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Sample records for cmos image sensor

  1. CMOS foveal image sensor chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Peter (Inventor); Sridhar, Ramalingam (Inventor); Bandera, Cesar (Inventor); Xia, Shu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A foveal image sensor integrated circuit comprising a plurality of CMOS active pixel sensors arranged both within and about a central fovea region of the chip. The pixels in the central fovea region have a smaller size than the pixels arranged in peripheral rings about the central region. A new photocharge normalization scheme and associated circuitry normalizes the output signals from the different size pixels in the array. The pixels are assembled into a multi-resolution rectilinear foveal image sensor chip using a novel access scheme to reduce the number of analog RAM cells needed. Localized spatial resolution declines monotonically with offset from the imager's optical axis, analogous to biological foveal vision.

  2. CMOS sensors for atmospheric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratlong, Jérôme; Burt, David; Jerram, Paul; Mayer, Frédéric; Walker, Andrew; Simpson, Robert; Johnson, Steven; Hubbard, Wendy

    2017-09-01

    Recent European atmospheric imaging missions have seen a move towards the use of CMOS sensors for the visible and NIR parts of the spectrum. These applications have particular challenges that are completely different to those that have driven the development of commercial sensors for applications such as cell-phone or SLR cameras. This paper will cover the design and performance of general-purpose image sensors that are to be used in the MTG (Meteosat Third Generation) and MetImage satellites and the technology challenges that they have presented. We will discuss how CMOS imagers have been designed with 4T pixel sizes of up to 250 μm square achieving good charge transfer efficiency, or low lag, with signal levels up to 2M electrons and with high line rates. In both devices a low noise analogue read-out chain is used with correlated double sampling to suppress the readout noise and give a maximum dynamic range that is significantly larger than in standard commercial devices. Radiation hardness is a particular challenge for CMOS detectors and both of these sensors have been designed to be fully radiation hard with high latch-up and single-event-upset tolerances, which is now silicon proven on MTG. We will also cover the impact of ionising radiation on these devices. Because with such large pixels the photodiodes have a large open area, front illumination technology is sufficient to meet the detection efficiency requirements but with thicker than standard epitaxial silicon to give improved IR response (note that this makes latch up protection even more important). However with narrow band illumination reflections from the front and back of the dielectric stack on the top of the sensor produce Fabry-Perot étalon effects, which have been minimised with process modifications. We will also cover the addition of precision narrow band filters inside the MTG package to provide a complete imaging subsystem. Control of reflected light is also critical in obtaining the

  3. CMOS Image Sensors for High Speed Applications.

    PubMed

    El-Desouki, Munir; Deen, M Jamal; Fang, Qiyin; Liu, Louis; Tse, Frances; Armstrong, David

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in deep submicron CMOS technologies and improved pixel designs have enabled CMOS-based imagers to surpass charge-coupled devices (CCD) imaging technology for mainstream applications. The parallel outputs that CMOS imagers can offer, in addition to complete camera-on-a-chip solutions due to being fabricated in standard CMOS technologies, result in compelling advantages in speed and system throughput. Since there is a practical limit on the minimum pixel size (4∼5 μm) due to limitations in the optics, CMOS technology scaling can allow for an increased number of transistors to be integrated into the pixel to improve both detection and signal processing. Such smart pixels truly show the potential of CMOS technology for imaging applications allowing CMOS imagers to achieve the image quality and global shuttering performance necessary to meet the demands of ultrahigh-speed applications. In this paper, a review of CMOS-based high-speed imager design is presented and the various implementations that target ultrahigh-speed imaging are described. This work also discusses the design, layout and simulation results of an ultrahigh acquisition rate CMOS active-pixel sensor imager that can take 8 frames at a rate of more than a billion frames per second (fps).

  4. Toward CMOS image sensor based glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Devadhasan, Jasmine Pramila; Kim, Sanghyo

    2012-09-07

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor is a powerful tool for biosensing applications. In this present study, CMOS image sensor has been exploited for detecting glucose levels by simple photon count variation with high sensitivity. Various concentrations of glucose (100 mg dL(-1) to 1000 mg dL(-1)) were added onto a simple poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chip and the oxidation of glucose was catalyzed with the aid of an enzymatic reaction. Oxidized glucose produces a brown color with the help of chromogen during enzymatic reaction and the color density varies with the glucose concentration. Photons pass through the PDMS chip with varying color density and hit the sensor surface. Photon count was recognized by CMOS image sensor depending on the color density with respect to the glucose concentration and it was converted into digital form. By correlating the obtained digital results with glucose concentration it is possible to measure a wide range of blood glucose levels with great linearity based on CMOS image sensor and therefore this technique will promote a convenient point-of-care diagnosis.

  5. Log polar image sensor in CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffer, Danny; Dierickx, Bart; Pardo, Fernando; Vlummens, Jan; Meynants, Guy; Hermans, Lou

    1996-08-01

    We report on the design, design issues, fabrication and performance of a log-polar CMOS image sensor. The sensor is developed for the use in a videophone system for deaf and hearing impaired people, who are not capable of communicating through a 'normal' telephone. The system allows 15 detailed images per second to be transmitted over existing telephone lines. This framerate is sufficient for conversations by means of sign language or lip reading. The pixel array of the sensor consists of 76 concentric circles with (up to) 128 pixels per circle, in total 8013 pixels. The interior pixels have a pitch of 14 micrometers, up to 250 micrometers at the border. The 8013-pixels image is mapped (log-polar transformation) in a X-Y addressable 76 by 128 array.

  6. USB video image controller used in CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenxuan; Wang, Yuxia; Fan, Hong

    2002-09-01

    CMOS process is mainstream technique in VLSI, possesses high integration. SE402 is multifunction microcontroller, which integrates image data I/O ports, clock control, exposure control and digital signal processing into one chip. SE402 reduces the number of chips and PCB's room. The paper studies emphatically on USB video image controller used in CMOS image sensor and give the application on digital still camera.

  7. CMOS Image Sensors: Electronic Camera On A Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Recent advancements in CMOS image sensor technology are reviewed, including both passive pixel sensors and active pixel sensors. On- chip analog to digital converters and on-chip timing and control circuits permit realization of an electronic camera-on-a-chip. Highly miniaturized imaging systems based on CMOS image sensor technology are emerging as a competitor to charge-coupled devices for low cost uses.

  8. CMOS image sensor with contour enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Liya; Lai, Xiaofeng; Chen, Kun; Yuan, Xianghui

    2010-10-01

    Imitating the signal acquisition and processing of vertebrate retina, a CMOS image sensor with bionic pre-processing circuit is designed. Integration of signal-process circuit on-chip can reduce the requirement of bandwidth and precision of the subsequent interface circuit, and simplify the design of the computer-vision system. This signal pre-processing circuit consists of adaptive photoreceptor, spatial filtering resistive network and Op-Amp calculation circuit. The adaptive photoreceptor unit with a dynamic range of approximately 100 dB has a good self-adaptability for the transient changes in light intensity instead of intensity level itself. Spatial low-pass filtering resistive network used to mimic the function of horizontal cell, is composed of the horizontal resistor (HRES) circuit and OTA (Operational Transconductance Amplifier) circuit. HRES circuit, imitating dendrite of the neuron cell, comprises of two series MOS transistors operated in weak inversion region. Appending two diode-connected n-channel transistors to a simple transconductance amplifier forms the OTA Op-Amp circuit, which provides stable bias voltage for the gate of MOS transistors in HRES circuit, while serves as an OTA voltage follower to provide input voltage for the network nodes. The Op-Amp calculation circuit with a simple two-stage Op-Amp achieves the image contour enhancing. By adjusting the bias voltage of the resistive network, the smoothing effect can be tuned to change the effect of image's contour enhancement. Simulations of cell circuit and 16×16 2D circuit array are implemented using CSMC 0.5μm DPTM CMOS process.

  9. CMOS image sensors: State-of-the-art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theuwissen, Albert J. P.

    2008-09-01

    This paper gives an overview of the state-of-the-art of CMOS image sensors. The main focus is put on the shrinkage of the pixels : what is the effect on the performance characteristics of the imagers and on the various physical parameters of the camera ? How is the CMOS pixel architecture optimized to cope with the negative performance effects of the ever-shrinking pixel size ? On the other hand, the smaller dimensions in CMOS technology allow further integration on column level and even on pixel level. This will make CMOS imagers even smarter that they are already.

  10. Smart CMOS image sensor for lightning detection and imaging.

    PubMed

    Rolando, Sébastien; Goiffon, Vincent; Magnan, Pierre; Corbière, Franck; Molina, Romain; Tulet, Michel; Bréart-de-Boisanger, Michel; Saint-Pé, Olivier; Guiry, Saïprasad; Larnaudie, Franck; Leone, Bruno; Perez-Cuevas, Leticia; Zayer, Igor

    2013-03-01

    We present a CMOS image sensor dedicated to lightning detection and imaging. The detector has been designed to evaluate the potentiality of an on-chip lightning detection solution based on a smart sensor. This evaluation is performed in the frame of the predevelopment phase of the lightning detector that will be implemented in the Meteosat Third Generation Imager satellite for the European Space Agency. The lightning detection process is performed by a smart detector combining an in-pixel frame-to-frame difference comparison with an adjustable threshold and on-chip digital processing allowing an efficient localization of a faint lightning pulse on the entire large format array at a frequency of 1 kHz. A CMOS prototype sensor with a 256×256 pixel array and a 60 μm pixel pitch has been fabricated using a 0.35 μm 2P 5M technology and tested to validate the selected detection approach.

  11. A 128 x 128 CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensor for Highly Integrated Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    A new CMOS-based image sensor that is intrinsically compatible with on-chip CMOS circuitry is reported. The new CMOS active pixel image sensor achieves low noise, high sensitivity, X-Y addressability, and has simple timing requirements. The image sensor was fabricated using a 2 micrometer p-well CMOS process, and consists of a 128 x 128 array of 40 micrometer x 40 micrometer pixels. The CMOS image sensor technology enables highly integrated smart image sensors, and makes the design, incorporation and fabrication of such sensors widely accessible to the integrated circuit community.

  12. Optical design of microlens array for CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongzhu; Lai, Liping

    2016-10-01

    The optical crosstalk between the pixel units can influence the image quality of CMOS image sensor. In the meantime, the duty ratio of CMOS is low because of its pixel structure. These two factors cause the low detection sensitivity of CMOS. In order to reduce the optical crosstalk and improve the fill factor of CMOS image sensor, a microlens array has been designed and integrated with CMOS. The initial parameters of the microlens array have been calculated according to the structure of a CMOS. Then the parameters have been optimized by using ZEMAX and the microlens arrays with different substrate thicknesses have been compared. The results show that in order to obtain the best imaging quality, when the effect of optical crosstalk for CMOS is the minimum, the best distance between microlens array and CMOS is about 19.3 μm. When incident light successively passes through microlens array and the distance, obtaining the minimum facula is around 0.347 um in the active area. In addition, when the incident angle of the light is 0o 22o, the microlens array has obvious inhibitory effect on the optical crosstalk. And the anti-crosstalk distance between microlens array and CMOS is 0 μm 162 μm.

  13. Broadband image sensor array based on graphene-CMOS integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Stijn; Navickaite, Gabriele; Monasterio, Carles; Gupta, Shuchi; Piqueras, Juan José; Pérez, Raúl; Burwell, Gregory; Nikitskiy, Ivan; Lasanta, Tania; Galán, Teresa; Puma, Eric; Centeno, Alba; Pesquera, Amaia; Zurutuza, Amaia; Konstantatos, Gerasimos; Koppens, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Integrated circuits based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) are at the heart of the technological revolution of the past 40 years, enabling compact and low-cost microelectronic circuits and imaging systems. However, the diversification of this platform into applications other than microcircuits and visible-light cameras has been impeded by the difficulty to combine semiconductors other than silicon with CMOS. Here, we report the monolithic integration of a CMOS integrated circuit with graphene, operating as a high-mobility phototransistor. We demonstrate a high-resolution, broadband image sensor and operate it as a digital camera that is sensitive to ultraviolet, visible and infrared light (300-2,000 nm). The demonstrated graphene-CMOS integration is pivotal for incorporating 2D materials into the next-generation microelectronics, sensor arrays, low-power integrated photonics and CMOS imaging systems covering visible, infrared and terahertz frequencies.

  14. CMOS Imaging Sensor Technology for Aerial Mapping Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Klaus; Welzenbach, Martin; Timm, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In June 2015 Leica Geosystems launched the first large format aerial mapping camera using CMOS sensor technology, the Leica DMC III. This paper describes the motivation to change from CCD sensor technology to CMOS for the development of this new aerial mapping camera. In 2002 the DMC first generation was developed by Z/I Imaging. It was the first large format digital frame sensor designed for mapping applications. In 2009 Z/I Imaging designed the DMC II which was the first digital aerial mapping camera using a single ultra large CCD sensor to avoid stitching of smaller CCDs. The DMC III is now the third generation of large format frame sensor developed by Z/I Imaging and Leica Geosystems for the DMC camera family. It is an evolution of the DMC II using the same system design with one large monolithic PAN sensor and four multi spectral camera heads for R,G, B and NIR. For the first time a 391 Megapixel large CMOS sensor had been used as PAN chromatic sensor, which is an industry record. Along with CMOS technology goes a range of technical benefits. The dynamic range of the CMOS sensor is approx. twice the range of a comparable CCD sensor and the signal to noise ratio is significantly better than with CCDs. Finally results from the first DMC III customer installations and test flights will be presented and compared with other CCD based aerial sensors.

  15. Robust Dehaze Algorithm for Degraded Image of CMOS Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chen; Bi, Du-Yan; Sui, Ping; Chao, Ai-Nong; Wang, Yun-Fei

    2017-09-22

    The CMOS (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor) is a new type of solid image sensor device widely used in object tracking, object recognition, intelligent navigation fields, and so on. However, images captured by outdoor CMOS sensor devices are usually affected by suspended atmospheric particles (such as haze), causing a reduction in image contrast, color distortion problems, and so on. In view of this, we propose a novel dehazing approach based on a local consistent Markov random field (MRF) framework. The neighboring clique in traditional MRF is extended to the non-neighboring clique, which is defined on local consistent blocks based on two clues, where both the atmospheric light and transmission map satisfy the character of local consistency. In this framework, our model can strengthen the restriction of the whole image while incorporating more sophisticated statistical priors, resulting in more expressive power of modeling, thus, solving inadequate detail recovery effectively and alleviating color distortion. Moreover, the local consistent MRF framework can obtain details while maintaining better results for dehazing, which effectively improves the image quality captured by the CMOS image sensor. Experimental results verified that the method proposed has the combined advantages of detail recovery and color preservation.

  16. Design and fabrication of vertically-integrated CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Skorka, Orit; Joseph, Dileepan

    2011-01-01

    Technologies to fabricate integrated circuits (IC) with 3D structures are an emerging trend in IC design. They are based on vertical stacking of active components to form heterogeneous microsystems. Electronic image sensors will benefit from these technologies because they allow increased pixel-level data processing and device optimization. This paper covers general principles in the design of vertically-integrated (VI) CMOS image sensors that are fabricated by flip-chip bonding. These sensors are composed of a CMOS die and a photodetector die. As a specific example, the paper presents a VI-CMOS image sensor that was designed at the University of Alberta, and fabricated with the help of CMC Microsystems and Micralyne Inc. To realize prototypes, CMOS dies with logarithmic active pixels were prepared in a commercial process, and photodetector dies with metal-semiconductor-metal devices were prepared in a custom process using hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The paper also describes a digital camera that was developed to test the prototype. In this camera, scenes captured by the image sensor are read using an FPGA board, and sent in real time to a PC over USB for data processing and display. Experimental results show that the VI-CMOS prototype has a higher dynamic range and a lower dark limit than conventional electronic image sensors.

  17. Design and Fabrication of Vertically-Integrated CMOS Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Skorka, Orit; Joseph, Dileepan

    2011-01-01

    Technologies to fabricate integrated circuits (IC) with 3D structures are an emerging trend in IC design. They are based on vertical stacking of active components to form heterogeneous microsystems. Electronic image sensors will benefit from these technologies because they allow increased pixel-level data processing and device optimization. This paper covers general principles in the design of vertically-integrated (VI) CMOS image sensors that are fabricated by flip-chip bonding. These sensors are composed of a CMOS die and a photodetector die. As a specific example, the paper presents a VI-CMOS image sensor that was designed at the University of Alberta, and fabricated with the help of CMC Microsystems and Micralyne Inc. To realize prototypes, CMOS dies with logarithmic active pixels were prepared in a commercial process, and photodetector dies with metal-semiconductor-metal devices were prepared in a custom process using hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The paper also describes a digital camera that was developed to test the prototype. In this camera, scenes captured by the image sensor are read using an FPGA board, and sent in real time to a PC over USB for data processing and display. Experimental results show that the VI-CMOS prototype has a higher dynamic range and a lower dark limit than conventional electronic image sensors. PMID:22163860

  18. CMOS Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Simple Floating Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Nakamura, Junichi; Kemeny, Sabrina E.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental complementary metal-oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) active-pixel image sensor integrated circuit features simple floating-gate structure, with metal-oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) as active circuit element in each pixel. Provides flexibility of readout modes, no kTC noise, and relatively simple structure suitable for high-density arrays. Features desirable for "smart sensor" applications.

  19. Research-grade CMOS image sensors for demanding space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Pé, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Magnan, Pierre; Corbière, Franck; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe; Belliot, Pierre

    2017-11-01

    Imaging detectors are key elements for optical instruments and sensors on board space missions dedicated to Earth observation (high resolution imaging, atmosphere spectroscopy...), Solar System exploration (micro cameras, guidance for autonomous vehicle...) and Universe observation (space telescope focal planes, guiding sensors...). This market has been dominated by CCD technology for long. Since the mid- 90s, CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) have been competing with CCDs for more and more consumer domains (webcams, cell phones, digital cameras...). Featuring significant advantages over CCD sensors for space applications (lower power consumption, smaller system size, better radiations behaviour...), CMOS technology is also expanding in this field, justifying specific R&D and development programs funded by national and European space agencies (mainly CNES, DGA, and ESA). All along the 90s and thanks to their increasingly improving performances, CIS have started to be successfully used for more and more demanding applications, from vision and control functions requiring low-level performances to guidance applications requiring medium-level performances. Recent technology improvements have made possible the manufacturing of research-grade CIS that are able to compete with CCDs in the high-performances arena. After an introduction outlining the growing interest of optical instruments designers for CMOS image sensors, this talk will present the existing and foreseen ways to reach high-level electro-optics performances for CIS. The developments of CIS prototypes built using an imaging CMOS process and of devices based on improved designs will be presented.

  20. Research-grade CMOS image sensors for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Pe, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Magnan, Pierre; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe; Corbiere, Franck; Belliot, Pierre; Estribeau, Magali

    2004-11-01

    Imaging detectors are key elements for optical instruments and sensors on board space missions dedicated to Earth observation (high resolution imaging, atmosphere spectroscopy...), Solar System exploration (micro cameras, guidance for autonomous vehicle...) and Universe observation (space telescope focal planes, guiding sensors...). This market has been dominated by CCD technology for long. Since the mid-90s, CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) have been competing with CCDs for consumer domains (webcams, cell phones, digital cameras...). Featuring significant advantages over CCD sensors for space applications (lower power consumption, smaller system size, better radiations behaviour...), CMOS technology is also expanding in this field, justifying specific R&D and development programs funded by national and European space agencies (mainly CNES, DGA and ESA). All along the 90s and thanks to their increasingly improving performances, CIS have started to be successfully used for more and more demanding space applications, from vision and control functions requiring low-level performances to guidance applications requiring medium-level performances. Recent technology improvements have made possible the manufacturing of research-grade CIS that are able to compete with CCDs in the high-performances arena. After an introduction outlining the growing interest of optical instruments designers for CMOS image sensors, this paper will present the existing and foreseen ways to reach high-level electro-optics performances for CIS. The developments and performances of CIS prototypes built using an imaging CMOS process will be presented in the corresponding section.

  1. Research-grade CMOS image sensors for demanding space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Pé, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Magnan, Pierre; Corbière, Franck; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe; Belliot, Pierre

    2004-06-01

    Imaging detectors are key elements for optical instruments and sensors on board space missions dedicated to Earth observation (high resolution imaging, atmosphere spectroscopy...), Solar System exploration (micro cameras, guidance for autonomous vehicle...) and Universe observation (space telescope focal planes, guiding sensors...). This market has been dominated by CCD technology for long. Since the mid-90s, CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) have been competing with CCDs for more and more consumer domains (webcams, cell phones, digital cameras...). Featuring significant advantages over CCD sensors for space applications (lower power consumption, smaller system size, better radiations behaviour...), CMOS technology is also expanding in this field, justifying specific R&D and development programs funded by national and European space agencies (mainly CNES, DGA, and ESA). All along the 90s and thanks to their increasingly improving performances, CIS have started to be successfully used for more and more demanding applications, from vision and control functions requiring low-level performances to guidance applications requiring medium-level performances. Recent technology improvements have made possible the manufacturing of research-grade CIS that are able to compete with CCDs in the high-performances arena. After an introduction outlining the growing interest of optical instruments designers for CMOS image sensors, this talk will present the existing and foreseen ways to reach high-level electro-optics performances for CIS. The developments of CIS prototypes built using an imaging CMOS process and of devices based on improved designs will be presented.

  2. Contact CMOS imaging of gaseous oxygen sensor array

    PubMed Central

    Daivasagaya, Daisy S.; Yao, Lei; Yi Yung, Ka; Hajj-Hassan, Mohamad; Cheung, Maurice C.; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.; Bright, Frank V.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a compact luminescent gaseous oxygen (O2) sensor microsystem based on the direct integration of sensor elements with a polymeric optical filter and placed on a low power complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager integrated circuit (IC). The sensor operates on the measurement of excited-state emission intensity of O2-sensitive luminophore molecules tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) ([Ru(dpp)3]2+) encapsulated within sol–gel derived xerogel thin films. The polymeric optical filter is made with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that is mixed with a dye (Sudan-II). The PDMS membrane surface is molded to incorporate arrays of trapezoidal microstructures that serve to focus the optical sensor signals on to the imager pixels. The molded PDMS membrane is then attached with the PDMS color filter. The xerogel sensor arrays are contact printed on top of the PDMS trapezoidal lens-like microstructures. The CMOS imager uses a 32 × 32 (1024 elements) array of active pixel sensors and each pixel includes a high-gain phototransistor to convert the detected optical signals into electrical currents. Correlated double sampling circuit, pixel address, digital control and signal integration circuits are also implemented on-chip. The CMOS imager data is read out as a serial coded signal. The CMOS imager consumes a static power of 320 µW and an average dynamic power of 625 µW when operating at 100 Hz sampling frequency and 1.8 V DC. This CMOS sensor system provides a useful platform for the development of miniaturized optical chemical gas sensors. PMID:24493909

  3. Contact CMOS imaging of gaseous oxygen sensor array.

    PubMed

    Daivasagaya, Daisy S; Yao, Lei; Yi Yung, Ka; Hajj-Hassan, Mohamad; Cheung, Maurice C; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Bright, Frank V

    2011-10-01

    We describe a compact luminescent gaseous oxygen (O 2 ) sensor microsystem based on the direct integration of sensor elements with a polymeric optical filter and placed on a low power complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager integrated circuit (IC). The sensor operates on the measurement of excited-state emission intensity of O 2 -sensitive luminophore molecules tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) ([Ru(dpp) 3 ] 2+ ) encapsulated within sol-gel derived xerogel thin films. The polymeric optical filter is made with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that is mixed with a dye (Sudan-II). The PDMS membrane surface is molded to incorporate arrays of trapezoidal microstructures that serve to focus the optical sensor signals on to the imager pixels. The molded PDMS membrane is then attached with the PDMS color filter. The xerogel sensor arrays are contact printed on top of the PDMS trapezoidal lens-like microstructures. The CMOS imager uses a 32 × 32 (1024 elements) array of active pixel sensors and each pixel includes a high-gain phototransistor to convert the detected optical signals into electrical currents. Correlated double sampling circuit, pixel address, digital control and signal integration circuits are also implemented on-chip. The CMOS imager data is read out as a serial coded signal. The CMOS imager consumes a static power of 320 µW and an average dynamic power of 625 µW when operating at 100 Hz sampling frequency and 1.8 V DC. This CMOS sensor system provides a useful platform for the development of miniaturized optical chemical gas sensors.

  4. CMOS image sensor-based implantable glucose sensor using glucose-responsive fluorescent hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Takashi; Takahashi, Masayuki; Uejima, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Keita; Kawamura, Toshikazu; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Okitsu, Teru; Takeuchi, Shoji; Ohta, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A CMOS image sensor-based implantable glucose sensor based on an optical-sensing scheme is proposed and experimentally verified. A glucose-responsive fluorescent hydrogel is used as the mediator in the measurement scheme. The wired implantable glucose sensor was realized by integrating a CMOS image sensor, hydrogel, UV light emitting diodes, and an optical filter on a flexible polyimide substrate. Feasibility of the glucose sensor was verified by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. PMID:25426316

  5. CMOS image sensor-based implantable glucose sensor using glucose-responsive fluorescent hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Takashi; Takahashi, Masayuki; Uejima, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Keita; Kawamura, Toshikazu; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Okitsu, Teru; Takeuchi, Shoji; Ohta, Jun

    2014-11-01

    A CMOS image sensor-based implantable glucose sensor based on an optical-sensing scheme is proposed and experimentally verified. A glucose-responsive fluorescent hydrogel is used as the mediator in the measurement scheme. The wired implantable glucose sensor was realized by integrating a CMOS image sensor, hydrogel, UV light emitting diodes, and an optical filter on a flexible polyimide substrate. Feasibility of the glucose sensor was verified by both in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  6. 77 FR 26787 - Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same; Notice of Receipt of Complaint...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Docket No. 2895] Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products.... International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain CMOS image sensors and...

  7. CMOS image sensors as an efficient platform for glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Devadhasan, Jasmine Pramila; Kim, Sanghyo; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2013-10-07

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors have been used previously in the analysis of biological samples. In the present study, a CMOS image sensor was used to monitor the concentration of oxidized mouse plasma glucose (86-322 mg dL(-1)) based on photon count variation. Measurement of the concentration of oxidized glucose was dependent on changes in color intensity; color intensity increased with increasing glucose concentration. The high color density of glucose highly prevented photons from passing through the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chip, which suggests that the photon count was altered by color intensity. Photons were detected by a photodiode in the CMOS image sensor and converted to digital numbers by an analog to digital converter (ADC). Additionally, UV-spectral analysis and time-dependent photon analysis proved the efficiency of the detection system. This simple, effective, and consistent method for glucose measurement shows that CMOS image sensors are efficient devices for monitoring glucose in point-of-care applications.

  8. Integrated imaging sensor systems with CMOS active pixel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, G.; Cunningham, T.; Ortiz, M.; Heynssens, J.; Sun, C.; Hancock, B.; Seshadri, S.; Wrigley, C.; McCarty, K.; Pain, B.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses common approaches to CMOS APS technology, as well as specific results on the five-wire programmable digital camera-on-a-chip developed at JPL. The paper also reports recent research in the design, operation, and performance of APS imagers for several imager applications.

  9. Nanosecond-laser induced crosstalk of CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Rongzhen; Wang, Yanbin; Chen, Qianrong; Zhou, Xuanfeng; Ren, Guangsen; Cui, Longfei; Li, Hua; Hao, Daoliang

    2018-02-01

    The CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) is photoelectricity image device which focused the photosensitive array, amplifier, A/D transfer, storage, DSP, computer interface circuit on the same silicon substrate[1]. It has low power consumption, high integration,low cost etc. With large scale integrated circuit technology progress, the noise suppression level of CIS is enhanced unceasingly, and its image quality is getting better and better. It has been in the security monitoring, biometrice, detection and imaging and even military reconnaissance and other field is widely used. CIS is easily disturbed and damaged while it is irradiated by laser. It is of great significance to study the effect of laser irradiation on optoelectronic countermeasure and device for the laser strengthening resistance is of great significance. There are some researchers have studied the laser induced disturbed and damaged of CIS. They focused on the saturation, supersaturated effects, and they observed different effects as for unsaturation, saturation, supersaturated, allsaturated and pixel flip etc. This paper research 1064nm laser interference effect in a typical before type CMOS, and observring the saturated crosstalk and half the crosstalk line. This paper extracted from cmos devices working principle and signal detection methods such as the Angle of the formation mechanism of the crosstalk line phenomenon are analyzed.

  10. A platform for European CMOS image sensors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minoglou, K.; San Segundo Bello, D.; Sabuncuoglu Tezcan, D.; Haspeslagh, L.; Van Olmen, J.; Merry, B.; Cavaco, C.; Mazzamuto, F.; Toqué-Trésonne, I.; Moirin, R.; Brouwer, M.; Toccafondi, M.; Preti, G.; Rosmeulen, M.; De Moor, P.

    2017-11-01

    Both ESA and the EC have identified the need for a supply chain of CMOS imagers for space applications which uses solely European sources. An essential requirement on this supply chain is the platformization of the process modules, in particular when it comes to very specific processing steps, such as those required for the manufacturing of backside illuminated image sensors. This is the goal of the European (EC/FP7/SPACE) funded project EUROCIS. All EUROCIS partners have excellent know-how and track record in the expertise fields required. Imec has been leading the imager chip design and the front side and backside processing. LASSE, as a major player in the laser annealing supplier sector, has been focusing on the optimization of the process related to the backside passivation of the image sensors. TNO, known worldwide as a top developer of instruments for scientific research, including space research and sensors for satellites, has contributed in the domain of optical layers for space instruments and optimized antireflective coatings. Finally, Selex ES, as a world-wide leader for manufacturing instruments with expertise in various space missions and programs, has defined the image sensor specifications and is taking care of the final device characterization. In this paper, an overview of the process flow, the results on test structures and imagers processed using this platform will be presented.

  11. 77 FR 33488 - Certain CMOS Image Sensors and Products Containing Same; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-846] Certain CMOS Image Sensors and..., the sale for importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain CMOS image sensors and products containing same by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S. Patent No...

  12. Efficient demodulation scheme for rolling-shutter-patterning of CMOS image sensor based visible light communications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Wei; Chow, Chi-Wai; Liu, Yang; Yeh, Chien-Hung

    2017-10-02

    Recently even the low-end mobile-phones are equipped with a high-resolution complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor. This motivates using a CMOS image sensor for visible light communication (VLC). Here we propose and demonstrate an efficient demodulation scheme to synchronize and demodulate the rolling shutter pattern in image sensor based VLC. The implementation algorithm is discussed. The bit-error-rate (BER) performance and processing latency are evaluated and compared with other thresholding schemes.

  13. Crosstalk quantification, analysis, and trends in CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Blockstein, Lior; Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2010-08-20

    Pixel crosstalk (CTK) consists of three components, optical CTK (OCTK), electrical CTK (ECTK), and spectral CTK (SCTK). The CTK has been classified into two groups: pixel-architecture dependent and pixel-architecture independent. The pixel-architecture-dependent CTK (PADC) consists of the sum of two CTK components, i.e., the OCTK and the ECTK. This work presents a short summary of a large variety of methods for PADC reduction. Following that, this work suggests a clear quantifiable definition of PADC. Three complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors based on different technologies were empirically measured, using a unique scanning technology, the S-cube. The PADC is analyzed, and technology trends are shown.

  14. Imaging system design and image interpolation based on CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-feng; Liang, Fei; Guo, Rui

    2009-11-01

    An image acquisition system is introduced, which consists of a color CMOS image sensor (OV9620), SRAM (CY62148), CPLD (EPM7128AE) and DSP (TMS320VC5509A). The CPLD implements the logic and timing control to the system. SRAM stores the image data, and DSP controls the image acquisition system through the SCCB (Omni Vision Serial Camera Control Bus). The timing sequence of the CMOS image sensor OV9620 is analyzed. The imaging part and the high speed image data memory unit are designed. The hardware and software design of the image acquisition and processing system is given. CMOS digital cameras use color filter arrays to sample different spectral components, such as red, green, and blue. At the location of each pixel only one color sample is taken, and the other colors must be interpolated from neighboring samples. We use the edge-oriented adaptive interpolation algorithm for the edge pixels and bilinear interpolation algorithm for the non-edge pixels to improve the visual quality of the interpolated images. This method can get high processing speed, decrease the computational complexity, and effectively preserve the image edges.

  15. CMOS Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Intensity-Driven Readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langenbacher, Harry T.; Fossum, Eric R.; Kemeny, Sabrina

    1996-01-01

    Proposed complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit image sensor automatically provides readouts from pixels in order of decreasing illumination intensity. Sensor operated in integration mode. Particularly useful in number of image-sensing tasks, including diffractive laser range-finding, three-dimensional imaging, event-driven readout of sparse sensor arrays, and star tracking.

  16. High-content analysis of single cells directly assembled on CMOS sensor based on color imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Saeki, Tatsuya; Sunaga, Yoshihiko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-12-15

    A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor was applied to high-content analysis of single cells which were assembled closely or directly onto the CMOS sensor surface. The direct assembling of cell groups on CMOS sensor surface allows large-field (6.66 mm×5.32 mm in entire active area of CMOS sensor) imaging within a second. Trypan blue-stained and non-stained cells in the same field area on the CMOS sensor were successfully distinguished as white- and blue-colored images under white LED light irradiation. Furthermore, the chemiluminescent signals of each cell were successfully visualized as blue-colored images on CMOS sensor only when HeLa cells were placed directly on the micro-lens array of the CMOS sensor. Our proposed approach will be a promising technique for real-time and high-content analysis of single cells in a large-field area based on color imaging. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. High-speed imaging using CMOS image sensor with quasi pixel-wise exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, T.; Nagahara, H.; Endo, K.; Sugiyama, Y.; Taniguchi, R.

    2017-02-01

    Several recent studies in compressive video sensing have realized scene capture beyond the fundamental trade-off limit between spatial resolution and temporal resolution using random space-time sampling. However, most of these studies showed results for higher frame rate video that were produced by simulation experiments or using an optically simulated random sampling camera, because there are currently no commercially available image sensors with random exposure or sampling capabilities. We fabricated a prototype complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with quasi pixel-wise exposure timing that can realize nonuniform space-time sampling. The prototype sensor can reset exposures independently by columns and fix these amount of exposure by rows for each 8x8 pixel block. This CMOS sensor is not fully controllable via the pixels, and has line-dependent controls, but it offers flexibility when compared with regular CMOS or charge-coupled device sensors with global or rolling shutters. We propose a method to realize pseudo-random sampling for high-speed video acquisition that uses the flexibility of the CMOS sensor. We reconstruct the high-speed video sequence from the images produced by pseudo-random sampling using an over-complete dictionary.

  18. The challenge of sCMOS image sensor technology to EMCCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Weijing; Dai, Fang; Na, Qiyue

    2018-02-01

    In the field of low illumination image sensor, the noise of the latest scientific-grade CMOS image sensor is close to EMCCD, and the industry thinks it has the potential to compete and even replace EMCCD. Therefore we selected several typical sCMOS and EMCCD image sensors and cameras to compare their performance parameters. The results show that the signal-to-noise ratio of sCMOS is close to EMCCD, and the other parameters are superior. But signal-to-noise ratio is very important for low illumination imaging, and the actual imaging results of sCMOS is not ideal. EMCCD is still the first choice in the high-performance application field.

  19. A back-illuminated megapixel CMOS image sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas; Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jones, Todd; Wrigley, Chris; Hancock, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the test and characterization results for a back-illuminated megapixel CMOS imager. The imager pixel consists of a standard junction photodiode coupled to a three transistor-per-pixel switched source-follower readout [1]. The imager also consists of integrated timing and control and bias generation circuits, and provides analog output. The analog column-scan circuits were implemented in such a way that the imager could be configured to run in off-chip correlated double-sampling (CDS) mode. The imager was originally designed for normal front-illuminated operation, and was fabricated in a commercially available 0.5 pn triple-metal CMOS-imager compatible process. For backside illumination, the imager was thinned by etching away the substrate was etched away in a post-fabrication processing step.

  20. Optical and Electric Multifunctional CMOS Image Sensors for On-Chip Biosensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Takashi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Ohta, Jun

    2010-12-29

    In this review, the concept, design, performance, and a functional demonstration of multifunctional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors dedicated to on-chip biosensing applications are described. We developed a sensor architecture that allows flexible configuration of a sensing pixel array consisting of optical and electric sensing pixels, and designed multifunctional CMOS image sensors that can sense light intensity and electric potential or apply a voltage to an on-chip measurement target. We describe the sensors' architecture on the basis of the type of electric measurement or imaging functionalities.

  1. Optical and Electric Multifunctional CMOS Image Sensors for On-Chip Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Takashi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Ohta, Jun

    2010-01-01

    In this review, the concept, design, performance, and a functional demonstration of multifunctional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors dedicated to on-chip biosensing applications are described. We developed a sensor architecture that allows flexible configuration of a sensing pixel array consisting of optical and electric sensing pixels, and designed multifunctional CMOS image sensors that can sense light intensity and electric potential or apply a voltage to an on-chip measurement target. We describe the sensors’ architecture on the basis of the type of electric measurement or imaging functionalities. PMID:28879978

  2. Performance test and image correction of CMOS image sensor in radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Congzheng; Hu, Song; Gao, Chunming; Feng, Chang

    2016-09-01

    CMOS image sensors rival CCDs in domains that include strong radiation resistance as well as simple drive signals, so it is widely applied in the high-energy radiation environment, such as space optical imaging application and video monitoring of nuclear power equipment. However, the silicon material of CMOS image sensors has the ionizing dose effect in the high-energy rays, and then the indicators of image sensors, such as signal noise ratio (SNR), non-uniformity (NU) and bad point (BP) are degraded because of the radiation. The radiation environment of test experiments was generated by the 60Co γ-rays source. The camera module based on image sensor CMV2000 from CMOSIS Inc. was chosen as the research object. The ray dose used for the experiments was with a dose rate of 20krad/h. In the test experiences, the output signals of the pixels of image sensor were measured on the different total dose. The results of data analysis showed that with the accumulation of irradiation dose, SNR of image sensors decreased, NU of sensors was enhanced, and the number of BP increased. The indicators correction of image sensors was necessary, as it was the main factors to image quality. The image processing arithmetic was adopt to the data from the experiences in the work, which combined local threshold method with NU correction based on non-local means (NLM) method. The results from image processing showed that image correction can effectively inhibit the BP, improve the SNR, and reduce the NU.

  3. CMOS Imaging of Temperature Effects on Pin-Printed Xerogel Sensor Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Lei Yao; Ka Yi Yung; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Bright, Frank V

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of temperature on the operation and performance of a xerogel-based sensor microarrays coupled to a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager integrated circuit (IC) that images the photoluminescence response from the sensor microarray. The CMOS imager uses a 32 × 32 (1024 elements) array of active pixel sensors and each pixel includes a high-gain phototransistor to convert the detected optical signals into electrical currents. A correlated double sampling circuit and pixel address/digital control/signal integration circuit are also implemented on-chip. The CMOS imager data are read out as a serial coded signal. The sensor system uses a light-emitting diode to excite target analyte responsive organometallic luminophores doped within discrete xerogel-based sensor elements. As a proto type, we developed a 3 × 3 (9 elements) array of oxygen (O2) sensors. Each group of three sensor elements in the array (arranged in a column) is designed to provide a different and specific sensitivity to the target gaseous O2 concentration. This property of multiple sensitivities is achieved by using a mix of two O2 sensitive luminophores in each pin-printed xerogel sensor element. The CMOS imager is designed to be low noise and consumes a static power of 320.4 μW and an average dynamic power of 624.6 μW when operating at 100-Hz sampling frequency and 1.8-V dc power supply.

  4. Displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zujun, E-mail: wangzujun@nint.ac.cn; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo

    The experiments of displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor are presented. The CMOS APS image sensors are manufactured in the standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The flux of neutron beams was about 1.33 × 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}s. The three samples were exposed by 1 MeV neutron equivalent-fluence of 1 × 10{sup 11}, 5 × 10{sup 11}, and 1 × 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The mean dark signal (K{sub D}), dark signal spike, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), noise (V{sub N}), saturation output signal voltage (V{sub S}), and dynamic rangemore » (DR) versus neutron fluence are investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors are analyzed. The mean dark signal increase due to neutron displacement damage appears to be proportional to displacement damage dose. The dark images from CMOS APS image sensors irradiated by neutrons are presented to investigate the generation of dark signal spike.« less

  5. Increasing Linear Dynamic Range of a CMOS Image Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata

    2007-01-01

    A generic design and a corresponding operating sequence have been developed for increasing the linear-response dynamic range of a complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor. The design provides for linear calibrated dual-gain pixels that operate at high gain at a low signal level and at low gain at a signal level above a preset threshold. Unlike most prior designs for increasing dynamic range of an image sensor, this design does not entail any increase in noise (including fixed-pattern noise), decrease in responsivity or linearity, or degradation of photometric calibration. The figure is a simplified schematic diagram showing the circuit of one pixel and pertinent parts of its column readout circuitry. The conventional part of the pixel circuit includes a photodiode having a small capacitance, CD. The unconventional part includes an additional larger capacitance, CL, that can be connected to the photodiode via a transfer gate controlled in part by a latch. In the high-gain mode, the signal labeled TSR in the figure is held low through the latch, which also helps to adapt the gain on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Light must be coupled to the pixel through a microlens or by back illumination in order to obtain a high effective fill factor; this is necessary to ensure high quantum efficiency, a loss of which would minimize the efficacy of the dynamic- range-enhancement scheme. Once the level of illumination of the pixel exceeds the threshold, TSR is turned on, causing the transfer gate to conduct, thereby adding CL to the pixel capacitance. The added capacitance reduces the conversion gain, and increases the pixel electron-handling capacity, thereby providing an extension of the dynamic range. By use of an array of comparators also at the bottom of the column, photocharge voltages on sampling capacitors in each column are compared with a reference voltage to determine whether it is necessary to switch from the high-gain to the low-gain mode. Depending upon

  6. Single Photon Counting Performance and Noise Analysis of CMOS SPAD-Based Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Neale A W; Gyongy, Istvan; Parmesan, Luca; Henderson, Robert K

    2016-07-20

    SPAD-based solid state CMOS image sensors utilising analogue integrators have attained deep sub-electron read noise (DSERN) permitting single photon counting (SPC) imaging. A new method is proposed to determine the read noise in DSERN image sensors by evaluating the peak separation and width (PSW) of single photon peaks in a photon counting histogram (PCH). The technique is used to identify and analyse cumulative noise in analogue integrating SPC SPAD-based pixels. The DSERN of our SPAD image sensor is exploited to confirm recent multi-photon threshold quanta image sensor (QIS) theory. Finally, various single and multiple photon spatio-temporal oversampling techniques are reviewed.

  7. Single Photon Counting Performance and Noise Analysis of CMOS SPAD-Based Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Neale A. W.; Gyongy, Istvan; Parmesan, Luca; Henderson, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    SPAD-based solid state CMOS image sensors utilising analogue integrators have attained deep sub-electron read noise (DSERN) permitting single photon counting (SPC) imaging. A new method is proposed to determine the read noise in DSERN image sensors by evaluating the peak separation and width (PSW) of single photon peaks in a photon counting histogram (PCH). The technique is used to identify and analyse cumulative noise in analogue integrating SPC SPAD-based pixels. The DSERN of our SPAD image sensor is exploited to confirm recent multi-photon threshold quanta image sensor (QIS) theory. Finally, various single and multiple photon spatio-temporal oversampling techniques are reviewed. PMID:27447643

  8. Recent Design Development in Molecular Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection Using Nanometer CMOS Based Sensors.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dung C; Ma, Dongsheng Brian; Roveda, Janet M W

    2012-01-01

    As one of the key clinical imaging methods, the computed X-ray tomography can be further improved using new nanometer CMOS sensors. This will enhance the current technique's ability in terms of cancer detection size, position, and detection accuracy on the anatomical structures. The current paper reviewed designs of SOI-based CMOS sensors and their architectural design in mammography systems. Based on the existing experimental results, using the SOI technology can provide a low-noise (SNR around 87.8 db) and high-gain (30 v/v) CMOS imager. It is also expected that, together with the fast data acquisition designs, the new type of imagers may play important roles in the near-future high-dimensional images in additional to today's 2D imagers.

  9. Commercial CMOS image sensors as X-ray imagers and particle beam monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castoldi, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Maffessanti, S.; Montemurro, G. V.; Carraresi, L.

    2015-01-01

    CMOS image sensors are widely used in several applications such as mobile handsets webcams and digital cameras among others. Furthermore they are available across a wide range of resolutions with excellent spectral and chromatic responses. In order to fulfill the need of cheap systems as beam monitors and high resolution image sensors for scientific applications we exploited the possibility of using commercial CMOS image sensors as X-rays and proton detectors. Two different sensors have been mounted and tested. An Aptina MT9v034, featuring 752 × 480 pixels, 6μm × 6μm pixel size has been mounted and successfully tested as bi-dimensional beam profile monitor, able to take pictures of the incoming proton bunches at the DeFEL beamline (1-6 MeV pulsed proton beam) of the LaBeC of INFN in Florence. The naked sensor is able to successfully detect the interactions of the single protons. The sensor point-spread-function (PSF) has been qualified with 1MeV protons and is equal to one pixel (6 mm) r.m.s. in both directions. A second sensor MT9M032, featuring 1472 × 1096 pixels, 2.2 × 2.2 μm pixel size has been mounted on a dedicated board as high-resolution imager to be used in X-ray imaging experiments with table-top generators. In order to ease and simplify the data transfer and the image acquisition the system is controlled by a dedicated micro-processor board (DM3730 1GHz SoC ARM Cortex-A8) on which a modified LINUX kernel has been implemented. The paper presents the architecture of the sensor systems and the results of the experimental measurements.

  10. CMOS image sensor-based immunodetection by refractive-index change.

    PubMed

    Devadhasan, Jasmine P; Kim, Sanghyo

    2012-01-01

    A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor is an intriguing technology for the development of a novel biosensor. Indeed, the CMOS image sensor mechanism concerning the detection of the antigen-antibody (Ag-Ab) interaction at the nanoscale has been ambiguous so far. To understand the mechanism, more extensive research has been necessary to achieve point-of-care diagnostic devices. This research has demonstrated a CMOS image sensor-based analysis of cardiovascular disease markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and troponin I, Ag-Ab interactions on indium nanoparticle (InNP) substrates by simple photon count variation. The developed sensor is feasible to detect proteins even at a fg/mL concentration under ordinary room light. Possible mechanisms, such as dielectric constant and refractive-index changes, have been studied and proposed. A dramatic change in the refractive index after protein adsorption on an InNP substrate was observed to be a predominant factor involved in CMOS image sensor-based immunoassay.

  11. Dual light field and polarization imaging using CMOS diffractive image sensors.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, Suren; Sivaramakrishnan, Sriram; Chuang, Ellen; Guruaribam, Debashree; Wang, Albert; Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-05-15

    In this Letter we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first integrated CMOS image sensor that can simultaneously perform light field and polarization imaging without the use of external filters or additional optical elements. Previous work has shown how photodetectors with two stacks of integrated metal gratings above them (called angle sensitive pixels) diffract light in a Talbot pattern to capture four-dimensional light fields. We show, in addition to diffractive imaging, that these gratings polarize incoming light and characterize the response of these sensors to polarization and incidence angle. Finally, we show two applications of polarization imaging: imaging stress-induced birefringence and identifying specular reflections in scenes to improve light field algorithms for these scenes.

  12. CMOS Image Sensor with a Built-in Lane Detector.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Pei-Yung; Cheng, Hsien-Chein; Huang, Shih-Shinh; Fu, Li-Chen

    2009-01-01

    This work develops a new current-mode mixed signal Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) imager, which can capture images and simultaneously produce vehicle lane maps. The adopted lane detection algorithm, which was modified to be compatible with hardware requirements, can achieve a high recognition rate of up to approximately 96% under various weather conditions. Instead of a Personal Computer (PC) based system or embedded platform system equipped with expensive high performance chip of Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) or Digital Signal Processor (DSP), the proposed imager, without extra Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) circuits to transform signals, is a compact, lower cost key-component chip. It is also an innovative component device that can be integrated into intelligent automotive lane departure systems. The chip size is 2,191.4 × 2,389.8 μm, and the package uses 40 pin Dual-In-Package (DIP). The pixel cell size is 18.45 × 21.8 μm and the core size of photodiode is 12.45 × 9.6 μm; the resulting fill factor is 29.7%.

  13. Design and implementation of non-linear image processing functions for CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Purnawarman; Sudiro, Sunny A.; Wibowo, Eri P.; Harmanto, Suryadi; Paindavoine, Michel

    2012-11-01

    Today, solid state image sensors are used in many applications like in mobile phones, video surveillance systems, embedded medical imaging and industrial vision systems. These image sensors require the integration in the focal plane (or near the focal plane) of complex image processing algorithms. Such devices must meet the constraints related to the quality of acquired images, speed and performance of embedded processing, as well as low power consumption. To achieve these objectives, low-level analog processing allows extracting the useful information in the scene directly. For example, edge detection step followed by a local maxima extraction will facilitate the high-level processing like objects pattern recognition in a visual scene. Our goal was to design an intelligent image sensor prototype achieving high-speed image acquisition and non-linear image processing (like local minima and maxima calculations). For this purpose, we present in this article the design and test of a 64×64 pixels image sensor built in a standard CMOS Technology 0.35 μm including non-linear image processing. The architecture of our sensor, named nLiRIC (non-Linear Rapid Image Capture), is based on the implementation of an analog Minima/Maxima Unit. This MMU calculates the minimum and maximum values (non-linear functions), in real time, in a 2×2 pixels neighbourhood. Each MMU needs 52 transistors and the pitch of one pixel is 40×40 mu m. The total area of the 64×64 pixels is 12.5mm2. Our tests have shown the validity of the main functions of our new image sensor like fast image acquisition (10K frames per second), minima/maxima calculations in less then one ms.

  14. Laser doppler blood flow imaging using a CMOS imaging sensor with on-chip signal processing.

    PubMed

    He, Diwei; Nguyen, Hoang C; Hayes-Gill, Barrie R; Zhu, Yiqun; Crowe, John A; Gill, Cally; Clough, Geraldine F; Morgan, Stephen P

    2013-09-18

    The first fully integrated 2D CMOS imaging sensor with on-chip signal processing for applications in laser Doppler blood flow (LDBF) imaging has been designed and tested. To obtain a space efficient design over 64 × 64 pixels means that standard processing electronics used off-chip cannot be implemented. Therefore the analog signal processing at each pixel is a tailored design for LDBF signals with balanced optimization for signal-to-noise ratio and silicon area. This custom made sensor offers key advantages over conventional sensors, viz. the analog signal processing at the pixel level carries out signal normalization; the AC amplification in combination with an anti-aliasing filter allows analog-to-digital conversion with a low number of bits; low resource implementation of the digital processor enables on-chip processing and the data bottleneck that exists between the detector and processing electronics has been overcome. The sensor demonstrates good agreement with simulation at each design stage. The measured optical performance of the sensor is demonstrated using modulated light signals and in vivo blood flow experiments. Images showing blood flow changes with arterial occlusion and an inflammatory response to a histamine skin-prick demonstrate that the sensor array is capable of detecting blood flow signals from tissue.

  15. Overview of CMOS process and design options for image sensor dedicated to space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Gonthier, P.; Magnan, P.; Corbiere, F.

    2005-10-01

    With the growth of huge volume markets (mobile phones, digital cameras...) CMOS technologies for image sensor improve significantly. New process flows appear in order to optimize some parameters such as quantum efficiency, dark current, and conversion gain. Space applications can of course benefit from these improvements. To illustrate this evolution, this paper reports results from three technologies that have been evaluated with test vehicles composed of several sub arrays designed with some space applications as target. These three technologies are CMOS standard, improved and sensor optimized process in 0.35μm generation. Measurements are focussed on quantum efficiency, dark current, conversion gain and noise. Other measurements such as Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) and crosstalk are depicted in [1]. A comparison between results has been done and three categories of CMOS process for image sensors have been listed. Radiation tolerance has been also studied for the CMOS improved process in the way of hardening the imager by design. Results at 4, 15, 25 and 50 krad prove a good ionizing dose radiation tolerance applying specific techniques.

  16. CMOS Imaging of Pin-Printed Xerogel-Based Luminescent Sensor Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lei; Yung, Ka Yi; Khan, Rifat; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Bright, Frank V

    2010-12-01

    We present the design and implementation of a luminescence-based miniaturized multisensor system using pin-printed xerogel materials which act as host media for chemical recognition elements. We developed a CMOS imager integrated circuit (IC) to image the luminescence response of the xerogel-based sensor array. The imager IC uses a 26 × 20 (520 elements) array of active pixel sensors and each active pixel includes a high-gain phototransistor to convert the detected optical signals into electrical currents. The imager includes a correlated double sampling circuit and pixel address/digital control circuit; the image data is read-out as coded serial signal. The sensor system uses a light-emitting diode (LED) to excite the target analyte responsive luminophores doped within discrete xerogel-based sensor elements. As a prototype, we developed a 4 × 4 (16 elements) array of oxygen (O 2 ) sensors. Each group of 4 sensor elements in the array (arranged in a row) is designed to provide a different and specific sensitivity to the target gaseous O 2 concentration. This property of multiple sensitivities is achieved by using a strategic mix of two oxygen sensitive luminophores ([Ru(dpp) 3 ] 2+ and ([Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ ) in each pin-printed xerogel sensor element. The CMOS imager consumes an average power of 8 mW operating at 1 kHz sampling frequency driven at 5 V. The developed prototype system demonstrates a low cost and miniaturized luminescence multisensor system.

  17. Fast regional readout CMOS Image Sensor for dynamic MLC tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, H.; Harris, E.; Osmond, J.; Evans, P.

    2014-03-01

    Advanced radiotherapy techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) require verification of the complex beam delivery including tracking of multileaf collimators (MLC) and monitoring the dose rate. This work explores the feasibility of a prototype Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor Image Sensor (CIS) for tracking these complex treatments by utilising fast, region of interest (ROI) read out functionality. An automatic edge tracking algorithm was used to locate the MLC leaves edges moving at various speeds (from a moving triangle field shape) and imaged with various sensor frame rates. The CIS demonstrates successful edge detection of the dynamic MLC motion within accuracy of 1.0 mm. This demonstrates the feasibility of the sensor to verify treatment delivery involving dynamic MLC up to ~400 frames per second (equivalent to the linac pulse rate), which is superior to any current techniques such as using electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). CIS provides the basis to an essential real-time verification tool, useful in accessing accurate delivery of complex high energy radiation to the tumour and ultimately to achieve better cure rates for cancer patients.

  18. Real-time biochemical sensor based on Raman scattering with CMOS contact imaging.

    PubMed

    Muyun Cao; Yuhua Li; Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2015-08-01

    This work presents a biochemical sensor based on Raman scattering with Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) contact imaging. This biochemical optical sensor is designed for detecting the concentration of solutions. The system is built with a laser diode, an optical filter, a sample holder and a commercial CMOS sensor. The output of the system is analyzed by an image processing program. The system provides instant measurements with a resolution of 0.2 to 0.4 Mol. This low cost and easy-operated small scale system is useful in chemical, biomedical and environmental labs for quantitative bio-chemical concentration detection with results reported comparable to a highly cost commercial spectrometer.

  19. Hyperspectral CMOS imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, P. A.; Fryer, M.; Pratlong, J.; Pike, A.; Walker, A.; Dierickx, B.; Dupont, B.; Defernez, A.

    2017-11-01

    CCDs have been used for many years for Hyperspectral imaging missions and have been extremely successful. These include the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) [1] on Envisat, the Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) on Proba and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument operating in the UV spectral region. ESA are also planning a number of further missions that are likely to use CCD technology (Sentinel 3, 4 and 5). However CMOS sensors have a number of advantages which means that they will probably be used for hyperspectral applications in the longer term. There are two main advantages with CMOS sensors: First a hyperspectral image consists of spectral lines with a large difference in intensity; in a frame transfer CCD the faint spectral lines have to be transferred through the part of the imager illuminated by intense lines. This can lead to cross-talk and whilst this problem can be reduced by the use of split frame transfer and faster line rates CMOS sensors do not require a frame transfer and hence inherently will not suffer from this problem. Second, with a CMOS sensor the intense spectral lines can be read multiple times within a frame to give a significant increase in dynamic range. We will describe the design, and initial test of a CMOS sensor for use in hyperspectral applications. This device has been designed to give as high a dynamic range as possible with minimum cross-talk. The sensor has been manufactured on high resistivity epitaxial silicon wafers and is be back-thinned and left relatively thick in order to obtain the maximum quantum efficiency across the entire spectral range

  20. Development of a 750x750 pixels CMOS imager sensor for tracking applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larnaudie, Franck; Guardiola, Nicolas; Saint-Pé, Olivier; Vignon, Bruno; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Magnan, Pierre; Corbière, Franck; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe; Estribeau, Magali

    2017-11-01

    Solid-state optical sensors are now commonly used in space applications (navigation cameras, astronomy imagers, tracking sensors...). Although the charge-coupled devices are still widely used, the CMOS image sensor (CIS), which performances are continuously improving, is a strong challenger for Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) systems. This paper describes a 750x750 pixels CMOS image sensor that has been specially designed and developed for star tracker and tracking sensor applications. Such detector, that is featuring smart architecture enabling very simple and powerful operations, is built using the AMIS 0.5μm CMOS technology. It contains 750x750 rectangular pixels with 20μm pitch. The geometry of the pixel sensitive zone is optimized for applications based on centroiding measurements. The main feature of this device is the on-chip control and timing function that makes the device operation easier by drastically reducing the number of clocks to be applied. This powerful function allows the user to operate the sensor with high flexibility: measurement of dark level from masked lines, direct access to the windows of interest… A temperature probe is also integrated within the CMOS chip allowing a very precise measurement through the video stream. A complete electro-optical characterization of the sensor has been performed. The major parameters have been evaluated: dark current and its uniformity, read-out noise, conversion gain, Fixed Pattern Noise, Photo Response Non Uniformity, quantum efficiency, Modulation Transfer Function, intra-pixel scanning. The characterization tests are detailed in the paper. Co60 and protons irradiation tests have been also carried out on the image sensor and the results are presented. The specific features of the 750x750 image sensor such as low power CMOS design (3.3V, power consumption<100mW), natural windowing (that allows efficient and robust tracking algorithms), simple proximity electronics (because of the on

  1. Real-time DNA Amplification and Detection System Based on a CMOS Image Sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiantian; Devadhasan, Jasmine Pramila; Lee, Do Young; Kim, Sanghyo

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we developed a polypropylene well-integrated complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) platform to perform the loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique for real-time DNA amplification and detection simultaneously. An amplification-coupled detection system directly measures the photon number changes based on the generation of magnesium pyrophosphate and color changes. The photon number decreases during the amplification process. The CMOS image sensor observes the photons and converts into digital units with the aid of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). In addition, UV-spectral studies, optical color intensity detection, pH analysis, and electrophoresis detection were carried out to prove the efficiency of the CMOS sensor based the LAMP system. Moreover, Clostridium perfringens was utilized as proof-of-concept detection for the new system. We anticipate that this CMOS image sensor-based LAMP method will enable the creation of cost-effective, label-free, optical, real-time and portable molecular diagnostic devices.

  2. Microlens performance limits in sub-2mum pixel CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yijie; Fesenmaier, Christian C; Catrysse, Peter B

    2010-03-15

    CMOS image sensors with smaller pixels are expected to enable digital imaging systems with better resolution. When pixel size scales below 2 mum, however, diffraction affects the optical performance of the pixel and its microlens, in particular. We present a first-principles electromagnetic analysis of microlens behavior during the lateral scaling of CMOS image sensor pixels. We establish for a three-metal-layer pixel that diffraction prevents the microlens from acting as a focusing element when pixels become smaller than 1.4 microm. This severely degrades performance for on and off-axis pixels in red, green and blue color channels. We predict that one-metal-layer or backside-illuminated pixels are required to extend the functionality of microlenses beyond the 1.4 microm pixel node.

  3. Fixed Pattern Noise pixel-wise linear correction for crime scene imaging CMOS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Messinger, David W.; Dube, Roger R.; Ientilucci, Emmett J.

    2017-05-01

    Filtered multispectral imaging technique might be a potential method for crime scene documentation and evidence detection due to its abundant spectral information as well as non-contact and non-destructive nature. Low-cost and portable multispectral crime scene imaging device would be highly useful and efficient. The second generation crime scene imaging system uses CMOS imaging sensor to capture spatial scene and bandpass Interference Filters (IFs) to capture spectral information. Unfortunately CMOS sensors suffer from severe spatial non-uniformity compared to CCD sensors and the major cause is Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN). IFs suffer from "blue shift" effect and introduce spatial-spectral correlated errors. Therefore, Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN) correction is critical to enhance crime scene image quality and is also helpful for spatial-spectral noise de-correlation. In this paper, a pixel-wise linear radiance to Digital Count (DC) conversion model is constructed for crime scene imaging CMOS sensor. Pixel-wise conversion gain Gi,j and Dark Signal Non-Uniformity (DSNU) Zi,j are calculated. Also, conversion gain is divided into four components: FPN row component, FPN column component, defects component and effective photo response signal component. Conversion gain is then corrected to average FPN column and row components and defects component so that the sensor conversion gain is uniform. Based on corrected conversion gain and estimated image incident radiance from the reverse of pixel-wise linear radiance to DC model, corrected image spatial uniformity can be enhanced to 7 times as raw image, and the bigger the image DC value within its dynamic range, the better the enhancement.

  4. Development of CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensors for Low Cost Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, E.; Gee, R.; Kemeny, S.; Kim, Q.; Mendis, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nixon, R.; Ortiz, M.; Pain, B.; Zhou, Z.; hide

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing research and development of CMOS active pixel image sensors for low cost commercial applications. A number of sensor designs have been fabricated and tested in both p-well and n-well technologies. Major elements in the development of the sensor include on-chip analog signal processing circuits for the reduction of fixed pattern noise, on-chip timing and control circuits and on-chip analog-to-digital conversion (ADC). Recent results and continuing efforts in these areas will be presented.

  5. A CMOS image sensor with stacked photodiodes for lensless observation system of digital enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehara, Hironari; Miyazawa, Kazuya; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Kim, Soo Hyeon; Iino, Ryota; Noji, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A CMOS image sensor with stacked photodiodes was fabricated using 0.18 µm mixed signal CMOS process technology. Two photodiodes were stacked at the same position of each pixel of the CMOS image sensor. The stacked photodiodes consist of shallow high-concentration N-type layer (N+), P-type well (PW), deep N-type well (DNW), and P-type substrate (P-sub). PW and P-sub were shorted to ground. By monitoring the voltage of N+ and DNW individually, we can observe two monochromatic colors simultaneously without using any color filters. The CMOS image sensor is suitable for fluorescence imaging, especially contact imaging such as a lensless observation system of digital enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Since the fluorescence increases with time in digital ELISA, it is possible to observe fluorescence accurately by calculating the difference from the initial relation between the pixel values for both photodiodes.

  6. CMOS image sensor with lateral electric field modulation pixels for fluorescence lifetime imaging with sub-nanosecond time response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhuo; Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with a high-speed lateral electric field modulation (LEFM) gating structure for time domain fluorescence lifetime measurement. Time-windowed signal charge can be transferred from a pinned photodiode (PPD) to a pinned storage diode (PSD) by turning on a pair of transfer gates, which are situated beside the channel. Unwanted signal charge can be drained from the PPD to the drain by turning on another pair of gates. The pixel array contains 512 (V) × 310 (H) pixels with 5.6 × 5.6 µm2 pixel size. The imager chip was fabricated using 0.11 µm CMOS image sensor process technology. The prototype sensor has a time response of 150 ps at 374 nm. The fill factor of the pixels is 5.6%. The usefulness of the prototype sensor is demonstrated for fluorescence lifetime imaging through simulation and measurement results.

