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Sample records for cmos low-noise amplifier

  1. Low-FPN high-gain capacitive transimpedance amplifier for low-noise CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Boyd A.; Balicki, Janusz; How, Dana; Godfrey, Michael

    2001-05-01

    In this paper we introduce a low fixed pattern noise (LFPN) capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) for active pixel CMOS image sensors (APS) with high switchable gain and low read noise. The LFPN CTIA APS uses a switched capacitor voltage divider feedback circuit to achieve high sensitivity, low gain FPN, and low read noise. This paper discusses the operation of the LFPN CTIA APS, and presents a theoretical analysis of its gain FPN and read noise. We do not analyze the effect of 1/f noise, since it is typically much smaller than the thermal and shot noise effects. Monte Carlo simulation of gain FPN and SPICE simulation of read noise are also presented. For a 0.35 micrometers CMOS LFPN CTIA at room temperature and an output data rate of 16Mpixel/sec, we show that the pixel amplifier gain FPN is less than 0.0064, where FPN is defined as the ratio of standard deviation to mean. The read noise and dynamic range are less than 3 electrons RMS and greater than 90dB respectively. We find that theory and simulated results match closely.

  2. Low-noise amplifiers for satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelehan, J.

    1984-02-01

    It is pointed out that over the past several years significant advances have been made in the overall capability of both microwave and mm-wave receivers. This is particularly apparent in the telecom market. Integral parts of advanced receiver technology are low-noise receivers. The advances currently being achieved in low-noise technology are partly based on developments in GaAs semiconductor technology. The development of high-cutoff-frequency beam lead mixer diodes has led to the development of mm-wave low-noise mixers with excellent low-noise capability. The advanced techniques are now being employed in field-deployable systems. Low noise is an important factor in satellite communications applications. Attention is given to C-band fixed satellite service, C-band parametric amplifiers, C-band FET, and X band, the Ku band, and the 30/20 GHz band.

  3. A Low-Noise Semiconductor Optical Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Ratowsky, R.P.; Dijaili, S.; Kallman, J.S.; Feit, M.D.; Walker, J.

    1999-03-23

    Optical amplifiers are essential devices for optical networks, optical systems, and computer communications. These amplifiers compensate for the inevitable optical loss in long-distance propagation (>50 km) or splitting (>10x). Fiber amplifiers such as the erbium-doped fiber amplifier have revolutionized the fiber-optics industry and are enjoying widespread use. Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are an alternative technology that complements the fiber amplifiers in cost and performance. One obstacle to the widespread use of SOAs is the severity of the inevitable noise output resulting from amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). Spectral filtering is often used to reduce ASE noise, but this constrains the source spectrally, and improvement is typically limited to about 10 dB. The extra components also add cost and complexity to the final assembly. The goal of this project was to analyze, design, and take significant steps toward the realization of an innovative, low-noise SOA based on the concept of ''distributed spatial filtering'' (DSF). In DSF, we alternate active SOA segments with passive free-space diffraction regions. Since spontaneous emission radiates equally in all directions, the free-space region lengthens the amplifier for a given length of gain region, narrowing the solid angle into which the spontaneous emission is amplified [1,2]. Our innovation is to use spatial filtering in a differential manner across many segments, thereby enhancing the effect when wave-optical effects are included [3]. The structure quickly and effectively strips the ASE into the higher-order modes, quenching the ASE gain relative to the signal.

  4. Reflected-wave maser. [low noise amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, R. C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A number of traveling-wave, slow-wave maser structures, containing active maser material but absent the typical ferrite isolators, are immersed in a nonuniform magnetic field. The microwave signal to be amplified is inserted at a circulator which directs the signal to a slow-wave structure. The signal travels through the slow-wave structure, being amplified according to the distance traveled. The end of the slow-wave structure farthest from the circulator is arranged to be a point of maximum reflection of the signal traveling through the slow-wave structure. As a consequence, the signal to be amplified traverses the slow-wave structure again, in the opposite direction (towards the circulator) experiencing amplification equivalent to that achieved by a conventional traveling-wave maser having twice the length. The circulator directs the amplified signal to following like stages of amplification. Isolators are used in between stages to prevent signals from traveling in the wrong direction, between the stages. Reduced signal loss is experienced at each stage. The high gain produced by each slow-wave structure is reduced to a moderate value by use of a nonuniform magnetic field which also broadens the line width of the maser material. The resulting bandwidth can be exceptionally wide. Cascaded stages provide high gain, exceptionally wide bandwith and very low noise temperature.

  5. Matched wideband low-noise amplifiers for radio astronomy.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, S; Bardin, J; Mani, H; Jones, G

    2009-04-01

    Two packaged low noise amplifiers for the 0.3-4 GHz frequency range are described. The amplifiers can be operated at temperatures of 300-4 K and achieve noise temperatures in the 5 K range (<0.1 dB noise figure) at 15 K physical temperature. One amplifier utilizes commercially available, plastic-packaged SiGe transistors for first and second stages; the second amplifier is identical except it utilizes an experimental chip transistor as the first stage. Both amplifiers use resistive feedback to provide input reflection coefficient S11<-10 dB over a decade bandwidth with gain over 30 dB. The amplifiers can be used as rf amplifiers in very low noise radio astronomy systems or as i.f. amplifiers following superconducting mixers operating in the millimeter and submillimeter frequency range.

  6. A Low Noise Amplifier for Neural Spike Recording Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Amaya, Jesus; Rodriguez-Perez, Alberto; Delgado-Restituto, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) for neural spike recording applications. The proposed topology, based on a capacitive feedback network using a two-stage OTA, efficiently solves the triple trade-off between power, area and noise. Additionally, this work introduces a novel transistor-level synthesis methodology for LNAs tailored for the minimization of their noise efficiency factor under area and noise constraints. The proposed LNA has been implemented in a 130 nm CMOS technology and occupies 0.053 mm-sq. Experimental results show that the LNA offers a noise efficiency factor of 2.16 and an input referred noise of 3.8 μVrms for 1.2 V power supply. It provides a gain of 46 dB over a nominal bandwidth of 192 Hz–7.4 kHz and consumes 1.92 μW. The performance of the proposed LNA has been validated through in vivo experiments with animal models. PMID:26437411

  7. External Peltier Cooler For Low-Noise Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soper, Terry A.

    1990-01-01

    Inexpensive Peltier-effect cooling module made of few commercially available parts used to reduce thermal noise in microwave amplifier. Retrofitted to almost any microwave low-noise amplifier or receiver preamplifier used in communication, telemetry, or radar. Includes copper or aluminum cold plate held tightly against unit to be cooled by strap-type worm-gear clamps.

  8. Cross-talk free, low-noise optical amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dijaili, Sol P.; Patterson, Frank G.; Deri, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A low-noise optical amplifier solves crosstalk problems in optical amplifiers by using an optical cavity oriented off-axis (e.g. perpendicular) to the direction of a signal amplified by the gain medium of the optical amplifier. Several devices are used to suppress parasitic lasing of these types of structures. The parasitic lasing causes the gain of these structures to be practically unusable. The lasing cavity is operated above threshold and the gain of the laser is clamped to overcome the losses of the cavity. Any increase in pumping causes the lasing power to increase. The clamping action of the gain greatly reduces crosstalk due to gain saturation for the amplified signal beam. It also reduces other nonlinearities associated with the gain medium such as four-wave mixing induced crosstalk. This clamping action can occur for a bandwidth defined by the speed of the laser cavity. The lasing field also reduces the response time of the gain medium. By having the lasing field off-axis, no special coatings are needed. Other advantages are that the lasing field is easily separated from the amplified signal and the carrier grating fluctuations induced by four-wave mixing are decreased. Two related methods reduce the amplified spontaneous emission power without sacrificing the gain of the optical amplifier.

  9. Cross-talk free, low-noise optical amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dijaili, S.P.; Patterson, F.G.; Deri, R.J.

    1995-07-25

    A low-noise optical amplifier solves crosstalk problems in optical amplifiers by using an optical cavity oriented off-axis (e.g. perpendicular) to the direction of a signal amplified by the gain medium of the optical amplifier. Several devices are used to suppress parasitic lasing of these types of structures. The parasitic lasing causes the gain of these structures to be practically unusable. The lasing cavity is operated above threshold and the gain of the laser is clamped to overcome the losses of the cavity. Any increase in pumping causes the lasing power to increase. The clamping action of the gain greatly reduces crosstalk due to gain saturation for the amplified signal beam. It also reduces other nonlinearities associated with the gain medium such as four-wave mixing induced crosstalk. This clamping action can occur for a bandwidth defined by the speed of the laser cavity. The lasing field also reduces the response time of the gain medium. By having the lasing field off-axis, no special coatings are needed. Other advantages are that the lasing field is easily separated from the amplified signal and the carrier grating fluctuations induced by four-wave mixing are decreased. Two related methods reduce the amplified spontaneous emission power without sacrificing the gain of the optical amplifier. 11 figs.

