redfern, P. C.; Mehmood, F.; Zapol, P.; Yale Univ.

    2009-03-01

    Small clusters are known to possess reactivity not observed in their bulk analogues, which can make them attractive for catalysis. Their distinct catalytic properties are often hypothesized to result from the large fraction of under-coordinated surface atoms. Here, we show that size-preselected Pt{sub 8-10} clusters stabilized on high-surface-area supports are 40-100 times more active for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane than previously studied platinum and vanadia catalysts, while at the same time maintaining high selectivity towards formation of propylene over by-products. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that under-coordination of the Pt atoms in the clusters is responsible for the surprisingly high reactivity compared with extended surfaces. We anticipate that these results will form the basis for development of a new class of catalysts by providing a route to bond-specific chemistry, ranging from energy-efficient and environmentally friendly synthesis strategies to the replacement of petrochemical feedstocks by abundant small alkanes.

  13. Visible-Light-Induced Olefin Activation Using 3D Aromatic Boron-Rich Cluster Photooxidants.

    PubMed

    Messina, Marco S; Axtell, Jonathan C; Wang, Yiqun; Chong, Paul; Wixtrom, Alex I; Kirlikovali, Kent O; Upton, Brianna M; Hunter, Bryan M; Shafaat, Oliver S; Khan, Saeed I; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Maynard, Heather D; Spokoyny, Alexander M

    2016-06-01

    We report a discovery that perfunctionalized icosahedral dodecaborate clusters of the type B12(OCH2Ar)12 (Ar = Ph or C6F5) can undergo photo-excitation with visible light, leading to a new class of metal-free photooxidants. Excitation in these species occurs as a result of the charge transfer between low-lying orbitals located on the benzyl substituents and an unoccupied orbital delocalized throughout the boron cluster core. Here we show how these species, photo-excited with a benchtop blue LED source, can exhibit excited-state reduction potentials as high as 3 V and can participate in electron-transfer processes with a broad range of styrene monomers, initiating their polymerization. Initiation is observed in cases of both electron-rich and electron-deficient styrene monomers at cluster loadings as low as 0.005 mol%. Furthermore, photo-excitation of B12(OCH2C6F5)12 in the presence of a less activated olefin such as isobutylene results in the production of highly branched poly(isobutylene). This work introduces a new class of air-stable, metal-free photo-redox reagents capable of mediating chemical transformations. PMID:27186856

  14. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  15. Modeling Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in Cool-core Clusters: The Formation of Cold Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t TI/t ff < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s-1. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  16. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK AND ENTROPY INJECTION IN GALAXY CLUSTER CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Anya; Majumdar, Subhabrata; Nath, Biman B. E-mail: subha@tifr.res.in

    2013-10-20

    We make the first estimate of non-gravitational energy profiles in galaxy cluster cores (and beyond) based on observational data. Comparing the observed entropy profiles within r{sub 500}, from the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey to simulated base entropy profiles without feedback from both adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) non-radiative simulations, we estimate the amount of additional non-gravitational energy, E{sub ICM}, contained in the intracluster medium (ICM), as well as the total energy feedback, E{sub Feedback}, from active galactic nuclei (AGNs; the central AGNs in most cases) into the clusters. The total feedback energy scales with the mean spectroscopic temperature as E{sub Feedback}∝T{sub sp}{sup 2.52±0.08} and E{sub Feedback}∝T{sub sp}{sup 2.17±0.11} for the SPH and AMR baseline profiles. The mean non-gravitational energy per particle within r{sub 500} remaining in the ICM after energy lost during cooling is ε{sub ICM} = 2.8 ± 0.8 keV for the SPH theoretical relation and ε{sub ICM} = 1.7 ± 0.9 keV for the AMR theoretical relation. We use the NRAO/VLA Sky Survey source catalog to determine the radio luminosity, L{sub R} , at 1.4 GHz of the central source(s) of our sample. For T{sub sp} > 3 keV, the E{sub Feedback} correlates with L{sub R} , although with different normalization for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. We show that AGNs could provide a significant portion of the feedback.

  17. Clustered mutations in hominid genome evolution are consistent with APOBEC3G enzymatic activity

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Yishay; Gabay, Orshay; Arbiza, Leonardo; Sams, Aaron J.; Keinan, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The gradual accumulation of mutations by any of a number of mutational processes is a major driving force of divergence and evolution. Here, we investigate a potentially novel mutational process that is based on the activity of members of the AID/APOBEC family of deaminases. This gene family has been recently shown to introduce—in multiple types of cancer—enzyme-induced clusters of co-occurring somatic mutations caused by cytosine deamination. Going beyond somatic mutations, we hypothesized that APOBEC3—following its rapid expansion in primates—can introduce unique germline mutation clusters that can play a role in primate evolution. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by performing a comprehensive comparative genomic screen for APOBEC3-induced mutagenesis patterns across different hominids. We detected thousands of mutation clusters introduced along primate evolution which exhibit features that strongly fit the known patterns of APOBEC3G mutagenesis. These results suggest that APOBEC3G-induced mutations have contributed to the evolution of all genomes we studied. This is the first indication of site-directed, enzyme-induced genome evolution, which played a role in the evolution of both modern and archaic humans. This novel mutational mechanism exhibits several unique features, such as its higher tendency to mutate transcribed regions and regulatory elements and its ability to generate clusters of concurrent point mutations that all occur in a single generation. Our discovery demonstrates the exaptation of an anti-viral mechanism as a new source of genomic variation in hominids with a strong potential for functional consequences. PMID:27056836

  18. ULF wave activity during the 2003 Halloween superstorm: multipoint observations from CHAMP, Cluster and Geotail missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, G.; Daglis, I. A.; Zesta, E.; Papadimitriou, C.; Georgiou, M.; Haagmans, R.; Tsinganos, K.

    2012-12-01

    We examine data from a topside ionosphere and two magnetospheric missions (CHAMP, Cluster and Geotail) for signatures of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves during the exceptional 2003 Halloween geospace magnetic storm, when Dst reached ~-380 nT. We use a suite of wavelet-based algorithms, which are a subset of a tool that is being developed for the analysis of multi-instrument multi-satellite and ground-based observations to identify ULF waves and investigate their properties. Starting from the region of topside ionosphere, we first present three clear and strong signatures of Pc3 ULF wave activity (frequency 15-100 mHz) in CHAMP tracks. We then expand these three time intervals for purposes of comparison between CHAMP, Cluster and Geotail Pc3 observations but also to be able to search for Pc4-5 wave signatures (frequency 1-10 mHz) into Cluster and Geotail measurements in order to have a more complete picture of the ULF wave occurrence during the storm. Due to the fast motion through field lines in a low Earth orbit (LEO) we are able to reliably detect Pc3 (but not Pc4-5) waves from CHAMP. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that ULF wave observations from a topside ionosphere mission are compared to ULF wave observations from magnetospheric missions. Our study provides evidence for the occurrence of a number of prominent ULF wave events in the Pc3 and Pc4-5 bands during the storm and offers a platform to study the wave evolution from high altitudes to LEO. The ULF wave analysis methods presented here can be applied to observations from the upcoming Swarm multi-satellite mission of ESA, which is anticipated to enable joint studies with the Cluster mission.

  19. Seed Population in Large Solar Energetic Particle Events and the Twin-CME Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liu-Guan; Li, Gang; Le, Gui-Ming; Gu, Bin; Cao, Xin-Xin

    2015-10-01

    It has recently been suggested that large solar energetic particle (SEP) events are often caused by twin coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In the twin-CME scenario, the preceding CME provides both an enhanced turbulence level and enhanced seed population at the main CME-driven shock. In this work, we study the effect of the preceding CMEs on the seed population. We examine event-integrated abundance of iron to oxygen ratio (Fe/O) at energies above 25 MeV/nuc for large SEP events in solar cycle 23. We find that the Fe/O ratio (normalized to the reference coronal value of 0.134) ≤2.0 for almost all single-CME events and these events tend to have smaller peak intensities. In comparison, the Fe/O ratio of twin-CME events scatters in a larger range, reaching as high as 8, suggesting the presence of flare material from perhaps preceding flares. For extremely large SEP events with peak intensities above 1000 pfu, the Fe/O ratios drop below 2, indicating that the seed particles are dominated by coronal material rather than flare material in these extreme events. The Fe/O ratios of ground level enhancement (GLE) events, which are all twin-CME events, scatter in a broad range. For a given Fe/O ratio, GLE events tend to have larger peak intensities than non-GLE events. Using velocity dispersion analysis, we find that GLE events have lower solar particle release heights than non-GLE events, agreeing with earlier results by Reames.

  20. Identification of novel mureidomycin analogues via rational activation of a cryptic gene cluster in Streptomyces roseosporus NRRL 15998

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lingjuan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jihui; Liu, Hao; Hong, Bin; Tan, Huarong; Niu, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents are urgently needed to tackle the growing threat of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. An important source of new antimicrobials is the large repertoire of cryptic gene clusters embedded in microbial genomes. Genome mining revealed a napsamycin/mureidomycin biosynthetic gene cluster in the chromosome of Streptomyces roseosporus NRRL 15998. The cryptic gene cluster was activated by constitutive expression of a foreign activator gene ssaA from sansanmycin biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces sp. strain SS. Expression of the gene cluster was verified by RT-PCR analysis of key biosynthetic genes. The activated metabolites demonstrated potent inhibitory activity against the highly refractory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and characterization of the metabolites led to the discovery of eight acetylated mureidomycin analogues. To our surprise, constitutive expression of the native activator gene SSGG_02995, a ssaA homologue in S. roseosporus NRRL 15998, has no beneficial effect on mureidomycin stimulation. This study provides a new way to activate cryptic gene cluster for the acquisition of novel antibiotics and will accelerate the exploitation of prodigious natural products in Streptomyces. PMID:26370924

  1. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkesh, Ryan A.; Ichimura, Andrew S.; Monson, Todd C.; Tomson, Neil C.; Anstey, Mitchell R.

    2016-02-01

    We used the redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Ultimately, complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events.

  2. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion.

    PubMed

    Zarkesh, Ryan A; Ichimura, Andrew S; Monson, Todd C; Tomson, Neil C; Anstey, Mitchell R

    2016-06-14

    The redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand was used to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events. PMID:26998892

  3. Role of Ambient Solar Wind Conditions in CME evolution (P21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadav, R.; Jadeja, A. K.; Iyer, K. N.

    2006-11-01

    ipsraj@yahoo.com Solar events are mainly responsible for producing storms at the Earth. Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is a major cause for this. In this paper, Coronal Mass Ejections occurred during 1998-2004 are studied. Ambient solar wind does play some role in determining the effect of a CME. The effects produced at the Earth during the period 1999 2004 are considered and an attempt has been made to understand the role of ambient solar wind. This is to draw some conclusion about how some of the events become geo- effective.

  4. NanoCluster Beacons as Reporter Probes in Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection†

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Sissel; Obliosca, Judy M.; Liu, Cong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Chen, Yu-An; Imphean, Darren M.; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping; Leong, Kam W.; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2015-01-01

    As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp.. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics. PMID:25901841

  5. [FeFe]-Hydrogenase with Chalcogenide Substitutions at the H-Cluster Maintains Full H2 Evolution Activity.

    PubMed

    Noth, Jens; Esselborn, Julian; Güldenhaupt, Jörn; Brünje, Annika; Sawyer, Anne; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Gerwert, Klaus; Hofmann, Eckhard; Winkler, Martin; Happe, Thomas

    2016-07-11

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenase HYDA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is particularly amenable to biochemical and biophysical characterization because the H-cluster in the active site is the only inorganic cofactor present. Herein, we present the complete chemical incorporation of the H-cluster into the HYDA1-apoprotein scaffold and, furthermore, the successful replacement of sulfur in the native [4FeH ] cluster with selenium. The crystal structure of the reconstituted pre-mature HYDA1[4Fe4Se]H protein was determined, and a catalytically intact artificial H-cluster variant was generated upon in vitro maturation. Full hydrogen evolution activity as well as native-like composition and behavior of the redesigned enzyme were verified through kinetic assays, FTIR spectroscopy, and X-ray structure analysis. These findings reveal that even a bioinorganic active site with exceptional complexity can exhibit a surprising level of compositional plasticity. PMID:27214763

  6. [FeFe]-Hydrogenase with Chalcogenide Substitutions at the H-Cluster Maintains Full H2 Evolution Activity.

    PubMed

    Noth, Jens; Esselborn, Julian; Güldenhaupt, Jörn; Brünje, Annika; Sawyer, Anne; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Gerwert, Klaus; Hofmann, Eckhard; Winkler, Martin; Happe, Thomas

    2016-07-11

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenase HYDA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is particularly amenable to biochemical and biophysical characterization because the H-cluster in the active site is the only inorganic cofactor present. Herein, we present the complete chemical incorporation of the H-cluster into the HYDA1-apoprotein scaffold and, furthermore, the successful replacement of sulfur in the native [4FeH ] cluster with selenium. The crystal structure of the reconstituted pre-mature HYDA1[4Fe4Se]H protein was determined, and a catalytically intact artificial H-cluster variant was generated upon in vitro maturation. Full hydrogen evolution activity as well as native-like composition and behavior of the redesigned enzyme were verified through kinetic assays, FTIR spectroscopy, and X-ray structure analysis. These findings reveal that even a bioinorganic active site with exceptional complexity can exhibit a surprising level of compositional plasticity.

  7. Overproduction of Ristomycin A by Activation of a Silent Gene Cluster in Amycolatopsis japonicum MG417-CF17

    PubMed Central

    Spohn, Marius; Kirchner, Norbert; Kulik, Andreas; Jochim, Angelika; Wolf, Felix; Muenzer, Patrick; Borst, Oliver; Gross, Harald; Wohlleben, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria within the last decades is one reason for the urgent need for new antibacterial agents. A strategy to discover new anti-infective compounds is the evaluation of the genetic capacity of secondary metabolite producers and the activation of cryptic gene clusters (genome mining). One genus known for its potential to synthesize medically important products is Amycolatopsis. However, Amycolatopsis japonicum does not produce an antibiotic under standard laboratory conditions. In contrast to most Amycolatopsis strains, A. japonicum is genetically tractable with different methods. In order to activate a possible silent glycopeptide cluster, we introduced a gene encoding the transcriptional activator of balhimycin biosynthesis, the bbr gene from Amycolatopsis balhimycina (bbrAba), into A. japonicum. This resulted in the production of an antibiotically active compound. Following whole-genome sequencing of A. japonicum, 29 cryptic gene clusters were identified by genome mining. One of these gene clusters is a putative glycopeptide biosynthesis gene cluster. Using bioinformatic tools, ristomycin (syn. ristocetin), a type III glycopeptide, which has antibacterial activity and which is used for the diagnosis of von Willebrand disease and Bernard-Soulier syndrome, was deduced as a possible product of the gene cluster. Chemical analyses by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy confirmed the in silico prediction that the recombinant A. japonicum/pRM4-bbrAba synthesizes ristomycin A. PMID:25114137

  8. Regulatory elements required for the activation and repression of the protocadherin-alpha gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Kehayova, Polina; Monahan, Kevin; Chen, Weisheng; Maniatis, Tom

    2011-10-11

    The mouse protocadherin (Pcdh) -α, -β, and -γ gene clusters encode more than 50 protein isoforms, the combinatorial expression of which generates vast single-cell diversity in the brain. At present, the mechanisms by which this diversity is expressed are not understood. Here we show that two transcriptional enhancer elements, HS5-1 and HS7, play a critical role in Pcdhα gene expression in mice. We show that the HS5-1 element functions as an enhancer in neurons and a silencer in nonneuronal cells. The enhancer activity correlates with the binding of zinc finger DNA binding protein CTCF to the target promoters, and the silencer activity requires the binding of the REST/NRSF repressor complex in nonneuronal cells. Thus, the HS5-1 element functions as a neuron-specific enhancer and nonneuronal cell repressor. In contrast, the HS7 element functions as a Pcdhα cluster-wide transcription enhancer element. These studies reveal a complex organization of regulatory elements required for generating single cell Pcdh diversity. PMID:21949399

  9. Microbial communication leading to the activation of silent fungal secondary metabolite gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Netzker, Tina; Fischer, Juliane; Weber, Jakob; Mattern, Derek J.; König, Claudia C.; Valiante, Vito; Schroeckh, Volker; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms form diverse multispecies communities in various ecosystems. The high abundance of fungal and bacterial species in these consortia results in specific communication between the microorganisms. A key role in this communication is played by secondary metabolites (SMs), which are also called natural products. Recently, it was shown that interspecies “talk” between microorganisms represents a physiological trigger to activate silent gene clusters leading to the formation of novel SMs by the involved species. This review focuses on mixed microbial cultivation, mainly between bacteria and fungi, with a special emphasis on the induced formation of fungal SMs in co-cultures. In addition, the role of chromatin remodeling in the induction is examined, and methodical perspectives for the analysis of natural products are presented. As an example for an intermicrobial interaction elucidated at the molecular level, we discuss the specific interaction between the filamentous fungi Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus with the soil bacterium Streptomyces rapamycinicus, which provides an excellent model system to enlighten molecular concepts behind regulatory mechanisms and will pave the way to a novel avenue of drug discovery through targeted activation of silent SM gene clusters through co-cultivations of microorganisms. PMID:25941517

  10. Changing Ionization Conditions in SDSS Galaxies with Active Galactic Nuclei as a Function of Environment from Pairs to Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabiboulline, Emil T.; Steinhardt, Charles L.; Silverman, John D.; Ellison, Sara L.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Patton, David R.

    2014-11-01

    We study how active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity changes across environments from galaxy pairs to clusters using 143,843 galaxies with z < 0.2 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a refined technique, we apply a continuous measure of AGN activity, characteristic of the ionization state of the narrow-line emitting gas. Changes in key emission-line ratios ([N II] λ6548/Hα, [O III] λ5007/Hβ) between different samples allow us to disentangle different environmental effects while removing contamination. We confirm that galaxy interactions enhance AGN activity. However, conditions in the central regions of clusters are inhospitable for AGN activity even if galaxies are in pairs. These results can be explained through models of gas dynamics in which pair interactions stimulate the transfer of gas to the nucleus and clusters suppress gas availability for accretion onto the central black hole.

  11. Changing ionization conditions in SDSS galaxies with active galactic nuclei as a function of environment from pairs to clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Khabiboulline, Emil T.; Steinhardt, Charles L.; Silverman, John D.; Ellison, Sara L.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Patton, David R.

    2014-11-01

    We study how active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity changes across environments from galaxy pairs to clusters using 143,843 galaxies with z < 0.2 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a refined technique, we apply a continuous measure of AGN activity, characteristic of the ionization state of the narrow-line emitting gas. Changes in key emission-line ratios ([N II] λ6548/Hα, [O III] λ5007/Hβ) between different samples allow us to disentangle different environmental effects while removing contamination. We confirm that galaxy interactions enhance AGN activity. However, conditions in the central regions of clusters are inhospitable for AGN activity even if galaxies are in pairs. These results can be explained through models of gas dynamics in which pair interactions stimulate the transfer of gas to the nucleus and clusters suppress gas availability for accretion onto the central black hole.

  12. Effects of efflux-pump inducers and genetic variation of the multidrug transporter cmeB in biocide resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    PubMed

    Mavri, Ana; Smole Možina, Sonja

    2013-03-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps, such as CmeABC and CmeDEF, are involved in the resistance of Campylobacter to a broad spectrum of antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of two putative efflux-pump inducers, bile salts and sodium deoxycholate, on the resistance of Campylobacter to biocides (triclosan, benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine diacetate, cetylpyridinium chloride and trisodium phosphate), SDS and erythromycin. The involvement of the CmeABC and CmeDEF efflux pumps in this resistance was studied on the basis of the effects of bile salts and sodium deoxycholate in Campylobacter cmeB, cmeF and cmeR mutants. The genetic variation in the cmeB gene was also examined, to see whether this polymorphism is related to the function of the efflux pump. In 15 Campylobacter jejuni and 23 Campylobacter coli strains, bile salts and sodium deoxycholate increased the MICs of benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine diacetate, cetylpyridinium chloride and SDS, and decreased the MICs of triclosan, trisodium phosphate and erythromycin. Bile salts and sodium deoxycholate further decreased or increased the MICs of biocides and erythromycin in the cmeF and cmeR mutants. For cmeB polymorphisms, 17 different cmeB-specific PCR-RFLP patterns were identified: six within C. jejuni only, nine within C. coli only and two in both species. In conclusion, bile salts and sodium deoxycholate can increase or decrease bacterial resistance to structurally unrelated antimicrobials. The MIC increases in the cmeF and cmeR mutants indicated that at least one non-CmeABC efflux system is involved in resistance to biocides. These results indicate that the cmeB gene polymorphism identified is not associated with biocide and erythromycin resistance in Campylobacter.

  13. Methane Activation by Iron-Carbide Cluster Anions FeC6(-).

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Fang; Li, Zi-Yu; Liu, Qing-Yu; Li, Xiao-Na; Zhao, Yan-Xia; He, Sheng-Gui

    2015-06-18

    Laser-ablation-generated and mass-selected iron-carbide cluster anions FeC6(-) were reacted with CH4 in a linear ion trap reactor under thermal collision conditions. The reactions were characterized by mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. Adsorption product of FeC6CH4(-) was observed in the experiments. The identified large kinetic isotope effect suggests that CH4 can be activated by FeC6(-) anions with a dissociative adsorption manner, which is further supported by the reaction mechanism calculations. The large dipole moment of FeC6(-) (19.21 D) can induce a polarization of CH4 and can facilitate the cleavage of C-H bond. This study reports the CH4 activation by transition-metal carbide anions, which provides insights into mechanistic understanding of iron-carbon centers that are important for condensed-phase catalysis.

  14. Clustering Home Activity Distributions for Automatic Detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults1

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Ahmad; Chikhaoui, Belkacem; Mattek, Nora; Kaye, Jeffrey; Austin, Daniel; Mihailidis, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The public health implications of growing numbers of older adults at risk for dementia places pressure on identifying dementia at its earliest stages so as to develop proactive management plans. The prodromal dementia phase commonly identified as mild cognitive impairment is an important target for this early detection of impending dementia amenable to treatment. In this paper, we propose a method for home-based automatic detection of mild cognitive impairment in older adults through continuous monitoring via unobtrusive sensing technologies. Our method is composed of two main stages: a training stage and a test stage. For training, room activity distributions are estimated for each subject using a time frame of ω weeks, and then affinity propagation is employed to cluster the activity distributions and to extract exemplars to represent the different emerging clusters. For testing, room activity distributions belonging to a test subject with unknown cognitive status are compared to the extracted exemplars and get assigned the labels of the exemplars that result in the smallest normalized Kullbak–Leibler divergence. The labels of the activity distributions are then used to determine the cognitive status of the test subject. Using the sensor and clinical data pertaining to 85 homes with single occupants, we were able to automatically detect mild cognitive impairment in older adults with an F0.5 score of 0.856. Also, we were able to detect the non-amnestic sub-type of mild cognitive impairment in older adults with an F0.5 score of 0.958. PMID:27617044

  15. Clustering Home Activity Distributions for Automatic Detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults1

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Ahmad; Chikhaoui, Belkacem; Mattek, Nora; Kaye, Jeffrey; Austin, Daniel; Mihailidis, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The public health implications of growing numbers of older adults at risk for dementia places pressure on identifying dementia at its earliest stages so as to develop proactive management plans. The prodromal dementia phase commonly identified as mild cognitive impairment is an important target for this early detection of impending dementia amenable to treatment. In this paper, we propose a method for home-based automatic detection of mild cognitive impairment in older adults through continuous monitoring via unobtrusive sensing technologies. Our method is composed of two main stages: a training stage and a test stage. For training, room activity distributions are estimated for each subject using a time frame of ω weeks, and then affinity propagation is employed to cluster the activity distributions and to extract exemplars to represent the different emerging clusters. For testing, room activity distributions belonging to a test subject with unknown cognitive status are compared to the extracted exemplars and get assigned the labels of the exemplars that result in the smallest normalized Kullbak–Leibler divergence. The labels of the activity distributions are then used to determine the cognitive status of the test subject. Using the sensor and clinical data pertaining to 85 homes with single occupants, we were able to automatically detect mild cognitive impairment in older adults with an F0.5 score of 0.856. Also, we were able to detect the non-amnestic sub-type of mild cognitive impairment in older adults with an F0.5 score of 0.958.

  16. Application of space-time scan statistics to describe geographic and temporal clustering of visible drug activity.

    PubMed

    Linton, Sabriya L; Jennings, Jacky M; Latkin, Carl A; Gomez, Marisela B; Mehta, Shruti H

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge of the geographic and temporal clustering of drug activity can inform where health and social services are needed and can provide insight on the potential impact of local policies on drug activity. This ecologic study assessed the spatial and temporal distribution of drug activity in Baltimore, Maryland, prior to and following the implementation of a large urban redevelopment project in East Baltimore, which began in 2003. Drug activity was measured by narcotic calls for service at the neighborhood level. A space-time scan statistic approach was used to identify statistically significant clusters of narcotic calls for service across space and time, using a discrete Poisson model. After adjusting for economic deprivation and housing vacancy, clusters of narcotic calls for service were identified among neighborhoods located in Southeast, Northeast, Northwest, and West Baltimore from 2001 to 2010. Clusters of narcotic calls for service were identified among neighborhoods located in East Baltimore from 2001 to 2003, indicating a decrease in narcotic calls thereafter. A large proportion of clusters occurred among neighborhoods located in North and Northeast Baltimore after 2003, which indicated a potential spike during this time frame. These findings suggest potential displacement of drug activity coinciding with the initiation of urban redevelopment in East Baltimore. Space-time scan statistics should be used in future research to describe the potential implications of local policies on drug activity.

  17. Reconciling CME Kinematics using Radio and White-light Observations from STEREO and SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Xie, Hong; Makela, Pertti; Akiyama, Sachiko; Reiner, Michael; MacDowall, Robert

    2014-05-01

    We study the characteristics of nonthermal radio emission associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by STEREO, SOHO, and Wind spacecraft. In particular, we examine three backside CMEs associated with type II radio bursts at frequencies below 16 MHz. These bursts are known to be excellent indicators of solar energetic particle events. We use the universal drift rate spectrum of type II radio bursts and the inferred density scale heights in the corona and interplanetary medium o estimate the speed of the shock waves that produce the type II radio bursts. We find that the radio bursts can provide an accurate estimate of the CME speeds. We consider three backside events and a cannibalism event to show the usefulness of radio dynamic spectrum in inferring CME kinematics. We use radio direction finding technique to show that CME-CME interaction results in enhanced nonthermal radio emission. The radio data also provide constraints on the particle acceleration mechanisms and the reason for the energetic particles observed at wide-ranging longitudes. Finally we infer the shape and extent of the shock associated with one of the biggest solar energetic particle events in the space era.

  18. Analysis of Metric Type II Burst and EUV Waves Generated by Shock Wave Driven by Cme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha-Silva, Rafael; Fernandes, Francisco; Selhorst, Caius

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between solar type II radio bursts produced by plasma oscillations and coronal shocks is well shown since the 1960s. However, the details of the association between the drivers of the shocks and the metric type II bursts remains a controversial issue. The flares and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the potential drivers of these shocks. In this work, we present the analysis of a metric type II burst observed on May 17, 2013, by spectrometers from e-CALLISTO network and EUV images from the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI), aboard the STEREO. The event was associated with an M3.2 X-ray flare and a halo CME. The EUV images show the EUV wave was produced by the expansion of the CME. The heights of the EUV wave fronts and the magnetic field intensity determined in the regions of the shock are consistent with those the heights of radio source obtained with the three-fold Newkirk density model, which suggests an oblique propagation of the shock. The finding of an accelerating shock with speed of 530-640 km/s and of 870-1220 km/s for the first and the second stages of the type II emission, respectively, is consistent with both the average speed of the associated EUV wave front, of 626 km/s, during the initial expansion of the CME, and with the linear speed of the CME, of 1345 km/s. These results will be presented and discussed.

  19. Constraints on CME Evolution from in situ Observations of Ionic Charge States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruesbeck, Jacob R.; Lepri, Susan T.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel procedure for deriving the physical properties of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMES) in the corona. Our methodology uses in-situ measurements of ionic charge states of C, O, Si and Fe in the heliosphere and interprets them in the context of a model for the early evolution of ICME plasma, between 2 - 5 R-solar. We find that the data can be fit only by an evolution that consists of an initial heating of the plasma, followed by an expansion that ultimately results in cooling. The heating profile is consistent with a compression of coronal plasma due to flare reconnect ion jets and an expansion cooling due to the ejection, as expected from the standard CME/flare model. The observed frozen-in ionic charge states reflect this time-history and, therefore, provide important constraints for the heating and expansion time-scales, as well as the maximum temperature the CME plasma is heated to during its eruption. Furthermore, our analysis places severe limits on the possible density of CME plasma in the corona. We discuss the implications of our results for CME models and for future analysis of ICME plasma composition.

  20. Medical Education and Communication Companies Involved in CME: An Updated Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Eric D.; Overstreet, Karen M.; Parochka, Jacqueline N.; Lemon, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Medical Education and Communication Companies (MECCs) represent approximately 21% of the providers accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), yet relatively little is known about these organizations in the greater continuing medical education (CME) community. Two prior studies described them,…

  1. The Integrated Joslin Performance Improvement/CME Program: A New Paradigm for Better Diabetes Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Julie A.; Beaser, Richard S.; Neighbours, James; Shuman, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing continuing medical education is an essential component of life-long learning and can have a positive influence on patient outcomes. However, some evidence suggests that continuing medical education has not fulfilled its potential as a performance improvement (PI) tool, in part due to a paradigm of CME that has focused on the quantity of…

  2. Towards a Better Understanding of CME Onsets with SECCHI on STEREO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, S.; Vourlidas, A.

    2007-12-01

    Observations of the first minutes in the life of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) represent the main key into identifying the physical mechanism(s) behind them. Previous observations of CME onsets were limited by factors such as low cadence, small field of view, single-temperature coverage, and lack of 3D information. These limitations are significantly mitigated by the availability of SECCHI observations onboard the STEREO mission. We analyze a series of high-cadence, multi-temperature observations of CME onsets taken with the EUVI/SECCHI imagers tied with high-cadence coronagraphic COR1/SECCHI observations. We discuss how our perception of well-known features pertinent to CME onsets such as dimmings, EIT waves and cavities is shaped by the unique characteristics of SECCHI observations, and of the 3D information available in STEREO obervations in particular. We finally discuss how the generic elements of our observations compare with the expectations of CME models in an attempt to place some constraints on them.

  3. Organizational Change in Management of Hepatitis C: Evaluation of a CME Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrard, Judith; Choudary, Veena; Groom, Holly; Dieperink, Eric; Willenbring, Mark L.; Durfee, Janet M.; Ho, Samuel B.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Effective treatment regimens exist for the hepatitis C virus (HCV); however, clinicians are often resistant to evaluation or treatment of patients with alcohol or substance abuse problems. We describe a continuing medical education (CME) program for clinicians in a nationwide health care system, with emphasis on current treatment…

  4. Are CME 'interactions' Really Important for Accelerating Major Solar Energetic Particle Events?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Lawrence, G. R.; Haggerty, D. K.; Kucera, T.; Szabo, A.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed that the presence or absence of an interaction with a preceding coronal mass ejection (CME) or other coronal structure within approximately 50R(sub s), of the Sun discriminates large, fast CMEs associated with major solar energetic particle (SEP) events from those that are not. We conclude that there is no compelling evidence that, if such interactions take place, they play an important role in SEP acceleration. Reasons include: The reported statistical results are consistent with a chance association between interacting CMEs and SEP events; Energetic SEPs are detected at Earth typically before or around the time when the primary CME enters the LASCO C2 field of view - interactions higher in the corona cannot play a role in acceleration of these particles; For approximately 60% of major SEP events in 1997-2001, the preceding CME fades into the background corona or is relatively narrow (less than 40 deg), suggesting any interaction will be weak; Radio signatures attributed to CME interaction occur after SEP acceleration has commenced.