  7. Column-parallel correlated multiple sampling circuits for CMOS image sensors and their noise reduction effects.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sungho; Itoh, Shinya; Aoyama, Satoshi; Kawahito, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    For low-noise complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors, the reduction of pixel source follower noises is becoming very important. Column-parallel high-gain readout circuits are useful for low-noise CMOS image sensors. This paper presents column-parallel high-gain signal readout circuits, correlated multiple sampling (CMS) circuits and their noise reduction effects. In the CMS, the gain of the noise cancelling is controlled by the number of samplings. It has a similar effect to that of an amplified CDS for the thermal noise but is a little more effective for 1/f and RTS noises. Two types of the CMS with simple integration and folding integration are proposed. In the folding integration, the output signal swing is suppressed by a negative feedback using a comparator and one-bit D-to-A converter. The CMS circuit using the folding integration technique allows to realize a very low-noise level while maintaining a wide dynamic range. The noise reduction effects of their circuits have been investigated with a noise analysis and an implementation of a 1Mpixel pinned photodiode CMOS image sensor. Using 16 samplings, dynamic range of 59.4 dB and noise level of 1.9 e(-) for the simple integration CMS and 75 dB and 2.2 e(-) for the folding integration CMS, respectively, are obtained.

  8. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Speller, R D; Evans, P M; Allinson, N M; Wells, K

    2014-07-07

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  9. Image sensor pixel with on-chip high extinction ratio polarizer based on 65-nm standard CMOS technology.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Shishido, Sanshiro; Ando, Keisuke; Matsuoka, Hitoshi; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Kakiuchi, Kiyomi; Ohta, Jun

    2013-05-06

    In this study, we demonstrate a polarization sensitive pixel for a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor based on 65-nm standard CMOS technology. Using such a deep-submicron CMOS technology, it is possible to design fine metal patterns smaller than the wavelengths of visible light by using a metal wire layer. We designed and fabricated a metal wire grid polarizer on a 20 × 20 μm(2) pixel for image sensor. An extinction ratio of 19.7 dB was observed at a wavelength 750 nm.

  10. Experimental single-chip color HDTV image acquisition system with 8M-pixel CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamoto, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Takayuki; Funatsu, Ryohei; Mitani, Kohji; Nojiri, Yuji

    2006-02-01

    We have developed an experimental single-chip color HDTV image acquisition system using 8M-pixel CMOS image sensor. The sensor has 3840 × 2160 effective pixels and is progressively scanned at 60 frames per second. We describe the color filter array and interpolation method to improve image quality with a high-pixel-count single-chip sensor. We also describe an experimental image acquisition system we used to measured spatial frequency characteristics in the horizontal direction. The results indicate good prospects for achieving a high quality single chip HDTV camera that reduces pseudo signals and maintains high spatial frequency characteristics within the frequency band for HDTV.

  11. Reduction of CMOS Image Sensor Read Noise to Enable Photon Counting.

    PubMed

    Guidash, Michael; Ma, Jiaju; Vogelsang, Thomas; Endsley, Jay

    2016-04-09

    Recent activity in photon counting CMOS image sensors (CIS) has been directed to reduction of read noise. Many approaches and methods have been reported. This work is focused on providing sub 1 e(-) read noise by design and operation of the binary and small signal readout of photon counting CIS. Compensation of transfer gate feed-through was used to provide substantially reduced CDS time and source follower (SF) bandwidth. SF read noise was reduced by a factor of 3 with this method. This method can be applied broadly to CIS devices to reduce the read noise for small signals to enable use as a photon counting sensor.

  12. Reduction of CMOS Image Sensor Read Noise to Enable Photon Counting

    PubMed Central

    Guidash, Michael; Ma, Jiaju; Vogelsang, Thomas; Endsley, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Recent activity in photon counting CMOS image sensors (CIS) has been directed to reduction of read noise. Many approaches and methods have been reported. This work is focused on providing sub 1 e− read noise by design and operation of the binary and small signal readout of photon counting CIS. Compensation of transfer gate feed-through was used to provide substantially reduced CDS time and source follower (SF) bandwidth. SF read noise was reduced by a factor of 3 with this method. This method can be applied broadly to CIS devices to reduce the read noise for small signals to enable use as a photon counting sensor. PMID:27070625

  13. A Low Power Digital Accumulation Technique for Digital-Domain CMOS TDI Image Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changwei; Nie, Kaiming; Xu, Jiangtao; Gao, Jing

    2016-09-23

    In this paper, an accumulation technique suitable for digital domain CMOS time delay integration (TDI) image sensors is proposed to reduce power consumption without degrading the rate of imaging. In terms of the slight variations of quantization codes among different pixel exposures towards the same object, the pixel array is divided into two groups: one is for coarse quantization of high bits only, and the other one is for fine quantization of low bits. Then, the complete quantization codes are composed of both results from the coarse-and-fine quantization. The equivalent operation comparably reduces the total required bit numbers of the quantization. In the 0.18 µm CMOS process, two versions of 16-stage digital domain CMOS TDI image sensor chains based on a 10-bit successive approximate register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC), with and without the proposed technique, are designed. The simulation results show that the average power consumption of slices of the two versions are 6 . 47 × 10 - 8 J/line and 7 . 4 × 10 - 8 J/line, respectively. Meanwhile, the linearity of the two versions are 99.74% and 99.99%, respectively.

  14. Polarization-Analyzing CMOS Image Sensor With Monolithically Embedded Polarizer for Microchemistry Systems.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, T; Yamada, H; Sasagawa, K; Ohta, J

    2009-10-01

    This paper proposes and demonstrates a polarization-analyzing CMOS sensor based on image sensor architecture. The sensor was designed targeting applications for chiral analysis in a microchemistry system. The sensor features a monolithically embedded polarizer. Embedded polarizers with different angles were implemented to realize a real-time absolute measurement of the incident polarization angle. Although the pixel-level performance was confirmed to be limited, estimation schemes based on the variation of the polarizer angle provided a promising performance for real-time polarization measurements. An estimation scheme using 180 pixels in a 1deg step provided an estimation accuracy of 0.04deg. Polarimetric measurements of chiral solutions were also successfully performed to demonstrate the applicability of the sensor to optical chiral analysis.

  15. CMOS image sensor for detection of interferon gamma protein interaction as a point-of-care approach.

    PubMed

    Marimuthu, Mohana; Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; Ahn, Chang Geun; Sung, Gun Yong; Kim, Min-Gon; Kim, Sanghyo

    2011-09-01

    Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based image sensors have received increased attention owing to the possibility of incorporating them into portable diagnostic devices. The present research examined the efficiency and sensitivity of a CMOS image sensor for the detection of antigen-antibody interactions involving interferon gamma protein without the aid of expensive instruments. The highest detection sensitivity of about 1 fg/ml primary antibody was achieved simply by a transmission mechanism. When photons are prevented from hitting the sensor surface, a reduction in digital output occurs in which the number of photons hitting the sensor surface is approximately proportional to the digital number. Nanoscale variation in substrate thickness after protein binding can be detected with high sensitivity by the CMOS image sensor. Therefore, this technique can be easily applied to smartphones or any clinical diagnostic devices for the detection of several biological entities, with high impact on the development of point-of-care applications.

  16. A simple and low-cost biofilm quantification method using LED and CMOS image sensor.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Yeon Hwa; Lee, Junhee; Lee, Junghoon; Kwak, Soo Hwan; Oh, Sangwoo; Paek, Se-Hwan; Ha, Un-Hwan; Seo, Sungkyu

    2014-12-01

    A novel biofilm detection platform, which consists of a cost-effective red, green, and blue light-emitting diode (RGB LED) as a light source and a lens-free CMOS image sensor as a detector, is designed. This system can measure the diffraction patterns of cells from their shadow images, and gather light absorbance information according to the concentration of biofilms through a simple image processing procedure. Compared to a bulky and expensive commercial spectrophotometer, this platform can provide accurate and reproducible biofilm concentration detection and is simple, compact, and inexpensive. Biofilms originating from various bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), were tested to demonstrate the efficacy of this new biofilm detection approach. The results were compared with the results obtained from a commercial spectrophotometer. To utilize a cost-effective light source (i.e., an LED) for biofilm detection, the illumination conditions were optimized. For accurate and reproducible biofilm detection, a simple, custom-coded image processing algorithm was developed and applied to a five-megapixel CMOS image sensor, which is a cost-effective detector. The concentration of biofilms formed by P. aeruginosa was detected and quantified by varying the indole concentration, and the results were compared with the results obtained from a commercial spectrophotometer. The correlation value of the results from those two systems was 0.981 (N = 9, P < 0.01) and the coefficients of variation (CVs) were approximately threefold lower at the CMOS image-sensor platform. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A 75-ps Gated CMOS Image Sensor with Low Parasitic Light Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Niu, Hanben

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a 40 × 48 pixel global shutter complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with an adjustable shutter time as low as 75 ps was implemented using a 0.5-μm mixed-signal CMOS process. The implementation consisted of a continuous contact ring around each p+/n-well photodiode in the pixel array in order to apply sufficient light shielding. The parasitic light sensitivity of the in-pixel storage node was measured to be 1/8.5 × 107 when illuminated by a 405-nm diode laser and 1/1.4 × 104 when illuminated by a 650-nm diode laser. The pixel pitch was 24 μm, the size of the square p+/n-well photodiode in each pixel was 7 μm per side, the measured random readout noise was 217 e− rms, and the measured dynamic range of the pixel of the designed chip was 5500:1. The type of gated CMOS image sensor (CIS) that is proposed here can be used in ultra-fast framing cameras to observe non-repeatable fast-evolving phenomena. PMID:27367699

  18. Two-step single slope/SAR ADC with error correction for CMOS image sensor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fang; Bermak, Amine; Amira, Abbes; Amor Benammar, Mohieddine; He, Debiao; Zhao, Xiaojin

    2014-01-01

    Conventional two-step ADC for CMOS image sensor requires full resolution noise performance in the first stage single slope ADC, leading to high power consumption and large chip area. This paper presents an 11-bit two-step single slope/successive approximation register (SAR) ADC scheme for CMOS image sensor applications. The first stage single slope ADC generates a 3-bit data and 1 redundant bit. The redundant bit is combined with the following 8-bit SAR ADC output code using a proposed error correction algorithm. Instead of requiring full resolution noise performance, the first stage single slope circuit of the proposed ADC can tolerate up to 3.125% quantization noise. With the proposed error correction mechanism, the power consumption and chip area of the single slope ADC are significantly reduced. The prototype ADC is fabricated using 0.18 μ m CMOS technology. The chip area of the proposed ADC is 7 μ m × 500 μ m. The measurement results show that the energy efficiency figure-of-merit (FOM) of the proposed ADC core is only 125 pJ/sample under 1.4 V power supply and the chip area efficiency is 84 k  μ m(2) · cycles/sample.

  19. A 75-ps Gated CMOS Image Sensor with Low Parasitic Light Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Niu, Hanben

    2016-06-29

    In this study, a 40 × 48 pixel global shutter complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with an adjustable shutter time as low as 75 ps was implemented using a 0.5-μm mixed-signal CMOS process. The implementation consisted of a continuous contact ring around each p+/n-well photodiode in the pixel array in order to apply sufficient light shielding. The parasitic light sensitivity of the in-pixel storage node was measured to be 1/8.5 × 10⁷ when illuminated by a 405-nm diode laser and 1/1.4 × 10⁴ when illuminated by a 650-nm diode laser. The pixel pitch was 24 μm, the size of the square p+/n-well photodiode in each pixel was 7 μm per side, the measured random readout noise was 217 e(-) rms, and the measured dynamic range of the pixel of the designed chip was 5500:1. The type of gated CMOS image sensor (CIS) that is proposed here can be used in ultra-fast framing cameras to observe non-repeatable fast-evolving phenomena.

  20. The Design of a Single-Bit CMOS Image Sensor for Iris Recognition Applications

    PubMed Central

    Park, Keunyeol; Song, Minkyu

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a single-bit CMOS image sensor (CIS) that uses a data processing technique with an edge detection block for simple iris segmentation. In order to recognize the iris image, the image sensor conventionally captures high-resolution image data in digital code, extracts the iris data, and then compares it with a reference image through a recognition algorithm. However, in this case, the frame rate decreases by the time required for digital signal conversion of multi-bit digital data through the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) in the CIS. In order to reduce the overall processing time as well as the power consumption, we propose a data processing technique with an exclusive OR (XOR) logic gate to obtain single-bit and edge detection image data instead of multi-bit image data through the ADC. In addition, we propose a logarithmic counter to efficiently measure single-bit image data that can be applied to the iris recognition algorithm. The effective area of the proposed single-bit image sensor (174 × 144 pixel) is 2.84 mm2 with a 0.18 μm 1-poly 4-metal CMOS image sensor process. The power consumption of the proposed single-bit CIS is 2.8 mW with a 3.3 V of supply voltage and 520 frame/s of the maximum frame rates. The error rate of the ADC is 0.24 least significant bit (LSB) on an 8-bit ADC basis at a 50 MHz sampling frequency. PMID:29495273

  1. The Design of a Single-Bit CMOS Image Sensor for Iris Recognition Applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Keunyeol; Song, Minkyu; Kim, Soo Youn

    2018-02-24

    This paper presents a single-bit CMOS image sensor (CIS) that uses a data processing technique with an edge detection block for simple iris segmentation. In order to recognize the iris image, the image sensor conventionally captures high-resolution image data in digital code, extracts the iris data, and then compares it with a reference image through a recognition algorithm. However, in this case, the frame rate decreases by the time required for digital signal conversion of multi-bit digital data through the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) in the CIS. In order to reduce the overall processing time as well as the power consumption, we propose a data processing technique with an exclusive OR (XOR) logic gate to obtain single-bit and edge detection image data instead of multi-bit image data through the ADC. In addition, we propose a logarithmic counter to efficiently measure single-bit image data that can be applied to the iris recognition algorithm. The effective area of the proposed single-bit image sensor (174 × 144 pixel) is 2.84 mm² with a 0.18 μm 1-poly 4-metal CMOS image sensor process. The power consumption of the proposed single-bit CIS is 2.8 mW with a 3.3 V of supply voltage and 520 frame/s of the maximum frame rates. The error rate of the ADC is 0.24 least significant bit (LSB) on an 8-bit ADC basis at a 50 MHz sampling frequency.

  2. Applications of the Integrated High-Performance CMOS Image Sensor to Range Finders - from Optical Triangulation to the Automotive Field.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jih-Huah; Pen, Cheng-Chung; Jiang, Joe-Air

    2008-03-13

    With their significant features, the applications of complementary metal-oxidesemiconductor (CMOS) image sensors covers a very extensive range, from industrialautomation to traffic applications such as aiming systems, blind guidance, active/passiverange finders, etc. In this paper CMOS image sensor-based active and passive rangefinders are presented. The measurement scheme of the proposed active/passive rangefinders is based on a simple triangulation method. The designed range finders chieflyconsist of a CMOS image sensor and some light sources such as lasers or LEDs. Theimplementation cost of our range finders is quite low. Image processing software to adjustthe exposure time (ET) of the CMOS image sensor to enhance the performance oftriangulation-based range finders was also developed. An extensive series of experimentswere conducted to evaluate the performance of the designed range finders. From theexperimental results, the distance measurement resolutions achieved by the active rangefinder and the passive range finder can be better than 0.6% and 0.25% within themeasurement ranges of 1 to 8 m and 5 to 45 m, respectively. Feasibility tests onapplications of the developed CMOS image sensor-based range finders to the automotivefield were also conducted. The experimental results demonstrated that our range finders arewell-suited for distance measurements in this field.

  3. Measurement of charge transfer potential barrier in pinned photodiode CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cao; Bing, Zhang; Junfeng, Wang; Longsheng, Wu

    2016-05-01

    The charge transfer potential barrier (CTPB) formed beneath the transfer gate causes a noticeable image lag issue in pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CIS), and is difficult to measure straightforwardly since it is embedded inside the device. From an understanding of the CTPB formation mechanism, we report on an alternative method to feasibly measure the CTPB height by performing a linear extrapolation coupled with a horizontal left-shift on the sensor photoresponse curve under the steady-state illumination. The theoretical study was performed in detail on the principle of the proposed method. Application of the measurements on a prototype PPD-CIS chip with an array of 160 × 160 pixels is demonstrated. Such a method intends to shine new light on the guidance for the lag-free and high-speed sensors optimization based on PPD devices. Project supported by the National Defense Pre-Research Foundation of China (No. 51311050301095).

  4. Characterization of total ionizing dose damage in COTS pinned photodiode CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zujun; Ma, Wuying; Huang, Shaoyan; Yao, Zhibin; Liu, Minbo; He, Baoping; Liu, Jing; Sheng, Jiangkun; Xue, Yuan

    2016-03-01

    The characterization of total ionizing dose (TID) damage in COTS pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) is investigated. The radiation experiments are carried out at a 60Co γ-ray source. The CISs are produced by 0.18-μm CMOS technology and the pixel architecture is 8T global shutter pixel with correlated double sampling (CDS) based on a 4T PPD front end. The parameters of CISs such as temporal domain, spatial domain, and spectral domain are measured at the CIS test system as the EMVA 1288 standard before and after irradiation. The dark current, random noise, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), photo response non-uniformity (PRNU), overall system gain, saturation output, dynamic range (DR), signal to noise ratio (SNR), quantum efficiency (QE), and responsivity versus the TID are reported. The behaviors of the tested CISs show remarkable degradations after radiation. The degradation mechanisms of CISs induced by TID damage are also analyzed.

  5. Integration of nanostructured planar diffractive lenses dedicated to near infrared detection for CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Thomas; Massenot, Sébastien; Estribeau, Magali; Magnan, Pierre; Pardo, Fabrice; Pelouard, Jean-Luc

    2016-04-18

    This paper deals with the integration of metallic and dielectric nanostructured planar lenses into a pixel from a silicon based CMOS image sensor, for a monochromatic application at 1.064 μm. The first is a Plasmonic Lens, based on the phase delay through nanoslits, which has been found to be hardly compatible with current CMOS technology and exhibits a notable metallic absorption. The second is a dielectric Phase-Fresnel Lens integrated at the top of a pixel, it exhibits an Optical Efficiency (OE) improved by a few percent and an angle of view of 50°. The third one is a metallic diffractive lens integrated inside a pixel, which shows a better OE and an angle of view of 24°. The last two lenses exhibit a compatibility with a spectral band close to 1.064 μm.

  6. An improved triangulation laser rangefinder using a custom CMOS HDR linear image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liscombe, Michael

    3-D triangulation laser rangefinders are used in many modern applications, from terrain mapping to biometric identification. Although a wide variety of designs have been proposed, laser speckle noise still provides a fundamental limitation on range accuracy. These works propose a new triangulation laser rangefinder designed specifically to mitigate the effects of laser speckle noise. The proposed rangefinder uses a precision linear translator to laterally reposition the imaging system (e.g., image sensor and imaging lens). For a given spatial location of the laser spot, capturing N spatially uncorrelated laser spot profiles is shown to improve range accuracy by a factor of N . This technique has many advantages over past speckle-reduction technologies, such as a fixed system cost and form factor, and the ability to virtually eliminate laser speckle noise. These advantages are made possible through spatial diversity and come at the cost of increased acquisition time. The rangefinder makes use of the ICFYKWG1 linear image sensor, a custom CMOS sensor developed at the Vision Sensor Laboratory (York University). Tests are performed on the image sensor's innovative high dynamic range technology to determine its effects on range accuracy. As expected, experimental results have shown that the sensor provides a trade-off between dynamic range and range accuracy.

  7. CMOS active pixel sensor type imaging system on a chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A single chip camera which includes an .[.intergrated.]. .Iadd.integrated .Iaddend.image acquisition portion and control portion and which has double sampling/noise reduction capabilities thereon. Part of the .[.intergrated.]. .Iadd.integrated .Iaddend.structure reduces the noise that is picked up during imaging.

  8. Using Polynomials to Simplify Fixed Pattern Noise and Photometric Correction of Logarithmic CMOS Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Mahmoodi, Alireza; Joseph, Dileepan

    2015-01-01

    An important class of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors are those where pixel responses are monotonic nonlinear functions of light stimuli. This class includes various logarithmic architectures, which are easily capable of wide dynamic range imaging, at video rates, but which are vulnerable to image quality issues. To minimize fixed pattern noise (FPN) and maximize photometric accuracy, pixel responses must be calibrated and corrected due to mismatch and process variation during fabrication. Unlike literature approaches, which employ circuit-based models of varying complexity, this paper introduces a novel approach based on low-degree polynomials. Although each pixel may have a highly nonlinear response, an approximately-linear FPN calibration is possible by exploiting the monotonic nature of imaging. Moreover, FPN correction requires only arithmetic, and an optimal fixed-point implementation is readily derived, subject to a user-specified number of bits per pixel. Using a monotonic spline, involving cubic polynomials, photometric calibration is also possible without a circuit-based model, and fixed-point photometric correction requires only a look-up table. The approach is experimentally validated with a logarithmic CMOS image sensor and is compared to a leading approach from the literature. The novel approach proves effective and efficient. PMID:26501287

  9. Using polynomials to simplify fixed pattern noise and photometric correction of logarithmic CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Mahmoodi, Alireza; Joseph, Dileepan

    2015-10-16

    An important class of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors are those where pixel responses are monotonic nonlinear functions of light stimuli. This class includes various logarithmic architectures, which are easily capable of wide dynamic range imaging, at video rates, but which are vulnerable to image quality issues. To minimize fixed pattern noise (FPN) and maximize photometric accuracy, pixel responses must be calibrated and corrected due to mismatch and process variation during fabrication. Unlike literature approaches, which employ circuit-based models of varying complexity, this paper introduces a novel approach based on low-degree polynomials. Although each pixel may have a highly nonlinear response, an approximately-linear FPN calibration is possible by exploiting the monotonic nature of imaging. Moreover, FPN correction requires only arithmetic, and an optimal fixed-point implementation is readily derived, subject to a user-specified number of bits per pixel. Using a monotonic spline, involving cubic polynomials, photometric calibration is also possible without a circuit-based model, and fixed-point photometric correction requires only a look-up table. The approach is experimentally validated with a logarithmic CMOS image sensor and is compared to a leading approach from the literature. The novel approach proves effective and efficient.

  10. Performance of PHOTONIS' low light level CMOS imaging sensor for long range observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourree, Loig E.

    2014-05-01

    Identification of potential threats in low-light conditions through imaging is commonly achieved through closed-circuit television (CCTV) and surveillance cameras by combining the extended near infrared (NIR) response (800-10000nm wavelengths) of the imaging sensor with NIR LED or laser illuminators. Consequently, camera systems typically used for purposes of long-range observation often require high-power lasers in order to generate sufficient photons on targets to acquire detailed images at night. While these systems may adequately identify targets at long-range, the NIR illumination needed to achieve such functionality can easily be detected and therefore may not be suitable for covert applications. In order to reduce dependency on supplemental illumination in low-light conditions, the frame rate of the imaging sensors may be reduced to increase the photon integration time and thus improve the signal to noise ratio of the image. However, this may hinder the camera's ability to image moving objects with high fidelity. In order to address these particular drawbacks, PHOTONIS has developed a CMOS imaging sensor (CIS) with a pixel architecture and geometry designed specifically to overcome these issues in low-light level imaging. By combining this CIS with field programmable gate array (FPGA)-based image processing electronics, PHOTONIS has achieved low-read noise imaging with enhanced signal-to-noise ratio at quarter moon illumination, all at standard video frame rates. The performance of this CIS is discussed herein and compared to other commercially available CMOS and CCD for long-range observation applications.

  11. Visible Wavelength Color Filters Using Dielectric Subwavelength Gratings for Backside-Illuminated CMOS Image Sensor Technologies.

    PubMed

    Horie, Yu; Han, Seunghoon; Lee, Jeong-Yub; Kim, Jaekwan; Kim, Yongsung; Arbabi, Amir; Shin, Changgyun; Shi, Lilong; Arbabi, Ehsan; Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Lee, Hong-Seok; Hwang, Sungwoo; Faraon, Andrei

    2017-05-10

    We report transmissive color filters based on subwavelength dielectric gratings that can replace conventional dye-based color filters used in backside-illuminated CMOS image sensor (BSI CIS) technologies. The filters are patterned in an 80 nm-thick poly silicon film on a 115 nm-thick SiO 2 spacer layer. They are optimized for operating at the primary RGB colors, exhibit peak transmittance of 60-80%, and have an almost insensitive response over a ± 20° angular range. This technology enables shrinking of the pixel sizes down to near a micrometer.

  12. 1T Pixel Using Floating-Body MOSFET for CMOS Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guo-Neng; Tournier, Arnaud; Roy, François; Deschamps, Benoît

    2009-01-01

    We present a single-transistor pixel for CMOS image sensors (CIS). It is a floating-body MOSFET structure, which is used as photo-sensing device and source-follower transistor, and can be controlled to store and evacuate charges. Our investigation into this 1T pixel structure includes modeling to obtain analytical description of conversion gain. Model validation has been done by comparing theoretical predictions and experimental results. On the other hand, the 1T pixel structure has been implemented in different configurations, including rectangular-gate and ring-gate designs, and variations of oxidation parameters for the fabrication process. The pixel characteristics are presented and discussed.

  13. FDTD-based optical simulations methodology for CMOS image sensors pixels architecture and process optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirigoyen, Flavien; Crocherie, Axel; Vaillant, Jérôme M.; Cazaux, Yvon

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents a new FDTD-based optical simulation model dedicated to describe the optical performances of CMOS image sensors taking into account diffraction effects. Following market trend and industrialization constraints, CMOS image sensors must be easily embedded into even smaller packages, which are now equipped with auto-focus and short-term coming zoom system. Due to miniaturization, the ray-tracing models used to evaluate pixels optical performances are not accurate anymore to describe the light propagation inside the sensor, because of diffraction effects. Thus we adopt a more fundamental description to take into account these diffraction effects: we chose to use Maxwell-Boltzmann based modeling to compute the propagation of light, and to use a software with an FDTD-based (Finite Difference Time Domain) engine to solve this propagation. We present in this article the complete methodology of this modeling: on one hand incoherent plane waves are propagated to approximate a product-use diffuse-like source, on the other hand we use periodic conditions to limit the size of the simulated model and both memory and computation time. After having presented the correlation of the model with measurements we will illustrate its use in the case of the optimization of a 1.75μm pixel.

  14. A 256×256 low-light-level CMOS imaging sensor with digital CDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Mei; Chen, Nan; Zhong, Shengyou; Li, Zhengfen; Zhang, Jicun; Yao, Li-bin

    2016-10-01

    In order to achieve high sensitivity for low-light-level CMOS image sensors (CIS), a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) pixel circuit with a small integration capacitor is used. As the pixel and the column area are highly constrained, it is difficult to achieve analog correlated double sampling (CDS) to remove the noise for low-light-level CIS. So a digital CDS is adopted, which realizes the subtraction algorithm between the reset signal and pixel signal off-chip. The pixel reset noise and part of the column fixed-pattern noise (FPN) can be greatly reduced. A 256×256 CIS with CTIA array and digital CDS is implemented in the 0.35μm CMOS technology. The chip size is 7.7mm×6.75mm, and the pixel size is 15μm×15μm with a fill factor of 20.6%. The measured pixel noise is 24LSB with digital CDS in RMS value at dark condition, which shows 7.8× reduction compared to the image sensor without digital CDS. Running at 7fps, this low-light-level CIS can capture recognizable images with the illumination down to 0.1lux.

  15. An analog gamma correction scheme for high dynamic range CMOS logarithmic image sensors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Pan, Xiaofang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Wu, Huisi

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, a novel analog gamma correction scheme with a logarithmic image sensor dedicated to minimize the quantization noise of the high dynamic applications is presented. The proposed implementation exploits a non-linear voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO) based analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to perform the gamma correction during the analog-to-digital conversion. As a result, the quantization noise does not increase while the same high dynamic range of logarithmic image sensor is preserved. Moreover, by combining the gamma correction with the analog-to-digital conversion, the silicon area and overall power consumption can be greatly reduced. The proposed gamma correction scheme is validated by the reported simulation results and the experimental results measured for our designed test structure, which is fabricated with 0.35 μm standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process.

  16. An Analog Gamma Correction Scheme for High Dynamic Range CMOS Logarithmic Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yuan; Pan, Xiaofang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Wu, Huisi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel analog gamma correction scheme with a logarithmic image sensor dedicated to minimize the quantization noise of the high dynamic applications is presented. The proposed implementation exploits a non-linear voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO) based analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to perform the gamma correction during the analog-to-digital conversion. As a result, the quantization noise does not increase while the same high dynamic range of logarithmic image sensor is preserved. Moreover, by combining the gamma correction with the analog-to-digital conversion, the silicon area and overall power consumption can be greatly reduced. The proposed gamma correction scheme is validated by the reported simulation results and the experimental results measured for our designed test structure, which is fabricated with 0.35 μm standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. PMID:25517692

  17. High-resolution depth profiling using a range-gated CMOS SPAD quanta image sensor.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ximing; Connolly, Peter W R; Halimi, Abderrahim; Altmann, Yoann; McLaughlin, Stephen; Gyongy, Istvan; Henderson, Robert K; Buller, Gerald S

    2018-03-05

    A CMOS single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) quanta image sensor is used to reconstruct depth and intensity profiles when operating in a range-gated mode used in conjunction with pulsed laser illumination. By designing the CMOS SPAD array to acquire photons within a pre-determined temporal gate, the need for timing circuitry was avoided and it was therefore possible to have an enhanced fill factor (61% in this case) and a frame rate (100,000 frames per second) that is more difficult to achieve in a SPAD array which uses time-correlated single-photon counting. When coupled with appropriate image reconstruction algorithms, millimeter resolution depth profiles were achieved by iterating through a sequence of temporal delay steps in synchronization with laser illumination pulses. For photon data with high signal-to-noise ratios, depth images with millimeter scale depth uncertainty can be estimated using a standard cross-correlation approach. To enhance the estimation of depth and intensity images in the sparse photon regime, we used a bespoke clustering-based image restoration strategy, taking into account the binomial statistics of the photon data and non-local spatial correlations within the scene. For sparse photon data with total exposure times of 75 ms or less, the bespoke algorithm can reconstruct depth images with millimeter scale depth uncertainty at a stand-off distance of approximately 2 meters. We demonstrate a new approach to single-photon depth and intensity profiling using different target scenes, taking full advantage of the high fill-factor, high frame rate and large array format of this range-gated CMOS SPAD array.

  18. Temporal Noise Analysis of Charge-Domain Sampling Readout Circuits for CMOS Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Theuwissen, Albert J. P.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a temporal noise analysis of charge-domain sampling readout circuits for Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors. In order to address the trade-off between the low input-referred noise and high dynamic range, a Gm-cell-based pixel together with a charge-domain correlated-double sampling (CDS) technique has been proposed to provide a way to efficiently embed a tunable conversion gain along the read-out path. Such readout topology, however, operates in a non-stationery large-signal behavior, and the statistical properties of its temporal noise are a function of time. Conventional noise analysis methods for CMOS image sensors are based on steady-state signal models, and therefore cannot be readily applied for Gm-cell-based pixels. In this paper, we develop analysis models for both thermal noise and flicker noise in Gm-cell-based pixels by employing the time-domain linear analysis approach and the non-stationary noise analysis theory, which help to quantitatively evaluate the temporal noise characteristic of Gm-cell-based pixels. Both models were numerically computed in MATLAB using design parameters of a prototype chip, and compared with both simulation and experimental results. The good agreement between the theoretical and measurement results verifies the effectiveness of the proposed noise analysis models. PMID:29495496

  19. A robust color signal processing with wide dynamic range WRGB CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Shun; Kuroda, Rihito; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a robust color reproduction methodology by a simple calculation with a new color matrix using the formerly developed wide dynamic range WRGB lateral overflow integration capacitor (LOFIC) CMOS image sensor. The image sensor was fabricated through a 0.18 μm CMOS technology and has a 45 degrees oblique pixel array, the 4.2 μm effective pixel pitch and the W pixels. A W pixel was formed by replacing one of the two G pixels in the Bayer RGB color filter. The W pixel has a high sensitivity through the visible light waveband. An emerald green and yellow (EGY) signal is generated from the difference between the W signal and the sum of RGB signals. This EGY signal mainly includes emerald green and yellow lights. These colors are difficult to be reproduced accurately by the conventional simple linear matrix because their wave lengths are in the valleys of the spectral sensitivity characteristics of the RGB pixels. A new linear matrix based on the EGY-RGB signal was developed. Using this simple matrix, a highly accurate color processing with a large margin to the sensitivity fluctuation and noise has been achieved.

  20. Temporal Noise Analysis of Charge-Domain Sampling Readout Circuits for CMOS Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaoliang; Theuwissen, Albert J P

    2018-02-27

    This paper presents a temporal noise analysis of charge-domain sampling readout circuits for Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors. In order to address the trade-off between the low input-referred noise and high dynamic range, a Gm-cell-based pixel together with a charge-domain correlated-double sampling (CDS) technique has been proposed to provide a way to efficiently embed a tunable conversion gain along the read-out path. Such readout topology, however, operates in a non-stationery large-signal behavior, and the statistical properties of its temporal noise are a function of time. Conventional noise analysis methods for CMOS image sensors are based on steady-state signal models, and therefore cannot be readily applied for Gm-cell-based pixels. In this paper, we develop analysis models for both thermal noise and flicker noise in Gm-cell-based pixels by employing the time-domain linear analysis approach and the non-stationary noise analysis theory, which help to quantitatively evaluate the temporal noise characteristic of Gm-cell-based pixels. Both models were numerically computed in MATLAB using design parameters of a prototype chip, and compared with both simulation and experimental results. The good agreement between the theoretical and measurement results verifies the effectiveness of the proposed noise analysis models.

  1. Degradation of CMOS image sensors in deep-submicron technology due to γ-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Padmakumar R.; Wang, Xinyang; Theuwissen, Albert J. P.

    2008-09-01

    In this work, radiation induced damage mechanisms in deep submicron technology is resolved using finger gated-diodes (FGDs) as a radiation sensitive tool. It is found that these structures are simple yet efficient structures to resolve radiation induced damage in advanced CMOS processes. The degradation of the CMOS image sensors in deep-submicron technology due to γ-ray irradiation is studied by developing a model for the spectral response of the sensor and also by the dark-signal degradation as a function of STI (shallow-trench isolation) parameters. It is found that threshold shifts in the gate-oxide/silicon interface as well as minority carrier life-time variations in the silicon bulk are minimal. The top-layer material properties and the photodiode Si-SiO2 interface quality are degraded due to γ-ray irradiation. Results further suggest that p-well passivated structures are inevitable for radiation-hard designs. It was found that high electrical fields in submicron technologies pose a threat to high quality imaging in harsh environments.

  2. Simulation and measurement of total ionizing dose radiation induced image lag increase in pinned photodiode CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Wei; Wang, Zujun; Xue, Yuanyuan; Yao, Zhibin; He, Baoping; Ma, Wuying; Jin, Junshan; Sheng, Jiangkun; Dong, Guantao

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation of total ionizing dose (TID) induced image lag sources in pinned photodiodes (PPD) CMOS image sensors based on radiation experiments and TCAD simulation. The radiation experiments have been carried out at the Cobalt -60 gamma-ray source. The experimental results show the image lag degradation is more and more serious with increasing TID. Combining with the TCAD simulation results, we can confirm that the junction of PPD and transfer gate (TG) is an important region forming image lag during irradiation. These simulations demonstrate that TID can generate a potential pocket leading to incomplete transfer.

  3. A 4MP high-dynamic-range, low-noise CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Cheng; Liu, Yang; Li, Jing; Zhou, Quan; Chang, Yuchun; Wang, Xinyang

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a 4 Megapixel high dynamic range, low dark noise and dark current CMOS image sensor, which is ideal for high-end scientific and surveillance applications. The pixel design is based on a 4-T PPD structure. During the readout of the pixel array, signals are first amplified, and then feed to a low- power column-parallel ADC array which is already presented in [1]. Measurement results show that the sensor achieves a dynamic range of 96dB, a dark noise of 1.47e- at 24fps speed. The dark current is 0.15e-/pixel/s at -20oC.

  4. The Dynamic Photometric Stereo Method Using a Multi-Tap CMOS Image Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Takuya; Nagahara, Hajime; Taniguchi, Rin-Ichiro; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2018-03-05

    The photometric stereo method enables estimation of surface normals from images that have been captured using different but known lighting directions. The classical photometric stereo method requires at least three images to determine the normals in a given scene. However, this method cannot be applied to dynamic scenes because it is assumed that the scene remains static while the required images are captured. In this work, we present a dynamic photometric stereo method for estimation of the surface normals in a dynamic scene. We use a multi-tap complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor to capture the input images required for the proposed photometric stereo method. This image sensor can divide the electrons from the photodiode from a single pixel into the different taps of the exposures and can thus capture multiple images under different lighting conditions with almost identical timing. We implemented a camera lighting system and created a software application to enable estimation of the normal map in real time. We also evaluated the accuracy of the estimated surface normals and demonstrated that our proposed method can estimate the surface normals of dynamic scenes.

  5. The Dynamic Photometric Stereo Method Using a Multi-Tap CMOS Image Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Yoda, Takuya; Nagahara, Hajime; Taniguchi, Rin-ichiro; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2018-01-01

    The photometric stereo method enables estimation of surface normals from images that have been captured using different but known lighting directions. The classical photometric stereo method requires at least three images to determine the normals in a given scene. However, this method cannot be applied to dynamic scenes because it is assumed that the scene remains static while the required images are captured. In this work, we present a dynamic photometric stereo method for estimation of the surface normals in a dynamic scene. We use a multi-tap complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor to capture the input images required for the proposed photometric stereo method. This image sensor can divide the electrons from the photodiode from a single pixel into the different taps of the exposures and can thus capture multiple images under different lighting conditions with almost identical timing. We implemented a camera lighting system and created a software application to enable estimation of the normal map in real time. We also evaluated the accuracy of the estimated surface normals and demonstrated that our proposed method can estimate the surface normals of dynamic scenes. PMID:29510599

  6. Spatial optical crosstalk in CMOS image sensors integrated with plasmonic color filters.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Chen, Qin; Wen, Long; Hu, Xin; Zhang, Hui-Fang

    2015-08-24

    Imaging resolution of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor (CIS) keeps increasing to approximately 7k × 4k. As a result, the pixel size shrinks down to sub-2μm, which greatly increases the spatial optical crosstalk. Recently, plasmonic color filter was proposed as an alternative to conventional colorant pigmented ones. However, there is little work on its size effect and the spatial optical crosstalk in a model of CIS. By numerical simulation, we investigate the size effect of nanocross array plasmonic color filters and analyze the spatial optical crosstalk of each pixel in a Bayer array of a CIS with a pixel size of 1μm. It is found that the small pixel size deteriorates the filtering performance of nanocross color filters and induces substantial spatial color crosstalk. By integrating the plasmonic filters in the low Metal layer in standard CMOS process, the crosstalk reduces significantly, which is compatible to pigmented filters in a state-of-the-art backside illumination CIS.

  7. SEM contour based metrology for microlens process studies in CMOS image sensor technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakcher, Amine; Ostrovsky, Alain; Le-Gratiet, Bertrand; Berthier, Ludovic; Bidault, Laurent; Ducoté, Julien; Jamin-Mornet, Clémence; Mortini, Etienne; Besacier, Maxime

    2018-03-01

    From the first digital cameras which appeared during the 70s to cameras of current smartphones, image sensors have undergone significant technological development in the last decades. The development of CMOS image sensor technologies in the 90s has been the main driver of the recent progresses. The main component of an image sensor is the pixel. A pixel contains a photodiode connected to transistors but only the photodiode area is light sensitive. This results in a significant loss of efficiency. To solve this issue, microlenses are used to focus the incident light on the photodiode. A microlens array is made out of a transparent material and has a spherical cap shape. To obtain this spherical shape, a lithography process is performed to generate resist blocks which are then annealed above their glass transition temperature (reflow). Even if the dimensions to consider are higher than in advanced IC nodes, microlenses are sensitive to process variability during lithography and reflow. A good control of the microlens dimensions is key to optimize the process and thus the performance of the final product. The purpose of this paper is to apply SEM contour metrology [1, 2, 3, 4] to microlenses in order to develop a relevant monitoring methodology and to propose new metrics to engineers to evaluate their process or optimize the design of the microlens arrays.

  8. Binary CMOS image sensor with a gate/body-tied MOSFET-type photodetector for high-speed operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byoung-Soo; Jo, Sung-Hyun; Bae, Myunghan; Kim, Sang-Hwan; Shin, Jang-Kyoo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a binary complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor with a gate/body-tied (GBT) metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET)-type photodetector is presented. The sensitivity of the GBT MOSFET-type photodetector, which was fabricated using the standard CMOS 0.35-μm process, is higher than the sensitivity of the p-n junction photodiode, because the output signal of the photodetector is amplified by the MOSFET. A binary image sensor becomes more efficient when using this photodetector. Lower power consumptions and higher speeds of operation are possible, compared to the conventional image sensors using multi-bit analog to digital converters (ADCs). The frame rate of the proposed image sensor is over 2000 frames per second, which is higher than those of the conventional CMOS image sensors. The output signal of an active pixel sensor is applied to a comparator and compared with a reference level. The 1-bit output data of the binary process is determined by this level. To obtain a video signal, the 1-bit output data is stored in the memory and is read out by horizontal scanning. The proposed chip is composed of a GBT pixel array (144 × 100), binary-process circuit, vertical scanner, horizontal scanner, and readout circuit. The operation mode can be selected from between binary mode and multi-bit mode.

  9. A 45 nm Stacked CMOS Image Sensor Process Technology for Submicron Pixel.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Seiji; Huang, Yi-Min; Sze, Jhy-Jyi; Wu, Tung-Ting; Guo, Fu-Sheng; Hsu, Wei-Cheng; Tseng, Tung-Hsiung; Liao, King; Kuo, Chin-Chia; Chen, Tzu-Hsiang; Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Chuang, Chun-Hao; Chou, Keng-Yu; Chung, Chi-Hsien; Chou, Kuo-Yu; Tseng, Chien-Hsien; Wang, Chuan-Joung; Yaung, Dun-Nien

    2017-12-05

    A submicron pixel's light and dark performance were studied by experiment and simulation. An advanced node technology incorporated with a stacked CMOS image sensor (CIS) is promising in that it may enhance performance. In this work, we demonstrated a low dark current of 3.2 e - /s at 60 °C, an ultra-low read noise of 0.90 e - ·rms, a high full well capacity (FWC) of 4100 e - , and blooming of 0.5% in 0.9 μm pixels with a pixel supply voltage of 2.8 V. In addition, the simulation study result of 0.8 μm pixels is discussed.

  10. Charge transfer efficiency improvement of 4T pixel for high speed CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiangliang; Liu, Weihui; Yang, Hongjiao; Tang, Lizhen; Yang, Jia

    2015-03-01

    The charge transfer efficiency improvement method is proposed by optimizing the electrical potential distribution along the transfer path from the PPD to the FD. In this work, we present a non-uniform doped transfer transistor channel, with the adjustments to the overlap length between the CPIA layer and the transfer gate, and the overlap length between the SEN layer and transfer gate. Theory analysis and TCAD simulation results show that the density of the residual charge reduces from 1e11 /cm3 to 1e9 /cm3, and the transfer time reduces from 500 ns to 143 ns, and the charge transfer efficiency is about 77 e-/ns. This optimizing design effectively improves the charge transfer efficiency of 4T pixel and the performance of 4T high speed CMOS image sensor.

  11. Non-Linearity in Wide Dynamic Range CMOS Image Sensors Utilizing a Partial Charge Transfer Technique.

    PubMed

    Shafie, Suhaidi; Kawahito, Shoji; Halin, Izhal Abdul; Hasan, Wan Zuha Wan

    2009-01-01

    The partial charge transfer technique can expand the dynamic range of a CMOS image sensor by synthesizing two types of signal, namely the long and short accumulation time signals. However the short accumulation time signal obtained from partial transfer operation suffers of non-linearity with respect to the incident light. In this paper, an analysis of the non-linearity in partial charge transfer technique has been carried, and the relationship between dynamic range and the non-linearity is studied. The results show that the non-linearity is caused by two factors, namely the current diffusion, which has an exponential relation with the potential barrier, and the initial condition of photodiodes in which it shows that the error in the high illumination region increases as the ratio of the long to the short accumulation time raises. Moreover, the increment of the saturation level of photodiodes also increases the error in the high illumination region.

  12. A 45 nm Stacked CMOS Image Sensor Process Technology for Submicron Pixel †

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Seiji; Huang, Yi-Min; Sze, Jhy-Jyi; Wu, Tung-Ting; Guo, Fu-Sheng; Hsu, Wei-Cheng; Tseng, Tung-Hsiung; Liao, King; Kuo, Chin-Chia; Chen, Tzu-Hsiang; Chiang, Wei-Chieh; Chuang, Chun-Hao; Chou, Keng-Yu; Chung, Chi-Hsien; Chou, Kuo-Yu; Tseng, Chien-Hsien; Wang, Chuan-Joung; Yaung, Dun-Nien

    2017-01-01

    A submicron pixel’s light and dark performance were studied by experiment and simulation. An advanced node technology incorporated with a stacked CMOS image sensor (CIS) is promising in that it may enhance performance. In this work, we demonstrated a low dark current of 3.2 e−/s at 60 °C, an ultra-low read noise of 0.90 e−·rms, a high full well capacity (FWC) of 4100 e−, and blooming of 0.5% in 0.9 μm pixels with a pixel supply voltage of 2.8 V. In addition, the simulation study result of 0.8 μm pixels is discussed. PMID:29206162

  13. Design and Performance of a Pinned Photodiode CMOS Image Sensor Using Reverse Substrate Bias †

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Andrew S.; Ivory, James; Holland, Andrew D.

    2018-01-01

    A new pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensor with reverse biased p-type substrate has been developed and characterized. The sensor uses traditional PPDs with one additional deep implantation step to suppress the parasitic reverse currents, and can be fully depleted. The first prototypes have been manufactured on an 18 µm thick, 1000 Ω·cm epitaxial silicon wafers using 180 nm PPD image sensor process. Both front-side illuminated (FSI) and back-side illuminated (BSI) devices were manufactured in collaboration with Teledyne e2v. The characterization results from a number of arrays of 10 µm and 5.4 µm PPD pixels, with different shape, the size and the depth of the new implant are in good agreement with device simulations. The new pixels could be reverse-biased without parasitic leakage currents well beyond full depletion, and demonstrate nearly identical optical response to the reference non-modified pixels. The observed excessive charge sharing in some pixel variants is shown to not be a limiting factor in operation. This development promises to realize monolithic PPD CIS with large depleted thickness and correspondingly high quantum efficiency at near-infrared and soft X-ray wavelengths. PMID:29301379

  14. Characterisation of a novel reverse-biased PPD CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanov, K. D.; Clarke, A. S.; Ivory, J.; Holland, A. D.

    2017-11-01

    A new pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensor (CIS) has been developed and characterised. The sensor can be fully depleted by means of reverse bias applied to the substrate, and the principle of operation is applicable to very thick sensitive volumes. Additional n-type implants under the pixel p-wells, called Deep Depletion Extension (DDE), have been added in order to eliminate the large parasitic substrate current that would otherwise be present in a normal device. The first prototype has been manufactured on a 18 μm thick, 1000 Ω .cm epitaxial silicon wafers using 180 nm PPD image sensor process at TowerJazz Semiconductor. The chip contains arrays of 10 μm and 5.4 μm pixels, with variations of the shape, size and the depth of the DDE implant. Back-side illuminated (BSI) devices were manufactured in collaboration with Teledyne e2v, and characterised together with the front-side illuminated (FSI) variants. The presented results show that the devices could be reverse-biased without parasitic leakage currents, in good agreement with simulations. The new 10 μm pixels in both BSI and FSI variants exhibit nearly identical photo response to the reference non-modified pixels, as characterised with the photon transfer curve. Different techniques were used to measure the depletion depth in FSI and BSI chips, and the results are consistent with the expected full depletion.

  15. Vulnerability of CMOS image sensors in Megajoule Class Laser harsh environment.

    PubMed

    Goiffon, V; Girard, S; Chabane, A; Paillet, P; Magnan, P; Cervantes, P; Martin-Gonthier, P; Baggio, J; Estribeau, M; Bourgade, J-L; Darbon, S; Rousseau, A; Glebov, V Yu; Pien, G; Sangster, T C

    2012-08-27

    CMOS image sensors (CIS) are promising candidates as part of optical imagers for the plasma diagnostics devoted to the study of fusion by inertial confinement. However, the harsh radiative environment of Megajoule Class Lasers threatens the performances of these optical sensors. In this paper, the vulnerability of CIS to the transient and mixed pulsed radiation environment associated with such facilities is investigated during an experiment at the OMEGA facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), Rochester, NY, USA. The transient and permanent effects of the 14 MeV neutron pulse on CIS are presented. The behavior of the tested CIS shows that active pixel sensors (APS) exhibit a better hardness to this harsh environment than a CCD. A first order extrapolation of the reported results to the higher level of radiation expected for Megajoule Class Laser facilities (Laser Megajoule in France or National Ignition Facility in the USA) shows that temporarily saturated pixels due to transient neutron-induced single event effects will be the major issue for the development of radiation-tolerant plasma diagnostic instruments whereas the permanent degradation of the CIS related to displacement damage or total ionizing dose effects could be reduced by applying well known mitigation techniques.

  16. Design and Performance of a Pinned Photodiode CMOS Image Sensor Using Reverse Substrate Bias.

    PubMed

    Stefanov, Konstantin D; Clarke, Andrew S; Ivory, James; Holland, Andrew D

    2018-01-03

    A new pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensor with reverse biased p-type substrate has been developed and characterized. The sensor uses traditional PPDs with one additional deep implantation step to suppress the parasitic reverse currents, and can be fully depleted. The first prototypes have been manufactured on an 18 µm thick, 1000 Ω·cm epitaxial silicon wafers using 180 nm PPD image sensor process. Both front-side illuminated (FSI) and back-side illuminated (BSI) devices were manufactured in collaboration with Teledyne e2v. The characterization results from a number of arrays of 10 µm and 5.4 µm PPD pixels, with different shape, the size and the depth of the new implant are in good agreement with device simulations. The new pixels could be reverse-biased without parasitic leakage currents well beyond full depletion, and demonstrate nearly identical optical response to the reference non-modified pixels. The observed excessive charge sharing in some pixel variants is shown to not be a limiting factor in operation. This development promises to realize monolithic PPD CIS with large depleted thickness and correspondingly high quantum efficiency at near-infrared and soft X-ray wavelengths.

  17. Continuous-time ΣΔ ADC with implicit variable gain amplifier for CMOS image sensor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fang; Bermak, Amine; Abbes, Amira; Benammar, Mohieddine Amor

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a column-parallel continuous-time sigma delta (CTSD) ADC for mega-pixel resolution CMOS image sensor (CIS). The sigma delta modulator is implemented with a 2nd order resistor/capacitor-based loop filter. The first integrator uses a conventional operational transconductance amplifier (OTA), for the concern of a high power noise rejection. The second integrator is realized with a single-ended inverter-based amplifier, instead of a standard OTA. As a result, the power consumption is reduced, without sacrificing the noise performance. Moreover, the variable gain amplifier in the traditional column-parallel read-out circuit is merged into the front-end of the CTSD modulator. By programming the input resistance, the amplitude range of the input current can be tuned with 8 scales, which is equivalent to a traditional 2-bit preamplification function without consuming extra power and chip area. The test chip prototype is fabricated using 0.18 μm CMOS process and the measurement result shows an ADC power consumption lower than 63.5 μW under 1.4 V power supply and 50 MHz clock frequency.

  18. Characterization of total ionizing dose damage in COTS pinned photodiode CMOS image sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zujun, E-mail: wangzujun@nint.ac.cn; Ma, Wuying; Huang, Shaoyan

    The characterization of total ionizing dose (TID) damage in COTS pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) is investigated. The radiation experiments are carried out at a {sup 60}Co γ-ray source. The CISs are produced by 0.18-μm CMOS technology and the pixel architecture is 8T global shutter pixel with correlated double sampling (CDS) based on a 4T PPD front end. The parameters of CISs such as temporal domain, spatial domain, and spectral domain are measured at the CIS test system as the EMVA 1288 standard before and after irradiation. The dark current, random noise, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), photo responsemore » non-uniformity (PRNU), overall system gain, saturation output, dynamic range (DR), signal to noise ratio (SNR), quantum efficiency (QE), and responsivity versus the TID are reported. The behaviors of the tested CISs show remarkable degradations after radiation. The degradation mechanisms of CISs induced by TID damage are also analyzed.« less

  19. IR sensitivity enhancement of CMOS Image Sensor with diffractive light trapping pixels.

    PubMed

    Yokogawa, Sozo; Oshiyama, Itaru; Ikeda, Harumi; Ebiko, Yoshiki; Hirano, Tomoyuki; Saito, Suguru; Oinoue, Takashi; Hagimoto, Yoshiya; Iwamoto, Hayato

    2017-06-19

    We report on the IR sensitivity enhancement of back-illuminated CMOS Image Sensor (BI-CIS) with 2-dimensional diffractive inverted pyramid array structure (IPA) on crystalline silicon (c-Si) and deep trench isolation (DTI). FDTD simulations of semi-infinite thick c-Si having 2D IPAs on its surface whose pitches over 400 nm shows more than 30% improvement of light absorption at λ = 850 nm and the maximum enhancement of 43% with the 540 nm pitch at the wavelength is confirmed. A prototype BI-CIS sample with pixel size of 1.2 μm square containing 400 nm pitch IPAs shows 80% sensitivity enhancement at λ = 850 nm compared to the reference sample with flat surface. This is due to diffraction with the IPA and total reflection at the pixel boundary. The NIR images taken by the demo camera equip with a C-mount lens show 75% sensitivity enhancement in the λ = 700-1200 nm wavelength range with negligible spatial resolution degradation. Light trapping CIS pixel technology promises to improve NIR sensitivity and appears to be applicable to many different image sensor applications including security camera, personal authentication, and range finding Time-of-Flight camera with IR illuminations.

  20. A CMOS image sensor with programmable pixel-level analog processing.

    PubMed

    Massari, Nicola; Gottardi, Massimo; Gonzo, Lorenzo; Stoppa, David; Simoni, Andrea

    2005-11-01

    A prototype of a 34 x 34 pixel image sensor, implementing real-time analog image processing, is presented. Edge detection, motion detection, image amplification, and dynamic-range boosting are executed at pixel level by means of a highly interconnected pixel architecture based on the absolute value of the difference among neighbor pixels. The analog operations are performed over a kernel of 3 x 3 pixels. The square pixel, consisting of 30 transistors, has a pitch of 35 microm with a fill-factor of 20%. The chip was fabricated in a 0.35 microm CMOS technology, and its power consumption is 6 mW with 3.3 V power supply. The device was fully characterized and achieves a dynamic range of 50 dB with a light power density of 150 nW/mm2 and a frame rate of 30 frame/s. The measured fixed pattern noise corresponds to 1.1% of the saturation level. The sensor's dynamic range can be extended up to 96 dB using the double-sampling technique.

  1. CMOS Image Sensor and System for Imaging Hemodynamic Changes in Response to Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Noor, Muhammad S; McCracken, Clinton B; Kiss, Zelma H T; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Murari, Kartikeya

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a therapeutic intervention used for a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, but its mechanism of action is not well understood. It is known that DBS modulates neural activity which changes metabolic demands and thus the cerebral circulation state. However, it is unclear whether there are correlations between electrophysiological, hemodynamic and behavioral changes and whether they have any implications for clinical benefits. In order to investigate these questions, we present a miniaturized system for spectroscopic imaging of brain hemodynamics. The system consists of a 144 ×144, [Formula: see text] pixel pitch, high-sensitivity, analog-output CMOS imager fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process, along with a miniaturized imaging system comprising illumination, focusing, analog-to-digital conversion and μSD card based data storage. This enables stand alone operation without a computer, nor electrical or fiberoptic tethers. To achieve high sensitivity, the pixel uses a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA). The nMOS transistors are in the pixel while pMOS transistors are column-parallel, resulting in a fill factor (FF) of 26%. Running at 60 fps and exposed to 470 nm light, the CMOS imager has a minimum detectable intensity of 2.3 nW/cm(2) , a maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 49 dB at 2.45 μW/cm(2) leading to a dynamic range (DR) of 61 dB while consuming 167 μA from a 3.3 V supply. In anesthetized rats, the system was able to detect temporal, spatial and spectral hemodynamic changes in response to DBS.

  2. CMOS image sensor with organic photoconductive layer having narrow absorption band and proposal of stack type solid-state image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Shunji; Ihama, Mikio; Inuiya, Masafumi

    2006-02-01

    Digital still cameras overtook film cameras in Japanese market in 2000 in terms of sales volume owing to their versatile functions. However, the image-capturing capabilities such as sensitivity and latitude of color films are still superior to those of digital image sensors. In this paper, we attribute the cause for the high performance of color films to their multi-layered structure, and propose the solid-state image sensors with stacked organic photoconductive layers having narrow absorption bands on CMOS read-out circuits.

  3. Single-event transient imaging with an ultra-high-speed temporally compressive multi-aperture CMOS image sensor.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Futa; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Okihara, Shin-ichiro; Seo, Min-Woong; Zhang, Bo; Takasawa, Taishi; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2016-02-22

    In the work described in this paper, an image reproduction scheme with an ultra-high-speed temporally compressive multi-aperture CMOS image sensor was demonstrated. The sensor captures an object by compressing a sequence of images with focal-plane temporally random-coded shutters, followed by reconstruction of time-resolved images. Because signals are modulated pixel-by-pixel during capturing, the maximum frame rate is defined only by the charge transfer speed and can thus be higher than those of conventional ultra-high-speed cameras. The frame rate and optical efficiency of the multi-aperture scheme are discussed. To demonstrate the proposed imaging method, a 5×3 multi-aperture image sensor was fabricated. The average rising and falling times of the shutters were 1.53 ns and 1.69 ns, respectively. The maximum skew among the shutters was 3 ns. The sensor observed plasma emission by compressing it to 15 frames, and a series of 32 images at 200 Mfps was reconstructed. In the experiment, by correcting disparities and considering temporal pixel responses, artifacts in the reconstructed images were reduced. An improvement in PSNR from 25.8 dB to 30.8 dB was confirmed in simulations.

  4. An ultra-low power CMOS image sensor with on-chip energy harvesting and power management capability.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Ismail; Huang, Xiwei; Yu, Hao; Yan, Mei; Ay, Suat U

    2015-03-06

    An ultra-low power CMOS image sensor with on-chip energy harvesting and power management capability is introduced in this paper. The photodiode pixel array can not only capture images but also harvest solar energy. As such, the CMOS image sensor chip is able to switch between imaging and harvesting modes towards self-power operation. Moreover, an on-chip maximum power point tracking (MPPT)-based power management system (PMS) is designed for the dual-mode image sensor to further improve the energy efficiency. A new isolated P-well energy harvesting and imaging (EHI) pixel with very high fill factor is introduced. Several ultra-low power design techniques such as reset and select boosting techniques have been utilized to maintain a wide pixel dynamic range. The chip was designed and fabricated in a 1.8 V, 1P6M 0.18 µm CMOS process. Total power consumption of the imager is 6.53 µW for a 96 × 96 pixel array with 1 V supply and 5 fps frame rate. Up to 30 μW of power could be generated by the new EHI pixels. The PMS is capable of providing 3× the power required during imaging mode with 50% efficiency allowing energy autonomous operation with a 72.5% duty cycle.

  5. An Ultra-Low Power CMOS Image Sensor with On-Chip Energy Harvesting and Power Management Capability

    PubMed Central

    Cevik, Ismail; Huang, Xiwei; Yu, Hao; Yan, Mei; Ay, Suat U.

    2015-01-01

    An ultra-low power CMOS image sensor with on-chip energy harvesting and power management capability is introduced in this paper. The photodiode pixel array can not only capture images but also harvest solar energy. As such, the CMOS image sensor chip is able to switch between imaging and harvesting modes towards self-power operation. Moreover, an on-chip maximum power point tracking (MPPT)-based power management system (PMS) is designed for the dual-mode image sensor to further improve the energy efficiency. A new isolated P-well energy harvesting and imaging (EHI) pixel with very high fill factor is introduced. Several ultra-low power design techniques such as reset and select boosting techniques have been utilized to maintain a wide pixel dynamic range. The chip was designed and fabricated in a 1.8 V, 1P6M 0.18 µm CMOS process. Total power consumption of the imager is 6.53 µW for a 96 × 96 pixel array with 1 V supply and 5 fps frame rate. Up to 30 μW of power could be generated by the new EHI pixels. The PMS is capable of providing 3× the power required during imaging mode with 50% efficiency allowing energy autonomous operation with a 72.5% duty cycle. PMID:25756863

  6. Self-amplified CMOS image sensor using a current-mode readout circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Patrick M.; de Lima Monteiro, Davies W.; Pittet, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The feature size of the CMOS processes decreased during the past few years and problems such as reduced dynamic range have become more significant in voltage-mode pixels, even though the integration of more functionality inside the pixel has become easier. This work makes a contribution on both sides: the possibility of a high signal excursion range using current-mode circuits together with functionality addition by making signal amplification inside the pixel. The classic 3T pixel architecture was rebuild with small modifications to integrate a transconductance amplifier providing a current as an output. The matrix with these new pixels will operate as a whole large transistor outsourcing an amplified current that will be used for signal processing. This current is controlled by the intensity of the light received by the matrix, modulated pixel by pixel. The output current can be controlled by the biasing circuits to achieve a very large range of output signal levels. It can also be controlled with the matrix size and this permits a very high degree of freedom on the signal level, observing the current densities inside the integrated circuit. In addition, the matrix can operate at very small integration times. Its applications would be those in which fast imaging processing, high signal amplification are required and low resolution is not a major problem, such as UV image sensors. Simulation results will be presented to support: operation, control, design, signal excursion levels and linearity for a matrix of pixels that was conceived using this new concept of sensor.

  7. Spatial filtering self-velocimeter for vehicle application using a CMOS linear image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Zhou, Jian; Nie, Xiaoming; Long, Xingwu

    2015-03-01

    The idea of using a spatial filtering velocimeter (SFV) to measure the velocity of a vehicle for an inertial navigation system is put forward. The presented SFV is based on a CMOS linear image sensor with a high-speed data rate, large pixel size, and built-in timing generator. These advantages make the image sensor suitable to measure vehicle velocity. The power spectrum of the output signal is obtained by fast Fourier transform and is corrected by a frequency spectrum correction algorithm. This velocimeter was used to measure the velocity of a conveyor belt driven by a rotary table and the measurement uncertainty is ˜0.54%. Furthermore, it was also installed on a vehicle together with a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) to measure self-velocity. The measurement result of the designed SFV is compared with that of the LDV. It is shown that the measurement result of the SFV is coincident with that of the LDV. Therefore, the designed SFV is suitable for a vehicle self-contained inertial navigation system.

  8. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors for Low Power, Highly Miniaturized Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1996-01-01

    The complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology has been developed over the past three years by NASA at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and has reached a level of performance comparable to CCDs with greatly increased functionality but at a very reduced power level.