  10. A Low-Noise Transimpedance Amplifier for BLM-Based Ion Channel Recording.

    PubMed

    Crescentini, Marco; Bennati, Marco; Saha, Shimul Chandra; Ivica, Josip; de Planque, Maurits; Morgan, Hywel; Tartagni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) using ion channel recording is a powerful drug discovery technique in pharmacology. Ion channel recording with planar bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) is scalable and has very high sensitivity. A HTS system based on BLM ion channel recording faces three main challenges: (i) design of scalable microfluidic devices; (ii) design of compact ultra-low-noise transimpedance amplifiers able to detect currents in the pA range with bandwidth >10 kHz; (iii) design of compact, robust and scalable systems that integrate these two elements. This paper presents a low-noise transimpedance amplifier with integrated A/D conversion realized in CMOS 0.35 μm technology. The CMOS amplifier acquires currents in the range ±200 pA and ±20 nA, with 100 kHz bandwidth while dissipating 41 mW. An integrated digital offset compensation loop balances any voltage offsets from Ag/AgCl electrodes. The measured open-input input-referred noise current is as low as 4 fA/√Hz at ±200 pA range. The current amplifier is embedded in an integrated platform, together with a microfluidic device, for current recording from ion channels. Gramicidin-A, α-haemolysin and KcsA potassium channels have been used to prove both the platform and the current-to-digital converter. PMID:27213382

  11. A Low-Noise Transimpedance Amplifier for BLM-Based Ion Channel Recording

    PubMed Central

    Crescentini, Marco; Bennati, Marco; Saha, Shimul Chandra; Ivica, Josip; de Planque, Maurits; Morgan, Hywel; Tartagni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) using ion channel recording is a powerful drug discovery technique in pharmacology. Ion channel recording with planar bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) is scalable and has very high sensitivity. A HTS system based on BLM ion channel recording faces three main challenges: (i) design of scalable microfluidic devices; (ii) design of compact ultra-low-noise transimpedance amplifiers able to detect currents in the pA range with bandwidth >10 kHz; (iii) design of compact, robust and scalable systems that integrate these two elements. This paper presents a low-noise transimpedance amplifier with integrated A/D conversion realized in CMOS 0.35 μm technology. The CMOS amplifier acquires currents in the range ±200 pA and ±20 nA, with 100 kHz bandwidth while dissipating 41 mW. An integrated digital offset compensation loop balances any voltage offsets from Ag/AgCl electrodes. The measured open-input input-referred noise current is as low as 4 fA/√Hz at ±200 pA range. The current amplifier is embedded in an integrated platform, together with a microfluidic device, for current recording from ion channels. Gramicidin-A, α-haemolysin and KcsA potassium channels have been used to prove both the platform and the current-to-digital converter. PMID:27213382

  12. Low Noise Amplifiers and Receivers for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Lim, Boon; Gaier, Todd; Tanner, Alan; Varonen, Mikko; Samoska, Lorene; Brown, Shannon; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Reising, Steven; Tanabe, Jordan; Montes, Oliver; Dawson, Douglas; Parashare, Chaitali

    2011-01-01

    The study of atmospheric dynamics and climatology depend on accurate and frequent measurements of temperature and humidity profiles of the atmosphere. These measurements furthermore enable highly accurate measurements of ocean topography by providing total column water vapour data for radar path delay correction. The atmospheric temperature profile is characterised at the oxygen molecule absorption frequencies (60 and 118 GHz) and the humidity profile at the water molecule absorption frequencies (23 and 183 GHz). Total column measurements can be achieved by comparing measured radiometric temperatures at atmospheric window channels, such as 90, 130 and 166 GHz. The standard receiver technology for these frequencies was diode mixers with MMIC LNAs being applied at the lower frequencies. The sensitivity of millimetre wave receivers improved significantly with the introduction of the low noise 35 nm gate length InP MMIC amplifiers. We currently achieve 3 dB noise figure at 180 GHz and 2 dB noise figure at 90 GHz with our MMIC low noise amplifiers (LNAs) in room temperature. These amplifiers and the receivers we have built using them made it possible to conduct highly accurate airborne measurement campaigns from the Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle, develop millimeter wave internally calibrated radiometers for altimeter radar path delay correction, and build prototypes of large arrays of millimeter receivers for a geostationary interferometric sounder. We use the developed millimeter wave receivers to measure temperature and humidity profiles in the atmosphere and in hurricanes as well as to characterize the path delay error in ocean topography altimetry.

  13. Low Noise Amplifiers and Receivers for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Lim, Boon; Gaier, Todd; Tanner, Alan; Varonen, Mikko; Samoska, Lorene; Brown, Shannon; Lambrigsten, Bjorn; Reising, Steven; Tanabe, Jordan; Montes, Oliver; Dawson, Douglas; Parashare, Chaitali

    2012-01-01

    The study of atmospheric dynamics and climatology depend on accurate and frequent measurements of temperature and humidity profiles of the atmosphere. These measurements furthermore enable highly accurate measurements of ocean topography by providing total column water vapour data for radar path delay correction. The atmospheric temperature profile is characterized at the oxygen molecule absorption frequencies (60 and 118 GHz) and the humidity profile at the water molecule absorption frequencies (23 and 183 GHz). Total column measurements can be achieved by comparing measured radiometric temperatures at atmospheric window channels, such as 90, 130, and 166 GHz. The standard receiver technology for these frequencies was diode mixers with MMIC LNAs being applied at the lower frequencies. The sensitivity of millimeter wave receivers improved significantly with the introduction of the low noise 35 nm gate length InP MMIC amplifiers. We currently achieve 3 dB noise figure at 180 GHz and 2 dB noise figure at 90 GHz with our MMIC low noise amplifiers (LNAs) in room temperature. These amplifiers and the receivers we have built using them made it possible to conduct highly accurate airborne measurements campaigns from the Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle, develop millimeter wave internally calibrated radiometers for altimeter radar path delay correction, and build prototypes of large arrays of millimeter receivers for a geostationary interferometric sounder. We use the developed millimeter wave receivers to measure temperature and humidity profiles in the atmosphere and in hurricanes as well as to characterize the path delay error in ocean topography alitmetery.

  14. A Dynamic Instrumentation Amplifier for Low-Power and Low-Noise Biopotential Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongpal; Ko, Hyoungho

    2016-01-01

    A low-power and low-noise dynamic instrumentation amplifier (IA) for biopotential acquisition is presented. A dynamic IA that can reduce power consumption with a timely piecewise power-gating method, and noise level with an alternating input and chopper stabilization technique is fabricated with a 0.13-μm CMOS. Using the reconfigurable architecture of the IA, various combinations of the low-noise schemes are investigated. The combination of power gating and chopper stabilization shows a lower noise performance than the combination of power gating and alternating input switching scheme. This dynamic IA achieved a power reduction level of 50% from 10 µA to 5 µA and a noise reduction of 90% from 9.1 µVrms to 0.92 µVrms with the combination of the power gating and chopper stabilization scheme.

  15. Low Noise Amplifier Receivers from Millimeter Wave Atmospheric Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Lim, Boon; Gaier, Todd; Tanner, Alan; Varonen, Mikko; Samoska, Lorene; Brown, Shannon; Lambrigsten, Bjorn; Reising, Steven; Tanabe, Jordan; Montes, Oliver; Dawson, Douglas; Parashare, Chaitali

    2012-01-01

    We currently achieve 3.4 dB noise figure at 183GHz and 2.1 dB noise figure at 90 GHz with our MMIC low noise amplifiers (LNAs) in room temperature. These amplifiers and the receivers we have built using them made it possible to conduct highly accurate airborne measurement campaigns from the Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle, develop millimeter wave internally calibrated radiometers for altimeter radar path delay correction, and build prototypes of large arrays of millimeter receivers for a geostationary interferometric sounder. We use the developed millimeter wave receivers to measure temperature and humidity profiles in the atmosphere and in hurricanes as well as to characterize the path delay error in ocean topography altimetry.

  16. Low-Noise Amplifier for 100 to 180 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Pukala, David; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd; Mei, Xiaobing; Lai, Richard; Deal, William

    2009-01-01

    A three-stage monolithic millimeter-wave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifier designed to exhibit low noise in operation at frequencies from about 100 to somewhat above 180 GHz has been built and tested. This is a prototype of broadband amplifiers that have potential utility in diverse applications, including measurement of atmospheric temperature and humidity and millimeter-wave imaging for inspecting contents of opaque containers. Figure 1 depicts the amplifier as it appears before packaging. Figure 2 presents data from measurements of the performance of the amplifier as packaged in a WR-05 waveguide and tested in the frequency range from about 150 to about 190 GHz. The amplifier exhibited substantial gain throughout this frequency range. Especially notable is the fact that at 165 GHz, the noise figure was found to be 3.7 dB, and the noise temperature was found to be 370 K: This is less than half the noise temperature of the prior state of the art.

  17. Low-Noise MMIC Amplifiers for 120 to 180 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pukala, David; Samoska, Lorene; Peralta, Alejandro; Bayuk, Brian; Grundbacher, Ron; Oliver, Patricia; Cavus, Abdullah; Liu, Po-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Three-stage monolithic millimeter-wave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifiers capable of providing useful amounts of gain over the frequency range from 120 to 180 GHz have been developed as prototype low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) to be incorporated into instruments for sensing cosmic microwave background radiation. There are also potential uses for such LNAs in electronic test equipment, passive millimeter- wave imaging systems, radar receivers, communication receivers, and systems for detecting hidden weapons. The main advantage afforded by these MMIC LNAs, relative to prior MMIC LNAs, is that their coverage of the 120-to-180-GHz frequency band makes them suitable for reuse in a wider variety of applications without need to redesign them. Each of these MMIC amplifiers includes InP transistors and coplanar waveguide circuitry on a 50- mthick chip (see Figure 1). Coplanar waveguide transmission lines are used for both applying DC bias and matching of input and output impedances of each transistor stage. Via holes are incorporated between top and bottom ground planes to suppress propagation of electromagnetic modes in the substrate. On the basis of computational simulations, each of these amplifiers was expected to operate with a small-signal gain of 14 dB and a noise figure of 4.3 dB. At the time of writing this article, measurements of noise figures had not been reported, but on-chip measurements had shown gains approaching their simulated values (see Figure 2).

  18. A monolithic 60 GHz balanced low noise amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yang; Hao, Yang; Haiying, Zhang; Xinnian, Zheng; Zhiwei, Dai; Zhiqiang, Li; Zebao, Du

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a 60 GHz balanced low noise amplifier. Compared with single-ended structures, the balanced structure can obtain a better input/output return loss, a lower noise figure (NF), a 3 dB improvement of the 1 dB compression point, a 6 dB improvement of IM3 and a doubled dynamic range. Each single-ended amplifier in this paper uses a four-stage cascade structure to achieve a high gain in broadband. At the operating frequency range of 59-64 GHz, the small signal gain of the balanced amplifier is more than 20 dB. Both the input and output return losses are less than -12 dB. The output 1 dB compression power is 10.5 dBm at 60 GHz. The simulation result for the NF is better than 3.9 dB. The chip is fabricated using a 0.15 μm GaAs pHEMT process with a size of 2.25 × 1.7 mm2. Project supported by the External Cooperation Program of BIC, Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. 172511KYSB20130108).