  5. A CME-driven solar wind distrubance observed at both low and high heliographic latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Phillips, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    A solar wind disturbance produced by a fast coronal mass ejection, CME, that departed from the Sun on Feburary 20, 1994 was observed in the ecliptic plane at 1 AU by IMP 8 and at high heliographic latitudes at 3.53 AU by Ulysses. In the ecliptic the disturbance included a strong forward shock but no reverse shock, while at high latitudes the disturbance was bounded by a relatively weak forward-reverse shock pair. It is clear that the disturbance in the ecliptic plane was driven primarily by the relative speed between the CME and a slower ambient solar wind ahead, whereas at higher latitudes the disturbance was driven by expansion of the CME. The combined IMP 8 and Ulysses observations thus provide a graphic illustration of how a single fast CME can produce very different types of solar wind disturbances at low and high heliographic latitudes. Simple numerical simulations help explain observed differences at the two spacecraft. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The balance between heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We study the long-term evolution of an idealized cool-core galaxy cluster under the influence of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback using three-dimensional high-resolution (60 pc) adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The feedback is modeled with a pair of precessing jets whose power is calculated based on the accretion rate of the cold gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH). The intracluster medium first cools into clumps along the propagation direction of the jets. As the jet power increases, gas condensation occurs isotropically, forming spatially extended structures that resemble the observed Hα filaments in Perseus and many other cool-core clusters. Jet heating elevates the gas entropy, halting clump formation. The cold gas that is not accreted onto the SMBH settles into a rotating disk of ∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The hot gas cools directly onto the disk while the SMBH accretes from its innermost region, powering the AGN that maintains a thermally balanced state for a few Gyr. The mass cooling rate averaged over 7 Gyr is ∼30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, an order of magnitude lower than the classic cooling flow value. Medium resolution simulations produce similar results, while in low resolution runs, the cluster experiences cycles of gas condensation and AGN outbursts. Owing to its self-regulating mechanism, AGN feedback can successfully balance cooling with a wide range of model parameters. Our model also produces cold structures in early stages that are in good agreement with the observations. However, the long-lived massive cold disk is unrealistic, suggesting that additional physical processes are still needed.

  7. Nanoparticle cluster gas sensor: Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticles for NH3 detection with ultrahigh sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Chen, Nan; Han, Bingqian; Xiao, Xuechun; Chen, Gang; Djerdj, Igor; Wang, Yude

    2015-09-28

    Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method. The structure, morphology, chemical state and specific surface area were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N2-sorption studies, respectively. The SnO2 nanoparticle cluster matrix consists of tens of thousands of SnO2 nanoparticles with an ultra-small grain size estimated to be 3.0 nm. And there are abundant random-packed wormhole-like pores, caused by the inter-connection of the SnO2 nanoparticles, throughout each cluster. The platinum element is present in two forms including metal (Pt) and tetravalent metal oxide (PtO2) in the Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters. The as-synthesized pure and Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were used to fabricate gas sensor devices. It was found that the gas response toward 500 ppm of ammonia was improved from 6.48 to 203.44 through the activation by Pt. And the results indicate that the sensor based on Pt activated SnO2 not only has ultrahigh sensitivity but also possesses good response-recovery properties, linear dependence, repeatability, selectivity and long-term stability, demonstrating the potential to use Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters as ammonia gas sensors. At the same time, the formation mechanisms of the unique nanoparticle clusters and highly enhanced sensitivity are also discussed. PMID:26289622

  8. Nanoparticle cluster gas sensor: Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticles for NH3 detection with ultrahigh sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Chen, Nan; Han, Bingqian; Xiao, Xuechun; Chen, Gang; Djerdj, Igor; Wang, Yude

    2015-09-28

    Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method. The structure, morphology, chemical state and specific surface area were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N2-sorption studies, respectively. The SnO2 nanoparticle cluster matrix consists of tens of thousands of SnO2 nanoparticles with an ultra-small grain size estimated to be 3.0 nm. And there are abundant random-packed wormhole-like pores, caused by the inter-connection of the SnO2 nanoparticles, throughout each cluster. The platinum element is present in two forms including metal (Pt) and tetravalent metal oxide (PtO2) in the Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters. The as-synthesized pure and Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were used to fabricate gas sensor devices. It was found that the gas response toward 500 ppm of ammonia was improved from 6.48 to 203.44 through the activation by Pt. And the results indicate that the sensor based on Pt activated SnO2 not only has ultrahigh sensitivity but also possesses good response-recovery properties, linear dependence, repeatability, selectivity and long-term stability, demonstrating the potential to use Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters as ammonia gas sensors. At the same time, the formation mechanisms of the unique nanoparticle clusters and highly enhanced sensitivity are also discussed.

  9. RADIO ACTIVE GALAXY NUCLEI IN GALAXY CLUSTERS: HEATING HOT ATMOSPHERES AND DRIVING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE GROWTH OVER COSMIC TIME

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C.-J.; McNamara, B. R.; Nulsen, P. E. J.

    2013-01-20

    We estimate the average radio active galactic nucleus (AGN, mechanical) power deposited into the hot atmospheres of galaxy clusters over more than three quarters of the age of the Universe. Our sample was drawn from eight major X-ray cluster surveys and includes 685 clusters in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.6 that overlap the area covered by the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS). The radio-AGN mechanical power was estimated from the radio luminosity of central NVSS sources, using the relation of Cavagnolo et al. that is based on mechanical powers determined from the enthalpies of X-ray cavities. We find only a weak correlation between radio luminosity and cluster X-ray luminosity, although the most powerful radio sources reside in luminous clusters. The average AGN mechanical power of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} exceeds the X-ray luminosity of 44% of the clusters, indicating that the accumulation of radio-AGN energy is significant in these clusters. Integrating the AGN mechanical power to redshift z = 2.0, using simple models for its evolution and disregarding the hierarchical growth of clusters, we find that the AGN energy accumulated per particle in low luminosity X-ray clusters exceeds 1 keV per particle. This result represents a conservative lower limit to the accumulated thermal energy. The estimate is comparable to the level of energy needed to 'preheat' clusters, indicating that continual outbursts from radio-AGN are a significant source of gas energy in hot atmospheres. Assuming an average mass conversion efficiency of {eta} = 0.1, our result implies that the supermassive black holes that released this energy did so by accreting an average of {approx}10{sup 9} M {sub Sun} over time, which is comparable to the level of growth expected during the quasar era.

  10. A conserved activation cluster is required for allosteric communication in HtrA-family proteases

    PubMed Central

    de Regt, Anna; Kim, Seokhee; Sohn, Jungsan; Grant, Robert A.; Baker, Tania A.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In E. coli, outer-membrane stress causes a transcriptional response through a signaling cascade initiated by DegS cleavage of a transmembrane anti-sigma factor. Each subunit of DegS, an HtrA-family protease, contains a protease domain and a PDZ domain. The trimeric protease domain is autoinhibited by the unliganded PDZ domains. Allosteric activation requires binding of unassembled outer-membrane proteins (OMPs) to the PDZ domains and protein-substrate binding. Here, we identify a set of DegS residues that cluster together at subunit-subunit interfaces in the trimer, link the active sites and substrate-binding sites, and are crucial for stabilizing the active enzyme conformation in response to OMP signaling. These residues are conserved across the HtrA-protease family, including orthologs linked to human disease, supporting a common mechanism of allosteric activation. Indeed, mutation of residues at homologous positions in the DegP quality-control protease also eliminates allosteric activation. PMID:25703375

  11. The angular clustering of WISE-selected active galactic nuclei: Different halos for obscured and unobscured active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Donoso, E.; Yan, Lin; Stern, D.; Assef, R. J.

    2014-07-01

    We calculate the angular correlation function for a sample of ∼170,000 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) extracted from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalog, selected to have red mid-IR colors (W1 – W2 > 0.8) and 4.6 μm flux densities brighter than 0.14 mJy). The sample is expected to be >90% reliable at identifying AGNs and to have a mean redshift of (z) = 1.1. In total, the angular clustering of WISE AGNs is roughly similar to that of optical AGNs. We cross-match these objects with the photometric Sloan Digital Sky Survey catalog and distinguish obscured sources with r – W2 > 6 from bluer, unobscured AGNs. Obscured sources present a higher clustering signal than unobscured sources. Since the host galaxy morphologies of obscured AGNs are not typical red sequence elliptical galaxies and show disks in many cases, it is unlikely that the increased clustering strength of the obscured population is driven by a host galaxy segregation bias. By using relatively complete redshift distributions from the COSMOS survey, we find that obscured sources at (z) ∼ 0.9 have a bias of b = 2.9 ± 0.6 and are hosted in dark matter halos with a typical mass of log (M/M {sub ☉} h {sup –1}) ∼ 13.5. In contrast, unobscured AGNs at (z) ∼ 1.1 have a bias of b = 1.6 ± 0.6 and inhabit halos of log (M/M {sub ☉} h {sup –1}) ∼ 12.4. These findings suggest that obscured AGNs inhabit denser environments than unobscured AGNs, and they are difficult to reconcile with the simplest AGN unification models, where obscuration is driven solely by orientation.

  12. Electron density estimation in cold magnetospheric plasmas with the Cluster Active Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, A.; Pedersen, A.; Taylor, M. G.; Escoubet, C. P.; Laakso, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    Electron density is a key physical quantity to characterize any plasma medium. Its measurement is thus essential to understand the various physical processes occurring in the environment of a magnetized planet. However, any magnetosphere of the solar system is far from being an homogeneous medium with a constant electron density and temperature. For instance, the Earth’s magnetosphere is composed of a variety of regions with densities and temperatures spanning over at least 6 decades of magnitude. For this reason, different types of scientific instruments are usually carried onboard a magnetospheric spacecraft to estimate in situ the electron density of the various plasma regions crossed by different means. In the case of the European Space Agency Cluster mission, five different instruments on each of its four identical spacecraft can be used to estimate it: two particle instruments, a DC electric field instrument, a relaxation sounder and a high-time resolution passive wave receiver. Each of these instruments has its pros and cons depending on the plasma conditions. The focus of this study is the accurate estimation of the electron density in cold plasma regions of the magnetosphere including the magnetotail lobes (Ne ≤ 0.01 e-/cc, Te ~ 100 eV) and the plasmasphere (Ne> 10 e-/cc, Te <10 eV). In these regions, particle instruments can be blind to low energy ions outflowing from the ionosphere or measuring only a portion of the energy range of the particles due to photoelectrons. This often results in an under estimation of the bulk density. Measurements from a relaxation sounder enables accurate estimation of the bulk electron density above a fraction of 1 e-/cc but requires careful calibration of the resonances and/or the cutoffs detected. On Cluster, active soundings enable to derive precise density estimates between 0.2 and 80 e-/cc every minute or two. Spacecraft-to-probe difference potential measurements from a double probe electric field experiment can be

  13. Eastern region represents a worrying cluster of active hepatitis C in Algeria in 2012.

    PubMed

    Bensalem, Aïcha; Selmani, Karima; Hihi, Narjes; Bencherifa, Nesrine; Mostefaoui, Fatma; Kerioui, Cherif; Pineau, Pascal; Debzi, Nabil; Berkane, Saadi

    2016-08-01

    Algeria is the largest country of Africa, peopled with populations living a range of traditional/rural and modern/urban lifestyles. The variations of prevalence of chronic active hepatitis care poorly known on the Algerian territory. We conducted a retrospective survey on all patients (n = 998) referred to our institution in 2012 and confirmed by us for an active hepatitis C. Half of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) isolates were genotyped. Forty Algerian regions out of the 48 were represented in our study. Three geographical clusters (Aïn-Temouchent/SidiBelAbbes, Algiers, and a large Eastern region) with an excess of active hepatitis C were observed. Patients coming from the Eastern cluster (Batna, Khenchela, Oum el Bouaghi, and Tebessa) were strongly over-represented (49% of cases, OR = 14.5, P < 0.0001). The hallmarks of Eastern region were an excess of women (65% vs. 46% in the remaining population, P < 0.0001) and the almost exclusive presence of HCV genotype 1 (93% vs. 63%, P = 0.0001). The core of the epidemics was apparently located in Khenchela (odds ratio = 24.6, P < 0.0001). This situation is plausibly connected with nosocomial transmission or traditional practices as scarification (Hijama), piercing or tattooing, very lively in this region. Distinct hepatitis C epidemics are currently affecting Algerian population. The most worrying situation is observed in rural regions located east of Algeria. J. Med. Virol. 88:1394-1403, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26856380

  14. CME-Producing Precursors to the 2006 December 13 X-Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Harra, Louise K.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2008-01-01

    We revisit one of the largest explosions observed during the Hinode era, the X4.3 class event of 2006 Dec 13. We gain insight into the main eruption through study of two sub-C-class precursor eruptions, occurring within 12 hours of and originating from the same (or nearby) neutral line as the X-flare. The precursors share some features in common with the main eruption, and their lower energy and consequent slower development renders interpretation of these features easier to decipher than in the rapidly explosive main eruption. In addition, because the weak precursors occurred in a magnetically strong region, magnetic connections indicated by soft X-ray loops are readily visible in these cases, while such connections can be much less apparent in weaker-region eruptions. Hinode/SOT magnetograms indicate that photospheric magnetic dynamic activity in the "magnetic core" is the likely ultimate source of the eruptions. All the eruptions, however, produce Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) that have wider spatial extent than the localized source region; this is a long-observed but puzzling phenomena, which can address directly here using the high-quality Hinode data. For the precursor eruptions, Hinode/XRT images show that the initial eruptions occur inside larger-scale magnetic structures that encompass the core. The exploding core field blows out this larger-scale structure, resulting in the CME having angular extent far exceeding that of the source-region core alone; this is the arch-arch-blowout scenario for CMEs of Moore & Sterling (2007). Similar processes occur in the main eruption, except that the much larger energy release in that eruption compared to the precursors results in much faster and larger-scale phenomena.

  15. THE CLUSTERING OF GALAXIES AROUND RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Worpel, Hauke; Brown, Michael J. I.; Jones, D. Heath; Floyd, David J. E.; Beutler, Florian

    2013-07-20

    We examine the hypothesis that mergers and close encounters between galaxies can fuel active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by increasing the rate at which gas accretes toward the central black hole. We compare the clustering of galaxies around radio-loud AGNs with the clustering around a population of radio-quiet galaxies with similar masses, colors, and luminosities. Our catalog contains 2178 elliptical radio galaxies with flux densities greater than 2.8 mJy at 1.4 GHz from the Six Degree Field Galaxy Survey. We find tentative evidence that radio AGNs with more than 200 times the median radio power have, on average, more close (r < 160 kpc) companions than their radio-quiet counterparts, suggesting that mergers play a role in forming the most powerful radio galaxies. For ellipticals of fixed stellar mass, the radio power is neither a function of large-scale environment nor halo mass, consistent with the radio powers of ellipticals varying by orders of magnitude over billions of years.

  16. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity and a Calvin cycle gene cluster in Sulfobacillus species.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Paul E; MacLean, Martin R; Norris, Paul R

    2007-07-01

    The Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle has been extensively studied in proteobacteria, cyanobacteria, algae and plants, but hardly at all in Gram-positive bacteria. Some characteristics of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and a cluster of potential CBB cycle genes in a Gram-positive bacterium are described in this study with two species of Sulfobacillus (Gram-positive, facultatively autotrophic, mineral sulfide-oxidizing acidophiles). In contrast to the Gram-negative, iron-oxidizing acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans grew poorly autotrophically unless the CO(2) concentration was enhanced over that in air. However, the RuBisCO of each organism showed similar affinities for CO(2) and for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate, and similar apparent derepression of activity under CO(2) limitation. The red-type, form I RuBisCO of Sulfobacillus acidophilus was confirmed as closely related to that of the anoxygenic phototroph Oscillochloris trichoides. Eight genes potentially involved in the CBB cycle in S. acidophilus were clustered in the order cbbA, cbbP, cbbE, cbbL, cbbS, cbbX, cbbG and cbbT.

  17. Coupled-cluster with active space selected higher amplitudes: performance of seminatural orbitals for ground and excited state calculations.

    PubMed

    Köhn, Andreas; Olsen, Jeppe

    2006-11-01

    The active space approach for coupled-cluster models is generalized using the general active space concept and implemented in a string-based general coupled-cluster code. Particular attention is devoted to the choice of orbitals on which the subspace division is based. Seminatural orbitals are proposed for that purpose. These orbitals are obtained by diagonalizing only the hole-hole and particle-particle block of the one-electron density of a lower-order method. The seminatural orbitals are shown to be a good replacement for complete active space self-consistent field orbitals and avoid the ambiguities with respect to the reference determinant introduced by the latter orbitals. The seminatural orbitals also perform well in excited state calculations, including excited states with strong double excitation contributions, which usually are difficult to describe with standard coupled-cluster methods. A set of vertical excitation energies is obtained and benchmarked against full configuration interaction calculations, and alternative hierarchies of active space coupled-cluster models are proposed. As a simple application the spectroscopic constants of the C(2) B (1)Delta(g) and B(') (1)Sigma(g) (+) states are calculated using active space coupled-cluster methods and basis sets up to quadruple-zeta quality in connection with extrapolation and additivity schemes. PMID:17100432

  18. Coupled-cluster with active space selected higher amplitudes: Performance of seminatural orbitals for ground and excited state calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhn, Andreas; Olsen, Jeppe

    2006-11-01

    The active space approach for coupled-cluster models is generalized using the general active space concept and implemented in a string-based general coupled-cluster code. Particular attention is devoted to the choice of orbitals on which the subspace division is based. Seminatural orbitals are proposed for that purpose. These orbitals are obtained by diagonalizing only the hole-hole and particle-particle block of the one-electron density of a lower-order method. The seminatural orbitals are shown to be a good replacement for complete active space self-consistent field orbitals and avoid the ambiguities with respect to the reference determinant introduced by the latter orbitals. The seminatural orbitals also perform well in excited state calculations, including excited states with strong double excitation contributions, which usually are difficult to describe with standard coupled-cluster methods. A set of vertical excitation energies is obtained and benchmarked against full configuration interaction calculations, and alternative hierarchies of active space coupled-cluster models are proposed. As a simple application the spectroscopic constants of the C2 BΔg1 and B'Σg+1 states are calculated using active space coupled-cluster methods and basis sets up to quadruple-zeta quality in connection with extrapolation and additivity schemes.

  19. Using Targeted Active-Learning Exercises and Diagnostic Question Clusters to Improve Students' Understanding of Carbon Cycling in Ecosystems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maskiewicz, April Cordero; Griscom, Heather Peckham; Welch, Nicole Turrill

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we used targeted active-learning activities to help students improve their ways of reasoning about carbon flow in ecosystems. The results of a validated ecology conceptual inventory (diagnostic question clusters [DQCs]) provided us with information about students' understanding of and reasoning about transformation of inorganic and…

  20. AVERAGE HEATING RATE OF HOT ATMOSPHERES IN DISTANT CLUSTERS BY RADIO ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS: EVIDENCE FOR CONTINUOUS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C.-J.; McNamara, B. R.; Schaffer, R.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2011-10-20

    We examine atmospheric heating by radio active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in distant X-ray clusters by cross correlating clusters selected from the 400 Square Degree (400SD) X-ray Cluster survey with radio sources in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. Roughly 30% of the clusters show radio emission above a flux threshold of 3 mJy within a projected radius of 250 kpc. The radio emission is presumably associated with the brightest cluster galaxy. The mechanical jet power for each radio source was determined using scaling relations between radio power and cavity (mechanical) power determined for nearby clusters, groups, and galaxies with hot atmospheres containing X-ray cavities. The average jet power of central radio AGNs is approximately 2 x 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. We find no significant correlation between radio power, and hence mechanical jet power, and the X-ray luminosities of clusters in the redshift range 0.1-0.6. This implies that the mechanical heating rate per particle is higher in lower mass, lower X-ray luminosity clusters. The jet power averaged over the sample corresponds to an atmospheric heating of approximately 0.2 keV per particle within R{sub 500}. Assuming the current AGN heating rate does not evolve but remains constant to redshifts of 2, the heating rate per particle would rise by a factor of two. We find that the energy injected from radio AGNs contribute substantially to the excess entropy in hot atmospheres needed to break self-similarity in cluster scaling relations. The detection frequency of radio AGNs is inconsistent with the presence of strong cooling flows in 400SD clusters, but does not exclude weak cooling flows. It is unclear whether central AGNs in 400SD clusters are maintained by feedback at the base of a cooling flow. Atmospheric heating by radio AGNs may retard the development of strong cooling flows at early epochs.

  1. NanoCluster Beacons as reporter probes in rolling circle enhanced enzyme activity detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juul, Sissel; Obliosca, Judy M.; Liu, Cong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Chen, Yu-An; Imphean, Darren M.; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping; Leong, Kam W.; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2015-04-01

    As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics.As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics. Electronic

  2. A cluster of noncoding RNAs activates the ESR1 locus during breast cancer adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Saori; Abdalla, Mohamed Osama Ali; Fujiwara, Saori; Matsumori, Haruka; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Iwase, Hirotaka; Saitoh, Noriko; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-α (ER)-positive breast cancer cells undergo hormone-independent proliferation after deprivation of oestrogen, leading to endocrine therapy resistance. Up-regulation of the ER gene (ESR1) is critical for this process, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the combination of transcriptome and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that oestrogen deprivation induced a cluster of noncoding RNAs that defined a large chromatin domain containing the ESR1 locus. We termed these RNAs as Eleanors (ESR1 locus enhancing and activating noncoding RNAs). Eleanors were present in ER-positive breast cancer tissues and localized at the transcriptionally active ESR1 locus to form RNA foci. Depletion of one Eleanor, upstream (u)-Eleanor, impaired cell growth and transcription of intragenic Eleanors and ESR1 mRNA, indicating that Eleanors cis-activate the ESR1 gene. Eleanor-mediated gene activation represents a new type of locus control mechanism and plays an essential role in the adaptation of breast cancer cells. PMID:25923108

  3. Robust x-ray image segmentation by spectral clustering and active shape model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Mahfouz, Mohamed R

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of bone contours from x-ray radiographs plays an important role in joint space width assessment, preoperative planning, and kinematics analysis. We present a robust segmentation method to accurately extract the distal femur and proximal tibia in knee radiographs of varying image quality. A spectral clustering method based on the eigensolution of an affinity matrix is utilized for x-ray image denoising. An active shape model-based segmentation method is employed for robust and accurate segmentation of the denoised x-ray images. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated with x-ray images from the public-use dataset(s), the osteoarthritis initiative, achieving a root mean square error of [Formula: see text] for femur and [Formula: see text] for tibia. The results demonstrate that this method outperforms previous segmentation methods in capturing anatomical shape variations, accounting for image quality differences and guiding accurate segmentation. PMID:27660806

  4. The Sound of Silence: Activating Silent Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in Marine Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Reen, F. Jerry; Romano, Stefano; Dobson, Alan D.W.; O’Gara, Fergal

    2015-01-01

    Unlocking the rich harvest of marine microbial ecosystems has the potential to both safeguard the existence of our species for the future, while also presenting significant lifestyle benefits for commercial gain. However, while significant advances have been made in the field of marine biodiscovery, leading to the introduction of new classes of therapeutics for clinical medicine, cosmetics and industrial products, much of what this natural ecosystem has to offer is locked in, and essentially hidden from our screening methods. Releasing this silent potential represents a significant technological challenge, the key to which is a comprehensive understanding of what controls these systems. Heterologous expression systems have been successful in awakening a number of these cryptic marine biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). However, this approach is limited by the typically large size of the encoding sequences. More recently, focus has shifted to the regulatory proteins associated with each BGC, many of which are signal responsive raising the possibility of exogenous activation. Abundant among these are the LysR-type family of transcriptional regulators, which are known to control production of microbial aromatic systems. Although the environmental signals that activate these regulatory systems remain unknown, it offers the exciting possibility of evoking mimic molecules and synthetic expression systems to drive production of potentially novel natural products in microorganisms. Success in this field has the potential to provide a quantum leap forward in medical and industrial bio-product development. To achieve these new endpoints, it is clear that the integrated efforts of bioinformaticians and natural product chemists will be required as we strive to uncover new and potentially unique structures from silent or cryptic marine gene clusters. PMID:26264003

  5. CME flux rope and shock identifications and locations: Comparison of white light data, Graduated Cylindrical Shell model, and MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Xie, Hong; St. Cyr, O. C.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-03-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are major transient phenomena in the solar corona that are observed with ground-based and spacecraft-based coronagraphs in white light or with in situ measurements by spacecraft. CMEs transport mass and momentum and often drive shocks. In order to derive the CME and shock trajectories with high precision, we apply the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model to fit a flux rope to the CME directed toward STEREO A after about 19:00 UT on 29 November 2013 and check the quality of the heliocentric distance-time evaluations by carrying out a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the same CME with the Block Adaptive Tree Solar-Wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code. Heliocentric distances of the CME and shock leading edges are determined from the simulated white light images and magnetic field strength data. We find very good agreement between the predicted and observed heliocentric distances, showing that the GCS model and the BATS-R-US simulation approach work very well and are consistent. In order to assess the validity of CME and shock identification criteria in coronagraph images, we also compute synthetic white light images of the CME and shock. We find that the outer edge of a cloud-like illuminated area in the observed and predicted images in fact coincides with the leading edge of the CME flux rope and that the outer edge of a faint illuminated band in front of the CME leading edge coincides with the CME-driven shock front.

  6. N2O reduction by the mu4-sulfide-bridged tetranuclear CuZ cluster active site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Gorelsky, Serge I; Ghosh, Somdatta; Solomon, Edward I

    2004-08-13

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) reduction is a chemical challenge both in the selective oxidation of organic substrates by N2O and in the removal of N2O as a green-house gas. The reduction of N2O is thermodynamically favorable but kinetically inert, and requires activating transition-metal centers. In biological systems, N2O reduction is the last step in the denitrification process of the bacterial nitrogen cycle and is accomplished by the enzyme nitrous oxide reductase, whose active site consists of a micro4-sulfide-bridged tetranuclear CuZ cluster which has many unusual spectroscopic features. Recent studies have developed a detailed electronic-structure description of the resting CuZ cluster, determined its catalytically relevant state, and provided insight into the role of this tetranuclear copper cluster in N2O activation and reduction.

  7. Temporal Offsets Between Maximum CME Speed Index and Solar, Geomagnetic, and Interplanetary Indicators During Solar Cycle 23 and the Ascending Phase of Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgüç, A.; Kilcik, A.; Georgieva, K.; Kirov, B.

    2016-05-01

    On the basis of a morphological analysis of yearly values of the maximum coronal mass ejection (CME) speed index, the sunspot number and total sunspot area, sunspot magnetic field, and solar flare index, the solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field strength, and the geomagnetic Ap and D_{st} indices, we point out the particularities of solar and geomagnetic activity during the last Cycle 23, the long minimum that followed it, and the ascending branch of Cycle 24. We also analyze the temporal offset between the maximum CME speed index and the above-mentioned solar, geomagnetic, and interplanetary indices. It is found that this solar activity index, analyzed jointly with other solar activity, interplanetary parameters, and geomagnetic activity indices, shows a hysteresis phenomenon. It is observed that these parameters follow different paths for the ascending and descending phases of Cycle 23. The hysteresis phenomenon represents a clue in the search for physical processes responsible for linking the solar activity to near-Earth and geomagnetic responses.

  8. Anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activity of iron hepta-tungsten phosphate oxygen clusters complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bisong; Qiu, Jianping; Wu, Changsheng; Li, Yunxia; Liu, Zhenxiang

    2015-12-01

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) have attracted a considerable attention due to their unique structural characteristics, physicochemical properties and biological activities. In this study, iron hepta-tungsten phosphate oxygen clusters complex Na12H[Fe(HPW7O28)2]·44H2O (IHTPO) was synthesized and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxic activities on human hepatoma HepG2, leukemia K562, lung carcinoma A549, and large cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells, therapeutic efficacies on mice transplantable tumor, and immunomodulatory potentials on the immune response in tumor-bearing mice. IHTPO exhibited lower in vitro cytotoxic activities against four human tumor cell lines, with the IC50 values being higher than 62.5μM (ca. 300μg/ml). IHTPO, however, significantly inhibited the growth of S180 sarcoma transplanted in mice. It was further showed that IHTPO could not only significantly promote splenocytes proliferation, NK cell and CTL activity from splenocytes, but remarkably enhance serum antigen-specific IgG, IgG2a and IgG2b antibody levels in S180-bearing mice. IHTPO also significantly promoted Th1 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-2 production, and up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of IFN-γ, IL-2 and Th1 transcription factors T-bet and STAT-4 in splenocytes from the S180-bearing mice. These results suggested that IHTPO significantly inhibited the growth of mice transplantable tumor, and that its in vivo antitumor activity might be achieved by improving Th1 protective cell-mediated immunity. IHTPO could act as antitumor agent with immunomodulatory activity.

  9. Cluster Analysis of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Canine Leukocytes Identifies Activation State

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Julie-Anne; Mortlock, Sally-Anne; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Williamson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system undergo activation and subsequent proliferation in the normal course of an immune response. Infrequently, the molecular and cellular events that underlie the mechanisms of proliferation are dysregulated and may lead to oncogenesis, leading to tumor formation. The most common forms of immunological cancers are lymphomas, which in dogs account for 8%–20% of all cancers, affecting up to 1.2% of the dog population. Key genes involved in negatively regulating proliferation of lymphocytes include a group classified as tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). These genes are also known to be associated with progression of lymphoma in humans, mice, and dogs and are potential candidates for pathological grading and diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to analyze TSG profiles in stimulated leukocytes from dogs to identify genes that discriminate an activated phenotype. A total of 554 TSGs and three gene set collections were analyzed from microarray data. Cluster analysis of three subsets of genes discriminated between stimulated and unstimulated cells. These included 20 most upregulated and downregulated TSGs, TSG in hallmark gene sets significantly enriched in active cells, and a selection of candidate TSGs, p15 (CDKN2B), p18 (CDKN2C), p19 (CDKN1A), p21 (CDKN2A), p27 (CDKN1B), and p53 (TP53) in the third set. Analysis of two subsets suggested that these genes or a subset of these genes may be used as a specialized PCR set for additional analysis. PMID:27478369

  10. Transition state stabilization by six arginines clustered in the active site of creatine kinase.

    PubMed

    Jourden, Michael J; Geiss, Paul R; Thomenius, Michael J; Horst, Lindsay A; Barty, Melissa M; Brym, Melissa J; Mulligan, Guy B; Almeida, Ryan M; Kersteen, Betsy A; Myers, Nichole R; Snider, Mark J; Borders, Charles L; Edmiston, Paul L

    2005-08-10

    Six fully conserved arginine residues (R129, R131, R235, R291, R319, and R340) closely grouped in the nucleotide binding site of rabbit muscle creatine kinase (rmCK) were mutated; four to alanine and all six to lysine. Kinetic analyses in the direction of phosphocreatine formation showed that all four alanine mutants led to substantial losses of activity with three (R129A, R131A, and R235A) having no detectable activity. All six lysine mutants retained variable degrees of reduced enzymatic activity. Static quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence was used to measure the binding constants for MgADP and MgATP. Nucleotide binding was at most only modestly affected by mutation of the arginine residues. Thus, the cluster of arginines seem to be primarily responsible for transition state stabilization which is further supported by the observation that none of the inactive mutants demonstrated the ability to form a transition analogue complex of MgADP.nitrate.creatine as determined by fluorescence quenching assays. As a whole, the results suggest that the most important role these residues play is to properly align the substrates for stabilization of the phosphoryl transfer reaction.

  11. Coronal Mass Ejections from the Same Active Region Cluster: Two Different Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, H.; Mandrini, C. H.; Schmieder, B.; Crescitelli, A. M.

    2015-06-01

    The cluster formed by active regions (ARs) NOAA 11121 and 11123, approximately located on the solar central meridian on 11 November 2010, is of great scientific interest. This complex was the site of violent flux emergence and the source of a series of Earth-directed events on the same day. The onset of the events was nearly simultaneously observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) telescope onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imagers (EUVI) on the Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) suite of telescopes onboard the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) twin spacecraft. The progression of these events in the low corona was tracked by the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraphs (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the SECCHI/COR coronagraphs on STEREO. SDO and SOHO imagers provided data from the Earth's perspective, whilst the STEREO twin instruments procured images from the orthogonal directions. This spatial configuration of spacecraft allowed optimum simultaneous observations of the AR cluster and the coronal mass ejections that originated in it. Quadrature coronal observations provided by STEREO revealed many more ejective events than were detected from Earth. Furthermore, joint observations by SDO/AIA and STEREO/SECCHI EUVI of the source region indicate that all events classified by GOES as X-ray flares had an ejective coronal counterpart in quadrature observations. These results directly affect current space weather forecasting because alarms might be missed when there is a lack of solar observations in a view direction perpendicular to the Sun-Earth line.