  9. A novel CMOS image sensor system for quantitative loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays to detect food-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiantian; Kim, Sanghyo; An, Jeong Ho

    2017-02-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is considered as one of the alternatives to the conventional PCR and it is an inexpensive portable diagnostic system with minimal power consumption. The present work describes the application of LAMP in real-time photon detection and quantitative analysis of nucleic acids integrated with a disposable complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor. This novel system works as an amplification-coupled detection platform, relying on a CMOS image sensor, with the aid of a computerized circuitry controller for the temperature and light sources. The CMOS image sensor captures the light which is passing through the sensor surface and converts into digital units using an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). This new system monitors the real-time photon variation, caused by the color changes during amplification. Escherichia coli O157 was used as a proof-of-concept target for quantitative analysis, and compared with the results for Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica to confirm the efficiency of the system. The system detected various DNA concentrations of E. coli O157 in a short time (45min), with a detection limit of 10fg/μL. The low-cost, simple, and compact design, with low power consumption, represents a significant advance in the development of a portable, sensitive, user-friendly, real-time, and quantitative analytic tools for point-of-care diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrahigh sensitivity endoscopic camera using a new CMOS image sensor: providing with clear images under low illumination in addition to fluorescent images.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hisae; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshiyuki; Fukuyo, Tsuneo; Chiba, Toshio

    2014-11-01

    We developed a new ultrahigh-sensitive CMOS camera using a specific sensor that has a wide range of spectral sensitivity characteristics. The objective of this study is to present our updated endoscopic technology that has successfully integrated two innovative functions; ultrasensitive imaging as well as advanced fluorescent viewing. Two different experiments were conducted. One was carried out to evaluate the function of the ultrahigh-sensitive camera. The other was to test the availability of the newly developed sensor and its performance as a fluorescence endoscope. In both studies, the distance from the endoscopic tip to the target was varied and those endoscopic images in each setting were taken for further comparison. In the first experiment, the 3-CCD camera failed to display the clear images under low illumination, and the target was hardly seen. In contrast, the CMOS camera was able to display the targets regardless of the camera-target distance under low illumination. Under high illumination, imaging quality given by both cameras was quite alike. In the second experiment as a fluorescence endoscope, the CMOS camera was capable of clearly showing the fluorescent-activated organs. The ultrahigh sensitivity CMOS HD endoscopic camera is expected to provide us with clear images under low illumination in addition to the fluorescent images under high illumination in the field of laparoscopic surgery.

  11. Process techniques of charge transfer time reduction for high speed CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhongxiang, Cao; Quanliang, Li; Ye, Han; Qi, Qin; Peng, Feng; Liyuan, Liu; Nanjian, Wu

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes pixel process techniques to reduce the charge transfer time in high speed CMOS image sensors. These techniques increase the lateral conductivity of the photo-generated carriers in a pinned photodiode (PPD) and the voltage difference between the PPD and the floating diffusion (FD) node by controlling and optimizing the N doping concentration in the PPD and the threshold voltage of the reset transistor, respectively. The techniques shorten the charge transfer time from the PPD diode to the FD node effectively. The proposed process techniques do not need extra masks and do not cause harm to the fill factor. A sub array of 32 × 64 pixels was designed and implemented in the 0.18 μm CIS process with five implantation conditions splitting the N region in the PPD. The simulation and measured results demonstrate that the charge transfer time can be decreased by using the proposed techniques. Comparing the charge transfer time of the pixel with the different implantation conditions of the N region, the charge transfer time of 0.32 μs is achieved and 31% of image lag was reduced by using the proposed process techniques.

  12. A Parkinson's disease measurement system using laser lines and a CMOS image sensor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Rong-Seng; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Chen, Fang-Pey; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Yang, Jen-Lin

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a non-invasive, non-contact system for the measurement of the arterial dorsum manus vibration waveforms of Parkinson disease patients. The laser line method is applied to detect the dorsum manus vibration in rest and postural situations. The proposed measurement system mainly consists of a laser diode and a low cost complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor. Laser line and centroid methods are combined with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) in this study. The shape and frequency and relative frequency of the dorsum manus vibration waveforms can be detected rapidly using our Parkinson's disease measurement system. A laser line near the wrist joint is used as the testing line. The experimental results show an obvious increase in the amplitude and frequency of dorsum manus variation in the measured region in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease, indicating the obvious effects of the disease. Both in postural and rest state measurements, as the patient disease age increases the vibration frequency increases. The measurement system is well suited for evaluating and pre-diagnosing early stage Parkinson's disease.

  13. Noise Reduction Techniques and Scaling Effects towards Photon Counting CMOS Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Boukhayma, Assim; Peizerat, Arnaud; Enz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the read noise in CMOS image sensors (CISs) based on four-transistors (4T) pixels, column-level amplification and correlated multiple sampling. Starting from the input-referred noise analytical formula, process level optimizations, device choices and circuit techniques at the pixel and column level of the readout chain are derived and discussed. The noise reduction techniques that can be implemented at the column and pixel level are verified by transient noise simulations, measurement and results from recently-published low noise CIS. We show how recently-reported process refinement, leading to the reduction of the sense node capacitance, can be combined with an optimal in-pixel source follower design to reach a sub-0.3erms- read noise at room temperature. This paper also discusses the impact of technology scaling on the CIS read noise. It shows how designers can take advantage of scaling and how the Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) transistor gate leakage tunneling current appears as a challenging limitation. For this purpose, both simulation results of the gate leakage current and 1/f noise data reported from different foundries and technology nodes are used.

  14. Nuclear Radiation Degradation Study on HD Camera Based on CMOS Image Sensor at Different Dose Rates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congzheng; Hu, Song; Gao, Chunming; Feng, Chang

    2018-02-08

    In this work, we irradiated a high-definition (HD) industrial camera based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) CMOS image sensor (CIS) with Cobalt-60 gamma-rays. All components of the camera under test were fabricated without radiation hardening, except for the lens. The irradiation experiments of the HD camera under biased conditions were carried out at 1.0, 10.0, 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h. During the experiment, we found that the tested camera showed a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differed in the dose rates. With the increase of dose rate, the same target images become brighter. Under the same dose rate, the radiation effect in bright area is lower than that in dark area. Under different dose rates, the higher the dose rate is, the worse the radiation effect will be in both bright and dark areas. And the standard deviations of bright and dark areas become greater. Furthermore, through the progressive degradation analysis of the captured image, experimental results demonstrate that the attenuation of signal to noise ratio (SNR) versus radiation time is not obvious at the same dose rate, and the degradation is more and more serious with increasing dose rate. Additionally, the decrease rate of SNR at 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h is far greater than that at 1.0 and 10.0 Gy/h. Even so, we confirm that the HD industrial camera is still working at 10.0 Gy/h during the 8 h of measurements, with a moderate decrease of the SNR (5 dB). The work is valuable and can provide suggestion for camera users in the radiation field.

  15. Nuclear Radiation Degradation Study on HD Camera Based on CMOS Image Sensor at Different Dose Rates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congzheng; Hu, Song; Gao, Chunming; Feng, Chang

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we irradiated a high-definition (HD) industrial camera based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) CMOS image sensor (CIS) with Cobalt-60 gamma-rays. All components of the camera under test were fabricated without radiation hardening, except for the lens. The irradiation experiments of the HD camera under biased conditions were carried out at 1.0, 10.0, 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h. During the experiment, we found that the tested camera showed a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differed in the dose rates. With the increase of dose rate, the same target images become brighter. Under the same dose rate, the radiation effect in bright area is lower than that in dark area. Under different dose rates, the higher the dose rate is, the worse the radiation effect will be in both bright and dark areas. And the standard deviations of bright and dark areas become greater. Furthermore, through the progressive degradation analysis of the captured image, experimental results demonstrate that the attenuation of signal to noise ratio (SNR) versus radiation time is not obvious at the same dose rate, and the degradation is more and more serious with increasing dose rate. Additionally, the decrease rate of SNR at 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 Gy/h is far greater than that at 1.0 and 10.0 Gy/h. Even so, we confirm that the HD industrial camera is still working at 10.0 Gy/h during the 8 h of measurements, with a moderate decrease of the SNR (5 dB). The work is valuable and can provide suggestion for camera users in the radiation field. PMID:29419782

  16. A Dynamic Range Enhanced Readout Technique with a Two-Step TDC for High Speed Linear CMOS Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiyuan; Yang, Congjie; Xu, Jiangtao; Nie, Kaiming

    2015-11-06

    This paper presents a dynamic range (DR) enhanced readout technique with a two-step time-to-digital converter (TDC) for high speed linear CMOS image sensors. A multi-capacitor and self-regulated capacitive trans-impedance amplifier (CTIA) structure is employed to extend the dynamic range. The gain of the CTIA is auto adjusted by switching different capacitors to the integration node asynchronously according to the output voltage. A column-parallel ADC based on a two-step TDC is utilized to improve the conversion rate. The conversion is divided into coarse phase and fine phase. An error calibration scheme is also proposed to correct quantization errors caused by propagation delay skew within -T(clk)~+T(clk). A linear CMOS image sensor pixel array is designed in the 0.13 μm CMOS process to verify this DR-enhanced high speed readout technique. The post simulation results indicate that the dynamic range of readout circuit is 99.02 dB and the ADC achieves 60.22 dB SNDR and 9.71 bit ENOB at a conversion rate of 2 MS/s after calibration, with 14.04 dB and 2.4 bit improvement, compared with SNDR and ENOB of that without calibration.

  17. Applications of the Integrated High-Performance CMOS Image Sensor to Range Finders — from Optical Triangulation to the Automotive Field

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jih-Huah; Pen, Cheng-Chung; Jiang, Joe-Air

    2008-01-01

    With their significant features, the applications of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors covers a very extensive range, from industrial automation to traffic applications such as aiming systems, blind guidance, active/passive range finders, etc. In this paper CMOS image sensor-based active and passive range finders are presented. The measurement scheme of the proposed active/passive range finders is based on a simple triangulation method. The designed range finders chiefly consist of a CMOS image sensor and some light sources such as lasers or LEDs. The implementation cost of our range finders is quite low. Image processing software to adjust the exposure time (ET) of the CMOS image sensor to enhance the performance of triangulation-based range finders was also developed. An extensive series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the designed range finders. From the experimental results, the distance measurement resolutions achieved by the active range finder and the passive range finder can be better than 0.6% and 0.25% within the measurement ranges of 1 to 8 m and 5 to 45 m, respectively. Feasibility tests on applications of the developed CMOS image sensor-based range finders to the automotive field were also conducted. The experimental results demonstrated that our range finders are well-suited for distance measurements in this field. PMID:27879789

  18. Combined reactor neutron beam and {sup 60}Co γ-ray radiation effects on CMOS APS image sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zujun, E-mail: wangzujun@nint.ac.cn; Chen, Wei; Sheng, Jiangkun

    The combined reactor neutron beam and {sup 60}Co γ-ray radiation effects on complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APS) have been discussed and some new experimental phenomena are presented. The samples are manufactured in the standard 0.35-μm CMOS technology. Two samples were first exposed to {sup 60}Co γ-rays up to the total ionizing dose (TID) level of 200 krad(Si) at the dose rates of 50.0 and 0.2 rad(Si)/s, and then exposed to neutron fluence up to 1 × 10{sup 11} n/cm{sup 2} (1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence). One sample was first exposed to neutron fluence up to 1 × 10{supmore » 11} n/cm{sup 2} (1-MeV equivalent neutron fluence), and then exposed to {sup 60}Co γ-rays up to the TID level of 200 krad(Si) at the dose rate of 0.2 rad(Si)/s. The mean dark signal (K{sub D}), the dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), and the noise (V{sub N}) versus the total dose and neutron fluence has been investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors have been analyzed, especially for the interaction induced by neutron displacement damage and TID damage.« less

  19. Large area CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis: Analysis, modeling, and characterization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy; Konstantinidis, Anastasios C; Patel, Tushita

    2015-11-01

    Large area x-ray imagers based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been proposed for various medical imaging applications including digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The low electronic noise (50-300 e-) of CMOS APS x-ray imagers provides a possible route to shrink the pixel pitch to smaller than 75 μm for microcalcification detection and possible reduction of the DBT mean glandular dose (MGD). In this study, imaging performance of a large area (29×23 cm2) CMOS APS x-ray imager [Dexela 2923 MAM (PerkinElmer, London)] with a pixel pitch of 75 μm was characterized and modeled. The authors developed a cascaded system model for CMOS APS x-ray imagers using both a broadband x-ray radiation and monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The experimental data including modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were theoretically described using the proposed cascaded system model with satisfactory consistency to experimental results. Both high full well and low full well (LFW) modes of the Dexela 2923 MAM CMOS APS x-ray imager were characterized and modeled. The cascaded system analysis results were further used to extract the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for microcalcifications with sizes of 165-400 μm at various MGDs. The impact of electronic noise on CNR was also evaluated. The LFW mode shows better DQE at low air kerma (Ka<10 μGy) and should be used for DBT. At current DBT applications, air kerma (Ka∼10 μGy, broadband radiation of 28 kVp), DQE of more than 0.7 and ∼0.3 was achieved using the LFW mode at spatial frequency of 0.5 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) and Nyquist frequency ∼6.7 lp/mm, respectively. It is shown that microcalcifications of 165-400 μm in size can be resolved using a MGD range of 0.3-1 mGy, respectively. In comparison to a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT system (at MGD of 2.5 mGy), an increased CNR (by ∼10) for

  20. Large area CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis: Analysis, modeling, and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy, E-mail: kanicki@eecs.umich.edu; Konstantinidis, Anastasios C.

    Purpose: Large area x-ray imagers based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been proposed for various medical imaging applications including digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The low electronic noise (50–300 e{sup −}) of CMOS APS x-ray imagers provides a possible route to shrink the pixel pitch to smaller than 75 μm for microcalcification detection and possible reduction of the DBT mean glandular dose (MGD). Methods: In this study, imaging performance of a large area (29 × 23 cm{sup 2}) CMOS APS x-ray imager [Dexela 2923 MAM (PerkinElmer, London)] with a pixel pitch of 75 μm was characterizedmore » and modeled. The authors developed a cascaded system model for CMOS APS x-ray imagers using both a broadband x-ray radiation and monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The experimental data including modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were theoretically described using the proposed cascaded system model with satisfactory consistency to experimental results. Both high full well and low full well (LFW) modes of the Dexela 2923 MAM CMOS APS x-ray imager were characterized and modeled. The cascaded system analysis results were further used to extract the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for microcalcifications with sizes of 165–400 μm at various MGDs. The impact of electronic noise on CNR was also evaluated. Results: The LFW mode shows better DQE at low air kerma (K{sub a} < 10 μGy) and should be used for DBT. At current DBT applications, air kerma (K{sub a} ∼ 10 μGy, broadband radiation of 28 kVp), DQE of more than 0.7 and ∼0.3 was achieved using the LFW mode at spatial frequency of 0.5 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) and Nyquist frequency ∼6.7 lp/mm, respectively. It is shown that microcalcifications of 165–400 μm in size can be resolved using a MGD range of 0.3–1 mGy, respectively. In comparison to a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT

  1. CMOS Image Sensor Using SOI-MOS/Photodiode Composite Photodetector Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uryu, Yuko; Asano, Tanemasa

    2002-04-01

    A new photodetector device composed of a lateral junction photodiode and a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor (MOSFET), in which the output of the diode is fed through the body of the MOSFET, has been investigated. It is shown that the silicon-on-insulator (SOI)-MOSFET amplifies the junction photodiode current due to the lateral bipolar action. It is also shown that the presence of the electrically floating gate enhances the current amplification factor of the SOI-MOSFET. The output current of this composite device linearly responds by four orders of illumination intensity. As an application of the composite device, a complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) line sensor incorporating the composite device is fabricated and its operation is demonstrated. The output signal of the line sensor using the composite device was two times larger than that using the lateral photodiode.

  2. Nano-patterned visible wavelength filter integrated with an image sensor exploiting a 90-nm CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yeo-Taek; Lee, Sang-Shin; Lee, Byoung-Su

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient visible wavelength filter enabling a homogeneous integration with an image sensor was proposed and manufactured by employing a standard 90-nm CMOS process. A one dimensional subwavelength Al grating overlaid with an oxide film was built on top of an image sensor to serve as a low-pass wavelength filter; a microlens was then formed atop the filter to achieve beam focusing. The structural parameters for the filter were: a grating pitch of 300 nm, a grating height of 170 nm, and a 150-nm thick oxide overlay. The overall transmission was observed to reach up to 80% in the visible band with a decent roll-off near ∼700 nm. Finally, the discrepancy between the observed and calculated result was accounted for by appropriately modeling the implemented metallic grating structure, accompanying an undercut sidewall.

  3. Room-temperature bonding of epitaxial layer to carbon-cluster ion-implanted silicon wafers for CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Yoshihiro; Kadono, Takeshi; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Hirose, Ryo; Onaka-Masada, Ayumi; Okuyama, Ryousuke; Okuda, Hidehiko; Kurita, Kazunari

    2018-06-01

    We propose a fabrication process for silicon wafers by combining carbon-cluster ion implantation and room-temperature bonding for advanced CMOS image sensors. These carbon-cluster ions are made of carbon and hydrogen, which can passivate process-induced defects. We demonstrated that this combination process can be used to form an epitaxial layer on a carbon-cluster ion-implanted Czochralski (CZ)-grown silicon substrate with a high dose of 1 × 1016 atoms/cm2. This implantation condition transforms the top-surface region of the CZ-grown silicon substrate into a thin amorphous layer. Thus, an epitaxial layer cannot be grown on this implanted CZ-grown silicon substrate. However, this combination process can be used to form an epitaxial layer on the amorphous layer of this implanted CZ-grown silicon substrate surface. This bonding wafer has strong gettering capability in both the wafer-bonding region and the carbon-cluster ion-implanted projection range. Furthermore, this wafer inhibits oxygen out-diffusion to the epitaxial layer from the CZ-grown silicon substrate after device fabrication. Therefore, we believe that this bonding wafer is effective in decreasing the dark current and white-spot defect density for advanced CMOS image sensors.

  4. The implementation of CMOS sensors within a real time digital mammography intelligent imaging system: The I-ImaS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esbrand, C.; Royle, G.; Griffiths, J.; Speller, R.

    2009-07-01

    The integration of technology with healthcare has undoubtedly propelled the medical imaging sector well into the twenty first century. The concept of digital imaging introduced during the 1970s has since paved the way for established imaging techniques where digital mammography, phase contrast imaging and CT imaging are just a few examples. This paper presents a prototype intelligent digital mammography system designed and developed by a European consortium. The final system, the I-ImaS system, utilises CMOS monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) technology promoting on-chip data processing, enabling the acts of data processing and image acquisition to be achieved simultaneously; consequently, statistical analysis of tissue is achievable in real-time for the purpose of x-ray beam modulation via a feedback mechanism during the image acquisition procedure. The imager implements a dual array of twenty 520 pixel × 40 pixel CMOS MAPS sensing devices with a 32μm pixel size, each individually coupled to a 100μm thick thallium doped structured CsI scintillator. This paper presents the first intelligent images of real breast tissue obtained from the prototype system of real excised breast tissue where the x-ray exposure was modulated via the statistical information extracted from the breast tissue itself. Conventional images were experimentally acquired where the statistical analysis of the data was done off-line, resulting in the production of simulated real-time intelligently optimised images. The results obtained indicate real-time image optimisation using the statistical information extracted from the breast as a means of a feedback mechanisms is beneficial and foreseeable in the near future.

  5. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology and Reliability Characterization Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yuan; Guertin, Steven M.; Pain, Bedabrata; Kayaii, Sammy

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the technology, design features and reliability characterization methodology of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. Both overall chip reliability and pixel reliability are projected for the imagers.

  6. Development of CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensors for Low Cost Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, R.; Kemeny, S.; Kim, Q.; Mendis, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nixon, R.; Ortiz, M.; Pain, B.; Staller, C.; Zhou, Z; hide

    1994-01-01

    JPL, under sponsorship from the NASA Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology, has been developing a second-generation solid-state image sensor technology. Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are a well-established first generation image sensor technology. For both commercial and NASA applications, CCDs have numerous shortcomings. In response, the active pixel sensor (APS) technology has been under research. The major advantages of APS technology are the ability to integrate on-chip timing, control, signal-processing and analog-to-digital converter functions, reduced sensitivity to radiation effects, low power operation, and random access readout.

  7. Low-Voltage 96 dB Snapshot CMOS Image Sensor with 4.5 nW Power Dissipation per Pixel

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, Arthur; Teman, Adam; Belenky, Alexander; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Fish, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Modern “smart” CMOS sensors have penetrated into various applications, such as surveillance systems, bio-medical applications, digital cameras, cellular phones and many others. Reducing the power of these sensors continuously challenges designers. In this paper, a low power global shutter CMOS image sensor with Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) ability is presented. This sensor features several power reduction techniques, including a dual voltage supply, a selective power down, transistors with different threshold voltages, a non-rationed logic, and a low voltage static memory. A combination of all these approaches has enabled the design of the low voltage “smart” image sensor, which is capable of reaching a remarkable dynamic range, while consuming very low power. The proposed power-saving solutions have allowed the maintenance of the standard architecture of the sensor, reducing both the time and the cost of the design. In order to maintain the image quality, a relation between the sensor performance and power has been analyzed and a mathematical model, describing the sensor Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and Dynamic Range (DR) as a function of the power supplies, is proposed. The described sensor was implemented in a 0.18 um CMOS process and successfully tested in the laboratory. An SNR of 48 dB and DR of 96 dB were achieved with a power dissipation of 4.5 nW per pixel. PMID:23112588

  8. Low-voltage 96 dB snapshot CMOS image sensor with 4.5 nW power dissipation per pixel.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Arthur; Teman, Adam; Belenky, Alexander; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Fish, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Modern "smart" CMOS sensors have penetrated into various applications, such as surveillance systems, bio-medical applications, digital cameras, cellular phones and many others. Reducing the power of these sensors continuously challenges designers. In this paper, a low power global shutter CMOS image sensor with Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) ability is presented. This sensor features several power reduction techniques, including a dual voltage supply, a selective power down, transistors with different threshold voltages, a non-rationed logic, and a low voltage static memory. A combination of all these approaches has enabled the design of the low voltage "smart" image sensor, which is capable of reaching a remarkable dynamic range, while consuming very low power. The proposed power-saving solutions have allowed the maintenance of the standard architecture of the sensor, reducing both the time and the cost of the design. In order to maintain the image quality, a relation between the sensor performance and power has been analyzed and a mathematical model, describing the sensor Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and Dynamic Range (DR) as a function of the power supplies, is proposed. The described sensor was implemented in a 0.18 um CMOS process and successfully tested in the laboratory. An SNR of 48 dB and DR of 96 dB were achieved with a power dissipation of 4.5 nW per pixel.

  9. Noise Reduction Effect of Multiple-Sampling-Based Signal-Readout Circuits for Ultra-Low Noise CMOS Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kawahito, Shoji; Seo, Min-Woong

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the noise reduction effect of multiple-sampling-based signal readout circuits for implementing ultra-low-noise image sensors. The correlated multiple sampling (CMS) technique has recently become an important technology for high-gain column readout circuits in low-noise CMOS image sensors (CISs). This paper reveals how the column CMS circuits, together with a pixel having a high-conversion-gain charge detector and low-noise transistor, realizes deep sub-electron read noise levels based on the analysis of noise components in the signal readout chain from a pixel to the column analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The noise measurement results of experimental CISs are compared with the noise analysis and the effect of noise reduction to the sampling number is discussed at the deep sub-electron level. Images taken with three CMS gains of two, 16, and 128 show distinct advantage of image contrast for the gain of 128 (noise(median): 0.29 e−rms) when compared with the CMS gain of two (2.4 e−rms), or 16 (1.1 e−rms). PMID:27827972

  10. Noise Reduction Effect of Multiple-Sampling-Based Signal-Readout Circuits for Ultra-Low Noise CMOS Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Kawahito, Shoji; Seo, Min-Woong

    2016-11-06

    This paper discusses the noise reduction effect of multiple-sampling-based signal readout circuits for implementing ultra-low-noise image sensors. The correlated multiple sampling (CMS) technique has recently become an important technology for high-gain column readout circuits in low-noise CMOS image sensors (CISs). This paper reveals how the column CMS circuits, together with a pixel having a high-conversion-gain charge detector and low-noise transistor, realizes deep sub-electron read noise levels based on the analysis of noise components in the signal readout chain from a pixel to the column analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The noise measurement results of experimental CISs are compared with the noise analysis and the effect of noise reduction to the sampling number is discussed at the deep sub-electron level. Images taken with three CMS gains of two, 16, and 128 show distinct advantage of image contrast for the gain of 128 (noise(median): 0.29 e - rms ) when compared with the CMS gain of two (2.4 e - rms ), or 16 (1.1 e - rms ).

  11. Highly sensitive and area-efficient CMOS image sensor using a PMOSFET-type photodetector with a built-in transfer gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Sang-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Do; Kong, Jae-Sung; Shin, Jang-Kyoo; Choi, Pyung

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, a new CMOS image sensor is presented, which uses a PMOSFET-type photodetector with a transfer gate that has a high and variable sensitivity. The proposed CMOS image sensor has been fabricated using a 0.35 μm 2-poly 4- metal standard CMOS technology and is composed of a 256 × 256 array of 7.05 × 7.10 μm pixels. The unit pixel has a configuration of a pseudo 3-transistor active pixel sensor (APS) with the PMOSFET-type photodetector with a transfer gate, which has a function of conventional 4-transistor APS. The generated photocurrent is controlled by the transfer gate of the PMOSFET-type photodetector. The maximum responsivity of the photodetector is larger than 1.0 × 10 3 A/W without any optical lens. Fabricated 256 × 256 CMOS image sensor exhibits a good response to low-level illumination as low as 5 lux.

  12. Effect of drain current on appearance probability and amplitude of random telegraph noise in low-noise CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichino, Shinya; Mawaki, Takezo; Teramoto, Akinobu; Kuroda, Rihito; Park, Hyeonwoo; Wakashima, Shunichi; Goto, Tetsuya; Suwa, Tomoyuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2018-04-01

    Random telegraph noise (RTN), which occurs in in-pixel source follower (SF) transistors, has become one of the most critical problems in high-sensitivity CMOS image sensors (CIS) because it is a limiting factor of dark random noise. In this paper, the behaviors of RTN toward changes in SF drain current conditions were analyzed using a low-noise array test circuit measurement system with a floor noise of 35 µV rms. In addition to statistical analysis by measuring a large number of transistors (18048 transistors), we also analyzed the behaviors of RTN parameters such as amplitude and time constants in the individual transistors. It is demonstrated that the appearance probability of RTN becomes small under a small drain current condition, although large-amplitude RTN tends to appear in a very small number of cells.

  13. Proton Radiation Effects on Dark Signal Distribution of PPD CMOS Image Sensors: Both TID and DDD Effects.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zujun; Chen, Wei; Liu, Minbo; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Sheng, Jiangkun; Ma, Wuying; Dong, Guantao; Jin, Junshan

    2017-11-30

    Four-transistor (T) pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) with four-megapixel resolution using 11µm pitch high dynamic range pixel were radiated with 3 MeV and 10MeV protons. The dark signal was measured pre- and post-radiation, with the dark signal post irradiation showing a remarkable increase. A theoretical method of dark signal distribution pre- and post-radiation is used to analyze the degradation mechanisms of the dark signal distribution. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental results. This research would provide a good understanding of the proton radiation effects on the CIS and make it possible to predict the dark signal distribution of the CIS under the complex proton radiation environments.

  14. High-Speed Scanning Interferometer Using CMOS Image Sensor and FPGA Based on Multifrequency Phase-Tracking Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohara, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    A sub-aperture stitching optical interferometer can provide a cost-effective solution for an in situ metrology tool for large optics; however, the currently available technologies are not suitable for high-speed and real-time continuous scan. NanoWave s SPPE (Scanning Probe Position Encoder) has been proven to exhibit excellent stability and sub-nanometer precision with a large dynamic range. This same technology can transform many optical interferometers into real-time subnanometer precision tools with only minor modification. The proposed field-programmable gate array (FPGA) signal processing concept, coupled with a new-generation, high-speed, mega-pixel CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) image sensor, enables high speed (>1 m/s) and real-time continuous surface profiling that is insensitive to variation of pixel sensitivity and/or optical transmission/reflection. This is especially useful for large optics surface profiling.

  15. Theoretical and experimental study of the dark signal in CMOS image sensors affected by neutron radiation from a nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zujun; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Liu, Minbo; Ma, Wuying; Sheng, Jiangkun; Dong, Guantao; Jin, Junshan

    2017-12-01

    The CMOS image sensors (CISs) are irradiated with neutron from a nuclear reactor. The dark signal in CISs affected by neutron radiation is studied theoretically and experimentally. The Primary knock-on atoms (PKA) energy spectra for 1 MeV incident neutrons are simulated by Geant4. And the theoretical models for the mean dark signal, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU) and dark signal distribution versus neutron fluence are established. The results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental outputs. Finally, the dark signal in the CISs under the different neutron fluence conditions is estimated. This study provides the theoretical and experimental evidence for the displacement damage effects on the dark signal CISs.

  16. A Fast Multiple Sampling Method for Low-Noise CMOS Image Sensors With Column-Parallel 12-bit SAR ADCs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Kyu; Hong, Seong-Kwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a fast multiple sampling method for low-noise CMOS image sensor (CIS) applications with column-parallel successive approximation register analog-to-digital converters (SAR ADCs). The 12-bit SAR ADC using the proposed multiple sampling method decreases the A/D conversion time by repeatedly converting a pixel output to 4-bit after the first 12-bit A/D conversion, reducing noise of the CIS by one over the square root of the number of samplings. The area of the 12-bit SAR ADC is reduced by using a 10-bit capacitor digital-to-analog converter (DAC) with four scaled reference voltages. In addition, a simple up/down counter-based digital processing logic is proposed to perform complex calculations for multiple sampling and digital correlated double sampling. To verify the proposed multiple sampling method, a 256 × 128 pixel array CIS with 12-bit SAR ADCs was fabricated using 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurement results shows that the proposed multiple sampling method reduces each A/D conversion time from 1.2 μs to 0.45 μs and random noise from 848.3 μV to 270.4 μV, achieving a dynamic range of 68.1 dB and an SNR of 39.2 dB. PMID:26712765

  17. A Fast Multiple Sampling Method for Low-Noise CMOS Image Sensors With Column-Parallel 12-bit SAR ADCs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Kyu; Hong, Seong-Kwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2015-12-26

    This paper presents a fast multiple sampling method for low-noise CMOS image sensor (CIS) applications with column-parallel successive approximation register analog-to-digital converters (SAR ADCs). The 12-bit SAR ADC using the proposed multiple sampling method decreases the A/D conversion time by repeatedly converting a pixel output to 4-bit after the first 12-bit A/D conversion, reducing noise of the CIS by one over the square root of the number of samplings. The area of the 12-bit SAR ADC is reduced by using a 10-bit capacitor digital-to-analog converter (DAC) with four scaled reference voltages. In addition, a simple up/down counter-based digital processing logic is proposed to perform complex calculations for multiple sampling and digital correlated double sampling. To verify the proposed multiple sampling method, a 256 × 128 pixel array CIS with 12-bit SAR ADCs was fabricated using 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurement results shows that the proposed multiple sampling method reduces each A/D conversion time from 1.2 μs to 0.45 μs and random noise from 848.3 μV to 270.4 μV, achieving a dynamic range of 68.1 dB and an SNR of 39.2 dB.

  18. A 12-bit high-speed column-parallel two-step single-slope analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Tao; Yao, Suying; Nie, Kaiming; Xu, Jiangtao

    2014-11-17

    A 12-bit high-speed column-parallel two-step single-slope (SS) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for CMOS image sensors is proposed. The proposed ADC employs a single ramp voltage and multiple reference voltages, and the conversion is divided into coarse phase and fine phase to improve the conversion rate. An error calibration scheme is proposed to correct errors caused by offsets among the reference voltages. The digital-to-analog converter (DAC) used for the ramp generator is based on the split-capacitor array with an attenuation capacitor. Analysis of the DAC's linearity performance versus capacitor mismatch and parasitic capacitance is presented. A prototype 1024 × 32 Time Delay Integration (TDI) CMOS image sensor with the proposed ADC architecture has been fabricated in a standard 0.18 μm CMOS process. The proposed ADC has average power consumption of 128 μW and a conventional rate 6 times higher than the conventional SS ADC. A high-quality image, captured at the line rate of 15.5 k lines/s, shows that the proposed ADC is suitable for high-speed CMOS image sensors.

  19. A Fixed-Pattern Noise Correction Method Based on Gray Value Compensation for TDI CMOS Image Sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenwang; Xu, Jiangtao; Wang, Xinlei; Nie, Kaiming; Jin, Weimin

    2015-09-16

    In order to eliminate the fixed-pattern noise (FPN) in the output image of time-delay-integration CMOS image sensor (TDI-CIS), a FPN correction method based on gray value compensation is proposed. One hundred images are first captured under uniform illumination. Then, row FPN (RFPN) and column FPN (CFPN) are estimated based on the row-mean vector and column-mean vector of all collected images, respectively. Finally, RFPN are corrected by adding the estimated RFPN gray value to the original gray values of pixels in the corresponding row, and CFPN are corrected by subtracting the estimated CFPN gray value from the original gray values of pixels in the corresponding column. Experimental results based on a 128-stage TDI-CIS show that, after correcting the FPN in the image captured under uniform illumination with the proposed method, the standard-deviation of row-mean vector decreases from 5.6798 to 0.4214 LSB, and the standard-deviation of column-mean vector decreases from 15.2080 to 13.4623 LSB. Both kinds of FPN in the real images captured by TDI-CIS are eliminated effectively with the proposed method.

  20. Fixed-pattern noise correction method based on improved moment matching for a TDI CMOS image sensor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiangtao; Nie, Huafeng; Nie, Kaiming; Jin, Weimin

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, an improved moment matching method based on a spatial correlation filter (SCF) and bilateral filter (BF) is proposed to correct the fixed-pattern noise (FPN) of a time-delay-integration CMOS image sensor (TDI-CIS). First, the values of row FPN (RFPN) and column FPN (CFPN) are estimated and added to the original image through SCF and BF, respectively. Then the filtered image will be processed by an improved moment matching method with a moving window. Experimental results based on a 128-stage TDI-CIS show that, after correcting the FPN in the image captured under uniform illumination, the standard deviation of row mean vector (SDRMV) decreases from 5.6761 LSB to 0.1948 LSB, while the standard deviation of the column mean vector (SDCMV) decreases from 15.2005 LSB to 13.1949LSB. In addition, for different images captured by different TDI-CISs, the average decrease of SDRMV and SDCMV is 5.4922/2.0357 LSB, respectively. Comparative experimental results indicate that the proposed method can effectively correct the FPNs of different TDI-CISs while maintaining image details without any auxiliary equipment.

  1. Optical and x-ray characterization of two novel CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohndiek, Sarah E.; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Venanzi, Cristian; Royle, Gary J.; Clark, Andy T.; Crooks, Jamie P.; Prydderch, Mark L.; Turchetta, Renato; Blue, Andrew; Speller, Robert D.

    2007-02-01

    A UK consortium (MI3) has been founded to develop advanced CMOS pixel designs for scientific applications. Vanilla, a 520x520 array of 25μm pixels benefits from flushed reset circuitry for low noise and random pixel access for region of interest (ROI) readout. OPIC, a 64x72 test structure array of 30μm digital pixels has thresholding capabilities for sparse readout at 3,700fps. Characterization is performed with both optical illumination and x-ray exposure via a scintillator. Vanilla exhibits 34+/-3e - read noise, interactive quantum efficiency of 54% at 500nm and can read a 6x6 ROI at 24,395fps. OPIC has 46+/-3e - read noise and a wide dynamic range of 65dB due to high full well capacity. Based on these characterization studies, Vanilla could be utilized in applications where demands include high spectral response and high speed region of interest readout while OPIC could be used for high speed, high dynamic range imaging.

  2. Rapid immuno-analytical system physically integrated with lens-free CMOS image sensor for food-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jee-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Mook; Lee, Won-Ho; Lee, Do-Young; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2014-02-15

    To realize an inexpensive, pocket-sized immunosensor system, a rapid test devise based on cross-flow immuno-chromatography was physically combined with a lens-free CMOS image sensor (CIS), which was then applied to the detection of the food-borne pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium). Two CISs, each retaining 1.3 mega pixel array, were mounted on a printed circuit board to fabricate a disposable sensing module, being connectable with a signal detection system. For the bacterial analysis, a cellulose membrane-based immunosensing platform, ELISA-on-a-chip (EOC), was employed, being integrated with the CIS module, and the antigen-antibody reaction sites were aligned with the respective sensor. In such sensor construction, the chemiluminescent signals produced from the EOC are transferred directly into the sensors and are converted to electric signals on the detector. The EOC-CIS integrated sensor was capable of detecting a traceable amount of the bacterium (4.22 × 10(3)CFU/mL), nearly comparable to that adopting a sophisticated detector such as cooled-charge-coupled device, while having greatly reduced dimensions and cost. Upon coupling with immuno-magnetic separation, the sensor showed an additional 67-fold enhancement in the detection limit. Furthermore, a real sample test was carried out for fish muscles inoculated with a sample of 3.3CFU S. typhimurium per 10 g, which was able to be detected earlier than 6h after the onset of pre-enrichment by culture. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantum efficiency and dark current evaluation of a backside illuminated CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecke, Bart; Cavaco, Celso; De Munck, Koen; Haspeslagh, Luc; Minoglou, Kyriaki; Moore, George; Sabuncuoglu, Deniz; Tack, Klaas; Wu, Bob; Osman, Haris

    2015-04-01

    We report on the development and characterization of monolithic backside illuminated (BSI) imagers at imec. Different surface passivation, anti-reflective coatings (ARCs), and anneal conditions were implemented and their effect on dark current (DC) and quantum efficiency (QE) are analyzed. Two different single layer ARC materials were developed for visible light and near UV applications, respectively. QE above 75% over the entire visible spectrum range from 400 to 700 nm is measured. In the spectral range from 260 to 400 nm wavelength, QE values above 50% over the entire range are achieved. A new technique, high pressure hydrogen anneal at 20 atm, was applied on photodiodes and improvement in DC of 30% for the BSI imager with HfO2 as ARC as well as for the front side imager was observed. The entire BSI process was developed 200 mm wafers and evaluated on test diode structures. The knowhow is then transferred to real imager sensors arrays.

  4. Synchrotron based planar imaging and digital tomosynthesis of breast and biopsy phantoms using a CMOS active pixel sensor.

    PubMed

    Szafraniec, Magdalena B; Konstantinidis, Anastasios C; Tromba, Giuliana; Dreossi, Diego; Vecchio, Sara; Rigon, Luigi; Sodini, Nicola; Naday, Steve; Gunn, Spencer; McArthur, Alan; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    The SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at Elettra is performing the first mammography study on human patients using free-space propagation phase contrast imaging. The stricter spatial resolution requirements of this method currently force the use of conventional films or specialized computed radiography (CR) systems. This also prevents the implementation of three-dimensional (3D) approaches. This paper explores the use of an X-ray detector based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology as a possible alternative, for acquisitions both in planar and tomosynthesis geometry. Results indicate higher quality of the images acquired with the synchrotron set-up in both geometries. This improvement can be partly ascribed to the use of parallel, collimated and monochromatic synchrotron radiation (resulting in scatter rejection, no penumbra-induced blurring and optimized X-ray energy), and partly to phase contrast effects. Even though the pixel size of the used detector is still too large - and thus suboptimal - for free-space propagation phase contrast imaging, a degree of phase-induced edge enhancement can clearly be observed in the images. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pixel pitch and particle energy influence on the dark current distribution of neutron irradiated CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Belloir, Jean-Marc; Goiffon, Vincent; Virmontois, Cédric; Raine, Mélanie; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Gaillardin, Marc; Molina, Romain; Magnan, Pierre; Gilard, Olivier

    2016-02-22

    The dark current produced by neutron irradiation in CMOS Image Sensors (CIS) is investigated. Several CIS with different photodiode types and pixel pitches are irradiated with various neutron energies and fluences to study the influence of each of these optical detector and irradiation parameters on the dark current distribution. An empirical model is tested on the experimental data and validated on all the irradiated optical imagers. This model is able to describe all the presented dark current distributions with no parameter variation for neutron energies of 14 MeV or higher, regardless of the optical detector and irradiation characteristics. For energies below 1 MeV, it is shown that a single parameter has to be adjusted because of the lower mean damage energy per nuclear interaction. This model and these conclusions can be transposed to any silicon based solid-state optical imagers such as CIS or Charged Coupled Devices (CCD). This work can also be used when designing an optical imager instrument, to anticipate the dark current increase or to choose a mitigation technique.

  6. Ionizing doses and displacement damage testing of COTS CMOS imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Frédéric; Petit, Sophie; Courtade, Sophie

    2017-11-01

    CMOS sensors begin to be a credible alternative to CCD sensors in some space missions. However, technology evolution of CMOS sensors is much faster than CCD one's. So a continuous technology evaluation is needed for CMOS imagers. Many of commercial COTS (Components Off The Shelf) CMOS sensors use organic filters, micro-lenses and non rad-hard technologies. An evaluation of the possibilities offered by such technologies is interesting before any custom development. This can be obtained by testing commercial COTS imagers. This article will present electro-optical performances evolution of off the shelves CMOS imagers after Ionizing Doses until 50kRad(Si) and Displacement Damage environment tests (until 1011 p/cm2 at 50 MeV). Dark current level and non uniformity evolutions are compared and discussed. Relative spectral response measurement and associated evolution with irradiation will also be presented and discussed. Tests have been performed on CNES detection benches.

  7. JPL CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper will present the JPL-developed complementary metal- oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology. The CMOS APS has achieved performance comparable to charge coupled devices, yet features ultra low power operation, random access readout, on-chip timing and control, and on-chip analog to digital conversion. Previously published open literature will be reviewed.

  8. A two-step A/D conversion and column self-calibration technique for low noise CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jaeyoung; Kim, Daeyun; Ham, Seokheon; Chae, Youngcheol; Song, Minkyu

    2014-07-04

    In this paper, a 120 frames per second (fps) low noise CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) based on a Two-Step Single Slope ADC (TS SS ADC) and column self-calibration technique is proposed. The TS SS ADC is suitable for high speed video systems because its conversion speed is much faster (by more than 10 times) than that of the Single Slope ADC (SS ADC). However, there exist some mismatching errors between the coarse block and the fine block due to the 2-step operation of the TS SS ADC. In general, this makes it difficult to implement the TS SS ADC beyond a 10-bit resolution. In order to improve such errors, a new 4-input comparator is discussed and a high resolution TS SS ADC is proposed. Further, a feedback circuit that enables column self-calibration to reduce the Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN) is also described. The proposed chip has been fabricated with 0.13 μm Samsung CIS technology and the chip satisfies the VGA resolution. The pixel is based on the 4-TR Active Pixel Sensor (APS). The high frame rate of 120 fps is achieved at the VGA resolution. The measured FPN is 0.38 LSB, and measured dynamic range is about 64.6 dB.

  9. Sensors for 3D Imaging: Metric Evaluation and Calibration of a CCD/CMOS Time-of-Flight Camera.

    PubMed

    Chiabrando, Filiberto; Chiabrando, Roberto; Piatti, Dario; Rinaudo, Fulvio

    2009-01-01

    3D imaging with Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras is a promising recent technique which allows 3D point clouds to be acquired at video frame rates. However, the distance measurements of these devices are often affected by some systematic errors which decrease the quality of the acquired data. In order to evaluate these errors, some experimental tests on a CCD/CMOS ToF camera sensor, the SwissRanger (SR)-4000 camera, were performed and reported in this paper. In particular, two main aspects are treated: the calibration of the distance measurements of the SR-4000 camera, which deals with evaluation of the camera warm up time period, the distance measurement error evaluation and a study of the influence on distance measurements of the camera orientation with respect to the observed object; the second aspect concerns the photogrammetric calibration of the amplitude images delivered by the camera using a purpose-built multi-resolution field made of high contrast targets.

  10. A CMOS high speed imaging system design based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong; Wang, Huawei; Cao, Jianzhong; Qiao, Mingrui

    2015-10-01

    CMOS sensors have more advantages than traditional CCD sensors. The imaging system based on CMOS has become a hot spot in research and development. In order to achieve the real-time data acquisition and high-speed transmission, we design a high-speed CMOS imaging system on account of FPGA. The core control chip of this system is XC6SL75T and we take advantages of CameraLink interface and AM41V4 CMOS image sensors to transmit and acquire image data. AM41V4 is a 4 Megapixel High speed 500 frames per second CMOS image sensor with global shutter and 4/3" optical format. The sensor uses column parallel A/D converters to digitize the images. The CameraLink interface adopts DS90CR287 and it can convert 28 bits of LVCMOS/LVTTL data into four LVDS data stream. The reflected light of objects is photographed by the CMOS detectors. CMOS sensors convert the light to electronic signals and then send them to FPGA. FPGA processes data it received and transmits them to upper computer which has acquisition cards through CameraLink interface configured as full models. Then PC will store, visualize and process images later. The structure and principle of the system are both explained in this paper and this paper introduces the hardware and software design of the system. FPGA introduces the driven clock of CMOS. The data in CMOS is converted to LVDS signals and then transmitted to the data acquisition cards. After simulation, the paper presents a row transfer timing sequence of CMOS. The system realized real-time image acquisition and external controls.

  11. Non-flickering 100 m RGB visible light communication transmission based on a CMOS image sensor.

    PubMed

    Chow, Chi-Wai; Shiu, Ruei-Jie; Liu, Yen-Chun; Liu, Yang; Yeh, Chien-Hung

    2018-03-19

    We demonstrate a non-flickering 100 m long-distance RGB visible light communication (VLC) transmission based on a complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) camera. Experimental bit-error rate (BER) measurements under different camera ISO values and different transmission distances are evaluated. Here, we also experimentally reveal that the rolling shutter effect- (RSE) based VLC system cannot work at long distance transmission, and the under-sampled modulation- (USM) based VLC system is a good choice.

  12. High responsivity CMOS imager pixel implemented in SOI technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, X.; Wrigley, C.; Yang, G.; Pain, B.

    2000-01-01

    Availability of mature sub-micron CMOS technology and the advent of the new low noise active pixel sensor (APS) concept have enabled the development of low power, miniature, single-chip, CMOS digital imagers in the decade of the 1990's.

  13. Mk x Nk gated CMOS imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesick, James; Elliott, Tom; Andrews, James; Tower, John; Bell, Perry; Teruya, Alan; Kimbrough, Joe; Bishop, Jeanne

    2014-09-01

    Our paper will describe a recently designed Mk x Nk x 10 um pixel CMOS gated imager intended to be first employed at the LLNL National Ignition Facility (NIF). Fabrication involves stitching MxN 1024x1024x10 um pixel blocks together into a monolithic imager (where M = 1, 2, . .10 and N = 1, 2, . . 10). The imager has been designed for either NMOS or PMOS pixel fabrication using a base 0.18 um/3.3V CMOS process. Details behind the design are discussed with emphasis on a custom global reset feature which erases the imager of unwanted charge in ~1 us during the fusion ignition process followed by an exposure to obtain useful data. Performance data generated by prototype imagers designed similar to the Mk x Nk sensor is presented.

  14. A safety monitoring system for taxi based on CMOS imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi

    2005-01-01

    CMOS image sensors now become increasingly competitive with respect to their CCD counterparts, while adding advantages such as no blooming, simpler driving requirements and the potential of on-chip integration of sensor, analogue circuitry, and digital processing functions. A safety monitoring system for taxi based on cmos imager that can record field situation when unusual circumstance happened is described in this paper. The monitoring system is based on a CMOS imager (OV7120), which can output digital image data through parallel pixel data port. The system consists of a CMOS image sensor, a large capacity NAND FLASH ROM, a USB interface chip and a micro controller (AT90S8515). The structure of whole system and the test data is discussed and analyzed in detail.

  15. CMOS Cell Sensors for Point-of-Care Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Adiguzel, Yekbun; Kulah, Haluk

    2012-01-01

    The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions. From this perspective, point-of-care diagnostics is a demanded field in clinics. It is also necessary both for prompt diagnosis and for providing health services evenly throughout the population, including the rural districts. The requirements can only be fulfilled by technologies whose productivity has already been proven, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities. Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature. CMOS-based sensors for cell studies have the potential to become essential counterparts of point-of-care diagnostics technologies. Hence, this review attempts to inform on the sensors fabricated with CMOS technology for point-of-care diagnostic studies, with a focus on CMOS image sensors and capacitance sensors for cell studies. PMID:23112587

  16. CMOS cell sensors for point-of-care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Adiguzel, Yekbun; Kulah, Haluk

    2012-01-01

    The burden of health-care related services in a global era with continuously increasing population and inefficient dissipation of the resources requires effective solutions. From this perspective, point-of-care diagnostics is a demanded field in clinics. It is also necessary both for prompt diagnosis and for providing health services evenly throughout the population, including the rural districts. The requirements can only be fulfilled by technologies whose productivity has already been proven, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). CMOS-based products can enable clinical tests in a fast, simple, safe, and reliable manner, with improved sensitivities. Portability due to diminished sensor dimensions and compactness of the test set-ups, along with low sample and power consumption, is another vital feature. CMOS-based sensors for cell studies have the potential to become essential counterparts of point-of-care diagnostics technologies. Hence, this review attempts to inform on the sensors fabricated with CMOS technology for point-of-care diagnostic studies, with a focus on CMOS image sensors and capacitance sensors for cell studies.

  17. An 80x80 microbolometer type thermal imaging sensor using the LWIR-band CMOS infrared (CIR) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankut, Firat; Cologlu, Mustafa H.; Askar, Hidir; Ozturk, Hande; Dumanli, Hilal K.; Oruc, Feyza; Tilkioglu, Bilge; Ugur, Beril; Akar, Orhan Sevket; Tepegoz, Murat; Akin, Tayfun

    2017-02-01

    This paper introduces an 80x80 microbolometer array with a 35 μm pixel pitch operating in the 8-12 μm wavelength range, where the detector is fabricated with the LWIR-band CMOS infrared technology, shortly named as CIR, which is a novel microbolometer implementation technique developed to reduce the detector cost in order to enable the use of microbolometer type sensors in high volume markets, such as the consumer market and IoT. Unlike the widely used conventional surface micromachined microbolometer approaches, MikroSens' CIR detector technology does not require the use of special high TCR materials like VOx or a-Si, instead, it allows to implement microbolometers with standard CMOS layers, where the suspended bulk micromachined structure is obtained by only few consecutive selective MEMS etching steps while protecting the wirebond pads with a simple lithograpy step. This approach not only reduces the fabrication cost but also increases the production yield. In addition, needing simple subtractive post-CMOS fabrication steps allows the CIR technology to be carried out in any CMOS and MEMS foundry in a truly fabless fashion, where industrially mature and Au-free wafer level vacuum packaging technologies can also be carried out, leading to cost advantage, simplicity, scalability, and flexibility. The CIR approach is used to implement an 80x80 FPA with 35 μm pixel pitch, namely MS0835A, using a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The fabricated sensor is measured to provide NETD (Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference) value of 163 mK at 17 fps (frames per second) and 71 mK at 4 fps with F/1.0 optics in a dewar environment. The measurement results of the wafer level vacuum packaged sensors with one side AR coating shows an NETD values of 112 mK at 4 fps with F/1.1 optics, i.e., demonstrates a good performance for high volume low-cost applications like advanced presence detection and human counting applications. The CIR approach of MikroSens is scalable and can be used to

  18. A Multi-Resolution Mode CMOS Image Sensor with a Novel Two-Step Single-Slope ADC for Intelligent Surveillance Systems.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehyeok; Song, Minkyu; Choe, Byeongseong; Kim, Soo Youn

    2017-06-25

    In this paper, we present a multi-resolution mode CMOS image sensor (CIS) for intelligent surveillance system (ISS) applications. A low column fixed-pattern noise (CFPN) comparator is proposed in 8-bit two-step single-slope analog-to-digital converter (TSSS ADC) for the CIS that supports normal, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, and 1/64 mode of pixel resolution. We show that the scaled-resolution images enable CIS to reduce total power consumption while images hold steady without events. A prototype sensor of 176 × 144 pixels has been fabricated with a 0.18 μm 1-poly 4-metal CMOS process. The area of 4-shared 4T-active pixel sensor (APS) is 4.4 μm × 4.4 μm and the total chip size is 2.35 mm × 2.35 mm. The maximum power consumption is 10 mW (with full resolution) with supply voltages of 3.3 V (analog) and 1.8 V (digital) and 14 frame/s of frame rates.

  19. High-End CMOS Active Pixel Sensors For Space-Borne Imaging Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-13

    DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release, distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES See also ADM001791, Potentially Disruptive ... Technologies and Their Impact in Space Programs Held in Marseille, France on 4-6 July 2005. , The original document contains color images. 14

  20. CMOS imager for pointing and tracking applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Chao (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Yang, Guang (Inventor); Heynssens, Julie B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Systems and techniques to realize pointing and tracking applications with CMOS imaging devices. In general, in one implementation, the technique includes: sampling multiple rows and multiple columns of an active pixel sensor array into a memory array (e.g., an on-chip memory array), and reading out the multiple rows and multiple columns sampled in the memory array to provide image data with reduced motion artifact. Various operation modes may be provided, including TDS, CDS, CQS, a tracking mode to read out multiple windows, and/or a mode employing a sample-first-read-later readout scheme. The tracking mode can take advantage of a diagonal switch array. The diagonal switch array, the active pixel sensor array and the memory array can be integrated onto a single imager chip with a controller. This imager device can be part of a larger imaging system for both space-based applications and terrestrial applications.

  1. Estimation of the particle concentration in hydraulic liquid by the in-line automatic particle counter based on the CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilin, Dmitriy V.; Kudryavtsev, Ilya A.; McMillan, Alison J.; Osanlou, Ardeshir; Ratcliffe, Ian

    2017-06-01

    Modern hydraulic systems should be monitored on the regular basis. One of the most effective ways to address this task is utilizing in-line automatic particle counters (APC) built inside of the system. The measurement of particle concentration in hydraulic liquid by APC is crucial because increasing numbers of particles should mean functional problems. Existing automatic particle counters have significant limitation for the precise measurement of relatively low concentration of particle in aerospace systems or they are unable to measure higher concentration in industrial ones. Both issues can be addressed by implementation of the CMOS image sensor instead of single photodiode used in the most of APC. CMOS image sensor helps to overcome the problem of the errors in volume measurement caused by inequality of particle speed inside of tube. Correction is based on the determination of the particle position and parabolic velocity distribution profile. Proposed algorithms are also suitable for reducing the errors related to the particles matches in measurement volume. The results of simulation show that the accuracy increased up to 90 per cent and the resolution improved ten times more compared to the single photodiode sensor.

  2. A high sensitivity 20Mfps CMOS image sensor with readout speed of 1Tpixel/sec for visualization of ultra-high speed phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, R.; Sugawa, S.

    2017-02-01

    Ultra-high speed (UHS) CMOS image sensors with on-chop analog memories placed on the periphery of pixel array for the visualization of UHS phenomena are overviewed in this paper. The developed UHS CMOS image sensors consist of 400H×256V pixels and 128 memories/pixel, and the readout speed of 1Tpixel/sec is obtained, leading to 10 Mfps full resolution video capturing with consecutive 128 frames, and 20 Mfps half resolution video capturing with consecutive 256 frames. The first development model has been employed in the high speed video camera and put in practical use in 2012. By the development of dedicated process technologies, photosensitivity improvement and power consumption reduction were simultaneously achieved, and the performance improved version has been utilized in the commercialized high-speed video camera since 2015 that offers 10 Mfps with ISO16,000 photosensitivity. Due to the improved photosensitivity, clear images can be captured and analyzed even under low light condition, such as under a microscope as well as capturing of UHS light emission phenomena.

  3. Design of CMOS imaging system based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Chen, Xiaolai

    2017-10-01

    In order to meet the needs of engineering applications for high dynamic range CMOS camera under the rolling shutter mode, a complete imaging system is designed based on the CMOS imaging sensor NSC1105. The paper decides CMOS+ADC+FPGA+Camera Link as processing architecture and introduces the design and implementation of the hardware system. As for camera software system, which consists of CMOS timing drive module, image acquisition module and transmission control module, the paper designs in Verilog language and drives it to work properly based on Xilinx FPGA. The ISE 14.6 emulator ISim is used in the simulation of signals. The imaging experimental results show that the system exhibits a 1280*1024 pixel resolution, has a frame frequency of 25 fps and a dynamic range more than 120dB. The imaging quality of the system satisfies the requirement of the index.

  4. Light-controlled biphasic current stimulator IC using CMOS image sensors for high-resolution retinal prosthesis and in vitro experimental results with rd1 mouse.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sungjin; Ahn, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Sangmin; Ko, Hyoungho; Seo, Jong Mo; Goo, Yong-Sook; Cho, Dong-il Dan

    2015-01-01

    Retinal prosthetic devices stimulate retinal nerve cells with electrical signals proportional to the incident light intensities. For a high-resolution retinal prosthesis, it is necessary to reduce the size of the stimulator pixels as much as possible, because the retinal nerve cells are concentrated in a small area of approximately 5 mm × 5 mm. In this paper, a miniaturized biphasic current stimulator integrated circuit is developed for subretinal stimulation and tested in vitro. The stimulator pixel is miniaturized by using a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor composed of three transistors. Compared to a pixel that uses a four-transistor CMOS image sensor, this new design reduces the pixel size by 8.3%. The pixel size is further reduced by simplifying the stimulation-current generating circuit, which provides a 43.9% size reduction when compared to the design reported to be the most advanced version to date for subretinal stimulation. The proposed design is fabricated using a 0.35 μm bipolar-CMOS-DMOS process. Each pixel is designed to fit in a 50 μ m × 55 μm area, which theoretically allows implementing more than 5000 pixels in the 5 mm × 5 mm area. Experimental results show that a biphasic current in the range of 0 to 300 μA at 12 V can be generated as a function of incident light intensities. Results from in vitro experiments with rd1 mice indicate that the proposed method can be effectively used for retinal prosthesis with a high resolution.

  5. Performance Analysis of Visible Light Communication Using CMOS Sensors.

    PubMed

    Do, Trong-Hop; Yoo, Myungsik

    2016-02-29

    This paper elucidates the fundamentals of visible light communication systems that use the rolling shutter mechanism of CMOS sensors. All related information involving different subjects, such as photometry, camera operation, photography and image processing, are studied in tandem to explain the system. Then, the system performance is analyzed with respect to signal quality and data rate. To this end, a measure of signal quality, the signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR), is formulated. Finally, a simulation is conducted to verify the analysis.

  6. Development of Gentle Slope Light Guide Structure in a 3.4 μm Pixel Pitch Global Shutter CMOS Image Sensor with Multiple Accumulation Shutter Technology.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Onuki, Yusuke; Kawabata, Kazunari; Tsuboi, Toshiki; Matsuno, Yasushi; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Inoue, Shunsuke; Ichikawa, Takeshi

    2017-12-09

    CMOS image sensors (CISs) with global shutter (GS) function are strongly required in order to avoid image degradation. However, CISs with GS function have generally been inferior to the rolling shutter (RS) CIS in performance, because they have more components. This problem is remarkable in small pixel pitch. The newly developed 3.4 µm pitch GS CIS solves this problem by using multiple accumulation shutter technology and the gentle slope light guide structure. As a result, the developed GS pixel achieves 1.8 e - temporal noise and 16,200 e - full well capacity with charge domain memory in 120 fps operation. The sensitivity and parasitic light sensitivity are 28,000 e - /lx·s and -89 dB, respectively. Moreover, the incident light angle dependence of sensitivity and parasitic light sensitivity are improved by the gentle slope light guide structure.

  7. Optimization of CMOS image sensor utilizing variable temporal multisampling partial transfer technique to achieve full-frame high dynamic range with superior low light and stop motion capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Salman; Smith, Craig; Armstrong, Frank; Barnard, Gerrit; Schneider, Alex; Guidash, Michael; Vogelsang, Thomas; Endsley, Jay

    2018-03-01

    Differential binary pixel technology is a threshold-based timing, readout, and image reconstruction method that utilizes the subframe partial charge transfer technique in a standard four-transistor (4T) pixel CMOS image sensor to achieve a high dynamic range video with stop motion. This technology improves low light signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by up to 21 dB. The method is verified in silicon using a Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company's 65 nm 1.1 μm pixel technology 1 megapixel test chip array and is compared with a traditional 4 × oversampling technique using full charge transfer to show low light SNR superiority of the presented technology.

  8. Dual-mode photosensitive arrays based on the integration of liquid crystal microlenses and CMOS sensors for obtaining the intensity images and wavefronts of objects.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qing; Lei, Yu; Xin, Zhaowei; Zhang, Xinyu; Sang, Hongshi; Xie, Changsheng

    2016-02-08

    In this paper, we present a kind of dual-mode photosensitive arrays (DMPAs) constructed by hybrid integration a liquid crystal microlens array (LCMLA) driven electrically and a CMOS sensor array, which can be used to measure both the conventional intensity images and corresponding wavefronts of objects. We utilize liquid crystal materials to shape the microlens array with the electrically tunable focal length. Through switching the voltage signal on and off, the wavefronts and the intensity images can be acquired through the DMPAs, sequentially. We use white light to obtain the object's wavefronts for avoiding losing important wavefront information. We separate the white light wavefronts with a large number of spectral components and then experimentally compare them with single spectral wavefronts of typical red, green and blue lasers, respectively. Then we mix the red, green and blue wavefronts to a composite wavefront containing more optical information of the object.

  9. Implantable self-reset CMOS image sensor and its application to hemodynamic response detection in living mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Takehara, Hiroaki; Sunaga, Yoshinori; Haruta, Makito; Motoyama, Mayumi; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2016-04-01

    A self-reset pixel of 15 × 15 µm2 with high signal-to-noise ratio (effective peak SNR ≃64 dB) for an implantable image sensor has been developed for intrinsic signal detection arising from hemodynamic responses in a living mouse brain. For detecting local conversion between oxyhemoglobin (HbO) and deoxyhemoglobin (HbR) in brain tissues, an implantable imaging device was fabricated with our newly designed self-reset image sensor and orange light-emitting diodes (LEDs; λ = 605 nm). We demonstrated imaging of hemodynamic responses in the sensory cortical area accompanied by forelimb stimulation of a living mouse. The implantable imaging device for intrinsic signal detection is expected to be a powerful tool to measure brain activities in living animals used in behavioral analysis.

  10. Advanced microlens and color filter process technology for the high-efficiency CMOS and CCD image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yang-Tung; Peng, Chiou-Shian; Chu, Cheng-Yu

    2000-12-01

    New markets are emerging for digital electronic image device, especially in visual communications, PC camera, mobile/cell phone, security system, toys, vehicle image system and computer peripherals for document capture. To enable one-chip image system that image sensor is with a full digital interface, can make image capture devices in our daily lives. Adding a color filter to such image sensor in a pattern of mosaics pixel or wide stripes can make image more real and colorful. We can say 'color filter makes the life more colorful color filter is? Color filter means can filter image light source except the color with specific wavelength and transmittance that is same as color filter itself. Color filter process is coating and patterning green, red and blue (or cyan, magenta and yellow) mosaic resists onto matched pixel in image sensing array pixels. According to the signal caught from each pixel, we can figure out the environment image picture. Widely use of digital electronic camera and multimedia applications today makes the feature of color filter becoming bright. Although it has challenge but it is very worthy to develop the process of color filter. We provide the best service on shorter cycle time, excellent color quality, high and stable yield. The key issues of advanced color process have to be solved and implemented are planarization and micro-lens technology. Lost of key points of color filter process technology have to consider will also be described in this paper.

  11. Charge Transfer Inefficiency in Pinned Photodiode CMOS image sensors: Simple Montecarlo modeling and experimental measurement based on a pulsed storage-gate method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelamatti, Alice; Goiffon, Vincent; Chabane, Aziouz; Magnan, Pierre; Virmontois, Cédric; Saint-Pé, Olivier; de Boisanger, Michel Breart

    2016-11-01

    The charge transfer time represents the bottleneck in terms of temporal resolution in Pinned Photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors. This work focuses on the modeling and estimation of this key parameter. A simple numerical model of charge transfer in PPDs is presented. The model is based on a Montecarlo simulation and takes into account both charge diffusion in the PPD and the effect of potential obstacles along the charge transfer path. This work also presents a new experimental approach for the estimation of the charge transfer time, called pulsed Storage Gate (SG) method. This method, which allows reproduction of a ;worst-case; transfer condition, is based on dedicated SG pixel structures and is particularly suitable to compare transfer efficiency performances for different pixel geometries.

  12. Image Sensors Enhance Camera Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the 1990s, a Jet Propulsion Laboratory team led by Eric Fossum researched ways of improving complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors in order to miniaturize cameras on spacecraft while maintaining scientific image quality. Fossum s team founded a company to commercialize the resulting CMOS active pixel sensor. Now called the Aptina Imaging Corporation, based in San Jose, California, the company has shipped over 1 billion sensors for use in applications such as digital cameras, camera phones, Web cameras, and automotive cameras. Today, one of every three cell phone cameras on the planet feature Aptina s sensor technology.