  19. CMOS preamplifier with high linearity and ultra low noise for x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.O.; Rehak, P.; Gramegna, G.; Corsi, F.; Marzocca, C.

    1996-12-31

    We present an ultra low noise charge preamplifier suitable for small capacitance (200M), low leakage current solid state detectors. A self adaptive bias circuit for the MOS feedback device establishes the static feedback resistance in the G{Omega} range while tracking the threshold variations and power supply and temperature fluctuations. The linearity of the gain versus input charge has been improved by means of a voltage divider between the output of the charge-sensitive amplifier and the source of the feedback transistor. With the preamplifier alone, we measure a room-temperature equivalent noise charge (ENC) of 9 e{sup -} rms at 12 usec shaping time. When coupled to a cooled detector a FWHM of 130 eV is obtained at 2.4 usec shaping, corresponding to an ENC of 16 e{sup -} rms. This is the best reported resolution obtained with a CMOS preamplifier. The circuit has good linearity (< 0.2%) up to 1.8 W. Since the preamplifier`s ENC is limited by flicker noise, we fabricated the circuit in two 1.2um CMOS technologies. Device measurements allow us to compare the 1/f noise behavior of each foundry. In addition to the preamplifiers, a 1 us shaper and a 50{Omega} output driver are included on the die.

  20. Ultra-low noise miniaturized neural amplifier with hardware averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dweiri, Yazan M.; Eggers, Thomas; McCallum, Grant; Durand, Dominique M.

    2015-08-01

    presence of high source impedances that are associated with the miniaturized contacts and the high channel count in electrode arrays. This technique can be adopted for other applications where miniaturized and implantable multichannel acquisition systems with ultra-low noise and low power are required.

  1. Cryogenic ultra-low noise HEMT amplifiers board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Broïse, Xavier; Bounab, Ayoub

    2015-07-01

    High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs), optimized by CNRS/LPN laboratory for ultra-low noise at a very low temperature, have demonstrated their capacity to be used in place of Si JFETs, when very high input impedance and working temperatures below 100 K are required. We have developed and tested simple amplifiers based only on this transistor technology, in order to work at a temperature as low as 1 K or less. They demonstrate at 4.2 K a typical noise of 1.6 nV/√{ Hz } at 100 Hz, 0.42 nV/√{ Hz } at 1 kHz and 0.32 nV/√{ Hz } at 10 kHz, with a gain of 50 and a power consumption of 1.4 mW per channel. Two boards have been designed for two different research applications: one for the readout of GMR magnetometers for medical and space applications, the other for search of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in Edelweiss experiment (HARD project).

  2. Cooling a low noise amplifier with a micromachined cryogenic cooler.

    PubMed

    Cao, H S; Witvers, R H; Vanapalli, S; Holland, H J; ter Brake, H J M

    2013-10-01

    The sensitivity of antenna systems increases with increasing active area, but decreases at higher noise figure of the low-noise amplifier (LNA). Cooling the LNA locally results in significant improvement in the gain and in lowering the noise figure of the LNA. Micromachined Joule-Thomson (JT) coolers can provide a cryogenic environment to the LNA. They are attractive because they have no cold moving parts and can be scaled down to match the size and the power consumption of LNAs. The performance of a LNA mounted on a JT microcooler with dimensions of 60.0 × 9.5 × 0.72 mm(3) is reported in this paper. The microcooler is operated with nitrogen gas and the cold-end temperature is controlled at 115 K. The measured net cooling power of the microcooler is about 43 mW when the LNA is not operating. The power dissipation of the LNA is 26 mW, with a supply voltage of 2 V. At room temperature the noise figure of the LNA is 0.83 dB and the gain lies between 17.9 and 13.1 dB, in the frequency range of 0.65 and 1.05 GHz. Upon cooling to 115 K, the noise figure drops to 0.50 dB and the increase in gain varies in the range of 0.6-1.5 dB.

  3. A low-noise current-sensitive amplifier-discriminator system for beta particle counting.

    PubMed

    Sephton, J P; Johansson, L C; Williams, J M

    2008-01-01

    NPL has developed a low-noise current amplifier/discriminator system for radionuclides that emit low-energy electrons and X-rays. The new beta amplifier is based on the low-noise Amptek A-250 operational amplifier. The design has been configured for optimum signal to noise ratio. The new amplifier is described and results obtained using primarily electron-capture decaying radionuclides are presented. The new amplifier gives rise to higher particle detection efficiency than the previously used Atomic Energy of Canada Limited-designed amplifier. This is shown by measurements of (54)Mn and (65)Zn. The counting plateaux are significantly longer and have reduced gradients.

  4. Low Noise and Highly Linear Wideband CMOS RF Front-End for DVB-H Direct-Conversion Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Ilku; Moon, Hyunwon; Woo, Doo Hyung

    In this paper, a wideband CMOS radio frequency (RF) front-end for digital video broadcasting-handheld (DVB-H) receiver is proposed. The RF front-end circuit is composed of a single-ended resistive feedback low noise amplifier (LNA), a single-to-differential amplifier, an I/Q down-conversion mixer with linearized transconductors employing third order intermodulation distortion cancellation, and a divide-by-two circuit with LO buffers. By employing a third order intermodulation (IMD3) cancellation technique and vertical NPN bipolar junction transistor (BJT) switching pair for an I/Q down-conversion mixer, the proposed RF front-end circuit has high linearity and low low-frequency noise performance. It is fabricated in a 0.18µm deep n-well CMOS technology and draws 12mA from a 1.8V supply voltage. It shows a voltage gain of 31dB, a noise figure (NF) lower than 2.6dB, and an IIP3 of -8dBm from 470MHz to 862MHz.

  5. Two-Stage, 90-GHz, Low-Noise Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Xenos, Stephanie; Soria, Mary M.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Cleary, Kieran A.; Ferreira, Linda; Lai, Richard; Mei, Xiaobing

    2010-01-01

    A device has been developed for coherent detection of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). A two-stage amplifier has been designed that covers 75-110 GHz. The device uses the emerging 35-nm InP HEMT technology recently developed at Northrop Grumman Corporation primarily for use at higher frequencies. The amplifier has more than 18 dB gain and less than 35 K noise figure across the band. These devices have noise less than 30 K at 100 GHz. The development started with design activities at JPL, as well as characterization of multichip modules using existing InP. Following processing, a test campaign was carried out using single-chip modules at 100 GHz. Successful development of the chips will lead to development of multichip modules, with simultaneous Q and U Stokes parameter detection. This MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) amplifier takes advantage of performance improvements intended for higher frequencies, but in this innovation are applied at 90 GHz. The large amount of available gain ultimately leads to lower possible noise performance at 90 GHz.

  6. Cryogenic Design of the Deep Space Network Large Array Low-Noise Amplifier System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britcliffe, M. J.; Hanson, T. R.; Franco, M. M.

    2004-05-01

    This article describes the cryogenic design and performance of a prototype low-noise amplifier (LNA) system for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Large Array task. The system is used to cool a dual-frequency feed system equipped with high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT) low-noise amplifiers and the associated support electronics. The LNA/feed system operates at a temperature under 18 K. The system is designed to be manufactured at minimum cost. The design considerations, including the cryocooler to be used, vacuum system, microwave interconnects, mechanical components, and radiation shielding, are discussed.

  7. Integrated CMOS amplifier for ENG signal recording.

    PubMed

    Uranga, A; Navarro, X; Barniol, N

    2004-12-01

    The development and in vivo test of a fully integrated differential CMOS amplifier, implemented with standard 0.7-microm CMOS technology (one poly, two metals, self aligned twin-well CMOS process) intended to record extracellular neural signals is described. In order to minimize the flicker noise generated by the CMOS circuitry, a chopper technique has been chosen. The fabricated amplifier has a gain of 74 dB, a bandwidth of 3 kHz, an input noise of 6.6 nV/(Hz)0.5, a power dissipation of 1.3 mW, and the active area is 2.7 mm2. An ac coupling has been used to adapt the electrode to the amplifier circuitry for the in vivo testing. Compound muscle action potentials, motor unit action potentials, and compound nerve action potentials have been recorded in acute experiments with rats, in order to validate the amplifier. PMID:15605867

  8. Low-noise CMOS SPAD arrays with in-pixel time-to-digital converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Alberto; Villa, Federica; Bronzi, Danilo; Zou, Yu; Lussana, Rudi; Tamborini, Davide; Tisa, Simone; Durini, Daniel; Weyers, Sascha; Pashen, Uwe; Brockherde, Werner; Zappa, Franco

    2014-05-01

    We present our latest results concerning CMOS Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) arrays for high-throughput parallel single-photon counting. We exploited a high-voltage 0.35 μm CMOS technology in order to develop low-noise CMOS SPADs. The Dark Count Rate is 30 cps at room temperature for 30 μm devices, increases to 2 kcps for 100 μm SPADs and just to 100 kcps for 500 μm ones. Afterpulsing is less than 1% for hold-off time longer than 50 ns, thus allowing to reach high count rates. Photon Detection Efficiency is > 50% at 420 nm, > 40% below 500 nm and is still 5% at 850 nm. Timing jitter is less than 100 ps (FWHM) in SPADs with active area diameter up to 50 μm. We developed CMOS SPAD imagers with 150 μm pixel pitch and 30 μm SPADs. A 64×32 SPAD array is based on pixels including three 9-bit counters for smart phase-resolved photon counting up to 100 kfps. A 32x32 SPAD array includes 1024 10-bit Time-to-Digital Converters (TDC) with 300 ps resolution and 450 ps single-shot precision, for 3D ranging and FLIM. We developed also linear arrays with up to 60 pixels (with 100 μm SPAD, 150 μm pitch and in-pixel 250 ps TDC) for time-resolved parallel spectroscopy with high fill factor.