  12. Substorms and polar cap convection: the 10 January 2004 interplanetary CME case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andalsvik, Y.; Sandholt, P. E.; Farrugia, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    The expansion-contraction model of Dungey cell plasma convection has two different convection sources, i.e. reconnections at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail. The spatial-temporal structure of the nightside source is not yet well understood. In this study we shall identify temporal variations in the winter polar cap convection structure during substorm activity under steady interplanetary conditions. Substorm activity (electrojets and particle precipitations) is monitored by excellent ground-satellite DMSP F15 conjunctions in the dusk-premidnight sector. We take advantage of the wide latitudinal coverage of the IMAGE chain of ground magnetometers in Svalbard - Scandinavia - Russia for the purpose of monitoring magnetic deflections associated with polar cap convection and substorm electrojets. These are augmented by direct observations of polar cap convection derived from SuperDARN radars and cross-track ion drift observations during traversals of polar cap along the dusk-dawn meridian by spacecraft DMSP F13. The interval we study is characterized by moderate, stable forcing of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system (EKL = 4.0-4.5 mV m-1; cross polar cap potential (CPCP), Φ (Boyle) = 115 kV) during Earth passage of an interplanetary CME (ICME), choosing an 4-h interval where the magnetic field pointed continuously south-west (Bz < 0; By < 0). The combination of continuous monitoring of ground magnetic deflections and the F13 cross-track ion drift observations in the polar cap allows us to infer the temporal CPCP structure on time scales less than the ~10 min duration of F13 polar cap transits. We arrived at the following estimates of the dayside and nightside contributions to the CPCP (CPCP = CPCP/day + CPCP/night) under two intervals of substorm activity: CPCP/day ~110 kV; CPCP/night ~50 kV (45% CPCP increase during substorms). The temporal CPCP structure during one of the substorm cases resulted in a dawn-dusk convection asymmetry measured by DMSP F13 which

  13. High reactivity of nanosized niobium oxide cluster cations in methane activation: A comparison with vanadium oxides.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xun-Lei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Yan-Xia; He, Sheng-Gui

    2015-09-28

    The reactions between methane and niobium oxide cluster cations were studied and compared to those employing vanadium oxides. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) reactions were identified over stoichiometric (Nb2O5)N(+) clusters for N as large as 14 with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The reactivity of (Nb2O5)N(+) clusters decreases as the N increases, and it is higher than that of (V 2O5)N(+) for N ≥ 4. Theoretical studies were conducted on (Nb2O5)N(+) (N = 2-6) by density functional calculations. HAA reactions on these clusters are all favorable thermodynamically and kinetically. The difference of the reactivity with respect to the cluster size and metal type (Nb vs V) was attributed to thermodynamics, kinetics, the electron capture ability, and the distribution of the unpaired spin density. Nanosized Nb oxide clusters show higher HAA reactivity than V oxides, indicating that niobia may serve as promising catalysts for practical methane conversion.

  14. A stereoscopic system for viewing the temporal evolution of brain activity clusters in response to linguistic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Angus; Villegas, Javier; Almryde, Kyle R; Plante, Elena

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel application, 3D+Time Brain View, for the stereoscopic visualization of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data gathered from participants exposed to unfamiliar spoken languages. An analysis technique based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is used to identify statistically significant clusters of brain activity and their changes over time during different testing sessions. That is, our system illustrates the temporal evolution of participants' brain activity as they are introduced to a foreign language through displaying these clusters as they change over time. The raw fMRI data is presented as a stereoscopic pair in an immersive environment utilizing passive stereo rendering. The clusters are presented using a ray casting technique for volume rendering. Our system incorporates the temporal information and the results of the ICA into the stereoscopic 3D rendering, making it easier for domain experts to explore and analyze the data.

  15. Detection of Hg2+ based on the selective inhibition of peroxidase mimetic activity of BSA-Au clusters.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rui; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Xi-Liang; Liang, Li-Ping; Long, Yi-Juan; Wang, Qin-Long; Zhang, Hai-Jie; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Zheng, Hu-Zhi

    2013-12-15

    It was found that Hg(2+) can inhibit the peroxidase mimetic activity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protected Au clusters (BSA-Au) due to the specific interaction between Hg(2+) and Au(+) existed onto the surface of BSA-Au clusters. By coupling with 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB)-H2O2 chromogenic reaction, a novel method for Hg(2+) detection was developed based on the inhibiting effect of Hg(2+) on BSA-Au clusters peroxidase-like activity. This method exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity. As low as 3 nM (0.6 ppb, 3σ) Hg(2+) could be detected with a linear range from 10 nM (2 ppb) to 10 µM (2 ppm) and this method was successfully applied for the determination of total mercury content in skin lightening products.

  16. Search for α-Cluster Structure in Exotic Nuclei with the Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, A.; Ayyad, Y.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bradt, J.; Carpenter, L.; Cortesi, M.; Mittig, W.; Suzuki, D.; Ahn, T.; Kolata, J. J.; Becchetti, F. D.; Howard, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Some exotic nuclei appear to exhibit α-cluster structure. While various theoretical models currently describe such clustering, more experimental data are needed to constrain model predictions. The Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber (PAT-TPC) has low-energy thresholds for charged-particle decay and a high luminosity due to its thick gaseous active target volume, making it well-suited to search for low-energy α-cluster reactions. Radioactive-ion beams produced by the TwinSol facility at the University of Notre Dame were delivered to the PAT-TPC to study nuclei including 14C and 14O via α-resonant scattering. Differential cross sections and excitation functions were measured. Preliminary results from our recent experiments will be presented. This work is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation.

  17. A stereoscopic system for viewing the temporal evolution of brain activity clusters in response to linguistic stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Angus; Villegas, Javier; Almryde, Kyle R.; Plante, Elena

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel application, 3D+Time Brain View, for the stereoscopic visualization of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data gathered from participants exposed to unfamiliar spoken languages. An analysis technique based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is used to identify statistically significant clusters of brain activity and their changes over time during different testing sessions. That is, our system illustrates the temporal evolution of participants' brain activity as they are introduced to a foreign language through displaying these clusters as they change over time. The raw fMRI data is presented as a stereoscopic pair in an immersive environment utilizing passive stereo rendering. The clusters are presented using a ray casting technique for volume rendering. Our system incorporates the temporal information and the results of the ICA into the stereoscopic 3D rendering, making it easier for domain experts to explore and analyze the data.

  18. Pair and Cluster Formation in Hybrid Active-Passive Matter Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafnick, Ryan; Garcia, Angel

    2015-03-01

    Systems composed of self-propelling entities, dubbed active matter, are ubiquitous in nature, from flocks of birds and schools of fish to swarms of bacteria and catalytic nanomotors. These systems (both biological and industrial) have applications ranging from micron-scale cargo manipulation and directed transport to water remediation and material processing. When added to a solution with passive (non-self-propelling) particles, active matter leads to new and altered system properties. For example, the diffusion of passive particles increases by orders of magnitude in typical systems, leading to a raised effective temperature. Additionally, particles that normally repel each other exhibit effective attractions which can lead to pair formation and clustering. The nature of these effects depends on both the mechanical collisions of swimmers and the hydrodynamic flow fields they propagate. We computationally examine the effect and dependence of various system parameters, such as particle shape and density, on these properties. This work was funded by NIH grant GM086801 and NSF grant MCB-1050966.

  19. Joint spatial-spectral feature space clustering for speech activity detection from ECoG signals.

    PubMed

    Kanas, Vasileios G; Mporas, Iosif; Benz, Heather L; Sgarbas, Kyriakos N; Bezerianos, Anastasios; Crone, Nathan E

    2014-04-01

    Brain-machine interfaces for speech restoration have been extensively studied for more than two decades. The success of such a system will depend in part on selecting the best brain recording sites and signal features corresponding to speech production. The purpose of this study was to detect speech activity automatically from electrocorticographic signals based on joint spatial-frequency clustering of the ECoG feature space. For this study, the ECoG signals were recorded while a subject performed two different syllable repetition tasks. We found that the optimal frequency resolution to detect speech activity from ECoG signals was 8 Hz, achieving 98.8% accuracy by employing support vector machines as a classifier. We also defined the cortical areas that held the most information about the discrimination of speech and nonspeech time intervals. Additionally, the results shed light on the distinct cortical areas associated with the two syllables repetition tasks and may contribute to the development of portable ECoG-based communication.

  20. Peroxidase-like activity of apoferritin paired gold clusters for glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin; Sun, Cuiji; Guo, Yi; Nie, Guangjun; Xu, Li

    2015-02-15

    The discovery and application of noble metal nanoclusters have received considerable attention. In this paper, we reported that apoferritin paired gold clusters (Au-Ft) could efficiently catalyze oxidation of 3.3',5.5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by H2O2 to produce a blue color reaction. Compared with natural enzyme, Au-Ft exhibited higher activity near acidic pH and could be used over a wide range of temperatures. Apoferritin nanocage enhanced the reaction activity of substrate TMB by H2O2. The reaction catalyzed by Au-Ft was found to follow a typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The kinetic parameters exhibited a lower K(m) value (0.097 mM) and a higher K(cat) value (5.8 × 10(4) s(-1)) for TMB than that of horse radish peroxidase (HRP). Base on these findings, Au-Ft, acting as a peroxidase mimetic, performed enzymatic spectrophotometric analysis of glucose. This system exhibited acceptable reproducibility and high selectivity in biosening, suggesting that it could have promising applications in the future. PMID:25218100

  1. Symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculation of the photoelectron spectra of famous biological active steroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abyar, Fatemeh; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2014-11-01

    The photoelectron spectra of some famous steroids, important in biology, were calculated in the gas phase. The selected steroids were 5α-androstane-3,11,17-trione, 4-androstane-3,11,17-trione, cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, dexamethasone, estradiol and cholesterol. The calculations were performed employing symmetry-adapted cluster/configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method using the 6-311++G(2df,pd) basis set. The population ratios of conformers of each steroid were calculated and used for simulating the photoelectron spectrum of steroid. It was found that more than one conformer contribute to the photoelectron spectra of some steroids. To confirm the calculated photoelectron spectra, they compared with their corresponding experimental spectra. There were no experimental gas phase Hesbnd I photoelectron spectra for some of the steroids of this work in the literature and their calculated spectra can show a part of intrinsic characteristics of this molecules in the gas phase. The canonical molecular orbitals involved in the ionization of each steroid were calculated at the HF/6-311++g(d,p) level of theory. The spectral bands of each steroid were assigned by natural bonding orbital (NBO) calculations. Knowing the electronic structures of steroids helps us to understand their biological activities and find which sites of steroid become active when a modification is performing under a biological pathway.

  2. Thyroid function testing in eastern Nepal and the impact of CME on subsequent requests.

    PubMed

    Baral, N; Koner, B C; Lamsal, M; Niraula, I; Dhungel, S

    2001-07-01

    This study reveals 1 year's experience of the introduction of thyroid function tests (TFT) in B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences (BPKIHS), a Medical University situated in eastern Nepal. These were performed on theadvice of doctors working in this region. The rational TFT advice by the medical practitioners was evaluated according to how closely the advice was in line with the algorithms recommended in the textbooks. Only about 14% of the TFT advice followed some rational strategy. A retrospective analysis showed that rational TFT advice could have reduced the cost of a TFT investigation to 43.11% without altering the patient management and disease outcome. Continuing medical education (CME) lectures arranged for a limited number of doctors were found to improve the quality of the subsequentTFT advising pattern. This emphasizes the importance of CME while introducing a costly laboratory test panel (e.g.TFT, lipid profile) needing a strategic approach. PMID:11444339

  3. Temporal Evolution of Energetic Particles and Magnetic Field Waves Near CME-driven shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir; Smith, Charles; Lee, Martin; Mason, Glenn; Al-Dayeh, Maher

    Coronal Mass Ejection-or CME-driven interplanetary (IP) shocks are responsible for caus-ing the so-called energetic storm particle (ESP) events observed at Earth. However, despite recent observational and theoretical advances, many important questions regarding such CME-associated particle events remain unanswered. This is because ESP events occur due to a con-fluence of numerous poorly understood physical effects all of whose contributions can vary with time and location. These effects include: the origin, structure, and obliquity of the shocks, the nature of wave-particle interactions and the type of turbulence that is present near the shocks, the distribution and composition of the seed populations, and the type of injection and accel-eration processes involved. In this paper, we combine observations of ˜0.1-0.5 MeV/nucleon O and Fe ions with that of the magnetic field near four CME-driven IP shocks observed at the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft to differentiate between shocks where the seed population is most likely dominated by thermal solar wind ions and those events where it is dominated by pre-existing suprathermal ions. In particular, we use the temporal evolution of (1) O and Fe intensities, (2) power-law spectral indices of O, (3) the Fe/O and C/O ratios, and (4) the magnetic field power spectrum to identify unique signatures that provide strong clues regarding the origin of the seed population. Such observational signatures may also be useful in modeling the properties of the so-called large gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events that are primarily accelerated by CME shocks near the Sun.

  4. The Dependence of Characteristic Times of Gradual SEP Events on Their Associated CME Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z. H.; Wang, C. B.; Xue, X. H.; Wang, Y. M.

    It is generally believed that coronal mass ejections CMEs are the drivers of shocks that accelerate gradual solar energetic particles SEPs One might expect that the characteristics of the SEP intensity time profiles observed at 1 AU are determined by properties of the associated CMEs such as the radial speed and the angular width Recently Kahler statistically investigated the characteristic times of gradual SEP events observed from 1998-2002 and their associated coronal mass ejection properties Astrophys J 628 1014--1022 2005 Three characteristic times of gradual SEP events are determined as functions of solar source longitude 1 T 0 the time from associated CME launch to SEP onset at 1 AU 2 T R the rise time from SEP onset to the time when the SEP intensity is a factor of 2 below peak intensity and 3 T D the duration over which the SEP intensity is within a factor of 2 of the peak intensity However in his study the CME speeds and angular widths are directly taken from the LASCO CME catalog In this study we analyze the radial speeds and the angular widths of CMEs by an ice-cream cone model and re-investigate their correlationships with the characteristic times of the corresponding SEP events We find T R and T D are significantly correlated with radial speed for SEP events in the best-connected longitude range and there is no correlation between T 0 and CME radial speed and angular width which is consistent with Kahler s results On the other hand it s found that T R and T D are also have

  5. Nanoparticle cluster gas sensor: Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticles for NH3 detection with ultrahigh sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xu; Chen, Nan; Han, Bingqian; Xiao, Xuechun; Chen, Gang; Djerdj, Igor; Wang, Yude

    2015-09-01

    Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method. The structure, morphology, chemical state and specific surface area were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N2-sorption studies, respectively. The SnO2 nanoparticle cluster matrix consists of tens of thousands of SnO2 nanoparticles with an ultra-small grain size estimated to be 3.0 nm. And there are abundant random-packed wormhole-like pores, caused by the inter-connection of the SnO2 nanoparticles, throughout each cluster. The platinum element is present in two forms including metal (Pt) and tetravalent metal oxide (PtO2) in the Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters. The as-synthesized pure and Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were used to fabricate gas sensor devices. It was found that the gas response toward 500 ppm of ammonia was improved from 6.48 to 203.44 through the activation by Pt. And the results indicate that the sensor based on Pt activated SnO2 not only has ultrahigh sensitivity but also possesses good response-recovery properties, linear dependence, repeatability, selectivity and long-term stability, demonstrating the potential to use Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters as ammonia gas sensors. At the same time, the formation mechanisms of the unique nanoparticle clusters and highly enhanced sensitivity are also discussed.Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method. The structure, morphology, chemical state and specific surface area were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N2-sorption studies, respectively. The SnO2 nanoparticle cluster matrix consists of tens of thousands of SnO2 nanoparticles with an ultra-small grain size estimated to be 3.0 nm. And there are abundant random-packed wormhole-like pores, caused by the inter

  6. Methane Activation Mediated by a Series of Cerium-Vanadium Bimetallic Oxide Cluster Cations: Tuning Reactivity by Doping.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia-Bi; Meng, Jing-Heng; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-04-18

    The reactions of cerium-vanadium cluster cations Cex Vy Oz (+) with CH4 are investigated by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. (CeO2 )m (V2 O5 )n (+) clusters (m=1,2, n=1-5; m=3, n=1-4) with dimensions up to nanosize can abstract one hydrogen atom from CH4 . The theoretical study indicates that there are two types of active species in (CeO2 )m (V2 O5 )n (+) , V[(Ot )2 ](.) and [(Ob )2 CeOt ](.) (Ot and Ob represent terminal and bridging oxygen atoms, respectively); the former is less reactive than the latter. The experimentally observed size-dependent reactivities can be rationalized by considering the different active species and mechanisms. Interestingly, the reactivity of the (CeO2 )m (V2 O5 )n (+) clusters falls between those of (CeO2 )2-4 (+) and (V2 O5 )1-5 (+) in terms of C-H bond activation, thus the nature of the active species and the cluster reactivity can be effectively tuned by doping.

  7. Methane Activation Mediated by a Series of Cerium-Vanadium Bimetallic Oxide Cluster Cations: Tuning Reactivity by Doping.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia-Bi; Meng, Jing-Heng; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-04-18

    The reactions of cerium-vanadium cluster cations Cex Vy Oz (+) with CH4 are investigated by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. (CeO2 )m (V2 O5 )n (+) clusters (m=1,2, n=1-5; m=3, n=1-4) with dimensions up to nanosize can abstract one hydrogen atom from CH4 . The theoretical study indicates that there are two types of active species in (CeO2 )m (V2 O5 )n (+) , V[(Ot )2 ](.) and [(Ob )2 CeOt ](.) (Ot and Ob represent terminal and bridging oxygen atoms, respectively); the former is less reactive than the latter. The experimentally observed size-dependent reactivities can be rationalized by considering the different active species and mechanisms. Interestingly, the reactivity of the (CeO2 )m (V2 O5 )n (+) clusters falls between those of (CeO2 )2-4 (+) and (V2 O5 )1-5 (+) in terms of C-H bond activation, thus the nature of the active species and the cluster reactivity can be effectively tuned by doping. PMID:26714587

  8. Assembly of Fe-substituted Dawson-type nanoscale selenotungstate clusters with photocatalytic H2 evolution activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Chao; Qin, Chao; Wang, Xin-Long; Li, Yang-Guang; Zang, Hong-Ying; Jiao, Yan-Qing; Huang, Peng; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Su, Zhong-Min; Wang, En-Bo

    2014-11-11

    Two Fe-substituted Dawson-type nanoscale selenotungstate clusters, {Fe6Se6W34} and {Fe10Se8W62} involving {α-Se2W14} and {γ-Se2W14} building blocks, have been isolated, which exhibit photocatalytic H2 evolution activity. Their electrochemical behaviours and magnetic properties were also investigated.

  9. Charge state composition in coronal hole and CME related solar wind: Latitudinal variations observed by Ulysses and WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvin, A. B.; Gloeckler, G.

    1997-01-01

    Iron charge states in recurrent coronal hole-associated solar wind flows are obtained in the ecliptic by WIND/SMS, while measurements of iron and silicon from the polar coronal holes are available from Ulysses/SWICS. Ulysses/SWICS also provides ion composition of coronal mass ejection (CME)-related solar wind. Both coronal hole-associated and CME-related solar wind charge charges show heliographic latitudinal variations.

  10. Physical activity levels and supportive care needs for physical activity among breast cancer survivors with different psychosocial profiles: a cluster-analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Charlier, C; Pauwels, E; Lechner, L; Spittaels, H; Bourgois, J; DE Bourdeaudhuij, I; VAN Hoof, E

    2012-11-01

    The transition from breast cancer patient to survivor is associated with many treatment-related and psychosocial factors, which can influence health behaviour and associated needs. First, this study aimed to identify clusters of treatment-related and psychosocial factors among breast cancer survivors. Second, clusters' physical activity levels and care needs for physical activity were evaluated. Breast cancer survivors (n= 440; 52 ± 8 years) (3 weeks to 6 months post treatment) completed self-reports on physical and psychological symptoms; illness representations; social support and coping; physical activity and care needs for physical activity. Analyses identified four clusters: (1) a low distress-active approach group; (2) a low distress-resigned approach group; (3) a high distress-active approach group; and (4) a high distress-emotional approach group. Physical activity levels were higher in the low distress groups than in the high distress-emotional approach group. However, women with low distress and an active approach reported equal care needs for physical activity than women with high distress and an emotional approach. These findings suggest that care needs for physical activity are unrelated to distress and actual physical activity levels. The results emphasise the importance of screening for needs and provide a framework supporting the referral of breast cancer survivors to tailored interventions.

  11. Metabolic risk profiles created using cluster analysis are differentially associated with physical activity: The ARIC study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conditions such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, and obesity tend to cluster together and predict cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and premature mortality. This clustering has led to multiple definitions of the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). While the definitions agree on the ...

  12. Tracking the CME-driven shock wave on 2012 March 5 and radio triangulation of associated radio emission

    SciTech Connect

    Magdalenić, J.; Marqué, C.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Krupar, V.; Maksimović, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.

  13. Social Interaction and Participation: Formative Evaluation of Online CME Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guan, Jianfei; Tregonning, Sarah; Keenan, Louanne

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: This exploratory study examines Canadian physicians' participation in online social activities and learning discussions, perceptions of online social closeness, barriers and motivators to participation, and perceptions of the impact of course duration and face-to-face meetings on learning. Methods: Formative evaluations were…

  14. Collisional activation of N2O decomposition and CO oxidation reactions on isolated rhodium clusters.

    PubMed

    Parry, Imogen S; Kartouzian, Aras; Hamilton, Suzanne M; Balaj, O Petru; Beyer, Martin K; Mackenzie, Stuart R

    2013-09-12

    The reactions of nitrous oxide decorated rhodium clusters, RhnN2O(+) (n = 5, 6), have been studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Collision induced dissociation with Ar is shown to lead to one of two processes; desorption of the intact N2O moiety (indicating molecular adsorption in the parent cluster) or N2O decomposition liberating molecular nitrogen with the latter becoming increasingly dominant at higher collision energies. Consistent with the results of earlier studies, which employed infrared excitation [Hermes, A. C.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2011, 2, 3053], Rh5ON2O(+) is observed to behave qualitatively differently to Rh5N2O(+) with decomposition of the nitrous oxide dominating the chemistry of the former. In other experiments, the reactivity of RhnN2O(+) clusters with CO has been studied. Chemisorption of (13)CO is calculated to deposit ca. 2 eV into the parent cluster, initiating a range of chemical processes on the cluster surface, which are fit to a simple reaction mechanism. Clear differences are again observed in the reaction branching ratios for Rh5N2O(+) and Rh6N2O(+) parent cluster ions. For the n = 5 cluster, the combined N2O reduction/CO oxidation is the most significant reaction channel, while the n = 6 cluster preferentially is oxidized to Rh6O(+) with loss of N2 and CO. Even larger differences are observed in the reactions of the N2O decorated cluster oxides, RhnON2O(+), for which more reaction possibilities arise. The results of all studies are discussed in relation to infrared driven processes on the same parent cluster species [Hamilton, S. M.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 1448; J. Phys. Chem. A, 2011, 115, 2489].

  15. Redox Control of the Human Iron-Sulfur Repair Protein MitoNEET Activity via Its Iron-Sulfur Cluster.

    PubMed

    Golinelli-Cohen, Marie-Pierre; Lescop, Ewen; Mons, Cécile; Gonçalves, Sergio; Clémancey, Martin; Santolini, Jérôme; Guittet, Eric; Blondin, Geneviève; Latour, Jean-Marc; Bouton, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Human mitoNEET (mNT) is the first identified Fe-S protein of the mammalian outer mitochondrial membrane. Recently, mNT has been implicated in cytosolic Fe-S repair of a key regulator of cellular iron homeostasis. Here, we aimed to decipher the mechanism by which mNT triggers its Fe-S repair capacity. By using tightly controlled reactions combined with complementary spectroscopic approaches, we have determined the differential roles played by both the redox state of the mNT cluster and dioxygen in cluster transfer and protein stability. We unambiguously demonstrated that only the oxidized state of the mNT cluster triggers cluster transfer to a generic acceptor protein and that dioxygen is neither required for the cluster transfer reaction nor does it affect the transfer rate. In the absence of apo-acceptors, a large fraction of the oxidized holo-mNT form is converted back to reduced holo-mNT under low oxygen tension. Reduced holo-mNT, which holds a [2Fe-2S](+)with a global protein fold similar to that of the oxidized form is, by contrast, resistant in losing its cluster or in transferring it. Our findings thus demonstrate that mNT uses an iron-based redox switch mechanism to regulate the transfer of its cluster. The oxidized state is the "active state," which reacts promptly to initiate Fe-S transfer independently of dioxygen, whereas the reduced state is a "dormant form." Finally, we propose that the redox-sensing function of mNT is a key component of the cellular adaptive response to help stress-sensitive Fe-S proteins recover from oxidative injury.

  16. Using SOHO to Understand CME-Producing Quiet-Region Filament Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.; Harra, L. K.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years we have been studying solar eruptions in an attempt to determine their primary initiation mechanism. We have focused on events involving filaments, because motions of the filaments just prior to their violent eruption are indicative of changes in the entire magnetic field system involved in the eruption. When the pre-eruption filament resides in a quiet region, the motions leading up to eruption are slower than in similar eruptions in active regions due to the weaker magnetic field strength and correspondingly lower Alfven velocities. These early motions manifest themselves in a slow rise (a few km/s) of the filament, in some cases lasting several hours. After this the filament and associated magnetic structures erupt rapidly, accelerating to speeds of a few 10 kmh over a few minutes. Because of their slow evolution, quiet-region eruptions such as these can be effectively studied in EUV with SOHO/EIT, with its regular cadence of about 12 min. For several cases we have combined EIT images with SOHO/MDI magnetograms and data from other other instruments, and compared our observations with predictions from various eruption scenarios, in particular the "breakout" (Antiochos 1998), "tether cutting" (e.g., Moore et al. 2001), and MHD instability mechanisms. Here we present a representative example of a quiet-region eruption involving a filament ejection, that occurred on 2001 February 28 in a magnetically quadrupolar region and produced a halo CME in SOHO/LASCO images. In addition to EIT and MDI, we analyzed spectral data from SOHO/CDS and soft X-ray (SXR) images from Yohkoh/SXT. We found that flux emergence occurred near one end of the filament, and that both this emergence and resulting microflaring in SXRs and EUV were temporally and spatially closely related to the start of the filament's slow rise. Intensity changes (dimmings and brightenings) in the EIT and SXT images indicate that fields far removed from the erupting core were involved in the

  17. The Activity of Rabies Vaccines against Genetic Clusters of Rabies Virus Circulating at the Territory of Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Mykola; Polupan, Ivan; Deryabin, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the presence of genetic clusters of rabies virus at the territory of Ukraine and to determine the degree of activity of rabies vaccines against these genetic clusters. Introduction To develop and implement an effective program of rabies eradication in Ukraine in 2008 was founded the unique collection of samples of pathological materials confirmed as positive in rabies at the regional veterinary laboratories of Ukraine. The collection is constantly updated and to present moment it includes 1389 samples from all regions of Ukraine, selected from 17 animal species and humans. Methods Identification of the rabies virus in samples of pathological material for their further selection was carried out using the test developed by us which based on RT-PCR with primers complementary to the conservative fragments of the 5’-end of nucleoprotein gene of rabies virus. For the study of the street rabies virus isolates from the collection we use RT-PCR with the primers pair (509, 304) flanking the variable 3’-end part of nucleoprotein gene of the reference strain of rabies virus CVS (fragment in 377 bp). Studies of rabies vaccines activity were carried out with modified method of U.S. National Institutes of Health using rabies virus street isolates of both genetic clusters instead of the Challenge Virus Standard (CVS). All isolates of street rabies virus were inoculated in a dose of 5–50 LD50. The criteria for evaluation of protective activity of rabies vaccine was effective dose (− lg ED50). Results In molecular genetic studies with variant-specific primers we established the presence in Ukraine of two clusters of rabies virus. Clusters I circulates on the right bank of the Dnipro river (the largest water barrier that divides the country into eastern and western side), and cluster II – on the left bank of the Dnieper. The relationship of these variants with the epizootic situation was researched. For this purpose epizootological zoning of Ukraine

  18. High interfacial activity of polymers "grafted through" functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle clusters.

    PubMed

    Foster, Lynn M; Worthen, Andrew J; Foster, Edward L; Dong, Jiannan; Roach, Clarissa M; Metaxas, Athena E; Hardy, Clifford D; Larsen, Eric S; Bollinger, Jonathan A; Truskett, Thomas M; Bielawski, Christopher W; Johnston, Keith P

    2014-09-01

    The mechanism by which polymers, when grafted to inorganic nanoparticles, lower the interfacial tension at the oil-water interface is not well understood, despite the great interest in particle stabilized emulsions and foams. A simple and highly versatile free radical "grafting through" technique was used to bond high organic fractions (by weight) of poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) monomethyl ether methacrylate) onto iron oxide clusters, without the need for catalysts. In the resulting ∼1 μm hybrid particles, the inorganic cores and grafting architecture contribute to the high local concentration of grafted polymer chains to the dodecane/water interface to produce low interfacial tensions of only 0.003 w/v % (polymer and particle core). This "critical particle concentration" (CPC) for these hybrid inorganic/polymer amphiphilic particles to lower the interfacial tension by 36 mN/m was over 30-fold lower than the critical micelle concentration of the free polymer (without inorganic cores) to produce nearly the same interfacial tension. The low CPC is favored by the high adsorption energy (∼10(6) kBT) for the large ∼1 μm hybrid particles, the high local polymer concentration on the particles surfaces, and the ability of the deformable hybrid nanocluster cores as well as the polymer chains to conform to the interface. The nanocluster cores also increased the entanglement of the polymer chains in bulk DI water or synthetic seawater, producing a viscosity up to 35,000 cP at 0.01 s(-1), in contrast with only 600 cP for the free polymer. As a consequence of these interfacial and rheological properties, the hybrid particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at concentrations as low as 0.01 w/v %, with average drop sizes down to 30 μm. In contrast, the bulk viscosity was low for the free polymer, and it did not stabilize the emulsions. The ability to influence the interfacial activity and rheology of polymers upon grafting them to inorganic particles, including clusters

  19. High interfacial activity of polymers "grafted through" functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle clusters.