  13. High dynamic range CMOS (HDRC) imagers for safety systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobel, Markus; Döttling, Dietmar

    2013-04-01

    The first part of this paper describes the high dynamic range CMOS (HDRC®) imager - a special type of CMOS image sensor with logarithmic response. The powerful property of a high dynamic range (HDR) image acquisition is detailed by mathematical definition and measurement of the optoelectronic conversion function (OECF) of two different HDRC imagers. Specific sensor parameters will be discussed including the pixel design for the global shutter readout. The second part will give an outline on the applications and requirements of cameras for industrial safety. Equipped with HDRC global shutter sensors SafetyEYE® is a high-performance stereo camera system for safe three-dimensional zone monitoring enabling new and more flexible solutions compared to existing safety guards.

  14. Fully depleted CMOS pixel sensor development and potential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Baudot, J.; Kachel, M.; CNRS, UMR7178, 67037 Strasbourg

    CMOS pixel sensors are often opposed to hybrid pixel sensors due to their very different sensitive layer. In standard CMOS imaging processes, a thin (about 20 μm) low resistivity epitaxial layer acts as the sensitive volume and charge collection is mostly driven by thermal agitation. In contrast, the so-called hybrid pixel technology exploits a thick (typically 300 μm) silicon sensor with high resistivity allowing for the depletion of this volume, hence charges drift toward collecting electrodes. But this difference is fading away with the recent availability of some CMOS imaging processes based on a relatively thick (about 50 μm) highmore » resistivity epitaxial layer which allows for full depletion. This evolution extents the range of applications for CMOS pixel sensors where their known assets, high sensitivity and granularity combined with embedded signal treatment, could potentially foster breakthrough in detection performances for specific scientific instruments. One such domain is the Xray detection for soft energies, typically below 10 keV, where the thin sensitive layer was previously severely impeding CMOS sensor usage. Another application becoming realistic for CMOS sensors, is the detection in environment with a high fluence of non-ionizing radiation, such as hadron colliders. However, when considering highly demanding applications, it is still to be proven that micro-circuits required to uniformly deplete the sensor at the pixel level, do not mitigate the sensitivity and efficiency required. Prototype sensors in two different technologies with resistivity higher than 1 kΩ, sensitive layer between 40 and 50 μm and featuring pixel pitch in the range 25 to 50 μm, have been designed and fabricated. Various biasing architectures were adopted to reach full depletion with only a few volts. Laboratory investigations with three types of sources (X-rays, β-rays and infrared light) demonstrated the validity of the approach with respect to depletion

  15. Low Power Camera-on-a-Chip Using CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    A second generation image sensor technology has been developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a result of the continuing need to miniaturize space science imaging instruments. Implemented using standard CMOS, the active pixel sensor (APS) technology permits the integration of the detector array with on-chip timing, control and signal chain electronics, including analog-to-digital conversion.

  16. CMOS VLSI Active-Pixel Sensor for Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Sun, Chao; Yang, Guang; Heynssens, Julie

    2004-01-01

    An architecture for a proposed active-pixel sensor (APS) and a design to implement the architecture in a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit provide for some advanced features that are expected to be especially desirable for tracking pointlike features of stars. The architecture would also make this APS suitable for robotic- vision and general pointing and tracking applications. CMOS imagers in general are well suited for pointing and tracking because they can be configured for random access to selected pixels and to provide readout from windows of interest within their fields of view. However, until now, the architectures of CMOS imagers have not supported multiwindow operation or low-noise data collection. Moreover, smearing and motion artifacts in collected images have made prior CMOS imagers unsuitable for tracking applications. The proposed CMOS imager (see figure) would include an array of 1,024 by 1,024 pixels containing high-performance photodiode-based APS circuitry. The pixel pitch would be 9 m. The operations of the pixel circuits would be sequenced and otherwise controlled by an on-chip timing and control block, which would enable the collection of image data, during a single frame period, from either the full frame (that is, all 1,024 1,024 pixels) or from within as many as 8 different arbitrarily placed windows as large as 8 by 8 pixels each. A typical prior CMOS APS operates in a row-at-a-time ( grolling-shutter h) readout mode, which gives rise to exposure skew. In contrast, the proposed APS would operate in a sample-first/readlater mode, suppressing rolling-shutter effects. In this mode, the analog readout signals from the pixels corresponding to the windows of the interest (which windows, in the star-tracking application, would presumably contain guide stars) would be sampled rapidly by routing them through a programmable diagonal switch array to an on-chip parallel analog memory array. The

  17. Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor for proton radiography.

    PubMed

    Seco, Joao; Depauw, Nicolas

    2011-02-01

    Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) in producing proton radiographic images using the proton beam at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). A CMOS APS, previously tested for use in s-ray radiation therapy applications, was used for proton beam radiographic imaging at the MGH. Two different setups were used as a proof of principle that CMOS can be used as proton imaging device: (i) a pen with two metal screws to assess spatial resolution of the CMOS and (ii) a phantom with lung tissue, bone tissue, and water to assess tissue contrast of the CMOS. The sensor was then traversed by a double scattered monoenergetic proton beam at 117 MeV, and the energy deposition inside the detector was recorded to assess its energy response. Conventional x-ray images with similar setup at voltages of 70 kVp and proton images using commercial Gafchromic EBT 2 and Kodak X-Omat V films were also taken for comparison purposes. Images were successfully acquired and compared to x-ray kVp and proton EBT2/X-Omat film images. The spatial resolution of the CMOS detector image is subjectively comparable to the EBT2 and Kodak X-Omat V film images obtained at the same object-detector distance. X-rays have apparent higher spatial resolution than the CMOS. However, further studies with different commercial films using proton beam irradiation demonstrate that the distance of the detector to the object is important to the amount of proton scatter contributing to the proton image. Proton images obtained with films at different distances from the source indicate that proton scatter significantly affects the CMOS image quality. Proton radiographic images were successfully acquired at MGH using a CMOS active pixel sensor detector. The CMOS demonstrated spatial resolution subjectively comparable to films at the same object-detector distance. Further work will be done in order to establish the spatial and energy resolution of the CMOS detector for protons. The

  18. Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor for proton radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Seco, Joao; Depauw, Nicolas

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) in producing proton radiographic images using the proton beam at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Methods: A CMOS APS, previously tested for use in s-ray radiation therapy applications, was used for proton beam radiographic imaging at the MGH. Two different setups were used as a proof of principle that CMOS can be used as proton imaging device: (i) a pen with two metal screws to assess spatial resolution of the CMOS and (ii) a phantom with lung tissue, bone tissue, and water to assess tissuemore » contrast of the CMOS. The sensor was then traversed by a double scattered monoenergetic proton beam at 117 MeV, and the energy deposition inside the detector was recorded to assess its energy response. Conventional x-ray images with similar setup at voltages of 70 kVp and proton images using commercial Gafchromic EBT 2 and Kodak X-Omat V films were also taken for comparison purposes. Results: Images were successfully acquired and compared to x-ray kVp and proton EBT2/X-Omat film images. The spatial resolution of the CMOS detector image is subjectively comparable to the EBT2 and Kodak X-Omat V film images obtained at the same object-detector distance. X-rays have apparent higher spatial resolution than the CMOS. However, further studies with different commercial films using proton beam irradiation demonstrate that the distance of the detector to the object is important to the amount of proton scatter contributing to the proton image. Proton images obtained with films at different distances from the source indicate that proton scatter significantly affects the CMOS image quality. Conclusion: Proton radiographic images were successfully acquired at MGH using a CMOS active pixel sensor detector. The CMOS demonstrated spatial resolution subjectively comparable to films at the same object-detector distance. Further work will be done in order to establish the spatial and energy resolution

  19. Using advertisement light-panel and CMOS image sensor with frequency-shift-keying for visible light communication.

    PubMed

    Chow, Chi-Wai; Shiu, Ruei-Jie; Liu, Yen-Chun; Liao, Xin-Lan; Lin, Kun-Hsien; Wang, Yi-Chang; Chen, Yi-Yuan

    2018-05-14

    A frequency-shift-keying (FSK) visible light communication (VLC) system is proposed and demonstrated using advertisement light-panel as transmitter and mobile-phone image sensor as receiver. The developed application program (APP) in mobile-phone can retrieve the rolling shutter effect (RSE) pattern produced by the FSK VLC signal effectively. Here, we also define noise-ratio value (NRV) to evaluate the contrast of different advertisements displayed on the light-panel. Both mobile-phones under test can achieve success rate > 96% even when the transmission distance is up to 200 cm and the NRVs are low.

  20. Performance Analysis of Visible Light Communication Using CMOS Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Do, Trong-Hop; Yoo, Myungsik

    2016-01-01

    This paper elucidates the fundamentals of visible light communication systems that use the rolling shutter mechanism of CMOS sensors. All related information involving different subjects, such as photometry, camera operation, photography and image processing, are studied in tandem to explain the system. Then, the system performance is analyzed with respect to signal quality and data rate. To this end, a measure of signal quality, the signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR), is formulated. Finally, a simulation is conducted to verify the analysis. PMID:26938535

  1. Radiation imaging with a new scintillator and a CMOS camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, S.; Shoji, Y.; Pejchal, J.; Yokota, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2014-07-01

    A new imaging system consisting of a high-sensitivity complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor, a microscope and a new scintillator, Ce-doped Gd3(Al,Ga)5O12 (Ce:GAGG) grown by the Czochralski process, has been developed. The noise, the dark current and the sensitivity of the CMOS camera (ORCA-Flash4.0, Hamamatsu) was revised and compared to a conventional CMOS, whose sensitivity is at the same level as that of a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Without the scintillator, this system had a good position resolution of 2.1 ± 0.4 μm and we succeeded in obtaining the alpha-ray images using 1-mm thick Ce:GAGG crystal. This system can be applied for example to high energy X-ray beam profile monitor, etc.

  2. Optimum Design Rules for CMOS Hall Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Crescentini, Marco; Biondi, Michele; Romani, Aldo; Tartagni, Marco; Sangiorgi, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript analyzes the effects of design parameters, such as aspect ratio, doping concentration and bias, on the performance of a general CMOS Hall sensor, with insight on current-related sensitivity, power consumption, and bandwidth. The article focuses on rectangular-shaped Hall probes since this is the most general geometry leading to shape-independent results. The devices are analyzed by means of 3D-TCAD simulations embedding galvanomagnetic transport model, which takes into account the Lorentz force acting on carriers due to a magnetic field. Simulation results define a set of trade-offs and design rules that can be used by electronic designers to conceive their own Hall probes. PMID:28375191

  3. Optimum Design Rules for CMOS Hall Sensors.

    PubMed

    Crescentini, Marco; Biondi, Michele; Romani, Aldo; Tartagni, Marco; Sangiorgi, Enrico

    2017-04-04

    This manuscript analyzes the effects of design parameters, such as aspect ratio, doping concentration and bias, on the performance of a general CMOS Hall sensor, with insight on current-related sensitivity, power consumption, and bandwidth. The article focuses on rectangular-shaped Hall probes since this is the most general geometry leading to shape-independent results. The devices are analyzed by means of 3D-TCAD simulations embedding galvanomagnetic transport model, which takes into account the Lorentz force acting on carriers due to a magnetic field. Simulation results define a set of trade-offs and design rules that can be used by electronic designers to conceive their own Hall probes.

  4. Monolithic integration of a plasmonic sensor with CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakoor, Abdul; Cheah, Boon C.; Hao, Danni; Al-Rawhani, Mohammed; Nagy, Bence; Grant, James; Dale, Carl; Keegan, Neil; McNeil, Calum; Cumming, David R. S.

    2017-02-01

    Monolithic integration of nanophotonic sensors with CMOS detectors can transform the laboratory based nanophotonic sensors into practical devices with a range of applications in everyday life. In this work, by monolithically integrating an array of gold nanodiscs with the CMOS photodiode we have developed a compact and miniaturized nanophotonic sensor system having direct electrical read out. Doing so eliminates the need of expensive and bulky laboratory based optical spectrum analyzers used currently for measurements of nanophotonic sensor chips. The experimental optical sensitivity of the gold nanodiscs is measured to be 275 nm/RIU which translates to an electrical sensitivity of 5.4 V/RIU. This integration of nanophotonic sensors with the CMOS electronics has the potential to revolutionize personalized medical diagnostics similar to the way in which the CMOS technology has revolutionized the electronics industry.

  5. Development of CMOS Imager Block for Capsule Endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafie, S.; Fodzi, F. A. M.; Tung, L. Q.; Lioe, D. X.; Halin, I. A.; Hasan, W. Z. W.; Jaafar, H.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the development of imager block to be associated in a capsule endoscopy system. Since the capsule endoscope is used to diagnose gastrointestinal diseases, the imager block must be in small size which is comfortable for the patients to swallow. In this project, a small size 1.5V button battery is used as the power supply while the voltage supply requirements for other components such as microcontroller and CMOS image sensor are higher. Therefore, a voltage booster circuit is proposed to boost up the voltage supply from 1.5V to 3.3V. A low power microcontroller is used to generate control pulses for the CMOS image sensor and to convert the 8-bits parallel data output to serial data to be transmitted to the display panel. The results show that the voltage booster circuit was able to boost the voltage supply from 1.5V to 3.3V. The microcontroller precisely controls the CMOS image sensor to produce parallel data which is then serialized again by the microcontroller. The serial data is then successfully translated to 2fps image and displayed on computer.

  6. IR CMOS: near infrared enhanced digital imaging (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pralle, Martin U.; Carey, James E.; Joy, Thomas; Vineis, Chris J.; Palsule, Chintamani

    2015-08-01

    SiOnyx has demonstrated imaging at light levels below 1 mLux (moonless starlight) at video frame rates with a 720P CMOS image sensor in a compact, low latency camera. Low light imaging is enabled by the combination of enhanced quantum efficiency in the near infrared together with state of the art low noise image sensor design. The quantum efficiency enhancements are achieved by applying Black Silicon, SiOnyx's proprietary ultrafast laser semiconductor processing technology. In the near infrared, silicon's native indirect bandgap results in low absorption coefficients and long absorption lengths. The Black Silicon nanostructured layer fundamentally disrupts this paradigm by enhancing the absorption of light within a thin pixel layer making 5 microns of silicon equivalent to over 300 microns of standard silicon. This results in a demonstrate 10 fold improvements in near infrared sensitivity over incumbent imaging technology while maintaining complete compatibility with standard CMOS image sensor process flows. Applications include surveillance, nightvision, and 1064nm laser see spot. Imaging performance metrics will be discussed. Demonstrated performance characteristics: Pixel size : 5.6 and 10 um Array size: 720P/1.3Mpix Frame rate: 60 Hz Read noise: 2 ele/pixel Spectral sensitivity: 400 to 1200 nm (with 10x QE at 1064nm) Daytime imaging: color (Bayer pattern) Nighttime imaging: moonless starlight conditions 1064nm laser imaging: daytime imaging out to 2Km

  7. A CMOS Humidity Sensor for Passive RFID Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Zhang, Chaolong; Feng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a low-cost low-power CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications. The humidity sensing element is implemented in standard CMOS technology without any further post-processing, which results in low fabrication costs. The interface of this humidity sensor employs a PLL-based architecture transferring sensor signal processing from the voltage domain to the frequency domain. Therefore this architecture allows the use of a fully digital circuit, which can operate on ultra-low supply voltage and thus achieves low-power consumption. The proposed humidity sensor has been fabricated in the TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurements show this humidity sensor exhibits excellent linearity and stability within the relative humidity range. The sensor interface circuit consumes only 1.05 μW at 0.5 V supply voltage and reduces it at least by an order of magnitude compared to previous designs. PMID:24841250

  8. A CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Zhang, Chaolong; Feng, Wei

    2014-05-16

    This paper presents a low-cost low-power CMOS humidity sensor for passive RFID sensing applications. The humidity sensing element is implemented in standard CMOS technology without any further post-processing, which results in low fabrication costs. The interface of this humidity sensor employs a PLL-based architecture transferring sensor signal processing from the voltage domain to the frequency domain. Therefore this architecture allows the use of a fully digital circuit, which can operate on ultra-low supply voltage and thus achieves low-power consumption. The proposed humidity sensor has been fabricated in the TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurements show this humidity sensor exhibits excellent linearity and stability within the relative humidity range. The sensor interface circuit consumes only 1.05 µW at 0.5 V supply voltage and reduces it at least by an order of magnitude compared to previous designs.

  9. MEMS capacitive pressure sensor monolithically integrated with CMOS readout circuit by using post CMOS processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Munseon; Yun, Kwang-Seok

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we presents a MEMS pressure sensor integrated with a readout circuit on a chip for an on-chip signal processing. The capacitive pressure sensor is formed on a CMOS chip by using a post-CMOS MEMS processes. The proposed device consists of a sensing capacitor that is square in shape, a reference capacitor and a readout circuitry based on a switched-capacitor scheme to detect capacitance change at various environmental pressures. The readout circuit was implemented by using a commercial 0.35 μm CMOS process with 2 polysilicon and 4 metal layers. Then, the pressure sensor was formed by wet etching of metal 2 layer through via hole structures. Experimental results show that the MEMS pressure sensor has a sensitivity of 11 mV/100 kPa at the pressure range of 100-400 kPa.

  10. Fundamental performance differences between CMOS and CCD imagers: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesick, James; Andrews, James; Tower, John; Grygon, Mark; Elliott, Tom; Cheng, John; Lesser, Michael; Pinter, Jeff

    2007-09-01

    A new class of CMOS imagers that compete with scientific CCDs is presented. The sensors are based on deep depletion backside illuminated technology to achieve high near infrared quantum efficiency and low pixel cross-talk. The imagers deliver very low read noise suitable for single photon counting - Fano-noise limited soft x-ray applications. Digital correlated double sampling signal processing necessary to achieve low read noise performance is analyzed and demonstrated for CMOS use. Detailed experimental data products generated by different pixel architectures (notably 3TPPD, 5TPPD and 6TPG designs) are presented including read noise, charge capacity, dynamic range, quantum efficiency, charge collection and transfer efficiency and dark current generation. Radiation damage data taken for the imagers is also reported.

  11. Lab-on-CMOS Integration of Microfluidics and Electrochemical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yue; Mason, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a CMOS-microfluidics integration scheme for electrochemical microsystems. A CMOS chip was embedded into a micro-machined silicon carrier. By leveling the CMOS chip and carrier surface to within 100 nm, an expanded obstacle-free surface suitable for photolithography was achieved. Thin film metal planar interconnects were microfabricated to bridge CMOS pads to the perimeter of the carrier, leaving a flat and smooth surface for integrating microfluidic structures. A model device containing SU-8 microfluidic mixers and detection channels crossing over microelectrodes on a CMOS integrated circuit was constructed using the chip-carrier assembly scheme. Functional integrity of microfluidic structures and on-CMOS electrodes was verified by a simultaneous sample dilution and electrochemical detection experiment within multi-channel microfluidics. This lab-on-CMOS integration process is capable of high packing density, is suitable for wafer-level batch production, and opens new opportunities to combine the performance benefits of on-CMOS sensors with lab-on-chip platforms. PMID:23939616

  12. Lab-on-CMOS integration of microfluidics and electrochemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue; Mason, Andrew J

    2013-10-07

    This paper introduces a CMOS-microfluidics integration scheme for electrochemical microsystems. A CMOS chip was embedded into a micro-machined silicon carrier. By leveling the CMOS chip and carrier surface to within 100 nm, an expanded obstacle-free surface suitable for photolithography was achieved. Thin film metal planar interconnects were microfabricated to bridge CMOS pads to the perimeter of the carrier, leaving a flat and smooth surface for integrating microfluidic structures. A model device containing SU-8 microfluidic mixers and detection channels crossing over microelectrodes on a CMOS integrated circuit was constructed using the chip-carrier assembly scheme. Functional integrity of microfluidic structures and on-CMOS electrodes was verified by a simultaneous sample dilution and electrochemical detection experiment within multi-channel microfluidics. This lab-on-CMOS integration process is capable of high packing density, is suitable for wafer-level batch production, and opens new opportunities to combine the performance benefits of on-CMOS sensors with lab-on-chip platforms.

  13. CMOS sensor as charged particles and ionizing radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Piña López, I.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports results of CMOS sensor suitable for use as charged particles and ionizing radiation detector. The CMOS sensor with 640 × 480 pixels area has been integrated into an electronic circuit for detection of ionizing radiation and it was exposed to alpha particle (Am-241, Unat), beta (Sr-90), and gamma photons (Cs-137). Results show after long period of time (168 h) irradiation the sensor had not loss of functionality and also the energy of the charge particles and photons were very well obtained.

  14. Application of CMOS Technology to Silicon Photomultiplier Sensors.

    PubMed

    D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Zhang, Xi; Xie, Qingguo

    2017-09-25

    We use the 180 nm GLOBALFOUNDRIES (GF) BCDLite CMOS process for the production of a silicon photomultiplier prototype. We study the main characteristics of the developed sensor in comparison with commercial SiPMs obtained in custom technologies and other SiPMs developed with CMOS-compatible processes. We support our discussion with a transient modeling of the detection process of the silicon photomultiplier as well as with a series of static and dynamic experimental measurements in dark and illuminated environments.

  15. First tests of a novel radiation hard CMOS sensor process for Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernegger, H.; Bates, R.; Buttar, C.; Dalla, M.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Kugathasan, T.; Maneuski, D.; Musa, L.; Riedler, P.; Riegel, C.; Sbarra, C.; Schaefer, D.; Schioppa, E. J.; Snoeys, W.

    2017-06-01

    The upgrade of the ATLAS [1] tracking detector for the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN requires novel radiation hard silicon sensor technologies. Significant effort has been put into the development of monolithic CMOS sensors but it has been a challenge to combine a low capacitance of the sensing node with full depletion of the sensitive layer. Low capacitance brings low analog power. Depletion of the sensitive layer causes the signal charge to be collected by drift sufficiently fast to separate hits from consecutive bunch crossings (25 ns at the LHC) and to avoid losing the charge by trapping. This paper focuses on the characterization of charge collection properties and detection efficiency of prototype sensors originally designed in the framework of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) upgrade [2]. The prototypes are fabricated both in the standard TowerJazz 180nm CMOS imager process [3] and in an innovative modification of this process developed in collaboration with the foundry, aimed to fully deplete the sensitive epitaxial layer and enhance the tolerance to non-ionizing energy loss. Sensors fabricated in standard and modified process variants were characterized using radioactive sources, focused X-ray beam and test beams before and after irradiation. Contrary to sensors manufactured in the standard process, sensors from the modified process remain fully functional even after a dose of 1015neq/cm2, which is the the expected NIEL radiation fluence for the outer pixel layers in the future ATLAS Inner Tracker (ITk) [4].

  16. A novel method to increase LinLog CMOS sensors' performance in high dynamic range scenarios.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sánchez, Antonio; Fernández, Carlos; Navarro, Pedro J; Iborra, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Images from high dynamic range (HDR) scenes must be obtained with minimum loss of information. For this purpose it is necessary to take full advantage of the quantification levels provided by the CCD/CMOS image sensor. LinLog CMOS sensors satisfy the above demand by offering an adjustable response curve that combines linear and logarithmic responses. This paper presents a novel method to quickly adjust the parameters that control the response curve of a LinLog CMOS image sensor. We propose to use an Adaptive Proportional-Integral-Derivative controller to adjust the exposure time of the sensor, together with control algorithms based on the saturation level and the entropy of the images. With this method the sensor's maximum dynamic range (120 dB) can be used to acquire good quality images from HDR scenes with fast, automatic adaptation to scene conditions. Adaptation to a new scene is rapid, with a sensor response adjustment of less than eight frames when working in real time video mode. At least 67% of the scene entropy can be retained with this method.

  17. Smart CMOS sensor for wideband laser threat detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarze, Craig R.; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2015-09-01

    The proliferation of lasers has led to their widespread use in applications ranging from short range standoff chemical detection to long range Lidar sensing and target designation operating across the UV to LWIR spectrum. Recent advances in high energy lasers have renewed the development of laser weapons systems. The ability to measure and assess laser source information is important to both identify a potential threat as well as determine safety and nominal hazard zone (NHZ). Laser detection sensors are required that provide high dynamic range, wide spectral coverage, pulsed and continuous wave detection, and large field of view. OPTRA, Inc. and Tufts have developed a custom ROIC smart pixel imaging sensor architecture and wavelength encoding optics for measurement of source wavelength, pulse length, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), irradiance, and angle of arrival. The smart architecture provides dual linear and logarithmic operating modes to provide 8+ orders of signal dynamic range and nanosecond pulse measurement capability that can be hybridized with the appropriate detector array to provide UV through LWIR laser sensing. Recent advances in sputtering techniques provide the capability for post-processing CMOS dies from the foundry and patterning PbS and PbSe photoconductors directly on the chip to create a single monolithic sensor array architecture for measuring sources operating from 0.26 - 5.0 microns, 1 mW/cm2 - 2 kW/cm2.

  18. Passive radiation detection using optically active CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosiek, Luke; Schalk, Patrick D.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, there have been a number of small-scale and hobbyist successes in employing commodity CMOS-based camera sensors for radiation detection. For example, several smartphone applications initially developed for use in areas near the Fukushima nuclear disaster are capable of detecting radiation using a cell phone camera, provided opaque tape is placed over the lens. In all current useful implementations, it is required that the sensor not be exposed to visible light. We seek to build a system that does not have this restriction. While building such a system would require sophisticated signal processing, it would nevertheless provide great benefits. In addition to fulfilling their primary function of image capture, cameras would also be able to detect unknown radiation sources even when the danger is considered to be low or non-existent. By experimentally profiling the image artifacts generated by gamma ray and β particle impacts, algorithms are developed to identify the unique features of radiation exposure, while discarding optical interaction and thermal noise effects. Preliminary results focus on achieving this goal in a laboratory setting, without regard to integration time or computational complexity. However, future work will seek to address these additional issues.

  19. Registration of Large Motion Blurred CMOS Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-28

    raju@ee.iitm.ac.in - Institution : Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras, India - Mailing Address : Room ESB 307c, Dept. of Electrical ...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0066 Registration of Large Motion Blurred CMOS Images Ambasamudram Rajagopalan INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MADRAS Final...NUMBER 5f.  WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY MADRAS SARDAR PATEL ROAD Chennai, 600036

  20. A 7 ke-SD-FWC 1.2 e-RMS Temporal Random Noise 128×256 Time-Resolved CMOS Image Sensor With Two In-Pixel SDs for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Seo, Min-Woong; Kawahito, Shoji

    2017-12-01

    A large full well capacity (FWC) for wide signal detection range and low temporal random noise for high sensitivity lock-in pixel CMOS image sensor (CIS) embedded with two in-pixel storage diodes (SDs) has been developed and presented in this paper. For fast charge transfer from photodiode to SDs, a lateral electric field charge modulator (LEFM) is used for the developed lock-in pixel. As a result, the time-resolved CIS achieves a very large SD-FWC of approximately 7ke-, low temporal random noise of 1.2e-rms at 20 fps with true correlated double sampling operation and fast intrinsic response less than 500 ps at 635 nm. The proposed imager has an effective pixel array of and a pixel size of . The sensor chip is fabricated by Dongbu HiTek 1P4M 0.11 CIS process.

  1. A CMOS In-Pixel CTIA High Sensitivity Fluorescence Imager.

    PubMed

    Murari, Kartikeya; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Thakor, Nitish; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2011-10-01

    Traditionally, charge coupled device (CCD) based image sensors have held sway over the field of biomedical imaging. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) based imagers so far lack sensitivity leading to poor low-light imaging. Certain applications including our work on animal-mountable systems for imaging in awake and unrestrained rodents require the high sensitivity and image quality of CCDs and the low power consumption, flexibility and compactness of CMOS imagers. We present a 132×124 high sensitivity imager array with a 20.1 μm pixel pitch fabricated in a standard 0.5 μ CMOS process. The chip incorporates n-well/p-sub photodiodes, capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) based in-pixel amplification, pixel scanners and delta differencing circuits. The 5-transistor all-nMOS pixel interfaces with peripheral pMOS transistors for column-parallel CTIA. At 70 fps, the array has a minimum detectable signal of 4 nW/cm(2) at a wavelength of 450 nm while consuming 718 μA from a 3.3 V supply. Peak signal to noise ratio (SNR) was 44 dB at an incident intensity of 1 μW/cm(2). Implementing 4×4 binning allowed the frame rate to be increased to 675 fps. Alternately, sensitivity could be increased to detect about 0.8 nW/cm(2) while maintaining 70 fps. The chip was used to image single cell fluorescence at 28 fps with an average SNR of 32 dB. For comparison, a cooled CCD camera imaged the same cell at 20 fps with an average SNR of 33.2 dB under the same illumination while consuming over a watt.

  2. A CMOS In-Pixel CTIA High Sensitivity Fluorescence Imager

    PubMed Central

    Murari, Kartikeya; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Thakor, Nitish; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, charge coupled device (CCD) based image sensors have held sway over the field of biomedical imaging. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) based imagers so far lack sensitivity leading to poor low-light imaging. Certain applications including our work on animal-mountable systems for imaging in awake and unrestrained rodents require the high sensitivity and image quality of CCDs and the low power consumption, flexibility and compactness of CMOS imagers. We present a 132×124 high sensitivity imager array with a 20.1 μm pixel pitch fabricated in a standard 0.5 μ CMOS process. The chip incorporates n-well/p-sub photodiodes, capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) based in-pixel amplification, pixel scanners and delta differencing circuits. The 5-transistor all-nMOS pixel interfaces with peripheral pMOS transistors for column-parallel CTIA. At 70 fps, the array has a minimum detectable signal of 4 nW/cm2 at a wavelength of 450 nm while consuming 718 μA from a 3.3 V supply. Peak signal to noise ratio (SNR) was 44 dB at an incident intensity of 1 μW/cm2. Implementing 4×4 binning allowed the frame rate to be increased to 675 fps. Alternately, sensitivity could be increased to detect about 0.8 nW/cm2 while maintaining 70 fps. The chip was used to image single cell fluorescence at 28 fps with an average SNR of 32 dB. For comparison, a cooled CCD camera imaged the same cell at 20 fps with an average SNR of 33.2 dB under the same illumination while consuming over a watt. PMID:23136624

  3. Photodiode area effect on performance of X-ray CMOS active pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. S.; Kim, Y.; Kim, G.; Lim, K. T.; Cho, G.; Kim, D.

    2018-02-01

    Compared to conventional TFT-based X-ray imaging devices, CMOS-based X-ray imaging sensors are considered next generation because they can be manufactured in very small pixel pitches and can acquire high-speed images. In addition, CMOS-based sensors have the advantage of integration of various functional circuits within the sensor. The image quality can also be improved by the high fill-factor in large pixels. If the size of the subject is small, the size of the pixel must be reduced as a consequence. In addition, the fill factor must be reduced to aggregate various functional circuits within the pixel. In this study, 3T-APS (active pixel sensor) with photodiodes of four different sizes were fabricated and evaluated. It is well known that a larger photodiode leads to improved overall performance. Nonetheless, if the size of the photodiode is > 1000 μm2, the degree to which the sensor performance increases as the photodiode size increases, is reduced. As a result, considering the fill factor, pixel-pitch > 32 μm is not necessary to achieve high-efficiency image quality. In addition, poor image quality is to be expected unless special sensor-design techniques are included for sensors with a pixel pitch of 25 μm or less.

  4. NV-CMOS HD camera for day/night imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelsong, T.; Tower, J.; Sudol, Thomas; Senko, T.; Chodelka, D.

    2014-06-01

    SRI International (SRI) has developed a new multi-purpose day/night video camera with low-light imaging performance comparable to an image intensifier, while offering the size, weight, ruggedness, and cost advantages enabled by the use of SRI's NV-CMOS HD digital image sensor chip. The digital video output is ideal for image enhancement, sharing with others through networking, video capture for data analysis, or fusion with thermal cameras. The camera provides Camera Link output with HD/WUXGA resolution of 1920 x 1200 pixels operating at 60 Hz. Windowing to smaller sizes enables operation at higher frame rates. High sensitivity is achieved through use of backside illumination, providing high Quantum Efficiency (QE) across the visible and near infrared (NIR) bands (peak QE <90%), as well as projected low noise (<2h+) readout. Power consumption is minimized in the camera, which operates from a single 5V supply. The NVCMOS HD camera provides a substantial reduction in size, weight, and power (SWaP) , ideal for SWaP-constrained day/night imaging platforms such as UAVs, ground vehicles, fixed mount surveillance, and may be reconfigured for mobile soldier operations such as night vision goggles and weapon sights. In addition the camera with the NV-CMOS HD imager is suitable for high performance digital cinematography/broadcast systems, biofluorescence/microscopy imaging, day/night security and surveillance, and other high-end applications which require HD video imaging with high sensitivity and wide dynamic range. The camera comes with an array of lens mounts including C-mount and F-mount. The latest test data from the NV-CMOS HD camera will be presented.

  5. CMOS: Efficient Clustered Data Monitoring in Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Tiny and smart sensors enable applications that access a network of hundreds or thousands of sensors. Thus, recently, many researchers have paid attention to wireless sensor networks (WSNs). The limitation of energy is critical since most sensors are battery-powered and it is very difficult to replace batteries in cases that sensor networks are utilized outdoors. Data transmission between sensor nodes needs more energy than computation in a sensor node. In order to reduce the energy consumption of sensors, we present an approximate data gathering technique, called CMOS, based on the Kalman filter. The goal of CMOS is to efficiently obtain the sensor readings within a certain error bound. In our approach, spatially close sensors are grouped as a cluster. Since a cluster header generates approximate readings of member nodes, a user query can be answered efficiently using the cluster headers. In addition, we suggest an energy efficient clustering method to distribute the energy consumption of cluster headers. Our simulation results with synthetic data demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of our proposed technique. PMID:24459444

  6. CMOS: efficient clustered data monitoring in sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Min, Jun-Ki

    2013-01-01

    Tiny and smart sensors enable applications that access a network of hundreds or thousands of sensors. Thus, recently, many researchers have paid attention to wireless sensor networks (WSNs). The limitation of energy is critical since most sensors are battery-powered and it is very difficult to replace batteries in cases that sensor networks are utilized outdoors. Data transmission between sensor nodes needs more energy than computation in a sensor node. In order to reduce the energy consumption of sensors, we present an approximate data gathering technique, called CMOS, based on the Kalman filter. The goal of CMOS is to efficiently obtain the sensor readings within a certain error bound. In our approach, spatially close sensors are grouped as a cluster. Since a cluster header generates approximate readings of member nodes, a user query can be answered efficiently using the cluster headers. In addition, we suggest an energy efficient clustering method to distribute the energy consumption of cluster headers. Our simulation results with synthetic data demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of our proposed technique.

  7. Application of CMOS Technology to Silicon Photomultiplier Sensors

    PubMed Central

    D’Ascenzo, Nicola; Zhang, Xi; Xie, Qingguo

    2017-01-01

    We use the 180 nm GLOBALFOUNDRIES (GF) BCDLite CMOS process for the production of a silicon photomultiplier prototype. We study the main characteristics of the developed sensor in comparison with commercial SiPMs obtained in custom technologies and other SiPMs developed with CMOS-compatible processes. We support our discussion with a transient modeling of the detection process of the silicon photomultiplier as well as with a series of static and dynamic experimental measurements in dark and illuminated environments. PMID:28946675

  8. A capacitive CMOS-MEMS sensor designed by multi-physics simulation for integrated CMOS-MEMS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Toshifumi; Yamane, Daisuke; Matsushima, Takaaki; Masu, Kazuya; Machida, Katsuyuki; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the design and evaluation results of a capacitive CMOS-MEMS sensor that consists of the proposed sensor circuit and a capacitive MEMS device implemented on the circuit. To design a capacitive CMOS-MEMS sensor, a multi-physics simulation of the electromechanical behavior of both the MEMS structure and the sensing LSI was carried out simultaneously. In order to verify the validity of the design, we applied the capacitive CMOS-MEMS sensor to a MEMS accelerometer implemented by the post-CMOS process onto a 0.35-µm CMOS circuit. The experimental results of the CMOS-MEMS accelerometer exhibited good agreement with the simulation results within the input acceleration range between 0.5 and 6 G (1 G = 9.8 m/s2), corresponding to the output voltages between 908.6 and 915.4 mV, respectively. Therefore, we have confirmed that our capacitive CMOS-MEMS sensor and the multi-physics simulation will be beneficial method to realize integrated CMOS-MEMS technology.

  9. Investigation of CMOS pixel sensor with 0.18 μm CMOS technology for high-precision tracking detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Fu, M.; Zhang, Y.; Yan, W.; Wang, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) proposed by the Chinese high energy physics community is aiming to measure Higgs particles and their interactions precisely. The tracking detector including Silicon Inner Tracker (SIT) and Forward Tracking Disks (FTD) has driven stringent requirements on sensor technologies in term of spatial resolution, power consumption and readout speed. CMOS Pixel Sensor (CPS) is a promising candidate to approach these requirements. This paper presents the preliminary studies on the sensor optimization for tracking detector to achieve high collection efficiency while keeping necessary spatial resolution. Detailed studies have been performed on the charge collection using a 0.18 μm CMOS image sensor process. This process allows high resistivity epitaxial layer, leading to a significant improvement on the charge collection and therefore improving the radiation tolerance. Together with the simulation results, the first exploratory prototype has bee designed and fabricated. The prototype includes 9 different pixel arrays, which vary in terms of pixel pitch, diode size and geometry. The total area of the prototype amounts to 2 × 7.88 mm2.

  10. Fundamental performance differences of CMOS and CCD imagers: part V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom; Andrews, James; Tower, John; Pinter, Jeff

    2013-02-01

    Previous papers delivered over the last decade have documented developmental progress made on large pixel scientific CMOS imagers that match or surpass CCD performance. New data and discussions presented in this paper include: 1) a new buried channel CCD fabricated on a CMOS process line, 2) new data products generated by high performance custom scientific CMOS 4T/5T/6T PPD pixel imagers, 3) ultimate CTE and speed limits for large pixel CMOS imagers, 4) fabrication and test results of a flight 4k x 4k CMOS imager for NRL's SoloHi Solar Orbiter Mission, 5) a progress report on ultra large stitched Mk x Nk CMOS imager, 6) data generated by on-chip sub-electron CDS signal chain circuitry used in our imagers, 7) CMOS and CMOSCCD proton and electron radiation damage data for dose levels up to 10 Mrd, 8) discussions and data for a new class of PMOS pixel CMOS imagers and 9) future CMOS development work planned.

  11. Vertical Isolation for Photodiodes in CMOS Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement in complementary metal oxide/semi conduct - or (CMOS) image detectors, two additional implants in each pixel would effect vertical isolation between the metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and the photodiode of the pixel. This improvement is expected to enable separate optimization of the designs of the photodiode and the MOSFETs so as to optimize their performances independently of each other. The purpose to be served by enabling this separate optimization is to eliminate or vastly reduce diffusion cross-talk, thereby increasing sensitivity, effective spatial resolution, and color fidelity while reducing noise.

  12. Design considerations for a new, high resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope based on a CMOS sensor (MAF-CMOS).

    PubMed

    Loughran, Brendan; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Singh, Vivek; Ionita, Ciprian N; Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Titus, Albert; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-06

    The detectors that are used for endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGI), particularly for neurovascular interventions, do not provide clinicians with adequate visualization to ensure the best possible treatment outcomes. Developing an improved x-ray imaging detector requires the determination of estimated clinical x-ray entrance exposures to the detector. The range of exposures to the detector in clinical studies was found for the three modes of operation: fluoroscopic mode, high frame-rate digital angiographic mode (HD fluoroscopic mode), and DSA mode. Using these estimated detector exposure ranges and available CMOS detector technical specifications, design requirements were developed to pursue a quantum limited, high resolution, dynamic x-ray detector based on a CMOS sensor with 50 μm pixel size. For the proposed MAF-CMOS, the estimated charge collected within the full exposure range was found to be within the estimated full well capacity of the pixels. Expected instrumentation noise for the proposed detector was estimated to be 50-1,300 electrons. Adding a gain stage such as a light image intensifier would minimize the effect of the estimated instrumentation noise on total image noise but may not be necessary to ensure quantum limited detector operation at low exposure levels. A recursive temporal filter may decrease the effective total noise by 2 to 3 times, allowing for the improved signal to noise ratios at the lowest estimated exposures despite consequent loss in temporal resolution. This work can serve as a guide for further development of dynamic x-ray imaging prototypes or improvements for existing dynamic x-ray imaging systems.

  13. An Over 90 dB Intra-Scene Single-Exposure Dynamic Range CMOS Image Sensor Using a 3.0 μm Triple-Gain Pixel Fabricated in a Standard BSI Process.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Isao; Yoshimura, Norio; Mori, Kazuya; Matsuo, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Abe, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Naoto; Ishikawa, Kenichiro; Okura, Shunsuke; Ohsawa, Shinji; Otaka, Toshinori

    2018-01-12

    To respond to the high demand for high dynamic range imaging suitable for moving objects with few artifacts, we have developed a single-exposure dynamic range image sensor by introducing a triple-gain pixel and a low noise dual-gain readout circuit. The developed 3 μm pixel is capable of having three conversion gains. Introducing a new split-pinned photodiode structure, linear full well reaches 40 ke - . Readout noise under the highest pixel gain condition is 1 e - with a low noise readout circuit. Merging two signals, one with high pixel gain and high analog gain, and the other with low pixel gain and low analog gain, a single exposure dynamic rage (SEHDR) signal is obtained. Using this technology, a 1/2.7", 2M-pixel CMOS image sensor has been developed and characterized. The image sensor also employs an on-chip linearization function, yielding a 16-bit linear signal at 60 fps, and an intra-scene dynamic range of higher than 90 dB was successfully demonstrated. This SEHDR approach inherently mitigates the artifacts from moving objects or time-varying light sources that can appear in the multiple exposure high dynamic range (MEHDR) approach.

  14. An Over 90 dB Intra-Scene Single-Exposure Dynamic Range CMOS Image Sensor Using a 3.0 μm Triple-Gain Pixel Fabricated in a Standard BSI Process †

    PubMed Central

    Takayanagi, Isao; Yoshimura, Norio; Mori, Kazuya; Matsuo, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Abe, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Naoto; Ishikawa, Kenichiro; Okura, Shunsuke; Ohsawa, Shinji; Otaka, Toshinori

    2018-01-01

    To respond to the high demand for high dynamic range imaging suitable for moving objects with few artifacts, we have developed a single-exposure dynamic range image sensor by introducing a triple-gain pixel and a low noise dual-gain readout circuit. The developed 3 μm pixel is capable of having three conversion gains. Introducing a new split-pinned photodiode structure, linear full well reaches 40 ke−. Readout noise under the highest pixel gain condition is 1 e− with a low noise readout circuit. Merging two signals, one with high pixel gain and high analog gain, and the other with low pixel gain and low analog gain, a single exposure dynamic rage (SEHDR) signal is obtained. Using this technology, a 1/2.7”, 2M-pixel CMOS image sensor has been developed and characterized. The image sensor also employs an on-chip linearization function, yielding a 16-bit linear signal at 60 fps, and an intra-scene dynamic range of higher than 90 dB was successfully demonstrated. This SEHDR approach inherently mitigates the artifacts from moving objects or time-varying light sources that can appear in the multiple exposure high dynamic range (MEHDR) approach. PMID:29329210

  15. SOI CMOS Imager with Suppression of Cross-Talk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Zheng, Xingyu; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Seshadri, Suresh; Sun, Chao

    2009-01-01

    A monolithic silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) image-detecting integrated circuit of the active-pixel-sensor type, now undergoing development, is designed to operate at visible and near-infrared wavelengths and to offer a combination of high quantum efficiency and low diffusion and capacitive cross-talk among pixels. The imager is designed to be especially suitable for astronomical and astrophysical applications. The imager design could also readily be adapted to general scientific, biological, medical, and spectroscopic applications. One of the conditions needed to ensure both high quantum efficiency and low diffusion cross-talk is a relatively high reverse bias potential (between about 20 and about 50 V) on the photodiode in each pixel. Heretofore, a major obstacle to realization of this condition in a monolithic integrated circuit has been posed by the fact that the required high reverse bias on the photodiode is incompatible with metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) in the CMOS pixel readout circuitry. In the imager now being developed, the SOI structure is utilized to overcome this obstacle: The handle wafer is retained and the photodiode is formed in the handle wafer. The MOSFETs are formed on the SOI layer, which is separated from the handle wafer by a buried oxide layer. The electrical isolation provided by the buried oxide layer makes it possible to bias the MOSFETs at CMOS-compatible potentials (between 0 and 3 V), while biasing the photodiode at the required higher potential, and enables independent optimization of the sensory and readout portions of the imager.

  16. Fundamental performance differences between CMOS and CCD imagers: part III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesick, James; Pinter, Jeff; Potter, Robert; Elliott, Tom; Andrews, James; Tower, John; Cheng, John; Bishop, Jeanne

    2009-08-01

    This paper is a status report on recent scientific CMOS imager developments since when previous publications were written. Focus today is being given on CMOS design and process optimization because fundamental problems affecting performance are now reasonably well understood. Topics found in this paper include discussions on a low cost custom scientific CMOS fabrication approach, substrate bias for deep depletion imagers, near IR and x-ray point-spread performance, custom fabricated high resisitivity epitaxial and SOI silicon wafers for backside illuminated imagers, buried channel MOSFETs for ultra low noise performance, 1 e- charge transfer imagers, high speed transfer pixels, RTS/ flicker noise versus MOSFET geometry, pixel offset and gain non uniformity measurements, high S/N dCDS/aCDS signal processors, pixel thermal dark current sources, radiation damage topics, CCDs fabricated in CMOS and future large CMOS imagers planned at Sarnoff.

  17. A noiseless, kHz frame rate imaging detector for AO wavefront sensors based on MCPs read out with the Medipix2 CMOS pixel chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; McPhate, J. B.; Tremsin, A. S.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Mikulec, B.; Clark, A. G.

    2004-12-01

    Future wavefront sensors in adaptive optics (AO) systems for the next generation of large telescopes (> 30 m diameter) will require large formats (512x512) , kHz frame rates, low readout noise (<3 electrons) and high optical QE. The current generation of CCDs cannot achieve the first three of these specifications simultaneously. We present a detector scheme that can meet the first three requirements with an optical QE > 40%. This detector consists of a vacuum tube with a proximity focused GaAs photocathode whose photoelectrons are amplified by microchannel plates and the resulting output charge cloud counted by a pixelated CMOS application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) called the Medipix2 (http://medipix.web.cern.ch/MEDIPIX/). Each 55 micron square pixel of the Medipix2 chip has an amplifier, discriminator and 14 bit counter and the 256x256 array can be read out in 287 microseconds. The chip is 3 side abuttable so a 512x512 array is feasible in one vacuum tube. We will present the first results with an open-faced, demountable version of the detector where we have mounted a pair of MCPs 500 microns above a Medipix2 readout inside a vacuum chamber and illuminated it with UV light. The results include: flat field response, spatial resolution, spatial linearity on the sub-pixel level and global event counting rate. We will also discuss the vacuum tube design and the fabrication issues associated with the Medipix2 surviving the tube making process.

  18. Towards real-time VMAT verification using a prototype, high-speed CMOS active pixel sensor.

    PubMed

    Zin, Hafiz M; Harris, Emma J; Osmond, John P F; Allinson, Nigel M; Evans, Philip M

    2013-05-21

    This work investigates the feasibility of using a prototype complementary metal oxide semiconductor active pixel sensor (CMOS APS) for real-time verification of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The prototype CMOS APS used region of interest read out on the chip to allow fast imaging of up to 403.6 frames per second (f/s). The sensor was made larger (5.4 cm × 5.4 cm) using recent advances in photolithographic technique but retains fast imaging speed with the sensor's regional read out. There is a paradigm shift in radiotherapy treatment verification with the advent of advanced treatment techniques such as VMAT. This work has demonstrated that the APS can track multi leaf collimator (MLC) leaves moving at 18 mm s(-1) with an automatic edge tracking algorithm at accuracy better than 1.0 mm even at the fastest imaging speed. Evaluation of the measured fluence distribution for an example VMAT delivery sampled at 50.4 f/s was shown to agree well with the planned fluence distribution, with an average gamma pass rate of 96% at 3%/3 mm. The MLC leaves motion and linac pulse rate variation delivered throughout the VMAT treatment can also be measured. The results demonstrate the potential of CMOS APS technology as a real-time radiotherapy dosimeter for delivery of complex treatments such as VMAT.

  19. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  20. A Microfluidic Cytometer for Complete Blood Count With a 3.2-Megapixel, 1.1- μm-Pitch Super-Resolution Image Sensor in 65-nm BSI CMOS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Huang, Xiwei; Jiang, Yu; Xu, Hang; Guo, Jing; Hou, Han Wei; Yan, Mei; Yu, Hao

    2017-08-01

    Based on a 3.2-Megapixel 1.1- μm-pitch super-resolution (SR) CMOS image sensor in a 65-nm backside-illumination process, a lens-free microfluidic cytometer for complete blood count (CBC) is demonstrated in this paper. Backside-illumination improves resolution and contrast at the device level with elimination of surface treatment when integrated with microfluidic channels. A single-frame machine-learning-based SR processing is further realized at system level for resolution correction with minimum hardware resources. The demonstrated microfluidic cytometer can detect the platelet cells (< 2 μm) required in CBC, hence is promising for point-of-care diagnostics.

  1. A CMOS active pixel sensor for retinal stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prydderch, Mark L.; French, Marcus J.; Mathieson, Keith; Adams, Christopher; Gunning, Deborah; Laudanski, Jonathan; Morrison, James D.; Moodie, Alan R.; Sinclair, James

    2006-02-01

    Degenerative photoreceptor diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa, are the most common causes of blindness in the western world. A potential cure is to use a microelectronic retinal prosthesis to provide electrical stimulation to the remaining healthy retinal cells. We describe a prototype CMOS Active Pixel Sensor capable of detecting a visual scene and translating it into a train of electrical pulses for stimulation of the retina. The sensor consists of a 10 x 10 array of 100 micron square pixels fabricated on a 0.35 micron CMOS process. Light incident upon each pixel is converted into output current pulse trains with a frequency related to the light intensity. These outputs are connected to a biocompatible microelectrode array for contact to the retinal cells. The flexible design allows experimentation with signal amplitudes and frequencies in order to determine the most appropriate stimulus for the retina. Neural processing in the retina can be studied by using the sensor in conjunction with a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) programmed to behave as a neural network. The sensor has been integrated into a test system designed for studying retinal response. We present the most recent results obtained from this sensor.

  2. Fabrication and Characterization of a CMOS-MEMS Humidity Sensor.

    PubMed

    Dennis, John-Ojur; Ahmed, Abdelaziz-Yousif; Khir, Mohd-Haris

    2015-07-10

    This paper reports on the fabrication and characterization of a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor-Microelectromechanical System (CMOS-MEMS) device with embedded microheater operated at relatively elevated temperatures (40 °C to 80 °C) for the purpose of relative humidity measurement. The sensing principle is based on the change in amplitude of the device due to adsorption or desorption of humidity on the active material layer of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles deposited on the moving plate, which results in changes in the mass of the device. The sensor has been designed and fabricated through a standard 0.35 µm CMOS process technology and post-CMOS micromachining technique has been successfully implemented to release the MEMS structures. The sensor is operated in the dynamic mode using electrothermal actuation and the output signal measured using a piezoresistive (PZR) sensor connected in a Wheatstone bridge circuit. The output voltage of the humidity sensor increases from 0.585 mV to 30.580 mV as the humidity increases from 35% RH to 95% RH. The output voltage is found to be linear from 0.585 mV to 3.250 mV as the humidity increased from 35% RH to 60% RH, with sensitivity of 0.107 mV/% RH; and again linear from 3.250 mV to 30.580 mV as the humidity level increases from 60% RH to 95% RH, with higher sensitivity of 0.781 mV/% RH. On the other hand, the sensitivity of the humidity sensor increases linearly from 0.102 mV/% RH to 0.501 mV/% RH with increase in the temperature from 40 °C to 80 °C and a maximum hysteresis of 0.87% RH is found at a relative humidity of 80%. The sensitivity is also frequency dependent, increasing from 0.500 mV/% RH at 2 Hz to reach a maximum value of 1.634 mV/% RH at a frequency of 12 Hz, then decreasing to 1.110 mV/% RH at a frequency of 20 Hz. Finally, the CMOS-MEMS humidity sensor showed comparable response, recovery, and repeatability of measurements in three cycles as compared to a standard sensor that directly

  3. Fabrication and Characterization of a CMOS-MEMS Humidity Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, John-Ojur; Ahmed, Abdelaziz-Yousif; Khir, Mohd-Haris

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication and characterization of a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor-Microelectromechanical System (CMOS-MEMS) device with embedded microheater operated at relatively elevated temperatures (40 °C to 80 °C) for the purpose of relative humidity measurement. The sensing principle is based on the change in amplitude of the device due to adsorption or desorption of humidity on the active material layer of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles deposited on the moving plate, which results in changes in the mass of the device. The sensor has been designed and fabricated through a standard 0.35 µm CMOS process technology and post-CMOS micromachining technique has been successfully implemented to release the MEMS structures. The sensor is operated in the dynamic mode using electrothermal actuation and the output signal measured using a piezoresistive (PZR) sensor connected in a Wheatstone bridge circuit. The output voltage of the humidity sensor increases from 0.585 mV to 30.580 mV as the humidity increases from 35% RH to 95% RH. The output voltage is found to be linear from 0.585 mV to 3.250 mV as the humidity increased from 35% RH to 60% RH, with sensitivity of 0.107 mV/% RH; and again linear from 3.250 mV to 30.580 mV as the humidity level increases from 60% RH to 95% RH, with higher sensitivity of 0.781 mV/% RH. On the other hand, the sensitivity of the humidity sensor increases linearly from 0.102 mV/% RH to 0.501 mV/% RH with increase in the temperature from 40 °C to 80 °C and a maximum hysteresis of 0.87% RH is found at a relative humidity of 80%. The sensitivity is also frequency dependent, increasing from 0.500 mV/% RH at 2 Hz to reach a maximum value of 1.634 mV/% RH at a frequency of 12 Hz, then decreasing to 1.110 mV/% RH at a frequency of 20 Hz. Finally, the CMOS-MEMS humidity sensor showed comparable response, recovery, and repeatability of measurements in three cycles as compared to a standard sensor that directly

  4. CMOS active pixel sensors response to low energy light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiriti, E.; Finck, Ch.; Baudot, J.; Divay, C.; Juliani, D.; Labalme, M.; Rousseau, M.; Salvador, S.; Vanstalle, M.; Agodi, C.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Romano, F.

    2017-12-01

    Recently CMOS active pixel sensors have been used in Hadrontherapy ions fragmentation cross section measurements. Their main goal is to reconstruct tracks generated by the non interacting primary ions or by the produced fragments. In this framework the sensors, unexpectedly, demonstrated the possibility to obtain also some informations that could contribute to the ion type identification. The present analysis shows a clear dependency in charge and number of pixels per cluster (pixels with a collected amount of charge above a given threshold) with both fragment atomic number Z and energy loss in the sensor. This information, in the FIRST (F ragmentation of I ons R elevant for S pace and T herapy) experiment, has been used in the overall particle identification analysis algorithm. The aim of this paper is to present the data analysis and the obtained results. An empirical model was developed, in this paper, that reproduce the cluster size as function of the deposited energy in the sensor.

  5. A CMOS Imager with Focal Plane Compression using Predictive Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon-Salas, Walter D.; Balkir, Sina; Sayood, Khalid; Schemm, Nathan; Hoffman, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a CMOS image sensor with focal-plane compression. The design has a column-level architecture and it is based on predictive coding techniques for image decorrelation. The prediction operations are performed in the analog domain to avoid quantization noise and to decrease the area complexity of the circuit, The prediction residuals are quantized and encoded by a joint quantizer/coder circuit. To save area resources, the joint quantizerlcoder circuit exploits common circuitry between a single-slope analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and a Golomb-Rice entropy coder. This combination of ADC and encoder allows the integration of the entropy coder at the column level. A prototype chip was fabricated in a 0.35 pm CMOS process. The output of the chip is a compressed bit stream. The test chip occupies a silicon area of 2.60 mm x 5.96 mm which includes an 80 X 44 APS array. Tests of the fabricated chip demonstrate the validity of the design.

  6. A CMOS smart temperature and humidity sensor with combined readout.

    PubMed

    Eder, Clemens; Valente, Virgilio; Donaldson, Nick; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2014-09-16

    A fully-integrated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor for combined temperature and humidity measurements is presented. The main purpose of the device is to monitor the hermeticity of micro-packages for implanted integrated circuits and to ensure their safe operation by monitoring the operating temperature and humidity on-chip. The smart sensor has two modes of operation, in which either the temperature or humidity is converted into a digital code representing a frequency ratio between two oscillators. This ratio is determined by the ratios of the timing capacitances and bias currents in both oscillators. The reference oscillator is biased by a current whose temperature dependency is complementary to the proportional to absolute temperature (PTAT) current. For the temperature measurement, this results in an exceptional normalized sensitivity of about 0.77%/°C at the accepted expense of reduced linearity. The humidity sensor is a capacitor, whose value varies linearly with relative humidity (RH) with a normalized sensitivity of 0.055%/% RH. For comparison, two versions of the humidity sensor with an area of either 0.2 mm2 or 1.2 mm2 were fabricated in a commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process. The on-chip readout electronics operate from a 5 V power supply and consume a current of approximately 85 µA.

  7. Lower-Dark-Current, Higher-Blue-Response CMOS Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas; Hancock, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Several improved designs for complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit image detectors have been developed, primarily to reduce dark currents (leakage currents) and secondarily to increase responses to blue light and increase signal-handling capacities, relative to those of prior CMOS imagers. The main conclusion that can be drawn from a study of the causes of dark currents in prior CMOS imagers is that dark currents could be reduced by relocating p/n junctions away from Si/SiO2 interfaces. In addition to reflecting this conclusion, the improved designs include several other features to counteract dark-current mechanisms and enhance performance.

  8. Sparsely-Bonded CMOS Hybrid Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Chao (Inventor); Jones, Todd J. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Newton, Kenneth W. (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor); Dickie, Matthew R. (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Wrigley, Christopher J. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and device for imaging or detecting electromagnetic radiation is provided. A device structure includes a first chip interconnected with a second chip. The first chip includes a detector array, wherein the detector array comprises a plurality of light sensors and one or more transistors. The second chip includes a Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC) that reads out, via the transistors, a signal produced by the light sensors. A number of interconnects between the ROIC and the detector array can be less than one per light sensor or pixel.

  9. Self-calibrated humidity sensor in CMOS without post-processing.

    PubMed

    Nizhnik, Oleg; Higuchi, Kohei; Maenaka, Kazusuke

    2012-01-01

    A 1.1 μW power dissipation, voltage-output humidity sensor with 10% relative humidity accuracy was developed in the LFoundry 0.15 μm CMOS technology without post-processing. The sensor consists of a woven lateral array of electrodes implemented in CMOS top metal, a humidity-sensitive layer of Intervia Photodielectric 8023D-10, a CMOS capacitance to voltage converter, and the self-calibration circuitry.

  10. Photon small-field measurements with a CMOS active pixel sensor.

    PubMed

    Spang, F Jiménez; Rosenberg, I; Hedin, E; Royle, G

    2015-06-07

    In this work the dosimetric performance of CMOS active pixel sensors for the measurement of small photon beams is presented. The detector used consisted of an array of 520  × 520 pixels on a 25 µm pitch. Dosimetric parameters measured with this sensor were compared with data collected with an ionization chamber, a film detector and GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. The sensor performance for beam profiles measurements was evaluated for field sizes of 0.5  × 0.5 cm(2). The high spatial resolution achieved with this sensor allowed the accurate measurement of profiles, beam penumbrae and field size under lateral electronic disequilibrium. Field size and penumbrae agreed within 5.4% and 2.2% respectively with film measurements. Agreements with ionization chambers better than 1.0% were obtained when measuring tissue-phantom ratios. Output factor measurements were in good agreement with ionization chamber and Monte Carlo simulation. The data obtained from this imaging sensor can be easily analyzed to extract dosimetric information. The results presented in this work are promising for the development and implementation of CMOS active pixel sensors for dosimetry applications.

  11. Radiation dosimetry properties of smartphone CMOS sensors.

    PubMed

    Van Hoey, Olivier; Salavrakos, Alexia; Marques, Antonio; Nagao, Alexandre; Willems, Ruben; Vanhavere, Filip; Cauwels, Vanessa; Nascimento, Luana F

    2016-03-01

    During the past years, several smartphone applications have been developed for radiation detection. These applications measure radiation using the smartphone camera complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensor. They are potentially useful for data collection and personal dose assessment in case of a radiological incident. However, it is important to assess these applications. Six applications were tested by means of irradiations with calibrated X-ray and gamma sources. It was shown that the measurement stabilises only after at least 10-25 min. All applications exhibited a flat dose rate response in the studied ambient dose equivalent range from 2 to 1000 μSv h(-1). Most applications significantly over- or underestimate the dose rate or are not calibrated in terms of dose rate. A considerable energy dependence was observed below 100 keV but not for the higher energy range more relevant for incident scenarios. Photon impact angle variation gave a measured signal variation of only about 10 %. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Efficient Smart CMOS Camera Based on FPGAs Oriented to Embedded Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Ignacio; Baliñas, Javier; Gardel, Alfredo; Lázaro, José L.; Espinosa, Felipe; García, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an image processing system based on an intelligent ad-hoc camera, whose two principle elements are a high speed 1.2 megapixel Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) sensor and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The latter is used to control the various sensor parameter configurations and, where desired, to receive and process the images captured by the CMOS sensor. The flexibility and versatility offered by the new FPGA families makes it possible to incorporate microprocessors into these reconfigurable devices, and these are normally used for highly sequential tasks unsuitable for parallelization in hardware. For the present study, we used a Xilinx XC4VFX12 FPGA, which contains an internal Power PC (PPC) microprocessor. In turn, this contains a standalone system which manages the FPGA image processing hardware and endows the system with multiple software options for processing the images captured by the CMOS sensor. The system also incorporates an Ethernet channel for sending processed and unprocessed images from the FPGA to a remote node. Consequently, it is possible to visualize and configure system operation and captured and/or processed images remotely. PMID:22163739

  13. A mathematical model of the inline CMOS matrix sensor for investigation of particles in hydraulic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilin, DV; Kudryavtsev, IA

    2016-10-01

    One of the most effective ways to diagnose the state of hydraulic system is an investigation of the particles in their liquids. The sizes of such particles range from 2 to 200 gm and their concentration and shape reveal important information about the current state of equipment and the necessity of maintenance. In-line automatic particle counters (APC), which are built into hydraulic system, are widely used for determination of particle size and concentration. These counters are based on a single photodiode and a light emitting diode (LED); however, samples of liquid are needed for analysis using microscope or industrial video camera in order to get information about particle shapes. The act of obtaining the sample leads to contamination by other particles from the air or from the sample tube, meaning that the results are usually corrupted. Using the CMOS or CCD matrix sensor without any lens for inline APC is the solution proposed by authors. In this case the matrix sensors are put into the liquid channel of the hydraulic system and illuminated by LED. This system could be stable in arduous conditions like high pressure and the vibration of the hydraulic system; however, the image or signal from that matrix sensor needs to be processed differently in comparison with the signal from microscope or industrial video camera because of relatively short distance between LED and sensor. This paper introduces mathematical model of a sensor with CMOS and LED, which can be built into hydraulic system. It is also provided a computational algorithm and results, which can be useful for calculation of particle sizes and shapes using the signal from the CMOS matrix sensor.