  9. Development of a simple low noise amplifier for recording of sensory mass signals from peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Klausmann, Dominic; Krueger, Thilo B

    2009-02-01

    In the present work, a simple low noise amplifier system with relatively few components for the recording of peripheral nerve signals via electrodes, such as cuff electrodes, was developed. The amplifier system was developed with the aid of a computer-aided characterization tool, which allowed the characterization of bioelectric signal amplifiers and the identification of system parameters. Three commercially available amplifier systems were investigated with this tool regarding their technical parameters. In addition, peripheral sensory nerve mass signals were analyzed to validate the target specifications for the amplifier to be designed with regard to amplitude and frequency range. An amplifier was designed and developed according to these specifications, characterized in comparison to the commercial amplifiers, and successfully applied in pilot experiments on the sciatic nerve in a rat animal model. PMID:19182867

  10. Cryogenic, low-noise high electron mobility transistor amplifiers for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    The rapid advances recently achieved by cryogenically cooled high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) low-noise amplifiers (LNA's) in the 1- to 10-GHz range are making them extremely competitive with maser amplifiers. In order to address future spacecraft navigation, telemetry, radar, and radio science needs, the Deep Space Network is investing both maser and HEMT amplifiers for its Ka-band (32-GHz) downlink capability. This article describes the current state cryogenic HEMT LNA development at Ka-band for the DSN. Noise performance results at S-band (2.3 GHz) and X-band (8.5 GHz) for HEMT's and masers are included for completeness.

  11. Low Noise Amplifiers for 140 Ghz Wide-Band Cryogenic Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkoski, Patricia V.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Samoska, Lorene; Lai, Richard; Sarkozy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    We report S-parameter and noise measurements for three different Indium Phosphide 35-nanometer-gate-length High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) designs operating in the frequency range centered on 140 gigahertz. When packaged in a Waveguide Rectangular-6.1 waveguide housing, the LNAs have an average measured noise figure of 3.0 decibels - 3.6 decibels over the 122-170 gigahertz band. One LNA was cooled to 20 degrees Kelvin and a record low noise temperature of 46 Kelvin, or 0.64 decibels noise figure, was measured at 152 gigahertz. These amplifiers can be used to develop receivers for instruments that operate in the 130-170 gigahertz atmospheric window, which is an important frequency band for ground-based astronomy and millimeter-wave imaging applications.

  12. Low noise buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators for precise time and frequency measurement and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichinger, R. A.; Dachel, P.; Miller, W. H.; Ingold, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely low noise, high performance, wideband buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators were developed. These buffer amplifiers are designed to distribute reference frequencies from 30 KHz to 45 MHz from a hydrogen maser without degrading the hydrogen maser's performance. The buffered phase comparators are designed to intercompare the phase of state of the art hydrogen masers without adding any significant measurement system noise. These devices have a 27 femtosecond phase stability floor and are stable to better than one picosecond for long periods of time. Their temperature coefficient is less than one picosecond per degree C, and they have shown virtually no voltage coefficients.

  13. A Low-Noise CMOS THz Imager Based on Source Modulation and an In-Pixel High-Q Passive Switched-Capacitor N-Path Filter.

    PubMed

    Boukhayma, Assim; Dupret, Antoine; Rostaing, Jean-Pierre; Enz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the first low noise complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) deletedCMOS terahertz (THz) imager based on source modulation and in-pixel high-Q filtering. The 31 × 31 focal plane array has been fully integrated in a 0 . 13 μ m standard CMOS process. The sensitivity has been improved significantly by modulating the active THz source that lights the scene and performing on-chip high-Q filtering. Each pixel encompass a broadband bow tie antenna coupled to an N-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (NMOS) detector that shifts the THz radiation, a low noise adjustable gain amplifier and a high-Q filter centered at the modulation frequency. The filter is based on a passive switched-capacitor (SC) N-path filter combined with a continuous-time broad-band Gm-C filter. A simplified analysis that helps in designing and tuning the passive SC N-path filter is provided. The characterization of the readout chain shows that a Q factor of 100 has been achieved for the filter with a good matching between the analytical calculation and the measurement results. An input-referred noise of 0 . 2 μ V RMS has been measured. Characterization of the chip with different THz wavelengths confirms the broadband feature of the antenna and shows that this THz imager reaches a total noise equivalent power of 0 . 6 nW at 270 GHz and 0 . 8 nW at 600 GHz. PMID:26950131

  14. Tests of Low-Noise MMIC Amplifier Module at 290 to 340 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd; Samoska, Lorene; Fung, King Man; Deal, William; Mei, Xiaobing; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    A document presents data from tests of a low-noise amplifier module operating in the frequency range from 290 to 340 GHz said to be the highest-frequency low-noise, solid-state amplifier ever developed. The module comprised a three-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier integrated with radial probe MMIC/waveguide transitions and contained in a compact waveguide package, all according to the concepts described in the immediately preceding article and in the referenced prior article, "Integrated Radial Probe Transition From MMIC to Waveguide" (NPO-43957), NASA Tech Briefs Vol. 31, No. 5 (May 2007), page 38. The tests included measurements by the Y-factor method, in which noise figures are measured repeatedly with an input noise source alternating between an "on" (hot-load) condition and an "off" (cold-load) condition. (The Y factor is defined as the ratio between the "on" and "off" noise power levels.) The test results showed that, among other things, the module exhibited a minimum noise figure of about 8.7 dB at 325 GHz and that the gain at that frequency under the bias conditions that produced the minimum noise figure was between about 9 and 10 dB.

  15. A 2.3-GHz low-noise cryo-FET amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loreman, J.

    1988-01-01

    A cryogenic cooled, low-noise Field Effect Transistor (FET) amplifier assembly for use at 2.2 to 2.3 GHz was developed for the DSN to meet the requirements of a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) upgrade. An amplifier assembly was developed at JPL that uses a commercial closed-cycle helium refrigerator (CCR) to cool a FET amplifier to an operating temperature of 15 K. A cooled probe waveguide-to-coaxial transition similar to that used in the research and development Ultra-Low-Noise S-band Traveling Wave Maser (TWM) is used to minimize input line losses. Typical performance includes an input flange equivalent noise contribution of 14.5 K, a gain slope of less than 0.05 dB/MHz across a bandwidth of 2.2 to 2.3 GHz, an input VSWR of 1.5:1 at 2.25 GHz, and an insertion gain of 45 + or - 1 dB across the bandwidth of 2.2 to 2.3 GHz. Three 2.3 GHz FET/CCR assemblies were delivered to the DSN in the spring of 1987.

  16. A GaAs monolithic low-noise broad-band amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, J. A.; Weidlich, H. P.; Pettenpaul, E.; Petz, F. A.; Huber, J.

    1981-12-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and performance of GaAs monolithic low-noise broad-band amplifiers intended for broadcast receiver antenna amplifier, IF amplifier, and instrumentation applications. The process technology includes the use of Czochralski-grown semiinsulating substrates, localized implantation of ohmic and FET channel regions, and silicon nitride for passivation and MIM capacitors. The amplifiers employ shunt feedback to obtain input matching and flat broad-band response. One amplifier provides a gain of 24 dB, bandwidth of 930 MHz, and noise figure of 5.0 dB. A second amplifier provides a gain of 17 dB, bandwidth of 1400 MHz, and noise figure of 5.6 dB. Input and output VSWR's are typically less than 2:1 and the third-order intercept points are 28 and 32 dB, respectively. Improved noise figure and intercept point can be achieved by the use of external RF chokes.

  17. Micropower CMOS Integrated Low-Noise Amplification, Filtering, and Digitization of Multimodal Neuropotentials.

    PubMed

    Mollazadeh, M; Murari, K; Cauwenberghs, G; Thakor, N

    2009-02-01

    Electrical activity in the brain spans a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, requiring simultaneous recording of multiple modalities of neurophysiological signals in order to capture various aspects of brain state dynamics. Here, we present a 16-channel neural interface integrated circuit fabricated in a 0.5 mum 3M2P CMOS process for selective digital acquisition of biopotentials across the spectrum of neural signal modalities in the brain, ranging from single spike action potentials to local field potentials (LFP), electrocorticograms (ECoG), and electroencephalograms (EEG). Each channel is composed of a tunable bandwidth, fixed gain front-end amplifier and a programmable gain/resolution continuous-time incremental DeltaSigma analog-to-digital converter (ADC). A two-stage topology for the front-end voltage amplifier with capacitive feedback offers independent tuning of the amplifier bandpass frequency corners, and attains a noise efficiency factor (NEF) of 2.9 at 8.2 kHz bandwidth for spike recording, and a NEF of 3.2 at 140 Hz bandwidth for EEG recording. The amplifier has a measured midband gain of 39.6 dB, frequency response from 0.2 Hz to 8.2 kHz, and an input-referred noise of 1.94 muV rms while drawing 12.2 muA of current from a 3.3 V supply. The lower and higher cutoff frequencies of the bandpass filter are adjustable from 0.2 to 94 Hz and 140 Hz to 8.2 kHz, respectively. At 10-bit resolution, the ADC has an SNDR of 56 dB while consuming 76 muW power. Time-modulation feedback in the ADC offers programmable digital gain (1-4096) for auto-ranging, further improving the dynamic range and linearity of the ADC. Experimental recordings with the system show spike signals in rat somatosensory cortex as well as alpha EEG activity in a human subject. PMID:20046962

  18. Updated design for a low-noise, wideband transimpedance photodiode amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, S. F.; Marsala, R.

    2006-10-15

    The high-speed rotation diagnostic developed for Columbia's HBT-EP tokamak requires a high quantum efficiency, very low drift detector/amplifier combination. An updated version of the circuit developed originally for the beam emission spectroscopy experiment on TFTR is being used. A low dark current (2 nA at 15 V bias), low input source capacitance (2 pF) FFD-040 N-type Si photodiode is operated in photoconductive mode. It has a quantum efficiency of 40% at the 468.6 nm (He II line that is being observed). A low-noise field-effect transistor (InterFET IFN152 with e{sub Na}=1.2 nV/{radical}Hz) is used to reduce the noise in the transimpedance preamplifier (A250 AMPTEK op-amp) and a very high speed (unity-gain bandwidth=200 MHz) voltage feedback amplifier (LM7171) is used to restore the frequency response up to 100 kHz. This type of detector/amplifier is photon-noise limited at this bandwidth for incident light with a power of >{approx}2 nW. The circuit has been optimized using SIMETRIX 4.0 SPICE software and a prototype circuit has been tested successfully. Though photomultipliers and avalanche photodiodes can detect much lower light levels, for light levels >2 nW and a 10 kHz bandwidth, this detector/amplifier combination is more sensitive because of the absence of excess (internally generated) noise.