    PubMed

    Foster, Lynn M; Worthen, Andrew J; Foster, Edward L; Dong, Jiannan; Roach, Clarissa M; Metaxas, Athena E; Hardy, Clifford D; Larsen, Eric S; Bollinger, Jonathan A; Truskett, Thomas M; Bielawski, Christopher W; Johnston, Keith P

    2014-09-01

    The mechanism by which polymers, when grafted to inorganic nanoparticles, lower the interfacial tension at the oil-water interface is not well understood, despite the great interest in particle stabilized emulsions and foams. A simple and highly versatile free radical "grafting through" technique was used to bond high organic fractions (by weight) of poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) monomethyl ether methacrylate) onto iron oxide clusters, without the need for catalysts. In the resulting ∼1 μm hybrid particles, the inorganic cores and grafting architecture contribute to the high local concentration of grafted polymer chains to the dodecane/water interface to produce low interfacial tensions of only 0.003 w/v % (polymer and particle core). This "critical particle concentration" (CPC) for these hybrid inorganic/polymer amphiphilic particles to lower the interfacial tension by 36 mN/m was over 30-fold lower than the critical micelle concentration of the free polymer (without inorganic cores) to produce nearly the same interfacial tension. The low CPC is favored by the high adsorption energy (∼10(6) kBT) for the large ∼1 μm hybrid particles, the high local polymer concentration on the particles surfaces, and the ability of the deformable hybrid nanocluster cores as well as the polymer chains to conform to the interface. The nanocluster cores also increased the entanglement of the polymer chains in bulk DI water or synthetic seawater, producing a viscosity up to 35,000 cP at 0.01 s(-1), in contrast with only 600 cP for the free polymer. As a consequence of these interfacial and rheological properties, the hybrid particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at concentrations as low as 0.01 w/v %, with average drop sizes down to 30 μm. In contrast, the bulk viscosity was low for the free polymer, and it did not stabilize the emulsions. The ability to influence the interfacial activity and rheology of polymers upon grafting them to inorganic particles, including clusters

  20. CAUGHT IN THE ACT: STRONG, ACTIVE RAM PRESSURE STRIPPING IN VIRGO CLUSTER SPIRAL NGC 4330

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, Anne; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P.; Crowl, Hugh H.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Schiminovich, David; Chung, Aeree; Vollmer, Bernd E-mail: jeff.kenney@yale.edu E-mail: jvangork@astro.columbia.edu E-mail: achung@yonsei.ac.kr

    2011-05-15

    We present a multi-wavelength study of NGC 4330, a highly inclined spiral galaxy in the Virgo Cluster which is a clear example of strong, ongoing intracluster medium-interstellar medium (ICM-ISM) ram pressure stripping. The H I has been removed from well within the undisturbed old stellar disk, to 50%-65% of R{sub 25}. Multi-wavelength data (WIYN BVR-H{alpha}, Very Large Array 21 cm H I and radio continuum, and Galaxy Evolution Explorer NUV and FUV) reveal several one-sided extraplanar features likely caused by ram pressure at an intermediate disk-wind angle. At the leading edge of the interaction, the H{alpha} and dust extinction curve sharply out of the disk in a remarkable and distinctive 'upturn' feature that may be generally useful as a diagnostic indicator of active ram pressure. On the trailing side, the ISM is stretched out in a long tail which contains 10% of the galaxy's total H I emission, 6%-9% of its NUV-FUV emission, but only 2% of the H{alpha}. The centroid of the H I tail is downwind of the UV/H{alpha} tail, suggesting that the ICM wind has shifted most of the ISM downwind over the course of the past 10-300 Myr. Along the major axis, the disk is highly asymmetric in the UV, but more symmetric in H{alpha} and H I, also implying recent changes in the distributions of gas and star formation. The UV-optical colors indicate very different star formation histories for the leading and trailing sides of the galaxy. On the leading side, a strong gradient in the UV-optical colors of the gas-stripped disk suggests that it has taken 200-400 Myr to strip the gas from a radius of >8 to 5 kpc, but on the trailing side there is no age gradient. All our data suggest a scenario in which NGC 4330 is falling into the cluster center for the first time and has experienced a significant increase in ram pressure over the last 200-400 Myr. Many of the UV-bright stars that form outside the thin disk due to ram pressure will ultimately produce stellar thick disk and halo

  1. The m-chlorophenylpiperazine test in cluster headache: a study on central serotoninergic activity.

    PubMed

    Leone, M; Attanasio, A; Croci, D; Libro, G; Grazzi, L; D'Amico, D; Nespolo, A; Bussone, G

    1997-10-01

    The central serotoninergic agonist m-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP) stimulates several 5HT receptor subtypes. It induces the release of both cortisol and prolactin (PRL). In this study we investigated central serotoninergic responsiveness in cluster headache by monitoring cortisol and PRL responses to m-CPP administration. Twenty-three patients with episodic cluster headache and 17 sex-matched and age-matched healthy subjects were studied. The cluster headache patients were tested during a cluster period, and none were receiving prophylaxis. A single oral dose of m-CPP, 0.5 mg/kg, was given at time 0. Blood samples were drawn at -30, 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min. PRL and cortisol levels were assayed in the samples. PRL and cortisol delta maxima (delta maximum = maximum response - baseline level at time 0/baseline level at time 0) were evaluated in each patient and mean values compared. Serum levels of m-CPP were detected by HPLC and correlated to hormonal responses. Reduced cortisol (p < 0.02) and increased PRL (p < 0.05) delta maxima were observed in cluster headache patients. Increased basal cortisol plasma levels (p < 0.05) and reduced basal PRL plasma levels (p = 0.06) also characterized cluster headache patients. This is the first study evaluating central serotoninergic responsiveness to m-CPP in cluster headache and these data suggest impaired central serotoninergic function in this pathology. PMID:9350388

  2. The m-chlorophenylpiperazine test in cluster headache: a study on central serotoninergic activity.

    PubMed

    Leone, M; Attanasio, A; Croci, D; Libro, G; Grazzi, L; D'Amico, D; Nespolo, A; Bussone, G

    1997-10-01

    The central serotoninergic agonist m-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP) stimulates several 5HT receptor subtypes. It induces the release of both cortisol and prolactin (PRL). In this study we investigated central serotoninergic responsiveness in cluster headache by monitoring cortisol and PRL responses to m-CPP administration. Twenty-three patients with episodic cluster headache and 17 sex-matched and age-matched healthy subjects were studied. The cluster headache patients were tested during a cluster period, and none were receiving prophylaxis. A single oral dose of m-CPP, 0.5 mg/kg, was given at time 0. Blood samples were drawn at -30, 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min. PRL and cortisol levels were assayed in the samples. PRL and cortisol delta maxima (delta maximum = maximum response - baseline level at time 0/baseline level at time 0) were evaluated in each patient and mean values compared. Serum levels of m-CPP were detected by HPLC and correlated to hormonal responses. Reduced cortisol (p < 0.02) and increased PRL (p < 0.05) delta maxima were observed in cluster headache patients. Increased basal cortisol plasma levels (p < 0.05) and reduced basal PRL plasma levels (p = 0.06) also characterized cluster headache patients. This is the first study evaluating central serotoninergic responsiveness to m-CPP in cluster headache and these data suggest impaired central serotoninergic function in this pathology.

  3. Unique DC-SIGN clustering activity of a small glycomimetic: A lesson for ligand design.

    PubMed

    Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Thépaut, Michel; Sattin, Sara; Berzi, Angela; McGeagh, John; Grudinin, Sergei; Weiser, Jörg; Le Roy, Aline; Reina, Jose J; Rojo, Javier; Clerici, Mario; Bernardi, Anna; Ebel, Christine; Fieschi, Franck

    2014-06-20

    DC-SIGN is a dendritic cell-specific C-type lectin receptor that recognizes highly glycosylated ligands expressed on the surface of various pathogens. This receptor plays an important role in the early stages of many viral infections, including HIV, which makes it an interesting therapeutic target. Glycomimetic compounds are good drug candidates for DC-SIGN inhibition due to their high solubility, resistance to glycosidases, and nontoxicity. We studied the structural properties of the interaction of the tetrameric DC-SIGN extracellular domain (ECD), with two glycomimetic antagonists, a pseudomannobioside (1) and a linear pseudomannotrioside (2). Though the inhibitory potency of 2, as measured by SPR competition experiments, was 1 order of magnitude higher than that of 1, crystal structures of the complexes within the DC-SIGN carbohydrate recognition domain showed the same binding mode for both compounds. Moreover, when conjugated to multivalent scaffolds, the inhibitory potencies of these compounds became uniform. Combining isothermal titration microcalorimetry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and dynamic light scattering techniques to study DC-SIGN ECD interaction with these glycomimetics revealed that 2 is able, without any multivalent presentation, to cluster DC-SIGN tetramers leading to an artificially overestimated inhibitory potency. The use of multivalent scaffolds presenting 1 or 2 in HIV trans-infection inhibition assay confirms the loss of potency of 2 upon conjugation and the equal efficacy of chemically simpler compound 1. This study documents a unique case where, among two active compounds chemically derived, the compound with the lower apparent activity is the optimal lead for further drug development.

  4. Hydrogen activation, diffusion, and clustering on CeO₂(111): a DFT+U study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Torre, Delia; Carrasco, Javier; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M Verónica; Pérez, Rubén

    2014-07-01

    We present a comprehensive density functional theory+U study of the mechanisms underlying the dissociation of molecular hydrogen, and diffusion and clustering of the resulting atomic species on the CeO2(111) surface. Contrary to a widely held view based solely on a previous theoretical prediction, our results show conclusively that H2 dissociation is an activated process with a large energy barrier ~1.0 eV that is not significantly affected by coverage or the presence of surface oxygen vacancies. The reaction proceeds through a local energy minimum--where the molecule is located close to one of the surface oxygen atoms and the H-H bond has been substantially weaken by the interaction with the substrate--, and a transition state where one H atom is attached to a surface O atom and the other H atom sits on-top of a Ce(4+) ion. In addition, we have explored how several factors, including H coverage, the location of Ce(3+) ions as well as the U value, may affect the chemisorption energy and the relative stability of isolated OH groups versus pair and trimer structures. The trimer stability at low H coverages and the larger upward relaxation of the surface O atoms within the OH groups are consistent with the assignment of the frequent experimental observation by non-contact atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopies of bright protrusions on three neighboring surface O atoms to a triple OH group. The diffusion path of isolated H atoms on the surface goes through the adsorption on-top of an oxygen in the third atomic layer with a large energy barrier of ~1.8 eV. Overall, the large energy barriers for both, molecular dissociation and atomic diffusion, are consistent with the high activity and selectivity found recently in the partial hydrogenation of acetylene catalyzed by ceria at high H2/C2H2 ratios.

  5. Hydrogen activation, diffusion, and clustering on CeO₂(111): a DFT+U study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Torre, Delia; Carrasco, Javier; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M Verónica; Pérez, Rubén

    2014-07-01

    We present a comprehensive density functional theory+U study of the mechanisms underlying the dissociation of molecular hydrogen, and diffusion and clustering of the resulting atomic species on the CeO2(111) surface. Contrary to a widely held view based solely on a previous theoretical prediction, our results show conclusively that H2 dissociation is an activated process with a large energy barrier ~1.0 eV that is not significantly affected by coverage or the presence of surface oxygen vacancies. The reaction proceeds through a local energy minimum--where the molecule is located close to one of the surface oxygen atoms and the H-H bond has been substantially weaken by the interaction with the substrate--, and a transition state where one H atom is attached to a surface O atom and the other H atom sits on-top of a Ce(4+) ion. In addition, we have explored how several factors, including H coverage, the location of Ce(3+) ions as well as the U value, may affect the chemisorption energy and the relative stability of isolated OH groups versus pair and trimer structures. The trimer stability at low H coverages and the larger upward relaxation of the surface O atoms within the OH groups are consistent with the assignment of the frequent experimental observation by non-contact atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopies of bright protrusions on three neighboring surface O atoms to a triple OH group. The diffusion path of isolated H atoms on the surface goes through the adsorption on-top of an oxygen in the third atomic layer with a large energy barrier of ~1.8 eV. Overall, the large energy barriers for both, molecular dissociation and atomic diffusion, are consistent with the high activity and selectivity found recently in the partial hydrogenation of acetylene catalyzed by ceria at high H2/C2H2 ratios. PMID:25005299

  6. Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Activity and Cytosolic Iron Regulate Iron Traffic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Joshua D; Lindahl, Paul A

    2015-11-01

    An ordinary differential equation-based mathematical model was developed to describe trafficking and regulation of iron in growing fermenting budding yeast. Accordingly, environmental iron enters the cytosol and moves into mitochondria and vacuoles. Dilution caused by increasing cell volume is included. Four sites are regulated, including those in which iron is imported into the cytosol, mitochondria, and vacuoles, and the site at which vacuolar Fe(II) is oxidized to Fe(III). The objective of this study was to determine whether cytosolic iron (Fecyt) and/or a putative sulfur-based product of iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) activity was/were being sensed in regulation. The model assumes that the matrix of healthy mitochondria is anaerobic, and that in ISC mutants, O2 diffuses into the matrix where it reacts with nonheme high spin Fe(II) ions, oxidizing them to nanoparticles and generating reactive oxygen species. This reactivity causes a further decline in ISC/heme biosynthesis, which ultimately gives rise to the diseased state. The ordinary differential equations that define this model were numerically integrated, and concentrations of each component were plotted versus the concentration of iron in the growth medium and versus the rate of ISC/heme biosynthesis. Model parameters were optimized by fitting simulations to literature data. The model variant that assumed that both Fecyt and ISC biosynthesis activity were sensed in regulation mimicked observed behavior best. Such "dual sensing" probably arises in real cells because regulation involves assembly of an ISC on a cytosolic protein using Fecyt and a sulfur species generated in mitochondria during ISC biosynthesis and exported into the cytosol.

  7. The effects of baryon physics, black holes and active galactic nucleus feedback on the mass distribution in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martizzi, Davide; Teyssier, Romain; Moore, Ben; Wentz, Tina

    2012-06-01

    The spatial distribution of matter in clusters of galaxies is mainly determined by the dominant dark matter component; however, physical processes involving baryonic matter are able to modify it significantly. We analyse a set of 500 pc resolution cosmological simulations of a cluster of galaxies with mass comparable to Virgo, performed with the AMR code RAMSES. We compare the mass density profiles of the dark, stellar and gaseous matter components of the cluster that result from different assumptions for the subgrid baryonic physics and galaxy formation processes. First, the prediction of a gravity-only N-body simulation is compared to that of a hydrodynamical simulation with standard galaxy formation recipes, and then all results are compared to a hydrodynamical simulation which includes thermal active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback from supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We find the usual effects of overcooling and adiabatic contraction in the run with standard galaxy formation physics, but very different results are found when implementing SMBHs and AGN feedback. Star formation is strongly quenched, producing lower stellar densities throughout the cluster, and much less cold gas is available for star formation at low redshifts. At redshift z= 0 we find a flat density core of radius 10 kpc in both the dark and stellar matter density profiles. We speculate on the possible formation mechanisms able to produce such cores and we conclude that they can be produced through the coupling of different processes: (I) dynamical friction from the decay of black hole orbits during galaxy mergers; (II) AGN-driven gas outflows producing fluctuations of the gravitational potential causing the removal of collisionless matter from the central region of the cluster; (III) adiabatic expansion in response to the slow expulsion of gas from the central region of the cluster during the quiescent mode of AGN activity.

  8. Screen-based media use clusters are related to other activity behaviours and health indicators in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Screen-based media (SBM) occupy a considerable portion of young peoples’ discretionary leisure time. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether distinct clusters of SBM use exist, and if so, to examine the relationship of any identified clusters with other activity/sedentary behaviours and physical and mental health indicators. Methods The data for this study come from 643 adolescents, aged 14 years, who were participating in the longitudinal Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study through May 2003 to June 2006. Time spent on SBM, phone use and reading was assessed using the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults. Height, weight, muscle strength were measured at a clinic visit and the adolescents also completed questionnaires on their physical activity and psychosocial health. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to analyse groupings of SBM use. Results Three clusters of SBM use were found; C1 ‘instrumental computer users’ (high email use, general computer use), C2 ‘multi-modal e-gamers’ (both high console and computer game use) and C3 ‘computer e-gamers’ (high computer game use only). Television viewing was moderately high amongst all the clusters. C2 males took fewer steps than their male peers in C1 and C3 (-13,787/week, 95% CI: -4619 to -22957, p = 0.003 and -14,806, 95% CI: -5,306 to -24,305, p = 0.002) and recorded less MVPA than the C1 males (-3.5 h, 95% CI: -1.0 to -5.9, p = 0.005). There was no difference in activity levels between females in clusters C1 and C3. Conclusion SBM use by adolescents did cluster and these clusters related differently to activity/sedentary behaviours and both physical and psychosocial health indicators. It is clear that SBM use is not a single construct and future research needs to take consideration of this if it intends to understand the impact SBM has on health. PMID:24330626

  9. Star Formation Activity in a Young Galaxy Cluster at Z = 0.866

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laganá, T. F.; Ulmer, M. P.; Martins, L. P.; da Cunha, E.

    2016-07-01

    The galaxy cluster RX J1257+4738 at z = 0.866 is one of the highest redshift clusters with a richness of multi-wavelength data, and is thus a good target to study the star formation-density relation at early epochs. Using a sample of spectroscopically confirmed cluster members, we derive the star-formation rates (SFRs) of our galaxies using two methods: (1) the relation between SFR and total infrared luminosity extrapolated from the observed Spitzer Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24 μm imaging data; and (2) spectral energy distribution fitting using the MAGPHYS code, including eight different bands. We show that, for this cluster, the SFR-density relation is very weak and seems to be dominated by the two central galaxies and the SFR presents a mild dependence on stellar mass, with more massive galaxies having higher SFR. However, the specific SFR (SSFR) decreases with stellar mass, meaning that more massive galaxies are forming fewer stars per unit of mass, and thus suggesting that the increase in star-forming members is driven by cluster assembly and infall. If the environment is somehow driving the star formation, one would expect a relation between the SSFR and the cluster centric distance, but that is not the case. A possible scenario to explain this lack of correlation is the contamination by infalling galaxies in the inner part of the cluster, which may be on their initial pass through the cluster center. As these galaxies have higher SFRs for their stellar mass, they enhance the mean SSFR in the center of the cluster.

  10. Asp1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe binds a [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster which inhibits inositol pyrophosphate 1-phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanchen; Nair, Vasudha S; Holland, Ashley A; Capolicchio, Samanta; Jessen, Henning J; Johnson, Michael K; Shears, Stephen B

    2015-10-27

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are widely distributed protein cofactors that are vital to cellular biochemistry and the maintenance of bioenergetic homeostasis, but to our knowledge, they have never been identified in any phosphatase. Here, we describe an iron-sulfur cluster in Asp1, a dual-function kinase/phosphatase that regulates cell morphogenesis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Full-length Asp1, and its phosphatase domain (Asp1(371-920)), were each heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The phosphatase activity is exquisitely specific: it hydrolyzes the 1-diphosphate from just two members of the inositol pyrophosphate (PP-InsP) signaling family, namely, 1-InsP7 and 1,5-InsP8. We demonstrate that Asp1 does not hydrolyze either InsP6, 2-InsP7, 3-InsP7, 4-InsP7, 5-InsP7, 6-InsP7, or 3,5-InsP8. We also recorded 1-phosphatase activity in a human homologue of Asp1, hPPIP5K1, which was heterologously expressed in Drosophila S3 cells with a biotinylated N-terminal tag, and then isolated from cell lysates with avidin beads. Purified, recombinant Asp1(371-920) contained iron and acid-labile sulfide, but the stoichiometry (0.8 atoms of each per protein molecule) indicates incomplete iron-sulfur cluster assembly. We reconstituted the Fe-S cluster in vitro under anaerobic conditions, which increased the stoichiometry to approximately 2 atoms of iron and acid-labile sulfide per Asp1 molecule. The presence of a [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster in Asp1(371-920) was demonstrated by UV-visible absorption, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. We determined that this [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster is unlikely to participate in redox chemistry, since it rapidly degraded upon reduction by dithionite. Biochemical and mutagenic studies demonstrated that the [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster substantially inhibits the phosphatase activity of Asp1, thereby increasing its net kinase activity.

  11. Highly Active Gold(I)-Silver(I) Oxo Cluster Activating sp³ C-H Bonds of Methyl Ketones under Mild Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xiao-Li; Yang, Yang; Lei, Zhen; Chang, Shan-Shan; Guan, Zong-Jie; Wan, Xian-Kai; Wen, Ting-Bin; Wang, Quan-Ming

    2015-04-29

    The activation of C(sp(3))-H bonds is challenging, due to their high bond dissociation energy, low proton acidity, and highly nonpolar character. Herein we report a unique gold(I)-silver(I) oxo cluster protected by hemilabile phosphine ligands [OAu3Ag3(PPhpy2)3](BF4)4 (1), which can activate C(sp(3))-H bonds under mild conditions for a broad scope of methyl ketones (RCOCH3, R = methyl, phenyl, 2-methylphenyl, 2-aminophenyl, 2-hydroxylphenyl, 2-pyridyl, 2-thiazolyl, tert-butyl, ethyl, isopropyl). Activation happens via triple deprotonation of the methyl group, leading to formation of heterometallic Au(I)-Ag(I) clusters with formula RCOCAu4Ag4(PPhpy2)4(BF4)5 (PPhpy2 = bis(2-pyridyl)phenylphosphine). Cluster 1 can be generated in situ via the reaction of [OAu3Ag(PPhpy2)3](BF4)2 with 2 equiv of AgBF4. The oxo ion and the metal centers are found to be essential in the cleavage of sp(3) C-H bonds of methyl ketones. Interestingly, cluster 1 selectively activates the C-H bonds in -CH3 rather than the N-H bonds in -NH2 or the O-H bond in -OH which is traditionally thought to be more reactive than C-H bonds. Control experiments with butanone, 3-methylbutanone, and cyclopentanone as substrates show that the auration of the C-H bond of the terminal methyl group is preferred over secondary or tertiary sp(3) C-H bonds; in other words, the C-H bond activation is influenced by steric effect. This work highlights the powerful reactivity of metal clusters toward C-H activation and sheds new light on gold(I)-mediated catalysis.

  12. A multiwavelength strong lensing analysis of baryons and dark matter in the dynamically active cluster AC 114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereno, M.; Lubini, M.; Jetzer, Ph.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Strong lensing studies can provide detailed mass maps of the inner regions even in dynamically active galaxy clusters. Aims: We illustrate the important role of a proper modelling of the intracluster medium, i.e., the main baryonic component. We demonstrate that the addition of a new contribution accounting for the gas can increase the statistical significance of the lensing model. Methods: We propose a parametric method for strong lensing analyses that exploits multiwavelength observations. The mass model accounts for cluster-sized dark matter halos, galaxies (whose stellar mass can be obtained from optical analyses), and the intracluster medium. The gas distribution is fitted to lensing data exploiting prior knowledge from X-ray observations. This gives an unbiased insight into each matter component and allows us to study the dynamical status of a cluster. The method was applied to AC 114, an irregular X-ray cluster. Results: We find positive evidence of dynamical activity, the dark matter distribution being shifted and rotated with respect to the gas. On the other hand, the dark matter follows the galaxy density in terms of both shape and orientation, illustrating the collisionless nature of dark matter. The inner region (≲250 kpc) is underluminous in optical bands, whereas the gas fraction (~20 ± 5%) slightly exceeds typical values. Evidence of lensing and X-ray suggests that the cluster develops in the plane of the sky and is not affected by the lensing over-concentration bias. Despite the dynamical activity, the matter distribution seems to agree with predictions of N-body simulations. An universal cusped profile provides a good description of either the overall or the dark matter distribution, whereas theoretical scaling relations seem to be accurately fitted.

  13. High reactivity of nanosized niobium oxide cluster cations in methane activation: A comparison with vanadium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Xun-Lei E-mail: chemzyx@iccas.ac.cn; Wang, Dan; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Yan-Xia E-mail: chemzyx@iccas.ac.cn; He, Sheng-Gui

    2015-09-28

    The reactions between methane and niobium oxide cluster cations were studied and compared to those employing vanadium oxides. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) reactions were identified over stoichiometric (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} clusters for N as large as 14 with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The reactivity of (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} clusters decreases as the N increases, and it is higher than that of (V {sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} for N ≥ 4. Theoretical studies were conducted on (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} (N = 2–6) by density functional calculations. HAA reactions on these clusters are all favorable thermodynamically and kinetically. The difference of the reactivity with respect to the cluster size and metal type (Nb vs V) was attributed to thermodynamics, kinetics, the electron capture ability, and the distribution of the unpaired spin density. Nanosized Nb oxide clusters show higher HAA reactivity than V oxides, indicating that niobia may serve as promising catalysts for practical methane conversion.

  14. High reactivity of nanosized niobium oxide cluster cations in methane activation: A comparison with vanadium oxides.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xun-Lei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Yan-Xia; He, Sheng-Gui

    2015-09-28

    The reactions between methane and niobium oxide cluster cations were studied and compared to those employing vanadium oxides. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) reactions were identified over stoichiometric (Nb2O5)N(+) clusters for N as large as 14 with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The reactivity of (Nb2O5)N(+) clusters decreases as the N increases, and it is higher than that of (V 2O5)N(+) for N ≥ 4. Theoretical studies were conducted on (Nb2O5)N(+) (N = 2-6) by density functional calculations. HAA reactions on these clusters are all favorable thermodynamically and kinetically. The difference of the reactivity with respect to the cluster size and metal type (Nb vs V) was attributed to thermodynamics, kinetics, the electron capture ability, and the distribution of the unpaired spin density. Nanosized Nb oxide clusters show higher HAA reactivity than V oxides, indicating that niobia may serve as promising catalysts for practical methane conversion. PMID:26429016

  15. Effect of Co doping on catalytic activity of small Pt clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhilip Kumar, T. J.; Zhou, Chenggang; Cheng, Hansong; Forrey, Robert C.; Balakrishnan, N.

    2008-03-01

    Platinum is the most widely used catalyst in fuel cell electrodes. Designing improved catalysts with low or no platinum content is one of the grand challenges in fuel cell research. Here, we investigate electronic structures of Pt4 and Pt3Co clusters and report a comparative study of adsorption of H2, O2, and CO molecules on the two clusters using density functional theory. The adsorption studies show that H2 undergoes dissociative chemisorption on the tetrahedral clusters in head on and side on approaches at Pt centers. O2 dissociation occurs primarily in three and four center coordinations and CO prefers to adsorb on Pt or Co atop atoms. The adsorption energy of O2 is found to be higher for the Co doped cluster. For CO, the Pt atop orientation is preferred for both Pt4 and Pt3Co tetrahedral clusters. Adsorption of CO molecule on tetrahedral Pt3Co in side on approach leads to isomerization to planar rhombus geometry. An analysis of Hirshfeld charge distribution shows that the clusters become more polarized after adsorption of the molecules.

  16. Effect of Co doping on catalytic activity of small Pt clusters.

    PubMed

    Dhilip Kumar, T J; Zhou, Chenggang; Cheng, Hansong; Forrey, Robert C; Balakrishnan, N

    2008-03-28

    Platinum is the most widely used catalyst in fuel cell electrodes. Designing improved catalysts with low or no platinum content is one of the grand challenges in fuel cell research. Here, we investigate electronic structures of Pt(4) and Pt(3)Co clusters and report a comparative study of adsorption of H(2), O(2), and CO molecules on the two clusters using density functional theory. The adsorption studies show that H(2) undergoes dissociative chemisorption on the tetrahedral clusters in head on and side on approaches at Pt centers. O(2) dissociation occurs primarily in three and four center coordinations and CO prefers to adsorb on Pt or Co atop atoms. The adsorption energy of O(2) is found to be higher for the Co doped cluster. For CO, the Pt atop orientation is preferred for both Pt(4) and Pt(3)Co tetrahedral clusters. Adsorption of CO molecule on tetrahedral Pt(3)Co in side on approach leads to isomerization to planar rhombus geometry. An analysis of Hirshfeld charge distribution shows that the clusters become more polarized after adsorption of the molecules. PMID:18376957

  17. White spot syndrome virus entry is dependent on multiple endocytic routes and strongly facilitated by Cq-GABARAP in a CME-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong-Yuan; Shen, Kai-Li; Chen, Zhen; Fan, Wei-Wei; Xie, Xiao-Lu; Meng, Chuang; Chang, Xue-Jiao; Zheng, Li-Bing; Jeswin, Joseph; Li, Cheng-Hua; Wang, Ke-Jian; Liu, Hai-Peng

    2016-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a lethal pathogen of shrimp and many other crustaceans, including crayfish. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cellular entry remains elusive due to the lack of shrimp cell lines for viral propagation. Crayfish hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cell culture was recently established as a good model for WSSV infection study. Here, we showed that multiple endocytic routes, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), macropinocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, were indispensably employed for the viral entry into Hpt cell of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. Intriguingly, cellular autophagic activity was positively correlated with efficient viral entry, in which a key autophagy-related protein, γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-associated protein (Cq-GABARAP), that not only localized but also co-localized with WSSV on the Hpt cell membrane, strongly facilitated WSSV entry by binding to the viral envelope VP28 in a CME-dependent manner that was negatively regulated by Cq-Rac1. Furthermore, cytoskeletal components, including Cq-β-tubulin and Cq-β-actin, bound to both recombinant rCq-GABARAP and WSSV envelope proteins, which likely led to viral entry promotion via cooperation with rCq-GABARAP. Even under conditions that promoted viral entry, rCq-GABARAP significantly reduced viral replication at an early stage of infection, which was probably caused by the formation of WSSV aggregates in the cytoplasm. PMID:27385304

  18. White spot syndrome virus entry is dependent on multiple endocytic routes and strongly facilitated by Cq-GABARAP in a CME-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong-yuan; Shen, Kai-li; Chen, Zhen; Fan, Wei-wei; Xie, Xiao-lu; Meng, Chuang; Chang, Xue-jiao; Zheng, Li-bing; Jeswin, Joseph; Li, Cheng-hua; Wang, Ke-jian; Liu, Hai-peng

    2016-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a lethal pathogen of shrimp and many other crustaceans, including crayfish. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cellular entry remains elusive due to the lack of shrimp cell lines for viral propagation. Crayfish hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cell culture was recently established as a good model for WSSV infection study. Here, we showed that multiple endocytic routes, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), macropinocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, were indispensably employed for the viral entry into Hpt cell of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. Intriguingly, cellular autophagic activity was positively correlated with efficient viral entry, in which a key autophagy-related protein, γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-associated protein (Cq-GABARAP), that not only localized but also co-localized with WSSV on the Hpt cell membrane, strongly facilitated WSSV entry by binding to the viral envelope VP28 in a CME-dependent manner that was negatively regulated by Cq-Rac1. Furthermore, cytoskeletal components, including Cq-β-tubulin and Cq-β-actin, bound to both recombinant rCq-GABARAP and WSSV envelope proteins, which likely led to viral entry promotion via cooperation with rCq-GABARAP. Even under conditions that promoted viral entry, rCq-GABARAP significantly reduced viral replication at an early stage of infection, which was probably caused by the formation of WSSV aggregates in the cytoplasm. PMID:27385304

  19. Prediction of Type II Burst Radiation for Large CME Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, I. H.; Schmidt, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Type IIs are associated with shocks in the corona and solar wind, either driven by CMEs or else blast waves. Recent quantitative theories for type II radiation show that the amount of radiation depends on the speed and spatial extent of the 3D shock, as well as on the background plasma, magnetic field configuration, and the number of superthermal electrons available for acceleration by the shock. In principle, then, Type II bursts may provide 1-3 day warnings of large and fast CMEs that might produce space weather at Earth. In this paper we couple the advanced 3D MHD BATS-R-US code of Toth, Gombosi, and colleagues with our new ``bolt-on'' theory for type II emission. The modeling includes initialization with coronal and active region magnetic fields reconstructed from solar magnetograms, coronal densities determined by 1 AU data, and CMEs modelled using STEREO coronagraph data. Two events with type IIs and strong CMEs are analyzed: 15 February 2011 and 7 March 2012. We demonstrate impressive accuracy in time, frequency, and intensity for both type II bursts. This strongly supports the type II theory, implies real understanding of the physics involved, and supports the near-term development of a capability to predict and track these events for space weather prediction.

  20. The Properties of Solar Energetic Particle Event-Associated Coronal Mass Ejections Reported in Different CME Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cane, H. V.

    2015-06-01

    We compare estimates of the speed and width of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in several catalogs for the CMEs associated with ˜ 200 solar energetic particle (SEP) events in 2006 - 2013 that included 25 MeV protons. The catalogs used are: CDAW, CACTUS, SEEDS, and CORIMP, all derived from observations by the LASCO coronagraphs on the SOHO spacecraft, the CACTUS catalog derived from the COR2 coronagraphs on the STEREO-A and -B spacecraft, and the DONKI catalog, which uses observations from SOHO and the STEREO spacecraft. We illustrate how, for this set of events, CME parameters can differ considerably in each catalog. The well-known correlation between CME speed and proton event intensity is shown to be similar for most catalogs, but this is largely because it is determined by a few large particle events associated with fast CMEs, and small events associated with slow CMEs. Intermediate particle events "shuffle" in position when speeds from different catalogs are used. Quadrature spacecraft CME speeds do not improve the correlation. CME widths also vary widely between catalogs, and they are influenced by plane-of-the-sky projection and how the width is inferred from the coronagraph images. The high degree of association (˜ 50 %) between the 25 MeV proton events and "full halo" (360∘-width) CMEs as defined in the CDAW catalog is removed when other catalogs are considered. Using CME parameters from the quadrature spacecraft, the SEP intensity is correlated with CME width, which is also correlated with CME speed.

  1. Efficacy of an integrated continuing medical education (CME) and quality improvement (QI) program on radiation oncologist (RO) clinical practice

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Cheng Nang . E-mail: Cheng_Nang_Leong@mail.nhg.com.sg; Shakespeare, Thomas Philip; Mukherjee, Rahul K.; Back, Michael F.; Lee, Khai Mun; Lu, Jiade Jay; Wynne, Christopher J.; Lim, Keith; Tang, Johann; Zhang Xiaojian

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: There has been little radiation oncologist (RO)-specific research in continuing medical education (CME) or quality improvement (QI) program efficacy. Our aim was to evaluate a CME/QI program for changes in RO behavior, performance, and adherence to department protocols/studies over the first 12 months of the program. Methods and Materials: The CME/QI program combined chart audit with feedback (C-AWF), simulation review AWF (SR-AWF), reminder checklists, and targeted CME tutorials. Between April 2003 and March 2004, management of 75 patients was evaluated by chart audit with feedback (C-AWF) and 178 patients via simulation review audit (SR-AWF) using a validated instrument. Scores were presented, and case management was discussed with individualized educational feedback. RO behavior and performance was compared over the first year of the program. Results: Comparing the first and second 6 months, there was a significant improvement in mean behavior (12.7-13.6 of 14, p = 0.0005) and RO performance (7.6-7.9 of 8, p = 0.018) scores. Protocol/study adherence significantly improved from 90.3% to 96.6% (p = 0.005). A total of 50 actions were generated, including the identification of learning needs to direct CME tutorials, the systematic change of suboptimal RO practice, and the alteration of deficient management of 3% of patients audited during the program. Conclusion: An integrated CME/QI program combining C-AWF, SR-AWF, QI reminders, and targeted CME tutorials effectively improved targeted RO behavior and performance over a 12-month period. There was a corresponding increase in departmental protocol and study adherence.

  2. Flare-CME Models: An Observational Perspective (Invited Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Aulanier, G.; Vršnak, B.