  14. Hybrid CMOS-Graphene Sensor Array for Subsecond Dopamine Detection.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Bayan; Wu, Ting; Alharbi, Abdullah; You, Kae-Dyi; Gupta, Mayank; Sebastian, Sunit P; Kiani, Roozbeh; Shahrjerdi, Davood

    2017-12-01

    We introduce a hybrid CMOS-graphene sensor array for subsecond measurement of dopamine via fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV). The prototype chip has four independent CMOS readout channels, fabricated in a 65-nm process. Using planar multilayer graphene as biologically compatible sensing material enables integration of miniaturized sensing electrodes directly above the readout channels. Taking advantage of the chemical specificity of FSCV, we introduce a region of interest technique, which subtracts a large portion of the background current using a programmable low-noise constant current at about the redox potentials. We demonstrate the utility of this feature for enhancing the sensitivity by measuring the sensor response to a known dopamine concentration in vitro at three different scan rates. This strategy further allows us to significantly reduce the dynamic range requirements of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) without compromising the measurement accuracy. We show that an integrating dual-slope ADC is adequate for digitizing the background-subtracted current. The ADC operates at a sampling frequency of 5-10 kHz and has an effective resolution of about 60 pA, which corresponds to a theoretical dopamine detection limit of about 6 nM. Our hybrid sensing platform offers an effective solution for implementing next-generation FSCV devices that can enable precise recording of dopamine signaling in vivo on a large scale.

  15. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  16. A CMOS Pressure Sensor Tag Chip for Passive Wireless Applications

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Li, Bing; Zuo, Lei; Wu, Xiang; Fu, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel monolithic pressure sensor tag for passive wireless applications. The proposed pressure sensor tag is based on an ultra-high frequency RFID system. The pressure sensor element is implemented in the 0.18 µm CMOS process and the membrane gap is formed by sacrificial layer release, resulting in a sensitivity of 1.2 fF/kPa within the range from 0 to 600 kPa. A three-stage rectifier adopts a chain of auxiliary floating rectifier cells to boost the gate voltage of the switching transistors, resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 53% at the low input power of −20 dBm. The capacitive sensor interface, using phase-locked loop archietcture, employs fully-digital blocks, which results in a 7.4 bits resolution and 0.8 µW power dissipation at 0.8 V supply voltage. The proposed passive wireless pressure sensor tag costs a total 3.2 µW power dissipation. PMID:25806868

  17. A CMOS pressure sensor tag chip for passive wireless applications.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Li, Bing; Zuo, Lei; Wu, Xiang; Fu, Zhihui

    2015-03-23

    This paper presents a novel monolithic pressure sensor tag for passive wireless applications. The proposed pressure sensor tag is based on an ultra-high frequency RFID system. The pressure sensor element is implemented in the 0.18 µm CMOS process and the membrane gap is formed by sacrificial layer release, resulting in a sensitivity of 1.2 fF/kPa within the range from 0 to 600 kPa. A three-stage rectifier adopts a chain of auxiliary floating rectifier cells to boost the gate voltage of the switching transistors, resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 53% at the low input power of -20 dBm. The capacitive sensor interface, using phase-locked loop archietcture, employs fully-digital blocks, which results in a 7.4 bits resolution and 0.8 µW power dissipation at 0.8 V supply voltage. The proposed passive wireless pressure sensor tag costs a total 3.2 µW power dissipation.

  18. CAOS-CMOS camera.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; La Torre, Juan Pablo; Amin, M Junaid

    2016-06-13

    Proposed and experimentally demonstrated is the CAOS-CMOS camera design that combines the coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager platform with the CMOS multi-pixel optical sensor. The unique CAOS-CMOS camera engages the classic CMOS sensor light staring mode with the time-frequency-space agile pixel CAOS imager mode within one programmable optical unit to realize a high dynamic range imager for extreme light contrast conditions. The experimentally demonstrated CAOS-CMOS camera is built using a digital micromirror device, a silicon point-photo-detector with a variable gain amplifier, and a silicon CMOS sensor with a maximum rated 51.3 dB dynamic range. White light imaging of three different brightness simultaneously viewed targets, that is not possible by the CMOS sensor, is achieved by the CAOS-CMOS camera demonstrating an 82.06 dB dynamic range. Applications for the camera include industrial machine vision, welding, laser analysis, automotive, night vision, surveillance and multispectral military systems.

  19. Quantitative evaluation of the accuracy and variance of individual pixels in a scientific CMOS (sCMOS) camera for computational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shigeo; Takahashi, Teruo; Bennett, Keith

    2017-02-01

    The"scientific" CMOS (sCMOS) camera architecture fundamentally differs from CCD and EMCCD cameras. In digital CCD and EMCCD cameras, conversion from charge to the digital output is generally through a single electronic chain, and the read noise and the conversion factor from photoelectrons to digital outputs are highly uniform for all pixels, although quantum efficiency may spatially vary. In CMOS cameras, the charge to voltage conversion is separate for each pixel and each column has independent amplifiers and analog-to-digital converters, in addition to possible pixel-to-pixel variation in quantum efficiency. The "raw" output from the CMOS image sensor includes pixel-to-pixel variability in the read noise, electronic gain, offset and dark current. Scientific camera manufacturers digitally compensate the raw signal from the CMOS image sensors to provide usable images. Statistical noise in images, unless properly modeled, can introduce errors in methods such as fluctuation correlation spectroscopy or computational imaging, for example, localization microscopy using maximum likelihood estimation. We measured the distributions and spatial maps of individual pixel offset, dark current, read noise, linearity, photoresponse non-uniformity and variance distributions of individual pixels for standard, off-the-shelf Hamamatsu ORCA-Flash4.0 V3 sCMOS cameras using highly uniform and controlled illumination conditions, from dark conditions to multiple low light levels between 20 to 1,000 photons / pixel per frame to higher light conditions. We further show that using pixel variance for flat field correction leads to errors in cameras with good factory calibration.

  20. The Impact of the Shallow-Trench Isolation Effect on Flicker Noise of Source Follower MOSFETs in a CMOS Image Sensor.

    PubMed

    Fan, C C; Chiu, Y C; Liu, C; Lai, W W; Cheng, C H; Lin, D L; Li, G R; Lo, Y H; Chang, C W; Tsai, C C; Chang, C Y

    2018-06-01

    The flicker noise of source follower transistors is the dominant noise source in image sensors. This paper reports a systematic study of the shallow trench isolation effect in transistors with different sizes under high temperature conditions that correspond to the quantity of empty defect sites. The effects of shallow trench isolation sidewall defects on flicker noise characteristics are investigated. In addition, the low-frequency noise and subthreshold swing degrade simultaneously in accordance to the device gate width scaling. Both serious subthreshold leakage and considerable noise can be attributed to the high trap density near the STI edge. Consequently, we propose a coincidental relationship between the noise level and the subthreshold characteristic; its trend is identical to the experiments and simulation results.

  1. Fundamental performance differences between CMOS and CCD imagers, part IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesick, James; Pinter, Jeff; Potter, Robert; Elliott, Tom; Andrews, James; Tower, John; Grygon, Mark; Keller, Dave

    2010-07-01

    This paper is a continuation of past papers written on fundamental performance differences of scientific CMOS and CCD imagers. New characterization results presented below include: 1). a new 1536 × 1536 × 8μm 5TPPD pixel CMOS imager, 2). buried channel MOSFETs for random telegraph noise (RTN) and threshold reduction, 3) sub-electron noise pixels, 4) 'MIM pixel' for pixel sensitivity (V/e-) control, 5) '5TPPD RING pixel' for large pixel, high-speed charge transfer applications, 6) pixel-to-pixel blooming control, 7) buried channel photo gate pixels and CMOSCCDs, 8) substrate bias for deep depletion CMOS imagers, 9) CMOS dark spikes and dark current issues and 10) high energy radiation damage test data. Discussions are also given to a 1024 × 1024 × 16 um 5TPPD pixel imager currently in fabrication and new stitched CMOS imagers that are in the design phase including 4k × 4k × 10 μm and 10k × 10k × 10 um imager formats.

  2. Ultrasonic Fingerprint Sensor With Transmit Beamforming Based on a PMUT Array Bonded to CMOS Circuitry.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoyue; Tang, Hao-Yen; Lu, Yipeng; Ng, Eldwin J; Tsai, Julius M; Boser, Bernhard E; Horsley, David A

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present a single-chip 65 ×42 element ultrasonic pulse-echo fingerprint sensor with transmit (TX) beamforming based on piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers directly bonded to a CMOS readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The readout ASIC was realized in a standard 180-nm CMOS process with a 24-V high-voltage transistor option. Pulse-echo measurements are performed column-by-column in sequence using either one column or five columns to TX the ultrasonic pulse at 20 MHz. TX beamforming is used to focus the ultrasonic beam at the imaging plane where the finger is located, increasing the ultrasonic pressure and narrowing the 3-dB beamwidth to [Formula: see text], a factor of 6.4 narrower than nonbeamformed measurements. The surface of the sensor is coated with a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer to provide good acoustic impedance matching to skin. Scanning laser Doppler vibrometry of the PDMS surface was used to map the ultrasonic pressure field at the imaging surface, demonstrating the expected increase in pressure, and reduction in beamwidth. Imaging experiments were conducted using both PDMS phantoms and real fingerprints. The average image contrast is increased by a factor of 1.5 when beamforming is used.

  3. DNA decorated carbon nanotube sensors on CMOS circuitry for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Chia-Ling; Agarwal, V.; Li, Xinghui; Sonkusale, S.; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Wang, Ming L.

    2010-04-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with their large surface area, high aspect ratio are one of the novel materials which have numerous attractive features amenable for high sensitivity sensors. Several nanotube based sensors including, gas, chemical and biosensors have been demonstrated. Moreover, most of these sensors require off chip components to detect the variations in the signals making them complicated and hard to commercialize. Here we present a novel complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated carbon nanotube sensors for portable high sensitivity chemical sensing applications. Multiple zincation steps have been developed to ascertain proper electrical connectivity between the carbon nanotubes and the foundry made CMOS circuitry. The SWNTs have been integrated onto (CMOS) circuitry as the feedback resistor of a Miller compensated operational amplifier utilizing low temperature Dielectrophoretic (DEP) assembly process which has been tailored to be compatible with the post-CMOS integration at the die level. Building nanotube sensors directly on commercial CMOS circuitry allows single chip solutions eliminating the need for long parasitic lines and numerous wire bonds. The carbon nanotube sensors realized on CMOS circuitry show strong response to various vapors including Dimethyl methylphosphonate and Dinitrotoluene. The remarkable set of attributes of the SWNTs realized on CMOS electronic chips provides an attractive platform for high sensitivity portable nanotube based bio and chemical sensors.

  4. Compressive Sensing Image Sensors-Hardware Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Dadkhah, Mohammadreza; Deen, M. Jamal; Shirani, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    The compressive sensing (CS) paradigm uses simultaneous sensing and compression to provide an efficient image acquisition technique. The main advantages of the CS method include high resolution imaging using low resolution sensor arrays and faster image acquisition. Since the imaging philosophy in CS imagers is different from conventional imaging systems, new physical structures have been developed for cameras that use the CS technique. In this paper, a review of different hardware implementations of CS encoding in optical and electrical domains is presented. Considering the recent advances in CMOS (complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor) technologies and the feasibility of performing on-chip signal processing, important practical issues in the implementation of CS in CMOS sensors are emphasized. In addition, the CS coding for video capture is discussed. PMID:23584123

  5. Ionizing radiation effects on CMOS imagers manufactured in deep submicron process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goiffon, Vincent; Magnan, Pierre; Bernard, Frédéric; Rolland, Guy; Saint-Pé, Olivier; Huger, Nicolas; Corbière, Franck

    2008-02-01

    We present here a study on both CMOS sensors and elementary structures (photodiodes and in-pixel MOSFETs) manufactured in a deep submicron process dedicated to imaging. We designed a test chip made of one 128×128-3T-pixel array with 10 μm pitch and more than 120 isolated test structures including photodiodes and MOSFETs with various implants and different sizes. All these devices were exposed to ionizing radiation up to 100 krad and their responses were correlated to identify the CMOS sensor weaknesses. Characterizations in darkness and under illumination demonstrated that dark current increase is the major sensor degradation. Shallow trench isolation was identified to be responsible for this degradation as it increases the number of generation centers in photodiode depletion regions. Consequences on hardness assurance and hardening-by-design are discussed.

  6. A time-resolved image sensor for tubeless streak cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasutomi, Keita; Han, SangMan; Seo, Min-Woong; Takasawa, Taishi; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Kawahito, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with draining-only modulation (DOM) pixels for tube-less streak cameras. Although the conventional streak camera has high time resolution, the device requires high voltage and bulky system due to the structure with a vacuum tube. The proposed time-resolved imager with a simple optics realize a streak camera without any vacuum tubes. The proposed image sensor has DOM pixels, a delay-based pulse generator, and a readout circuitry. The delay-based pulse generator in combination with an in-pixel logic allows us to create and to provide a short gating clock to the pixel array. A prototype time-resolved CMOS image sensor with the proposed pixel is designed and implemented using 0.11um CMOS image sensor technology. The image array has 30(Vertical) x 128(Memory length) pixels with the pixel pitch of 22.4um. .

  7. Statistical Analysis of the Random Telegraph Noise in a 1.1 μm Pixel, 8.3 MP CMOS Image Sensor Using On-Chip Time Constant Extraction Method.

    PubMed

    Chao, Calvin Yi-Ping; Tu, Honyih; Wu, Thomas Meng-Hsiu; Chou, Kuo-Yu; Yeh, Shang-Fu; Yin, Chin; Lee, Chih-Lin

    2017-11-23

    A study of the random telegraph noise (RTN) of a 1.1 μm pitch, 8.3 Mpixel CMOS image sensor (CIS) fabricated in a 45 nm backside-illumination (BSI) technology is presented in this paper. A noise decomposition scheme is used to pinpoint the noise source. The long tail of the random noise (RN) distribution is directly linked to the RTN from the pixel source follower (SF). The full 8.3 Mpixels are classified into four categories according to the observed RTN histogram peaks. A theoretical formula describing the RTN as a function of the time difference between the two phases of the correlated double sampling (CDS) is derived and validated by measured data. An on-chip time constant extraction method is developed and applied to the RTN analysis. The effects of readout circuit bandwidth on the settling ratios of the RTN histograms are investigated and successfully accounted for in a simulation using a RTN behavior model.

  8. A monolithic 640 × 512 CMOS imager with high-NIR sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauxtermann, Stefan; Fisher, John; McDougal, Michael

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we present first results from a backside illuminated CMOS image sensor that we fabricated on high resistivity silicon. Compared to conventional CMOS imagers, a thicker photosensitive membrane can be depleted when using silicon with low background doping concentration while maintaining low dark current and good MTF performance. The benefits of such a fully depleted silicon sensor are high quantum efficiency over a wide spectral range and a fast photo detector response. Combining these characteristics with the circuit complexity and manufacturing maturity available from a modern, mixed signal CMOS technology leads to a new type of sensor, with an unprecedented performance spectrum in a monolithic device. Our fully depleted, backside illuminated CMOS sensor was designed to operate at integration times down to 100nsec and frame rates up to 1000Hz. Noise in Integrate While Read (IWR) snapshot shutter operation for these conditions was simulated to be below 10e- at room temperature. 2×2 binning with a 4× increase in sensitivity and a maximum frame rate of 4000 Hz is supported. For application in hyperspectral imaging systems the full well capacity in each row can individually be programmed between 10ke-, 60ke- and 500ke-. On test structures we measured a room temperature dark current of 360pA/cm2 at a reverse bias of 3.3V. A peak quantum efficiency of 80% was measured with a single layer AR coating on the backside. Test images captured with the 50μm thick VGA imager between 30Hz and 90Hz frame rate show a strong response at NIR wavelengths.

  9. Ultra-fast high-resolution hybrid and monolithic CMOS imagers in multi-frame radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Kris; Douence, Vincent; Bai, Yibin; Nedrow, Paul; Mariam, Fesseha; Merrill, Frank; Morris, Christopher L.; Saunders, Andy

    2014-09-01

    A new burst-mode, 10-frame, hybrid Si-sensor/CMOS-ROIC FPA chip has been recently fabricated at Teledyne Imaging Sensors. The intended primary use of the sensor is in the multi-frame 800 MeV proton radiography at LANL. The basic part of the hybrid is a large (48×49 mm2) stitched CMOS chip of 1100×1100 pixel count, with a minimum shutter speed of 50 ns. The performance parameters of this chip are compared to the first generation 3-frame 0.5-Mpixel custom hybrid imager. The 3-frame cameras have been in continuous use for many years, in a variety of static and dynamic experiments at LANSCE. The cameras can operate with a per-frame adjustable integration time of ~ 120ns-to- 1s, and inter-frame time of 250ns to 2s. Given the 80 ms total readout time, the original and the new imagers can be externally synchronized to 0.1-to-5 Hz, 50-ns wide proton beam pulses, and record up to ~1000-frame radiographic movies typ. of 3-to-30 minute duration. The performance of the global electronic shutter is discussed and compared to that of a high-resolution commercial front-illuminated monolithic CMOS imager.

  10. Amorphous selenium direct detection CMOS digital x-ray imager with 25 micron pixel pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Christopher C.; Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Ghanbarzadeh, Sina; Allan, Gary; Farrier, Michael; Cunningham, Ian A.; Karim, Karim S.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a high resolution amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detection imager using a large-area compatible back-end fabrication process on top of a CMOS active pixel sensor having 25 micron pixel pitch. Integration of a-Se with CMOS technology requires overcoming CMOS/a-Se interfacial strain, which initiates nucleation of crystalline selenium and results in high detector dark currents. A CMOS-compatible polyimide buffer layer was used to planarize the backplane and provide a low stress and thermally stable surface for a-Se. The buffer layer inhibits crystallization and provides detector stability that is not only a performance factor but also critical for favorable long term cost-benefit considerations in the application of CMOS digital x-ray imagers in medical practice. The detector structure is comprised of a polyimide (PI) buffer layer, the a-Se layer, and a gold (Au) top electrode. The PI layer is applied by spin-coating and is patterned using dry etching to open the backplane bond pads for wire bonding. Thermal evaporation is used to deposit the a-Se and Au layers, and the detector is operated in hole collection mode (i.e. a positive bias on the Au top electrode). High resolution a-Se diagnostic systems typically use 70 to 100 μm pixel pitch and have a pre-sampling modulation transfer function (MTF) that is significantly limited by the pixel aperture. Our results confirm that, for a densely integrated 25 μm pixel pitch CMOS array, the MTF approaches the fundamental material limit, i.e. where the MTF begins to be limited by the a-Se material properties and not the pixel aperture. Preliminary images demonstrating high spatial resolution have been obtained from a frst prototype imager.

  11. Design and characterization of high precision in-pixel discriminators for rolling shutter CMOS pixel sensors with full CMOS capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Y.; Hu-Guo, C.; Dorokhov, A.; Pham, H.; Hu, Y.

    2013-07-01

    In order to exploit the ability to integrate a charge collecting electrode with analog and digital processing circuitry down to the pixel level, a new type of CMOS pixel sensors with full CMOS capability is presented in this paper. The pixel array is read out based on a column-parallel read-out architecture, where each pixel incorporates a diode, a preamplifier with a double sampling circuitry and a discriminator to completely eliminate analog read-out bottlenecks. The sensor featuring a pixel array of 8 rows and 32 columns with a pixel pitch of 80 μm×16 μm was fabricated in a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The behavior of each pixel-level discriminator isolated from the diode and the preamplifier was studied. The experimental results indicate that all in-pixel discriminators which are fully operational can provide significant improvements in the read-out speed and the power consumption of CMOS pixel sensors.

  12. A novel CMOS transducer for giant magnetoresistance sensors.

    PubMed

    Luong, Van Su; Lu, Chih-Cheng; Yang, Jing-Wen; Jeng, Jen-Tzong

    2017-02-01

    In this work, an ASIC (application specific integrated circuits) transducer circuit for field modulated giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors was designed and fabricated using a 0.18-μm CMOS process. The transducer circuits consist of a frequency divider, a digital phase shifter, an instrument amplifier, and an analog mixer. These comprise a mix of analog and digital circuit techniques. The compact chip size of 1.5 mm × 1.5 mm for both analog and digital parts was achieved using the TSMC18 1P6M (1-polysilicon 6-metal) process design kit, and the characteristics of the system were simulated using an HSpice simulator. The output of the transducer circuit is the result of the first harmonic detection, which resolves the modulated field using a phase sensitive detection (PSD) technique and is proportional to the measured magnetic field. When the dual-bridge GMR sensor is driven by the transducer circuit with a current of 10 mA at 10 kHz, the observed sensitivity of the field sensor is 10.2 mV/V/Oe and the nonlinearity error was 3% in the linear range of ±1 Oe. The performance of the system was also verified by rotating the sensor system horizontally in earth's magnetic field and recording the sinusoidal output with respect to the azimuth angle, which exhibits an error of less than ±0.04 Oe. These results prove that the ASIC transducer is suitable for driving the AC field modulated GMR sensors applied to geomagnetic measurement.

  13. Novel Si-Ge-C Superlattices for More than Moore CMOS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-31

    diodes can be entirely formed by epitaxial growth, CMOS Active Pixel Sensors can be made with Fully-Depleted SOI CMOS . One important advantage of...a NMOS Transfer Gate (TG), which could be part of a 4T pixel APS. PPDs are preferred in CMOS image sensors for the ability of the pinning layer to...than Moore” with the creation of active photonic devices monolithically integrated with CMOS . Applications include Multispectral CMOS Image Sensors

  14. Meteor Film Recording with Digital Film Cameras with large CMOS Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slansky, P. C.

    2016-12-01

    In this article the author combines his professional know-how about cameras for film and television production with his amateur astronomy activities. Professional digital film cameras with high sensitivity are still quite rare in astronomy. One reason for this may be their costs of up to 20 000 and more (camera body only). In the interim, however,consumer photo cameras with film mode and very high sensitivity have come to the market for about 2 000 EUR. In addition, ultra-high sensitive professional film cameras, that are very interesting for meteor observation, have been introduced to the market. The particular benefits of digital film cameras with large CMOS sensors, including photo cameras with film recording function, for meteor recording are presented by three examples: a 2014 Camelopardalid, shot with a Canon EOS C 300, an exploding 2014 Aurigid, shot with a Sony alpha7S, and the 2016 Perseids, shot with a Canon ME20F-SH. All three cameras use large CMOS sensors; "large" meaning Super-35 mm, the classic 35 mm film format (24x13.5 mm, similar to APS-C size), or full format (36x24 mm), the classic 135 photo camera format. Comparisons are made to the widely used cameras with small CCD sensors, such as Mintron or Watec; "small" meaning 12" (6.4x4.8 mm) or less. Additionally, special photographic image processing of meteor film recordings is discussed.

  15. Visible light communication based vehicle positioning using LED street light and rolling shutter CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Trong Hop; Yoo, Myungsik

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a vehicle positioning system using LED street lights and two rolling shutter CMOS sensor cameras. In this system, identification codes for the LED street lights are transmitted to camera-equipped vehicles through a visible light communication (VLC) channel. Given that the camera parameters are known, the positions of the vehicles are determined based on the geometric relationship between the coordinates of the LEDs in the images and their real world coordinates, which are obtained through the LED identification codes. The main contributions of the paper are twofold. First, the collinear arrangement of the LED street lights makes traditional camera-based positioning algorithms fail to determine the position of the vehicles. In this paper, an algorithm is proposed to fuse data received from the two cameras attached to the vehicles in order to solve the collinearity problem of the LEDs. Second, the rolling shutter mechanism of the CMOS sensors combined with the movement of the vehicles creates image artifacts that may severely degrade the positioning accuracy. This paper also proposes a method to compensate for the rolling shutter artifact, and a high positioning accuracy can be achieved even when the vehicle is moving at high speeds. The performance of the proposed positioning system corresponding to different system parameters is examined by conducting Matlab simulations. Small-scale experiments are also conducted to study the performance of the proposed algorithm in real applications.

  16. Backside illuminated CMOS-TDI line scan sensor for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Omer; Ofer, Oren; Abramovich, Gil; Ben-Ari, Nimrod; Gershon, Gal; Brumer, Maya; Shay, Adi; Shamay, Yaron

    2018-05-01

    A multi-spectral backside illuminated Time Delayed Integration Radiation Hardened line scan sensor utilizing CMOS technology was designed for continuous scanning Low Earth Orbit small satellite applications. The sensor comprises a single silicon chip with 4 independent arrays of pixels where each array is arranged in 2600 columns with 64 TDI levels. A multispectral optical filter whose spectral responses per array are adjustable per system requirement is assembled at the package level. A custom 4T Pixel design provides the required readout speed, low-noise, very low dark current, and high conversion gains. A 2-phase internally controlled exposure mechanism improves the sensor's dynamic MTF. The sensor high level of integration includes on-chip 12 bit per pixel analog to digital converters, on-chip controller, and CMOS compatible voltage levels. Thus, the power consumption and the weight of the supporting electronics are reduced, and a simple electrical interface is provided. An adjustable gain provides a Full Well Capacity ranging from 150,000 electrons up to 500,000 electrons per column and an overall readout noise per column of less than 120 electrons. The imager supports line rates ranging from 50 to 10,000 lines/sec, with power consumption of less than 0.5W per array. Thus, the sensor is characterized by a high pixel rate, a high dynamic range and a very low power. To meet a Latch-up free requirement RadHard architecture and design rules were utilized. In this paper recent electrical and electro-optical measurements of the sensor's Flight Models will be presented for the first time.

  17. Radiation hard pixel sensors using high-resistive wafers in a 150 nm CMOS processing line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, D.-L.; Hemperek, T.; Caicedo, I.; Gonella, L.; Hügging, F.; Janssen, J.; Krüger, H.; Macchiolo, A.; Owtscharenko, N.; Vigani, L.; Wermes, N.

    2017-06-01

    Pixel sensors using 8'' CMOS processing technology have been designed and characterized offering the benefits of industrial sensor fabrication, including large wafers, high throughput and yield, as well as low cost. The pixel sensors are produced using a 150 nm CMOS technology offered by LFoundry in Avezzano. The technology provides multiple metal and polysilicon layers, as well as metal-insulator-metal capacitors that can be employed for AC-coupling and redistribution layers. Several prototypes were fabricated and are characterized with minimum ionizing particles before and after irradiation to fluences up to 1.1 × 1015 neq cm-2. The CMOS-fabricated sensors perform equally well as standard pixel sensors in terms of noise and hit detection efficiency. AC-coupled sensors even reach 100% hit efficiency in a 3.2 GeV electron beam before irradiation.

  18. Improved Signal Chains for Readout of CMOS Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Hancock, Bruce; Cunningham, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    An improved generic design has been devised for implementing signal chains involved in readout from complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors and for other readout integrated circuits (ICs) that perform equivalent functions. The design applies to any such IC in which output signal charges from the pixels in a given row are transferred simultaneously into sampling capacitors at the bottoms of the columns, then voltages representing individual pixel charges are read out in sequence by sequentially turning on column-selecting field-effect transistors (FETs) in synchronism with source-follower- or operational-amplifier-based amplifier circuits. The improved design affords the best features of prior source-follower-and operational- amplifier-based designs while overcoming the major limitations of those designs. The limitations can be summarized as follows: a) For a source-follower-based signal chain, the ohmic voltage drop associated with DC bias current flowing through the column-selection FET causes unacceptable voltage offset, nonlinearity, and reduced small-signal gain. b) For an operational-amplifier-based signal chain, the required bias current and the output noise increase superlinearly with size of the pixel array because of a corresponding increase in the effective capacitance of the row bus used to couple the sampled column charges to the operational amplifier. The effect of the bus capacitance is to simultaneously slow down the readout circuit and increase noise through the Miller effect.

  19. A Multi-Modality CMOS Sensor Array for Cell-Based Assay and Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Chi, Taiyun; Park, Jong Seok; Butts, Jessica C; Hookway, Tracy A; Su, Amy; Zhu, Chengjie; Styczynski, Mark P; McDevitt, Todd C; Wang, Hua

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated multi-modality CMOS cellular sensor array with four sensing modalities to characterize different cell physiological responses, including extracellular voltage recording, cellular impedance mapping, optical detection with shadow imaging and bioluminescence sensing, and thermal monitoring. The sensor array consists of nine parallel pixel groups and nine corresponding signal conditioning blocks. Each pixel group comprises one temperature sensor and 16 tri-modality sensor pixels, while each tri-modality sensor pixel can be independently configured for extracellular voltage recording, cellular impedance measurement (voltage excitation/current sensing), and optical detection. This sensor array supports multi-modality cellular sensing at the pixel level, which enables holistic cell characterization and joint-modality physiological monitoring on the same cellular sample with a pixel resolution of 80 μm × 100 μm. Comprehensive biological experiments with different living cell samples demonstrate the functionality and benefit of the proposed multi-modality sensing in cell-based assay and drug screening.

  20. 10000 pixels wide CMOS frame imager for earth observation from a HALE UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delauré, B.; Livens, S.; Everaerts, J.; Kleihorst, R.; Schippers, Gert; de Wit, Yannick; Compiet, John; Banachowicz, Bartosz

    2009-09-01

    MEDUSA is the lightweight high resolution camera, designed to be operated from a solar-powered Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) flying at stratospheric altitudes. The instrument is a technology demonstrator within the Pegasus program and targets applications such as crisis management and cartography. A special wide swath CMOS imager has been developed by Cypress Semiconductor Cooperation Belgium to meet the specific sensor requirements of MEDUSA. The CMOS sensor has a stitched design comprising a panchromatic and color sensor on the same die. Each sensor consists of 10000*1200 square pixels (5.5μm size, novel 6T architecture) with micro-lenses. The exposure is performed by means of a high efficiency snapshot shutter. The sensor is able to operate at a rate of 30fps in full frame readout. Due to a novel pixel design, the sensor has low dark leakage of the memory elements (PSNL) and low parasitic light sensitivity (PLS). Still it maintains a relative high QE (Quantum efficiency) and a FF (fill factor) of over 65%. It features an MTF (Modulation Transfer Function) higher than 60% at Nyquist frequency in both X and Y directions The measured optical/electrical crosstalk (expressed as MTF) of this 5.5um pixel is state-of-the art. These properties makes it possible to acquire sharp images also in low-light conditions.

  1. CMOS based capacitance to digital converter circuit for MEMS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotake, D. R.; Darji, A. D.

    2018-02-01

    Most of the MEMS cantilever based system required costly instruments for characterization, processing and also has large experimental setups which led to non-portable device. So there is a need of low cost, highly sensitive, high speed and portable digital system. The proposed Capacitance to Digital Converter (CDC) interfacing circuit converts capacitance to digital domain which can be easily processed. Recent demand microcantilever deflection is part per trillion ranges which change the capacitance in 1-10 femto farad (fF) range. The entire CDC circuit is designed using CMOS 250nm technology. Design of CDC circuit consists of a D-latch and two oscillators, namely Sensor controlled oscillator (SCO) and digitally controlled oscillator (DCO). The D-latch is designed using transmission gate based MUX for power optimization. A CDC design of 7-stage, 9-stage and 11-stage tested for 1-18 fF and simulated using mentor graphics Eldo tool with parasitic. Since the proposed design does not use resistance component, the total power dissipation is reduced to 2.3621 mW for CDC designed using 9-stage SCO and DCO.

  2. Integrated CMOS dew point sensors for relative humidity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savalli, Nicolo; Baglio, Salvatore; Castorina, Salvatore; Sacco, Vincenzo; Tringali, Cristina

    2004-07-01

    This work deals with the development of integrated relative humidity dew point sensors realized by adopting standard CMOS technology for applications in various fields. The proposed system is composed by a suspended plate that is cooled by exploiting integrated Peltier cells. The cold junctions of the cells have been spread over the plate surface to improve the homogeneity of the temperature distribution over its surface, where cooling will cause the water condensation. The temperature at which water drops occur, named dew point temperature, is a function of the air humidity. Measurement of such dew point temperature and the ambient temperature allows to know the relative humidity. The detection of water drops is achieved by adopting a capacitive sensing strategy realized by interdigited fixed combs, composed by the upper layer of the adopted process. Such a capacitive sensor, together with its conditioning circuit, drives a trigger that stops the cooling of the plate and enables the reading of the dew point temperature. Temperature measurements are achieved by means of suitably integrated thermocouples. The analytical model of the proposed system has been developed and has been used to design a prototype device and to estimate its performances. In such a prototype, the thermoelectric cooler is composed by 56 Peltier cells, made by metal 1/poly 1 junctions. The plate has a square shape with 200 μm side, and it is realized by exploiting the oxide layers. Starting from the ambient temperature a temperature variation of ΔT = 15 K can be reached in 10 ms thus allowing to measure a relative humidity greater than 40%.

  3. Charge collection and non-ionizing radiation tolerance of CMOS pixel sensors using a 0.18 μm CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhang, Liang; Fu, Min

    2016-09-01

    The proposed Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) will be primarily aimed for precision measurements of the discovered Higgs boson. Its innermost vertex detector, which will play a critical role in heavy-flavor tagging, must be constructed with fine-pitched silicon pixel sensors with low power consumption and fast readout. CMOS pixel sensor (CPS), as one of the most promising candidate technologies, has already demonstrated its excellent performance in several high energy physics experiments. Therefore it has been considered for R&D for the CEPC vertex detector. In this paper, we present the preliminary studies to improve the collected signal charge over the equivalent input capacitance ratio (Q / C), which will be crucial to reduce the analog power consumption. We have performed detailed 3D device simulation and evaluated potential impacts from diode geometry, epitaxial layer properties and non-ionizing radiation damage. We have proposed a new approach to improve the treatment of the boundary conditions in simulation. Along with the TCAD simulation, we have designed the exploratory prototype utilizing the TowerJazz 0.18 μm CMOS imaging sensor process and we will verify the simulation results with future measurements.

  4. Design and Fabrication of High-Efficiency CMOS/CCD Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata

    2007-01-01

    An architecture for back-illuminated complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled-device (CCD) ultraviolet/visible/near infrared- light image sensors, and a method of fabrication to implement the architecture, are undergoing development. The architecture and method are expected to enable realization of the full potential of back-illuminated CMOS/CCD imagers to perform with high efficiency, high sensitivity, excellent angular response, and in-pixel signal processing. The architecture and method are compatible with next-generation CMOS dielectric-forming and metallization techniques, and the process flow of the method is compatible with process flows typical of the manufacture of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits. The architecture and method overcome all obstacles that have hitherto prevented high-yield, low-cost fabrication of back-illuminated CMOS/CCD imagers by use of standard VLSI fabrication tools and techniques. It is not possible to discuss the obstacles in detail within the space available for this article. Briefly, the obstacles are posed by the problems of generating light-absorbing layers having desired uniform and accurate thicknesses, passivation of surfaces, forming structures for efficient collection of charge carriers, and wafer-scale thinning (in contradistinction to diescale thinning). A basic element of the present architecture and method - the element that, more than any other, makes it possible to overcome the obstacles - is the use of an alternative starting material: Instead of starting with a conventional bulk-CMOS wafer that consists of a p-doped epitaxial silicon layer grown on a heavily-p-doped silicon substrate, one starts with a special silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer that consists of a thermal oxide buried between a lightly p- or n-doped, thick silicon layer and a device silicon layer of appropriate thickness and doping. The thick silicon layer is used as a handle: that is, as a mechanical support for the

  5. A Dual-Mode Large-Arrayed CMOS ISFET Sensor for Accurate and High-Throughput pH Sensing in Biomedical Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiwei; Yu, Hao; Liu, Xu; Jiang, Yu; Yan, Mei; Wu, Dongping

    2015-09-01

    The existing ISFET-based DNA sequencing detects hydrogen ions released during the polymerization of DNA strands on microbeads, which are scattered into microwell array above the ISFET sensor with unknown distribution. However, false pH detection happens at empty microwells due to crosstalk from neighboring microbeads. In this paper, a dual-mode CMOS ISFET sensor is proposed to have accurate pH detection toward DNA sequencing. Dual-mode sensing, optical and chemical modes, is realized by integrating a CMOS image sensor (CIS) with ISFET pH sensor, and is fabricated in a standard 0.18-μm CIS process. With accurate determination of microbead physical locations with CIS pixel by contact imaging, the dual-mode sensor can correlate local pH for one DNA slice at one location-determined microbead, which can result in improved pH detection accuracy. Moreover, toward a high-throughput DNA sequencing, a correlated-double-sampling readout that supports large array for both modes is deployed to reduce pixel-to-pixel nonuniformity such as threshold voltage mismatch. The proposed CMOS dual-mode sensor is experimentally examined to show a well correlated pH map and optical image for microbeads with a pH sensitivity of 26.2 mV/pH, a fixed pattern noise (FPN) reduction from 4% to 0.3%, and a readout speed of 1200 frames/s. A dual-mode CMOS ISFET sensor with suppressed FPN for accurate large-arrayed pH sensing is proposed and demonstrated with state-of-the-art measured results toward accurate and high-throughput DNA sequencing. The developed dual-mode CMOS ISFET sensor has great potential for future personal genome diagnostics with high accuracy and low cost.

  6. Characterization of pixel sensor designed in 180 nm SOI CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benka, T.; Havranek, M.; Hejtmanek, M.; Jakovenko, J.; Janoska, Z.; Marcisovska, M.; Marcisovsky, M.; Neue, G.; Tomasek, L.; Vrba, V.

    2018-01-01

    A new type of X-ray imaging Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS), X-CHIP-02, was developed using a 180 nm deep submicron Silicon On Insulator (SOI) CMOS commercial technology. Two pixel matrices were integrated into the prototype chip, which differ by the pixel pitch of 50 μm and 100 μm. The X-CHIP-02 contains several test structures, which are useful for characterization of individual blocks. The sensitive part of the pixel integrated in the handle wafer is one of the key structures designed for testing. The purpose of this structure is to determine the capacitance of the sensitive part (diode in the MAPS pixel). The measured capacitance is 2.9 fF for 50 μm pixel pitch and 4.8 fF for 100 μm pixel pitch at -100 V (default operational voltage). This structure was used to measure the IV characteristics of the sensitive diode. In this work, we report on a circuit designed for precise determination of sensor capacitance and IV characteristics of both pixel types with respect to X-ray irradiation. The motivation for measurement of the sensor capacitance was its importance for the design of front-end amplifier circuits. The design of pixel elements, as well as circuit simulation and laboratory measurement techniques are described. The experimental results are of great importance for further development of MAPS sensors in this technology.

  7. sCMOS detector for imaging VNIR spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Andreas; Reulke, Ralf; Schwarzer, Horst; Venus, Holger; Neumann, Christian

    2013-09-01

    The facility Optical Information Systems (OS) at the Robotics and Mechatronics Center of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has more than 30 years of experience with high-resolution imaging technology. This paper shows the scientific results of the institute of leading edge instruments and focal plane designs for EnMAP VIS/NIR spectrograph. EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program) is one of the selected proposals for the national German Space Program. The EnMAP project includes the technological design of the hyper spectral space borne instrument and the algorithms development of the classification. The EnMAP project is a joint response of German Earth observation research institutions, value-added resellers and the German space industry like Kayser-Threde GmbH (KT) and others to the increasing demand on information about the status of our environment. The Geo Forschungs Zentrum (GFZ) Potsdam is the Principal Investigator of EnMAP. DLR OS and KT were driving the technology of new detectors and the FPA design for this project, new manufacturing accuracy and on-chip processing capability in order to keep pace with the ambitious scientific and user requirements. In combination with the engineering research, the current generations of space borne sensor systems are focusing on VIS/NIR high spectral resolution to meet the requirements on earth and planetary observation systems. The combination of large swath and high spectral resolution with intelligent synchronization control, fast-readout ADC chains and new focal-plane concepts open the door to new remote-sensing and smart deep space instruments. The paper gives an overview over the detector verification program at DLR on FPA level, new control possibilities for sCMOS detectors in global shutter mode and key parameters like PRNU, DSNU, MTF, SNR, Linearity, Spectral Response, Quantum Efficiency, Flatness and Radiation Tolerance will be discussed in detail.

  8. Semi-physical simulation test for micro CMOS star sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Zhang, Guang-jun; Jiang, Jie; Fan, Qiao-yun

    2008-03-01

    A designed star sensor must be extensively tested before launching. Testing star sensor requires complicated process with much time and resources input. Even observing sky on the ground is a challenging and time-consuming job, requiring complicated and expensive equipments, suitable time and location, and prone to be interfered by weather. And moreover, not all stars distributed on the sky can be observed by this testing method. Semi-physical simulation in laboratory reduces the testing cost and helps to debug, analyze and evaluate the star sensor system while developing the model. The test system is composed of optical platform, star field simulator, star field simulator computer, star sensor and the central data processing computer. The test system simulates the starlight with high accuracy and good parallelism, and creates static or dynamic image in FOV (Field of View). The conditions of the test are close to observing real sky. With this system, the test of a micro star tracker designed by Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics has been performed successfully. Some indices including full-sky autonomous star identification time, attitude update frequency and attitude precision etc. meet design requirement of the star sensor. Error source of the testing system is also analyzed. It is concluded that the testing system is cost-saving, efficient, and contributes to optimizing the embed arithmetic, shortening the development cycle and improving engineering design processes.

  9. Linear dynamic range enhancement in a CMOS imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A CMOS imager with increased linear dynamic range but without degradation in noise, responsivity, linearity, fixed-pattern noise, or photometric calibration comprises a linear calibrated dual gain pixel in which the gain is reduced after a pre-defined threshold level by switching in an additional capacitance. The pixel may include a novel on-pixel latch circuit that is used to switch in the additional capacitance.

  10. Flexible ultrathin-body single-photon avalanche diode sensors and CMOS integration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengfei; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Charbon, Edoardo

    2016-02-22

    We proposed the world's first flexible ultrathin-body single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) as photon counting device providing a suitable solution to advanced implantable bio-compatible chronic medical monitoring, diagnostics and other applications. In this paper, we investigate the Geiger-mode performance of this flexible ultrathin-body SPAD comprehensively and we extend this work to the first flexible SPAD image sensor with in-pixel and off-pixel electronics integrated in CMOS. Experimental results show that dark count rate (DCR) by band-to-band tunneling can be reduced by optimizing multiplication doping. DCR by trap-assisted avalanche, which is believed to be originated from the trench etching process, could be further reduced, resulting in a DCR density of tens to hundreds of Hertz per micrometer square at cryogenic temperature. The influence of the trench etching process onto DCR is also proved by comparison with planar ultrathin-body SPAD structures without trench. Photon detection probability (PDP) can be achieved by wider depletion and drift regions and by carefully optimizing body thickness. PDP in frontside- (FSI) and backside-illumination (BSI) are comparable, thus making this technology suitable for both modes of illumination. Afterpulsing and crosstalk are negligible at 2µs dead time, while it has been proved, for the first time, that a CMOS SPAD pixel of this kind could work in a cryogenic environment. By appropriate choice of substrate, this technology is amenable to implantation for biocompatible photon-counting applications and wherever bended imaging sensors are essential.

  11. A photovoltaic-driven and energy-autonomous CMOS implantable sensor.

    PubMed

    Ayazian, Sahar; Akhavan, Vahid A; Soenen, Eric; Hassibi, Arjang

    2012-08-01

    An energy-autonomous, photovoltaic (PV)-driven and MRI-compatible CMOS implantable sensor is presented. On-chip P+/N-well diode arrays are used as CMOS-compatible PV cells to harvest μW's of power from the light that penetrates into the tissue. In this 2.5 mm × 2.5 mm sub-μW integrated system, the in-vivo physiological signals are first measured by using a subthreshold ring oscillator-based sensor, the acquired data is then modulated into a frequency-shift keying (FSK) signal, and finally transmitted neuromorphically to the skin surface by using a pair of polarized electrodes.

  12. Results of the 2015 testbeam of a 180 nm AMS High-Voltage CMOS sensor prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, M.; de Mendizabal, J. Bilbao; Casse, G.

    We investigated the active pixel sensors based on the High-Voltage CMOS technology as a viable option for the future pixel tracker of the ATLAS experiment at the High-Luminosity LHC. Our paper reports on the testbeam measurements performed at the H8 beamline of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron on a High-Voltage CMOS sensor prototype produced in 180 nm AMS technology. These results in terms of tracking efficiency and timing performance, for different threshold and bias conditions, are shown.

  13. Results of the 2015 testbeam of a 180 nm AMS High-Voltage CMOS sensor prototype

    DOE PAGES

    Benoit, M.; de Mendizabal, J. Bilbao; Casse, G.; ...

    2016-07-21

    We investigated the active pixel sensors based on the High-Voltage CMOS technology as a viable option for the future pixel tracker of the ATLAS experiment at the High-Luminosity LHC. Our paper reports on the testbeam measurements performed at the H8 beamline of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron on a High-Voltage CMOS sensor prototype produced in 180 nm AMS technology. These results in terms of tracking efficiency and timing performance, for different threshold and bias conditions, are shown.

  14. CMOS nanoelectrode array for all-electrical intracellular electrophysiological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Jeffrey; Ye, Tianyang; Qin, Ling; Jorgolli, Marsela; Gertner, Rona S.; Ham, Donhee; Park, Hongkun

    2017-05-01

    Developing a new tool capable of high-precision electrophysiological recording of a large network of electrogenic cells has long been an outstanding challenge in neurobiology and cardiology. Here, we combine nanoscale intracellular electrodes with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits to realize a high-fidelity all-electrical electrophysiological imager for parallel intracellular recording at the network level. Our CMOS nanoelectrode array has 1,024 recording/stimulation 'pixels' equipped with vertical nanoelectrodes, and can simultaneously record intracellular membrane potentials from hundreds of connected in vitro neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate that this network-level intracellular recording capability can be used to examine the effect of pharmaceuticals on the delicate dynamics of a cardiomyocyte network, thus opening up new opportunities in tissue-based pharmacological screening for cardiac and neuronal diseases as well as fundamental studies of electrogenic cells and their networks.

  15. Beam imaging sensor

    DOEpatents

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  16. Resolution Properties of a Calcium Tungstate (CaWO4) Screen Coupled to a CMOS Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukou, Vaia; Martini, Niki; Valais, Ioannis; Bakas, Athanasios; Kalyvas, Nektarios; Lavdas, Eleftherios; Fountos, George; Kandarakis, Ioannis; Michail, Christos

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the current work was to assess the resolution properties of a calcium tungstate (CaWO4) screen (screen coating thickness: 50.09 mg/cm2, actual thickness: 167.2 μm) coupled to a high resolution complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) digital imaging sensor. A 2.7x3.6 cm2 CaWO4 sample was extracted from an Agfa Curix universal screen and was coupled directly with the active area of the active pixel sensor (APS) CMOS sensor. Experiments were performed following the new IEC 62220-1-1:2015 International Standard, using an RQA-5 beam quality. Resolution was assessed in terms of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), using the slanted-edge method. The CaWO4/CMOS detector configuration was found with linear response, in the exposure range under investigation. The final MTF was obtained through averaging the oversampled edge spread function (ESF), using a custom-made software developed by our team, according to the IEC 62220-1-1:2015. Considering the renewed interest in calcium tungstate for various applications, along with the resolution results of this work, CaWO4 could be also considered for use in X-ray imaging devices such as charged-coupled devices (CCD) and CMOS.

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of a Micro Methanol Sensor Using the CMOS-MEMS Technique.

    PubMed

    Fong, Chien-Fu; Dai, Ching-Liang; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2015-10-23

    A methanol microsensor integrated with a micro heater manufactured using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technique was presented. The sensor has a capability of detecting low concentration methanol gas. Structure of the sensor is composed of interdigitated electrodes, a sensitive film and a heater. The heater located under the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to provide a working temperature to the sensitive film. The sensitive film prepared by the sol-gel method is tin dioxide doped cadmium sulfide, which is deposited on the interdigitated electrodes. To obtain the suspended structure and deposit the sensitive film, the sensor needs a post-CMOS process to etch the sacrificial silicon dioxide layer and silicon substrate. The methanol senor is a resistive type. A readout circuit converts the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. The experimental results show that the methanol sensor has a sensitivity of 0.18 V/ppm.

  18. Fabrication and Characterization of a Micro Methanol Sensor Using the CMOS-MEMS Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Chien-Fu; Dai, Ching-Liang; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2015-01-01

    A methanol microsensor integrated with a micro heater manufactured using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technique was presented. The sensor has a capability of detecting low concentration methanol gas. Structure of the sensor is composed of interdigitated electrodes, a sensitive film and a heater. The heater located under the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to provide a working temperature to the sensitive film. The sensitive film prepared by the sol-gel method is tin dioxide doped cadmium sulfide, which is deposited on the interdigitated electrodes. To obtain the suspended structure and deposit the sensitive film, the sensor needs a post-CMOS process to etch the sacrificial silicon dioxide layer and silicon substrate. The methanol senor is a resistive type. A readout circuit converts the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. The experimental results show that the methanol sensor has a sensitivity of 0.18 V/ppm. PMID:26512671

  19. A CMOS Front-End With Integrated Magnetoresistive Sensors for Biomolecular Recognition Detection Applications.

    PubMed

    Costa, Tiago; Cardoso, Filipe A; Germano, Jose; Freitas, Paulo P; Piedade, Moises S

    2017-10-01

    The development of giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors has demonstrated significant advantages in nanomedicine, particularly for ultrasensitive point-of-care diagnostics. To this end, the detection system is required to be compact, portable, and low power consuming at the same time that a maximum signal to noise ratio is maintained. This paper reports a CMOS front-end with integrated magnetoresistive sensors for biomolecular recognition detection applications. Based on the characterization of the GMR sensor's signal and noise, CMOS building blocks (i.e., current source, multiplexers, and preamplifier) were designed targeting a negligible noise when compared with the GMR sensor's noise and a low power consumption. The CMOS front-end was fabricated using AMS [Formula: see text] technology and the magnetoresistive sensors were post-fabricated on top of the CMOS chip with high yield ( [Formula: see text]). Due to its low circuit noise (16 [Formula: see text]) and overall equivalent magnetic noise ([Formula: see text]), the full system was able to detect 250 nm magnetic nanoparticles with a circuit imposed signal-to-noise ratio degradation of only -1.4 dB. Furthermore, the low power consumption (6.5 mW) and small dimensions ([Formula: see text] ) of the presented solution guarantees the portability of the detection system allowing its usage at the point-of-care.

  20. Pre-Clinical Tests of an Integrated CMOS Biomolecular Sensor for Cardiac Diseases Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jen-Kuang; Wang, I-Shun; Huang, Chi-Hsien; Chen, Yih-Fan; Huang, Nien-Tsu; Lin, Chih-Ting

    2017-11-26

    Coronary artery disease and its related complications pose great threats to human health. In this work, we aim to clinically evaluate a CMOS field-effect biomolecular sensor for cardiac biomarkers, cardiac-specific troponin-I (cTnI), N -terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The CMOS biosensor is implemented via a standard commercialized 0.35 μm CMOS process. To validate the sensing characteristics, in buffer conditions, the developed CMOS biosensor has identified the detection limits of IL-6, cTnI, and NT-proBNP as being 45 pM, 32 pM, and 32 pM, respectively. In clinical serum conditions, furthermore, the developed CMOS biosensor performs a good correlation with an enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) obtained from a hospital central laboratory. Based on this work, the CMOS field-effect biosensor poses good potential for accomplishing the needs of a point-of-care testing (POCT) system for heart disease diagnosis.

  1. Nanophotonic Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin; Hu, Xin; Wen, Long; Yu, Yan; Cumming, David R S

    2016-09-01

    The increasing miniaturization and resolution of image sensors bring challenges to conventional optical elements such as spectral filters and polarizers, the properties of which are determined mainly by the materials used, including dye polymers. Recent developments in spectral filtering and optical manipulating techniques based on nanophotonics have opened up the possibility of an alternative method to control light spectrally and spatially. By integrating these technologies into image sensors, it will become possible to achieve high compactness, improved process compatibility, robust stability and tunable functionality. In this Review, recent representative achievements on nanophotonic image sensors are presented and analyzed including image sensors with nanophotonic color filters and polarizers, metamaterial-based THz image sensors, filter-free nanowire image sensors and nanostructured-based multispectral image sensors. This novel combination of cutting edge photonics research and well-developed commercial products may not only lead to an important application of nanophotonics but also offer great potential for next generation image sensors beyond Moore's Law expectations. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Nanophotonic Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Wen, Long; Yu, Yan; Cumming, David R. S.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing miniaturization and resolution of image sensors bring challenges to conventional optical elements such as spectral filters and polarizers, the properties of which are determined mainly by the materials used, including dye polymers. Recent developments in spectral filtering and optical manipulating techniques based on nanophotonics have opened up the possibility of an alternative method to control light spectrally and spatially. By integrating these technologies into image sensors, it will become possible to achieve high compactness, improved process compatibility, robust stability and tunable functionality. In this Review, recent representative achievements on nanophotonic image sensors are presented and analyzed including image sensors with nanophotonic color filters and polarizers, metamaterial‐based THz image sensors, filter‐free nanowire image sensors and nanostructured‐based multispectral image sensors. This novel combination of cutting edge photonics research and well‐developed commercial products may not only lead to an important application of nanophotonics but also offer great potential for next generation image sensors beyond Moore's Law expectations. PMID:27239941

  3. Low-Power RF SOI-CMOS Technology for Distributed Sensor Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dogan, Numan S.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this work is to design and develop Low-Power RF SOI-CMOS Technology for Distributed Sensor Networks. We briefly report on the accomplishments in this work. We also list the impact of this work on graduate student research training/involvement.

  4. Large CMOS imager using hadamard transform based multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; Wadsworth, Mark V.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a concept design for a large (10k x 10k) CMOS imaging array whose elements are grouped in small subarrays with N pixels in each. The subarrays are code-division multiplexed using the Hadamard Transform (HT) based encoding. The Hadamard code improves the signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio to the reference of the read-out amplifier by a factor of N^1/2. This way of grouping pixels reduces the number of hybridization bumps by N. A single chip layout has been designed and the architecture of the imager has been developed to accommodate the HT base multiplexing into the existing CMOS technology. The imager architecture allows for a trade-off between the speed and the sensitivity. The envisioned imager would operate at a speed >100 fps with the pixel noise < 20 e-. The power dissipation would be 100 pW/pixe1. The combination of the large format, high speed, high sensitivity and low power dissipation can be very attractive for space reconnaissance applications.

  5. Onboard Image Processing System for Hyperspectral Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hihara, Hiroki; Moritani, Kotaro; Inoue, Masao; Hoshi, Yoshihiro; Iwasaki, Akira; Takada, Jun; Inada, Hitomi; Suzuki, Makoto; Seki, Taeko; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Tanii, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Onboard image processing systems for a hyperspectral sensor have been developed in order to maximize image data transmission efficiency for large volume and high speed data downlink capacity. Since more than 100 channels are required for hyperspectral sensors on Earth observation satellites, fast and small-footprint lossless image compression capability is essential for reducing the size and weight of a sensor system. A fast lossless image compression algorithm has been developed, and is implemented in the onboard correction circuitry of sensitivity and linearity of Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) sensors in order to maximize the compression ratio. The employed image compression method is based on Fast, Efficient, Lossless Image compression System (FELICS), which is a hierarchical predictive coding method with resolution scaling. To improve FELICS’s performance of image decorrelation and entropy coding, we apply a two-dimensional interpolation prediction and adaptive Golomb-Rice coding. It supports progressive decompression using resolution scaling while still maintaining superior performance measured as speed and complexity. Coding efficiency and compression speed enlarge the effective capacity of signal transmission channels, which lead to reducing onboard hardware by multiplexing sensor signals into a reduced number of compression circuits. The circuitry is embedded into the data formatter of the sensor system without adding size, weight, power consumption, and fabrication cost. PMID:26404281

  6. A highly sensitive CMOS digital Hall sensor for low magnetic field applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue; Pan, Hong-Bin; He, Shu-Zhuan; Li, Li

    2012-01-01

    Integrated CMOS Hall sensors have been widely used to measure magnetic fields. However, they are difficult to work with in a low magnetic field environment due to their low sensitivity and large offset. This paper describes a highly sensitive digital Hall sensor fabricated in 0.18 μm high voltage CMOS technology for low field applications. The sensor consists of a switched cross-shaped Hall plate and a novel signal conditioner. It effectively eliminates offset and low frequency 1/f noise by applying a dynamic quadrature offset cancellation technique. The measured results show the optimal Hall plate achieves a high current related sensitivity of about 310 V/AT. The whole sensor has a remarkable ability to measure a minimum ± 2 mT magnetic field and output a digital Hall signal in a wide temperature range from -40 °C to 120 °C.

  7. System-in Package of Integrated Humidity Sensor Using CMOS-MEMS Technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Pil

    2015-10-01

    Temperature/humidity microchips with micropump were fabricated using a CMOS-MEMS process and combined with ZigBee modules to implement a sensor system in package (SIP) for a ubiquitous sensor network (USN) and/or a wireless communication system. The current of a diode temperature sensor to temperature and a normalized current of FET humidity sensor to relative humidity showed linear characteristics, respectively, and the use of the micropump has enabled a faster response. A wireless reception module using the same protocol as that in transmission systems processed the received data within 10 m and showed temperature and humidity values in the display.

  8. Nanometric Integrated Temperature and Thermal Sensors in CMOS-SOI Technology

    PubMed Central

    Malits, Maria; Nemirovsky, Yael

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews and compares the thermal and noise characterization of CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) SOI (Silicon on insulator) transistors and lateral diodes used as temperature and thermal sensors. DC analysis of the measured sensors and the experimental results in a broad (300 K up to 550 K) temperature range are presented. It is shown that both sensors require small chip area, have low power consumption, and exhibit linearity and high sensitivity over the entire temperature range. However, the diode’s sensitivity to temperature variations in CMOS-SOI technology is highly dependent on the diode’s perimeter; hence, a careful calibration for each fabrication process is needed. In contrast, the short thermal time constant of the electrons in the transistor’s channel enables measuring the instantaneous heating of the channel and to determine the local true temperature of the transistor. This allows accurate “on-line” temperature sensing while no additional calibration is needed. In addition, the noise measurements indicate that the diode’s small area and perimeter causes a high 1/f noise in all measured bias currents. This is a severe drawback for the sensor accuracy when using the sensor as a thermal sensor; hence, CMOS-SOI transistors are a better choice for temperature sensing. PMID:28758932

  9. Nanometric Integrated Temperature and Thermal Sensors in CMOS-SOI Technology.

    PubMed

    Malits, Maria; Nemirovsky, Yael

    2017-07-29

    This paper reviews and compares the thermal and noise characterization of CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) SOI (Silicon on insulator) transistors and lateral diodes used as temperature and thermal sensors. DC analysis of the measured sensors and the experimental results in a broad (300 K up to 550 K) temperature range are presented. It is shown that both sensors require small chip area, have low power consumption, and exhibit linearity and high sensitivity over the entire temperature range. However, the diode's sensitivity to temperature variations in CMOS-SOI technology is highly dependent on the diode's perimeter; hence, a careful calibration for each fabrication process is needed. In contrast, the short thermal time constant of the electrons in the transistor's channel enables measuring the instantaneous heating of the channel and to determine the local true temperature of the transistor. This allows accurate "on-line" temperature sensing while no additional calibration is needed. In addition, the noise measurements indicate that the diode's small area and perimeter causes a high 1/ f noise in all measured bias currents. This is a severe drawback for the sensor accuracy when using the sensor as a thermal sensor; hence, CMOS-SOI transistors are a better choice for temperature sensing.

  10. Study of prototypes of LFoundry active CMOS pixels sensors for the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigani, L.; Bortoletto, D.; Ambroz, L.; Plackett, R.; Hemperek, T.; Rymaszewski, P.; Wang, T.; Krueger, H.; Hirono, T.; Caicedo Sierra, I.; Wermes, N.; Barbero, M.; Bhat, S.; Breugnon, P.; Chen, Z.; Godiot, S.; Pangaud, P.; Rozanov, A.

    2018-02-01

    Current high energy particle physics experiments at the LHC use hybrid silicon detectors, in both pixel and strip configurations, for their inner trackers. These detectors have proven to be very reliable and performant. Nevertheless, there is great interest in depleted CMOS silicon detectors, which could achieve a similar performance at lower cost of production. We present recent developments of this technology in the framework of the ATLAS CMOS demonstrator project. In particular, studies of two active sensors from LFoundry, CCPD_LF and LFCPIX, are shown.

  11. An SOI CMOS-Based Multi-Sensor MEMS Chip for Fluidic Applications.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Mohtashim; Haneef, Ibraheem; Akhtar, Suhail; Rafiq, Muhammad Aftab; De Luca, Andrea; Ali, Syed Zeeshan; Udrea, Florin

    2016-11-04

    An SOI CMOS multi-sensor MEMS chip, which can simultaneously measure temperature, pressure and flow rate, has been reported. The multi-sensor chip has been designed keeping in view the requirements of researchers interested in experimental fluid dynamics. The chip contains ten thermodiodes (temperature sensors), a piezoresistive-type pressure sensor and nine hot film-based flow rate sensors fabricated within the oxide layer of the SOI wafers. The silicon dioxide layers with embedded sensors are relieved from the substrate as membranes with the help of a single DRIE step after chip fabrication from a commercial CMOS foundry. Very dense sensor packing per unit area of the chip has been enabled by using technologies/processes like SOI, CMOS and DRIE. Independent apparatuses were used for the characterization of each sensor. With a drive current of 10 µA-0.1 µA, the thermodiodes exhibited sensitivities of 1.41 mV/°C-1.79 mV/°C in the range 20-300 °C. The sensitivity of the pressure sensor was 0.0686 mV/(V excit kPa) with a non-linearity of 0.25% between 0 and 69 kPa above ambient pressure. Packaged in a micro-channel, the flow rate sensor has a linearized sensitivity of 17.3 mV/(L/min) -0.1 in the tested range of 0-4.7 L/min. The multi-sensor chip can be used for simultaneous measurement of fluid pressure, temperature and flow rate in fluidic experiments and aerospace/automotive/biomedical/process industries.