  19. Electro-Static Discharge Protection Design for V-Band Low-Noise Amplifier Using Radio Frequency Junction Varactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Huang, Sing-Kai; Hsu, Shawn S. H.

    2013-04-01

    The RF junction varactors are employed as electro-static discharge (ESD) protection devices and co-designed with 60 GHz low-noise amplifier (LNA) fabricated in a 65-nm CMOS technology. The junction varactor acts as an ESD diode to bypass ESD current during ESD zapping, and also utilized as a capacitor to be a part of input matching network of the LNA in normal RF operation. By transmission line pulse (TLP) measurement, the ESD protection capabilities of RF junction varactors are characterized with different device parameters. The experimental results demonstrate excellent second breakdown currents (It2) and high ratios of the ESD levels to parasitic capacitances (VESD/CESD). With ESD/matching co-design methodology, the ESD-protected LNA demonstrates a second breakdown current It2 of 1.4 A, corresponding to a 2-kV human-body-model (HBM) ESD protection level with a noise figure (NF) of 6.6 dB and a peak gain of 16.5 dB at 60 GHz under a power consumption of only 28 mW.

  20. Validation of the ultrastable low-noise current amplifier as travelling standard for small direct currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drung, D.; Krause, C.; Giblin, S. P.; Djordjevic, S.; Piquemal, F.; Séron, O.; Rengnez, F.; Götz, M.; Pesel, E.; Scherer, H.

    2015-12-01

    An interlaboratory comparison of small-current generation and measurement capability is presented with the ultrastable low-noise current amplifier (ULCA) acting as travelling standard. Various measurements at direct currents between 0.16 nA and 13 nA were performed to verify the degree of agreement between the three national metrology institutes involved in the study. Consistency well within one part per million (ppm) was found. Due to harsh environmental conditions during shipment, the ULCA’s transfer accuracy had been limited to about  ±0.4 ppm. Supplemental measurements performed at PTB indicate that further improvements in accuracy are possible. Relative uncertainties of 0.1 ppm are achieved by applying on-site calibration of the ULCA with a suitable cryogenic current comparator.

  1. Instrumental and Observational Studies in Radio Astronomy, Low Noise Amplifier Design and Methanol Maser Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minier, V.

    1998-10-01

    ``Radio astronomy is the study of the universe by observing electromagnetic radiation after it has been amplified. The use of amplifiers that preserve the oscillatory character of radiation - the phase information - is the mark of Radio astronomy.'' Thus, the development of low noise amplifiers for microwave and millimeter wavelengths is a major part of Radio astronomy as important as the observations themselves. This technical report involves those two aspects of Radio astronomy, the observational and technical aspects. In the first part, observations of methanol masers in massive star forming regions using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) are presented. The second part concerns the realization of low noise amplifiers using in a radio camera. Recent observations have confirmed that the methanol masers are powerful tools for probing the regions of massive star formation. The methanol masers fall in two distinct classes related to their location in the star forming regions. Class I methanol masers are observed offset far away from the UC HII region emission peak. They are certainly collisionally pumped and may occur in the interface between high velocity gas outflows and the ambient molecular material. Class II methanol masers coincide with the UC HII region emission. They may be radiatively pumped by FIR radiation from the dust grains and reside either in spherical layers surrounding the UC HII regions or in circumstellar discs. The maser spots are usually compact (~1-10 AU) and lie in region of physical conditions n(H)~104-108 cm-3 and T=100-1000 K. CH3OH may be produced by hydrogenation of CO on the surface of the icy mantles of the dust grains . The methanol is then injected in the molecular gas by evaporation of the ice (n(H)=106 cm-3, T=100-300 K). In this report we present VLBI observations of 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol masers in the star forming regions NGC7538, W75N and S252. Our results show the existence of two groups of masers in NGC7538. The

  2. Simple nonlinearity evaluation and modeling of low-noise amplifiers with application to radio astronomy receivers.

    PubMed

    Casas, F J; Pascual, J P; de la Fuente, M L; Artal, E; Portilla, J

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes a comparative nonlinear analysis of low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) under different stimuli for use in astronomical applications. Wide-band Gaussian-noise input signals, together with the high values of gain required, make that figures of merit, such as the 1 dB compression (1 dBc) point of amplifiers, become crucial in the design process of radiometric receivers in order to guarantee the linearity in their nominal operation. The typical method to obtain the 1 dBc point is by using single-tone excitation signals to get the nonlinear amplitude to amplitude (AM-AM) characteristic but, as will be shown in the paper, in radiometers, the nature of the wide-band Gaussian-noise excitation signals makes the amplifiers present higher nonlinearity than when using single tone excitation signals. Therefore, in order to analyze the suitability of the LNA's nominal operation, the 1 dBc point has to be obtained, but using realistic excitation signals. In this work, an analytical study of compression effects in amplifiers due to excitation signals composed of several tones is reported. Moreover, LNA nonlinear characteristics, as AM-AM, total distortion, and power to distortion ratio, have been obtained by simulation and measurement with wide-band Gaussian-noise excitation signals. This kind of signal can be considered as a limit case of a multitone signal, when the number of tones is very high. The work is illustrated by means of the extraction of realistic nonlinear characteristics, through simulation and measurement, of a 31 GHz back-end module LNA used in the radiometer of the QUIJOTE (Q U I JOint TEnerife) CMB experiment.

  3. Low-noise kinetic inductance traveling-wave amplifier using three-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissers, M. R.; Erickson, R. P.; Ku, H.-S.; Vale, Leila; Wu, Xian; Hilton, G. C.; Pappas, D. P.

    2016-01-01

    We have fabricated a wide-bandwidth, high dynamic range, low-noise cryogenic amplifier based on a superconducting kinetic inductance traveling-wave device. The device was made from NbTiN and consisted of a long, coplanar waveguide on a silicon chip. By adding a DC current and an RF pump tone, we are able to generate parametric amplification using three-wave mixing (3WM). The devices exhibit gain of more than 15 dB across an instantaneous bandwidth from 4 to 8 GHz. The total usable gain bandwidth, including both sides of the signal-idler gain region, is more than 6 GHz. The noise referred to the input of the devices approaches the quantum limit, with less than 1 photon excess noise. We compare these results directly to the four-wave mixing amplification mode, i.e., without DC-biasing. We find that the 3WM mode allows operation with the pump at lower RF power and at frequencies far from the signal. We have used this knowledge to redesign the amplifiers to utilize primarily 3WM amplification, thereby allowing for direct integration into large scale qubit and detector applications.

  4. A Low-Noise CMOS THz Imager Based on Source Modulation and an In-Pixel High-Q Passive Switched-Capacitor N-Path Filter

    PubMed Central

    Boukhayma, Assim; Dupret, Antoine; Rostaing, Jean-Pierre; Enz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the first low noise complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) terahertz (THz) imager based on source modulation and in-pixel high-Q filtering. The 31×31 focal plane array has been fully integrated in a 0.13μm standard CMOS process. The sensitivity has been improved significantly by modulating the active THz source that lights the scene and performing on-chip high-Q filtering. Each pixel encompass a broadband bow tie antenna coupled to an N-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (NMOS) detector that shifts the THz radiation, a low noise adjustable gain amplifier and a high-Q filter centered at the modulation frequency. The filter is based on a passive switched-capacitor (SC) N-path filter combined with a continuous-time broad-band Gm-C filter. A simplified analysis that helps in designing and tuning the passive SC N-path filter is provided. The characterization of the readout chain shows that a Q factor of 100 has been achieved for the filter with a good matching between the analytical calculation and the measurement results. An input-referred noise of 0.2μV RMS has been measured. Characterization of the chip with different THz wavelengths confirms the broadband feature of the antenna and shows that this THz imager reaches a total noise equivalent power of 0.6 nW at 270 GHz and 0.8 nW at 600 GHz. PMID:26950131

  5. Analysis and design of low noise column stage in CMOS ROIC for UV GaN focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojuan; Yuan, Yonggang; Xie, Jing; Wang, Jiqiang; Ma, Ding; Wang, Ling; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-03-01

    A novel column-stage structure of readout integrated circuit (ROIC) for GaN ultraviolet (UV) focal plane array (FPA) working in "solar-blind" band is proposed. The column stage has better drive capability, higher dynamic range, stable bias current and low impedance. The noise voltage of the column readout stage is discussed, which has been reduced by small-current driving, column-stage sample and hold and the technology of divided-output-bus. This research on low-noise ROIC is designed for weak-current UV FPA. It is designed, simulated and laid out using the 0.35um 2P4M CMOS 5V process. The clock rate operates at 8MHz. The simulation input current sets 0.01nA. The output swing is 2.6V and power consumption is 40 mW according to the measurement results.