    2015-12-01

    Eruptions, flares, and coronal mass ejection (CMEs) are due to physical phenomena mainly driven by an initially force-free current-carrying magnetic field. We review some key observations relevant to the current theoretical trigger mechanisms of the eruption and to the energy release via reconnection. Sigmoids observed in X-rays and UV, as well as the pattern (double J-shaped) of electric currents in the photosphere show clear evidence of the existence of currents parallel to the magnetic field and can be the signature of a flux rope that is detectable in CMEs. The magnetic helicity of filaments and active regions is an interesting indirectly measurable parameter because it can quantify the twist of the flux rope. On the other hand, the magnetic helicity of the solar structures allows us to associate solar eruptions and magnetic clouds in the heliosphere. The magnetic topology analysis based on the 3D magnetic field extrapolated from vector magnetograms is a good tool for identifying the reconnection locations (null points and/or the 3D large volumes - hyperbolic flux tube, HFT). Flares are associated more with quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) and HFTs than with a single null point, which is a relatively rare case. We review various mechanisms that have been proposed to trigger CMEs and their observable signatures: by "breaking" the field lines overlying the flux rope or by reconnection below the flux rope to reduce the magnetic tension, or by letting the flux rope to expand until it reaches a minimum threshold height (loss of equilibrium or torus instability). Additional mechanisms are commonly operating in the solar atmosphere. Examples of observations are presented throughout the article and are discussed in this framework.

  3. Sejong Open Cluster Survey (SOS) - V. The Active Star Forming Region SH 2-255-257

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Beomdu; Sung, Hwankyung; Hur, Hyeonoh; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Bessell, Michael S.; Kim, Jinyoung S.; Lee, Kang Hwan; Park, Byeong-Gon; Jeong, Gwanghui

    2015-12-01

    There is much observational evidence that active star formation is taking place in the H II regions Sh 2-255-257. We present a photometric study of this star forming region (SFR) using imaging data obtained in passbands from the optical to the mid-infrared, in order to study the star formation process. A total of 218 members were identified using various selection criteria based on their observational properties. The SFR is reddened by at least E(B-V) = 0.8 mag, and the reddening law toward the region is normal (R_V = 3.1). From the zero-age main sequence fitting method it is confirmed that the SFR is 2.1 ± 0.3 kpc from the Sun. The median age of the identified members is estimated to be about 1.3 Myr from a comparison of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD) with stellar evolutionary models. The initial mass function (IMF) is derived from the HRD and the near-infrared (J, J-H) color-magnitude diagram. The slope of the IMF is about Γ = -1.6 ± 0.1, which is slightly steeper than that of the Salpeter/Kroupa IMF. It implies that low-mass star formation is dominant in the SFR. The sum of the masses of all the identified members provides the lower limit of the cluster mass (169 M_{⊙}). We also analyzed the spectral energy distribution (SED) of pre-main sequence stars using the SED fitting tool of Robitaille et al., and confirm that there is a significant discrepancy between stellar mass and age obtained from two different methods based on the SED fitting tool and the HRD.

  4. Imaging active faults in a region of distributed deformation from joint focal mechanism and hypocenter clustering: Application to western Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, S.; Lima, V.; Vales, D.; Carrilho, F.; Cesca, S.

    2015-12-01

    Mainland Portugal, on the SW edge of the European continent, is located directly north of the boundary between the Eurasian and Nubian plates. It lies in a region of slow lithospheric deformation, which has generated some of the largest earthquakes in Europe, both intraplate (mainland) and interplate (offshore). The seismicity of mainland Portugal and its adjacent offshore has been repeatedly classified as diffuse. We analyse the instrumental earthquake catalog for western Iberia, enriched with data from recent dense broadband deployments. We show that although the plate boundary south of Portugal is diffuse, in that deformation is accommodated along several distributed faults rather than along one long linear plate boundary, the seismicity itself is not diffuse. Rather, when located using high quality data, earthquakes collapse into well-defined clusters and lineations. We then present a new joint focal mechanism and hypocenter cluster algorithm that is able to extract coherent information between hypocenter locations and focal mechanisms. We apply the method to the Azores-western Mediterranean region, with emphasis on western Iberia. In addition to identifying well-known seismo-tectonic features, the joint clustering algorithm identifies eight new clusters of earthquakes with a good match between the directions of epicentre lineations and focal mechanism fault planes. These clusters may signal single active faults or wider fault zones accommodating a consistent type of faulting. Mainland Portugal is dominated by strike-slip faulting, consistent with the NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE oriented lineations. The region offshore SW Iberia displays clusters that are either predominantly strike-slip or reverse, indicating slip partitioning. This work shows that the study of low-magnitude earthquakes using dense seismic deployments is a powerful tool to study lithospheric deformation in slowly deforming regions, where high-magnitude earthquakes occur with long recurrence intervals.

  5. MC2: boosted AGN and star formation activity in CIZA J2242.8+5301, a massive post-merger cluster at z = 0.19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, David; Stroe, Andra; Dawson, William A.; Wittman, David; Jee, M. James; Röttgering, Huub; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brüggen, Marcus

    2015-06-01

    Cluster mergers may play a fundamental role in the formation and evolution of cluster galaxies. Stroe et al. revealed unexpected overdensities of candidate Hα emitters near the ˜1-Mpc-wide shock fronts of the massive (˜2 × 1015 M⊙) `Sausage' merging cluster, CIZA J2242.8+5301. We used the Keck/Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph and the William Herschel Telescope/AutoFib2+WYFFOS to confirm 83 Hα emitters in and around the merging cluster. We find that cluster star-forming galaxies in the hottest X-ray gas and/or in the cluster subcores (away from the shock fronts) show high [S II]6716/[S II]6761 and high [S II] 6716/Hα, implying very low electron densities (<30 × lower than all other star-forming galaxies outside the cluster) and/or significant contribution from supernovae, respectively. All cluster star-forming galaxies near the cluster centre show evidence of significant outflows (blueshifted Na D ˜200-300 km s-1), likely driven by supernovae. Strong outflows are also found for the clusteractive galactic nucleus (AGN). Hα star-forming galaxies in the merging cluster follow the z ˜ 0 mass-metallicity relation, showing systematically higher metallicity (˜0.15-0.2 dex) than Hα emitters outside the cluster (projected R > 2.5 Mpc). This suggests that the shock front may have triggered remaining metal-rich gas which galaxies were able to retain into forming stars. Our observations show that the merger of impressively massive (˜1015 M⊙) clusters can provide the conditions for significant star formation and AGN activity, but, as we witness strong feedback by star-forming galaxies and AGN (and given how massive the merging cluster is), such sources will likely quench in a few 100 Myr.

  6. [Continuing medical education (CME) in neurology. Concept of the German Society of Neurology (DGN) and the Neurology Section of the Professional League of German Neurologic Medicine (BVDN)].

    PubMed

    Reuther, P; Diener, H C; Franz, P; Hacke, W; Hofmann, W; Hopf, H C; Jungmann, F; Wiethölter, H

    1999-10-01

    Continuous medical education in Neurology (CME-Neurology) has been promoted in a concept organized by both the German society of neurology, German association for occupational interests of neurologists and psychiatrists). CME-Neurology has been started in January 1999 and is closely adapted to the CME guidelines of neurology section of UEMS and EFNS. The program shall serve to the maintenance and upgrading of knowledge skills and competence of postgraduate training in neurology.

  7. Alpha6beta4 integrin crosslinking induces EGFR clustering and promotes EGF-mediated Rho activation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gilcrease, Michael Z; Zhou, Xiao; Lu, Xiaolin; Woodward, Wendy A; Hall, Brian E; Morrissey, Phillip J

    2009-01-01

    Background The α6β4 integrin is overexpressed in the basal subtype of breast cancer and plays an important role in tumor cell motility and invasion. EGFR is also overexpressed in the basal subtype of breast cancer, and crosstalk between α6β4 integrin and EGFR appears to be important in tumor progression. Methods We evaluated the effects of α6β4 crosslinking on the distribution and function of EGFR in breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231. Receptor distribution was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and multispectral imaging flow cytometry, and ligand-mediated EGFR signaling was evaluated using Western blots and a Rho pull-down assay. Results Antibody-mediated crosslinking of α6β4 integrin was sufficient to induce cell-surface clustering of not only α6β4 but also EGFR in nonadherent cells. The induced clustering of EGFR was observed minimally after 5 min of integrin crosslinking but was more prominent after 15 min. EGFR clustering had minimal effect on the phosphorylation of Akt or Erk1,2 in response to EGF in suspended cells or in response to HB-EGF in adherent cells. However, EGFR clustering induced by crosslinking α6β4 had a marked effect on Rho activation in response to EGF. Conclusion Crosslinking α6β4 integrin in breast carcinoma cells induces EGFR clustering and preferentially promotes Rho activation in response to EGF. We hypothesize that this integrin-EGFR crosstalk may facilitate tumor cell cytoskeletal rearrangements important for tumor progression. PMID:19470173

  8. Intervention Effects on Adolescent Physical Activity in the Multicomponent SPACE Study: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Toftager, Mette; Christiansen, Lars B.; Ersbøll, Annette K.; Kristensen, Peter L.; Due, Pernille; Troelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background Multicomponent school-based interventions have the potential to reduce the age-related decline in adolescents' physical activity (PA), yet there is not consistent evidence to guide non-curricular and school environment interventions. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a multicomponent environmental school-based intervention, designed to reduce the age-related decline in PA among adolescents. Methods A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted with 7 intervention and 7 control schools. Baseline measurements were carried out in spring 2010 with 2 years of follow-up. A total of 1,348 students (11–13 years, in grade 5 and 6) enrolled in the study at baseline. The 14 schools included in the study were located in the Region of Southern Denmark. The intervention consisted of organizational and physical changes in the school environment with a total of 11 intervention components. The primary outcome measure was overall PA (cpm, counts per minute) and was supported by analyses of time spent in MVPA, and time spent sedentary. Furthermore, a secondary outcome measure was PA in school time and during recess. PA was measured using accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X). Results A total of 797 students completed the trial and had valid accelerometer data. No significant difference was found for overall PA with an adjusted difference of −19.1 cpm (95% CI: −93, 53) or for school time activity with an adjusted difference of 6 cpm (95% CI: −73, 85). A sensitivity analysis revealed a positive significant intervention effect of PA in recess with an adjusted difference of 95 cpm. Conclusions No evidence was found of the overall effect of a non-curricular multicomponent school-based intervention on PA among Danish adolescents. The intervention was positively associated with PA during school time and recess, however, with small estimates. Lack of effect on overall PA could be due to both program theory and different degrees of implementation

  9. The Blob Connection: Searching for Low Coronal Signatures of Solar Post-CME Blobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanche, Nicole E.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Webb, David F.

    2016-11-01

    Bright linear structures, thought to be indicators of a current sheet (CS), are often seen in Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) white-light data in the wake of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In a subset of these post-CME structures, relatively bright blobs are seen moving outward along the rays. These blobs have been interpreted as consequences of the plasmoid instability in the CS, and can help us to understand the dynamics of the reconnection. We examine several instances, taken largely from the SOHO/LASCO CME-rays Catalog, where these blobs are clearly visible in white-light data. Using radially filtered, difference, wavelet enhanced, and multiscale Gaussian normalized images to visually inspect Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data in multiple wavelengths, we look for signatures of material that correspond both temporally and spatially to the later appearance of the blobs in LASCO/C2. Constraints from measurements of the blobs allow us to predict the expected count rates in DN pixel‑1 s‑1 for each AIA channel. The resulting values would make the blobs bright enough to be detectable at 1.2 R ⊙. However, we do not see conclusive evidence for corresponding blobs in the AIA data in any of the events. We do the same calculation for the “cartwheel CME,” an event in which blobs were seen in X-rays, and find that our estimated count rates are close to those observed. We suggest several possibilities for the absence of the EUV blobs including the formation of the blob higher than the AIA field of view, blob coalescence, and overestimation of blob densities.

  10. AN INTERPRETATION OF GLE71 CONCURRENT CME-DRIVEN SHOCK WAVE

    SciTech Connect

    Firoz, Kazi A.; Rodríguez-Pacheco, J.; Zhang, Q. M.; Gan, W. Q.; Li, Y. P.; Moon, Y.-J.; Kudela, K.; Park, Y.-D.; Dorman, Lev I. E-mail: firoz.kazi@uah.es

    2014-08-01

    Particle accelerations in solar flares and CME-driven shocks can sometimes result in very high-energy particle events (≥1 GeV) that are known as ground level enhancements (GLEs). Recent studies on the first GLE event (GLE71 2012 May 17 01:50 UT) of solar cycle 24 suggested that CME-driven shock played a leading role in causing the event. To verify this claim, we have made an effort to interpret the GLE71 concurrent shock wave. For this, we have deduced the possible speed and height of the shock wave in terms of the frequency (MHz) of the solar radio type II burst and its drift rate (MHz min{sup –1}), and studied the temporal evolution of the particle intensity profiles at different heights of the solar corona. For a better perception of the particle acceleration in the shock, we have studied the solar radio type II burst with concurrent solar radio and electron fluxes. When the particle intensity profiles are necessarily shifted in time at ∼1 AU, it is found that the growth phases of the electron and cosmic ray intensity fluxes are strongly correlated (>0.91; ≥0.87) with the frequency drift rate of the type II burst, which is also consistent with the intensive particle accelerations at upper coronal heights (∼≥0.80 R {sub S} < 1.10 R {sub S}). Thus, we conclude that the CME-driven shock was possibly capable of producing the high-energy particle event. However, since the peaks of some flare components are found to be strongly associated with the fundamental phase of the type II burst, the preceding flare is supposed to contribute to the shock acceleration process.

  11. The efficacy of trivalent cyclic hexapeptides to induce lipid clustering in PG/PE membranes correlates with their antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Finger, Sebastian; Kerth, Andreas; Dathe, Margitta; Blume, Alfred

    2015-11-01

    Various models have been proposed for the sequence of events occurring after binding of specific antimicrobial peptides to lipid membranes. The lipid clustering model arose by the finding that antimicrobial peptides can induce a segregation of certain negatively charged lipids in lipid model membranes. Anionic lipid segregation by cationic peptides is initially an effect of charge interaction where the ratio of peptide and lipid charges is thought to be the decisive parameter in the peptide induced lipid demixing. However, the sequence of events following this initial lipid clustering is more complex and can lead to deactivation of membrane proteins involved in cell division or perturbation of lipid reorganization essential for cell division. In this study we used DSC and ITC techniques to investigate the effect of binding different cyclic hexapeptides with varying antimicrobial efficacy, to phosphatidylglycerol (PG)/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipid membranes and their ability to induce lipid segregation in these mixtures. We found that these cyclic hexapeptides consisting of three charged and three aromatic amino acids showed indeed different abilities to induce lipid demixing depending on their amino acid composition and their sequence. The results clearly showed that the cationic amino acids are essential for electrostatic binding but that the three hydrophobic amino acids in the peptides and their position in the sequence also contribute to binding affinity and to the extent of induction of lipid clustering. The efficacy of these different hexapeptides to induce PG clusters in PG/PE membranes was found to be correlated with their antimicrobial activity.

  12. Activation and Transformation of Ethane by Au2 VO3(+) Clusters with Closed-Shell Electronic Structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Ke; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Liu, Qing-Yu; Meng, Jing-Heng; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-01-26

    The study of chemical reactions between gold-containing heteronuclear oxide clusters and small molecules can provide molecular level mechanisms to understand the excellent activity of gold supported by metal oxides. While the promotion role of gold in alkane transformation was identified in the clusters with atomic oxygen radicals (O(-.)), the role of gold in the systems without O(-.) is not clear. By employing mass spectrometry and quantum chemistry calculations, the reactivity of Au2 VO3(+) clusters with closed-shell electronic structures toward ethane was explored. Both the dehydrogenation and ethene elimination channels were identified. It is gold rather than oxygen species initiating the C-H activation. The Au-Au dimer formed during the reactions plays important roles in ethane transformation. The reactivity comparison between Au2 VO3(+) and bare Au2(+) demonstrates that Au2 VO3(+) not only retains the property of bare Au2(+) that transforming ethane to dihydrogen, but also exhibits new functions in converting ethane to ethene, which reveals the importance of the composite system. This study provides a further understanding of the reactivity of metal oxide supported gold in alkane activation and transformation. PMID:26679978

  13. Synthesis and SAR requirements of adamantane-colchicine conjugates with both microtubule depolymerizing and tubulin clustering activities.

    PubMed

    Zefirova, Olga N; Nurieva, Evgeniya V; Shishov, Dmitrii V; Baskin, Igor I; Fuchs, Fabian; Lemcke, Heiko; Schröder, Fabian; Weiss, Dieter G; Zefirov, Nikolay S; Kuznetsov, Sergei A

    2011-09-15

    A series of analogues of conjugate 1, combining an adamantane-based paclitaxel (taxol) mimetic with colchicine was synthesized and tested for cytotoxicity in a cell-based assay with the human lung carcinoma cell line A549. The most active compounds (10 EC(50) 2 ± 1.0 nM, 23 EC(50) 6 ± 1.4 nM, 26 EC(50) 5 ± 1.8 nM, 28 EC(50) 11 ± 1.7 nM, 30 EC(50) 4.8 ± 0.5 nM) were found to interfere with the microtubule dynamics in an interesting manner. Treatment of the cells with these compounds promoted disassembly of microtubules followed by the formation of stable tubulin clusters. Structure-activity relationships for the analogues of 23 revealed the sensitivity of both cytotoxicity and tubulin clustering ability to the linker length. The presence of adamantane (or another bulky hydrophobic and non-aromatic moiety) in 23 was found to play an important role in the formation of tubulin clusters. Structural requirements for optimal activity have been partially explained by molecular modeling. PMID:21873068

  14. Prediction system of the 1-AU arrival times of CME-associated interplanetary shocks using three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den, Mitsue; Amo, Hiroyoshi; Sugihara, Kohta; Takei, Toshifumi; Ogawa, Tomoya; Tanaka, Takashi; Watari, Shinichi

    We describe prediction system of the 1-AU arrival times of interplanetary shock waves associated with coromal mass ejections (CMEs). The system is based on modeling of the shock propagation using a three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code. Once a CME is observed by LASCO/SOHO, firstly ambient solar wind is obtained by numerical simulation, which reproduces the solar wind parameters at that time observed by ACE spacecraft. Then we input the expansion speed and occurrence position data of that CME as initial condtions for an CME model, and 3D simulation of the CME and the shock propagation is perfomed until the shock wave passes the 1-AU. Input the parameters, execution of simulation and output of the result are available on Web, so a person who is not familiar with operation of computer or simulations or is not a researcher can use this system to predict the shock passage time. Simulated CME and shock evolution is visuallized at the same time with simulation and snap shots appear on the web automatically, so that user can follow the propagation. This system is expected to be useful for forecasters of space weather. We will describe the system and simulation model in detail.

  15. On the effect of the initial magnetic polarity and of the background wind on the evolution of CME shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chané, E.; Jacobs, C.; van der Holst, B.; Poedts, S.; Kimpe, D.

    2005-03-01

    The shocks and magnetic clouds caused by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in the solar corona and interplanetary (IP) space play an important role in the study of space weather. In the present paper, numerical simulations of some simple CME models were performed by means of a finite volume, explicit solver to advance the equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The aim is to quantify here both the effect of the background wind model and of the initial polarity on the evolution of the IP CMEs and the corresponding shocks. To simulate the CMEs, a high density-pressure plasma blob is superposed on different steady state solar wind models. The evolution of an initially non-magnetized plasma blob is compared with that of two magnetized ones (with both normal and inverse polarity) and the differences are analysed and quantified. Depending on the launch angle of the CME and the polarity of the initial flux rope, the velocity of the shock front and magnetic cloud is decreased or increased. Also the spread angle of the CME and the evolution path of the CME in the background solar wind is substantially different for the different CME models and the different wind models. A quantitative comparison of these simulations shows that these effects can be quite substantial and can clearly affect the geo-effectiveness and the arrival time of the events.

  16. The CME Rate over Four Solar Cycles: Filling the Final Gap with MLSO MK3 Observations [1989-1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Cyr, O. C.; Flint, Q.; Quirk, C. A.; Burkepile, J.; Webb, D. F.; Lecinski, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were discovered in the early 1970's by the OSO-7 coronagraph, and large numbers were characterized for the first time by the Skylab ATM coronagraph. Since 1973 there has been only a single major gap in CME coverage in white light. Instruments that have contributed to estimates of the rate and properties of CMEs have included: Skylab ATM (1973-1974); Helios photometers (1974-1981); Solwind (1979-1985); SMM C/P (1980; 1984-1989); SOHO LASCO (1996-present); the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI, 2003-2011); and STEREO SECCHI (2006-present). We report here the first attempt to fill the 1989-1996 gap in the CME rate using the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory's MK3 K-coronameter. The MK3 instrument observed routinely several hours most days beginning in 1980 until it was upgraded to MK4 in 1998. MK3 CMEs detected from 1980-1989 were compared with Solwind and SMM and reported by St. Cyr et al. (1999). Since spaceborne instruments have more complete duty cycles than a groundbased instrument at a single location, we have 'calibrated' the MK3-derived CME rate from 1989 with the SMM C/P coronagraph, and from 1996 with the SOHO LASCO coronagraphs. CME rate calculations have been documented in Webb & Howard (1994), St. Cyr et al. (2000) and Robbrecht et al. (2009). Here we provide the preliminary CME rate calculation for 1989-1996 using the MLSO MK3 coronameter.

  17. Comparison of the WSA-ENLIL model with three CME cone types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Soojeong; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2013-07-01

    We have made a comparison of the CME-associated shock propagation based on the WSA-ENLIL model with three cone types using 29 halo CMEs from 2001 to 2002. These halo CMEs have cone model parameters as well as their associated interplanetary (IP) shocks. For this study we consider three different cone types (an asymmetric cone model, an ice-cream cone model and an elliptical cone model) to determine 3-D CME parameters (radial velocity, angular width and source location), which are the input values of the WSA-ENLIL model. The mean absolute error (MAE) of the arrival times for the asymmetric cone model is 10.6 hours, which is about 1 hour smaller than those of the other models. Their ensemble average of MAE is 9.5 hours. However, this value is still larger than that (8.7 hours) of the empirical model of Kim et al. (2007). We will compare their IP shock velocities and densities with those from ACE in-situ measurements and discuss them in terms of the prediction of geomagnetic storms.Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): We have made a comparison of the CME-associated shock propagation based on the WSA-ENLIL model with three cone types using 29 halo CMEs from 2001 to 2002. These halo CMEs have cone model parameters as well as their associated interplanetary (IP) shocks. For this study we consider three different cone types (an asymmetric cone model, an ice-cream cone model and an elliptical cone model) to determine 3-D CME parameters (radial velocity, angular width and source location), which are the input values of the WSA-ENLIL model. The mean absolute error (MAE) of the arrival times for the asymmetric cone model is 10.6 hours, which is about 1 hour smaller than those of the other models. Their ensemble average of MAE is 9.5 hours. However, this value is still larger than that (8.7 hours) of the empirical model of Kim et al. (2007). We will compare their IP shock velocities and densities with those from ACE in-situ measurements and discuss them in terms of the

  18. The Driving Magnetic Field and Reconnection in CME/Flare Eruptions and Coronal Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    Signatures of reconnection in major CME (coronal mass ejection)/flare eruptions and in coronal X-ray jets are illustrated and interpreted. The signatures are magnetic field lines and their feet that brighten in flare emission. CME/flare eruptions are magnetic explosions in which: 1. The field that erupts is initially a closed arcade. 2. At eruption onset, most of the free magnetic energy to be released is not stored in field bracketing a current sheet, but in sheared field in the core of the arcade. 3. The sheared core field erupts by a process that from its start or soon after involves fast "tether-cutting" reconnection at an initially small current sheet low in the sheared core field. If the arcade has oppositely-directed field over it, the eruption process from its start or soon after also involves fast "breakout" reconnection at an initially small current sheet between the arcade and the overarching field. These aspects are shown by the small area of the bright field lines and foot-point flare ribbons in the onset of the eruption. 4. At either small current sheet, the fast reconnection progressively unleashes the erupting core field to erupt with progressively greater force. In turn, the erupting core field drives the current sheet to become progressively larger and to undergo progressively greater fast reconnection in the explosive phase of the eruption, and the flare arcade and ribbons grow to become comparable to the pre-eruption arcade in lateral extent. In coronal X-ray jets: 1. The magnetic energy released in the jet is built up by the emergence of a magnetic arcade into surrounding unipolar "open" field. 2. A simple jet is produced when a burst of reconnection occurs at the current sheet between the arcade and the open field. This produces a bright reconnection jet and a bright reconnection arcade that are both much smaller in diameter that the driving arcade. 3. A more complex jet is produced when the arcade has a sheared core field and undergoes an

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of interplanetary propagation of multiple coronal mass ejections with internal magnetic flux rope (SUSANOO-CME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, D.; Kataoka, R.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most important drivers of various types of space weather disturbance. Here we report a newly developed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the solar wind, including a series of multiple CMEs with internal spheromak-type magnetic fields. First, the polarity of the spheromak magnetic field is set as determined automatically according to the Hale-Nicholson law and the chirality law of Bothmer and Schwenn. The MHD simulation is therefore capable of predicting the time profile of the southward interplanetary magnetic field at the Earth, in relation to the passage of a magnetic cloud within a CME. This profile is the most important parameter for space weather forecasts of magnetic storms. In order to evaluate the current ability of our simulation, we demonstrate a test case: the propagation and interaction process of multiple CMEs associated with the highly complex active region NOAA 10486 in October to November 2003, and present the result of a simulation of the solar wind parameters at the Earth during the 2003 Halloween storms. We succeeded in reproducing the arrival at the Earth's position of a large amount of southward magnetic flux, which is capable of causing an intense magnetic storm. We find that the observed complex time profile of the solar wind parameters at the Earth could be reasonably well understood by the interaction of a few specific CMEs.

  20. Costimulation with anti-cluster of differentiation 3 and anti-cluster of differentiation 28 reduces the activity of mucin 1-stimulated human mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    WRIGHT, STEPHEN E.; REWERS-FELKINS, KATHLEEN A.; QUINLIN, IMELDA; ZOHRA, FATEMA; AHMED, JEWEL

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activation and extension of the cell life span is necessary in order to enable immunotherapy to perform effectively against cancer. In the present study, mucin 1 (MUC1)-stimulated human mononuclear cells (M1SHMCs) were costimulated with bead-attached monoclonal antibodies specific for cluster of differentiation (CD)3 and CD28 receptors. The study was undertaken to determine whether costimulation was capable of enhancing the killing of cancer cells in vitro and of protecting non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mice from tumor development. Lysis of MCF-7 tumor cells by M1SHMCs was reduced following costimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28. Furthermore, costimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 eliminated the protective effects of M1SHMCs on MCF-7 breast cancer cell growth in the non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mice. The present study suggested that costimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 is not advisable following antigen activation of lymphocytes under the conditions used here. Using a lower anti-CD3/CD28 bead to T-cell ratio may prevent immune suppression, however, further studies are required to support this hypothesis. PMID:26870234

  1. Destabilization of a Solar Prominence/Filament Field System by a Series of Eight Homologous Eruptive Flares Leading to a CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Innes, Davina E.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2015-09-01

    Homologous flares are flares that occur repetitively in the same active region, with similar structure and morphology. A series of at least eight homologous flares occurred in active region NOAA 11237 over 2011 June 16-17. A nearby prominence/filament was rooted in the active region, and situated near the bottom of a coronal cavity. The active region was on the southeast solar limb as seen from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, and on the disk as viewed from the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory/EUVI-B. The dual perspective allows us to study in detail behavior of the prominence/filament material entrained in the magnetic field of the repeatedly erupting system. Each of the eruptions were mainly confined, but expelled hot material into the prominence/filament cavity system (PFCS). The field carrying and containing the ejected hot material interacted with the PFCS and caused it to inflate, resulting in a step-wise rise of the PFCS approximately in step with the homologous eruptions. The eighth eruption triggered the PFCS to move outward slowly, accompanied by a weak coronal dimming. As this slow PFCS eruption was underway, a final “ejective” flare occurred in the core of the active region, resulting in strong dimming in the EUVI-B images and expulsion of a coronal mass ejection (CME). A plausible scenario is that the repeated homologous flares could have gradually destabilized the PFCS, and its subsequent eruption removed field above the acitive region and in turn led to the ejective flare, strong dimming, and CME.

  2. Activity-dependent regulation of the K/Cl transporter KCC2 membrane diffusion, clustering, and function in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Chamma, Ingrid; Heubl, Martin; Chevy, Quentin; Renner, Marianne; Moutkine, Imane; Eugène, Emmanuel; Poncer, Jean Christophe; Lévi, Sabine

    2013-09-25

    The neuronal K/Cl transporter KCC2 exports chloride ions and thereby influences the efficacy and polarity of GABA signaling in the brain. KCC2 is also critical for dendritic spine morphogenesis and the maintenance of glutamatergic transmission in cortical neurons. Because KCC2 plays a pivotal role in the function of central synapses, it is of particular importance to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying its regulation. Here, we studied the impact of membrane diffusion and clustering on KCC2 function. KCC2 forms clusters in the vicinity of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Using quantum-dot-based single-particle tracking on rat primary hippocampal neurons, we show that KCC2 is slowed down and confined at excitatory and inhibitory synapses compared with extrasynaptic regions. However, KCC2 escapes inhibitory synapses faster than excitatory synapses, reflecting stronger molecular constraints at the latter. Interfering with KCC2-actin interactions or inhibiting F-actin polymerization releases diffusion constraints on KCC2 at excitatory but not inhibitory synapses. Thus, F-actin constrains KCC2 diffusion at excitatory synapses, whereas KCC2 is confined at inhibitory synapses by a distinct mechanism. Finally, increased neuronal activity rapidly increases the diffusion coefficient and decreases the dwell time of KCC2 at excitatory synapses. This effect involves NMDAR activation, Ca(2+) influx, KCC2 S940 dephosphorylation and calpain protease cleavage of KCC2 and is accompanied by reduced KCC2 clustering and ion transport function. Thus, activity-dependent regulation of KCC2 lateral diffusion and clustering allows for a rapid regulation of chloride homeostasis in neurons.

  3. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate triggers activation of focal adhesion kinase by inducing clustering and conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Goñi, Guillermina M.; Epifano, Carolina; Boskovic, Jasminka; Camacho-Artacho, Marta; Zhou, Jing; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Martín, M. Teresa; Eck, Michael J.; Kremer, Leonor; Gräter, Frauke; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Lietha, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) with key roles in integrating growth and cell matrix adhesion signals, and FAK is a major driver of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Cell adhesion via integrin receptors is well known to trigger FAK signaling, and many of the players involved are known; however, mechanistically, FAK activation is not understood. Here, using a multidisciplinary approach, including biochemical, biophysical, structural, computational, and cell biology approaches, we provide a detailed view of a multistep activation mechanism of FAK initiated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Interestingly, the mechanism differs from canonical NRTK activation and is tailored to the dual catalytic and scaffolding function of FAK. We find PI(4,5)P2 induces clustering of FAK on the lipid bilayer by binding a basic region in the regulatory 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin homology (FERM) domain. In these clusters, PI(4,5)P2 induces a partially open FAK conformation where the autophosphorylation site is exposed, facilitating efficient autophosphorylation and subsequent Src recruitment. However, PI(4,5)P2 does not release autoinhibitory interactions; rather, Src phosphorylation of the activation loop in FAK results in release of the FERM/kinase tether and full catalytic activation. We propose that PI(4,5)P2 and its generation in focal adhesions by the enzyme phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase type Iγ are important in linking integrin signaling to FAK activation. PMID:25049397

  4. Modeling clustered activity increase in amyloid-beta positron emission tomographic images with statistical descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; Rogers, Baxter P; Kang, Hakmook; Ding, Zhaohua; Claassen, Daniel O; Mckay, John W; Riddle, William R

    2015-01-01

    Background Amyloid-beta (Aβ) imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) holds promise for detecting the presence of Aβ plaques in the cortical gray matter. Many image analyses focus on regional average measurements of tracer activity distribution; however, considerable additional information is available in the images. Metrics that describe the statistical properties of images, such as the two-point correlation function (S2), have found wide applications in astronomy and materials science. S2 provides a detailed characterization of spatial patterns in images typically referred to as clustering or flocculence. The objective of this study was to translate the two-point correlation method into Aβ-PET of the human brain using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB) to characterize longitudinal changes in the tracer distribution that may reflect changes in Aβ plaque accumulation. Methods We modified the conventional S2 metric, which is primarily used for binary images and formulated a weighted two-point correlation function (wS2) to describe nonbinary, real-valued PET images with a single statistical function. Using serial 11C-PiB scans, we calculated wS2 functions from two-dimensional PET images of different cortical regions as well as three-dimensional data from the whole brain. The area under the wS2 functions was calculated and compared with the mean/median of the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR). For three-dimensional data, we compared the area under the wS2 curves with the subjects’ cerebrospinal fluid measures. Results Overall, the longitudinal changes in wS2 correlated with the increase in mean SUVR but showed lower variance. The whole brain results showed a higher inverse correlation between the cerebrospinal Aβ and wS2 than between the cerebrospinal Aβ and SUVR mean/median. We did not observe any confounding of wS2 by region size or injected dose. Conclusion The wS2 detects subtle changes and provides additional information about the binding

  5. Near infrared emission from molecule-like silver clusters confined in zeolite A assisted by thermal activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hui Imakita, Kenji; Rong Gui, Sa Chu; Fujii, Minoru

    2014-07-07

    Strong and broad near infrared (NIR) emission peaked at ~855 nm upon optimal excitation at 342 nm has been observed from molecule-like silver clusters (MLSCs) confined in zeolite A assisted by thermal activation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first observation of NIR emission peaked at longer than 800 nm from MLSCs confined in solid matrices. The decay time of the NIR emission is over 10 μs, which indicates that it is a spin-forbidden transition. The ~855 nm NIR emission shows strong dependence on the silver loading concentration and the thermal activation temperature.