  12. An SOI CMOS-Based Multi-Sensor MEMS Chip for Fluidic Applications †

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Mohtashim; Haneef, Ibraheem; Akhtar, Suhail; Rafiq, Muhammad Aftab; De Luca, Andrea; Ali, Syed Zeeshan; Udrea, Florin

    2016-01-01

    An SOI CMOS multi-sensor MEMS chip, which can simultaneously measure temperature, pressure and flow rate, has been reported. The multi-sensor chip has been designed keeping in view the requirements of researchers interested in experimental fluid dynamics. The chip contains ten thermodiodes (temperature sensors), a piezoresistive-type pressure sensor and nine hot film-based flow rate sensors fabricated within the oxide layer of the SOI wafers. The silicon dioxide layers with embedded sensors are relieved from the substrate as membranes with the help of a single DRIE step after chip fabrication from a commercial CMOS foundry. Very dense sensor packing per unit area of the chip has been enabled by using technologies/processes like SOI, CMOS and DRIE. Independent apparatuses were used for the characterization of each sensor. With a drive current of 10 µA–0.1 µA, the thermodiodes exhibited sensitivities of 1.41 mV/°C–1.79 mV/°C in the range 20–300 °C. The sensitivity of the pressure sensor was 0.0686 mV/(Vexcit kPa) with a non-linearity of 0.25% between 0 and 69 kPa above ambient pressure. Packaged in a micro-channel, the flow rate sensor has a linearized sensitivity of 17.3 mV/(L/min)−0.1 in the tested range of 0–4.7 L/min. The multi-sensor chip can be used for simultaneous measurement of fluid pressure, temperature and flow rate in fluidic experiments and aerospace/automotive/biomedical/process industries. PMID:27827904

  13. A Tactile Sensor Network System Using a Multiple Sensor Platform with a Dedicated CMOS-LSI for Robot Applications †

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chenzhong; Tanaka, Shuji; Nakayama, Takahiro; Hata, Yoshiyuki; Bartley, Travis; Muroyama, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    Robot tactile sensation can enhance human–robot communication in terms of safety, reliability and accuracy. The final goal of our project is to widely cover a robot body with a large number of tactile sensors, which has significant advantages such as accurate object recognition, high sensitivity and high redundancy. In this study, we developed a multi-sensor system with dedicated Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) Large-Scale Integration (LSI) circuit chips (referred to as “sensor platform LSI”) as a framework of a serial bus-based tactile sensor network system. The sensor platform LSI supports three types of sensors: an on-chip temperature sensor, off-chip capacitive and resistive tactile sensors, and communicates with a relay node via a bus line. The multi-sensor system was first constructed on a printed circuit board to evaluate basic functions of the sensor platform LSI, such as capacitance-to-digital and resistance-to-digital conversion. Then, two kinds of external sensors, nine sensors in total, were connected to two sensor platform LSIs, and temperature, capacitive and resistive sensing data were acquired simultaneously. Moreover, we fabricated flexible printed circuit cables to demonstrate the multi-sensor system with 15 sensor platform LSIs operating simultaneously, which showed a more realistic implementation in robots. In conclusion, the multi-sensor system with up to 15 sensor platform LSIs on a bus line supporting temperature, capacitive and resistive sensing was successfully demonstrated. PMID:29061954

  14. A Tactile Sensor Network System Using a Multiple Sensor Platform with a Dedicated CMOS-LSI for Robot Applications.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chenzhong; Tanaka, Shuji; Nakayama, Takahiro; Hata, Yoshiyuki; Bartley, Travis; Nonomura, Yutaka; Muroyama, Masanori

    2017-08-28

    Robot tactile sensation can enhance human-robot communication in terms of safety, reliability and accuracy. The final goal of our project is to widely cover a robot body with a large number of tactile sensors, which has significant advantages such as accurate object recognition, high sensitivity and high redundancy. In this study, we developed a multi-sensor system with dedicated Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) Large-Scale Integration (LSI) circuit chips (referred to as "sensor platform LSI") as a framework of a serial bus-based tactile sensor network system. The sensor platform LSI supports three types of sensors: an on-chip temperature sensor, off-chip capacitive and resistive tactile sensors, and communicates with a relay node via a bus line. The multi-sensor system was first constructed on a printed circuit board to evaluate basic functions of the sensor platform LSI, such as capacitance-to-digital and resistance-to-digital conversion. Then, two kinds of external sensors, nine sensors in total, were connected to two sensor platform LSIs, and temperature, capacitive and resistive sensing data were acquired simultaneously. Moreover, we fabricated flexible printed circuit cables to demonstrate the multi-sensor system with 15 sensor platform LSIs operating simultaneously, which showed a more realistic implementation in robots. In conclusion, the multi-sensor system with up to 15 sensor platform LSIs on a bus line supporting temperature, capacitive and resistive sensing was successfully demonstrated.

  15. Design and Characterization of a Built-In CMOS TID Smart Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustin, Javier; Gil, Carlos; Lopez-Vallejo, Marisa; Ituero, Pablo

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a total ionization dose (TID) sensor that presents the following advantages: it is a digital sensor able to be integrated in CMOS circuits; it has a configurable sensitivity that allows radiation doses ranging from very low to high levels; its interface helps to integrate this design in a multidisciplinary sensor network; and it is self-timed, hence it does not need a clock signal. We designed, implemented and manufactured the sensor in a 0.35 μm CMOS commercial technology. It was irradiated with a 60Co source. This test was used to characterize the sensor in terms of the radiation response up to 575 krad. After irradiation, we monitored the sensor to control charge redistribution and annealing effects for 80 hours. We also exposed our design to meticulous temperature analysis from 0 to 50°C and we studied the acceleration on the annealing phenomena due to high temperatures. Sensor calibration takes into account the results of all tests. Finally we propose to use this sensor in a self-recovery system. The sensor manufactured in this work has an area of 0.047 mm 2, of which 22% is dedicated to measuring radiation. Its energy per conversion is 463 pJ.

  16. Monolithic integration of GMR sensors for standard CMOS-IC current sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marcellis, A.; Reig, C.; Cubells-Beltrán, M.-D.; Madrenas, J.; Santos, J. D.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we report on the development of Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors for off-line current measurements in standard integrated circuits. An ASIC has been specifically designed and fabricated in the well-known AMS-0.35 μm CMOS technology, including the electronic circuitry for sensor interfacing. It implements an oscillating circuit performing a voltage-to-frequency conversion. Subsequently, a fully CMOS-compatible low temperature post-process has been applied for depositing the GMR sensing devices in a full-bridge configuration onto the buried current straps. Sensitivity and resolution of these sensors have been investigated achieving experimental results that show a detection sensitivity of about 100 Hz/mA, with a resolution of about 5 μA.

  17. Micromachined Thin-Film Sensors for SOI-CMOS Co-Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laconte, Jean; Flandre, D.; Raskin, Jean-Pierre

    Co-integration of sensors with their associated electronics on a single silicon chip may provide many significant benefits regarding performance, reliability, miniaturization and process simplicity without significantly increasing the total cost. Micromachined Thin-Film Sensors for SOI-CMOS Co-integration covers the challenges and interests and demonstrates the successful co-integration of gas flow sensors on dielectric membrane, with their associated electronics, in CMOS-SOI technology. We firstly investigate the extraction of residual stress in thin layers and in their stacking and the release, in post-processing, of a 1 μm-thick robust and flat dielectric multilayered membrane using Tetramethyl Ammonium Hydroxide (TMAH) silicon micromachining solution.

  18. A novel input-parasitic compensation technique for a nanopore-based CMOS DNA detection sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsuk

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a novel input-parasitic compensation (IPC) technique for a nanopore-based complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) DNA detection sensor. A resistive-feedback transimpedance amplifier is typically adopted as the headstage of a DNA detection sensor to amplify the minute ionic currents generated from a nanopore and convert them to a readable voltage range for digitization. But, parasitic capacitances arising from the headstage input and the nanopore often cause headstage saturation during nanopore sensing, thereby resulting in significant DNA data loss. To compensate for the unwanted saturation, in this work, we propose an area-efficient and automated IPC technique, customized for a low-noise DNA detection sensor, fabricated using a 0.35- μm CMOS process; we demonstrated this prototype in a benchtop test using an α-hemolysin ( α-HL) protein nanopore.

  19. Respiration detection chip with integrated temperature-insensitive MEMS sensors and CMOS signal processing circuits.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yu-Chen; Chen, Tse-An; Lin, Ren-Yi; Liu, Tin-Hao

    2015-02-01

    An airflow sensing chip, which integrates MEMS sensors with their CMOS signal processing circuits into a single chip, is proposed for respiration detection. Three micro-cantilever-based airflow sensors were designed and fabricated using a 0.35 μm CMOS/MEMS 2P4M mixed-signal polycide process. Two main differences were present among these three designs: they were either metal-covered or metal-free structures, and had either bridge-type or fixed-type reference resistors. The performances of these sensors were measured and compared, including temperature sensitivity and airflow sensitivity. Based on the measured results, the metal-free structure with fixed-type reference resistors is recommended for use, because it has the highest airflow sensitivity and also can effectively reduce the output voltage drift caused by temperature change.

  20. Testbeam results of irradiated ams H18 HV-CMOS pixel sensor prototypes

    DOE PAGES

    Benoit, M.; Braccini, S.; Casse, G.; ...

    2018-02-08

    HV-CMOS pixel sensors are a promising option for the tracker upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, as well as for other future tracking applications in which large areas are to be instrumented with radiation-tolerant silicon pixel sensors. We present results of testbeam characterisations of the 4 th generation of Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detectors (CCPDv4) produced with the ams H18 HV-CMOS process that have been irradiated with different particles (reactor neutrons and 18 MeV protons) to fluences between 1×10 14 and 5×10 15 1–MeV– n eq. The sensors were glued to ATLAS FE-I4 pixel readout chips and measured atmore » the CERN SPS H8 beamline using the FE-I4 beam telescope. Results for all fluences are very encouraging with all hit efficiencies being better than 97% for bias voltages of 85 V. The sample irradiated to a fluence of 1×10 15 neq—a relevant value for a large volume of the upgraded tracker—exhibited 99.7% average hit efficiency. Furthermore, the results give strong evidence for the radiation tolerance of HV-CMOS sensors and their suitability as sensors for the experimental HL-LHC upgrades and future large-area silicon-based tracking detectors in high-radiation environments.« less

  1. Characterisation of capacitively coupled HV/HR-CMOS sensor chips for the CLIC vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremastiotis, I.

    2017-12-01

    The capacitive coupling between an active sensor and a readout ASIC has been considered in the framework of the CLIC vertex detector study. The CLICpix Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detector (C3PD) is a High-Voltage CMOS sensor chip produced in a commercial 180 nm HV-CMOS process for this purpose. The sensor was designed to be connected to the CLICpix2 readout chip. It therefore matches the dimensions of the readout chip, featuring a matrix of 128×128 square pixels with 25μm pitch. The sensor chip has been produced with the standard value for the substrate resistivity (~20 Ωcm) and it has been characterised in standalone testing mode, before receiving and testing capacitively coupled assemblies. The standalone measurement results show a rise time of ~20 ns for a power consumption of 5μW/pixel. Production of the C3PD HV-CMOS sensor chip with higher substrate resistivity wafers (~20, 80, 200 and 1000 Ωcm) is foreseen. The expected benefits of the higher substrate resistivity will be studied using future assemblies with the readout chip.

  2. Testbeam results of irradiated ams H18 HV-CMOS pixel sensor prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, M.; Braccini, S.; Casse, G.

    HV-CMOS pixel sensors are a promising option for the tracker upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, as well as for other future tracking applications in which large areas are to be instrumented with radiation-tolerant silicon pixel sensors. We present results of testbeam characterisations of the 4 th generation of Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detectors (CCPDv4) produced with the ams H18 HV-CMOS process that have been irradiated with different particles (reactor neutrons and 18 MeV protons) to fluences between 1×10 14 and 5×10 15 1–MeV– n eq. The sensors were glued to ATLAS FE-I4 pixel readout chips and measured atmore » the CERN SPS H8 beamline using the FE-I4 beam telescope. Results for all fluences are very encouraging with all hit efficiencies being better than 97% for bias voltages of 85 V. The sample irradiated to a fluence of 1×10 15 neq—a relevant value for a large volume of the upgraded tracker—exhibited 99.7% average hit efficiency. Furthermore, the results give strong evidence for the radiation tolerance of HV-CMOS sensors and their suitability as sensors for the experimental HL-LHC upgrades and future large-area silicon-based tracking detectors in high-radiation environments.« less

  3. 3-Axis Fully-Integrated Capacitive Tactile Sensor with Flip-Bonded CMOS on LTCC Interposer.

    PubMed

    Asano, Sho; Muroyama, Masanori; Nakayama, Takahiro; Hata, Yoshiyuki; Nonomura, Yutaka; Tanaka, Shuji

    2017-10-25

    This paper reports a 3-axis fully integrated differential capacitive tactile sensor surface-mountable on a bus line. The sensor integrates a flip-bonded complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) with capacitive sensing circuits on a low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) interposer with Au through vias by Au-Au thermo-compression bonding. The CMOS circuit and bonding pads on the sensor backside were electrically connected through Au bumps and the LTCC interposer, and the differential capacitive gap was formed by an Au sealing frame. A diaphragm for sensing 3-axis force was formed in the CMOS substrate. The dimensions of the completed sensor are 2.5 mm in width, 2.5 mm in length, and 0.66 mm in thickness. The fabricated sensor output coded 3-axis capacitive sensing data according to applied 3-axis force by three-dimensional (3D)-printed pins. The measured sensitivity was as high as over 34 Count/mN for normal force and 14 to 15 Count/mN for shear force with small noise, which corresponds to less than 1 mN. The hysteresis and the average cross-sensitivity were also found to be less than 2% full scale and 11%, respectively.

  4. Testbeam results of irradiated ams H18 HV-CMOS pixel sensor prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, M.; Braccini, S.; Casse, G.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Di Bello, F. A.; Ferrere, D.; Golling, T.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Iacobucci, G.; Kiehn, M.; Lanni, F.; Liu, H.; Meng, L.; Merlassino, C.; Miucci, A.; Muenstermann, D.; Nessi, M.; Okawa, H.; Perić, I.; Rimoldi, M.; Ristić, B.; Barrero Pinto, M. Vicente; Vossebeld, J.; Weber, M.; Weston, T.; Wu, W.; Xu, L.; Zaffaroni, E.

    2018-02-01

    HV-CMOS pixel sensors are a promising option for the tracker upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, as well as for other future tracking applications in which large areas are to be instrumented with radiation-tolerant silicon pixel sensors. We present results of testbeam characterisations of the 4th generation of Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detectors (CCPDv4) produced with the ams H18 HV-CMOS process that have been irradiated with different particles (reactor neutrons and 18 MeV protons) to fluences between 1× 1014 and 5× 1015 1-MeV- neq. The sensors were glued to ATLAS FE-I4 pixel readout chips and measured at the CERN SPS H8 beamline using the FE-I4 beam telescope. Results for all fluences are very encouraging with all hit efficiencies being better than 97% for bias voltages of 85 V. The sample irradiated to a fluence of 1× 1015 neq—a relevant value for a large volume of the upgraded tracker—exhibited 99.7% average hit efficiency. The results give strong evidence for the radiation tolerance of HV-CMOS sensors and their suitability as sensors for the experimental HL-LHC upgrades and future large-area silicon-based tracking detectors in high-radiation environments.

  5. Autonomous pedestrian localization technique using CMOS camera sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Chanwoo

    2014-09-01

    We present a pedestrian localization technique that does not need infrastructure. The proposed angle-only measurement method needs specially manufactured shoes. Each shoe has two CMOS cameras and two markers such as LEDs attached on the inward side. The line of sight (LOS) angles towards the two markers on the forward shoe are measured using the two cameras on the other rear shoe. Our simulation results shows that a pedestrian walking down in a shopping mall wearing this device can be accurately guided to the front of a destination store located 100m away, if the floor plan of the mall is available.

  6. Imaging optical sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Walt, David R

    2002-10-01

    Imaging optical fibres have been etched to prepare microwell arrays. These microwells have been loaded with sensing materials such as bead-based sensors and living cells to create high-density sensor arrays. The extremely small sizes and volumes of the wells enable high sensitivity and high information content sensing capabilities.

  7. Organic-on-silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor colour image sensors.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seon-Jeong; Leem, Dong-Seok; Park, Kyung-Bae; Kim, Kyu-Sik; Sul, Sangchul; Na, Kyoungwon; Lee, Gae Hwang; Heo, Chul-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Bulliard, Xavier; Satoh, Ryu-Ichi; Yagi, Tadao; Ro, Takkyun; Im, Dongmo; Jung, Jungkyu; Lee, Myungwon; Lee, Tae-Yon; Han, Moon Gyu; Jin, Yong Wan; Lee, Sangyoon

    2015-01-12

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) colour image sensors are representative examples of light-detection devices. To achieve extremely high resolutions, the pixel sizes of the CMOS image sensors must be reduced to less than a micron, which in turn significantly limits the number of photons that can be captured by each pixel using silicon (Si)-based technology (i.e., this reduction in pixel size results in a loss of sensitivity). Here, we demonstrate a novel and efficient method of increasing the sensitivity and resolution of the CMOS image sensors by superposing an organic photodiode (OPD) onto a CMOS circuit with Si photodiodes, which consequently doubles the light-input surface area of each pixel. To realise this concept, we developed organic semiconductor materials with absorption properties selective to green light and successfully fabricated highly efficient green-light-sensitive OPDs without colour filters. We found that such a top light-receiving OPD, which is selective to specific green wavelengths, demonstrates great potential when combined with a newly designed Si-based CMOS circuit containing only blue and red colour filters. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this state-of-the-art hybrid colour image sensor, we acquired a real full-colour image using a camera that contained the organic-on-Si hybrid CMOS colour image sensor.

  8. Organic-on-silicon complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor colour image sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seon-Jeong; Leem, Dong-Seok; Park, Kyung-Bae; Kim, Kyu-Sik; Sul, Sangchul; Na, Kyoungwon; Lee, Gae Hwang; Heo, Chul-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Bulliard, Xavier; Satoh, Ryu-Ichi; Yagi, Tadao; Ro, Takkyun; Im, Dongmo; Jung, Jungkyu; Lee, Myungwon; Lee, Tae-Yon; Han, Moon Gyu; Jin, Yong Wan; Lee, Sangyoon

    2015-01-01

    Complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) colour image sensors are representative examples of light-detection devices. To achieve extremely high resolutions, the pixel sizes of the CMOS image sensors must be reduced to less than a micron, which in turn significantly limits the number of photons that can be captured by each pixel using silicon (Si)-based technology (i.e., this reduction in pixel size results in a loss of sensitivity). Here, we demonstrate a novel and efficient method of increasing the sensitivity and resolution of the CMOS image sensors by superposing an organic photodiode (OPD) onto a CMOS circuit with Si photodiodes, which consequently doubles the light-input surface area of each pixel. To realise this concept, we developed organic semiconductor materials with absorption properties selective to green light and successfully fabricated highly efficient green-light-sensitive OPDs without colour filters. We found that such a top light-receiving OPD, which is selective to specific green wavelengths, demonstrates great potential when combined with a newly designed Si-based CMOS circuit containing only blue and red colour filters. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this state-of-the-art hybrid colour image sensor, we acquired a real full-colour image using a camera that contained the organic-on-Si hybrid CMOS colour image sensor. PMID:25578322

  9. Three-dimensional cascaded system analysis of a 50 µm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Vassiljev, N; Konstantinidis, A C; Speller, R D; Kanicki, J

    2017-03-07

    High-resolution, low-noise x-ray detectors based on the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been developed and proposed for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this study, we evaluated the three-dimensional (3D) imaging performance of a 50 µm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). The two-dimensional (2D) angle-dependent modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were experimentally characterized and modeled using the cascaded system analysis at oblique incident angles up to 30°. The cascaded system model was extended to the 3D spatial frequency space in combination with the filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction method to calculate the 3D and in-plane MTF, NNPS and DQE parameters. The results demonstrate that the beam obliquity blurs the 2D MTF and DQE in the high spatial frequency range. However, this effect can be eliminated after FBP image reconstruction. In addition, impacts of the image acquisition geometry and detector parameters were evaluated using the 3D cascaded system analysis for DBT. The result shows that a wider projection angle range (e.g.  ±30°) improves the low spatial frequency (below 5 mm -1 ) performance of the CMOS APS detector. In addition, to maintain a high spatial resolution for DBT, a focal spot size of smaller than 0.3 mm should be used. Theoretical analysis suggests that a pixelated scintillator in combination with the 50 µm pixel pitch CMOS APS detector could further improve the 3D image resolution. Finally, the 3D imaging performance of the CMOS APS and an indirect amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistor (TFT) passive pixel sensor (PPS) detector was simulated and compared.

  10. Three-dimensional cascaded system analysis of a 50 µm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Vassiljev, N.; Konstantinidis, A. C.; Speller, R. D.; Kanicki, J.

    2017-03-01

    High-resolution, low-noise x-ray detectors based on the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been developed and proposed for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this study, we evaluated the three-dimensional (3D) imaging performance of a 50 µm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). The two-dimensional (2D) angle-dependent modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were experimentally characterized and modeled using the cascaded system analysis at oblique incident angles up to 30°. The cascaded system model was extended to the 3D spatial frequency space in combination with the filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction method to calculate the 3D and in-plane MTF, NNPS and DQE parameters. The results demonstrate that the beam obliquity blurs the 2D MTF and DQE in the high spatial frequency range. However, this effect can be eliminated after FBP image reconstruction. In addition, impacts of the image acquisition geometry and detector parameters were evaluated using the 3D cascaded system analysis for DBT. The result shows that a wider projection angle range (e.g.  ±30°) improves the low spatial frequency (below 5 mm-1) performance of the CMOS APS detector. In addition, to maintain a high spatial resolution for DBT, a focal spot size of smaller than 0.3 mm should be used. Theoretical analysis suggests that a pixelated scintillator in combination with the 50 µm pixel pitch CMOS APS detector could further improve the 3D image resolution. Finally, the 3D imaging performance of the CMOS APS and an indirect amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistor (TFT) passive pixel sensor (PPS) detector was simulated and compared.

  11. High speed CMOS acquisition system based on FPGA embedded image processing for electro-optical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosu-Hamzescu, Mihnea; Polonschii, Cristina; Oprea, Sergiu; Popescu, Dragos; David, Sorin; Bratu, Dumitru; Gheorghiu, Eugen

    2018-06-01

    Electro-optical measurements, i.e., optical waveguides and plasmonic based electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (P-EIS), are based on the sensitive dependence of refractive index of electro-optical sensors on surface charge density, modulated by an AC electrical field applied to the sensor surface. Recently, P-EIS has emerged as a new analytical tool that can resolve local impedance with high, optical spatial resolution, without using microelectrodes. This study describes a high speed image acquisition and processing system for electro-optical measurements, based on a high speed complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor and a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) board. The FPGA is used to configure CMOS parameters, as well as to receive and locally process the acquired images by performing Fourier analysis for each pixel, deriving the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier coefficients for the AC field frequencies. An AC field generator, for single or multi-sine signals, is synchronized with the high speed acquisition system for phase measurements. The system was successfully used for real-time angle-resolved electro-plasmonic measurements from 30 Hz up to 10 kHz, providing results consistent to ones obtained by a conventional electrical impedance approach. The system was able to detect amplitude variations with a relative variation of ±1%, even for rather low sampling rates per period (i.e., 8 samples per period). The PC (personal computer) acquisition and control software allows synchronized acquisition for multiple FPGA boards, making it also suitable for simultaneous angle-resolved P-EIS imaging.

  12. Design and fabrication of a CMOS-compatible MHP gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Yu, Jun, E-mail: junyu@dlut.edu.cn; Wu, Hao

    2014-03-15

    A novel micro-hotplate (MHP) gas sensor is designed and fabricated with a standard CMOS technology followed by post-CMOS processes. The tungsten plugging between the first and the second metal layer in the CMOS processes is designed as zigzag resistor heaters embedded in the membrane. In the post-CMOS processes, the membrane is released by front-side bulk silicon etching, and excellent adiabatic performance of the sensor is obtained. Pt/Ti electrode films are prepared on the MHP before the coating of the SnO{sub 2} film, which are promising to present better contact stability compared with Al electrodes. Measurements show that at room temperaturemore » in atmosphere, the device has a low power consumption of ∼19 mW and a rapid thermal response of 8 ms for heating up to 300 °C. The tungsten heater exhibits good high temperature stability with a slight fluctuation (<0.3%) in the resistance at an operation temperature of 300 °C under constant heating mode for 336 h, and a satisfactory temperature coefficient of resistance of about 1.9‰/°C.« less

  13. CMOS compatible IR sensors by cytochrome c protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chien-Jen; Su, Guo-Dung

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, due to the progression of the semiconductor industrial, the uncooled Infrared sensor - microbolometer has opened the opportunity for achieving low cost infrared imaging systems for both military and commercial applications. Therefore, various fabrication processes and different materials based microbolometer have been developed sequentially. The cytochrome c (protein) thin film has be reported high temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR), which is related to the performance of microbolometer directly. Hence the superior TCR value will increase the performance of microbolometer. In this paper, we introduced a novel fabrication process using aluminum which is compatible with the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacture Company (TSMC) D35 2P4M process as the main structure material, which benefits the device to integrate with readout integrated circuit (ROIC).The aluminum split structure is suspended by sacrificial layer utilizing the standard photolithography technology and chemical etching. The height and thickness of the structure are already considered. Besides, cytochrome c solutions were ink-jetted onto the aluminum structure by using the inkjet printer, applying precise control of the Infrared absorbing layer. In measurement, incident Infrared radiation can be detected and later the heat can be transmitted to adjacent pads to readout the signal. This approach applies an inexpensive and simple fabrication process and makes the device suitable for integration. In addition, the performance can be further improved with low noise readout circuits.

  14. High-Speed Binary-Output Image Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric; Panicacci, Roger A.; Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Jones, Peter D.

    1996-01-01

    Photodetector outputs digitized by circuitry on same integrated-circuit chip. Developmental special-purpose binary-output image sensor designed to capture up to 1,000 images per second, with resolution greater than 10 to the 6th power pixels per image. Lower-resolution but higher-frame-rate prototype of sensor contains 128 x 128 array of photodiodes on complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit chip. In application for which it is being developed, sensor used to examine helicopter oil to determine whether amount of metal and sand in oil sufficient to warrant replacement.

  15. CMOS minimal array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesick, James; Cheng, John; Bishop, Jeanne; Andrews, James T.; Tower, John; Walker, Jeff; Grygon, Mark; Elliot, Tom

    2006-08-01

    A high performance prototype CMOS imager is introduced. Test data is reviewed for different array formats that utilize 3T photo diode, 5T pinned photo diode and 6T photo gate CMOS pixel architectures. The imager allows several readout modes including progressive scan, snap and windowed operation. The new imager is built on different silicon substrates including very high resistivity epitaxial wafers for deep depletion operation. Data products contained in this paper focus on sensor's read noise, charge capacity, charge transfer efficiency, thermal dark current, RTS dark spikes, QE, pixel cross- talk and on-chip analog circuitry performance.

  16. Integrating Metal-Oxide-Decorated CNT Networks with a CMOS Readout in a Gas Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunjoong; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, Dai-Hong; Perello, David; Park, Young June; Hong, Seong-Hyeon; Yun, Minhee; Kim, Suhwan

    2012-01-01

    We have implemented a tin-oxide-decorated carbon nanotube (CNT) network gas sensor system on a single die. We have also demonstrated the deposition of metallic tin on the CNT network, its subsequent oxidation in air, and the improvement of the lifetime of the sensors. The fabricated array of CNT sensors contains 128 sensor cells for added redundancy and increased accuracy. The read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) was combined with coarse and fine time-to-digital converters to extend its resolution in a power-efficient way. The ROIC is fabricated using a 0.35 μm CMOS process, and the whole sensor system consumes 30 mA at 5 V. The sensor system was successfully tested in the detection of ammonia gas at elevated temperatures. PMID:22736966

  17. Thermal neutron detector based on COTS CMOS imagers and a conversion layer containing Gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Martín; Blostein, Juan Jerónimo; Bessia, Fabricio Alcalde; Tartaglione, Aureliano; Sidelnik, Iván; Haro, Miguel Sofo; Suárez, Sergio; Gimenez, Melisa Lucía; Berisso, Mariano Gómez; Lipovetzky, Jose

    2018-06-01

    In this work we will introduce a novel low cost position sensitive thermal neutron detection technique, based on a Commercial Off The Shelf CMOS image sensor covered with a Gadolinium containing conversion layer. The feasibility of the neutron detection technique implemented in this work has been experimentally demonstrated. A thermal neutron detection efficiency of 11.3% has been experimentally obtained with a conversion layer of 11.6 μm. It was experimentally verified that the thermal neutron detection efficiency of this technique is independent on the intensity of the incident thermal neutron flux, which was confirmed for conversion layers of different thicknesses. Based on the experimental results, a spatial resolution better than 25 μm is expected. This spatial resolution makes the proposed technique specially useful for neutron beam characterization, neutron beam dosimetry, high resolution neutron imaging, and several neutron scattering techniques.

  18. A CMOS One-chip Wireless Camera with Digital Image Transmission Function for Capsule Endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Shinya; Kawahito, Shoji; Terakawa, Susumu

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a one-chip camera device for capsule endoscopes. This experimental chip integrates functional circuits required for capsule endoscopes and digital image transmission function. The integrated functional blocks include an image array, a timing generator, a clock generator, a voltage regulator, a 10b cyclic A/D converter, and a BPSK modulator. It can be operated autonomously with 3 pins (VDD, GND, and DATAOUT). A prototype image sensor chip which has 320x240 effective pixels was fabricated using 0.25μm CMOS image sensor process and the autonomous imaging was demonstrated. The chip size is 4.84mmx4.34mm. With a 2.0 V power supply, the analog part consumes 950μW and the total power consumption at 2 frames per second (fps) is 2.6mW. Error-free image transmission over a distance of 48cm at 2.5Mbps corresponding to 2fps has been succeeded with inductive coupling.

  19. CMOS-MEMS Chemiresistive and Chemicapacitive Chemical Sensor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, Nathan S.

    Integrating chemical sensors with testing electronics is a powerful technique with the potential to lower power and cost and allow for lower system limits of detection. This thesis explores the possibility of creating an integrated sensor system intended to be embedded within respirator cartridges to notify the user that hazardous chemicals will soon leak into the face mask. For a chemical sensor designer, this application is particularly challenging due to the need for a very sensitive and cheap sensor that will be exposed to widely varying environmental conditions during use. An octanethiol-coated gold nanoparticle chemiresistor to detect industrial solvents is developed, focusing on characterizing the environmental stability and limits of detection of the sensor. Since the chemiresistor was found to be highly sensitive to water vapor, a series of highly sensitive humidity sensor topologies were developed, with sensitivities several times previous integrated capacitive humidity sensors achieved. Circuit techniques were then explored to reduce the humidity sensor limits of detection, including the analysis of noise, charge injection, jitter and clock feedthrough in a charge-based capacitance measurement (CBCM) circuit and the design of a low noise Colpitts LC oscillator. The characterization of high resistance gold nanoclusters for capacitive chemical sensing was also performed. In the final section, a preconcentrator, a heater element intended to release a brief concentrated pulse of analate, was developed and tested for the purposes of lowering the system limit of detection.

  20. Delta-Doped Back-Illuminated CMOS Imaging Arrays: Progress and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Jones, Todd J.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Greer, Frank; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Blazejewski, Edward; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report the latest results on our development of delta-doped, thinned, back-illuminated CMOS imaging arrays. As with charge-coupled devices, thinning and back-illumination are essential to the development of high performance CMOS imaging arrays. Problems with back surface passivation have emerged as critical to the prospects for incorporating CMOS imaging arrays into high performance scientific instruments, just as they did for CCDs over twenty years ago. In the early 1990's, JPL developed delta-doped CCDs, in which low temperature molecular beam epitaxy was used to form an ideal passivation layer on the silicon back surface. Comprising only a few nanometers of highly-doped epitaxial silicon, delta-doping achieves the stability and uniformity that are essential for high performance imaging and spectroscopy. Delta-doped CCDs were shown to have high, stable, and uniform quantum efficiency across the entire spectral range from the extreme ultraviolet through the near infrared. JPL has recently bump-bonded thinned, delta-doped CMOS imaging arrays to a CMOS readout, and demonstrated imaging. Delta-doped CMOS devices exhibit the high quantum efficiency that has become the standard for scientific-grade CCDs. Together with new circuit designs for low-noise readout currently under development, delta-doping expands the potential scientific applications of CMOS imaging arrays, and brings within reach important new capabilities, such as fast, high-sensitivity imaging with parallel readout and real-time signal processing. It remains to demonstrate manufacturability of delta-doped CMOS imaging arrays. To that end, JPL has acquired a new silicon MBE and ancillary equipment for delta-doping wafers up to 200mm in diameter, and is now developing processes for high-throughput, high yield delta-doping of fully-processed wafers with CCD and CMOS imaging devices.

  1. Differential wide temperature range CMOS interface circuit for capacitive MEMS pressure sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yucai; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P

    2015-02-12

    We describe a Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) differential interface circuit for capacitive Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) pressure sensors that is functional over a wide temperature range between -55 °C and 225 °C. The circuit is implemented using IBM 0.13 μm CMOS technology with 2.5 V power supply. A constant-gm biasing technique is used to mitigate performance degradation at high temperatures. The circuit offers the flexibility to interface with MEMS sensors with a wide range of the steady-state capacitance values from 0.5 pF to 10 pF. Simulation results show that the circuitry has excellent linearity and stability over the wide temperature range. Experimental results confirm that the temperature effects on the circuitry are small, with an overall linearity error around 2%.

  2. Differential Wide Temperature Range CMOS Interface Circuit for Capacitive MEMS Pressure Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yucai; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) differential interface circuit for capacitive Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) pressure sensors that is functional over a wide temperature range between −55 °C and 225 °C. The circuit is implemented using IBM 0.13 μm CMOS technology with 2.5 V power supply. A constant-gm biasing technique is used to mitigate performance degradation at high temperatures. The circuit offers the flexibility to interface with MEMS sensors with a wide range of the steady-state capacitance values from 0.5 pF to 10 pF. Simulation results show that the circuitry has excellent linearity and stability over the wide temperature range. Experimental results confirm that the temperature effects on the circuitry are small, with an overall linearity error around 2%. PMID:25686312

  3. Use and imaging performance of CMOS flat panel imager with LiF/ZnS(Ag) and Gadox scintillation screens for neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, B. K.; kim, J. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Sim, C.; Cho, G.; Lee, D. H.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2011-01-01

    In digital neutron radiography system, a thermal neutron imaging detector based on neutron-sensitive scintillating screens with CMOS(complementary metal oxide semiconductor) flat panel imager is introduced for non-destructive testing (NDT) application. Recently, large area CMOS APS (active-pixel sensor) in conjunction with scintillation films has been widely used in many digital X-ray imaging applications. Instead of typical imaging detectors such as image plates, cooled-CCD cameras and amorphous silicon flat panel detectors in combination with scintillation screens, we tried to apply a scintillator-based CMOS APS to neutron imaging detection systems for high resolution neutron radiography. In this work, two major Gd2O2S:Tb and 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillation screens with various thickness were fabricated by a screen printing method. These neutron converter screens consist of a dispersion of Gd2O2S:Tb and 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillating particles in acrylic binder. These scintillating screens coupled-CMOS flat panel imager with 25x50mm2 active area and 48μm pixel pitch was used for neutron radiography. Thermal neutron flux with 6x106n/cm2/s was utilized at the NRF facility of HANARO in KAERI. The neutron imaging characterization of the used detector was investigated in terms of relative light output, linearity and spatial resolution in detail. The experimental results of scintillating screen-based CMOS flat panel detectors demonstrate possibility of high sensitive and high spatial resolution imaging in neutron radiography system.

  4. A CMOS Luminescence Intensity and Lifetime Dual Sensor Based on Multicycle Charge Modulation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guoqing; Sonkusale, Sameer R

    2018-06-01

    Luminescence plays an important role in many scientific and industrial applications. This paper proposes a novel complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) sensor chip that can realize both luminescence intensity and lifetime sensing. To enable high sensitivity, we propose parasitic insensitive multicycle charge modulation scheme for low-light lifetime extraction benefiting from simplicity, accuracy, and compatibility with deeply scaled CMOS process. The designed in-pixel capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) based structure is able to capture the weak luminescence-induced voltage signal by accumulating photon-generated charges in 25 discrete gated 10-ms time windows and 10-μs pulsewidth. A pinned photodiode on chip with 1.04 pA dark current is utilized for luminescence detection. The proposed CTIA-based circuitry can achieve 2.1-mV/(nW/cm 2 ) responsivity and 4.38-nW/cm 2 resolution at 630 nm wavelength for intensity measurement and 45-ns resolution for lifetime measurement. The sensor chip is employed for measuring time constants and luminescence lifetimes of an InGaN-based white light-emitting diode at different wavelengths. In addition, we demonstrate accurate measurement of the lifetime of an oxygen sensitive chromophore with sensitivity to oxygen concentration of 7.5%/ppm and 6%/ppm in both intensity and lifetime domain. This CMOS-enabled oxygen sensor was then employed to test water quality from different sources (tap water, lakes, and rivers).

  5. Flow sensor based on monolithic integration of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and CMOS circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckziegel, S.; Kreye, D.; Puegner, T.; Vogel, U.; Scholles, M.; Grillberger, C.; Fehse, K.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we present an optoelectronic integrated circuit (OEIC) based on monolithic integration of organic lightemitting diodes (OLEDs) and CMOS technology. By the use of integrated circuits, photodetectors and highly efficient OLEDs on the same silicon chip, novel OEICs with combined sensors and actuating elements can be realized. The OLEDs are directly deposited on the CMOS top metal. The metal layer serves as OLED bottom electrode and determines the bright area. Furthermore, the area below the OLED electrodes can be used for integrated circuits. The monolithic integration of actuators, sensors and electronics on a common silicon substrate brings significant advantages in most sensory applications. The developed OEIC combines three different types of sensors: a reflective sensor, a color sensor and a particle flow sensor and is configured with an orange (597nm) emitting p-i-n OLED. We describe the architecture of such a monolithic OEIC and demonstrate a method to determine the velocity of a fluid being conveyed pneumatically in a transparent capillary. The integrated OLEDs illuminate the capillary with the flowing fluid. The fluid has a random reflection profile. Depending on the velocity and a random contrast difference, more or less light is reflected back to the substrate. The integrated photodiodes located at different fixed points detect the reflected light and using crosscorrelation, the velocity is calculated from the time in which contrast differences move over a fixed distance.

  6. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Star Tracker with Regional Electronic Shutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Pain, Bedabrata; Staller, Craig; Clark, Christopher; Fossum, Eric

    1996-01-01

    The guidance system in a spacecraft determines spacecraft attitude by matching an observed star field to a star catalog....An APS(active pixel sensor)-based system can reduce mass and power consumption and radiation effects compared to a CCD(charge-coupled device)-based system...This paper reports an APS (active pixel sensor) with locally variable times, achieved through individual pixel reset (IPR).

  7. A sub-nJ CMOS ECG classifier for wireless smart sensor.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Paul; Pallas, Remi; Lahuec, Cyril; Arzel, Matthieu; Seguin, Fabrice

    2017-07-01

    Body area sensor networks hold the promise of more efficient and cheaper medical care services through the constant monitoring of physiological markers such as heart beats. Continuously transmitting the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal requires most of the wireless ECG sensor energy budget. This paper presents the analog implantation of a classifier for ECG signals that can be embedded onto a sensor. The classifier is a sparse neural associative memory. It is implemented using the ST 65 nm CMOS technology and requires only 234 pJ per classification while achieving a 93.6% classification accuracy. The energy requirement is 6 orders of magnitude lower than a digital accelerator that performs a similar task. The lifespan of the resulting sensor is 191 times as large as that of a sensor sending all the data.

  8. Image acquisition system using on sensor compressed sampling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Pravir Singh; Choi, Gwan Seong

    2018-01-01

    Advances in CMOS technology have made high-resolution image sensors possible. These image sensors pose significant challenges in terms of the amount of raw data generated, energy efficiency, and frame rate. This paper presents a design methodology for an imaging system and a simplified image sensor pixel design to be used in the system so that the compressed sensing (CS) technique can be implemented easily at the sensor level. This results in significant energy savings as it not only cuts the raw data rate but also reduces transistor count per pixel; decreases pixel size; increases fill factor; simplifies analog-to-digital converter, JPEG encoder, and JPEG decoder design; decreases wiring; and reduces the decoder size by half. Thus, CS has the potential to increase the resolution of image sensors for a given technology and die size while significantly decreasing the power consumption and design complexity. We show that it has potential to reduce power consumption by about 23% to 65%.

  9. Radiation damage caused by cold neutrons in boron doped CMOS active pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnik, B.; Bus, T.; Deveaux, M.; Doering, D.; Kudejova, P.; Wagner, F. M.; Yazgili, A.; Stroth, J.

    2017-05-01

    CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are considered as an emerging technology in the field of charged particle tracking. They will be used in the vertex detectors of experiments like STAR, CBM and ALICE and are considered for the ILC and the tracker of ATLAS. In those applications, the sensors are exposed to sizeable radiation doses. While the tolerance of MAPS to ionizing radiation and fast hadrons is well known, the damage caused by low energy neutrons was not studied so far. Those slow neutrons may initiate nuclear fission of 10B dopants found in the B-doped silicon active medium of MAPS. This effect was expected to create an unknown amount of radiation damage beyond the predictions of the NIEL (Non Ionizing Energy Loss) model for pure silicon. We estimate the impact of this effect by calculating the additional NIEL created by this fission. Moreover, we show first measured data for CMOS sensors which were irradiated with cold neutrons. The empirical results contradict the prediction of the updated NIEL model both, qualitatively and quantitatively: the sensors irradiated with slow neutrons show an unexpected and strong acceptor removal, which is not observed in sensors irradiated with MeV neutrons.

  10. Advancing the technology of monolithic CMOS detectors for use as x-ray imaging spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Amato, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff has been engaged in a multi year effort to advance the technology of monolithic back-thinned CMOS detectors for use as X-ray imaging spectrometers. The long term goal of this campaign is to produce X-ray Active Pixel Sensor (APS) detectors with Fano limited performance over the 0.1-10keV band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Such devices would be ideal for candidate post 2020 decadal missions such as LYNX and for smaller more immediate applications such as CubeX. Devices from a recent fabrication have been back-thinned, packaged and tested for soft X-ray response. These devices have 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels with ˜135μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel signal chain. These new detectors are fabricated on 10μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. We present details of our camera design and device performance with particular emphasis on those aspects of interest to single photon counting X-ray astronomy. These features include read noise, X-ray spectral response and quantum efficiency.

  11. Enhancing the far-UV sensitivity of silicon CMOS imaging arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, K. D.; Bai, Yibin; Ryu, Kevin K.; Gregory, J. A.; Welander, Paul B.; Davis, Michael W.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Winter, Gregory S.; Suntharalingam, Vyshnavi; Beletic, James W.

    2014-07-01

    We report our progress toward optimizing backside-illuminated silicon PIN CMOS devices developed by Teledyne Imaging Sensors (TIS) for far-UV planetary science applications. This project was motivated by initial measurements at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) of the far-UV responsivity of backside-illuminated silicon PIN photodiode test structures described in Bai et al., SPIE, 2008, which revealed a promising QE in the 100-200 nm range as reported in Davis et al., SPIE, 2012. Our effort to advance the capabilities of thinned silicon wafers capitalizes on recent innovations in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) doping processes. Key achievements to date include: 1) Representative silicon test wafers were fabricated by TIS, and set up for MBE processing at MIT Lincoln Laboratory (LL); 2) Preliminary far-UV detector QE simulation runs were completed to aid MBE layer design; 3) Detector fabrication was completed through the pre-MBE step; and 4) Initial testing of the MBE doping process was performed on monitoring wafers, with detailed quality assessments. Early results suggest that potential challenges in optimizing the UV-sensitivity of silicon PIN type CMOS devices, compared with similar UV enhancement methods established for CCDs, have been mitigated through our newly developed methods. We will discuss the potential advantages of our approach and briefly describe future development steps.

  12. Compressive Sensing Based Bio-Inspired Shape Feature Detection CMOS Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A CMOS imager integrated circuit using compressive sensing and bio-inspired detection is presented which integrates novel functions and algorithms within a novel hardware architecture enabling efficient on-chip implementation.

  13. Low light CMOS contact imager with an integrated poly-acrylic emission filter for fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Dattner, Yonathan; Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the fabrication of a low cost poly-acrylic acid (PAA) based emission filter integrated with a low light CMOS contact imager for fluorescence detection. The process involves the use of PAA as an adhesive for the emission filter. The poly-acrylic solution was chosen due its optical transparent properties, adhesive properties, miscibility with polar protic solvents and most importantly its bio-compatibility with a biological environment. The emission filter, also known as an absorption filter, involves dissolving an absorbing specimen in a polar protic solvent and mixing it with the PAA to uniformly bond the absorbing specimen and harden the filter. The PAA is optically transparent in solid form and therefore does not contribute to the absorbance of light in the visible spectrum. Many combinations of absorbing specimen and polar protic solvents can be derived, yielding different filter characteristics in different parts of the spectrum. We report a specific combination as a first example of implementation of our technology. The filter reported has excitation in the green spectrum and emission in the red spectrum, utilizing the increased quantum efficiency of the photo sensitive sensor array. The thickness of the filter (20 μm) was chosen by calculating the desired SNR using Beer-Lambert's law for liquids, Quantum Yield of the fluorophore and the Quantum Efficiency of the sensor array. The filters promising characteristics make it suitable for low light fluorescence detection. The filter was integrated with a fully functional low noise, low light CMOS contact imager and experimental results using fluorescence polystyrene micro-spheres are presented.

  14. Image processing occupancy sensor

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2016-09-27

    A system and method of detecting occupants in a building automation system environment using image based occupancy detection and position determinations. In one example, the system includes an image processing occupancy sensor that detects the number and position of occupants within a space that has controllable building elements such as lighting and ventilation diffusers. Based on the position and location of the occupants, the system can finely control the elements to optimize conditions for the occupants, optimize energy usage, among other advantages.

  15. Power pulsing of the CMOS sensor Mimosa 26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuprash, Oleg

    2013-12-01

    Mimosa 26 is a monolithic active pixel sensor developed by IPHC (Strasbourg) & IRFU (Saclay) as a prototype for the ILC vertex detector studies. The resolution requirements for the ILC tracking detector are very extreme, demanding very low material in the detector, thus only air cooling can be considered. Power consumption has to be reduced as far as possible. The beam structure of the ILC allows the possibility of power pulsing: only for about the 1 ms long bunch train full power is required, and during the 199 ms long pauses between the bunch trains the power can be reduced to a minimum. Not being adapted for the power pulsing, the sensor shows in laboratory tests a good performance under power pulsing. The power pulsing allows to significantly reduce the heating of the chip and divides power consumption approximately by a factor of 6. In this report a summary of power pulsing studies using the digital readout of Mimosa 26 is given.

  16. Real-time detection of fast and thermal neutrons in radiotherapy with CMOS sensors.

    PubMed

    Arbor, Nicolas; Higueret, Stephane; Elazhar, Halima; Combe, Rodolphe; Meyer, Philippe; Dehaynin, Nicolas; Taupin, Florence; Husson, Daniel

    2017-03-07

    The peripheral dose distribution is a growing concern for the improvement of new external radiation modalities. Secondary particles, especially photo-neutrons produced by the accelerator, irradiate the patient more than tens of centimeters away from the tumor volume. However the out-of-field dose is still not estimated accurately by the treatment planning softwares. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a specially designed CMOS sensor for fast and thermal neutron monitoring in radiotherapy. The 14 microns-thick sensitive layer and the integrated electronic chain of the CMOS are particularly suitable for real-time measurements in γ/n mixed fields. An experimental field size dependency of the fast neutron production rate, supported by Monte Carlo simulations and CR-39 data, has been observed. This dependency points out the potential benefits of a real-time monitoring of fast and thermal neutron during beam intensity modulated radiation therapies.

  17. Performance of CMOS imager as sensing element for a Real-time Active Pixel Dosimeter for Interventional Radiology procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalotti, D.; Bissi, L.; Conti, E.; Paolucci, M.; Placidi, P.; Scorzoni, A.; Servoli, L.

    2014-01-01

    Staff members applying Interventional Radiology procedures are exposed to ionizing radiation, which can induce detrimental effects to the human body, and requires an improvement of radiation protection. This paper is focused on the study of the sensor element for a wireless real-time dosimeter to be worn by the medical staff during the interventional radiology procedures, in the framework of the Real-Time Active PIxel Dosimetry (RAPID) INFN project. We characterize a CMOS imager to be used as detection element for the photons scattered by the patient body. The CMOS imager has been first characterized in laboratory using fluorescence X-ray sources, then a PMMA phantom has been used to diffuse the X-ray photons from an angiography system. Different operating conditions have been used to test the detector response in realistic situations, by varying the X-ray tube parameters (continuous/pulsed mode, tube voltage and current, pulse parameters), the sensor parameters (gain, integration time) and the relative distance between sensor and phantom. The sensor response has been compared with measurements performed using passive dosimeters (TLD) and also with a certified beam, in an accredited calibration centre, in order to obtain an absolute calibration. The results are very encouraging, with dose and dose rate measurement uncertainties below the 10% level even for the most demanding Interventional Radiology protocols.

  18. A low-noise CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-

    DOE PAGES

    An, Mangmang; Chen, Chufeng; Gao, Chaosong; ...

    2015-12-12

    In this paper, we report the design and characterization of a CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-, fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS Integrated Circuit process. The sensor utilizes exposed metal patches on top of each pixel to directly collect charge. Each pixel contains a low-noise charge-sensitive preamplifier to establish the analog signal and a discriminator with tunable threshold to generate hits. The analog signal from each pixel is accessible through time-shared multiplexing over the entire array. Hits are read out digitally through a column-based priority logic structure. Tests show that the sensor achieved a <15e - analog noisemore » and a 200e - minimum threshold for digital readout per pixel. The sensor is capable of detecting both electrons and ions drifting in gas. Lastly, these characteristics enable its use as the charge readout device in future Time Projection Chambers without gaseous gain mechanism, which has unique advantages in low background and low rate-density experiments.« less

  19. A low-noise CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-

    SciTech Connect

    An, Mangmang; Chen, Chufeng; Gao, Chaosong

    In this paper, we report the design and characterization of a CMOS pixel direct charge sensor, Topmetal-II-, fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS Integrated Circuit process. The sensor utilizes exposed metal patches on top of each pixel to directly collect charge. Each pixel contains a low-noise charge-sensitive preamplifier to establish the analog signal and a discriminator with tunable threshold to generate hits. The analog signal from each pixel is accessible through time-shared multiplexing over the entire array. Hits are read out digitally through a column-based priority logic structure. Tests show that the sensor achieved a <15e - analog noisemore » and a 200e - minimum threshold for digital readout per pixel. The sensor is capable of detecting both electrons and ions drifting in gas. Lastly, these characteristics enable its use as the charge readout device in future Time Projection Chambers without gaseous gain mechanism, which has unique advantages in low background and low rate-density experiments.« less

  20. Image Processing Occupancy Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    The Image Processing Occupancy Sensor, or IPOS, is a novel sensor technology developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The sensor is based on low-cost embedded microprocessors widely used by the smartphone industry and leverages mature open-source computer vision software libraries. Compared to traditional passive infrared and ultrasonic-based motion sensors currently used for occupancy detection, IPOS has shown the potential for improved accuracy and a richer set of feedback signals for occupant-optimized lighting, daylighting, temperature setback, ventilation control, and other occupancy and location-based uses. Unlike traditional passive infrared (PIR) or ultrasonic occupancy sensors, which infer occupancy based only onmore » motion, IPOS uses digital image-based analysis to detect and classify various aspects of occupancy, including the presence of occupants regardless of motion, their number, location, and activity levels of occupants, as well as the illuminance properties of the monitored space. The IPOS software leverages the recent availability of low-cost embedded computing platforms, computer vision software libraries, and camera elements.« less

  1. Performance study of double SOI image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, T.; Arai, Y.; Fujita, Y.; Hamasaki, R.; Hara, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Kurachi, I.; Nishimura, R.; Ono, S.; Tauchi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Yamada, M.

    2018-02-01

    Double silicon-on-insulator (DSOI) sensors composed of two thin silicon layers and one thick silicon layer have been developed since 2011. The thick substrate consists of high resistivity silicon with p-n junctions while the thin layers are used as SOI-CMOS circuitry and as shielding to reduce the back-gate effect and crosstalk between the sensor and the circuitry. In 2014, a high-resolution integration-type pixel sensor, INTPIX8, was developed based on the DSOI concept. This device is fabricated using a Czochralski p-type (Cz-p) substrate in contrast to a single SOI (SSOI) device having a single thin silicon layer and a Float Zone p-type (FZ-p) substrate. In the present work, X-ray spectra of both DSOI and SSOI sensors were obtained using an Am-241 radiation source at four gain settings. The gain of the DSOI sensor was found to be approximately three times that of the SSOI device because the coupling capacitance is reduced by the DSOI structure. An X-ray imaging demonstration was also performed and high spatial resolution X-ray images were obtained.

  2. Optical Characterization of Lorentz Force Based CMOS-MEMS Magnetic Field Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, John Ojur; Ahmad, Farooq; Khir, M. Haris Bin Md; Hamid, Nor Hisham Bin

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic field sensors are becoming an essential part of everyday life due to the improvements in their sensitivities and resolutions, while at the same time they have become compact, smaller in size and economical. In the work presented herein a Lorentz force based CMOS-MEMS magnetic field sensor is designed, fabricated and optically characterized. The sensor is fabricated by using CMOS thin layers and dry post micromachining is used to release the device structure and finally the sensor chip is packaged in DIP. The sensor consists of a shuttle which is designed to resonate in the lateral direction (first mode of resonance). In the presence of an external magnetic field, the Lorentz force actuates the shuttle in the lateral direction and the amplitude of resonance is measured using an optical method. The differential change in the amplitude of the resonating shuttle shows the strength of the external magnetic field. The resonance frequency of the shuttle is determined to be 8164 Hz experimentally and from the resonance curve, the quality factor and damping ratio are obtained. In an open environment, the quality factor and damping ratio are found to be 51.34 and 0.00973 respectively. The sensitivity of the sensor is determined in static mode to be 0.034 µm/mT when a current of 10 mA passes through the shuttle, while it is found to be higher at resonance with a value of 1.35 µm/mT at 8 mA current. Finally, the resolution of the sensor is found to be 370.37 µT. PMID:26225972

  3. Optical Characterization of Lorentz Force Based CMOS-MEMS Magnetic Field Sensor.

    PubMed

    Dennis, John Ojur; Ahmad, Farooq; Khir, M Haris Bin Md; Bin Hamid, Nor Hisham

    2015-07-27

    Magnetic field sensors are becoming an essential part of everyday life due to the improvements in their sensitivities and resolutions, while at the same time they have become compact, smaller in size and economical. In the work presented herein a Lorentz force based CMOS-MEMS magnetic field sensor is designed, fabricated and optically characterized. The sensor is fabricated by using CMOS thin layers and dry post micromachining is used to release the device structure and finally the sensor chip is packaged in DIP. The sensor consists of a shuttle which is designed to resonate in the lateral direction (first mode of resonance). In the presence of an external magnetic field, the Lorentz force actuates the shuttle in the lateral direction and the amplitude of resonance is measured using an optical method. The differential change in the amplitude of the resonating shuttle shows the strength of the external magnetic field. The resonance frequency of the shuttle is determined to be 8164 Hz experimentally and from the resonance curve, the quality factor and damping ratio are obtained. In an open environment, the quality factor and damping ratio are found to be 51.34 and 0.00973 respectively. The sensitivity of the sensor is determined in static mode to be 0.034 µm/mT when a current of 10 mA passes through the shuttle, while it is found to be higher at resonance with a value of 1.35 µm/mT at 8 mA current. Finally, the resolution of the sensor is found to be 370.37 µT.

  4. Sensor image prediction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, A. J.; Stone, W. R.; Berry, L.; Murray, T. J.

    1981-02-01

    The preparation of prediction imagery is a complex, costly, and time consuming process. Image prediction systems which produce a detailed replica of the image area require the extensive Defense Mapping Agency data base. The purpose of this study was to analyze the use of image predictions in order to determine whether a reduced set of more compact image features contains enough information to produce acceptable navigator performance. A job analysis of the navigator's mission tasks was performed. It showed that the cognitive and perceptual tasks he performs during navigation are identical to those performed for the targeting mission function. In addition, the results of the analysis of his performance when using a particular sensor can be extended to the analysis of this mission tasks using any sensor. An experimental approach was used to determine the relationship between navigator performance and the type of amount of information in the prediction image. A number of subjects were given image predictions containing varying levels of scene detail and different image features, and then asked to identify the predicted targets in corresponding dynamic flight sequences over scenes of cultural, terrain, and mixed (both cultural and terrain) content.

  5. CCD imaging sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James R. (Inventor); Elliott, Stythe T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method for promoting quantum efficiency (QE) of a CCD imaging sensor for UV, far UV and low energy x-ray wavelengths by overthinning the back side beyond the interface between the substrate and the photosensitive semiconductor material, and flooding the back side with UV prior to using the sensor for imaging. This UV flooding promotes an accumulation layer of positive states in the oxide film over the thinned sensor to greatly increase QE for either frontside or backside illumination. A permanent or semipermanent image (analog information) may be stored in a frontside SiO.sub.2 layer over the photosensitive semiconductor material using implanted ions for a permanent storage and intense photon radiation for a semipermanent storage. To read out this stored information, the gate potential of the CCD is biased more negative than that used for normal imaging, and excess charge current thus produced through the oxide is integrated in the pixel wells for subsequent readout by charge transfer from well to well in the usual manner.

  6. 50 μm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Anaxagoras, T; Speller, R D; Kanicki, J

    2015-12-07

    Wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensors (APSs) have been developed recently for x-ray imaging applications. The small pixel pitch and low noise are very promising properties for medical imaging applications such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this work, we evaluated experimentally and through modeling the imaging properties of a 50 μm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). A modified cascaded system model was developed for CMOS APS x-ray detectors by taking into account the device nonlinear signal and noise properties. The imaging properties such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were extracted from both measurements and the nonlinear cascaded system analysis. The results show that the DynAMITe x-ray detector achieves a high spatial resolution of 10 mm(-1) and a DQE of around 0.5 at spatial frequencies  <1 mm(-1). In addition, the modeling results were used to calculate the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNRi) of microcalcifications at various mean glandular dose (MGD). For an average breast (5 cm thickness, 50% glandular fraction), 165 μm microcalcifications can be distinguished at a MGD of 27% lower than the clinical value (~1.3 mGy). To detect 100 μm microcalcifications, further optimizations of the CMOS APS x-ray detector, image aquisition geometry and image reconstruction techniques should be considered.

  7. CMOS Time-Resolved, Contact, and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging for DNA Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Nan; Cheung, Ka Wai; Wong, Hiu Tung; Ho, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Instrumental limitations such as bulkiness and high cost prevent the fluorescence technique from becoming ubiquitous for point-of-care deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection and other in-field molecular diagnostics applications. The complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology, as benefited from process scaling, provides several advanced capabilities such as high integration density, high-resolution signal processing, and low power consumption, enabling sensitive, integrated, and low-cost fluorescence analytical platforms. In this paper, CMOS time-resolved, contact, and multispectral imaging are reviewed. Recently reported CMOS fluorescence analysis microsystem prototypes are surveyed to highlight the present state of the art. PMID:25365460

  8. On-chip copper-dielectric interference filters for manufacturing of ambient light and proximity CMOS sensors.

    PubMed

    Frey, Laurent; Masarotto, Lilian; D'Aillon, Patrick Gros; Pellé, Catherine; Armand, Marilyn; Marty, Michel; Jamin-Mornet, Clémence; Lhostis, Sandrine; Le Briz, Olivier

    2014-07-10

    Filter technologies implemented on CMOS image sensors for spectrally selective applications often use a combination of on-chip organic resists and an external substrate with multilayer dielectric coatings. The photopic-like and near-infrared bandpass filtering functions respectively required by ambient light sensing and user proximity detection through time-of-flight can be fully integrated on chip with multilayer metal-dielectric filters. Copper, silicon nitride, and silicon oxide are the materials selected for a technological proof-of-concept on functional wafers, due to their immediate availability in front-end semiconductor fabs. Filter optical designs are optimized with respect to specific performance criteria, and the robustness of the designs regarding process errors are evaluated for industrialization purposes.

  9. A Monolithic CMOS Magnetic Hall Sensor with High Sensitivity and Linearity Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiyun; Wang, Dejun; Xu, Yue

    2015-10-27

    This paper presents a fully integrated linear Hall sensor by means of 0.8 μm high voltage complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. This monolithic Hall sensor chip features a highly sensitive horizontal switched Hall plate and an efficient signal conditioner using dynamic offset cancellation technique. An improved cross-like Hall plate achieves high magnetic sensitivity and low offset. A new spinning current modulator stabilizes the quiescent output voltage and improves the reliability of the signal conditioner. The tested results show that at the 5 V supply voltage, the maximum Hall output voltage of the monolithic Hall sensor microsystem, is up to ±2.1 V and the linearity of Hall output voltage is higher than 99% in the magnetic flux density range from ±5 mT to ±175 mT. The output equivalent residual offset is 0.48 mT and the static power consumption is 20 mW.

  10. Solar XUV Imaging and Non-dispersive Spectroscopy for Solar-C Enabled by Scientific CMOS APS Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Robert A.; Lemen, J. R.; Shing, L.; Janesick, J.; Tower, J.

    2009-05-01

    Monolithic CMOS Advanced Pixel Sensor (APS) arrays are showing great promise as eventual replacements for the current workhorse of solar physics focal planes, the scientific CCD. CMOS APS devices have individually addressable pixels, increased radiation tolerance compared to CCDs, and require lower clock voltages, and thus lower power. However, commercially available CMOS chips, while suitable for use with intensifiers or fluorescent coatings, are generally not optimized for direct detection of EUV and X-ray photons. A high performance scientific CMOS array designed for these wavelengths will have significant new capabilities compared to CCDs, including the ability to read out small regions of the solar disk at high (sub sec) cadence, count single X-ray photons with Fano-limited energy resolution, and even operate at room temperature with good noise performance. Such capabilities will be crucial for future solar X-ray and EUV missions such as Solar-C. Sarnoff Corporation has developed scientific grade, monolithic CMOS arrays for X-ray imaging and photon counting. One prototype device, the "minimal" array, has 8 um pixels, is 15 to 25 um thick, is fabricated on high-resistivity ( 10 to 20 kohm-cm) Si wafers, and can be back-illuminated. These characteristics yield high quantum efficiency and high spatial resolution with minimal charge sharing among pixels, making it ideal for the detection of keV X-rays. When used with digital correlated double sampling, the array has demonstrated noise performance as low as 2 e, allowing single photon counting of X-rays over a range of temperatures. We report test results for this device in X-rays, and discuss the implications for future solar space missions.

  11. Titanium dioxide nanowire sensor array integration on CMOS platform using deterministic assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Oren Z.; Zhong, Xiahua; Schulman, Daniel S.; Kang, Myungkoo; Razavieh, Ali; Mayer, Theresa S.

    2017-06-01

    Nanosensor arrays have recently received significant attention due to their utility in a wide range of applications, including gas sensing, fuel cells, internet of things, and portable health monitoring systems. Less attention has been given to the production of sensor platforms in the μW range for ultra-low power applications. Here, we discuss how to scale the nanosensor energy demand by developing a process for integration of nanowire sensing arrays on a monolithic CMOS chip. This work demonstrates an off-chip nanowire fabrication method; subsequently nanowires link to a fused SiO2 substrate using electric-field assisted directed assembly. The nanowire resistances shown in this work have the highest resistance uniformity reported to date of 18%, which enables a practical roadmap towards the coupling of nanosensors to CMOS circuits and signal processing systems. The article also presents the utility of optimizing annealing conditions of the off-chip metal-oxides prior to CMOS integration to avoid limitations of thermal budget and process incompatibility. In the context of the platform demonstrated here, directed assembly is a powerful tool that can realize highly uniform, cross-reactive arrays of different types of metal-oxide nanosensors suited for gas discrimination and signal processing systems.

  12. Titanium dioxide nanowire sensor array integration on CMOS platform using deterministic assembly.

    PubMed

    Gall, Oren Z; Zhong, Xiahua; Schulman, Daniel S; Kang, Myungkoo; Razavieh, Ali; Mayer, Theresa S

    2017-06-30

    Nanosensor arrays have recently received significant attention due to their utility in a wide range of applications, including gas sensing, fuel cells, internet of things, and portable health monitoring systems. Less attention has been given to the production of sensor platforms in the μW range for ultra-low power applications. Here, we discuss how to scale the nanosensor energy demand by developing a process for integration of nanowire sensing arrays on a monolithic CMOS chip. This work demonstrates an off-chip nanowire fabrication method; subsequently nanowires link to a fused SiO 2 substrate using electric-field assisted directed assembly. The nanowire resistances shown in this work have the highest resistance uniformity reported to date of 18%, which enables a practical roadmap towards the coupling of nanosensors to CMOS circuits and signal processing systems. The article also presents the utility of optimizing annealing conditions of the off-chip metal-oxides prior to CMOS integration to avoid limitations of thermal budget and process incompatibility. In the context of the platform demonstrated here, directed assembly is a powerful tool that can realize highly uniform, cross-reactive arrays of different types of metal-oxide nanosensors suited for gas discrimination and signal processing systems.

  13. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Evans, P M; Green, S; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J; Parker, D J; Poludniowski, G; Price, T; Waltham, C; Allinson, N M

    2015-06-03

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs.