  6. A CMOS-Compatible, Low-Noise ISFET Based on High Efficiency Ion-Modulated Lateral-Bipolar Conduction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sheng-Ren; Chen, Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Ion-sensitive, field-effect transistors (ISFET) have been useful biosensors in many applications. However, the signal-to-noise ratio of the ISFET is limited by its intrinsic, low-frequency noise. This paper presents an ISFET capable of utilizing lateral-bipolar conduction to reduce low-frequency noise. With a particular layout design, the conduction efficiency is further enhanced. Moreover, the ISFET is compatible with the standard CMOS technology. All materials above the gate-oxide are removed by simple, die-level post-CMOS process, allowing ions to modulate the lateral-bipolar current directly. By varying the gate-to-bulk voltage, the operation mode of the ISFET is controlled effectively, so is the noise performance measured and compared. Finally, the biasing conditions preferable for different low-noise applications are identified. Under the identified biasing condition, the signal-to-noise ratio of the ISFET as a pH sensor is proved to be improved by more than five times. PMID:22408508

  7. A Fast Multiple Sampling Method for Low-Noise CMOS Image Sensors With Column-Parallel 12-bit SAR ADCs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Kyu; Hong, Seong-Kwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a fast multiple sampling method for low-noise CMOS image sensor (CIS) applications with column-parallel successive approximation register analog-to-digital converters (SAR ADCs). The 12-bit SAR ADC using the proposed multiple sampling method decreases the A/D conversion time by repeatedly converting a pixel output to 4-bit after the first 12-bit A/D conversion, reducing noise of the CIS by one over the square root of the number of samplings. The area of the 12-bit SAR ADC is reduced by using a 10-bit capacitor digital-to-analog converter (DAC) with four scaled reference voltages. In addition, a simple up/down counter-based digital processing logic is proposed to perform complex calculations for multiple sampling and digital correlated double sampling. To verify the proposed multiple sampling method, a 256 × 128 pixel array CIS with 12-bit SAR ADCs was fabricated using 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurement results shows that the proposed multiple sampling method reduces each A/D conversion time from 1.2 μs to 0.45 μs and random noise from 848.3 μV to 270.4 μV, achieving a dynamic range of 68.1 dB and an SNR of 39.2 dB. PMID:26712765

  8. A Fast Multiple Sampling Method for Low-Noise CMOS Image Sensors With Column-Parallel 12-bit SAR ADCs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Kyu; Hong, Seong-Kwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2015-12-26

    This paper presents a fast multiple sampling method for low-noise CMOS image sensor (CIS) applications with column-parallel successive approximation register analog-to-digital converters (SAR ADCs). The 12-bit SAR ADC using the proposed multiple sampling method decreases the A/D conversion time by repeatedly converting a pixel output to 4-bit after the first 12-bit A/D conversion, reducing noise of the CIS by one over the square root of the number of samplings. The area of the 12-bit SAR ADC is reduced by using a 10-bit capacitor digital-to-analog converter (DAC) with four scaled reference voltages. In addition, a simple up/down counter-based digital processing logic is proposed to perform complex calculations for multiple sampling and digital correlated double sampling. To verify the proposed multiple sampling method, a 256 × 128 pixel array CIS with 12-bit SAR ADCs was fabricated using 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurement results shows that the proposed multiple sampling method reduces each A/D conversion time from 1.2 μs to 0.45 μs and random noise from 848.3 μV to 270.4 μV, achieving a dynamic range of 68.1 dB and an SNR of 39.2 dB.

  9. Method and apparatus for linear low-frequency feedback in monolithic low-noise charge amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    DeGeronimo, Gianluigi

    2006-02-14

    A charge amplifier includes an amplifier, feedback circuit, and cancellation circuit. The feedback circuit includes a capacitor, inverter, and current mirror. The capacitor is coupled across the signal amplifier, the inverter is coupled to the output of the signal amplifier, and the current mirror is coupled to the input of the signal amplifier. The cancellation circuit is coupled to the output of the signal amplifier. A method of charge amplification includes providing a signal amplifier; coupling a first capacitor across the signal amplifier; coupling an inverter to the output of the signal amplifier; coupling a current mirror to the input of the signal amplifier; and coupling a cancellation circuit to the output of the signal amplifier. A front-end system for use with radiation sensors includes a charge amplifier and a current amplifier, shaping amplifier, baseline stabilizer, discriminator, peak detector, timing detector, and logic circuit coupled to the charge amplifier.

  10. Performance of a Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting filter/GaAs low noise amplifier hybrid circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Toncich, S. S.; Chorey, C. M.; Bonetti, R. R.; Williams, A. E.

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting 7.3 GHz two-pole microstrip bandpass filter and a GaAs low noise amplifier (LNA) were combined into a hybrid circuit and characterized at liquid nitrogen temperatures. This superconducting/seismology circuit's performance was compared to a gold filter/GaAs LNA hybrid circuit. The superconducting filter/GaAs LNA hybrid circuit showed higher gain and lower noise figure than its gold counterpart.

  11. Radio astronomy ultra-low-noise amplifier for operation at 91 cm wavelength in high RFI environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, A. M.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Ulyanov, O. M.

    2016-02-01

    An ultra-low-noise input amplifier intended for a use in a radio telescope operating at 91 cm wavelength is presented. The amplifier noise temperatures are 12.8 ± 1.5 and 10.0 ± 1.5 K at ambient temperatures of 293 and 263 K respectively. The amplifier does not require cryogenic cooling. It can be quickly put in operation thus shortening losses in the telescope observation time. High linearity of the amplifier (output power at 1 dB gain compression P1dB ≥ 22 dBm, output third order intercept point OIP3 ≥ 37 dBm) enables the telescope operation in highly urbanized and industrialized regions. To obtain low noise characteristics along with high linearity, high-electron-mobility field-effect transistors were used in parallel in the circuit developed. The transistors used in the amplifier are cost-effective and commercially available. The circuit solution is recommended for similar devices working in ultra-high frequency band.

  12. A two-step A/D conversion and column self-calibration technique for low noise CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jaeyoung; Kim, Daeyun; Ham, Seokheon; Chae, Youngcheol; Song, Minkyu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a 120 frames per second (fps) low noise CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) based on a Two-Step Single Slope ADC (TS SS ADC) and column self-calibration technique is proposed. The TS SS ADC is suitable for high speed video systems because its conversion speed is much faster (by more than 10 times) than that of the Single Slope ADC (SS ADC). However, there exist some mismatching errors between the coarse block and the fine block due to the 2-step operation of the TS SS ADC. In general, this makes it difficult to implement the TS SS ADC beyond a 10-bit resolution. In order to improve such errors, a new 4-input comparator is discussed and a high resolution TS SS ADC is proposed. Further, a feedback circuit that enables column self-calibration to reduce the Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN) is also described. The proposed chip has been fabricated with 0.13 μm Samsung CIS technology and the chip satisfies the VGA resolution. The pixel is based on the 4-TR Active Pixel Sensor (APS). The high frame rate of 120 fps is achieved at the VGA resolution. The measured FPN is 0.38 LSB, and measured dynamic range is about 64.6 dB.

  13. A two-step A/D conversion and column self-calibration technique for low noise CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jaeyoung; Kim, Daeyun; Ham, Seokheon; Chae, Youngcheol; Song, Minkyu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a 120 frames per second (fps) low noise CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) based on a Two-Step Single Slope ADC (TS SS ADC) and column self-calibration technique is proposed. The TS SS ADC is suitable for high speed video systems because its conversion speed is much faster (by more than 10 times) than that of the Single Slope ADC (SS ADC). However, there exist some mismatching errors between the coarse block and the fine block due to the 2-step operation of the TS SS ADC. In general, this makes it difficult to implement the TS SS ADC beyond a 10-bit resolution. In order to improve such errors, a new 4-input comparator is discussed and a high resolution TS SS ADC is proposed. Further, a feedback circuit that enables column self-calibration to reduce the Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN) is also described. The proposed chip has been fabricated with 0.13 μm Samsung CIS technology and the chip satisfies the VGA resolution. The pixel is based on the 4-TR Active Pixel Sensor (APS). The high frame rate of 120 fps is achieved at the VGA resolution. The measured FPN is 0.38 LSB, and measured dynamic range is about 64.6 dB. PMID:24999716

  14. Cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier for radio-astronomical observations and centimeter-wave deep-space communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovin, V. F.; Grachev, V. G.; Dryagin, S. Yu.; Eliseev, A. I.; Kamaletdinov, R. K.; Korotaev, D. V.; Lesnov, I. V.; Mansfeld, M. A.; Pevzner, E. L.; Perminov, V. G.; Pilipenko, A. M.; Sapozhnikov, B. D.; Saurin, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    We report a design solution for a highly reliable, low-noise and extremely efficient cryogenically cooled transmit/receive unit for a large antenna system meant for radio-astronomical observations and deep-space communications in the X band. We describe our design solution and the results of a series of laboratory and antenna tests carried out in order to investigate the properties of the cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier developed. The transmit/receive unit designed for deep-space communications (Mars missions, radio observatories located at Lagrangian point L2, etc.) was used in practice for communication with live satellites including "Radioastron" observatory, which moves in a highly elliptical orbit.

  15. From an MMIC chip to a working cryogenic low-noise amplifier: a detailed study on packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenziano, L.; Mariotti, S.; Armogida, A.; Baz, A.; Biggi, M.; Carbonaro, L.; Cremonini, A.; De Rosa, A.; Gervasi, M.; Passerini, A.; Schiavone, F.; Zannoni, M.; Zuccarelli, J.

    2012-09-01

    Cryogenic Low Noise Amplifiers, based on MMIC HEMT technology, require a careful packaging to reach optimal performance. Differences between modeled and measured performance can often be related to chip mounting details. In the framework of the development of new cryogenic LNAs, described in a companion paper, we have developed a specific packaging to host W-band cryogenic MMIC LNAs. We present here some of the main factors analyzed in the design and chip integration activities. In particular, mechanical and thermal modeling, LNA chip gluing and adhesive properties, sensitivity to components integration accuracy (i.e. deviation from the ideal orientation). Preliminary test results are also reported.

  16. Low noise parametric amplifiers for radio astronomy observations at 18-21 cm wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanevskiy, B. Z.; Veselov, V. M.; Strukov, I. A.; Etkin, V. S.

    1974-01-01

    The principle characteristics and use of SHF parametric amplifiers for radiometer input devices are explored. Balanced parametric amplifiers (BPA) are considered as the SHF signal amplifiers allowing production of the amplifier circuit without a special filter to achieve decoupling. Formulas to calculate the basic parameters of a BPA are given. A modulator based on coaxial lines is discussed as the input element of the SHF. Results of laboratory tests of the receiver section and long-term stability studies of the SHF sector are presented.

  17. Ultrastable low-noise current amplifier: A novel device for measuring small electric currents with high accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drung, D.; Krause, C.; Becker, U.; Scherer, H.; Ahlers, F. J.