  6. Advancing Water and Water-Energy-Food Cluster Activities within Future Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawford, R. G.; Bhaduri, A.; Pahl-Wostl, C.

    2014-12-01

    In building its emerging program, Future Earth has encouraged former Earth System Science Partnership (ESSP) projects to redefine their objectives, priorities and problem approaches so they are aligned with those of Future Earth. These new projects will be characterized by more integrated applications of natural and social sciences as well as dialogue and science integrated across disciplinary boundaries to address a wide range of environmental and social issues. The Global Water System Project (GWSP) has had a heritage of integrating natural and social sciences, and recently started to also look at issues within the Water-Energy-Food (WEF) cluster using similar integrated approaches. As part of the growth of the scientific elements of this cluster, GWSP has approached Future Earth opportunities by addressing the sustainability for Water, Energy, and Food through integrated water information and improved governance.In this presentation the approaches being considered for promoting integration in both water and the WEF cluster will be discussed. In particular, potential contributions of Future Earth to research related to the use and management of water and to issues and science underpinning the W-E-F nexus deliberations will be identified. In both cases the increasing ability to utilize Earth observations and big data will advance this research agenda. In addition, the better understanding of the implications of governance structures in addressing these issues and the options for harmonizing the use of scientific knowledge and technological advances will be explored. For example, insights gained from water management studies undertaken within the GWSP are helping to focus plans for a "sustainable water futures" project and a WEF cluster within Future Earth. The potential role of the Sustainable Development Goals in bringing together the monitoring and science capabilities, and understanding of governance approaches, will be discussed as a framework for facilitating

  7. Large-scale clustering of broad-line Active Galactic Nuclei at low redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumpe, Mirko; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Coil, Alison; Husemann, Bernd; Fanidakis, Nikolaos; Aceves, Hector

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade, large area surveys (e.g., SDSS, 2dF, XMM-COSMOS) significantly improved AGN clustering measurements, which now provide tight constraints on the mass of the hosting dark matter halos (as a function of AGN luminosity, type, and redshift), the environment in which super massive black hole accretion takes place, and the co-evolution of galaxies and AGN.I will report on a series of papers in which we study the large-scale clustering of broad-line optical and X-ray AGN through cross-correlation measurements with SDSS galaxies. With three independent measurements, we cover a redshift range of z=0.07-0.50. We find an X-ray luminosity dependence in the clustering amplitude of X-ray selected broad-line AGN. X-ray and optically selected broad-line AGN do not show significant differences in the clustering strengths at low redshifts. We apply Halo Occupation Distribution modeling and determined constraints on the distribution of AGN among dark matter halos as a function of their mass. At z~0.3, the AGN fraction decreases with increasing DMH mass. I will also present our newest results on the origin of the X-ray luminosity dependence of broad-line AGN clustering. The mass of supermassive black holes drives the dependence, while no dependence on L/L_EDD is found. Thus, more massive black holes reside in more massive dark matter halos. We also compare our results to state-of-the-art cosmological simulations and find good agreement.

  8. Plasma properties from the multi-wavelength analysis of the November 1st 2003 CME/shock event

    PubMed Central

    Benna, Carlo; Mancuso, Salvatore; Giordano, Silvio; Gioannini, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of the spectral properties and dynamic evolution of a CME/shock event observed on November 1st 2003 in white-light by the LASCO coronagraph and in the ultraviolet by the UVCS instrument operating aboard SOHO, has been performed to compute the properties of some important plasma parameters in the middle corona below about 2R⊙. Simultaneous observations obtained with the MLSO/Mk4 white-light coronagraph, providing both the early evolution of the CME expansion in the corona and the pre-shock electron density profile along the CME front, were also used to study this event. By combining the above information with the analysis of the metric type II radio emission detected by ground-based radio spectrographs, we finally derive estimates of the values of the local Alfvén speed and magnetic field strength in the solar corona. PMID:25685432

  9. GRB2 Nucleates T Cell Receptor-Mediated LAT Clusters That Control PLC-γ1 Activation and Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Mahmood Yousif; Houtman, Jon C D

    2015-01-01

    GRB2 is a ubiquitously expressed adaptor protein required for signaling downstream of multiple receptors. To address the role of GRB2 in receptor-mediated signaling, the expression of GRB2 was suppressed in human CD4+ T cells and its role downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) was examined. Interestingly, GRB2 deficient T cells had enhanced signaling from complexes containing the TCR. However, GRB2 deficient T cells had substantially reduced production of IL-2 and IFN-γ. This defect was attributed to diminished formation of linker for activation of T cells (LAT) signaling clusters, which resulted in reduced MAP kinase activation, calcium flux, and PLC-γ1 recruitment to LAT signaling clusters. Add back of wild-type GRB2, but not a novel N-terminal SH3 domain mutant, rescued LAT microcluster formation, calcium mobilization, and cytokine release, providing the first direct evidence that GRB2, and its ability to bind to SH3 domain ligands, is required for establishing LAT microclusters. Our data demonstrate that the ability of GRB2 to facilitate protein clusters is equally important in regulating TCR-mediated functions as its capacity to recruit effector proteins. This highlights that GRB2 regulates signaling downstream of adaptors and receptors by both recruiting effector proteins and regulating the formation of signaling complexes.

  10. Comparison of CME and CIR driven geomagnetic storms using the artificial neural network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revallo, Milos; Valach, Fridrich; Hejda, Pavel; Bochnicek, Josef

    2016-04-01

    A model of geomagnetic storms based on the method of artificial neural networks (ANN) combined with an analytical approach is presented in the paper. Unlike our previous studies, here we focus on medium and weak geomagnetic storms caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and those caused by corotating interaction regions (CIRs). As the model input, the hourly solar wind parameters measured by the ACE satellite at the libration point L1 are used. The time series of the Dst index is obtained as the model output. The simulated Dst index series is compared with the corresponding observatory data. The resulting Dst index series are inspected and typical features of CME and CIR driven storms are isolated. The model reliabilty is assessed using the skill scores, namely the correlation coefficient CC and the prediction efficiency PE. The general observation is that in the case of medium and weak geomagnetic storms the model performance is worse than in the case of intense geomagnetic storms studied in our previous paper. Due to more complex Dst index record, the model response for CIR driven storms is worse than in the case of CME driven storms.

  11. What can we learn about CME evolution from multi-point observations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.

    2013-05-01

    Knowing about Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagation is critical for developing a reliable Space Weather forecast capability. Multi-spacecraft observations of CME/ICMEs are critical sources of information about the CME initiation and evolution from the Sun throughout the heliosphere. However, these investigations have been undertaken from two, quite separate points of view; namely, remote sensing and in-situ observations. In the recent years, there have been multiple efforts to provide a unique interpretation using remote and in-situ observations, mainly because of the availability of heliospheric imaging. However, a comprehensive and coordinated analysis of the multi-view point data, using different techniques and models, is still far of being completely understood. In this presentation, we will review the advances obtained thus far and demonstrate the discrepancies still larking between these two points of view using a thorough analysis of imaging and in-situ observations at many inner heliospheric locations. We use a combination of remote (SOHO, STEREO, SDO) and in-situ (Wind, ACE, MESSENGER) observations to show the potential of this approach to shed light into the dynamical interaction of CMEs with the solar wind during their propagation and development through the interplanetary medium.

  12. Imaging of a radio type II burst relative to the CME shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krucker, S.; Dauphin, C.; Vilmer, N. R.

    2006-05-01

    Radio type II emission is thought to be produced by energetic electrons that are accelerated at shocks in the solar corona and in interplanetary space. Simultaneous imaging observations of both, the radio emission and the shock, are rare, especially in the lower corona. Here, we present imaging observations in radio waves and soft X-rays of a type II burst that occurred on November 3, 2003 during a GOES X3 flare. The radio type II burst starts at an unusally high frequency (600 MHz) and can therefore be imaged with the Nancay radio heliograph. Simultaneous soft X-ray observations provided by GOES SXI show a faint, fast moving (~800 km/s) loop-like emission in the lower corona (0.1-0.3 solar radius above the photosphere) that spatially and temporally correlates with the Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) later seen in white-light with SOHO/LASCO. Therefore, the observed SXR front is most likely emitted when the CME shock is in the lower corona. The radio type II emission is observed to occur infront of the SXR emission and is only seen from a single location, but not all along the shock front.

  13. Solar Source and CME Properties of Solar Cycle 23 Ground Level Enhancement Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Xie, H.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Makela, P.; Usoskin, I.

    2010-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 witnessed the most complete set of observations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) associated with the Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) events. GLE events are extreme cases of solar energetic particle (SEP) events in that the energetic particles penetrate Earth's neutral atmosphere to be detected by neutron monitors. In this paper we present the CME and their source properties that seem to be equally extreme. These observations are consistent with the idea that the GLE particles are accelerated in the same way as the regular SEP events by CME-driven shocks. While we cannot rule out the possibility of the presence of a flare component during GLE events, we can definitely say that a shock component is present in all the GLE events. We provide additional information on the GLE-associated type II radio bursts, complex type III radio bursts, and soft X-ray flares, which are not very different from those associated with large SEP events. Finally we compare the properties of GLEassociated CMEs in cycle 23 with those in cycle 22.

  14. The Divergence of CME and Sunspot Number Rates During Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David F.; St. Cyr, Orville Chris; Xie, Hong; Kuchar, Thomas Andrew

    2014-06-01

    In the previous three solar cycles the frequency of occurrence of CMEs observed in white light has closely tracked the solar cycle in both phase and amplitude, varying by an order of magnitude over the cycle. LASCO has now observed the entire solar Cycle 23 and continues to observe through the current rise and maximum phases of Cycle 24. Cycle 23 had an unusually long decline and extended minimum. During this period we have been able to image and count CMEs in the heliosphere, and can determine rates from both LASCO and STEREO SECCHI (since 2007) coronagraphs and from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI - since 2003) and the SECCHI Heliospheric Imagers in the heliosphere. Manual rates estimated by observers are now supplemented by counts from identifications made by automatic programs, such as contained in the SEEDS, CACTus and ARTEMIS catalogs. Since the cycle 23/24 minimum, the CME and sunspot number rates have diverged, with similar cycle 23/24 rise and peak CME rates but much lower SSN rates in this cycle. We will discuss these rate estimates and their implications for the evolution of the global solar magnetic field.

  15. Ion acceleration at CME-driven shocks near the Earth and the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Mihir; Dayeh, Maher; Ebert, Robert; Smith, Charles; Mason, Glenn; Li, G.

    2012-11-20

    We compare the behavior of heavy ion spectra during an Energetic Storm Particle (ESP) event that exhibited clear evidence of wave excitation with that observed during an intense, large gradual Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) event in which the associated <0.2 MeV/nucleon ions are delayed >12 hr. We interpret that the ESP event is an example of the first-order Fermi acceleration process where enhancements in the magnetic field power spectral densities around local ion cyclotron frequency {nu}{sub pc} indicate the presence of Alfven waves excited by accelerated protons streaming away from the in-situ interplanetary shock. The softening or unfolding of the CNO energy spectrum below {approx}200 keV/nucleon and the systematic organization of the Fe and O spectral roll-overs with the E/q ratio during the ESP event are likely due to M/Q-dependent trapping and scattering of the heavy ions by the proton-excited waves. Based on striking similarities in the spectral behavior observed upstream of both, the ESP and the SEP event, we suggest that coupling between proton-generated Alfven waves and energetic ions is also operating at the distant CME shock during the large, gradual SEP event, thereby providing us with a new, powerful tool to remotely probe the roles of shock geometries and wave-particle interactions at near-Sun CME-driven shocks.

  16. Evaluation of standoff distance method to determine the coronal magnetic field using CME-driven shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, K.; Shanmugaraju, A.; Syed Ibrahim, M.

    2016-11-01

    We have analyzed the propagation characteristics of four limb coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with their shocks. These CMEs were observed in 18 frames up to 18 solar radii using LASCO white light images. Gopalswamy and Yashiro (Astrophys. J. 736:L17, 2011) introduced the standoff distance method (SOD) to find the magnetic field in the corona using CME-driven shock. In this paper, we have used this technique to determine the magnetic field strength and to study the propagation/shock formation condition of these CMEs at 18 different locations. Since the thickness of shock sheath (standoff distance or SOD) is not constant around CME, we estimate the shock parameters and their variation in large and small SOD regions of the shock. The Mach number ranges from 1.7 to 2.8 and Alfvén speed varies from 197 to 857 km s^{-1}. Finally, we estimate the magnetic field variation in the corona. The magnetic field strength ranges from 4.9 to 26.2 mG from 8.3 to 17.5 solar radii. The estimated magnetic field strength in this study is consistent with the literature value (7.6 to 45.8 mG from Gopalswamy and Yashiro (Astrophys. J. 736:L17, 2011), and 6 to 105 mG from Kim et al. (Astrophys. J. 746:118, 2012)) and it smoothly follows the general coronal magnetic field profile.

  17. Kinetic Reconnection Simulations for CME Initiation Driven by Velocity-Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; Karpen, J.; DeVore, C. R.; Germaschewski, K.

    2012-12-01

    In the standard model for coronal mass ejections (CME) and/or solar flares, the free energy for the event resides in the strongly sheared magnetic field of a filament channel. The pre-eruption force balance consists of an upward force due to the magnetic pressure of the sheared field balanced by a downward tension due to overlying unsheared field. Magnetic reconnection is widely believed to be the mechanism that disrupts this force balance, leading to explosive eruption. For understanding CME/flare initiation, therefore, it is critical to model the onset or reconnection that is driven by the buildup of magnetic shear. In MHD simulations, the application of a magnetic field shear is a trivial matter. However, kinetic effects are important in the diffusion region and thus, it is important to examine this process with PIC simulations as well. The implementation of such a driver in PIC methods is nontrivial. The field must be sheared self-consistently/ indirectly to prevent the generation of waves that destroy the desired system. In the work presented here, we discuss methods for applying a velocity shear perpendicular to the plane of reconnection for a nonperiodic system. We also discuss the implementation of boundary conditions that are open to electric currents that flow through the system boundary. C.B. is supported through an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program at GSFC, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA.

  18. Multi-Wavelength Observations of an Unusual Impulsive Flare Associated with Cme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Wahab; Jain, Rajmal; Yoshimura, Keiji; Chandra, Ramesh; Sakao, T.; Kosugi, T.; Joshi, Anita; Despande, M. R.

    2004-12-01

    We present the results of a detailed analysis of multi-wavelength observations of a very impulsive solar flare 1B/M6.7, which occurred on 10 March, 2001 in NOAA AR 9368 (N27 W42). The observations show that the flare is very impulsive with a very hard spectrum in HXR that reveal that non-thermal emission was most dominant. On the other hand, this flare also produced a type II radio burst and coronal mass ejections (CME), which are not general characteristics for impulsive flares. In Hα we observed bright mass ejecta (BME) followed by dark mass ejecta (DME). Based on the consistency of the onset times and directions of BME and CME, we conclude that these two phenomena are closely associated. It is inferred that the energy build-up took place due to photospheric reconnection between emerging positive parasitic polarity and predominant negative polarity, which resulted as a consequence of flux cancellation. The shear increased to >80° due to further emergence of positive parasitic polarity causing strongly enhanced cancellation of flux. It appears that such enhanced magnetic flux cancellation in a strongly sheared region triggered the impulsive flare.

  19. The Geo-Effectiveness of CME-Driven Shocks and Sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaz, Noé; Al-haddad, Nada; Schwadron, Nathan; Riley, Pete; Farrugia, Charles; Winslow, Reka

    2016-07-01

    Past studies have found that ˜30% of intense geomagnetic storms and ˜20% of moderate geomagnetic storms are caused by forward fast magnetosonic shocks and the sheath plasma and magnetic field behind these shocks, making shocks the second most important cause of geomagnetic storms after magnetic ejecta. Since only about 20% of fast-mode shocks are followed by a moderate geomagnetic storm, it is important to understand which shock and upstream properties are most effective in creating optimal conditions for the development of geomagnetic storms. To do so, we identify all fast-mode forwards shocks (˜100), for which the sheath region resulted in a moderate or intense geomagnetic storm during solar cycles 23 and 24 (1997 - 2015). We find that about half such shocks are shocks propagating into a preceding CME or shocks propagating into the sheath region of a preceding shock. Overall, only a small fraction of shocks propagating through normal solar wind are geo-effective (less than 15%), whereas the majority of shocks propagating through a previous CME are geo-effective. We further discuss the conditions which can result in the formation of southward Bz in the sheath region behind a shock.

  20. PROPAGATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE JUNE 1st 2008 CME IN THE INTERPLANETARY MEDIUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Lamb, D. A.; Davila, J. M.; Vinas, A. F.; Moestl, C.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Malandraki, O.; Dresing, N.; Gómez-Herrero, R.

    2009-12-01

    In this work we present a study of the coronal mass ejection (CME) of June 1st of 2008 in the interplanetary medium. This event has been extensively studied by others because of its favorable geometry and the possible consequences of its peculiar initiation for space weather forecasting. We show an analysis of the evolution of the CME in the interplanetary medium in order to shed some light on the propagation mechanism of the ICME. We have determined the typical shock associated characteristics of the ICME in order to understand the propagation properties. Using two different non force-free models of the magnetic cloud allows us to incorporate expansion of the cloud. We use in-situ measurements from STEREO B/IMPACT to characterize the ICME. In addition, we use images from STEREO A/SECCHI-HI to analyze the propagation and visual evolution of the associated flux rope in the interplanetary medium. We compare and contrast these observations with the results of the analytical models.

  1. Role of the lysine-rich cluster of the C2 domain in the phosphatidylserine-dependent activation of PKCalpha.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Alfaro, Jose A; Gomez-Fernandez, Juan C; Corbalan-Garcia, Senena

    2004-01-23

    The C2 domain of PKCalpha is a Ca(2+)-dependent membrane-targeting module involved in the plasma membrane localization of the enzyme. Recent findings have shown an additional area located in the beta3-beta4 strands, named the lysine-rich cluster, which has been demonstrated to be involved in the PtdIns(4,5)P(2)-dependent activation of the enzyme. Nevertheless, whether other anionic phospholipids can bind to this region and contribute to the regulation of the enzyme's function is not clear. To study other possible roles for this cluster, we generated double and triple mutants that substituted the lysine by alanine residues, and studied their binding and activation properties in a Ca(2+)/phosphatidylserine-dependent manner and compared them with the wild-type protein. It was found that some of the mutants exerted a constitutive activation independently of membrane binding. Furthermore, the constructs were fused to green fluorescent protein and were expressed in fibroblast cells. It was shown that none of the mutants was able to translocate to the plasma membrane, even in saturating conditions of Ca(2+) and diacylglycerol, suggesting that the interactions performed by this lysine-rich cluster are a key event in the subcellular localization of PKCalpha. Taken together, the results obtained showed that these lysine residues might be involved in two functions: one to establish an intramolecular interaction that keeps the enzyme in an inactive conformation; and the second, once the enzyme has been partially activated, to establish further interactions with diacylglycerol and/or acidic phospholipids, leading to the full activation of PKCalpha.

  2. An Application of the Stereoscopic Self-similar-Expansion Model to the Determination of CME-Driven Shock Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, L.; Bothmer, V.

    2015-10-01

    We present an application of the stereoscopic self-similar-expansion model (SSSEM) to Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/ Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) observations of the CME on 3 April 2010 and its associated shock. The aim is to verify whether CME-driven shock parameters can be inferred from the analysis of j-maps. For this purpose, we used the SSSEM to derive the CME and the shock kinematics. Arrival times and speeds, inferred assuming either propagation at constant speed or with uniform deceleration, agree well with Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) measurements. The shock standoff distance [Δ], the density compression [ρd/ρu], and the Mach number [M] were calculated by combining the results obtained for the CME and shock kinematics with models for the shock location. Their values were extrapolated to L1 and compared to in-situ data. The in-situ standoff distance was obtained from ACE solar-wind measurements, and the Mach number and compression ratio were provided by the interplanetary shock database of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. They are ρd/ρu =2.84 and M = 2.2. The best fit to observations was obtained when the SSSEM half-width λ= 40°, and the CME and shock propagate with uniform deceleration. In this case we found Δ= 23 R_{⊙}, ρd/ρu =2.61, and M = 2.93. The study shows that CME-driven shock parameters can be estimated from the analysis of time-elongation plots and can be used to predict their in-situ values.

  3. Future capabilities of CME polarimetric 3D reconstructions with the METIS instrument: A numerical test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, P.; Bemporad, A.; Mackay, D. H.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Understanding the 3D structure of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is crucial for understanding the nature and origin of solar eruptions. However, owing to the optical thinness of the solar corona we can only observe the line of sight integrated emission. As a consequence the resulting projection effects hide the true 3D structure of CMEs. To derive information on the 3D structure of CMEs from white-light (total and polarized brightness) images, the polarization ratio technique is widely used. The soon-to-be-launched METIS coronagraph on board Solar Orbiter will use this technique to produce new polarimetric images. Aims: This work considers the application of the polarization ratio technique to synthetic CME observations from METIS. In particular we determine the accuracy at which the position of the centre of mass, direction and speed of propagation, and the column density of the CME can be determined along the line of sight. Methods: We perform a 3D MHD simulation of a flux rope ejection where a CME is produced. From the simulation we (i) synthesize the corresponding METIS white-light (total and polarized brightness) images and (ii) apply the polarization ratio technique to these synthesized images and compare the results with the known density distribution from the MHD simulation. In addition, we use recent results that consider how the position of a single blob of plasma is measured depending on its projected position in the plane of the sky. From this we can interpret the results of the polarization ratio technique and give an estimation of the error associated with derived parameters. Results: We find that the polarization ratio technique reproduces with high accuracy the position of the centre of mass along the line of sight. However, some errors are inherently associated with this determination. The polarization ratio technique also allows information to be derived on the real 3D direction of propagation of the CME. The determination of this is of

  4. On the interplanetary evolution of CME-driven shocks: a comparison between remote sensing observations and in-situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpes, Laura; Bothmer, Volker

    2015-08-01

    Fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are a prime driver of major space weather effects and strong geomagnetic storms. When the CME propagation speed is higher than the Alfvén speed a shock forms in front of the CME leading edge. CME-driven shocks are observed in in-situ data and, with the advent of increasingly sensitive imaging instruments, also in remote sensing observations in the form of bright fronts ahead of the CMEs.In this work we present the study of 4 Earth-directed CMEs which drove shocks detected in STEREO COR 2 and HI observations. For each event we identify the source region and the signatures of CME eruption such as waves, EUV dimmings, flare and prominence eruptions. The shock and CME interplanetary evolution is determined from COR2 and HI observations via an application of triangulation techniques. Furthermore, propagation speed and arrival times are inferred. The CME geometry is modelled in COR2 via the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model and the assumption on self-similar expansion is tested by expanding the flux rope to the HI1 field of view. A combination of these results with models for the shock location allows to infer the time evolution of the compression ratio ρd/ρu across the shock and of the upstream Mach number M at locations where no direct plasma measurements are available. These values, as well as the arrival time and speed, are compared to ACE in-situ measurements to validate the results. For the 03 April 2010 event, e.g., the values of the Mach number and the compression ratio extrapolated to the position of ACE are respectively 2.1 < ρd/ρu < 2.4 and 2.3 < M < 2.5, in good agreement with the in-situ values found in literature, ρd/ρu = 2.84 and M = 2.2. This study is carried out in conjunction to simulations of CME initiation. Combined results from observations and simulations allow to connect the interplanetary and near-Earth properties of CMEs to those of their source regions, and to the mechanisms of CME onset.

  5. Simultaneous blind separation and clustering of coactivated EEG/MEG sources for analyzing spontaneous brain activity.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Jun-ichiro; Ogawa, Takeshi; Hyvärinen, Aapo

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the dynamics (non-stationarity) of functional connectivity patterns has recently received a lot of attention in the neuroimaging community. Most analysis has been using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), partly due to the inherent technical complexity of the electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG) signals, but EEG/MEG holds great promise in analyzing fast changes in connectivity. Here, we propose a method for dynamic connectivity analysis of EEG/MEG, combining blind source separation with dynamic connectivity analysis in a single probabilistic model. Blind source separation is extremely useful for interpretation of the connectivity changes, and also enables rejection of artifacts. Dynamic connectivity analysis is performed by clustering the coactivation patterns of separated sources by modeling their variances. Experiments on resting-state EEG show that the obtained clusters correlate with physiologically meaningful quantities. PMID:25571098

  6. Clustering Analysis of OFFICER'S Behaviours in London Police Foot Patrol Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J.; Cheng, T.

    2015-07-01

    In this small paper we aim at presenting a framework of conceptual representation and clustering analysis of police officers' patrol pattern obtained from mining their raw movement trajectory data. This have been achieved by a model developed to accounts for the spatio-temporal dynamics human movements by incorporating both the behaviour features of the travellers and the semantic meaning of the environment they are moving in. Hence, the similarity metric of traveller behaviours is jointly defined according to the stay time allocation in each Spatio-temporal region of interests (ST-ROI) to support clustering analysis of patrol behaviours. The proposed framework enables the analysis of behaviour and preferences on higher level based on raw moment trajectories. The model is firstly applied to police patrol data provided by the Metropolitan Police and will be tested by other type of dataset afterwards.

  7. ALMA and HST Observations of the Molecular Environment, Star formation Activity and Cluster Dissolution In NGC 1097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik; Regan, Michael W.; Ngcebetsha, Buntu; Kohno, Kotaro; Teuben, Peter J.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Villard, Eric; Wiklind, Tommy; Lundgren, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Barred spiral galaxies, such as NGC 1097, are an ideal laboratory for studying the interplay between the molecular gas environment and recent star formation activity because there are several dynamically distinct environs (the circumnuclear ring, the bar dust lanes and spurs, the bar end, the inner ring and spiral arms) where the SF activity varies by over three orders of magnitude. We present new ALMA Cycle 1 data showing the CO(1-0), HCN, HCO+, CS, 13CO, C18O emission across the entire disk of NGC 1097 at a resolution of 75 pc (1'). We map the distribution and kinematics of the molecular ISM and quantify the free fall time and shear to constrain what initiates (or inhibits) the star formation activity. By combining the 12m primary array, ACA-7m and total power data we show the most complete maps of NGC 1097. We use the high resolution data to measure the gas inflow rate and accretion onto the circumnuclear ring and constrain the feeding of the central AGN. The 13CO / 12CO ratio across the different environments is used to measure and quantify the diffuse versus dense phases of the molecular ISM across the disk of the galaxy. Finally we compare the ALMA data to new HST UV & optical data to measure the ages and locations of young star clusters. By comparing the cluster age and morphology to the ALMA data we constrain the cluster dissolution time scales as a function of the molecular ISM. Finally we show new JVLA C, X and Ka band continuum data to distinguish between old and young star formation activity.

  8. Growth of fluorescence gold clusters using photo-chemically activated ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Dinesh; Aldeek, Fadi; Michael, Serge; Palui, Goutam; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2016-03-01

    Ligands made of lipoic acid (LA) appended with a polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain have been used in the aqueous phase growth of luminescent gold clusters with distinct emission from yellow to near-IR, using two different routes. In the first route, the gold-ligand complex was chemically reduced using sodium borohydride in alkaline medium, which gave near- IR luminescent gold clusters with maximum emission around 745 nm. In the second method, LA-PEG ligand was photochemically modified to a mixture of thiols, oligomers and oxygenated species under UV-irradiation, which was then used as both reducing agent and stabilizing ligand. By adjusting the pH, temperature, and time of the reaction, we were able to obtain clusters with two distinct emission properties. Refluxing the gold-ligand complex in alkaline medium in the presence of excess ligand gave yellow emission within the first two hours and the emission shifted to red after overnight reaction. Mass spectrometry and chemical assay were used to understand the photo-chemical transformation of Lipoic Acid (LA). Mass spectroscopic studies showed the photo-irradiated product contains thiols, oligomers (dimers, trimers and tetramers) as well as oxygenated species. The amount of thiol formed under different conditions of irradiation was estimated using Ellman's assay.

  9. MET18 Connects the Cytosolic Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Pathway to Active DNA Demethylation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kai; Zhang, Huiming; Mangrauthia, Satendra K.; Lei, Mingguang; Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Hou, Yueh-Ju; Wang, Chunguo; Li, Yan; Tao, W. Andy; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2015-01-01

    DNA demethylation mediated by the DNA glycosylase ROS1 helps determine genomic DNA methylation patterns and protects active genes from being silenced. However, little is known about the mechanism of regulation of ROS1 enzymatic activity. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified an anti-silencing (ASI) factor, ASI3, the dysfunction of which causes transgene promoter hyper-methylation and silencing. Map-based cloning identified ASI3 as MET18, a component of the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly (CIA) pathway. Mutation in MET18 leads to hyper-methylation at thousands of genomic loci, the majority of which overlap with hypermethylated loci identified in ros1 and ros1dml2dml3 mutants. Affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry indicated that ROS1 physically associates with MET18 and other CIA components. Yeast two-hybrid and split luciferase assays showed that ROS1 can directly interact with MET18 and another CIA component, AE7. Site-directed mutagenesis of ROS1 indicated that the conserved iron-sulfur motif is indispensable for ROS1 enzymatic activity. Our results suggest that ROS1-mediated active DNA demethylation requires MET18-dependent transfer of the iron-sulfur cluster, highlighting an important role of the CIA pathway in epigenetic regulation. PMID:26492035

  10. MET18 Connects the Cytosolic Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Pathway to Active DNA Demethylation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Xingang; Tang, Kai; Zhang, Huiming; Mangrauthia, Satendra K; Lei, Mingguang; Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Hou, Yueh-Ju; Wang, Chunguo; Li, Yan; Tao, W Andy; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2015-10-01

    DNA demethylation mediated by the DNA glycosylase ROS1 helps determine genomic DNA methylation patterns and protects active genes from being silenced. However, little is known about the mechanism of regulation of ROS1 enzymatic activity. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified an anti-silencing (ASI) factor, ASI3, the dysfunction of which causes transgene promoter hyper-methylation and silencing. Map-based cloning identified ASI3 as MET18, a component of the cytosolic iron-sulfur cluster assembly (CIA) pathway. Mutation in MET18 leads to hyper-methylation at thousands of genomic loci, the majority of which overlap with hypermethylated loci identified in ros1 and ros1dml2dml3 mutants. Affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry indicated that ROS1 physically associates with MET18 and other CIA components. Yeast two-hybrid and split luciferase assays showed that ROS1 can directly interact with MET18 and another CIA component, AE7. Site-directed mutagenesis of ROS1 indicated that the conserved iron-sulfur motif is indispensable for ROS1 enzymatic activity. Our results suggest that ROS1-mediated active DNA demethylation requires MET18-dependent transfer of the iron-sulfur cluster, highlighting an important role of the CIA pathway in epigenetic regulation.