  14. Performance analysis and enhancement for visible light communication using CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Weipeng; Wu, Yuxiang; Xie, Canyu; Fang, Liangtao; Liu, Xiaowei; Chen, Yingcong

    2018-03-01

    Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) sensors are widely used in mobile-phone and cameras. Hence, it is attractive if these camera can be used as the receivers of visible light communication (VLC). Using the rolling shutter mechanism can increase the data rate of VLC based on CMOS camera, and different techniques have been proposed to improve the demodulation of the rolling shutter mechanism. However, these techniques are too complexity. In this work, we demonstrate and analyze the performance of the VLC link using CMOS camera for different LED luminaires for the first time in our knowledge. Experimental evaluation to compare their bit-error-rate (BER) performances and demodulation are also performed, and it can be summarized that just need to change the LED luminaire with more uniformity light output, the blooming effect would not exist; which not only can reduce the complexity of the demodulation but also enhance the communication quality. In addition, we propose and demonstrate to use contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization to extend the transmission distance and mitigate the influence of the background noise. And the experimental results show that the BER can be decreased by an order of magnitude by using the proposed method.

  15. Design of an ultra low power CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Hu-Guo, C.; Husson, D.

    2011-07-01

    Despite a continuously increasing demand, neutron electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) are still far from being completely established because their development is a very difficult task. A low-noise, ultra low power consumption CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter has been implemented in a 0.35 {mu}m CMOS technology. The prototype is composed of a pixel array for detection of charged particles, and the readout electronics is integrated on the same substrate for signal processing. The excess electrons generated by an impinging particle are collected by the pixel array. The charge collection time and the efficiency are the crucial pointsmore » of a CMOS detector. The 3-D device simulations using the commercially available Synopsys-SENTAURUS package address the detailed charge collection process. Within a time of 1.9 {mu}s, about 59% electrons created by the impact particle are collected in a cluster of 4 x 4 pixels with the pixel pitch of 80 {mu}m. A charge sensitive preamplifier (CSA) and a shaper are employed in the frond-end readout. The tests with electrical signals indicate that our prototype with a total active area of 2.56 x 2.56 mm{sup 2} performs an equivalent noise charge (ENC) of less than 400 e - and 314 {mu}W power consumption, leading to a promising prototype. (authors)« less

  16. A CMOS micromachined capacitive tactile sensor with integrated readout circuits and compensation of process variations.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Tsai, Hao-Cheng; Wu, Tien-Keng

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a capacitive tactile sensor fabricated in a standard CMOS process. Both of the sensor and readout circuits are integrated on a single chip by a TSMC 0.35 μm CMOS MEMS technology. In order to improve the sensitivity, a T-shaped protrusion is proposed and implemented. This sensor comprises the metal layer and the dielectric layer without extra thin film deposition, and can be completed with few post-processing steps. By a nano-indenter, the measured spring constant of the T-shaped structure is 2.19 kNewton/m. Fully differential correlated double sampling capacitor-to-voltage converter (CDS-CVC) and reference capacitor correction are utilized to compensate process variations and improve the accuracy of the readout circuits. The measured displacement-to-voltage transductance is 7.15 mV/nm, and the sensitivity is 3.26 mV/μNewton. The overall power dissipation is 132.8 μW.

  17. A linearization time-domain CMOS smart temperature sensor using a curvature compensation oscillator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Chen, Hao-Wen

    2013-08-28

    This paper presents an area-efficient time-domain CMOS smart temperature sensor using a curvature compensation oscillator for linearity enhancement with a -40 to 120 °C temperature range operability. The inverter-based smart temperature sensors can substantially reduce the cost and circuit complexity of integrated temperature sensors. However, a large curvature exists on the temperature-to-time transfer curve of the inverter-based delay line and results in poor linearity of the sensor output. For cost reduction and error improvement, a temperature-to-pulse generator composed of a ring oscillator and a time amplifier was used to generate a thermal sensing pulse with a sufficient width proportional to the absolute temperature (PTAT). Then, a simple but effective on-chip curvature compensation oscillator is proposed to simultaneously count and compensate the PTAT pulse with curvature for linearization. With such a simple structure, the proposed sensor possesses an extremely small area of 0.07 mm2 in a TSMC 0.35-mm CMOS 2P4M digital process. By using an oscillator-based scheme design, the proposed sensor achieves a fine resolution of 0.045 °C without significantly increasing the circuit area. With the curvature compensation, the inaccuracy of -1.2 to 0.2 °C is achieved in an operation range of -40 to 120 °C after two-point calibration for 14 packaged chips. The power consumption is measured as 23 mW at a sample rate of 10 samples/s.

  18. Real-time imaging of microparticles and living cells with CMOS nanocapacitor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborde, C.; Pittino, F.; Verhoeven, H. A.; Lemay, S. G.; Selmi, L.; Jongsma, M. A.; Widdershoven, F. P.

    2015-09-01

    Platforms that offer massively parallel, label-free biosensing can, in principle, be created by combining all-electrical detection with low-cost integrated circuits. Examples include field-effect transistor arrays, which are used for mapping neuronal signals and sequencing DNA. Despite these successes, however, bioelectronics has so far failed to deliver a broadly applicable biosensing platform. This is due, in part, to the fact that d.c. or low-frequency signals cannot be used to probe beyond the electrical double layer formed by screening salt ions, which means that under physiological conditions the sensing of a target analyte located even a short distance from the sensor (∼1 nm) is severely hampered. Here, we show that high-frequency impedance spectroscopy can be used to detect and image microparticles and living cells under physiological salt conditions. Our assay employs a large-scale, high-density array of nanoelectrodes integrated with CMOS electronics on a single chip and the sensor response depends on the electrical properties of the analyte, allowing impedance-based fingerprinting. With our platform, we image the dynamic attachment and micromotion of BEAS, THP1 and MCF7 cancer cell lines in real time at submicrometre resolution in growth medium, demonstrating the potential of the platform for label/tracer-free high-throughput screening of anti-tumour drug candidates.

  19. Multi-purpose CMOS sensor interface for low-power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, P.; de Cooman, M.; Puers, R.

    1994-08-01

    A dedicated low-power CMOS transponder microchip is presented as part of a novel telemetry implant for biomedical applications. This mixed analog-digital circuit contains an identification code and collects information on physiological parameters, i.e., body temperature and physical activity, and on the status of the battery. To minimize the amount of data to be transmitted, a dedicated signal processing algorithm is embedded within its circuitry. All telemetry functions (encoding, modulation, generation of the carrier) are implemented on the integrated circuit. Emphasis is on a high degree of flexibility towards sensor inputs and internal data management, extreme miniaturization, and low-power consumption to allow a long implantation lifetime.

  20. A low-power integrated humidity CMOS sensor by printing-on-chip technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hung; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Cowan, Melissa A; Wu, Wen-Jung; Lin, Chih-Ting

    2014-05-23

    A low-power, wide-dynamic-range integrated humidity sensing chip is implemented using a printable polymer sensing material with an on-chip pulse-width-modulation interface circuit. By using the inkjet printing technique, poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene)/polystyrene sulfonate that has humidity sensing features can be printed onto the top metal layer of a 0.35 μm CMOS IC. The developed printing-on-chip humidity sensor achieves a heterogeneous three dimensional sensor system-on-chip architecture. The humidity sensing of the implemented printing-on-chip sensor system is experimentally tested. The sensor shows a sensitivity of 0.98% to humidity in the atmosphere. The maximum dynamic range of the readout circuit is 9.8 MΩ, which can be further tuned by the frequency of input signal to fit the requirement of the resistance of printed sensor. The power consumption keeps only 154 μW. This printing-on-chip sensor provides a practical solution to fulfill an ultra-small integrated sensor for the applications in miniaturized sensing systems.

  1. A Low-Power Integrated Humidity CMOS Sensor by Printing-on-Chip Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hung; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Cowan, Melissa A.; Wu, Wen-Jung; Lin, Chih-Ting

    2014-01-01

    A low-power, wide-dynamic-range integrated humidity sensing chip is implemented using a printable polymer sensing material with an on-chip pulse-width-modulation interface circuit. By using the inkjet printing technique, poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene)/polystyrene sulfonate that has humidity sensing features can be printed onto the top metal layer of a 0.35 μm CMOS IC. The developed printing-on-chip humidity sensor achieves a heterogeneous three dimensional sensor system-on-chip architecture. The humidity sensing of the implemented printing-on-chip sensor system is experimentally tested. The sensor shows a sensitivity of 0.98% to humidity in the atmosphere. The maximum dynamic range of the readout circuit is 9.8 MΩ, which can be further tuned by the frequency of input signal to fit the requirement of the resistance of printed sensor. The power consumption keeps only 154 μW. This printing-on-chip sensor provides a practical solution to fulfill an ultra-small integrated sensor for the applications in miniaturized sensing systems. PMID:24859027

  2. Wavefront image sensor chip

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiquan; Ren, Jian; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Yang, Changhuei

    2010-01-01

    We report the implementation of an image sensor chip, termed wavefront image sensor chip (WIS), that can measure both intensity/amplitude and phase front variations of a light wave separately and quantitatively. By monitoring the tightly confined transmitted light spots through a circular aperture grid in a high Fresnel number regime, we can measure both intensity and phase front variations with a high sampling density (11 µm) and high sensitivity (the sensitivity of normalized phase gradient measurement is 0.1 mrad under the typical working condition). By using WIS in a standard microscope, we can collect both bright-field (transmitted light intensity) and normalized phase gradient images. Our experiments further demonstrate that the normalized phase gradient images of polystyrene microspheres, unstained and stained starfish embryos, and strongly birefringent potato starch granules are improved versions of their corresponding differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope images in that they are artifact-free and quantitative. Besides phase microscopy, WIS can benefit machine recognition, object ranging, and texture assessment for a variety of applications. PMID:20721059

  3. Thermal annealing response following irradiation of a CMOS imager for the JUICE JANUS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofthouse-Smith, D.-D.; Soman, M. R.; Allanwood, E. A. H.; Stefanov, K. D.; Holland, A. D.; Leese, M.; Turne, P.

    2018-03-01

    ESA's JUICE (JUpiter ICy moon Explorer) spacecraft is an L-class mission destined for the Jovian system in 2030. Its primary goals are to investigate the conditions for planetary formation and the emergence of life, and how does the solar system work. The JANUS camera, an instrument on JUICE, uses a 4T back illuminated CMOS image sensor, the CIS115 designed by Teledyne e2v. JANUS imager test campaigns are studying the CIS115 following exposure to gammas, protons, electrons and heavy ions, simulating the harsh radiation environment present in the Jovian system. The degradation of 4T CMOS device performance following proton fluences is being studied, as well as the effectiveness of thermal annealing to reverse radiation damage. One key parameter for the JANUS mission is the Dark current of the CIS115, which has been shown to degrade in previous radiation campaigns. A thermal anneal of the CIS115 has been used to accelerate any annealing following the irradiation as well as to study the evolution of any performance characteristics. CIS115s have been irradiated to double the expected End of Life (EOL) levels for displacement damage radiation (2×1010 protons, 10 MeV equivalent). Following this, devices have undergone a thermal anneal cycle at 100oC for 168 hours to reveal the extent to which CIS115 recovers pre-irradiation performance. Dark current activation energy analysis following proton fluence gives information on trap species present in the device and how effective anneal is at removing these trap species. Thermal anneal shows no quantifiable change in the activation energy of the dark current following irradiation.

  4. Multi-channel measurement for hetero-core optical fiber sensor by using CMOS camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Yuya; Nishiyama, Michiko; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-07-01

    Fiber optic smart structures have been developed over several decades by the recent fiber optic sensor technology. Optical intensity-based sensors, which use LD or LEDs, can be suitable for the monitor system to be simple and cost effective. In this paper, a novel fiber optic smart structure with human-like perception has been demonstrated by using intensity-based hetero-core optical fiber sensors system with the CMOS detector. The optical intensity from the hetero-core optical fiber bend sensor is obtained as luminance spots indicated by the optical power distributions. A number of optical intensity spots are simultaneously readout by taking a picture of luminance pattern. To recognize the state of fiber optic smart structure with the hetero-core optical fibers, the template matching process is employed with Sum of Absolute Differences (SAD). A fiber optic smart glove having five optic fiber nerves have been employed to monitor hand postures. Three kinds of hand postures have been recognized by means of the template matching process. A body posture monitoring has also been developed by placing the wearable hetero-core optical fiber bend sensors on the body segments. In order for the CMOS system to be a human brain-like, the luminescent spots in the obtained picture were arranged to make the pattern corresponding to the position of body segments. As a result, it was successfully demonstrated that the proposed fiber optic smart structure could recognize eight kinds of body postures. The developed system will give a capability of human brain-like processing to the existing fiber optic smart structures.

  5. Decoding mobile-phone image sensor rolling shutter effect for visible light communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Optical wireless communication (OWC) using visible lights, also known as visible light communication (VLC), has attracted significant attention recently. As the traditional OWC and VLC receivers (Rxs) are based on PIN photo-diode or avalanche photo-diode, deploying the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor as the VLC Rx is attractive since nowadays nearly every person has a smart phone with embedded CMOS image sensor. However, deploying the CMOS image sensor as the VLC Rx is challenging. In this work, we propose and demonstrate two simple contrast ratio (CR) enhancement schemes to improve the contrast of the rolling shutter pattern. Then we describe their processing algorithms one by one. The experimental results show that both the proposed CR enhancement schemes can significantly mitigate the high-intensity fluctuations of the rolling shutter pattern and improve the bit-error-rate performance.

  6. High resistivity CMOS pixel sensors and their application to the STAR PXL detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorokhov, A.; Bertolone, G.; Baudot, J.; Colledani, C.; Claus, G.; Degerli, Y.; de Masi, R.; Deveaux, M.; Dozière, G.; Dulinski, W.; Gélin, M.; Goffe, M.; Himmi, A.; Hu-Guo, Ch.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Koziel, M.; Morel, F.; Santos, C.; Specht, M.; Valin, I.; Voutsinas, G.; Winter, M.

    2011-09-01

    CMOS pixel sensors are foreseen to equip the vertex detector (called PXL) of the upgraded inner tracking system of the STAR experiment at RHIC. The sensors (called ULTIMATE) are being designed and their architecture is being optimized for the PXL specifications, extrapolating from the MIMOSA-26 sensor realized for the EUDET beam telescope.The paper gives an overview of the ULTIMATE sensor specifications and of the adaptation of its forerunner, MIMOSA-26, to the PXL specifications.One of the main changes between MIMOSA-26 and ULTIMATE is the use of a high resistivity epitaxial layer. Recent performance assessments obtained with MIMOSA-26 sensors manufactured on such an epitaxial layer are presented, as well as results of beam tests obtained with a prototype probing improved versions of the MIMOSA-26 pixel design. They show drastic improvements of the pixel signal-to-noise ratio and of the sensor radiation tolerance with respect to the performances achieved with a standard, i.e. low resistivity, layer.

  7. SOI-CMOS Process for Monolithic, Radiation-Tolerant, Science-Grade Imagers

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, George; Lee, Adam

    In Phase I, Voxtel worked with Jazz and Sandia to document and simulate the processes necessary to implement a DH-BSI SOI CMOS imaging process. The development is based upon mature SOI CMOS process at both fabs, with the addition of only a few custom processing steps for integration and electrical interconnection of the fully-depleted photodetectors. In Phase I, Voxtel also characterized the Sandia process, including the CMOS7 design rules, and we developed the outline of a process option that included a “BOX etch”, that will permit a “detector in handle” SOI CMOS process to be developed The process flows weremore » developed in cooperation with both Jazz and Sandia process engineers, along with detailed TCAD modeling and testing of the photodiode array architectures. In addition, Voxtel tested the radiation performance of the Jazz’s CA18HJ process, using standard and circular-enclosed transistors.« less

  8. Ultrasensitive and label-free detection of pathogenic avian influenza DNA by using CMOS impedimetric sensors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei-An; Lin, Chih-Heng; Yang, Yuh-Shyong; Lu, Michael S-C

    2012-05-15

    This work presents miniaturized CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) sensors for non-faradic impedimetric detection of AIV (avian influenza virus) oligonucleotides. The signal-to-noise ratio is significantly improved by monolithic sensor integration to reduce the effect of parasitic capacitances. The use of sub-μm interdigitated microelectrodes is also beneficial for promoting the signal coupling efficiency. Capacitance changes associated with surface modification, functionalization, and DNA hybridization were extracted from the measured frequency responses based on an equivalent-circuit model. Hybridization of the AIV H5 capture and target DNA probes produced a capacitance reduction of -13.2 ± 2.1% for target DNA concentrations from 1 fM to 10 fM, while a capacitance increase was observed when H5 target DNA was replaced with non-complementary H7 target DNA. With the demonstrated superior sensing capabilities, this miniaturized CMOS sensing platform shows great potential for label-free point-of-care biosensing applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. CMOS Rad-Hard Front-End Electronics for Precise Sensors Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordo-Ibáñez, Samuel; Piñero-García, Blanca; Muñoz-Díaz, Manuel; Ragel-Morales, Antonio; Ceballos-Cáceres, Joaquín; Carranza-González, Luis; Espejo-Meana, Servando; Arias-Drake, Alberto; Ramos-Martos, Juan; Mora-Gutiérrez, José Miguel; Lagos-Florido, Miguel Angel

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports a single-chip solution for the implementation of radiation-tolerant CMOS front-end electronics (FEE) for applications requiring the acquisition of base-band sensor signals. The FEE has been designed in a 0.35μm CMOS process, and implements a set of parallel conversion channels with high levels of configurability to adapt the resolution, conversion rate, as well as the dynamic input range for the required application. Each conversion channel has been designed with a fully-differential implementation of a configurable-gain instrumentation amplifier, followed by an also configurable dual-slope ADC (DS ADC) up to 16 bits. The ASIC also incorporates precise thermal monitoring, sensor conditioning and error detection functionalities to ensure proper operation in extreme environments. Experimental results confirm that the proposed topologies, in conjunction with the applied radiation-hardening techniques, are reliable enough to be used without loss in the performance in environments with an extended temperature range (between -25 and 125 °C) and a total dose beyond 300 krad.

  10. Preliminary investigations of active pixel sensors in Nuclear Medicine imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Robert; Evans, Noel; Evans, Phil; Osmond, J.; Clark, A.; Turchetta, R.

    2009-06-01

    Three CMOS active pixel sensors have been investigated for their application to Nuclear Medicine imaging. Startracker with 525×525 25 μm square pixels has been coupled via a fibre optic stud to a 2 mm thick segmented CsI(Tl) crystal. Imaging tests were performed using 99mTc sources, which emit 140 keV gamma rays. The system was interfaced to a PC via FPGA-based DAQ and optical link enabling imaging rates of 10 f/s. System noise was measured to be >100e and it was shown that the majority of this noise was fixed pattern in nature. The intrinsic spatial resolution was measured to be ˜80 μm and the system spatial resolution measured with a slit was ˜450 μm. The second sensor, On Pixel Intelligent CMOS (OPIC), had 64×72 40 μm pixels and was used to evaluate noise characteristics and to develop a method of differentiation between fixed pattern and statistical noise. The third sensor, Vanilla, had 520×520 25 μm pixels and a measured system noise of ˜25e. This sensor was coupled directly to the segmented phosphor. Imaging results show that even at this lower level of noise the signal from 140 keV gamma rays is small as the light from the phosphor is spread over a large number of pixels. Suggestions for the 'ideal' sensor are made.

  11. e2v CMOS and CCD sensors and systems for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorden, P. R.; Jerram, P. A.; Fryer, M.; Stefanov, K. D.

    2017-07-01

    e2v designs and manufactures a wide range of sensors for space and astronomy applications. This includes high performance CCDs for X-ray, visible and near-IR wavelengths. In this paper we illustrate the maturity of CMOS capability for these applications; examples are presented together with performance data. The majority of e2v sensors for these applications are back-thinned for highest spectral response and designed for very low read-out noise; the combination delivers high signal to noise ratio in association with a variety of formats and package designs. The growing e2v capability in delivery of sub-systems and cryogenic cameras is illustrated—including the 1.2 Giga-pixel J-PAS camera system.

  12. Pick-and-place process for sensitivity improvement of the capacitive type CMOS MEMS 2-axis tilt sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-I.; Tsai, Ming-Han; Liu, Yu-Chia; Sun, Chih-Ming; Fang, Weileun

    2013-09-01

    This study exploits the foundry available complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process and the packaging house available pick-and-place technology to implement a capacitive type micromachined 2-axis tilt sensor. The suspended micro mechanical structures such as the spring, stage and sensing electrodes are fabricated using the CMOS microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) processes. A bulk block is assembled onto the suspended stage by pick-and-place technology to increase the proof-mass of the tilt sensor. The low temperature UV-glue dispensing and curing processes are employed to bond the block onto the stage. Thus, the sensitivity of the CMOS MEMS capacitive type 2-axis tilt sensor is significantly improved. In application, this study successfully demonstrates the bonding of a bulk solder ball of 100 µm in diameter with a 2-axis tilt sensor fabricated using the standard TSMC 0.35 µm 2P4M CMOS process. Measurements show the sensitivities of the 2-axis tilt sensor are increased for 2.06-fold (x-axis) and 1.78-fold (y-axis) after adding the solder ball. Note that the sensitivity can be further improved by reducing the parasitic capacitance and the mismatch of sensing electrodes caused by the solder ball.

  13. Sensitivity-Enhanced CMOS Phase Luminometry System Using Xerogel-Based Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lei Yao; Khan, R; Chodavarapu, V P; Tripathi, V S; Bright, F V

    2009-10-01

    We present the design and implementation of a phase luminometry sensor system with improved and tunable detection sensitivity achieved using a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit. We use sol-gel derived xerogel thin films as an immobilization media to house oxygen (O2) responsive luminescent molecules. The sensor operates on the principal of phase luminometry wherein a sinusoidal modulation signal is used to excite the luminophores encapsulated in the porous xerogel films and the corresponding phase shift of the emission signals is monitored. The phase shift is directly related to excited state lifetimes of the luminophores which in turn are related to the concentration of the target analyte species present in the vicinity of the luminophores. The CMOS IC, which consists of a 16 times 16 high-gain phototransistor array, current-to-voltage converter, amplifier and tunable phase shift detector, consumes an average power of 14 mW with 5-V power supply operating at a 38-kHz modulation frequency. The output of the IC is a dc voltage that corresponds to the detected luminescence phase shift with respect to the excitation signal. As a prototype, we demonstrate an oxygen sensor system by encapsulating the luminophore tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II) within the xerogel matrices. The sensor system showed a fast response on the order of few seconds and we obtained a detection sensitivity of 118 mV per 1% change in O2 concentration. The system demonstrates a novel concept to tune and improve the detection sensitivity for specific concentrations of the target analyte in many biomedical monitoring applications.

  14. Low-cost compact thermal imaging sensors for body temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Myung-Soo; Han, Seok Man; Kim, Hyo Jin; Shin, Jae Chul; Ahn, Mi Sook; Kim, Hyung Won; Han, Yong Hee

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a 32x32 microbolometer thermal imaging sensor for human body temperature measurement. Waferlevel vacuum packaging technology allows us to get a low cost and compact imaging sensor chip. The microbolometer uses V-W-O film as sensing material and ROIC has been designed 0.35-um CMOS process in UMC. A thermal image of a human face and a hand using f/1 lens convinces that it has a potential of human body temperature for commercial use.

  15. Design of an Embedded CMOS Temperature Sensor for Passive RFID Tag Chips.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Li, Bing; Zhang, Lihua; Wu, Xiang; Fu, Zhihui; Zuo, Lei

    2015-05-18

    This paper presents an ultra-low embedded power temperature sensor for passive RFID tags. The temperature sensor converts the temperature variation to a PTAT current, which is then transformed into a temperature-controlled frequency. A phase locked loop (PLL)-based sensor interface is employed to directly convert this temperature-controlled frequency into a corresponding digital output without an external reference clock. The fabricated sensor occupies an area of 0.021 mm2 using the TSMC 0.18 1P6M mixed-signal CMOS process. Measurement results of the embedded sensor within the tag system shows a 92 nW power dissipation under 1.0 V supply voltage at room temperature, with a sensing resolution of 0.15 °C/LSB and a sensing accuracy of -0.7/0.6 °C from -30 °C to 70 °C after 1-point calibration at 30 °C.

  16. Design of an Embedded CMOS Temperature Sensor for Passive RFID Tag Chips

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Li, Bing; Zhang, Lihua; Wu, Xiang; Fu, Zhihui; Zuo, Lei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an ultra-low embedded power temperature sensor for passive RFID tags. The temperature sensor converts the temperature variation to a PTAT current, which is then transformed into a temperature-controlled frequency. A phase locked loop (PLL)-based sensor interface is employed to directly convert this temperature-controlled frequency into a corresponding digital output without an external reference clock. The fabricated sensor occupies an area of 0.021 mm2 using the TSMC 0.18 1P6M mixed-signal CMOS process. Measurement results of the embedded sensor within the tag system shows a 92 nW power dissipation under 1.0 V supply voltage at room temperature, with a sensing resolution of 0.15 °C/LSB and a sensing accuracy of −0.7/0.6 °C from −30 °C to 70 °C after 1-point calibration at 30 °C. PMID:25993518

  17. A CMOS-based large-area high-resolution imaging system for high-energy x-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodricks, Brian; Fowler, Boyd; Liu, Chiao; Lowes, John; Haeffner, Dean; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, John

    2008-08-01

    CCDs have been the primary sensor in imaging systems for x-ray diffraction and imaging applications in recent years. CCDs have met the fundamental requirements of low noise, high-sensitivity, high dynamic range and spatial resolution necessary for these scientific applications. State-of-the-art CMOS image sensor (CIS) technology has experienced dramatic improvements recently and their performance is rivaling or surpassing that of most CCDs. The advancement of CIS technology is at an ever-accelerating pace and is driven by the multi-billion dollar consumer market. There are several advantages of CIS over traditional CCDs and other solid-state imaging devices; they include low power, high-speed operation, system-on-chip integration and lower manufacturing costs. The combination of superior imaging performance and system advantages makes CIS a good candidate for high-sensitivity imaging system development. This paper will describe a 1344 x 1212 CIS imaging system with a 19.5μm pitch optimized for x-ray scattering studies at high-energies. Fundamental metrics of linearity, dynamic range, spatial resolution, conversion gain, sensitivity are estimated. The Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) is also estimated. Representative x-ray diffraction images are presented. Diffraction images are compared against a CCD-based imaging system.

  18. All-Digital Time-Domain CMOS Smart Temperature Sensor with On-Chip Linearity Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Chen, Chao-Lieh; Lin, Yi

    2016-01-30

    This paper proposes the first all-digital on-chip linearity enhancement technique for improving the accuracy of the time-domain complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) smart temperature sensor. To facilitate on-chip application and intellectual property reuse, an all-digital time-domain smart temperature sensor was implemented using 90 nm Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Although the inverter-based temperature sensor has a smaller circuit area and lower complexity, two-point calibration must be used to achieve an acceptable inaccuracy. With the help of a calibration circuit, the influence of process variations was reduced greatly for one-point calibration support, reducing the test costs and time. However, the sensor response still exhibited a large curvature, which substantially affected the accuracy of the sensor. Thus, an on-chip linearity-enhanced circuit is proposed to linearize the curve and achieve a new linearity-enhanced output. The sensor was implemented on eight different Xilinx FPGA using 118 slices per sensor in each FPGA to demonstrate the benefits of the linearization. Compared with the unlinearized version, the maximal inaccuracy of the linearized version decreased from 5 °C to 2.5 °C after one-point calibration in a range of -20 °C to 100 °C. The sensor consumed 95 μW using 1 kSa/s. The proposed linearity enhancement technique significantly improves temperature sensing accuracy, avoiding costly curvature compensation while it is fully synthesizable for future Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) system.

  19. All-Digital Time-Domain CMOS Smart Temperature Sensor with On-Chip Linearity Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Chen, Chao-Lieh; Lin, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the first all-digital on-chip linearity enhancement technique for improving the accuracy of the time-domain complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) smart temperature sensor. To facilitate on-chip application and intellectual property reuse, an all-digital time-domain smart temperature sensor was implemented using 90 nm Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Although the inverter-based temperature sensor has a smaller circuit area and lower complexity, two-point calibration must be used to achieve an acceptable inaccuracy. With the help of a calibration circuit, the influence of process variations was reduced greatly for one-point calibration support, reducing the test costs and time. However, the sensor response still exhibited a large curvature, which substantially affected the accuracy of the sensor. Thus, an on-chip linearity-enhanced circuit is proposed to linearize the curve and achieve a new linearity-enhanced output. The sensor was implemented on eight different Xilinx FPGA using 118 slices per sensor in each FPGA to demonstrate the benefits of the linearization. Compared with the unlinearized version, the maximal inaccuracy of the linearized version decreased from 5 °C to 2.5 °C after one-point calibration in a range of −20 °C to 100 °C. The sensor consumed 95 μW using 1 kSa/s. The proposed linearity enhancement technique significantly improves temperature sensing accuracy, avoiding costly curvature compensation while it is fully synthesizable for future Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) system. PMID:26840316

  20. Method for implementation of back-illuminated CMOS or CCD imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for implementation of back-illuminated CMOS or CCD imagers. An oxide layer buried between silicon wafer and device silicon is provided. The oxide layer forms a passivation layer in the imaging structure. A device layer and interlayer dielectric are formed, and the silicon wafer is removed to expose the oxide layer.

  1. Studies for a 10 μs, thin, high resolution CMOS pixel sensor for future vertex detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voutsinas, G.; Amar-Youcef, S.; Baudot, J.; Bertolone, G.; Brogna, A.; Chon-Sen, N.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Dorokhov, A.; Dozière, G.; Dulinski, W.; Degerli, Y.; De Masi, R.; Deveaux, M.; Gelin, M.; Goffe, M.; Hu-Guo, Ch.; Himmi, A.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Koziel, M.; Morel, F.; Müntz, C.; Orsini, F.; Santos, C.; Schrader, C.; Specht, M.; Stroth, J.; Valin, I.; Wagner, F. M.; Winter, M.

    2011-06-01

    Future high energy physics (HEP) experiments require detectors with unprecedented performances for track and vertex reconstruction. These requirements call for high precision sensors, with low material budget and short integration time. The development of CMOS sensors for HEP applications was initiated at IPHC Strasbourg more than 10 years ago, motivated by the needs for vertex detectors at the International Linear Collider (ILC) [R. Turchetta et al, NIM A 458 (2001) 677]. Since then several other applications emerged. The first real scale digital CMOS sensor MIMOSA26 equips Flavour Tracker at RHIC, as well as for the microvertex detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR. MIMOSA sensors may also offer attractive performances for the ALICE upgrade at LHC. This paper will demonstrate the substantial performance improvement of CMOS sensors based on a high resistivity epitaxial layer. First studies for integrating the sensors into a detector system will be addressed and finally the way to go to a 10 μs readout sensor will be discussed.

  2. A process modification for CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors for enhanced depletion, timing performance and radiation tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeys, W.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Hillemanns, H.; Kugathasan, T.; Mager, M.; Musa, L.; Riedler, P.; Reidt, F.; Van Hoorne, J.; Fenigstein, A.; Leitner, T.

    2017-11-01

    For the upgrade of its Inner Tracking System, the ALICE experiment plans to install a new tracker fully constructed with monolithic active pixel sensors implemented in a standard 180 nm CMOS imaging sensor process, with a deep pwell allowing full CMOS within the pixel. Reverse substrate bias increases the tolerance to non-ionizing energy loss (NIEL) well beyond 1013 1 MeVneq /cm2, but does not allow full depletion of the sensitive layer and hence full charge collection by drift, mandatory for more extreme radiation tolerance. This paper describes a process modification to fully deplete the epitaxial layer even with a small charge collection electrode. It uses a low dose blanket deep high energy n-type implant in the pixel array and does not require significant circuit or layout changes so that the same design can be fabricated both in the standard and modified process. When exposed to a 55 Fe source at a reverse substrate bias of -6 V, pixels implemented in the standard and the modified process in a low and high dose variant for the deep n-type implant respectively yield a signal of about 115 mV, 110 mV and 90 mV at the output of a follower circuit. Signal rise times heavily affected by the speed of this circuit are 27 . 8 + / - 5 ns, 23 . 2 + / - 4 . 2 ns, and 22 . 2 + / - 3 . 7 ns rms, respectively. In a different setup, the single pixel signal from a 90 Sr source only degrades by less than 20% for the modified process after a 1015 1 MeVneq /cm2 irradiation, while the signal rise time only degrades by about 16 + / - 2 ns to 19 + / - 2 . 8 ns rms. From sensors implemented in the standard process no useful signal could be extracted after the same exposure. These first results indicate the process modification maintains low sensor capacitance, improves timing performance and increases NIEL tolerance by at least an order of magnitude.

  3. Integrated High Resolution Digital Color Light Sensor in 130 nm CMOS Technology

    PubMed Central

    Strle, Drago; Nahtigal, Uroš; Batistell, Graciele; Zhang, Vincent Chi; Ofner, Erwin; Fant, Andrea; Sturm, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a color light detection system integrated in 130 nm CMOS technology. The sensors and corresponding electronics detect light in a CIE XYZ color luminosity space using on-chip integrated sensors without any additional process steps, high-resolution analog-to-digital converter, and dedicated DSP algorithm. The sensor consists of a set of laterally arranged integrated photodiodes that are partly covered by metal, where color separation between the photodiodes is achieved by lateral carrier diffusion together with wavelength-dependent absorption. A high resolution, hybrid, ∑∆ ADC converts each photo diode’s current into a 22-bit digital result, canceling the dark current of the photo diodes. The digital results are further processed by the DSP, which calculates normalized XYZ or RGB color and intensity parameters using linear transformations of the three photo diode responses by multiplication of the data with a transformation matrix, where the coefficients are extracted by training in combination with a pseudo-inverse operation and the least-mean square approximation. The sensor system detects the color light parameters with 22-bit accuracy, consumes less than 60 μA on average at 10 readings per second, and occupies approx. 0.8 mm2 of silicon area (including three photodiodes and the analog part of the ADC). The DSP is currently implemented on FPGA. PMID:26205275

  4. Integrated High Resolution Digital Color Light Sensor in 130 nm CMOS Technology.

    PubMed

    Strle, Drago; Nahtigal, Uroš; Batistell, Graciele; Zhang, Vincent Chi; Ofner, Erwin; Fant, Andrea; Sturm, Johannes

    2015-07-22

    This article presents a color light detection system integrated in 130 nm CMOS technology. The sensors and corresponding electronics detect light in a CIE XYZ color luminosity space using on-chip integrated sensors without any additional process steps, high-resolution analog-to-digital converter, and dedicated DSP algorithm. The sensor consists of a set of laterally arranged integrated photodiodes that are partly covered by metal, where color separation between the photodiodes is achieved by lateral carrier diffusion together with wavelength-dependent absorption. A high resolution, hybrid, ∑∆ ADC converts each photo diode's current into a 22-bit digital result, canceling the dark current of the photo diodes. The digital results are further processed by the DSP, which calculates normalized XYZ or RGB color and intensity parameters using linear transformations of the three photo diode responses by multiplication of the data with a transformation matrix, where the coefficients are extracted by training in combination with a pseudo-inverse operation and the least-mean square approximation. The sensor system detects the color light parameters with 22-bit accuracy, consumes less than 60 μA on average at 10 readings per second, and occupies approx. 0.8 mm(2) of silicon area (including three photodiodes and the analog part of the ADC). The DSP is currently implemented on FPGA.

  5. Research on HDR image fusion algorithm based on Laplace pyramid weight transform with extreme low-light CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Wen; Li, Li; Jin, Weiqi; Qiu, Su; Zou, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Extreme-Low-Light CMOS has been widely applied in the field of night-vision as a new type of solid image sensor. But if the illumination in the scene has drastic changes or the illumination is too strong, Extreme-Low-Light CMOS can't both clearly present the high-light scene and low-light region. According to the partial saturation problem in the field of night-vision, a HDR image fusion algorithm based on the Laplace Pyramid was researched. The overall gray value and the contrast of the low light image is very low. We choose the fusion strategy based on regional average gradient for the top layer of the long exposure image and short exposure image, which has rich brightness and textural features. The remained layers which represent the edge feature information of the target are based on the fusion strategy based on regional energy. In the process of source image reconstruction with Laplacian pyramid image, we compare the fusion results with four kinds of basal images. The algorithm is tested using Matlab and compared with the different fusion strategies. We use information entropy, average gradient and standard deviation these three objective evaluation parameters for the further analysis of the fusion result. Different low illumination environment experiments show that the algorithm in this paper can rapidly get wide dynamic range while keeping high entropy. Through the verification of this algorithm features, there is a further application prospect of the optimized algorithm. Keywords: high dynamic range imaging, image fusion, multi-exposure image, weight coefficient, information fusion, Laplacian pyramid transform.

  6. A CMOS pixel sensor prototype for the outer layers of linear collider vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Morel, F.; Hu-Guo, C.; Himmi, A.; Dorokhov, A.; Hu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) expresses a stringent requirement for high precision vertex detectors (VXD). CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) have been considered as an option for the VXD of the International Large Detector (ILD), one of the detector concepts proposed for the ILC. MIMOSA-31 developed at IPHC-Strasbourg is the first CPS integrated with 4-bit column-level ADC for the outer layers of the VXD, adapted to an original concept minimizing the power consumption. It is composed of a matrix of 64 rows and 48 columns. The pixel concept combines in-pixel amplification with a correlated double sampling (CDS) operation in order to reduce the temporal noise and fixed pattern noise (FPN). At the bottom of the pixel array, each column is terminated with a self-triggered analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The ADC design was optimized for power saving at a sampling frequency of 6.25 MS/s. The prototype chip is fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology. This paper presents the details of the prototype chip and its test results.

  7. Technical guidance for the development of a solid state image sensor for human low vision image warping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderspiegel, Jan

    1994-01-01

    This report surveys different technologies and approaches to realize sensors for image warping. The goal is to study the feasibility, technical aspects, and limitations of making an electronic camera with special geometries which implements certain transformations for image warping. This work was inspired by the research done by Dr. Juday at NASA Johnson Space Center on image warping. The study has looked into different solid-state technologies to fabricate image sensors. It is found that among the available technologies, CMOS is preferred over CCD technology. CMOS provides more flexibility to design different functions into the sensor, is more widely available, and is a lower cost solution. By using an architecture with row and column decoders one has the added flexibility of addressing the pixels at random, or read out only part of the image.

  8. I-ImaS: intelligent imaging sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Royle, G.; Esbrand, C.; Hall, G.; Turchetta, R.; Speller, R.

    2010-08-01

    Conventional x-radiography uniformly irradiates the relevant region of the patient. Across that region, however, there is likely to be significant variation in both the thickness and pathological composition of the tissues present, which means that the x-ray exposure conditions selected, and consequently the image quality achieved, are a compromise. The I-ImaS concept eliminates this compromise by intelligently scanning the patient to identify the important diagnostic features, which are then used to adaptively control the x-ray exposure conditions at each point in the patient. In this way optimal image quality is achieved throughout the region of interest whilst maintaining or reducing the dose. An I-ImaS system has been built under an EU Framework 6 project and has undergone pre-clinical testing. The system is based upon two rows of sensors controlled via an FPGA based DAQ board. Each row consists of a 160 mm × 1 mm linear array of ten scintillator coated 3T CMOS APS devices with 32 μm pixels and a readable array of 520 × 40 pixels. The first sensor row scans the patient using a fraction of the total radiation dose to produce a preview image, which is then interrogated to identify the optimal exposure conditions at each point in the image. A signal is then sent to control a beam filter mechanism to appropriately moderate x-ray beam intensity at the patient as the second row of sensors follows behind. Tests performed on breast tissue sections found that the contrast-to-noise ratio in over 70% of the images was increased by an average of 15% at an average dose reduction of 9%. The same technology is currently also being applied to baggage scanning for airport security.

  9. Integrated Amorphous Silicon p-i-n Temperature Sensor for CMOS Photonics.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sandro; Pangallo, Giovanni; Della Corte, Francesco Giuseppe

    2016-01-06

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) shows interesting optoelectronic and technological properties that make it suitable for the fabrication of passive and active micro-photonic devices, compatible moreover with standard microelectronic devices on a microchip. A temperature sensor based on a hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diode integrated in an optical waveguide for silicon photonics applications is presented here. The linear dependence of the voltage drop across the forward-biased diode on temperature, in a range from 30 °C up to 170 °C, has been used for thermal sensing. A high sensitivity of 11.9 mV/°C in the bias current range of 34-40 nA has been measured. The proposed device is particularly suitable for the continuous temperature monitoring of CMOS-compatible photonic integrated circuits, where the behavior of the on-chip active and passive devices are strongly dependent on their operating temperature.

  10. Vision communications based on LED array and imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jong-Ho; Jung, Sung-Yoon

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a brand new communication concept, called as "vision communication" based on LED array and image sensor. This system consists of LED array as a transmitter and digital device which include image sensor such as CCD and CMOS as receiver. In order to transmit data, the proposed communication scheme simultaneously uses the digital image processing and optical wireless communication scheme. Therefore, the cognitive communication scheme is possible with the help of recognition techniques used in vision system. By increasing data rate, our scheme can use LED array consisting of several multi-spectral LEDs. Because arranged each LED can emit multi-spectral optical signal such as visible, infrared and ultraviolet light, the increase of data rate is possible similar to WDM and MIMO skills used in traditional optical and wireless communications. In addition, this multi-spectral capability also makes it possible to avoid the optical noises in communication environment. In our vision communication scheme, the data packet is composed of Sync. data and information data. Sync. data is used to detect the transmitter area and calibrate the distorted image snapshots obtained by image sensor. By making the optical rate of LED array be same with the frame rate (frames per second) of image sensor, we can decode the information data included in each image snapshot based on image processing and optical wireless communication techniques. Through experiment based on practical test bed system, we confirm the feasibility of the proposed vision communications based on LED array and image sensor.

  11. Compact characterization of liquid absorption and emission spectra using linear variable filters integrated with a CMOS imaging camera

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yuhang; Carlson, John A.; Kesler, Benjamin A.; Peng, Wang; Su, Patrick; Al-Mulla, Saoud A.; Lim, Sung Jun; Smith, Andrew M.; Dallesasse, John M.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    A compact analysis platform for detecting liquid absorption and emission spectra using a set of optical linear variable filters atop a CMOS image sensor is presented. The working spectral range of the analysis platform can be extended without a reduction in spectral resolution by utilizing multiple linear variable filters with different wavelength ranges on the same CMOS sensor. With optical setup reconfiguration, its capability to measure both absorption and fluorescence emission is demonstrated. Quantitative detection of fluorescence emission down to 0.28 nM for quantum dot dispersions and 32 ng/mL for near-infrared dyes has been demonstrated on a single platform over a wide spectral range, as well as an absorption-based water quality test, showing the versatility of the system across liquid solutions for different emission and absorption bands. Comparison with a commercially available portable spectrometer and an optical spectrum analyzer shows our system has an improved signal-to-noise ratio and acceptable spectral resolution for discrimination of emission spectra, and characterization of colored liquid’s absorption characteristics generated by common biomolecular assays. This simple, compact, and versatile analysis platform demonstrates a path towards an integrated optical device that can be utilized for a wide variety of applications in point-of-use testing and point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:27389070

  12. Compact characterization of liquid absorption and emission spectra using linear variable filters integrated with a CMOS imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yuhang; Carlson, John A.; Kesler, Benjamin A.; Peng, Wang; Su, Patrick; Al-Mulla, Saoud A.; Lim, Sung Jun; Smith, Andrew M.; Dallesasse, John M.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-07-01

    A compact analysis platform for detecting liquid absorption and emission spectra using a set of optical linear variable filters atop a CMOS image sensor is presented. The working spectral range of the analysis platform can be extended without a reduction in spectral resolution by utilizing multiple linear variable filters with different wavelength ranges on the same CMOS sensor. With optical setup reconfiguration, its capability to measure both absorption and fluorescence emission is demonstrated. Quantitative detection of fluorescence emission down to 0.28 nM for quantum dot dispersions and 32 ng/mL for near-infrared dyes has been demonstrated on a single platform over a wide spectral range, as well as an absorption-based water quality test, showing the versatility of the system across liquid solutions for different emission and absorption bands. Comparison with a commercially available portable spectrometer and an optical spectrum analyzer shows our system has an improved signal-to-noise ratio and acceptable spectral resolution for discrimination of emission spectra, and characterization of colored liquid’s absorption characteristics generated by common biomolecular assays. This simple, compact, and versatile analysis platform demonstrates a path towards an integrated optical device that can be utilized for a wide variety of applications in point-of-use testing and point-of-care diagnostics.

  13. Compact characterization of liquid absorption and emission spectra using linear variable filters integrated with a CMOS imaging camera.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yuhang; Carlson, John A; Kesler, Benjamin A; Peng, Wang; Su, Patrick; Al-Mulla, Saoud A; Lim, Sung Jun; Smith, Andrew M; Dallesasse, John M; Cunningham, Brian T

    2016-07-08

    A compact analysis platform for detecting liquid absorption and emission spectra using a set of optical linear variable filters atop a CMOS image sensor is presented. The working spectral range of the analysis platform can be extended without a reduction in spectral resolution by utilizing multiple linear variable filters with different wavelength ranges on the same CMOS sensor. With optical setup reconfiguration, its capability to measure both absorption and fluorescence emission is demonstrated. Quantitative detection of fluorescence emission down to 0.28 nM for quantum dot dispersions and 32 ng/mL for near-infrared dyes has been demonstrated on a single platform over a wide spectral range, as well as an absorption-based water quality test, showing the versatility of the system across liquid solutions for different emission and absorption bands. Comparison with a commercially available portable spectrometer and an optical spectrum analyzer shows our system has an improved signal-to-noise ratio and acceptable spectral resolution for discrimination of emission spectra, and characterization of colored liquid's absorption characteristics generated by common biomolecular assays. This simple, compact, and versatile analysis platform demonstrates a path towards an integrated optical device that can be utilized for a wide variety of applications in point-of-use testing and point-of-care diagnostics.

  14. Establishing imaging sensor specifications for digital still cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    2007-02-01

    Digital Still Cameras, DSCs, have now displaced conventional still cameras in most markets. The heart of a DSC is thought to be the imaging sensor, be it Full Frame CCD, and Interline CCD, a CMOS sensor or the newer Foveon buried photodiode sensors. There is a strong tendency by consumers to consider only the number of mega-pixels in a camera and not to consider the overall performance of the imaging system, including sharpness, artifact control, noise, color reproduction, exposure latitude and dynamic range. This paper will provide a systematic method to characterize the physical requirements of an imaging sensor and supporting system components based on the desired usage. The analysis is based on two software programs that determine the "sharpness", potential for artifacts, sensor "photographic speed", dynamic range and exposure latitude based on the physical nature of the imaging optics, sensor characteristics (including size of pixels, sensor architecture, noise characteristics, surface states that cause dark current, quantum efficiency, effective MTF, and the intrinsic full well capacity in terms of electrons per square centimeter). Examples will be given for consumer, pro-consumer, and professional camera systems. Where possible, these results will be compared to imaging system currently on the market.

  15. A Monolithic CMOS Magnetic Hall Sensor with High Sensitivity and Linearity Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiyun; Wang, Dejun; Xu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a fully integrated linear Hall sensor by means of 0.8 μm high voltage complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. This monolithic Hall sensor chip features a highly sensitive horizontal switched Hall plate and an efficient signal conditioner using dynamic offset cancellation technique. An improved cross-like Hall plate achieves high magnetic sensitivity and low offset. A new spinning current modulator stabilizes the quiescent output voltage and improves the reliability of the signal conditioner. The tested results show that at the 5 V supply voltage, the maximum Hall output voltage of the monolithic Hall sensor microsystem, is up to ±2.1 V and the linearity of Hall output voltage is higher than 99% in the magnetic flux density range from ±5 mT to ±175 mT. The output equivalent residual offset is 0.48 mT and the static power consumption is 20 mW. PMID:26516864

  16. An Autonomous Wireless Sensor Node With Asynchronous ECG Monitoring in 0.18 μ m CMOS.

    PubMed

    Mansano, Andre L; Li, Yongjia; Bagga, Sumit; Serdijn, Wouter A

    2016-06-01

    The design of a 13.56 MHz/402 MHz autonomous wireless sensor node with asynchronous ECG monitoring for near field communication is presented. The sensor node consists of an RF energy harvester (RFEH), a power management unit, an ECG readout, a data encoder and an RF backscattering transmitter. The energy harvester supplies the system with 1.25 V and offers a power conversion efficiency of 19% from a -13 dBm RF source at 13.56 MHz. The power management unit regulates the output voltage of the RFEH to supply the ECG readout with VECG = 0.95 V and the data encoder with VDE = 0.65 V . The ECG readout comprises an analog front-end (low noise amplifier and programmable voltage to current converter) and an asynchronous level crossing ADC with 8 bits resolution. The ADC output is encoded by a pulse generator that drives a backscattering transmitter at 402 MHz. The total power consumption of the sensor node circuitry is 9.7 μ W for a data rate of 90 kb/s and a heart rate of 70 bpm. The chip has been designed in a 0.18 μm CMOS process and shows superior RF input power sensitivity and lower power consumption when compared to previous works.

  17. An NFC-Enabled CMOS IC for a Wireless Fully Implantable Glucose Sensor.

    PubMed

    DeHennis, Andrew; Getzlaff, Stefan; Grice, David; Mailand, Marko

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated circuit (IC) that merges integrated optical and temperature transducers, optical interface circuitry, and a near-field communication (NFC)-enabled digital, wireless readout for a fully passive implantable sensor platform to measure glucose in people with diabetes. A flip-chip mounted LED and monolithically integrated photodiodes serve as the transduction front-end to enable fluorescence readout. A wide-range programmable transimpedance amplifier adapts the sensor signals to the input of an 11-bit analog-to-digital converter digitizing the measurements. Measurement readout is enabled by means of wireless backscatter modulation to a remote NFC reader. The system is able to resolve current levels of less than 10 pA with a single fluorescent measurement energy consumption of less than 1 μJ. The wireless IC is fabricated in a 0.6-μm-CMOS process and utilizes a 13.56-MHz-based ISO15693 for passive wireless readout through a NFC interface. The IC is utilized as the core interface to a fluorescent, glucose transducer to enable a fully implantable sensor-based continuous glucose monitoring system.

  18. Multichannel lens-free CMOS sensors for real-time monitoring of cell growth.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ko-Tung; Chang, Yu-Jen; Chen, Chia-Ling; Wang, Yao-Nan

    2015-02-01

    A low-cost platform is proposed for the growth and real-time monitoring of biological cells. The main components of the platform include a PMMA cell culture microchip and a multichannel lens-free CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) / LED imaging system. The PMMA microchip comprises a three-layer structure and is fabricated using a low-cost CO2 laser ablation technique. The CMOS / LED monitoring system is controlled using a self-written LabVIEW program. The platform has overall dimensions of just 130 × 104 × 115 mm(3) and can therefore be placed within a commercial incubator. The feasibility of the proposed system is demonstrated using HepG2 cancer cell samples with concentrations of 5000, 10 000, 20 000, and 40 000 cells/mL. In addition, cell cytotoxicity tests are performed using 8, 16, and 32 mM cyclophosphamide. For all of the experiments, the cell growth is observed over a period of 48 h. The cell growth rate is found to vary in the range of 44∼52% under normal conditions and from 17.4∼34.5% under cyclophosphamide-treated conditions. In general, the results confirm the long-term cell growth and real-time monitoring ability of the proposed system. Moreover, the magnification provided by the lens-free CMOS / LED observation system is around 40× that provided by a traditional microscope. Consequently, the proposed system has significant potential for long-term cell proliferation and cytotoxicity evaluation investigations. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. 3-Axis Fully-Integrated Capacitive Tactile Sensor with Flip-Bonded CMOS on LTCC Interposer †

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Sho; Nakayama, Takahiro; Hata, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Shuji

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports a 3-axis fully integrated differential capacitive tactile sensor surface-mountable on a bus line. The sensor integrates a flip-bonded complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) with capacitive sensing circuits on a low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) interposer with Au through vias by Au-Au thermo-compression bonding. The CMOS circuit and bonding pads on the sensor backside were electrically connected through Au bumps and the LTCC interposer, and the differential capacitive gap was formed by an Au sealing frame. A diaphragm for sensing 3-axis force was formed in the CMOS substrate. The dimensions of the completed sensor are 2.5 mm in width, 2.5 mm in length, and 0.66 mm in thickness. The fabricated sensor output coded 3-axis capacitive sensing data according to applied 3-axis force by three-dimensional (3D)-printed pins. The measured sensitivity was as high as over 34 Count/mN for normal force and 14 to 15 Count/mN for shear force with small noise, which corresponds to less than 1 mN. The hysteresis and the average cross-sensitivity were also found to be less than 2% full scale and 11%, respectively. PMID:29068429

  20. Image stacking approach to increase sensitivity of fluorescence detection using a low cost complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) webcam

    PubMed Central

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Kostov, Yordan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    Optical technologies are important for biological analysis. Current biomedical optical analyses rely on high-cost, high-sensitivity optical detectors such as photomultipliers, avalanched photodiodes or cooled CCD cameras. In contrast, Webcams, mobile phones and other popular consumer electronics use lower-sensitivity, lower-cost optical components such as photodiodes or CMOS sensors. In order for consumer electronics devices, such as webcams, to be useful for biomedical analysis, they must have increased sensitivity. We combined two strategies to increase the sensitivity of CMOS-based fluorescence detector. We captured hundreds of low sensitivity images using a Webcam in video mode, instead of a single image typically used in cooled CCD devices.We then used a computational approach consisting of an image stacking algorithm to remove the noise by combining all of the images into a single image. While video mode is widely used for dynamic scene imaging (e.g. movies or time-lapse photography), it is not used to capture a single static image, which removes noise and increases sensitivity by more than thirty fold. The portable, battery-operated Webcam-based fluorometer system developed here consists of five modules: (1) a low cost CMOS Webcam to monitor light emission, (2) a plate to perform assays, (3) filters and multi-wavelength LED illuminator for fluorophore excitation, (4) a portable computer to acquire and analyze images, and (5) image stacking software for image enhancement. The samples consisted of various concentrations of fluorescein, ranging from 30 μM to 1000 μM, in a 36-well miniature plate. In the single frame mode, the fluorometer's limit-of-detection (LOD) for fluorescein is ∼1000 μM, which is relatively insensitive. However, when used in video mode combined with image stacking enhancement, the LOD is dramatically reduced to 30 μM, sensitivity which is similar to that of state-of-the-art ELISA plate photomultiplier-based readers. Numerous medical

  1. Image stacking approach to increase sensitivity of fluorescence detection using a low cost complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) webcam.

    PubMed

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Kostov, Yordan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2012-01-01

    Optical technologies are important for biological analysis. Current biomedical optical analyses rely on high-cost, high-sensitivity optical detectors such as photomultipliers, avalanched photodiodes or cooled CCD cameras. In contrast, Webcams, mobile phones and other popular consumer electronics use lower-sensitivity, lower-cost optical components such as photodiodes or CMOS sensors. In order for consumer electronics devices, such as webcams, to be useful for biomedical analysis, they must have increased sensitivity. We combined two strategies to increase the sensitivity of CMOS-based fluorescence detector. We captured hundreds of low sensitivity images using a Webcam in video mode, instead of a single image typically used in cooled CCD devices.We then used a computational approach consisting of an image stacking algorithm to remove the noise by combining all of the images into a single image. While video mode is widely used for dynamic scene imaging (e.g. movies or time-lapse photography), it is not used to capture a single static image, which removes noise and increases sensitivity by more than thirty fold. The portable, battery-operated Webcam-based fluorometer system developed here consists of five modules: (1) a low cost CMOS Webcam to monitor light emission, (2) a plate to perform assays, (3) filters and multi-wavelength LED illuminator for fluorophore excitation, (4) a portable computer to acquire and analyze images, and (5) image stacking software for image enhancement. The samples consisted of various concentrations of fluorescein, ranging from 30 μM to 1000 μM, in a 36-well miniature plate. In the single frame mode, the fluorometer's limit-of-detection (LOD) for fluorescein is ∼1000 μM, which is relatively insensitive. However, when used in video mode combined with image stacking enhancement, the LOD is dramatically reduced to 30 μM, sensitivity which is similar to that of state-of-the-art ELISA plate photomultiplier-based readers. Numerous medical

  2. Autonomous vision networking: miniature wireless sensor networks with imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messinger, Gioia; Goldberg, Giora

    2006-09-01

    The recent emergence of integrated PicoRadio technology, the rise of low power, low cost, System-On-Chip (SOC) CMOS imagers, coupled with the fast evolution of networking protocols and digital signal processing (DSP), created a unique opportunity to achieve the goal of deploying large-scale, low cost, intelligent, ultra-low power distributed wireless sensor networks for the visualization of the environment. Of all sensors, vision is the most desired, but its applications in distributed sensor networks have been elusive so far. Not any more. The practicality and viability of ultra-low power vision networking has been proven and its applications are countless, from security, and chemical analysis to industrial monitoring, asset tracking and visual recognition, vision networking represents a truly disruptive technology applicable to many industries. The presentation discusses some of the critical components and technologies necessary to make these networks and products affordable and ubiquitous - specifically PicoRadios, CMOS imagers, imaging DSP, networking and overall wireless sensor network (WSN) system concepts. The paradigm shift, from large, centralized and expensive sensor platforms, to small, low cost, distributed, sensor networks, is possible due to the emergence and convergence of a few innovative technologies. Avaak has developed a vision network that is aided by other sensors such as motion, acoustic and magnetic, and plans to deploy it for use in military and commercial applications. In comparison to other sensors, imagers produce large data files that require pre-processing and a certain level of compression before these are transmitted to a network server, in order to minimize the load on the network. Some of the most innovative chemical detectors currently in development are based on sensors that change color or pattern in the presence of the desired analytes. These changes are easily recorded and analyzed by a CMOS imager and an on-board DSP processor

  3. Performance and Stress Analysis of Metal Oxide Films for CMOS-Integrated Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Filipovic, Lado; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    The integration of gas sensor components into smart phones, tablets and wrist watches will revolutionize the environmental health and safety industry by providing individuals the ability to detect harmful chemicals and pollutants in the environment using always-on hand-held or wearable devices. Metal oxide gas sensors rely on changes in their electrical conductance due to the interaction of the oxide with a surrounding gas. These sensors have been extensively studied in the hopes that they will provide full gas sensing functionality with CMOS integrability. The performance of several metal oxide materials, such as tin oxide (SnO2), zinc oxide (ZnO), indium oxide (In2O3) and indium-tin-oxide (ITO), are studied for the detection of various harmful or toxic cases. Due to the need for these films to be heated to temperatures between 250 °C and 550 °C during operation in order to increase their sensing functionality, a considerable degradation of the film can result. The stress generation during thin film deposition and the thermo-mechanical stress that arises during post-deposition cooling is analyzed through simulations. A tin oxide thin film is deposited using the efficient and economical spray pyrolysis technique, which involves three steps: the atomization of the precursor solution, the transport of the aerosol droplets towards the wafer and the decomposition of the precursor at or near the substrate resulting in film growth. The details of this technique and a simulation methodology are presented. The dependence of the deposition technique on the sensor performance is also discussed. PMID:25815445

  4. Performance and stress analysis of metal oxide films for CMOS-integrated gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, Lado; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2015-03-25

    The integration of gas sensor components into smart phones, tablets and wrist watches will revolutionize the environmental health and safety industry by providing individuals the ability to detect harmful chemicals and pollutants in the environment using always-on hand-held or wearable devices. Metal oxide gas sensors rely on changes in their electrical conductance due to the interaction of the oxide with a surrounding gas. These sensors have been extensively studied in the hopes that they will provide full gas sensing functionality with CMOS integrability. The performance of several metal oxide materials, such as tin oxide (SnO2), zinc oxide (ZnO), indium oxide (In2O3) and indium-tin-oxide (ITO), are studied for the detection of various harmful or toxic cases. Due to the need for these films to be heated to temperatures between 250°C and 550°C during operation in order to increase their sensing functionality, a considerable degradation of the film can result. The stress generation during thin film deposition and the thermo-mechanical stress that arises during post-deposition cooling is analyzed through simulations. A tin oxide thin film is deposited using the efficient and economical spray pyrolysis technique, which involves three steps: the atomization of the precursor solution, the transport of the aerosol droplets towards the wafer and the decomposition of the precursor at or near the substrate resulting in film growth. The details of this technique and a simulation methodology are presented. The dependence of the deposition technique on the sensor performance is also discussed.

  5. Manufacture of a Polyaniline Nanofiber Ammonia Sensor Integrated with a Readout Circuit Using the CMOS-MEMS Technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mao-Chen; Dai, Ching-Liang; Chan, Chih-Hua; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2009-01-01

    This study presents the fabrication of a polyaniline nanofiber ammonia sensor integrated with a readout circuit on a chip using the commercial 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process and a post-process. The micro ammonia sensor consists of a sensing resistor and an ammonia sensing film. Polyaniline prepared by a chemical polymerization method was adopted as the ammonia sensing film. The fabrication of the ammonia sensor needs a post-process to etch the sacrificial layers and to expose the sensing resistor, and then the ammonia sensing film is coated on the sensing resistor. The ammonia sensor, which is of resistive type, changes its resistance when the sensing film adsorbs or desorbs ammonia gas. A readout circuit is employed to convert the resistance of the ammonia sensor into the voltage output. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the ammonia sensor is about 0.88 mV/ppm at room temperature.

  6. Manufacture of a Polyaniline Nanofiber Ammonia Sensor Integrated with a Readout Circuit Using the CMOS-MEMS Technique

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mao-Chen; Dai, Ching-Liang; Chan, Chih-Hua; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2009-01-01

    This study presents the fabrication of a polyaniline nanofiber ammonia sensor integrated with a readout circuit on a chip using the commercial 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process and a post-process. The micro ammonia sensor consists of a sensing resistor and an ammonia sensing film. Polyaniline prepared by a chemical polymerization method was adopted as the ammonia sensing film. The fabrication of the ammonia sensor needs a post-process to etch the sacrificial layers and to expose the sensing resistor, and then the ammonia sensing film is coated on the sensing resistor. The ammonia sensor, which is of resistive type, changes its resistance when the sensing film adsorbs or desorbs ammonia gas. A readout circuit is employed to convert the resistance of the ammonia sensor into the voltage output. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the ammonia sensor is about 0.88 mV/ppm at room temperature. PMID:22399944

  7. Micro ethanol sensors with a heater fabricated using the commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei-Zhen; Dai, Ching-Liang; Yang, Ming-Zhi

    2013-09-25

    The study investigates the fabrication and characterization of an ethanol microsensor equipped with a heater. The ethanol sensor is manufactured using the commercial 0.18 µm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The sensor consists of a sensitive film, a heater and interdigitated electrodes. The sensitive film is zinc oxide prepared by the sol-gel method, and it is coated on the interdigitated electrodes. The heater is located under the interdigitated electrodes, and it is used to supply a working temperature to the sensitive film. The sensor needs a post-processing step to remove the sacrificial oxide layer, and to coat zinc oxide on the interdigitated electrodes. When the sensitive film senses ethanol gas, the resistance of the sensor generates a change. An inverting amplifier circuit is utilized to convert the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. Experiments show that the sensitivity of the ethanol sensor is 0.35 mV/ppm.

  8. Structure for implementation of back-illuminated CMOS or CCD imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A structure for implementation of back-illuminated CMOS or CCD imagers. An epitaxial silicon layer is connected with a passivation layer, acting as a junction anode. The epitaxial silicon layer converts light passing through the passivation layer and collected by the imaging structure to photoelectrons. A semiconductor well is also provided, located opposite the passivation layer with respect to the epitaxial silicon layer, acting as a junction cathode. Prior to detection, light does not pass through a dielectric separating interconnection metal layers.

  9. Front-end receiver electronics for high-frequency monolithic CMUT-on-CMOS imaging arrays.

    PubMed

    Gurun, Gokce; Hasler, Paul; Degertekin, F

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the design of CMOS receiver electronics for monolithic integration with capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays for highfrequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. A custom 8-inch (20-cm) wafer is fabricated in a 0.35-μm two-poly, four-metal CMOS process and then CMUT arrays are built on top of the application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) on the wafer. We discuss advantages of the single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS approach in terms of receive sensitivity and SNR. Low-noise and high-gain design of a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) optimized for a forward-looking volumetric-imaging CMUT array element is discussed as a challenging design example. Amplifier gain, bandwidth, dynamic range, and power consumption trade-offs are discussed in detail. With minimized parasitics provided by the CMUT-on-CMOS approach, the optimized TIA design achieves a 90 fA/√Hz input-referred current noise, which is less than the thermal-mechanical noise of the CMUT element. We show successful system operation with a pulseecho measurement. Transducer-noise-dominated detection in immersion is also demonstrated through output noise spectrum measurement of the integrated system at different CMUT bias voltages. A noise figure of 1.8 dB is obtained in the designed CMUT bandwidth of 10 to 20 MHz.