    2015-02-01

    An ultrastable low-noise current amplifier (ULCA) is presented. The ULCA is a non-cryogenic instrument based on specially designed operational amplifiers and resistor networks. It involves two stages, the first providing a 1000-fold current gain and the second performing a current-to-voltage conversion via an internal 1 MΩ reference resistor or, optionally, an external standard resistor. The ULCA's transfer coefficient is highly stable versus time, temperature, and current amplitude within the full dynamic range of ±5 nA. The low noise level of 2.4 fA/√Hz helps to keep averaging times short at small input currents. A cryogenic current comparator is used to calibrate both input current gain and output transresistance, providing traceability to the quantum Hall effect. Within one week after calibration, the uncertainty contribution from short-term fluctuations and drift of the transresistance is about 0.1 parts per million (ppm). The long-term drift is typically 5 ppm/yr. A high-accuracy variant is available that shows improved stability of the input gain at the expense of a higher noise level of 7.5 fA/√Hz. The ULCA also allows the traceable generation of small electric currents or the calibration of high-ohmic resistors.

  18. Ultrastable low-noise current amplifier: A novel device for measuring small electric currents with high accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Drung, D.; Krause, C.; Becker, U.; Scherer, H.; Ahlers, F. J.

    2015-02-15

    An ultrastable low-noise current amplifier (ULCA) is presented. The ULCA is a non-cryogenic instrument based on specially designed operational amplifiers and resistor networks. It involves two stages, the first providing a 1000-fold current gain and the second performing a current-to-voltage conversion via an internal 1 MΩ reference resistor or, optionally, an external standard resistor. The ULCA’s transfer coefficient is highly stable versus time, temperature, and current amplitude within the full dynamic range of ±5 nA. The low noise level of 2.4 fA/√Hz helps to keep averaging times short at small input currents. A cryogenic current comparator is used to calibrate both input current gain and output transresistance, providing traceability to the quantum Hall effect. Within one week after calibration, the uncertainty contribution from short-term fluctuations and drift of the transresistance is about 0.1 parts per million (ppm). The long-term drift is typically 5 ppm/yr. A high-accuracy variant is available that shows improved stability of the input gain at the expense of a higher noise level of 7.5 fA/√Hz. The ULCA also allows the traceable generation of small electric currents or the calibration of high-ohmic resistors.

  19. Ultrastable low-noise current amplifier: a novel device for measuring small electric currents with high accuracy.

    PubMed

    Drung, D; Krause, C; Becker, U; Scherer, H; Ahlers, F J

    2015-02-01

    An ultrastable low-noise current amplifier (ULCA) is presented. The ULCA is a non-cryogenic instrument based on specially designed operational amplifiers and resistor networks. It involves two stages, the first providing a 1000-fold current gain and the second performing a current-to-voltage conversion via an internal 1 MΩ reference resistor or, optionally, an external standard resistor. The ULCA's transfer coefficient is highly stable versus time, temperature, and current amplitude within the full dynamic range of ±5 nA. The low noise level of 2.4 fA/√Hz helps to keep averaging times short at small input currents. A cryogenic current comparator is used to calibrate both input current gain and output transresistance, providing traceability to the quantum Hall effect. Within one week after calibration, the uncertainty contribution from short-term fluctuations and drift of the transresistance is about 0.1 parts per million (ppm). The long-term drift is typically 5 ppm/yr. A high-accuracy variant is available that shows improved stability of the input gain at the expense of a higher noise level of 7.5 fA/√Hz. The ULCA also allows the traceable generation of small electric currents or the calibration of high-ohmic resistors.

  20. OLA, A low-noise bipolar amplifier for the readout of Silicon Drift Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, W.; Białas, W.; Bonazzola, G.; Bonvicini, V.; Ceretto, F.; Giubellino, P.; Idzik, M.; Prest, M.; Riccati, L.; Zampa, N.

    1995-11-01

    A very low noise, 32-channel preamplifier/shaper chip has been designed for the analogue readout of silicon detectors. The circuit has been optimised in view of the operation of Silicon Drift Detectors, which have very low capacitance and produce gaussian signals of σ up to ˜ 100 ns. The chip (OLA) has been designed and manufactured using the SHPi full-custom bipolar process by Tektronix. Each channel is composed by a preamplifier, a shaper and a symmetrical line driver, which allows to drive either a positive and a negative single ended output separately on 50 Ω impedance or a differential twisted pair. The intrinsic peaking time of the circuit is ˜ 60 ns, and the noise is below 250 electrons at zero input load capacitance. The power consumption is 2 mW/channel, mostly due to the output driver.

  1. Low noise, tunable Ho:fiber soliton oscillator for Ho:YLF amplifier seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Ruehl, Axel; Bransley, Colleen; Hartl, Ingmar

    2016-06-01

    We present a passively mode-locked, tunable soliton Ho:fiber ring oscillator, optimized for seeding of holmium-doped yttrium lithium flouride (Ho:YLF) amplifiers. The oscillator is independently tunable in central wavelength and spectral width from 2040 to 2070 nm and from 5 to 10 nm, respectively. At all settings the pulse energy within the soliton is around 800 pJ. The soliton oscillator was optimized to fully meet the spectral requirements for seeding Ho:YLF amplifiers. Its Kelly sidebands are located outside the amplifier gain spectrum, resulting in a train of about 1 ps long pedestal-free pulses with relative intensity noise of only 0.13% RMS when integrated from 1 Hz to Nyquist frequency.

  2. Low-noise two-wired buffer electrodes for bioelectric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Degen, Thomas; Torrent, Simon; Jäckel, Heinz

    2007-07-01

    Active buffer electrodes are known to improve the immunity of bioelectric recordings against power line interferences. A survey of published work reveals that buffer electrodes are almost exclusively designed using operational amplifiers (opamps). In this paper, we discuss the advantage of utilizing a single transistor instead. This allows for a simple electrode, which is small and requires only two wires. In addition, a single transistor adds considerably less noise when compared to an opamp with the same power consumption. We then discuss output resistance and gain as well as their respective effect on the common mode rejection ratio (CMRR). Finally, we demonstrate the use of two-wired buffer electrodes for a bioelectric amplifier.

  3. Optimum design of wide-bandwidth, low-noise photodiode amplifiers. Volume 1: Bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. K.

    A circuit with video applications was tested. A reversed biased junction is a parallel combination of resistance and capacitance, which varies with the applied reverse voltage. The complete equivalent circuit model includes these components in parallel with a current generator. For optimum response at high frequency critical damping is necessary. The circuit allows the use of an amplifier with a wider open loop bandwidth than one compensated for unity gain, with a corresponding increase in system bandwidth.

  4. Study of built-in amplifier performance on HV-CMOS sensor for the ATLAS phase-II strip tracker upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Z.; Affolder, A.; Arndt, K.; Bates, R.; Benoit, M.; Di Bello, F.; Blue, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Buckland, M.; Buttar, C.; Caragiulo, P.; Das, D.; Dopke, J.; Dragone, A.; Ehrler, F.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Grabas, H.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grillo, A.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Huffman, B. T.; John, J.; Kanisauskas, K.; Kenney, C.; Kramberger, J.; Mandić, I.; Maneuski, D.; Martinez-Mckinney, F.; McMahon, S.; Meng, L.; Mikuž, M.; Muenstermann, D.; Nickerson, R.; Peric, I.; Phillips, P.; Plackett, R.; Rubbo, F.; Segal, J.; Seidel, S.; Seiden, A.; Shipsey, I.; Song, W.; Stanitzki, M.; Su, D.; Tamma, C.; Turchetta, R.; Vigani, L.; Volk, J.; Wang, R.; Warren, M.; Wilson, F.; Worm, S.; Xiu, Q.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, H.

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on the performance of analog readout electronics (built-in amplifier) integrated on the high-voltage (HV) CMOS silicon sensor chip, as well as its radiation hardness. Since the total collected charge from minimum ionizing particle (MIP) for the CMOS sensor is 10 times lower than for a conventional planar sensor, it is crucial to integrate a low noise built-in amplifier on the sensor chip to improve the signal to noise ratio of the system. As part of the investigation for the ATLAS strip detector upgrade, a test chip that comprises several pixel arrays with different geometries, as well as standalone built-in amplifiers and built-in amplifiers in pixel arrays has been fabricated in a 0.35 μm high-voltage CMOS process. Measurements of the gain and the noise of both the standalone amplifiers and built-in amplifiers in pixel arrays were performed before and after gamma radiation of up to 60 Mrad. Of special interest is the variation of the noise as a function of the sensor capacitance. We optimized the configuration of the amplifier for a fast rise time to adapt to the LHC bunch crossing period of 25 ns, and measured the timing characteristics including jitter. Our results indicate an adequate amplifier performance for monolithic structures used in HV-CMOS technology. The results have been incorporated in the next submission of a large-structure chip.

  5. Passive 670 GHz imaging with uncooled low-noise HEMT amplifiers coupled to zero-bias diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, E. N.; Leong, K.; Mei, X. B.; Deal, W. R.

    2014-06-01

    We discuss the application of recently developed 670 GHz low-noise amplifiers based on InP HEMTs to passive indoor imaging. Packaged LNAs were integrated with commercial zero-bias diodes, and accurate measurements of system noise-equivalent temperature difference (NETD) made, using blackbody sources. The NETD values are compared with independent prior measurements (Deal et al. 2011) of LNA gain, noise figure, and bandwidth, and with cryogenic bolometer measurements made in the same test conditions. Currently, the LNA gain is not sufficient to render the ZBD noise negligible; measurements are presented that separate the two components. Low-frequency noise measurements are also presented that display the effects of 1/f noise in the ZBD and gain variations in the LNA. The implications of the low-frequency noise are discussed in terms of scanning or beam-steering strategies for an imager based on the LNAs. Raster-scanned, single-pixel images of indoor scenes are presented. They are quantitatively interpreted in terms of NETD, and angular resolution and coupling efficiency of the optics.