  11. Two- and four-component relativistic generalized-active-space coupled cluster method: implementation and application to BiH.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Lasse K; Olsen, Jeppe; Fleig, Timo

    2011-06-01

    A string-based coupled-cluster method of general excitation rank and with optimal scaling which accounts for special relativity within the four-component framework is presented. The method opens the way for the treatment of multi-reference problems through an active-space inspired single-reference based state-selective expansion of the model space. The evaluation of the coupled-cluster vector function is implemented by considering contractions of elementary second-quantized operators without setting up the amplitude equations explicitly. The capabilities of the new method are demonstrated in application to the electronic ground state of the bismuth monohydride molecule. In these calculations simulated multi-reference expansions with both doubles and triples excitations into the external space as well as the regular coupled-cluster hierarchy up to full quadruples excitations are compared. The importance of atomic outer core-correlation for obtaining accurate results is shown. Comparison to the non-relativistic framework is performed throughout to illustrate the additional work of the transition to the four-component relativistic framework both in implementation and application. Furthermore, an evaluation of the highest order scaling for general-order expansions is presented. PMID:21663339

  12. Two- and four-component relativistic generalized-active-space coupled cluster method: implementation and application to BiH.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Lasse K; Olsen, Jeppe; Fleig, Timo

    2011-06-01

    A string-based coupled-cluster method of general excitation rank and with optimal scaling which accounts for special relativity within the four-component framework is presented. The method opens the way for the treatment of multi-reference problems through an active-space inspired single-reference based state-selective expansion of the model space. The evaluation of the coupled-cluster vector function is implemented by considering contractions of elementary second-quantized operators without setting up the amplitude equations explicitly. The capabilities of the new method are demonstrated in application to the electronic ground state of the bismuth monohydride molecule. In these calculations simulated multi-reference expansions with both doubles and triples excitations into the external space as well as the regular coupled-cluster hierarchy up to full quadruples excitations are compared. The importance of atomic outer core-correlation for obtaining accurate results is shown. Comparison to the non-relativistic framework is performed throughout to illustrate the additional work of the transition to the four-component relativistic framework both in implementation and application. Furthermore, an evaluation of the highest order scaling for general-order expansions is presented.

  13. A minimal nitrogen fixation gene cluster from Paenibacillus sp. WLY78 enables expression of active nitrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liying; Zhang, Lihong; Liu, Zhanzhi; Liu, Zhangzhi; Zhao, Dehua; Liu, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Bo; Xie, Jianbo; Hong, Yuanyuan; Li, Pengfei; Chen, Sanfeng; Dixon, Ray; Li, Jilun

    2013-01-01

    Most biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase, an enzyme complex comprising two component proteins that contains three different metalloclusters. Diazotrophs contain a common core of nitrogen fixation nif genes that encode the structural subunits of the enzyme and components required to synthesize the metalloclusters. However, the complement of nif genes required to enable diazotrophic growth varies significantly amongst nitrogen fixing bacteria and archaea. In this study, we identified a minimal nif gene cluster consisting of nine nif genes in the genome of Paenibacillus sp. WLY78, a gram-positive, facultative anaerobe isolated from the rhizosphere of bamboo. We demonstrate that the nif genes in this organism are organized as an operon comprising nifB, nifH, nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, nifX, hesA and nifV and that the nif cluster is under the control of a σ(70) (σ(A))-dependent promoter located upstream of nifB. To investigate genetic requirements for diazotrophy, we transferred the Paenibacillus nif cluster to Escherichia coli. The minimal nif gene cluster enables synthesis of catalytically active nitrogenase in this host, when expressed either from the native nifB promoter or from the T7 promoter. Deletion analysis indicates that in addition to the core nif genes, hesA plays an important role in nitrogen fixation and is responsive to the availability of molybdenum. Whereas nif transcription in Paenibacillus is regulated in response to nitrogen availability and by the external oxygen concentration, transcription from the nifB promoter is constitutive in E. coli, indicating that negative regulation of nif transcription is bypassed in the heterologous host. This study demonstrates the potential for engineering nitrogen fixation in a non-nitrogen fixing organism with a minimum set of nine nif genes.

  14. A Minimal Nitrogen Fixation Gene Cluster from Paenibacillus sp. WLY78 Enables Expression of Active Nitrogenase in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dehua; Liu, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Bo; Xie, Jianbo; Hong, Yuanyuan; Li, Pengfei; Chen, Sanfeng; Dixon, Ray; Li, Jilun

    2013-01-01

    Most biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase, an enzyme complex comprising two component proteins that contains three different metalloclusters. Diazotrophs contain a common core of nitrogen fixation nif genes that encode the structural subunits of the enzyme and components required to synthesize the metalloclusters. However, the complement of nif genes required to enable diazotrophic growth varies significantly amongst nitrogen fixing bacteria and archaea. In this study, we identified a minimal nif gene cluster consisting of nine nif genes in the genome of Paenibacillus sp. WLY78, a gram-positive, facultative anaerobe isolated from the rhizosphere of bamboo. We demonstrate that the nif genes in this organism are organized as an operon comprising nifB, nifH, nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, nifX, hesA and nifV and that the nif cluster is under the control of a σ70 (σA)-dependent promoter located upstream of nifB. To investigate genetic requirements for diazotrophy, we transferred the Paenibacillus nif cluster to Escherichia coli. The minimal nif gene cluster enables synthesis of catalytically active nitrogenase in this host, when expressed either from the native nifB promoter or from the T7 promoter. Deletion analysis indicates that in addition to the core nif genes, hesA plays an important role in nitrogen fixation and is responsive to the availability of molybdenum. Whereas nif transcription in Paenibacillus is regulated in response to nitrogen availability and by the external oxygen concentration, transcription from the nifB promoter is constitutive in E. coli, indicating that negative regulation of nif transcription is bypassed in the heterologous host. This study demonstrates the potential for engineering nitrogen fixation in a non-nitrogen fixing organism with a minimum set of nine nif genes. PMID:24146630

  15. A Cluster Of Activities On Coma From The Hubble Space Telescope, StarDate, And McDonald Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Jogee, S.; Fricke, K.; Preston, S.

    2011-01-01

    With a goal of providing a vast audience of students, teachers, the general public, and Spanish-speakers with activities to learn about research on the Coma cluster of galaxies based on the HST ACS Treasury survey of Coma, McDonald Observatory used a many-faceted approach. Since this research offered an unprecedented legacy dataset, part of the challenge was to convey the importance of this project to a diverse audience. The methodology was to create different products for different (overlapping) audiences. Five radio programs were produced in English and Spanish for distribution on over 500 radio stations in the US and Mexico with a listening audience of over 2 million; in addition to the radio listeners, there were over 13,000 downloads of the English scripts and almost 6000 of the Spanish. Images were prepared for use in the StarDate Online Astronomy Picture of the Week, for ViewSpace (used in museums), and for the StarDate/Universo Teacher Guide. A high-school level activity on the Coma Cluster was prepared and distributed both on-line and in an upgraded printed version of the StarDate/Universo Teacher Guide. This guide has been distributed to over 1700 teachers nationally. A YouTube video about careers and research in astronomy using the Coma cluster as an example was produced. Just as the activities were varied, so were the evaluation methods. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant/Contract/Agreement No. HST-EO-10861.35-A issued through the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  16. Physical activity and health-related quality of life during pregnancy: a secondary analysis of a cluster-randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Kolu, Päivi; Raitanen, Jani; Luoto, Riitta

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of physical activity before and during pregnancy on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Data from the cluster-randomised gestational diabetes mellitus primary prevention trial conducted in maternity clinics were utilised in a secondary analysis. The cases considered were pregnant women who reported engaging in at least 150 min of moderate-intensity leisure-time physical activity per week (active women) (N = 80), and the controls were women below these recommendations (less active) (N = 258). All participants had at least one risk factor for gestational diabetes mellitus. Their HRQoL was evaluated via the validated generic instrument 15D, with HRQoL at the end of pregnancy examined in relation to changes in physical activity during pregnancy. Logistic regression models addressed age, parity, education, and pre-pregnancy body mass index. At the end of pregnancy, the expected HRQoL was higher (tobit regression coefficient 0.022, 95 % CI 0.003-0.042) among active women than less active women. Active women also had greater mobility (OR 1.98, 95 % CI 1.04-3.78), ability to handle their usual activities (OR 2.22, 95 % CI 1.29-3.81), and vitality (OR 2.08, 95 % CI 1.22-3.54) than did less active women. Active women reported higher-quality sleep (OR 2.11, 95 % CI 1.03-4.30) throughout pregnancy as compared to less active women. Meeting of the physical activity guidelines before pregnancy was associated with better overall HRQoL and components thereof related to physical activity.

  17. Acoustic Cluster Therapy: In Vitro and Ex Vivo Measurement of Activated Bubble Size Distribution and Temporal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Healey, Andrew John; Sontum, Per Christian; Kvåle, Svein; Eriksen, Morten; Bendiksen, Ragnar; Tornes, Audun; Østensen, Jonny

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic cluster technology (ACT) is a two-component, microparticle formulation platform being developed for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. Sonazoid microbubbles, which have a negative surface charge, are mixed with micron-sized perfluoromethylcyclopentane droplets stabilized with a positively charged surface membrane to form microbubble/microdroplet clusters. On exposure to ultrasound, the oil undergoes a phase change to the gaseous state, generating 20- to 40-μm ACT bubbles. An acoustic transmission technique is used to measure absorption and velocity dispersion of the ACT bubbles. An inversion technique computes bubble size population with temporal resolution of seconds. Bubble populations are measured both in vitro and in vivo after activation within the cardiac chambers of a dog model, with catheter-based flow through an extracorporeal measurement flow chamber. Volume-weighted mean diameter in arterial blood after activation in the left ventricle was 22 μm, with no bubbles >44 μm in diameter. After intravenous administration, 24.4% of the oil is activated in the cardiac chambers. PMID:26831341

  18. IUE observations of rapidly rotating low-mass stars in young clusters - The relation between chromospheric activity and rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Theodore

    1990-01-01

    If the rapid spindown of low-mass stars immediately following their arrival on the ZAMS results from magnetic braking by coronal winds, an equally sharp decline in their chromospheric emission may be expected. To search for evidence of this effect, the IUE spacecraft was used to observe the chromospheric Mg II emission lines of G-M dwarfs in the nearby IC 2391, Alpha Persei, Pleiades, and Hyades clusters. Similar observations were made of a group of X-ray-selected 'naked' T Tauri stars in Taurus-Auriga. The existence of a decline in activity cannot be confirmed from the resulting data. However, the strength of the chromospheric emission in the Mg II lines of the cluster stars is found to be correlated with rotation rate, being strongest for the stars with the shortest rotation periods and weakest for those with the longest periods. This provides indirect support for such an evolutionary change in activity. Chromospheric activity may thus be only an implicit function of age.

  19. Acoustic Cluster Therapy: In Vitro and Ex Vivo Measurement of Activated Bubble Size Distribution and Temporal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Healey, Andrew John; Sontum, Per Christian; Kvåle, Svein; Eriksen, Morten; Bendiksen, Ragnar; Tornes, Audun; Østensen, Jonny

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic cluster technology (ACT) is a two-component, microparticle formulation platform being developed for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. Sonazoid microbubbles, which have a negative surface charge, are mixed with micron-sized perfluoromethylcyclopentane droplets stabilized with a positively charged surface membrane to form microbubble/microdroplet clusters. On exposure to ultrasound, the oil undergoes a phase change to the gaseous state, generating 20- to 40-μm ACT bubbles. An acoustic transmission technique is used to measure absorption and velocity dispersion of the ACT bubbles. An inversion technique computes bubble size population with temporal resolution of seconds. Bubble populations are measured both in vitro and in vivo after activation within the cardiac chambers of a dog model, with catheter-based flow through an extracorporeal measurement flow chamber. Volume-weighted mean diameter in arterial blood after activation in the left ventricle was 22 μm, with no bubbles >44 μm in diameter. After intravenous administration, 24.4% of the oil is activated in the cardiac chambers.

  20. Timing and duration of hydrothermal activity at the Los Bronces porphyry cluster: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckart, K.; Silva, W.; Spröhnle, C.; Vela, I.

    2014-06-01

    New geochronological data from the Los Bronces cluster of the Río Blanco-Los Bronces mega-porphyry Cu-Mo district establish a wide range of magmatism, hydrothermal alteration, and mineralization ages, both in terms of areal extent and time. The northern El Plomo and southernmost Los Piches exploration areas contain the oldest barren porphyritic intrusions with U-Pb ages of 10.8 ± 0.1 Ma and 13.4 ± 0.1 Ma, respectively. A hypabyssal barren intrusion adjacent northwesterly to the main pit area yields a slightly younger age of 10.2 ± 0.3 Ma (San Manuel sector, U-Pb), whereas in the Los Bronces (LB) open-pit area, the present day mineral extraction zone, porphyries range from 8.49 to 6.02 Ma (U-Pb). Hydrothermal biotite and sericite ages are up to 0.5 Ma younger but consistent with the cooling of the corresponding intrusion events of each area. Two quartz-molybdenite B-type veins from the LB open pit have Re-Os molybdenite ages of 5.65 ± 0.03 Ma and 5.35 ± 0.03 Ma consistent with published data for the contiguous Río Blanco cluster. The San Manuel exploration area within the Los Bronces cluster, located about 1.5-2 km southeast of the open-pit extraction zone, shows both the oldest hydrothermal biotite (7.70 ± 0.07 Ma; 40Ar/39Ar) and breccia cement molybdenite ages (8.36 ± 0.06 Ma; Re-Os) registered in the entire Río Blanco-Los Bronces district. These are also older than those reported from the El Teniente porphyry Cu(-Mo) deposit, suggesting that mineralization in the late Miocene to early Pliocene porphyry belt of Central Chile commenced 2 Ma before the previously accepted age of 6.3 Ma.

  1. Active Tectonics of Southern California Revealed by Cluster Analysis of GPS Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, W. R.; Savage, J. C.; Simpson, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    We use cluster analysis of the USGS National Seismic Hazard Map GPS velocity field for southern California with standard deviations < 1 mm/yr to determine velocity gradients that locate the most important faults, the elastic strain associated with them, and regions of possible block-like behavior. Seven to ten well resolved clusters are statistically significant and spatially distinct with small overlap. In map view (see figure), the 7 clusters solution shows bands of relatively constant velocity sub-parallel to the San Andreas (SAF) and San Jacinto (SJF) faults and the major faults of the eastern Mojave shear zone (EMSZ). These bands are due both to elastic strain accumulation on the SAF and relative motion across lower slip rate faults in the EMSZ and Los Angeles and Ventura basins. At the largest scale, the 7-cluster map shows two main trends. The blue dots define the SJ and SA faults from northwest of the Salton Sea (SS) to Parkfield (P); the grey/magenta boundary suggests that the defined Eastern California Shear Zone could be extended farther south to the Salton Sea. The short ~80-km-long San Gorgonio Pass-San Bernardino Mountains (SGP) segment of the SAF has a much lower slip rate, ~7 mm/yr of right-lateral oblique convergence. As generally shown by previous GPS studies, right-lateral strike-slip movement rates vary considerably along the SAF. In the Imperial Valley (IV) the rate is ~40 mm/yr; east of the Salton Sea it drops to ~20 mm/yr, with 10-15 mm/yr having been shunted westward to the SJF; north of the Salton Sea ~10-15 mm/yr of strike-slip is transferred to the faults of the eastern Mojave; therefore the east-trending faults of San Gorgonio Pass (SGP) take up only ~5 mm/yr of strike slip and ~equal amounts of north-south shortening; on the Mojave (M) segment of the SAF the slip rate increases to ~15-20 mm/yr in the vicinity of Cajon Pass (CP) because of transfer of SJF slip back onto the San Andreas; northwest of Tejon Pass the rate increases again to

  2. The cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly component MET18 is required for the full enzymatic activity of ROS1 in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaokang; Li, Qi; Yuan, Wei; Cao, Zhendong; Qi, Bei; Kumar, Suresh; Li, Yan; Qian, Weiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns in plants are dynamically regulated by DNA methylation and active DNA demethylation in response to both environmental changes and development of plant. Beginning with the removal of methylated cytosine by ROS1/DME family of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases, active DNA demethylation in plants occurs through base excision repair. So far, many components involved in active DNA demethylation remain undiscovered. Through a forward genetic screening of Arabidopsis mutants showing DNA hypermethylation at the EPF2 promoter region, we identified the conserved iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein MET18. MET18 dysfunction caused DNA hypermethylation at more than 1000 loci as well as the silencing of reporter genes and some endogenous genes. MET18 can directly interact with ROS1 in vitro and in vivo. ROS1 activity was reduced in the met18 mutant plants and point mutation in the conserved Fe-S cluster binding motif of ROS1 disrupted its biological function. Interestingly, a large number of DNA hypomethylated loci, especially in the CHH context, were identified from the met18 mutants and most of the hypo-DMRs were from TE regions. Our results suggest that MET18 can regulate both active DNA demethylation and DNA methylation pathways in Arabidopsis. PMID:27193999

  3. The mechanism of emerging catalytic activity of gold nano-clusters on rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) in CO oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuhara, K.; Tagami, M.; Matsuda, T.; Visikovskiy, A.; Kido, Y.; Takizawa, M.

    2012-03-28

    This paper reveals the fact that the O adatoms (O{sub ad}) adsorbed on the 5-fold Ti rows of rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) react with CO to form CO{sub 2} at room temperature and the oxidation reaction is pronouncedly enhanced by Au nano-clusters deposited on the above O-rich TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces. The optimum activity is obtained for 2D clusters with a lateral size of {approx}1.5 nm and two-atomic layer height corresponding to {approx}50 Au atoms/cluster. This strong activity emerging is attributed to an electronic charge transfer from Au clusters to O-rich TiO{sub 2}(110) supports observed clearly by work function measurement, which results in an interface dipole. The interface dipoles lower the potential barrier for dissociative O{sub 2} adsorption on the surface and also enhance the reaction of CO with the O{sub ad} atoms to form CO{sub 2} owing to the electric field of the interface dipoles, which generate an attractive force upon polar CO molecules and thus prolong the duration time on the Au nano-clusters. This electric field is screened by the valence electrons of Au clusters except near the perimeter interfaces, thereby the activity is diminished for three-dimensional clusters with a larger size.

  4. Relation Between the 3D-Geometry of the Coronal Wave and Associated CME During the 26 April 2008 Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.

    2011-01-01

    We study the kinematical characteristics and 3D geometry of a large-scale coronal wave that occurred in association with the 26 April 2008 flare-CME event. The wave was observed with the EUVI instruments aboard both STEREO spacecraft (STEREO-A and STEREO-B) with a mean speed of approx 240 km/s. The wave is more pronounced in the eastern propagation direction, and is thus, better observable in STEREO-B images. From STEREO-B observations we derive two separate initiation centers for the wave, and their locations fit with the coronal dimming regions. Assuming a simple geometry of the wave we reconstruct its 3D nature from combined STEREO-A and STEREO-B observations. We find that the wave structure is asymmetric with an inclination toward East. The associated CME has a deprojected speed of approx 750 +/- 50 km/s, and it shows a non-radial outward motion toward the East with respect to the underlying source region location. Applying the forward fitting model developed by Thernisien, Howard, and Vourlidas we derive the CME flux rope position on the solar surface to be close to the dimming regions. We conclude that the expanding flanks of the CME most likely drive and shape the coronal wave.

  5. 43 CFR 11.42 - How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE? 11.42 Section 11.42 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Type A Procedures § 11.42 How does the authorized...

  6. 43 CFR 11.42 - How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How does the authorized official apply the NRDAM/CME or NRDAM/GLE? 11.42 Section 11.42 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Type A Procedures § 11.42 How does the authorized...

  7. Gas dynamic modeling of the CME propagation through the envelope of a hot Jupiter-type exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherenkov, A. A.; Kaygorodov, P. V.; Bisikalo, D. V.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a 3D gasdynamic numerical model for the study of the interaction between the extended envelopes of hot Jupiters, overfilling their Roche lobes, and non-stationary stellar wind. In the model we use a Roe-Osher numerical scheme with Eindfeldt entropy fix. To test the model we have simulated a flow structure, forming due to the interaction between the extended quasi-stationary envelope of the hot Jupiter planet HD 209458b and the bow shock formed ahead of a propagating coronal mass ejection (CME). We have adopted the solar CME parameters in our computations and taken into account the fact that the planet is located close to its host star. The simulation results show that the bow shock of the CME partially destroys the stream, starting from the Li point of the quasi-closed planet's envelope. A bow shock, existing ahead of the planet in its orbital motion when the stellar wind is undisturbed, almost disappears when the CME shock passes through the system.

  8. C-ME: A 3D Community-Based, Real-Time Collaboration Tool for Scientific Research and Training

    PubMed Central

    Kolatkar, Anand; Kennedy, Kevin; Halabuk, Dan; Kunken, Josh; Marrinucci, Dena; Bethel, Kelly; Guzman, Rodney; Huckaby, Tim; Kuhn, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The need for effective collaboration tools is growing as multidisciplinary proteome-wide projects and distributed research teams become more common. The resulting data is often quite disparate, stored in separate locations, and not contextually related. Collaborative Molecular Modeling Environment (C-ME) is an interactive community-based collaboration system that allows researchers to organize information, visualize data on a two-dimensional (2-D) or three-dimensional (3-D) basis, and share and manage that information with collaborators in real time. C-ME stores the information in industry-standard databases that are immediately accessible by appropriate permission within the computer network directory service or anonymously across the internet through the C-ME application or through a web browser. The system addresses two important aspects of collaboration: context and information management. C-ME allows a researcher to use a 3-D atomic structure model or a 2-D image as a contextual basis on which to attach and share annotations to specific atoms or molecules or to specific regions of a 2-D image. These annotations provide additional information about the atomic structure or image data that can then be evaluated, amended or added to by other project members. PMID:18286178

  9. Efficient active waveguiding properties of Mo6 nano-cluster-doped polymer nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigeon, J.; Huby, N.; Amela-Cortes, M.; Molard, Y.; Garreau, A.; Cordier, S.; Bêche, B.; Duvail, J.-L.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate 1D nanostructures based on a Mo6@SU8 hybrid nanocomposite in which photoluminescent Mo6 clusters are embedded in the photosensitive SU8 resist. Tens of micrometers long Mo6@SU8-based tubular nanostructures were fabricated by the wetting template method, enabling the control of the inner and outer diameter to about 190 nm and 240 nm respectively, as supported by structural and optical characterizations. The image plane optical study of these nanotubes under optical pumping highlights the efficient waveguiding phenomenon of the red luminescence emitted by the clusters. Moreover, the wave vector distribution in the Fourier plane determined by leakage radiation microscopy gives additional features of the emission and waveguiding. First, the anisotropic red luminescence of the whole system can be attributed to the guided mode along the nanotube. Then, a low-loss propagation behavior is evidenced in the Mo6@SU8-based nanotubes. This result contrasts with the weaker waveguiding signature in the case of UV210-based nanotubes embedding PFO (poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)). It is attributed to the strong reabsorption phenomenon, owing to overlapping between absorption and emission bands in the semi-conducting conjugated polymer PFO. These results make this Mo6@SU8 original class of nanocomposite a promising candidate as nanosources for submicronic photonic integration.

  10. Clustering Finnish Gambler Profiles Based on the Money and Time Consumed in Gambling Activities.

    PubMed

    Heiskanen, Maria; Toikka, Arho

    2016-06-01

    Gambling involves consumption of gamblers' money and time. Gamblers are a heterogeneous group, and in addition to grouping gamblers based on personality factors, it is also important to find different gambler profiles with respect to their gambling behavior. Using the nationally representative survey 'Finnish Gambling 2011' (N = 4484), this article studies the subtypes of Finnish gamblers based on the frequency of gambling and the amounts of money and time used in different gambling forms. Cluster analysis reveals six profiles of gamblers, from infrequent gamblers to omnivorous gamblers. In the further analysis of the clusters, it was found that the highest problem gambling prevalence was in the groups of sport betting + electronic gaming machine gamblers and omnivorous gamblers, which were also both dominated by men. Certain gambling consumption patterns and risk factors for problem gambling are related to both socio-demographic backgrounds of the gamblers as well as the structural and situational characteristics of the games. The results have implications for the prevention of problem gambling, as some consumption patterns may be connected with the probability of developing gambling problems.

  11. Comparison of CME radial velocities from a flux rope model and an ice cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2011-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun are the largest energy release process in the solar system and act as the primary driver of geomagnetic storms and other space weather phenomena on the Earth. So it is very important to infer their directions, velocities and three-dimensional structures. In this study, we choose two different models to infer radial velocities of halo CMEs since 2008 : (1) an ice cream cone model by Xue et al (2005) using SOHO/LASCO data, (2) a flux rope model by Thernisien et al. (2009) using the STEREO/SECCHI data. In addition, we use another flux rope model in which the separation angle of flux rope is zero, which is morphologically similar to the ice cream cone model. The comparison shows that the CME radial velocities from among each model have very good correlations (R>0.9). We will extending this comparison to other partial CMEs observed by STEREO and SOHO.

  12. Symbolic clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Reinke, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Clustering is the problem of finding a good organization for data. Because there are many kinds of clustering problems, and because there are many possible clusterings for any data set, clustering programs use knowledge and assumptions about individual problems to make clustering tractable. Cluster-analysis techniques allow knowledge to be expressed in the choice of a pairwise distance measure and in the choice of clustering algorithm. Conceptual clustering adds knowledge and preferences about cluster descriptions. In this study the author describes symbolic clustering, which adds representation choice to the set of ways a data analyst can use problem-specific knowledge. He develops an informal model for symbolic clustering, and uses it to suggest where and how knowledge can be expressed in clustering. A language for creating symbolic clusters, based on the model, was developed and tested on three real clustering problems. The study concludes with a discussion of the implications of the model and the results for clustering in general.

  13. Wavelet analysis of CME, X-ray flare, and sunspot series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, M. R. G.; Pereira, E. S.; Cecatto, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are the most energetic transient phenomena taking place at the Sun. Together they are principally responsible for disturbances in outer geospace. Coronal mass ejections and solar flares are believed to be correlated with the solar cycle, which is mainly characterized by sunspot numbers. Aims: Here, we search for pattern identification in CMEs, X-ray solar flares, and sunspot number time series using a new data mining process and a quantitative procedure to correlate these series. Methods: This new process consists of the combination of a decomposition method with the wavelet transform technique applied to the series ranging from 2000 until 2012. A simple moving average is used for the time-series decomposition as a high-pass filter. A continuous wavelet transform is applied to the series in sequence, which permits us to uncover signals previously masked by the original time series. We made use of the wavelet coherence to find some correlation between the data. Results: The results have shown the existence of periodic and intermittent signals in the CMEs, flares, and sunspot time series. For the CME and flare series, few and relatively short time intervals without any signal were observed. Signals with an intermittent character take place during some epochs of the maximum and descending phases of the solar cycle 23 and rising phase of solar cycle 24. A comparison among X-ray flares, sunspots, and CME time series shows a stronger relation between flare and CMEs, although during some short intervals (four-eight months) and in a relatively narrow band. Yet, in contrast we have obtained a fainter or even absent relation between the X-ray flares and sunspot number series as well as between the CMEs and sunspot number series.

  14. Shock wave driven by CME evidenced by metric type II burst and EUV wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha-Silva, R. D.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Selhorst, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Solar type II radio bursts are produced by plasma oscillations in the solar corona as a result of shock waves. The relationship between type II bursts and coronal shocks is well evidenced by observations since the 1960s. However, the drivers of the shocks associated with type II events at metric wavelengths remain as a controversial issue among solar physicists. The flares and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are considered as potential drivers of these shocks. In this article, we present an analysis of a metric type II burst observed on May 17, 2013, using data provided by spectrometers from e-CALLISTO (extended-Compound Astronomical Low-cost Low-frequency Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatories) and EUV images from the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI), aboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The event was associated with an M3.2 SXR flare and a halo CME. The EUV wave produced by the expansion of the CME was clear from the EUV images. The heights of the EUV wave fronts proved to be consistent with the heights of the radio source obtained with the 2-4 × Newkirk density model, which provided a clue to an oblique propagation of the type-II-emitting shock segment. The results for the magnetic field in the regions of the shock also revealed to be consistent with the heights of the radio source obtained using the 2-4 × Newkirk density model. Exponential fit on the intensity maxima of the harmonic emission provided a shock speed of ∼580-990 km s-1, consistent with the average speed of the associated EUV wave front of 626 km s-1.

  15. Interrupted Eruption of Large Quiescent Filament Associated with a Halo CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosain, S.; Filippov, Boris; Ajor Maurya, Ram; Chandra, Ramesh

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the observations of an eruptive quiescent filament associated with a halo Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). We use observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO A/B) satellites. The filament exhibits a slow-rise phase followed by a gradual acceleration and then completely disappears. The filament could be traced in STEREO observations up to an altitude of about 1.44 {R}⊙ , where its rise speed reached ˜14 km s-1 and disappeared completely at about 10:32 UT on 2011 October 21. The CME associated with the filament eruption and two bright ribbons in the chromosphere both appeared at about 01:30 UT on October 22, i.e., 15 hr after the filament eruption was seen in He ii 304 Å filtergrams. We show that this delay is abnormally large even if the slow rise speed and slow acceleration of the filament are taken into account. To understand the cause of this delay, we compute the decay index (n) of the overlying coronal magnetic field. The height distribution of the decay index, n, suggests that the zone of instability (n \\gt 1) at a lower altitude, 144-480 Mm, is followed by a zone of stability (n \\lt 1) between 540 and 660 Mm. We interpret the observed delay to be due to the presence of the latter zone, i.e., the zone of stability, which could provide a second quasi-equilibrium state to the filament until it finally erupts.

  16. Rhenium Complexes and Clusters Supported on c-Al2O3: Effects of Rhenium Oxidation State and Rhenium Cluster Size on Catalytic Activity for n-butane Hydrogenolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo Lapidus, R.; Gates, B

    2009-01-01

    Supported metals prepared from H{sub 3}Re{sub 3}(CO){sub 12} on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were treated under conditions that led to various rhenium structures on the support and were tested as catalysts for n-butane conversion in the presence of H{sub 2} in a flow reactor at 533 K and 1 atm. After use, two samples were characterized by X-ray absorption edge positions of approximately 5.6 eV (relative to rhenium metal), indicating that the rhenium was cationic and essentially in the same average oxidation state in each. But the Re-Re coordination numbers found by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (2.2 and 5.1) show that the clusters in the two samples were significantly different in average nuclearity despite their indistinguishable rhenium oxidation states. Spectra of a third sample after catalysis indicate approximately Re{sub 3} clusters, on average, and an edge position of 4.5 eV. Thus, two samples contained clusters approximated as Re{sub 3} (on the basis of the Re-Re coordination number), on average, with different average rhenium oxidation states. The data allow resolution of the effects of rhenium oxidation state and cluster size, both of which affect the catalytic activity; larger clusters and a greater degree of reduction lead to increased activity.

  17. Using Targeted Active-Learning Exercises and Diagnostic Question Clusters to Improve Students' Understanding of Carbon Cycling in Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Maskiewicz, April Cordero; Griscom, Heather Peckham; Welch, Nicole Turrill

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we used targeted active-learning activities to help students improve their ways of reasoning about carbon flow in ecosystems. The results of a validated ecology conceptual inventory (diagnostic question clusters [DQCs]) provided us with information about students' understanding of and reasoning about transformation of inorganic and organic carbon-containing compounds in biological systems. These results helped us identify specific active-learning exercises that would be responsive to students' existing knowledge. The effects of the active-learning interventions were then examined through analysis of students' pre- and postinstruction responses on the DQCs. The biology and non–biology majors participating in this study attended a range of institutions and the instructors varied in their use of active learning; one lecture-only comparison class was included. Changes in pre- to postinstruction scores on the DQCs showed that an instructor's teaching method had a highly significant effect on student reasoning following course instruction, especially for questions pertaining to cellular-level, carbon-transforming processes. We conclude that using targeted in-class activities had a beneficial effect on student learning regardless of major or class size, and argue that using diagnostic questions to identify effective learning activities is a valuable strategy for promoting learning, as gains from lecture-only classes were minimal. PMID:22383618

  18. PREDICTING CME EJECTA AND SHEATH FRONT ARRIVAL AT L1 WITH A DATA-CONSTRAINED PHYSICAL MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Phillip; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-20

    We present a method for predicting the arrival of a coronal mass ejection (CME) flux rope in situ, as well as the sheath of solar wind plasma accumulated ahead of the driver. For faster CMEs, the front of this sheath will be a shock. The method is based upon geometrical separate measurement of the CME ejecta and sheath. These measurements are used to constrain a drag-based model, improved by including both a height dependence and accurate de-projected velocities. We also constrain the geometry of the model to determine the error introduced as a function of the deviation of the CME nose from the Sun–Earth line. The CME standoff-distance in the heliosphere fit is also calculated, fit, and combined with the ejecta model to determine sheath arrival. Combining these factors allows us to create predictions for both fronts at the L1 point and compare them against observations. We demonstrate an ability to predict the sheath arrival with an average error of under 3.5 hr, with an rms error of about 1.58 hr. For the ejecta the error is less than 1.5 hr, with an rms error within 0.76 hr. We also discuss the physical implications of our model for CME expansion and density evolution. We show the power of our method with ideal data and demonstrate the practical implications of having a permanent L5 observer with space weather forecasting capabilities, while also discussing the limitations of the method that will have to be addressed in order to create a real-time forecasting tool.