  10. Frontend Receiver Electronics for High Frequency Monolithic CMUT-on-CMOS Imaging Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Gurun, Gokce; Hasler, Paul; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design of CMOS receiver electronics for monolithic integration with capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays for high-frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. A custom 8-inch wafer is fabricated in a 0.35 μm two-poly, four-metal CMOS process and then CMUT arrays are built on top of the application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) on the wafer. We discuss advantages of the single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS approach in terms of receive sensitivity and SNR. Low-noise and high-gain design of a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) optimized for a forward-looking volumetric-imaging CMUT array element is discussed as a challenging design example. Amplifier gain, bandwidth, dynamic range and power consumption trade-offs are discussed in detail. With minimized parasitics provided by the CMUT-on-CMOS approach, the optimized TIA design achieves a 90 fA/√Hz input referred current noise, which is less than the thermal-mechanical noise of the CMUT element. We show successful system operation with a pulse-echo measurement. Transducer noise-dominated detection in immersion is also demonstrated through output noise spectrum measurement of the integrated system at different CMUT bias voltages. A noise figure of 1.8 dB is obtained in the designed CMUT bandwidth of 10 MHz to 20 MHz. PMID:21859585

  11. Design and standalone characterisation of a capacitively coupled HV-CMOS sensor chip for the CLIC vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremastiotis, I.; Ballabriga, R.; Campbell, M.; Dannheim, D.; Fiergolski, A.; Hynds, D.; Kulis, S.; Peric, I.

    2017-09-01

    The concept of capacitive coupling between sensors and readout chips is under study for the vertex detector at the proposed high-energy CLIC electron positron collider. The CLICpix Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detector (C3PD) is an active High-Voltage CMOS sensor, designed to be capacitively coupled to the CLICpix2 readout chip. The chip is implemented in a commercial 180 nm HV-CMOS process and contains a matrix of 128×128 square pixels with 25μm pitch. First prototypes have been produced with a standard resistivity of ~20 Ωcm for the substrate and tested in standalone mode. The results show a rise time of ~20 ns, charge gain of 190 mV/ke- and ~40 e- RMS noise for a power consumption of 4.8μW/pixel. The main design aspects, as well as standalone measurement results, are presented.

  12. An acquisition system for CMOS imagers with a genuine 10 Gbit/s bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérin, C.; Mahroug, J.; Tromeur, W.; Houles, J.; Calabria, P.; Barbier, R.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a high data throughput acquisition system for pixel detector readout such as CMOS imagers. This CMOS acquisition board offers a genuine 10 Gbit/s bandwidth to the workstation and can provide an on-line and continuous high frame rate imaging capability. On-line processing can be implemented either on the Data Acquisition Board or on the multi-cores workstation depending on the complexity of the algorithms. The different parts composing the acquisition board have been designed to be used first with a single-photon detector called LUSIPHER (800×800 pixels), developed in our laboratory for scientific applications ranging from nano-photonics to adaptive optics. The architecture of the acquisition board is presented and the performances achieved by the produced boards are described. The future developments (hardware and software) concerning the on-line implementation of algorithms dedicated to single-photon imaging are tackled.

  13. Optical and electrical characterization of a back-thinned CMOS active pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, Andrew; Clark, A.; Houston, S.; Laing, A.; Maneuski, D.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; O'Shea, V.

    2009-06-01

    This work will report on the first work on the characterization of a back-thinned Vanilla-a 512×512 (25 μm squared) active pixel sensor (APS). Characterization of the detectors was carried out through the analysis of photon transfer curves to yield a measurement of full well capacity, noise levels, gain constants and linearity. Spectral characterization of the sensors was also performed in the visible and UV regions. A full comparison against non-back-thinned front illuminated Vanilla sensors is included. Such measurements suggest that the Vanilla APS will be suitable for a wide range of applications, including particle physics and biomedical imaging.

  14. Characterization of X-ray Lobster Optics with a Hybrid CMOS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy; Falcone, Abraham; Burrows, David N.; Bray, Evan; McQuaide, Maria; Kern, Matthew; Wages, Mitchell; Hull, Samuel; Inneman, Adolf; Hudec, Rene; Stehlikova, Veronika

    2018-01-01

    X-ray lobster optics provide a unique way to focus X-rays onto a small focal plane imager with wide field of view imaging. Such an instrument with angular resolution of a few arcminutes can be used to study GRB afterglows, as well as the variability and spectroscopic characteristics for various astrophysical objects. At Penn State University, we have characterized a lobster optic with an H1RG X-Ray hybrid CMOS detector (100 μm thick Silicon with 18 μm pixel size). The light-weight compact lobster optic with a 25 cm focal length provides two dimensional imaging with ~25 cm2 effective area at 2 keV. We utilize a 47 meter long X-ray beam line at Penn state University to do our experiments where we characterize the overall effective area of the instrument at 1.5 - 8 keV for both on-axis and off-axis angles. In this presentation, we will describe the characterization test stand and methods, as well as the detailed results. While this is simply a proof-of-concept experiment, such an instrument with significant collecting area can be explored for future rocket or CubeSat experiments.

  15. Development of CMOS pixel sensors for the upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, L.

    2014-12-01

    The ALICE Collaboration is preparing a major upgrade of the current detector, planned for installation during the second long LHC shutdown in the years 2018-19, in order to enhance its low-momentum vertexing and tracking capability, and exploit the planned increase of the LHC luminosity with Pb beams. One of the cornerstones of the ALICE upgrade strategy is to replace the current Inner Tracking System in its entirety with a new, high resolution, low-material ITS detector. The new ITS will consist of seven concentric layers equipped with Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) implemented using the 0.18 μm CMOS technology of TowerJazz. In this contribution, the main key features of the ITS upgrade will be illustrated with emphasis on the functionality of the pixel chip. The ongoing developments on the readout architectures, which have been implemented in several fabricated prototypes, will be discussed. The operational features of these prototypes as well as the results of the characterisation tests before and after irradiation will also be presented.

  16. Pitch dependence of the tolerance of CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors to non-ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, D.; Deveaux, M.; Domachowski, M.; Fröhlich, I.; Koziel, M.; Müntz, C.; Scharrer, P.; Stroth, J.

    2013-12-01

    CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) have demonstrated excellent performance as tracking detectors for charged particles. They provide an outstanding spatial resolution (a few μm), a detection efficiency of ≳ 99.9 %, very low material budget (0.05 %X0) and good radiation tolerance (≳ 1 Mrad, ≳1013neq /cm2) (Deveaux et al. [1]). This makes them an interesting technology for various applications in heavy ion and particle physics. Their tolerance to bulk damage was recently improved by using high-resistivity (∼ 1 kΩ cm) epitaxial layers as sensitive volume (Deveaux et al. [1], Dorokhov et al. [2]). The radiation tolerance of conventional MAPS is known to depend on the pixel pitch. This is as a higher pitch extends the distance, which signal electrons have to travel by thermal diffusion before being collected. Increased diffusion paths turn into a higher probability of loosing signal charge due to recombination. Provided that a similar effect exists in MAPS with high-resistivity epitaxial layer, it could be used to extend their radiation tolerance further. We addressed this question with MIMOSA-18AHR prototypes, which were provided by the IPHC Strasbourg and irradiated with reactor neutrons. We report about the results of this study and provide evidences that MAPS with 10 μm pixel pitch tolerate doses of ≳ 3 ×1014neq /cm2.

  17. Geiger-Mode Avalanche Photodiode Arrays Integrated to All-Digital CMOS Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-20

    Figure 7 4×4 GMAPD array wire bonded to CMOS timing circuits Figure 8 Low‐fill‐factor APD design used in lidar sensors The APD doping...epitaxial growth and the pixels are isolated by mesa etch. 128×32 lidar image sensors were built by bump bonding the APD arrays to a CMOS timing...passive image sensor with this large a format based on hybridization of a GMAPD array to a CMOS readout. Fig. 14 shows one of the first images taken

  18. First results on DEPFET Active Pixel Sensors fabricated in a CMOS foundry—a promising approach for new detector development and scientific instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschauer, S.; Majewski, P.; Lutz, G.; Soltau, H.; Holl, P.; Hartmann, R.; Schlosser, D.; Paschen, U.; Weyers, S.; Dreiner, S.; Klusmann, M.; Hauser, J.; Kalok, D.; Bechteler, A.; Heinzinger, K.; Porro, M.; Titze, B.; Strüder, L.

    2017-11-01

    DEPFET Active Pixel Sensors (APS) have been introduced as focal plane detectors for X-ray astronomy already in 1996. Fabricated on high resistivity, fully depleted silicon and back-illuminated they can provide high quantum efficiency and low noise operation even at very high read rates. In 2009 a new type of DEPFET APS, the DSSC (DEPFET Sensor with Signal Compression) was developed, which is dedicated to high-speed X-ray imaging at the European X-ray free electron laser facility (EuXFEL) in Hamburg. In order to resolve the enormous contrasts occurring in Free Electron Laser (FEL) experiments, this new DSSC-DEPFET sensor has the capability of nonlinear amplification, that is, high gain for low intensities in order to obtain single-photon detection capability, and reduced gain for high intensities to achieve high dynamic range for several thousand photons per pixel and frame. We call this property "signal compression". Starting in 2015, we have been fabricating DEPFET sensors in an industrial scale CMOS foundry maintaining the outstanding proven DEPFET properties and adding new capabilities due to the industrial-scale CMOS process. We will highlight these additional features and describe the progress achieved so far. In a first attempt on double-sided polished 725 μm thick 200 mm high resistivity float zone silicon wafers all relevant device related properties have been measured, such as leakage current, depletion voltage, transistor characteristics, noise and energy resolution for X-rays and the nonlinear response. The smaller feature size provided by the new technology allows for an advanced design and significant improvements in device performance. A brief summary of the present status will be given as well as an outlook on next steps and future perspectives.

  19. Fabrication of Ultra-Thin Printed Organic TFT CMOS Logic Circuits Optimized for Low-Voltage Wearable Sensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yasunori; Hayasaka, Kazuma; Shiwaku, Rei; Yokosawa, Koji; Shiba, Takeo; Mamada, Masashi; Kumaki, Daisuke; Fukuda, Kenjiro; Tokito, Shizuo

    2016-05-09

    Ultrathin electronic circuits that can be manufactured by using conventional printing technologies are key elements necessary to realize wearable health sensors and next-generation flexible electronic devices. Due to their low level of power consumption, complementary (CMOS) circuits using both types of semiconductors can be easily employed in wireless devices. Here, we describe ultrathin CMOS logic circuits, for which not only the source/drain electrodes but also the semiconductor layers were printed. Both p-type and n-type organic thin film transistor devices were employed in a D-flip flop circuit in the newly developed stacked structure and exhibited excellent electrical characteristics, including good carrier mobilities of 0.34 and 0.21 cm(2) V(-1) sec(-1), and threshold voltages of nearly 0 V with low operating voltages. These printed organic CMOS D-flip flop circuits exhibit operating frequencies of 75 Hz and demonstrate great potential for flexible and printed electronics technology, particularly for wearable sensor applications with wireless connectivity.

  20. Full-wafer fabrication by nanostencil lithography of micro/nanomechanical mass sensors monolithically integrated with CMOS.

    PubMed

    Arcamone, J; van den Boogaart, M A F; Serra-Graells, F; Fraxedas, J; Brugger, J; Pérez-Murano, F

    2008-07-30

    Wafer-scale nanostencil lithography (nSL) is used to define several types of silicon mechanical resonators, whose dimensions range from 20 µm down to 200 nm, monolithically integrated with CMOS circuits. We demonstrate the simultaneous patterning by nSL of ∼2000 nanodevices per wafer by post-processing standard CMOS substrates using one single metal evaporation, pattern transfer to silicon and subsequent etch of the sacrificial layer. Resonance frequencies in the MHz range were measured in air and vacuum. As proof-of-concept towards an application as high performance sensors, CMOS integrated nano/micromechanical resonators are successfully implemented as ultra-sensitive areal mass sensors. These devices demonstrate the ability to monitor the deposition of gold layers whose average thickness is smaller than a monolayer. Their areal mass sensitivity is in the range of 10(-11) g cm(-2) Hz(-1), and their thickness resolution corresponds to approximately a thousandth of a monolayer.

  1. Fabrication of Ultra-Thin Printed Organic TFT CMOS Logic Circuits Optimized for Low-Voltage Wearable Sensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yasunori; Hayasaka, Kazuma; Shiwaku, Rei; Yokosawa, Koji; Shiba, Takeo; Mamada, Masashi; Kumaki, Daisuke; Fukuda, Kenjiro; Tokito, Shizuo

    2016-01-01

    Ultrathin electronic circuits that can be manufactured by using conventional printing technologies are key elements necessary to realize wearable health sensors and next-generation flexible electronic devices. Due to their low level of power consumption, complementary (CMOS) circuits using both types of semiconductors can be easily employed in wireless devices. Here, we describe ultrathin CMOS logic circuits, for which not only the source/drain electrodes but also the semiconductor layers were printed. Both p-type and n-type organic thin film transistor devices were employed in a D-flip flop circuit in the newly developed stacked structure and exhibited excellent electrical characteristics, including good carrier mobilities of 0.34 and 0.21 cm2 V−1 sec−1, and threshold voltages of nearly 0 V with low operating voltages. These printed organic CMOS D-flip flop circuits exhibit operating frequencies of 75 Hz and demonstrate great potential for flexible and printed electronics technology, particularly for wearable sensor applications with wireless connectivity. PMID:27157914

  2. 1024-Pixel CMOS Multimodality Joint Cellular Sensor/Stimulator Array for Real-Time Holistic Cellular Characterization and Cell-Based Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Seok; Aziz, Moez Karim; Li, Sensen; Chi, Taiyun; Grijalva, Sandra Ivonne; Sung, Jung Hoon; Cho, Hee Cheol; Wang, Hua

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a fully integrated CMOS multimodality joint sensor/stimulator array with 1024 pixels for real-time holistic cellular characterization and drug screening. The proposed system consists of four pixel groups and four parallel signal-conditioning blocks. Every pixel group contains 16 × 16 pixels, and each pixel includes one gold-plated electrode, four photodiodes, and in-pixel circuits, within a pixel footprint. Each pixel supports real-time extracellular potential recording, optical detection, charge-balanced biphasic current stimulation, and cellular impedance measurement for the same cellular sample. The proposed system is fabricated in a standard 130-nm CMOS process. Rat cardiomyocytes are successfully cultured on-chip. Measured high-resolution optical opacity images, extracellular potential recordings, biphasic current stimulations, and cellular impedance images demonstrate the unique advantages of the system for holistic cell characterization and drug screening. Furthermore, this paper demonstrates the use of optical detection on the on-chip cultured cardiomyocytes to real-time track their cyclic beating pattern and beating rate.

  3. Image quality analysis of a color LCD as well as a monochrome LCD using a Foveon color CMOS camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallas, William J.; Roehrig, Hans; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.

    2007-09-01

    We have combined a CMOS color camera with special software to compose a multi-functional image-quality analysis instrument. It functions as a colorimeter as well as measuring modulation transfer functions (MTF) and noise power spectra (NPS). It is presently being expanded to examine fixed-pattern noise and temporal noise. The CMOS camera has 9 μm square pixels and a pixel matrix of 2268 x 1512 x 3. The camera uses a sensor that has co-located pixels for all three primary colors. We have imaged sections of both a color and a monochrome LCD monitor onto the camera sensor with LCD-pixel-size to camera-pixel-size ratios of both 12:1 and 17.6:1. When used as an imaging colorimeter, each camera pixel is calibrated to provide CIE color coordinates and tristimulus values. This capability permits the camera to simultaneously determine chromaticity in different locations on the LCD display. After the color calibration with a CS-200 colorimeter the color coordinates of the display's primaries determined from the camera's luminance response are very close to those found from the CS-200. Only the color coordinates of the display's white point were in error. For calculating the MTF a vertical or horizontal line is displayed on the monitor. The captured image is color-matrix preprocessed, Fourier transformed then post-processed. For NPS, a uniform image is displayed on the monitor. Again, the image is pre-processed, transformed and processed. Our measurements show that the horizontal MTF's of both displays have a larger negative slope than that of the vertical MTF's. This behavior indicates that the horizontal MTF's are poorer than the vertical MTF's. However the modulations at the Nyquist frequency seem lower for the color LCD than for the monochrome LCD. The spatial noise of the color display in both directions is larger than that of the monochrome display. Attempts were also made to analyze the total noise in terms of spatial and temporal noise by applying subtractions of

  4. Active-Pixel Image Sensor With Analog-To-Digital Converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Mendis, Sunetra K.; Pain, Bedabrata; Nixon, Robert H.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed single-chip integrated-circuit image sensor contains 128 x 128 array of active pixel sensors at 50-micrometer pitch. Output terminals of all pixels in each given column connected to analog-to-digital (A/D) converter located at bottom of column. Pixels scanned in semiparallel fashion, one row at time; during time allocated to scanning row, outputs of all active pixel sensors in row fed to respective A/D converters. Design of chip based on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, and individual circuit elements fabricated according to 2-micrometer CMOS design rules. Active pixel sensors designed to operate at video rate of 30 frames/second, even at low light levels. A/D scheme based on first-order Sigma-Delta modulation.

  5. A 0.18 μm CMOS LDO Regulator for an On-Chip Sensor Array Impedance Measurement System.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bailón, Jorge; Márquez, Alejandro; Calvo, Belén; Medrano, Nicolás

    2018-05-02

    This paper presents a fully integrated 0.18 μm CMOS Low-Dropout (LDO) Voltage Regulator specifically designed to meet the stringent requirements of a battery-operated impedance spectrometry multichannel CMOS micro-instrument. The proposed LDO provides a regulated 1.8 V voltage from a 3.6 V to 1.94 V battery voltage over a −40 °C to 100 °C temperature range, with a compact topology (<0.10 mm² area) and a constant quiescent current of only 7.45 μA with 99.985% current efficiency, achieving remarkable state-of-art Figures of Merit (FoMs) for the regulating⁻transient performance. Experimental measurements validate its suitability for the target application, paving the way towards the future achievement of a truly portable System on Chip (SoC) platform for impedance sensors.

  6. Photon Counting Imaging with an Electron-Bombarded Pixel Image Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Electron-bombarded pixel image sensors, where a single photoelectron is accelerated directly into a CCD or CMOS sensor, allow wide-field imaging at extremely low light levels as they are sensitive enough to detect single photons. This technology allows the detection of up to hundreds or thousands of photon events per frame, depending on the sensor size, and photon event centroiding can be employed to recover resolution lost in the detection process. Unlike photon events from electron-multiplying sensors, the photon events from electron-bombarded sensors have a narrow, acceleration-voltage-dependent pulse height distribution. Thus a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor could allow photon arrival time determination from the pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. We give a brief overview of our work with electron-bombarded pixel image sensor technology and recent developments in this field for single photon counting imaging, and examples of some applications. PMID:27136556

  7. Evaluation of a ''CMOS'' Imager for Shadow Mask Hard X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Upendra D.; Orwig, Larry E.; Oergerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a hard x-ray coder that provides high angular resolution imaging capability using a coarse position sensitive image plane detector. The coder consists of two Fresnel zone plates. (FZP) Two such 'FZP's generate Moire fringe patterns whose frequency and orientation define the arrival direction of a beam with respect to telescope axis. The image plane detector needs to resolve the Moire fringe pattern. Pixilated detectors can be used as an image plane detector. The recently available 'CMOS' imager could provide a very low power large area image plane detector for hard x-rays. We have looked into a unit made by Rad-Icon Imaging Corp. The Shadow-Box 1024 x-ray camera is a high resolution 1024xl024 pixel detector of 50x50 mm area. It is a very low power, stand alone camera. We present some preliminary results of our investigation of evaluation of such camera.

  8. Active pixel sensors with substantially planarized color filtering elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A semiconductor imaging system preferably having an active pixel sensor array compatible with a CMOS fabrication process. Color-filtering elements such as polymer filters and wavelength-converting phosphors can be integrated with the image sensor.

  9. Bioinspired Polarization Imaging Sensors: From Circuits and Optics to Signal Processing Algorithms and Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    York, Timothy; Powell, Samuel B.; Gao, Shengkui; Kahan, Lindsey; Charanya, Tauseef; Saha, Debajit; Roberts, Nicholas W.; Cronin, Thomas W.; Marshall, Justin; Achilefu, Samuel; Lake, Spencer P.; Raman, Baranidharan; Gruev, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present recent work on bioinspired polarization imaging sensors and their applications in biomedicine. In particular, we focus on three different aspects of these sensors. First, we describe the electro–optical challenges in realizing a bioinspired polarization imager, and in particular, we provide a detailed description of a recent low-power complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) polarization imager. Second, we focus on signal processing algorithms tailored for this new class of bioinspired polarization imaging sensors, such as calibration and interpolation. Third, the emergence of these sensors has enabled rapid progress in characterizing polarization signals and environmental parameters in nature, as well as several biomedical areas, such as label-free optical neural recording, dynamic tissue strength analysis, and early diagnosis of flat cancerous lesions in a murine colorectal tumor model. We highlight results obtained from these three areas and discuss future applications for these sensors. PMID:26538682

  10. Design rules for quantum imaging devices: experimental progress using CMOS single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbon, Edoardo; Gunther, Neil J.; Boiko, Dmitri L.; Beretta, Giordano B.

    2006-08-01

    We continue our previous program1 where we introduced a set of quantum-based design rules directed at quantum engineers who design single-photon quantum communications and quantum imaging devices. Here, we report on experimental progress using SPAD (single photon avalanche diode) arrays of our design and fabricated in CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) technology. Emerging high-resolution imaging techniques based on SPAD arrays have proven useful in a variety of disciplines including bio-fluorescence microscopy and 3D vision systems. They have also been particularly successful for intra-chip optical communications implemented entirely in CMOS technology. More importantly for our purposes, a very low dark count allows SPADs to detect rare photon events with a high dynamic range and high signal-to-noise ratio. Our CMOS SPADs support multi-channel detection of photon arrivals with picosecond accuracy, several million times per second, due to a very short detection cycle. The tiny chip area means they are suitable for highly miniaturized quantum imaging devices and that is how we employ them in this paper. Our quantum path integral analysis of the Young-Afshar-Wheeler interferometer showed that Bohr's complementarity principle was not violated due the previously overlooked effect of photon bifurcation within the lens--a phenomenon consistent with our quantum design rules--which accounts for the loss of which-path information in the presence of interference. In this paper, we report on our progress toward the construction of quantitative design rules as well as some proposed tests for quantum imaging devices using entangled photon sources with our SPAD imager.

  11. Development of CMOS MEMS inductive type tactile sensor with the integration of chrome steel ball force interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Sheng-Kai; Chang, Heng-Chung; Fang, Weileun

    2018-04-01

    This study presents an inductive tactile sensor with a chrome steel ball sensing interface based on the commercially available standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process (the TSMC 0.18 µm 1P6M CMOS process). The tactile senor has a deformable polymer layer as the spring of the device and no fragile suspended thin film structures are required. As a tactile force is applied on the chrome steel ball, the polymer would deform. The distance between the chrome steel ball and the sensing coil would changed. Thus, the tactile force can be detected by the inductance change of the sensing coil. In short, the chrome steel ball acts as a tactile bump as well as the sensing interface. Experimental results show that the proposed inductive tactile sensor has a sensing range of 0-1.4 N with a sensitivity of 9.22(%/N) and nonlinearity of 2%. Preliminary wireless sensing test is also demonstrated. Moreover, the influence of the process and material issues on the sensor performances have also been investigated.

  12. A Low Power 2.4 GHz CMOS Mixer Using Forward Body Bias Technique for Wireless Sensor Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, C. J.; Murad, S. A. Z.; Harun, A.; Ramli, M. M.; Zulkifli, T. Z. A.; Karim, J.

    2018-03-01

    Wireless sensor network (WSN) is a highly-demanded application since the evolution of wireless generation which is often used in recent communication technology. A radio frequency (RF) transceiver in WSN should have a low power consumption to support long operating times of mobile devices. A down-conversion mixer is responsible for frequency translation in a receiver. By operating a down-conversion mixer at a low supply voltage, the power consumed by WSN receiver can be greatly reduced. This paper presents a development of low power CMOS mixer using forward body bias technique for wireless sensor network. The proposed mixer is implemented using CMOS 0.13 μm Silterra technology. The forward body bias technique is adopted to obtain low power consumption. The simulation results indicate that a low power consumption of 0.91 mW is achieved at 1.6 V supply voltage. Moreover, the conversion gain (CG) of 21.83 dB, the noise figure (NF) of 16.51 dB and the input-referred third-order intercept point (IIP3) of 8.0 dB at 2.4 GHz are obtained. The proposed mixer is suitable for wireless sensor network.

  13. Theoretical performance analysis for CMOS based high resolution detectors.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-06

    High resolution imaging capabilities are essential for accurately guiding successful endovascular interventional procedures. Present x-ray imaging detectors are not always adequate due to their inherent limitations. The newly-developed high-resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF-CCD) detector has demonstrated excellent clinical image quality; however, further improvement in performance and physical design may be possible using CMOS sensors. We have thus calculated the theoretical performance of two proposed CMOS detectors which may be used as a successor to the MAF. The proposed detectors have a 300 μm thick HL-type CsI phosphor, a 50 μm-pixel CMOS sensor with and without a variable gain light image intensifier (LII), and are designated MAF-CMOS-LII and MAF-CMOS, respectively. For the performance evaluation, linear cascade modeling was used. The detector imaging chains were divided into individual stages characterized by one of the basic processes (quantum gain, binomial selection, stochastic and deterministic blurring, additive noise). Ranges of readout noise and exposure were used to calculate the detectors' MTF and DQE. The MAF-CMOS showed slightly better MTF than the MAF-CMOS-LII, but the MAF-CMOS-LII showed far better DQE, especially for lower exposures. The proposed detectors can have improved MTF and DQE compared with the present high resolution MAF detector. The performance of the MAF-CMOS is excellent for the angiography exposure range; however it is limited at fluoroscopic levels due to additive instrumentation noise. The MAF-CMOS-LII, having the advantage of the variable LII gain, can overcome the noise limitation and hence may perform exceptionally for the full range of required exposures; however, it is more complex and hence more expensive.

  14. Multiple-Event, Single-Photon Counting Imaging Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Xinyu; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Sun, Chao; Wang, Kang L.

    2011-01-01

    The single-photon counting imaging sensor is typically an array of silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes that are monolithically integrated with CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) readout, signal processing, and addressing circuits located in each pixel and the peripheral area of the chip. The major problem is its single-event method for photon count number registration. A single-event single-photon counting imaging array only allows registration of up to one photon count in each of its pixels during a frame time, i.e., the interval between two successive pixel reset operations. Since the frame time can t be too short, this will lead to very low dynamic range and make the sensor merely useful for very low flux environments. The second problem of the prior technique is a limited fill factor resulting from consumption of chip area by the monolithically integrated CMOS readout in pixels. The resulting low photon collection efficiency will substantially ruin any benefit gained from the very sensitive single-photon counting detection. The single-photon counting imaging sensor developed in this work has a novel multiple-event architecture, which allows each of its pixels to register as more than one million (or more) photon-counting events during a frame time. Because of a consequently boosted dynamic range, the imaging array of the invention is capable of performing single-photon counting under ultra-low light through high-flux environments. On the other hand, since the multiple-event architecture is implemented in a hybrid structure, back-illumination and close-to-unity fill factor can be realized, and maximized quantum efficiency can also be achieved in the detector array.

  15. In vitro near-infrared imaging of occlusal dental caries using germanium enhanced CMOS camera.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chulsung; Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    The high transparency of dental enamel in the near-infrared (NIR) at 1310-nm can be exploited for imaging dental caries without the use of ionizing radiation. The objective of this study was to determine whether the lesion contrast derived from NIR transillumination can be used to estimate lesion severity. Another aim was to compare the performance of a new Ge enhanced complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) based NIR imaging camera with the InGaAs focal plane array (FPA). Extracted human teeth (n=52) with natural occlusal caries were imaged with both cameras at 1310-nm and the image contrast between sound and carious regions was calculated. After NIR imaging, teeth were sectioned and examined using more established methods, namely polarized light microscopy (PLM) and transverse microradiography (TMR) to calculate lesion severity. Lesions were then classified into 4 categories according to the lesion severity. Lesion contrast increased significantly with lesion severity for both cameras (p<0.05). The Ge enhanced CMOS camera equipped with the larger array and smaller pixels yielded higher contrast values compared with the smaller InGaAs FPA (p<0.01). Results demonstrate that NIR lesion contrast can be used to estimate lesion severity.

  16. CMOS Imager Has Better Cross-Talk and Full-Well Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    A complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) image detector now undergoing development is designed to exhibit less cross-talk and greater full-well capacity than do prior CMOS image detectors of the same type. Imagers of the type in question are designed to operate from low-voltage power supplies and are fabricated by processes that yield device features having dimensions in the deep submicron range. Because of the use of low supply potentials, maximum internal electric fields and depletion widths are correspondingly limited. In turn, these limitations are responsible for increases in cross-talk and decreases in charge-handling capacities. Moreover, for small pixels, lateral depletion cannot be extended. These adverse effects are even more accentuated in a back-illuminated CMOS imager, in which photogenerated charge carriers must travel across the entire thickness of the device. The figure shows a partial cross section of the structure in the device layer of the present developmental CMOS imager. (In a practical imager, the device layer would sit atop either a heavily doped silicon substrate or a thin silicon oxide layer on a silicon substrate, not shown here.) The imager chip is divided into two areas: area C, which contains readout circuits and other electronic circuits; and area I, which contains the imaging (photodetector and photogenerated-charge-collecting) pixel structures. Areas C and I are electrically isolated from each other by means of a trench filled with silicon oxide. The electrical isolation between areas C and I makes it possible to apply different supply potentials to these areas, thereby enabling optimization of the supply potential and associated design features for each area. More specifically, metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) that are typically included in CMOS imagers now reside in area C and can remain unchanged from established designs and operated at supply potentials prescribed for those designs, while the

  17. Quadrant anode image sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Malina, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    A position-sensitive event-counting electronic readout system for microchannel plates (MCPs) is described that offers the advantages of high spatial resolution and fast time resolution. The technique relies upon a four-quadrant electron-collecting anode located behind the output face of the microchannel plate, so that the electron cloud from each detected event is partly intercepted by each of the four quadrants. The relative amounts of charge collected by each quadrant depend on event position, permitting each event to be localized with two ratio circuits. A prototype quadrant anode system for ion, electron, and extreme ultraviolet imaging is described. The spatial resolution achieved, about 10 microns, allows individual MCP channels to be distinguished.

  18. Micro Ethanol Sensors with a Heater Fabricated Using the Commercial 0.18 μm CMOS Process

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei-Zhen; Dai, Ching-Liang; Yang, Ming-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    The study investigates the fabrication and characterization of an ethanol microsensor equipped with a heater. The ethanol sensor is manufactured using the commercial 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The sensor consists of a sensitive film, a heater and interdigitated electrodes. The sensitive film is zinc oxide prepared by the sol-gel method, and it is coated on the interdigitated electrodes. The heater is located under the interdigitated electrodes, and it is used to supply a working temperature to the sensitive film. The sensor needs a post-processing step to remove the sacrificial oxide layer, and to coat zinc oxide on the interdigitated electrodes. When the sensitive film senses ethanol gas, the resistance of the sensor generates a change. An inverting amplifier circuit is utilized to convert the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. Experiments show that the sensitivity of the ethanol sensor is 0.35 mV/ppm. PMID:24072022

  19. Increasing the dynamic range of CMOS photodiode imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A multiple-step reset process and circuit for resetting a voltage stored on a photodiode of an imaging device. A first stage of the reset occurs while a source and a drain of a pixel source-follower transistor are held at ground potential and the photodiode and a gate of the pixel source-follower transistor are charged to an initial reset voltage having potential less that of a supply voltage. A second stage of the reset occurs after the initial reset voltage is stored on the photodiode and the gate of the pixel source-follower transistor and the source and drain voltages of the pixel source-follower transistor are released from ground potential thereby allowing the source and drain voltages of the pixel source-follower transistor to assume ordinary values above ground potential and resulting in a capacitive feed-through effect that increases the voltage on the photodiode to a value greater than the initial reset voltage.

  20. An ultra-low power self-timed column-level ADC for a CMOS pixel sensor based vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Wang, M.

    2014-11-01

    The International Large Detector (ILD) is a detector concept for the future linear collider experiment. The vertex detector is the key tool to achieve high precision measurements for flavor tagging, which puts stringent requirements on the CMOS pixel sensors. Due to the cooling systems which deteriorate the material budget and increase the multiple scattering, it is important to reduce the power consumption. This paper presents an ultra-low power self-timed column-level ADC for the CMOS pixel sensors, aiming to equip the outer layers of the vertex detector. The ADC was designed to operate in two modes (active and idle) adapted to the low hit density in the outer layers. The architecture employs an enhanced sample-and-hold circuit and a self-timed technique. The total power consumption with a 3-V supply is 225μW during idle mode, which is the most frequent situation. This value rises to 425μW in the case of the active mode. It occupies an area of 35 × 590μm2.

  1. Sticker-type ECG/PPG concurrent monitoring system hybrid integration of CMOS SoC and organic sensor device.

    PubMed

    Yongsu Lee; Hyeonwoo Lee; Seunghyup Yoo; Hoi-Jun Yoo

    2016-08-01

    The sticker-type sensor system is proposed targeting ECG/PPG concurrent monitoring for cardiovascular diseases. The stickers are composed of two types: Hub and Sensor-node (SN) sticker. Low-power CMOS SoC for measuring ECG and PPG signal is hybrid integrated with organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photo detector (OPD). The sticker has only 2g weight and only consumes 141μW. The optical calibration loop is adopted for maintaining SNR of PPG signal higher than 30dB. The pulse arrival time (PAT) and SpO2 value can be extracted from various body parts and verified comparing with the reference device from 20 people in-vivo experiments.

  2. A FPGA-based Cluster Finder for CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors of the MIMOSA-26 Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiyan; Amar-Youcef, S.; Doering, D.; Deveaux, M.; Fröhlich, I.; Koziel, M.; Krebs, E.; Linnik, B.; Michel, J.; Milanovic, B.; Müntz, C.; Stroth, J.; Tischler, T.

    2014-06-01

    CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) demonstrated excellent performances in the field of charged particle tracking. Among their strong points are an single point resolution few μm, a light material budget of 0.05% X0 in combination with a good radiation tolerance and high rate capability. Those features make the sensors a valuable technology for vertex detectors of various experiments in heavy ion and particle physics. To reduce the load on the event builders and future mass storage systems, we have developed algorithms suited for preprocessing and reducing the data streams generated by the MAPS. This real-time processing employs remaining free resources of the FPGAs of the readout controllers of the detector and complements the on-chip data reduction circuits of the MAPS.

  3. Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a Quadruple Well Technology for Nearly 100% Fill Factor and Full CMOS Pixels

    PubMed Central

    Ballin, Jamie Alexander; Crooks, Jamie Phillip; Dauncey, Paul Dominic; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Mikami, Yoshinari; Miller, Owen Daniel; Noy, Matthew; Rajovic, Vladimir; Stanitzki, Marcel; Stefanov, Konstantin; Turchetta, Renato; Tyndel, Mike; Villani, Enrico Giulio; Watson, Nigel Keith; Wilson, John Allan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel, quadruple well process developed in a modern 0.18 μm CMOS technology called INMAPS. On top of the standard process, we have added a deep P implant that can be used to form a deep P-well and provide screening of N-wells from the P-doped epitaxial layer. This prevents the collection of radiation-induced charge by unrelated N-wells, typically ones where PMOS transistors are integrated. The design of a sensor specifically tailored to a particle physics experiment is presented, where each 50 μm pixel has over 150 PMOS and NMOS transistors. The sensor has been fabricated in the INMAPS process and first experimental evidence of the effectiveness of this process on charge collection is presented, showing a significant improvement in efficiency. PMID:27873817

  4. Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a Quadruple Well Technology for Nearly 100% Fill Factor and Full CMOS Pixels.

    PubMed

    Ballin, Jamie Alexander; Crooks, Jamie Phillip; Dauncey, Paul Dominic; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Mikami, Yoshiari; Miller, Owen Daniel; Noy, Matthew; Rajovic, Vladimir; Stanitzki, Marcel; Stefanov, Konstantin; Turchetta, Renato; Tyndel, Mike; Villani, Enrico Giulio; Watson, Nigel Keith; Wilson, John Allan

    2008-09-02

    In this paper we present a novel, quadruple well process developed in a modern 0.18 mm CMOS technology called INMAPS. On top of the standard process, we have added a deep P implant that can be used to form a deep P-well and provide screening of N-wells from the P-doped epitaxial layer. This prevents the collection of radiation-induced charge by unrelated N-wells, typically ones where PMOS transistors are integrated. The design of a sensor specifically tailored to a particle physics experiment is presented, where each 50 mm pixel has over 150 PMOS and NMOS transistors. The sensor has been fabricated in the INMAPS process and first experimental evidence of the effectiveness of this process on charge collection is presented, showing a significant improvement in efficiency.

  5. Pseudo-differential CMOS analog front-end circuit for wide-bandwidth optical probe current sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uekura, Takaharu; Oyanagi, Kousuke; Sonehara, Makoto; Sato, Toshiro; Miyaji, Kousuke

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we present a pseudo-differential analog front-end (AFE) circuit for a novel optical probe current sensor (OPCS) aimed for high-frequency power electronics. It employs a regulated cascode transimpedance amplifier (RGC-TIA) to achieve a high gain and a large bandwidth without using an extremely high performance operational amplifier. The AFE circuit is designed in a 0.18 µm standard CMOS technology achieving a high transimpedance gain of 120 dB Ω and high cut off frequency of 16 MHz. The measured slew rate is 70 V/µs and the input referred current noise is 1.02 pA/\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}} . The magnetic resolution and bandwidth of OPCS are estimated to be 1.29 mTrms and 16 MHz, respectively; the bandwidth is higher than that of the reported Hall effect current sensor.

  6. An ultrasensitive method of real time pH monitoring with complementary metal oxide semiconductor image sensor.

    PubMed

    Devadhasan, Jasmine Pramila; Kim, Sanghyo

    2015-02-09

    CMOS sensors are becoming a powerful tool in the biological and chemical field. In this work, we introduce a new approach on quantifying various pH solutions with a CMOS image sensor. The CMOS image sensor based pH measurement produces high-accuracy analysis, making it a truly portable and user friendly system. pH indicator blended hydrogel matrix was fabricated as a thin film to the accurate color development. A distinct color change of red, green and blue (RGB) develops in the hydrogel film by applying various pH solutions (pH 1-14). The semi-quantitative pH evolution was acquired by visual read out. Further, CMOS image sensor absorbs the RGB color intensity of the film and hue value converted into digital numbers with the aid of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to determine the pH ranges of solutions. Chromaticity diagram and Euclidean distance represent the RGB color space and differentiation of pH ranges, respectively. This technique is applicable to sense the various toxic chemicals and chemical vapors by situ sensing. Ultimately, the entire approach can be integrated into smartphone and operable with the user friendly manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Low noise WDR ROIC for InGaAs SWIR image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yang

    2017-11-01

    Hybridized image sensors are actually the only solution for image sensing beyond the spectral response of silicon devices. By hybridization, we can combine the best sensing material and photo-detector design with high performance CMOS readout circuitry. In the infrared band, we are facing typically 2 configurations: high background situation and low background situation. The performance of high background sensors are conditioned mainly by the integration capacity in each pixel which is the case for mid-wave and long-wave infrared detectors. For low background situation, the detector's performance is mainly limited by the pixel's noise performance which is conditioned by dark signal and readout noise. In the case of reflection based imaging condition, the pixel's dynamic range is also an important parameter. This is the case for SWIR band imaging. We are particularly interested by InGaAs based SWIR image sensors.

  8. Advancing the Technology of Monolithic CMOS detectors for their use as X-ray Imaging Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenter, Almus

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) proposes a two year program to further advance the scientific capabilities of monolithic CMOS detectors for use as x-ray imaging spectrometers. This proposal will build upon the progress achieved with funding from a previous APRA proposal that ended in 2013. As part of that previous proposal, x- ray optimized, highly versatile, monolithic CMOS imaging detectors and technology were developed and tested. The performance and capabilities of these devices were then demonstrated, with an emphasis on the performance advantages these devices have over CCDs and other technologies. The developed SAO/SRI-Sarnoff CMOS devices incorporate: Low noise, high sensitivity ("gain") pixels; Highly parallel on-chip signal chains; Standard and very high resistivity (30,000Ohm-cm) Si; Back-Side thinning and passivation. SAO demonstrated the performance benefits of each of these features in these devices. This new proposal high-lights the performance of this previous generation of devices, and segues into new technology and capability. The high sensitivity ( 135uV/e) 6 Transistor (6T) Pinned Photo Diode (PPD) pixels provided a large charge to voltage conversion gain to the detect and resolve even small numbers of photo electrons produced by x-rays. The on-chip, parallel signal chain processed an entire row of pixels in the same time that a CCD requires to processes a single pixel. The resulting high speed operation ( 1000 times faster than CCD) provide temporal resolution while mitigating dark current and allowed room temperature operation. The high resistivity Si provided full (over) depletion for thicker devices which increased QE for higher energy x-rays. In this proposal, SAO will investigate existing NMOS and existing PMOS devices as xray imaging spectrometers. Conventional CMOS imagers are NMOS. NMOS devices collect and measure photo-electrons. In contrast, PMOS devices collect and measure photo-holes. PMOS devices have various

  9. Fast frame rate rodent cardiac x-ray imaging using scintillator lens coupled to CMOS camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swathi Lakshmi, B.; Sai Varsha, M. K. N.; Kumar, N. Ashwin; Dixit, Madhulika; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy

    2017-03-01

    Micro-Computed Tomography (MCT) systems for small animal imaging plays a critical role for monitoring disease progression and therapy evaluation. In this work, an in-house built micro-CT system equipped with a X-ray scintillator lens coupled to a commercial CMOS camera was used to test the feasibility of its application to Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA). Literature has reported such studies being done with clinical X-ray tubes that can be pulsed rapidly or with rotating gantry systems, thus increasing the cost and infrastructural requirements.The feasibility of DSA was evaluated by injected Iodinated contrast agent (ICA) through the tail vein of a mouse. Projection images of the heart were acquired pre and post contrast using the high frame rate X-ray detector and processing done to visualize transit of ICA through the heart.

  10. Detecting single-abasic residues within a DNA strand immobilized in a biological nanopore using an integrated CMOS sensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsuk; Maitra, Raj D; Pedrotti, Ken; Dunbar, William B

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the application of a novel current-measuring sensor (CMS) customized for nanopore applications. The low-noise CMS is fabricated in a 0.35μm CMOS process and is implemented in experiments involving DNA captured in an α-hemolysin (α-HL) nanopore. Specifically, the CMS is used to build a current amplitude map as a function of varying positions of a single-abasic residue within a homopolymer cytosine single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that is captured and held in the pore. Each ssDNA is immobilized using a biotin-streptavidin linkage. Five different DNA templates are measured and compared: one all-cytosine ssDNA, and four with a single-abasic residue substitution that resides in or near the ~1.5nm aperture of the α-HL channel when the strand is immobilized. The CMOS CMS is shown to resolves the ~5Å displacements of the abasic residue within the varying templates. The demonstration represents an advance in application-specific circuitry that is optimized for small-footprint nanopore applications, including genomic sequencing.

  11. Tests of commercial colour CMOS cameras for astronomical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhvala, S. M.; Reshetnyk, V. M.; Zhilyaev, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    We present some results of testing commercial colour CMOS cameras for astronomical applications. Colour CMOS sensors allow to perform photometry in three filters simultaneously that gives a great advantage compared with monochrome CCD detectors. The Bayer BGR colour system realized in colour CMOS sensors is close to the astronomical Johnson BVR system. The basic camera characteristics: read noise (e^{-}/pix), thermal noise (e^{-}/pix/sec) and electronic gain (e^{-}/ADU) for the commercial digital camera Canon 5D MarkIII are presented. We give the same characteristics for the scientific high performance cooled CCD camera system ALTA E47. Comparing results for tests of Canon 5D MarkIII and CCD ALTA E47 show that present-day commercial colour CMOS cameras can seriously compete with the scientific CCD cameras in deep astronomical imaging.

  12. Improved Space Object Observation Techniques Using CMOS Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, T.; Hinze, A.; Schlatter, P.; Silha, J.; Peltonen, J.; Santti, T.; Flohrer, T.

    2013-08-01

    CMOS-sensors, or in general Active Pixel Sensors (APS), are rapidly replacing CCDs in the consumer camera market. Due to significant technological advances during the past years these devices start to compete with CCDs also for demanding scientific imaging applications, in particular in the astronomy community. CMOS detectors offer a series of inherent advantages compared to CCDs, due to the structure of their basic pixel cells, which each contain their own amplifier and readout electronics. The most prominent advantages for space object observations are the extremely fast and flexible readout capabilities, feasibility for electronic shuttering and precise epoch registration, and the potential to perform image processing operations on-chip and in real-time. Presently applied and proposed optical observation strategies for space debris surveys and space surveillance applications had to be analyzed. The major design drivers were identified and potential benefits from using available and future CMOS sensors were assessed. The major challenges and design drivers for ground-based and space-based optical observation strategies have been analyzed. CMOS detector characteristics were critically evaluated and compared with the established CCD technology, especially with respect to the above mentioned observations. Similarly, the desirable on-chip processing functionalities which would further enhance the object detection and image segmentation were identified. Finally, the characteristics of a particular CMOS sensor available at the Zimmerwald observatory were analyzed by performing laboratory test measurements.

  13. Label-free CMOS bio sensor with on-chip noise reduction scheme for real-time quantitative monitoring of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Seong-Jin Kim; Euisik Yoon

    2012-06-01

    We present a label-free CMOS field-effect transistor sensing array to detect the surface potential change affected by the negative charge in DNA molecules for real-time monitoring and quantification. The proposed CMOS bio sensor includes a new sensing pixel architecture implemented with correlated double sampling for reducing offset fixed pattern noise and 1/f noise of the sensing devices. We incorporated non-surface binding detection which allows real-time continuous monitoring of DNA concentrations without immobilizing them on the sensing surface. Various concentrations of 19-bp oligonucleotides solution can be discriminated using the prototype device fabricated in 1- μm double-poly double-metal standard CMOS process. The detection limit was measured as 1.1 ng/μl with a dynamic range of 40 dB and the transient response time was measured less than 20 seconds.

  14. High-density CMOS Microelectrode Array System for Impedance Spectroscopy and Imaging of Biological Cells.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Viswam; Raziyeh, Bounik; Amir, Shadmani; Jelena, Dragas; Alicia, Boos Julia; Axel, Birchler; Jan, Müller; Yihui, Chen; Andreas, Hierlemann

    2017-01-26

    A monolithic measurement platform was implemented to enable label-free in-vitro electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements of cells on multi-functional CMOS microelectrode array. The array includes 59,760 platinum microelectrodes, densely packed within a 4.5 mm × 2.5 mm sensing region at a pitch of 13.5 μm. The 32 on-chip lock-in amplifiers can be used to measure the impedance of any arbitrarily chosen electrodes on the array by applying a sinusoidal voltage, generated by an on-chip waveform generator with a frequency range from 1 Hz to 1 MHz, and measuring the respective current. Proof-of-concept measurements of impedance sensing and imaging are shown in this paper. Correlations between cell detection through optical microscopy and electrochemical impedance scanning were established.

  15. Registration of Large Motion Blurred Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-09

    in handling the dynamics of the capturing system, for example, a drone. CMOS sensors , used in recent times, when employed in these cameras produce...handling the dynamics of the capturing system, for example, a drone. CMOS sensors , used in recent times, when employed in these cameras produce two types...blur in the captured image when there is camera motion during exposure. However, contemporary CMOS sensors employ an electronic rolling shutter (RS

  16. CMOS detector arrays in a virtual 10-kilopixel camera for coherent terahertz real-time imaging.

    PubMed

    Boppel, Sebastian; Lisauskas, Alvydas; Max, Alexander; Krozer, Viktor; Roskos, Hartmut G

    2012-02-15

    We demonstrate the principle applicability of antenna-coupled complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect transistor arrays as cameras for real-time coherent imaging at 591.4 GHz. By scanning a few detectors across the image plane, we synthesize a focal-plane array of 100×100 pixels with an active area of 20×20 mm2, which is applied to imaging in transmission and reflection geometries. Individual detector pixels exhibit a voltage conversion loss of 24 dB and a noise figure of 41 dB for 16 μW of the local oscillator (LO) drive. For object illumination, we use a radio-frequency (RF) source with 432 μW at 590 GHz. Coherent detection is realized by quasioptical superposition of the image and the LO beam with 247 μW. At an effective frame rate of 17 Hz, we achieve a maximum dynamic range of 30 dB in the center of the image and more than 20 dB within a disk of 18 mm diameter. The system has been used for surface reconstruction resolving a height difference in the μm range.

  17. Thermal infrared panoramic imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutin, Mikhail; Tsui, Eddy K.; Gutin, Olga; Wang, Xu-Ming; Gutin, Alexey

    2006-05-01

    Panoramic cameras offer true real-time, 360-degree coverage of the surrounding area, valuable for a variety of defense and security applications, including force protection, asset protection, asset control, security including port security, perimeter security, video surveillance, border control, airport security, coastguard operations, search and rescue, intrusion detection, and many others. Automatic detection, location, and tracking of targets outside protected area ensures maximum protection and at the same time reduces the workload on personnel, increases reliability and confidence of target detection, and enables both man-in-the-loop and fully automated system operation. Thermal imaging provides the benefits of all-weather, 24-hour day/night operation with no downtime. In addition, thermal signatures of different target types facilitate better classification, beyond the limits set by camera's spatial resolution. The useful range of catadioptric panoramic cameras is affected by their limited resolution. In many existing systems the resolution is optics-limited. Reflectors customarily used in catadioptric imagers introduce aberrations that may become significant at large camera apertures, such as required in low-light and thermal imaging. Advantages of panoramic imagers with high image resolution include increased area coverage with fewer cameras, instantaneous full horizon detection, location and tracking of multiple targets simultaneously, extended range, and others. The Automatic Panoramic Thermal Integrated Sensor (APTIS), being jointly developed by Applied Science Innovative, Inc. (ASI) and the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) combines the strengths of improved, high-resolution panoramic optics with thermal imaging in the 8 - 14 micron spectral range, leveraged by intelligent video processing for automated detection, location, and tracking of moving targets. The work in progress supports the Future Combat Systems (FCS) and the

  18. Visual Image Sensor Organ Replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.

    2014-01-01

    This innovation is a system that augments human vision through a technique called "Sensing Super-position" using a Visual Instrument Sensory Organ Replacement (VISOR) device. The VISOR device translates visual and other sensors (i.e., thermal) into sounds to enable very difficult sensing tasks. Three-dimensional spatial brightness and multi-spectral maps of a sensed image are processed using real-time image processing techniques (e.g. histogram normalization) and transformed into a two-dimensional map of an audio signal as a function of frequency and time. Because the human hearing system is capable of learning to process and interpret extremely complicated and rapidly changing auditory patterns, the translation of images into sounds reduces the risk of accidentally filtering out important clues. The VISOR device was developed to augment the current state-of-the-art head-mounted (helmet) display systems. It provides the ability to sense beyond the human visible light range, to increase human sensing resolution, to use wider angle visual perception, and to improve the ability to sense distances. It also allows compensation for movement by the human or changes in the scene being viewed.

  19. Highly curved image sensors: a practical approach for improved optical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenter, Brian; Joshi, Neel; Stoakley, Richard; Keefe, Andrew; Geary, Kevin; Freeman, Ryan; Hundley, Jake; Patterson, Pamela; Hammon, David; Herrera, Guillermo; Sherman, Elena; Nowak, Andrew; Schubert, Randall; Brewer, Peter; Yang, Louis; Mott, Russell; McKnight, Geoff

    2017-06-01

    The significant optical and size benefits of using a curved focal surface for imaging systems have been well studied yet never brought to market for lack of a high-quality, mass-producible, curved image sensor. In this work we demonstrate that commercial silicon CMOS image sensors can be thinned and formed into accurate, highly curved optical surfaces with undiminished functionality. Our key development is a pneumatic forming process that avoids rigid mechanical constraints and suppresses wrinkling instabilities. A combination of forming-mold design, pressure membrane elastic properties, and controlled friction forces enables us to gradually contact the die at the corners and smoothly press the sensor into a spherical shape. Allowing the die to slide into the concave target shape enables a threefold increase in the spherical curvature over prior approaches having mechanical constraints that resist deformation, and create a high-stress, stretch-dominated state. Our process creates a bridge between the high precision and low-cost but planar CMOS process, and ideal non-planar component shapes such as spherical imagers for improved optical systems. We demonstrate these curved sensors in prototype cameras with custom lenses, measuring exceptional resolution of 3220 line-widths per picture height at an aperture of f/1.2 and nearly 100% relative illumination across the field. Though we use a 1/2.3" format image sensor in this report, we also show this process is generally compatible with many state of the art imaging sensor formats. By example, we report photogrammetry test data for an APS-C sized silicon die formed to a 30$^\\circ$ subtended spherical angle. These gains in sharpness and relative illumination enable a new generation of ultra-high performance, manufacturable, digital imaging systems for scientific, industrial, and artistic use.

  20. Reborn quadrant anode image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokazov, Yury; Turbin, Evgeny; Vitali, Marco; Herzog, Andreas; Michaelis, Bernd; Zuschratter, Werner; Kemnitz, Klaus

    2009-06-01

    We describe a position sensitive photon counting microchannel plate based detector with an improved quadrant anode (QA) readout system. The technique relies on a combination of the four planar elements pattern and an additional fifth electrode. The charge cloud induced by single particle detection is split between the electrodes. The measured charge values uniquely define the position of the initial event. QA has been first published in 1976 by Lampton and Malina. This anode configuration was undeservedly forgotten and its potential has been hardly underestimated. The presented approach extends the operating spatial range to the whole sensitive area of the microchannel plate surface and demonstrates good linearity over the field of view. Therefore, the novel image sensor results in spatial resolution better then 50 μm and count rates up to one million events per second.

  1. SPIDER: Next Generation Chip Scale Imaging Sensor Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, A.; Kendrick, R.; Ogden, C.; Wuchenich, D.; Thurman, S.; Su, T.; Lai, W.; Chun, J.; Li, S.; Liu, G.; Yoo, S. J. B.

    2016-09-01

    The Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center (LM ATC) and the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) are developing an electro-optical (EO) imaging sensor called SPIDER (Segmented Planar Imaging Detector for Electro-optical Reconnaissance) that seeks to provide a 10x to 100x size, weight, and power (SWaP) reduction alternative to the traditional bulky optical telescope and focal-plane detector array. The substantial reductions in SWaP would reduce cost and/or provide higher resolution by enabling a larger-aperture imager in a constrained volume. Our SPIDER imager replaces the traditional optical telescope and digital focal plane detector array with a densely packed interferometer array based on emerging photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technologies that samples the object being imaged in the Fourier domain (i.e., spatial frequency domain), and then reconstructs an image. Our approach replaces the large optics and structures required by a conventional telescope with PICs that are accommodated by standard lithographic fabrication techniques (e.g., complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication). The standard EO payload integration and test process that involves precision alignment and test of optical components to form a diffraction limited telescope is, therefore, replaced by in-process integration and test as part of the PIC fabrication, which substantially reduces associated schedule and cost. This paper provides an overview of performance data on the second-generation PIC for SPIDER developed under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)'s SPIDER Zoom research funding. We also update the design description of the SPIDER Zoom imaging sensor and the second-generation PIC (high- and low resolution versions).

  2. A low-power CMOS trans-impedance amplifier for FM/cw ladar imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kai; Zhao, Yi-qiang; Sheng, Yun; Zhao, Hong-liang; Yu, Hai-xia

    2013-09-01

    A scannerless ladar imaging system based on a unique frequency modulation/continuous wave (FM/cw) technique is able to entirely capture the target environment, using a focal plane array to construct a 3D picture of the target. This paper presents a low power trans-impedance amplifier (TIA) designed and implemented by 0.18 μm CMOS technology, which is used in the FM/cw imaging ladar with a 64×64 metal-semiconductor-metal(MSM) self-mixing detector array. The input stage of the operational amplifier (op amp) in TIA is realized with folded cascade structure to achieve large open loop gain and low offset. The simulation and test results of TIA with MSM detectors indicate that the single-end trans-impedance gain is beyond 100 kΩ, and the -3 dB bandwidth of Op Amp is beyond 60 MHz. The input common mode voltage ranges from 0.2 V to 1.5 V, and the power dissipation is reduced to 1.8 mW with a supply voltage of 3.3 V. The performance test results show that the TIA is a candidate for preamplifier of the read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) in the FM/cw scannerless ladar imaging system.

  3. Finite Element Analysis of Film Stack Architecture for Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuo-Tsai; Hwang, Sheng-Jye; Lee, Huei-Huang

    2017-05-02

    Image sensors are the core components of computer, communication, and consumer electronic products. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors have become the mainstay of image-sensing developments, but are prone to leakage current. In this study, we simulate the CMOS image sensor (CIS) film stacking process by finite element analysis. To elucidate the relationship between the leakage current and stack architecture, we compare the simulated and measured leakage currents in the elements. Based on the analysis results, we further improve the performance by optimizing the architecture of the film stacks or changing the thin-film material. The material parameters are then corrected to improve the accuracy of the simulation results. The simulated and experimental results confirm a positive correlation between measured leakage current and stress. This trend is attributed to the structural defects induced by high stress, which generate leakage. Using this relationship, we can change the structure of the thin-film stack to reduce the leakage current and thereby improve the component life and reliability of the CIS components.

  4. Finite Element Analysis of Film Stack Architecture for Complementary Metal-Oxide–Semiconductor Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kuo-Tsai; Hwang, Sheng-Jye; Lee, Huei-Huang

    2017-01-01

    Image sensors are the core components of computer, communication, and consumer electronic products. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors have become the mainstay of image-sensing developments, but are prone to leakage current. In this study, we simulate the CMOS image sensor (CIS) film stacking process by finite element analysis. To elucidate the relationship between the leakage current and stack architecture, we compare the simulated and measured leakage currents in the elements. Based on the analysis results, we further improve the performance by optimizing the architecture of the film stacks or changing the thin-film material. The material parameters are then corrected to improve the accuracy of the simulation results. The simulated and experimental results confirm a positive correlation between measured leakage current and stress. This trend is attributed to the structural defects induced by high stress, which generate leakage. Using this relationship, we can change the structure of the thin-film stack to reduce the leakage current and thereby improve the component life and reliability of the CIS components. PMID:28468324

  5. Performance of a 512 x 512 Gated CMOS Imager with a 250 ps Exposure Time

    SciTech Connect

    Teruya, A T; Moody, J D; Hsing, W W

    2012-10-01

    We describe the performance of a 512x512 gated CMOS read out integrated circuit (ROIC) with a 250 ps exposure time. A low-skew, H-tree trigger distribution system is used to locally generate individual pixel gates in each 8x8 neighborhood of the ROIC. The temporal width of the gate is voltage controlled and user selectable via a precision potentiometer. The gating implementation was first validated in optical tests of a 64x64 pixel prototype ROIC developed as a proof-of-concept during the early phases of the development program. The layout of the H-Tree addresses each quadrant of the ROIC independently and admits operation ofmore » the ROIC in two modes. If “common mode” triggering is used, the camera provides a single 512x512 image. If independent triggers are used, the camera can provide up to four 256x256 images with a frame separation set by the trigger intervals. The ROIC design includes small (sub-pixel) optical photodiode structures to allow test and characterization of the ROIC using optical sources prior to bump bonding. Reported test results were obtained using short pulse, second harmonic Ti:Sapphire laser systems operating at λ~ 400 nm at sub-ps pulse widths.« less

  6. A high-frequency transimpedance amplifier for CMOS integrated 2D CMUT array towards 3D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiwei; Cheong, Jia Hao; Cha, Hyouk-Kyu; Yu, Hongbin; Je, Minkyu; Yu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    One transimpedance amplifier based CMOS analog front-end (AFE) receiver is integrated with capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUTs) towards high frequency 3D ultrasound imaging. Considering device specifications from CMUTs, the TIA is designed to amplify received signals from 17.5MHz to 52.5MHz with center frequency at 35MHz; and is fabricated in Global Foundry 0.18-µm 30-V high-voltage (HV) Bipolar/CMOS/DMOS (BCD) process. The measurement results show that the TIA with power-supply 6V can reach transimpedance gain of 61dBΩ and operating frequency from 17.5MHz to 100MHz. The measured input referred noise is 27.5pA/√Hz. Acoustic pulse-echo testing is conducted to demonstrate the receiving functionality of the designed 3D ultrasound imaging system.

  7. Architecture and applications of a high resolution gated SPAD image sensor

    PubMed Central

    Burri, Samuel; Maruyama, Yuki; Michalet, Xavier; Regazzoni, Francesco; Bruschini, Claudio; Charbon, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    We present the architecture and three applications of the largest resolution image sensor based on single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) published to date. The sensor, fabricated in a high-voltage CMOS process, has a resolution of 512 × 128 pixels and a pitch of 24 μm. The fill-factor of 5% can be increased to 30% with the use of microlenses. For precise control of the exposure and for time-resolved imaging, we use fast global gating signals to define exposure windows as small as 4 ns. The uniformity of the gate edges location is ∼140 ps (FWHM) over the whole array, while in-pixel digital counting enables frame rates as high as 156 kfps. Currently, our camera is used as a highly sensitive sensor with high temporal resolution, for applications ranging from fluorescence lifetime measurements to fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and generation of true random numbers. PMID:25090572

  8. Thermal luminescence spectroscopy chemical imaging sensor.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Arthur H; Buican, Tudor N; Roese, Erik S; Sutter, James; Samuels, Alan C

    2012-10-01

    The authors present a pseudo-active chemical imaging sensor model embodying irradiative transient heating, temperature nonequilibrium thermal luminescence spectroscopy, differential hyperspectral imaging, and artificial neural network technologies integrated together. We elaborate on various optimizations, simulations, and animations of the integrated sensor design and apply it to the terrestrial chemical contamination problem, where the interstitial contaminant compounds of detection interest (analytes) comprise liquid chemical warfare agents, their various derivative condensed phase compounds, and other material of a life-threatening nature. The sensor must measure and process a dynamic pattern of absorptive-emissive middle infrared molecular signature spectra of subject analytes to perform its chemical imaging and standoff detection functions successfully.

  9. Subpixel mapping and test beam studies with a HV2FEI4v2 CMOS-Sensor-Hybrid Module for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisanz, T.; Große-Knetter, J.; Quadt, A.; Rieger, J.; Weingarten, J.

    2017-08-01

    The upgrade to the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider will increase the instantaneous luminosity by more than a factor of 5, thus creating significant challenges to the tracking systems of all experiments. Recent advancement of active pixel detectors designed in CMOS processes provide attractive alternatives to the well-established hybrid design using passive sensors since they allow for smaller pixel sizes and cost effective production. This article presents studies of a high-voltage CMOS active pixel sensor designed for the ATLAS tracker upgrade. The sensor is glued to the read-out chip of the Insertable B-Layer, forming a capacitively coupled pixel detector. The pixel pitch of the device under test is 33× 125 μm2, while the pixels of the read-out chip have a pitch of 50× 250 μm2. Three pixels of the CMOS device are connected to one read-out pixel, the information of which of these subpixels is hit is encoded in the amplitude of the output signal (subpixel encoding). Test beam measurements are presented that demonstrate the usability of this subpixel encoding scheme.