  19. Analysis of EIT/LASCO Observations Using Available MHD Models: Investigation of CME Initiation Propagation and Geoeffectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2001-01-01

    The Sun's activity drives the variability of geospace (i.e., near-earth environment). Observations show that the ejection of plasma from the sun, called coronal mass ejections (CMEs), are the major cause of geomagnetic storms. This global-scale solar dynamical feature of coronal mass ejection was discovered almost three decades ago by the use of space-borne coronagraphs (OSO-7, Skylab/ATM and P78-1). Significant progress has been made in understanding the physical nature of the CMEs. Observations show that these global-scale CMEs have size in the order of a solar radius (approximately 6.7 x 10(exp 5) km) near the sun, and each event involves a mass of about 10(exp 15) g and an energy comparable to that of a large flare on the order of 10(exp 32) ergs. The radial propagation speeds of CMEs have a wide range from tens to thousands of kilometers per second. Thus, the transit time to near earth's environment [i.e., 1 AU (astronomical unit)] can be as fast as 40 hours to 100 hours. The typical transit time for geoeffective events is approximately 60-80 h. This paper consists of two parts: 1) A summary of the observed CMEs from Skylab to the present SOHO will be presented. Special attention will be made to SOHO/ LASCO/ EIT observations and their characteristics leading to a geoeffectiv a CME 2) The chronological development of theory and models to interpret the physical nature of this fascinating phenomenon will be reviewed. Finally, an example will be presented to illustrate the geoeffectiveness of the CMEs by using both observation and model.

  20. Highly active Ag clusters stabilized on TiO2 nanocrystals for catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Zhao, Zhe; Ou, Dingrong; Tu, Baofeng; Cui, Daan; Wei, Xuming; Cheng, Mojie

    2016-11-01

    Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites comprising of Ag clusters on TiO2 nanocrystal surfaces are of great significance in catalysts and advanced functional materials. Herein a novel method to synthesize Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites with Ag clusters under 2 nm on TiO2 nanocrystal surfaces have been developed. The success of this method relies on a silver mirror reaction in toluene, which refers to the reduction of silver-dodecylamine complexes by acetaldehyde in the presence of mono-dispersed TiO2 nanocrystals. The prepared Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites have been characterized by FT-IR spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, ultra high resolution scanning electron microscope (Ultra-HRSEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). Catalytic activity of Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites is evaluated for the reduction of p-nitrophenol (4-NP) into p-aminophenol (4-AP) by NaBH4. Results demonstrate that Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites have shown an outstanding catalytic activity as well as a good stability in successive reduction of 4-NP. Noticeably, TOF of Ag/TiO2-0.75 nanocomposites obtained in this work is the highest among Ag based catalysts previously reported.

  1. Active mammalian replication origins are associated with a high-density cluster of mCpG dinucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Rein, T; Zorbas, H; DePamphilis, M L

    1997-01-01

    ori-beta is a well-characterized origin of bidirectional replication (OBR) located approximately 17 kb downstream of the dihydrofolate reductase gene in hamster cell chromosomes. The approximately 2-kb region of ori-beta that exhibits greatest replication initiation activity also contains 12 potential methylation sites in the form of CpG dinucleotides. To ascertain whether DNA methylation might play a role at mammalian replication origins, the methylation status of these sites was examined with bisulfite to chemically distinguish cytosine (C) from 5-methylcytosine (mC). All of the CpGs were methylated, and nine of them were located within 356 bp flanking the minimal OBR, creating a high-density cluster of mCpGs that was approximately 10 times greater than average for human DNA. However, the previously reported densely methylated island in which all cytosines were methylated regardless of their dinucleotide composition was not detected and appeared to be an experimental artifact. A second OBR, located at the 5' end of the RPS14 gene, exhibited a strikingly similar methylation pattern, and the organization of CpG dinucleotides at other mammalian origins revealed the potential for high-density CpG methylation. Moreover, analysis of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled nascent DNA confirmed that active replication origins were methylated. These results suggest that a high-density cluster of mCpG dinucleotides may play a role in either the establishment or the regulation of mammalian replication origins. PMID:8972222

  2. SufD and SufC ATPase activity are required for iron acquisition during in vivo Fe-S cluster formation on SufB

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Avneesh; Mapolelo, Daphne T.; Chahal, Harsimranjit K.; Johnson, Michael K.; Outten, F. Wayne

    2010-01-01

    In vivo biogenesis of Fe-S cluster cofactors requires complex biosynthetic machinery to limit release of iron and sulfide, to protect the Fe-S cluster from oxidation, and to target the Fe-S cluster to the correct apo-enzyme. The SufABCDSE pathway for Fe-S cluster assembly in E. coli accomplishes these tasks under iron starvation and oxidative stress conditions that disrupt Fe-S cluster metabolism. Although SufB, SufC, and SufD are all required for in vivo Suf function, their exact roles are unclear. Here we show that SufB, SufC, and SufD, co-expressed with the SufS-SufE sulfur transfer pair, purify as two distinct complexes (SufBC2D and SufB2C2) that contain Fe-S clusters and FADH2. These studies also show that SufC and SufD are required for in vivo Fe-S cluster formation on SufB. Furthermore, while SufD is dispensable for in vivo sulfur transfer, it is absolutely required for in vivo iron acquisition. Finally, we demonstrate for the first time that the ATPase activity of SufC is necessary for in vivo iron acquisition during Fe-S cluster assembly. PMID:20857974

  3. Efficient anchorage of Pt clusters on N-doped carbon nanotubes and their catalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepró, Xavier; Terrés, Eduardo; Vega-Cantú, Yadira; Rodríguez-Macías, Fernando J.; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Kim, Yoon Ahm; Hayahsi, Takuya; Endo, Morinobu; Torres R., Miguel; Terrones, Mauricio

    2008-09-01

    We report an efficient method for anchoring Pt clusters (e.g., 6 nm in size) on the surfaces of N-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs-CN x) using a relatively simple method consisting of a hydrothermal treatment of Na 2[PtCl 6] · 6H 2O and N-doped nanotubes dispersed in acetic acid. The catalytic properties of this material were evaluated finding that the conversion of cinnamaldehyde using Pt-coated MWNTs-CN x could increase up to 6 times with respect to that obtained for uncoated MWNTs-CN x and pure carbon CNTs. Therefore, we envisage this material could be either used as an efficient catalyst or as a sensor.

  4. The Devon Active Villages Evaluation (DAVE) trial of a community-level physical activity intervention in rural south-west England: a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of adults are not meeting the guidelines for physical activity despite activity being linked with numerous improvements to long-term health. In light of this, researchers have called for more community-level interventions. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate whether a community-level physical activity intervention increased the activity levels of rural communities. Methods 128 rural villages (clusters) were randomised to receive the intervention in one of four time periods between April 2011 and December 2012. The Devon Active Villages intervention provided villages with 12 weeks of physical activity opportunities for all age groups, including at least three different types of activities per village. Each village received an individually tailored intervention, incorporating a local needs-led approach. Support was provided for a further 12 months following the intervention. The evaluation study used a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial design. All 128 villages were measured at each of five data collection periods using a postal survey. The primary outcome of interest was the proportion of adults reporting sufficient physical activity to meet internationally recognised guidelines. Minutes spent in moderate-and-vigorous activity per week was analysed as a secondary outcome. To compare between intervention and control modes, random effects linear regression and marginal logistic regression models were implemented for continuous and binary outcomes respectively. Results 10,412 adults (4693 intervention, 5719 control) completed the postal survey (response rate 32.2%). The intervention did not increase the odds of adults meeting the physical activity guideline (adjusted OR 1.02, 95% CI: 0.88 to 1.17; P = 0.80), although there was weak evidence of an increase in minutes of moderate-and-vigorous-intensity activity per week (adjusted mean difference = 171, 95% CI: -16 to 358; P = 0.07). The

  5. The Relationship Between CME Properties in the CDAW, CACTUS and SEEDS Catalogs and ?25 MeV Solar Proton Event Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, I. G.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cane, H. V.

    2013-12-01

    The existence of a correlation between the intensity of solar energetic proton (SEP) events and the speed of the associated coronal mass ejection near the Sun is well known, and is often interpreted as evidence for particle acceleration at CME-driven shocks. However, this correlation is far from perfect and might be improved by taking other parameters into consideration (e.g., CME width). In studies of cycle 23 SEP events, values of CME speed, width and other parameters were typically taken from the CDAWWeb LASCO CME catalog. This is compiled 'by hand' from examination of LASCO images by experienced observers. Other automated LASCO CME catalogs have now been developed, e.g., CACTUS (Royal Observatory of Belgium) and SEEDS (George Mason University), but the basic CME parameters do not always agree with those from the CDAWweb catalog since they are not determined in the same way. For example the 'CME speed' might be measured at a specific position angle against the plane of the sky in one catalog, or be the average of speeds taken along the CME front in another. Speeds may also be based on linear or higher order fits to the coronagraph images. There will also be projection effects in these plane of the sky speeds. Similarly, CME widths can vary between catalogs and are dependent on how they are defined. For example, the CDAW catalog lists any CME that surrounds the occulting disk as a 'halo' (360 deg. width) CME even though the CME may be highly-asymmetric and originate from a solar event far from central meridian. Another catalog may give a smaller width for the same CME. The problem of obtaining the 'true' CME width is especially acute for assessing the relationship between CME width and SEP properties when using the CDAW catalog since a significant fraction, if not the majority, of the CMEs associated with major SEP events are reported to be halo CMEs. In principle, observations of CMEs from the STEREO A and B spacecraft, launched in late 2006, might be used to

  6. Improvements on GPS Location Cluster Analysis for the Prediction of Large Carnivore Feeding Activities: Ground-Truth Detection Probability and Inclusion of Activity Sensor Measures.

    PubMed

    Blecha, Kevin A; Alldredge, Mat W

    2015-01-01

    Animal space use studies using GPS collar technology are increasingly incorporating behavior based analysis of spatio-temporal data in order to expand inferences of resource use. GPS location cluster analysis is one such technique applied to large carnivores to identify the timing and location of feeding events. For logistical and financial reasons, researchers often implement predictive models for identifying these events. We present two separate improvements for predictive models that future practitioners can implement. Thus far, feeding prediction models have incorporated a small range of covariates, usually limited to spatio-temporal characteristics of the GPS data. Using GPS collared cougar (Puma concolor) we include activity sensor data as an additional covariate to increase prediction performance of feeding presence/absence. Integral to the predictive modeling of feeding events is a ground-truthing component, in which GPS location clusters are visited by human observers to confirm the presence or absence of feeding remains. Failing to account for sources of ground-truthing false-absences can bias the number of predicted feeding events to be low. Thus we account for some ground-truthing error sources directly in the model with covariates and when applying model predictions. Accounting for these errors resulted in a 10% increase in the number of clusters predicted to be feeding events. Using a double-observer design, we show that the ground-truthing false-absence rate is relatively low (4%) using a search delay of 2-60 days. Overall, we provide two separate improvements to the GPS cluster analysis techniques that can be expanded upon and implemented in future studies interested in identifying feeding behaviors of large carnivores.

  7. Improvements on GPS Location Cluster Analysis for the Prediction of Large Carnivore Feeding Activities: Ground-Truth Detection Probability and Inclusion of Activity Sensor Measures

    PubMed Central

    Blecha, Kevin A.; Alldredge, Mat W.

    2015-01-01

    Animal space use studies using GPS collar technology are increasingly incorporating behavior based analysis of spatio-temporal data in order to expand inferences of resource use. GPS location cluster analysis is one such technique applied to large carnivores to identify the timing and location of feeding events. For logistical and financial reasons, researchers often implement predictive models for identifying these events. We present two separate improvements for predictive models that future practitioners can implement. Thus far, feeding prediction models have incorporated a small range of covariates, usually limited to spatio-temporal characteristics of the GPS data. Using GPS collared cougar (Puma concolor) we include activity sensor data as an additional covariate to increase prediction performance of feeding presence/absence. Integral to the predictive modeling of feeding events is a ground-truthing component, in which GPS location clusters are visited by human observers to confirm the presence or absence of feeding remains. Failing to account for sources of ground-truthing false-absences can bias the number of predicted feeding events to be low. Thus we account for some ground-truthing error sources directly in the model with covariates and when applying model predictions. Accounting for these errors resulted in a 10% increase in the number of clusters predicted to be feeding events. Using a double-observer design, we show that the ground-truthing false-absence rate is relatively low (4%) using a search delay of 2–60 days. Overall, we provide two separate improvements to the GPS cluster analysis techniques that can be expanded upon and implemented in future studies interested in identifying feeding behaviors of large carnivores. PMID:26398546

  8. Transferability study of CHO cell clustering assays for monitoring of pertussis toxin activity in acellular pertussis vaccines.

    PubMed

    Isbrucker, R; Daas, A; Wagner, L; Costanzo, A

    2016-01-01

    Current regulations for acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines require that they are tested for the presence of residual or reversion-derived pertussis toxin (PTx) activity using the mouse histamine sensitisation test (HIST). Although a CHO cell clustering assay can be used by manufacturers to verify if sufficient inactivation of the substance has occurred in-process, this assay cannot be used at present for the final product due to the presence of aluminium adjuvants which interfere with mammalian cell cultures. Recently, 2 modified CHO cell clustering assays which accommodate for the adjuvant effects have been proposed as alternatives to the HIST. These modified assays eliminate the adjuvant-induced cytotoxicity either through dilution of the vaccine (called the Direct Method) or by introducing a porous barrier between the adjuvant and the cells (the Indirect Method). Transferability and suitability of these methods for testing of products present on the European market were investigated during a collaborative study organised by the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM). Thirteen laboratories participated in this study which included 4 aP-containing vaccines spiked by addition of PTx. This study also assessed the transferability of a standardised CHO cell clustering assay protocol for use with non-adjuvanted PTx preparations. Results showed that the majority of laboratories were able to detect the PTx spike in all 4 vaccines at concentrations of 4 IU/mL or lower using the Indirect Method. This sensitivity is in the range of the theoretical sensitivity of the HIST. The Direct Method however did not show the expected results and would need additional development work. PMID:27506252

  9. Transferability study of CHO cell clustering assays for monitoring of pertussis toxin activity in acellular pertussis vaccines.

    PubMed

    Isbrucker, R; Daas, A; Wagner, L; Costanzo, A

    2016-01-01

    Current regulations for acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines require that they are tested for the presence of residual or reversion-derived pertussis toxin (PTx) activity using the mouse histamine sensitisation test (HIST). Although a CHO cell clustering assay can be used by manufacturers to verify if sufficient inactivation of the substance has occurred in-process, this assay cannot be used at present for the final product due to the presence of aluminium adjuvants which interfere with mammalian cell cultures. Recently, 2 modified CHO cell clustering assays which accommodate for the adjuvant effects have been proposed as alternatives to the HIST. These modified assays eliminate the adjuvant-induced cytotoxicity either through dilution of the vaccine (called the Direct Method) or by introducing a porous barrier between the adjuvant and the cells (the Indirect Method). Transferability and suitability of these methods for testing of products present on the European market were investigated during a collaborative study organised by the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM). Thirteen laboratories participated in this study which included 4 aP-containing vaccines spiked by addition of PTx. This study also assessed the transferability of a standardised CHO cell clustering assay protocol for use with non-adjuvanted PTx preparations. Results showed that the majority of laboratories were able to detect the PTx spike in all 4 vaccines at concentrations of 4 IU/mL or lower using the Indirect Method. This sensitivity is in the range of the theoretical sensitivity of the HIST. The Direct Method however did not show the expected results and would need additional development work.

  10. Methane activation by cobalt cluster cations, Con+ (n=2-16): Reaction mechanisms and thermochemistry of cluster-CHx (x=0-3) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citir, Murat; Liu, Fuyi; Armentrout, P. B.

    2009-02-01

    The kinetic energy dependences of the reactions of Con+ (n =2-16) with CD4 are studied in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer over the energy range of 0-10 eV. The main products are hydride formation, ConD+, dehydrogenation to form ConCD2+, and double dehydrogenation yielding ConC+. These primary products decompose to form secondary and higher order products, ConCD+, Con-1D+, Con-1C+, Con-1CD+, and Con-1CD2+ at higher energies. Adduct formation of ConCD4+ is also observed for the largest cluster cations, n ≥10. In general, the efficiencies of the single and double dehydrogenation processes increase with cluster size, although the hexamer cation shows a reduced reactivity compared to its neighbors. All reactions exhibit thresholds, and cross sections for the various primary and secondary reactions are analyzed to yield reaction thresholds from which bond energies for cobalt cluster cations to D, C, CD, CD2, and CD3 are determined. The relative magnitudes of these bond energies are consistent with simple bond order considerations. Bond energies for larger clusters rapidly reach relatively constant values, which are used to estimate the chemisorption energies of the C, CD, CD2, and CD3 molecular fragments to cobalt surfaces.

  11. A cluster-randomised controlled trial of a physical activity and nutrition programme in retirement villages: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Anne-Marie; Jancey, Jonine; Lee, Andy H; Kerr, Deborah A; Hills, Andrew P; Anderson, Annie S; Howat, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Physical activity levels of Australia's ageing population are declining and coincidentally rates of overweight and obesity are increasing. Adequate levels of physical activity and a healthy diet are recognised as important lifestyle factors for the maintenance of a healthy weight and prevention of chronic diseases. Retirement village (RV) residents rarely engage in physical activity and nutrition programmes offered, with poor attendance and low use of existing facilities such as on-site fitness centres and classes and nutrition seminars. The RV provides a unique setting to access and engage with this older target group, to test the effectiveness of strategies to increase levels of physical activity, improve nutrition and maintain a healthy weight. Method and analysis This cluster-randomised controlled trial will evaluate a physical activity, nutrition and healthy weight management intervention for insufficiently active (‘not achieving 150 min of moderate-intensity physical activity per week’) adults aged 60–75 residing in RV's. A total of 400 participants will be recruited from 20 randomly selected RV's in Perth, Western Australia. Villages will be assigned to either the intervention group (n=10) or the control group (n=10) each containing 200 participants. The Retirement Village Physical Activity and Nutrition for Seniors (RVPANS) programme is a home-based physical activity and nutrition programme that includes educational resources, along with facilitators who will motivate and guide the participants during the 6-month intervention. Descriptive statistics and mixed regression models will be performed to assess the intervention effects. This trial will evaluate an intervention for the modification of health risk factors in the RV setting. Such research conducted in RV's has been limited. Ethics and dissemination Curtin University Human Research Ethics Committee (approval number: HR128/2012). Dissemination of the study results will occur

  12. Prominence activity related to CME observed by SOHO, Yohkoh and ground-based observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmieder, B.; vanDriel-Gesztelyi, L.; Wiik, J. E.; Kucera, T.; Thompson, B.; DeForest, C.; SaintCyr, C.; Simnett, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    Examples of destabilization of prominences and their associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are presented. During the 1996 campaigns of multi-wavelength observations with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), the Yohkoh satellite's soft X-ray telescope (SXT) and the Meudon (France) H alpha spectroheliograph eruptive solar filaments and prominences associated with the CMEs were observed. Two of the observed events showed that CMEs and 'brusques disparitions' (BDs) seem to be consequences of global magnetic field instability.

  13. ADAP–SLP-76 Binding Differentially Regulates Supramolecular Activation Cluster (SMAC) Formation Relative to T Cell–APC Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; McCann, Fiona E.; Gordan, John D.; Wu, Xiang; Raab, Monika; Malik, Talat H.; Davis, Daniel M.; Rudd, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    T cell–APC conjugation as mediated by leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)–intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 binding is followed by formation of the supramolecular activation cluster (SMAC) at the immunological synapse. The intracellular processes that regulate SMAC formation and its influence on T cell function are important questions to be addressed. Here, using a mutational approach, we demonstrate that binding of adaptor adhesion and degranulation promoting adaptor protein (ADAP) to SLP-76 differentially regulates peripheral SMAC (pSMAC) formation relative to conjugation. Although mutation of the YDDV sites (termed M12) disrupted SLP-76 SH2 domain binding and prevented the ability of ADAP to increase conjugation and LFA-1 clustering, M12 acted selectively as a dominant negative (DN) inhibitor of pSMAC formation, an effect that was paralleled by a DN effect on interleukin-2 production. ADAP also colocalized with LFA-1 at the immunological synapse. Our findings identify ADAP–SLP-76 binding as a signaling event that differentially regulates SMAC formation, and support a role for SMAC formation in T cell cytokine production. PMID:15477347

  14. Mechanisms of the S/CO/Se interchange reactions at FeMo-co, the active site cluster of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2016-09-28

    The active site of the N2 fixing enzyme nitrogenase is a C-centred Fe7MoS cluster (FeMo-co) containing a trigonal prism of six Fe atoms connected by a central belt of three doubly-bridging S atoms. The trigonal faces of the prism are capped via triply-bridging S atoms to Fe1 at one end and Mo at the other end. One of the central belt atoms, S2B, considered to be important in the chemical mechanism of the enzyme, has been shown by Spatzal, Rees et al. to undergo substitution by CO, and also substitution by Se in the presence of SeCN(-), under turnover conditions. Further, when turning over under C2H2 or N2/CO there is migration of Se to the other two belt bridging positions. These reactions are extraordinary, and unprecedented in metal chalcogenide cluster chemistry. Using density functional simulations, mechanisms for all of these reactions have been developed, involving the small molecules SCO, SeCO, C2H2S, C2H2Se, SeCN(-), SCN(-) functioning as carriers of S and Se atoms. The possibility that the S2B bridge position is vacant is discounted, because the barrier to formation of a bridge-void intermediate with two contiguous three-coordinate Fe atoms is too large. A bridging ligand is retained throughout the proposed mechanisms. Intermediates with Fe-C(O)-S/Se-Fe cycles and with SCO/SeCO C-bound to Fe are predicted. The energetics of the reaction trajectories show them to be feasible and easily reversible, consistent with experiment. Alternative mechanisms involving intramolecular differential rotatory rearrangements of the cluster to scramble the Se bridges are also examined, and shown to be very unlikely. The implications of these new facets of the reactivity of the FeMo-co cluster are discussed: it is considered that they are unlikely to be part of the mechanism of the physiological reactions of nitrogenase. PMID:27534727

  15. The formation of complex acetylcholine receptor clusters requires MuSK kinase activity and structural information from the MuSK extracellular domain

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Sania; Herbst, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Efficient synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) requires the topological maturation of the postsynaptic apparatus from an oval acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-rich plaque into a complex pretzel-shaped array of branches. However, compared to NMJ formation very little is known about the mechanisms that regulate NMJ maturation. Recently the process of in vivo transformation from plaque into pretzel has been reproduced in vitro by culturing myotubes aneurally on laminin-coated substrate. It was proposed that the formation of complex AChR clusters is regulated by a MuSK-dependent muscle intrinsic program. To elucidate the structure–function role of MuSK in the aneural maturation of AChR pretzels, we used muscle cell lines expressing MuSK mutant and chimeric proteins. Here we report, that besides its role during agrin-induced AChR clustering, MuSK kinase activity is also necessary for substrate-dependent cluster formation. Constitutive-active MuSK induces larger AChR clusters, a faster cluster maturation on laminin and increases the anchorage of AChRs to the cytoskeleton compared to MuSK wild-type. In addition, we find that the juxtamembrane region of MuSK, which has previously been shown to regulate agrin-induced AChR clustering, is unable to induce complex AChR clusters on laminin substrate. Most interestingly, MuSK kinase activity is not sufficient for laminin-dependent AChR cluster formation since the MuSK ectodomain is also required suggesting a so far undiscovered instructive role for the extracellular domain of MuSK. PMID:22210232

  16. Conserved structure and adjacent location of the thrombin receptor and protease-activated receptor 2 genes define a protease-activated receptor gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, M.; Ishii, K.; Kuo, W. L.; Piper, M.; Connolly, A.; Shi, Y. P.; Wu, R.; Lin, C. C.; Coughlin, S. R.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thrombin is a serine protease that elicits a variety of cellular responses. Molecular cloning of a thrombin receptor revealed a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by a novel proteolytic mechanism. Recently, a second protease-activated receptor was discovered and dubbed PAR2. PAR2 is highly related to the thrombin receptor by sequence and, like the thrombin receptor, is activated by cleavage of its amino terminal exodomain. Also like the thrombin receptor, PAR2 can be activated by the hexapeptide corresponding to its tethered ligand sequence independent of receptor cleavage. Thus, functionally, the thrombin receptor and PAR2 constitute a fledgling receptor family that shares a novel proteolytic activation mechanism. To further explore the relatedness of the two known protease-activated receptors and to examine the possibility that a protease-activated gene cluster might exist, we have compared the structure and chromosomal locations of the thrombin receptor and PAR2 genes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The genomic structures of the two protease-activated receptor genes were determined by analysis of lambda phage, P1 bacteriophage, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) genomic clones. Chromosomal location was determined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase chromosomes, and the relative distance separating the two genes was evaluated both by means of two-color FISH and analysis of YACs and BACs containing both genes. RESULTS: Analysis of genomic clones revealed that the two protease-activated receptor genes share a two-exon genomic structure in which the first exon encodes 5'-untranslated sequence and signal peptide, and the second exon encodes the mature receptor protein and 3'-untranslated sequence. The two receptor genes also share a common locus with the two human genes located at 5q13 and the two mouse genes at 13D2, a syntenic region of the mouse genome. These techniques also suggest that the physical distance separating

  17. Evolution of Three Geoeffective Shock-CME pairs in September 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. T.; Liou, K.; Wu, C. C.; Vourlidas, A.; Plunkett, S. P.; Dryer, Ph D., M.; Socker, D. G.; Wood, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Three sizable geomagnetic storms were recorded in September 2011. The intensity of geomagnetic storms (Dstmin: minimum Dst) are -69, -70, -101 nT and the storms' onset time are September 9, 17, and 26, respectively. A sequence of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) correspond causing these three geomagnetic storms. The severe geomagnetic storm (Dstmin < -100 nT) on 26 September was caused by a couple of CMEs erupted on 24 September. Wind spacecraft detected an interplanetary (IP) shock at ~11:18 UT on 26 September but no magnetic cloud was recorded behind the IP shock. A severe geomagnetic storm was recorded ~6 hours after the IP shock passed through the Wind spacecraft. Geomagnetic index (Dst) dropped to -101 nT which was due to the z-component of interplanetary magnetic field (Bz) dropped to ~ -20 nT. Both September 9th and 17th IP shocks have followed by a magnetic hole with a very sharp change in both magnetic field and density. Inside the magnetic holes, both solar wind velocity and temperature are almost constant, and the peak of density and dip of magnetic field occurred near the centre of the magnetic field hole. Peak densities were close to ~94, ~60 cm-3 near the centre of the hole on Sept. 09, 17, respectively. A global, three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical model with inputs based on actual solar observations (e.g., velocity of the CME) is used to simulate the responses of the 3-D heliosphere. These velocity pulses are deduced from STEREO-A which are used to minic the initiation of the observed 15 CMEs at lower boundary (2.5 Rs) to investigate the CME evolution from the Sun to the Earth during September 03-30, 2011.Simulated background solar wind parameters (velocity, density, magnetic field, and temperature) are matched well with 1 AU in-situ measurement from Wind spacecraft. In summary, we have successfully simulated these CMEs' evolution and the IP shocks arrival time at 1 AU by comparison with Wind measurement.It is found that

  18. Clustered Conserved Cysteines in Hyaluronan Synthase Mediate Cooperative Activation by Mg(2+) Ions and Severe Inhibitory Effects of Divalent Cations.

    PubMed

    Tlapak-Simmons, Valarie L; Medina, Andria P; Baggenstoss, Bruce A; Nguyen, Long; Baron, Christina A; Weigel, Paul H

    2011-11-15

    Hyaluronan synthase (HAS) uses UDP-GlcUA and UDP-GlcNAc to make hyaluronan (HA). Streptococcus equisimilis HAS (SeHAS) contains four conserved cysteines clustered near the membrane, and requires phospholipids and Mg(2+) for activity. Activity of membrane-bound or purified enzyme displayed a sigmoidal saturation profile for Mg(2+) with a Hill coefficient of 2. To assess if Cys residues are important for cooperativity we examined the Mg(2+) dependence of mutants with various combinations of Cys-to-Ala mutations. All Cys-mutants lost the cooperative response to Mg(2+). In the presence of Mg(2+), other divalent cations inhibited SeHAS with different potencies (Cu(2+)~Zn(2+) >Co(2+) >Ni(2+) >Mn(2+) >Ba(2+) Sr(2+) Ca(2+)). Some divalent metal ions likely inhibit by displacement of Mg(2+)-UDP-Sugar complexes (e.g. Ca(2+), Sr(2+) and Ba(2+) had apparent Ki values of 2-5 mM). In contrast, Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) inhibited more potently (apparent Ki ≤ 0.2 mM). Inhibition of Cys-null SeHAS by Cu(2+), but not Zn(2+), was greatly attenuated compared to wildtype. Double and triple Cys-mutants showed differing sensitivities to Zn(2+) or Cu(2+). Wildtype SeHAS allowed to make HA prior to exposure to Zn(2+) or Cu(2+) was protected from inhibition, indicating that access of metal ions to sensitive functional groups was hindered in processively acting HA•HAS complexes. We conclude that clustered Cys residues mediate cooperative interactions with Mg(2+) and that transition metal ions inhibit SeHAS very potently by interacting with one or more of these -SH groups.

  19. Clustering of T cell ligands on artificial APC membranes influences T cell activation and protein kinase C theta translocation to the T cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Francesca; Barnett, Joellen; Bi, Kun; Samodal, Rodrigo; Lanza, Paola; Marchese, Patrizia; Billetta, Rosario; Vita, Randi; Klein, Mark R; Prakken, Berent; Kwok, William W; Sercarz, Eli; Altman, Amnon; Albani, Salvatore

    2005-03-15

    T cell activation is associated with active clustering of relevant molecules in membrane microdomains defined as the supramolecular activation cluster. The contact area between these regions on the surface of T cells and APC is defined as the immunological synapse. It has been recently shown that preclustering of MHC-peptide complexes in membrane microdomains on the APC surface affects the efficiency of immune synapse formation and the related T cell activation. Disruption of such clusters may reduce the efficiency of stimulation. We describe here an entirely artificial system for Ag-specific, ex vivo stimulation of human polyclonal T cells (artificial APC (aAPC)). aAPC are based on artificial membrane bilayers containing discrete membrane microdomains encompassing T cell ligands (i.e., appropriate MHC-peptide complexes in association with costimulatory molecules). We show here that preclustering of T cell ligands triggered a degree of T cell activation significantly higher than the one achieved when we used either soluble tetramers or aAPC in which MHC-peptide complexes were uniformly distributed within artificial bilayer membranes. This increased efficiency in stimulation was mirrored by increased translocation from the cytoplasm to the membrane of protein kinase theta, a T cell signaling molecule that colocalizes with the TCR within the supramolecular activation cluster, thus indicating efficient engagement of T cell activation pathways. Engineered aAPC may have immediate application for basic and clinical immunology studies pertaining to modulation of T cells ex vivo.

  20. EVOLUTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN GALAXY CLUSTERS. I. THE EFFECT OF INJECTION ENERGY AND REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Li Shengtai; Collins, David C.; Norman, Michael L. E-mail: hli@lanl.go E-mail: dcollins@physics.ucsd.ed

    2010-12-20

    We present a series of cosmological magnetohydrodynamic simulations that simultaneously follow the formation of a galaxy cluster and evolution of magnetic fields ejected by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Specifically, we investigate the influence of both the epoch of the AGN (z {approx} 3-0.5) and the AGN energy ({approx}3 x 10{sup 57}- 2 x 10{sup 60} erg) on the final magnetic field distribution in a relatively massive cluster (M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 15} M{sub sun}). We find that as long as the AGN magnetic fields are ejected before the major mergers in the cluster formation history, magnetic fields can be transported throughout the cluster and can be further amplified by the intracluster medium (ICM) turbulence caused by hierarchical mergers during the cluster formation process. The total magnetic energy in the cluster can reach {approx}10{sup 61} erg, with micro Gauss fields distributed over the {approx}Mpc scale. The amplification of the total magnetic energy by the ICM turbulence can be significant, up to {approx}1000 times in some cases. Therefore even weak magnetic fields from AGNs can be used to magnetize the cluster to the observed level. The final magnetic energy in the ICM is determined by the ICM turbulent energy, with a weak dependence on the AGN injection energy. We discuss the properties of magnetic fields throughout the cluster and the synthetic Faraday rotation measure maps they produce. We also show that high spatial resolution over most of the magnetic regions of the cluster is very important to capture the small-scale dynamo process and maintain the magnetic field structure in our simulations.