  6. ALDO: A radiation-tolerant, low-noise, adjustable low drop-out linear regulator in 0.35 μm CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Pessina, G.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we present ALDO, an adjustable low drop-out linear regulator designed in AMS 0.35 μm CMOS technology. It is specifically tailored for use in the upgraded LHCb RICH detector in order to improve the power supply noise for the front end readout chip (CLARO). ALDO is designed with radiation-tolerant solutions such as an all-MOS band-gap voltage reference and layout techniques aiming to make it able to operate in harsh environments like High Energy Physics accelerators. It is capable of driving up to 200 mA while keeping an adequate power supply filtering capability in a very wide frequency range from 10 Hz up to 100 MHz. This property allows us to suppress the noise and high frequency spikes that could be generated by a DC/DC regulator, for example. ALDO also shows a very low noise of 11.6 μV RMS in the same frequency range. Its output is protected with over-current and short detection circuits for a safe integration in tightly packed environments. Design solutions and measurements of the first prototype are presented.

  7. Design of Low-Noise Output Amplifiers for P-channel Charge-Coupled Devices Fabricated on High-Resistivity Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, S; Frost, F Dion R.; Groulx, R; Holland, S E; Karcher, A; Kolbe, W F; Roe, N A; Wang, G; Yu, Y

    2011-12-22

    We describe the design and optimization of low-noise, single-stage output amplifiers for p-channel charge-coupled devices (CCDs) used for scientific applications in astronomy and other fields. The CCDs are fabricated on high-resistivity, 4000–5000 -cm, n-type silicon substrates. Single-stage amplifiers with different output structure designs and technologies have been characterized. The standard output amplifier is designed with an n{sup +} polysilicon gate that has a metal connection to the sense node. In an effort to lower the output amplifier readout noise by minimizing the capacitance seen at the sense node, buried-contact technology has been investigated. In this case, the output transistor has a p{sup +} polysilicon gate that connects directly to the p{sup +} sense node. Output structures with buried-contact areas as small as 2 μm × 2 μm are characterized. In addition, the geometry of the source-follower transistor was varied, and we report test results on the conversion gain and noise of the various amplifier structures. By use of buried-contact technology, better amplifier geometry, optimization of the amplifier biases and improvements in the test electronics design, we obtain a 45% reduction in noise, corresponding to 1.7 e{sup -} rms at 70 kpixels/sec.

  8. Extension of non-invasive EEG into the kHz range for evoked thalamocortical activity by means of very low noise amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Scheer, H J; Fedele, T; Curio, G; Burghoff, M

    2011-12-01

    Ultrafast electroencephalographic signals, having frequencies above 500 Hz, can be observed in somatosensory evoked potential measurements. Usually, these recordings have a poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) because weak signals are overlaid by intrinsic noise of much higher amplitude like that generated by biological sources and the amplifier. As an example, recordings at the scalp taken during electrical stimulation of the median nerve show a 600 Hz burst with submicro-volt amplitudes which can be extracted from noise by the use of massive averaging and digital signal processing only. We have investigated this signal by means of a very low noise amplifier made in-house (minimal voltage noise 2.7 nV Hz(-1/2), FET inputs). We examined how the SNR of the data is altered by the bandwidth and the use of amplifiers with different intrinsic amplifier noise levels of 12 and 4.8 nV Hz(-1/2), respectively. By analyzing different frequency contributions of the signal, we found an extremely weak 1 kHz component superimposed onto the well-known 600 Hz burst. Previously such high-frequency electroencephalogram responses around 1 kHz have only been observed by deep brain electrodes implanted for tremor therapy of Parkinson patients. For the non-invasive measurement of such signals, we recommend that amplifier noise should not exceed 4 nV Hz(-1/2).

  9. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of “Violin-Mode” resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level “Violin-Mode” (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent “noise-gain peaking” arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes’ two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m{sup −1}(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  10. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m-1(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  11. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations-this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m(-1)(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm. PMID:25430131

  12. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of "Violin-Mode" resonances in Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level "Violin-Mode" (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent "noise-gain peaking" arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations-this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes' two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m(-1)(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/√Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  13. A novel low-noise linear-in-dB intermediate frequency variable-gain amplifier for DRM/DAB tuners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keping, Wang; Zhigong, Wang; Jianzheng, Zhou; Xuemei, Lei; Mingzhu, Zhou

    2009-03-01

    A broadband CMOS intermediate frequency (IF) variable-gain amplifier (VGA) for DRM/DAB tuners is presented. The VGA comprises two cascaded stages: one is for noise-canceling and another is for signal-summing. The chip is fabricated in a standard 0.18 μm 1P6M RF CMOS process of SMIC. Measured results show a good linear-in-dB gain characteristic in 28 dB dynamic gain range of -10 to 18 dB. It can operate in the frequency range of 30-700 MHz and consumes 27 mW at 1.8 V supply with the on-chip test buffer. The minimum noise figure is only 3.1 dB at maximum gain and the input-referred 1 dB gain compression point at the minimum gain is -3.9 dBm.

  14. Low-noise detector and amplifier design for 100 ns direct detection CO{sub 2} LIDAR receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Cafferty, M.M.; Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.; Olivas, N.L.; Fuller, K.

    1997-06-01

    The development and test results of a prototype detector/amplifier design for a background limited, pulsed 100 ns, 10--100 kHz repetition rate LIDAR/DIAL receiver system are presented. Design objectives include near-matched filter detection of received pulse amplitude and round trip time-of-flight, and the elimination of excess correlated detector/amplifier noise for optimal pulse averaging. A novel pole-zero cancellation amplifier, coupled with a state-of-the-art SBRC (Santa Barbara Research Center) infrared detector was implemented to meet design objectives. The pole-zero cancellation amplifier utilizes a tunable, pseudo-matched filter technique to match the width of the laser pulse to the shaping time of the filter for optimal SNR performance. Low frequency correlated noise, (l/f and drift noise) is rejected through a second order high gain feedback loop. The amplifier also employs an active detector bias stage minimizing detector drift. Experimental results will be provided that demonstrate near-background limited, 100 ns pulse detection performance given a 8.5--11.5 {micro}m (300 K B.B.) radiant background, with the total noise floor spectrally white for optimal pulse averaging efficiency.

  15. A 5.4-9.2 GHz 19.5 dB Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Ultrawide-Band Receiver Front-End Low-Noise Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhari, Afreen; Kubota, Shinichi; Toya, Akihiro; Sasaki, Nobuo; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we present an ultrawide-band (UWB) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) low-noise amplifier (LNA) for wireless communication in the upper UWB band, that is, from 5.4-9.2 GHz bandwidth with a wide-band 50 Ω input matching network in front of the LNA. A three-stage cascode-topology-based LNA with high-transconductance MOS transistors, was employed to improve the voltage gain up to 23 dB at 7.5 GHz, with 4.5-9.2 GHz 3 dB bandwidth. The maximum output power S21 was 19.5 dB at 7.3 GHz, with 5.4-9.2 GHz 3 dB bandwidth. The input matching circuit was designed with a reduced number of passive elements, resulting in an input reflection coefficient S11 of less than -10 dB from 4.5-9.2 GHz. The noise figure of the LNA was as low as 3.5 dB and the input-referred third-order intercept point (IIP3) was -8 dBm. The LNA has output reflection coefficient S22 of less than -10 dB from 5-7 GHz and a good reverse isolation, that is, S12 of < -45 dB in the entire UWB, due to a cascode topology. The LNA was fabricated using 180 nm CMOS technology, which consumes 56 mW power at 1.8 V power supply. In this paper, we also demonstrate a wireless communication of 7 GHz Gaussian monocycle pulse (GMP) by horn antennas and the LNA from 20 cm transmission distance.

  16. Single-polarization optical low-noise pre-amplified receiver for heavily coded optical communications links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Jeffrey M.; Masurkar, Amrita; Scalesse, Vincent; Minch, Jeffrey R.; Walther, Frederick G.; Savage, Shelby J.; Ulmer, Todd G.

    2015-03-01

    We report a single-polarization, optical low-noise pre-amplfier (SP-OLNA) that enhances the receiver sensitivity of heavily-coded 1.55-μm optical communication links. At channel bit-error ratios of approximately 10%, the erbium-doped SP-OLNA provides an approximately 1.0-dB receiver sensitivity enhancement over a conventional two-polarization pre-amplfier. The SP-OLNA includes three gain stages, each followed by narrow-band athermal fiber Bragg gratings. This cascaded fiter is matched to a return-to-zero, 2.88-Gb/s, variable burst-mode, differential phase shift keying (DPSK) waveform. The SP-OLNA enhancement of approximately 1.0 dB is demonstrated over a range of data rates, from the full 2.88-Gb/s (non-burst) data rate, down to a 1/40th burst rate (72 Mb/s). The SP-OLNA'sfirst stage of ampli_cation is a single-polarization gain block constructed from polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber components, PM erbium gain fiber, and a PM integrated pump coupler and polarizer. This first stage sets the SP-OLNA's noise figure, measured at 3.4 dB. Two subsequent non-PM gain stages allow the SP-OLNA to provide an overall gain of 78 dB to drive a DPSK demodulator receiver. This receiver is comprised of a delay-line interferometer and balanced photo-receiver. The SP-OLNA is packaged into a compact, 5"x7"x1.6" volume, which includes an electronic digital interface to control and monitor pump lasers, optical switches, and power monitors.

  17. Advances In Cryogenic Monolithic Millimeter-wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Low Noise Amplifiers For CO Intensity Mapping and ALMA Band 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Cleary, Kieran; Church, Sarah E.; Cuadrado-Calle, David; Fung, Andy; gaier, todd; gawande, rohit; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Lai, Richard; Lawrence, Charles R.; Readhead, Anthony C. S.; Sarkozy, Stephen; Seiffert, Michael D.; Sieth, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We will present results of the latest InP HEMT MMIC low noise amplifiers in the 30-300 GHz range, with emphasis on LNAs and mixers developed for CO intensity mapping in the 40-80 GHz range, as well as MMIC LNAs suitable for ALMA Band 2 (67-90 GHz). The LNAs have been developed together with NGC in a 35 nm InP HEMT MMIC process. Recent results and a summary of best InP low noise amplifier data will be presented. This work describes technologies related to the detection and study of highly redshifted spectral lines from the CO molecule, a key tracer for molecular hydrogen. One of the most promising techniques for observing the Cosmic Dawn is intensity mapping of spectral-spatial fluctuations of line emission from neutral hydrogen (H I), CO, and [C II]. The essential idea is that instead of trying to detect line emission from individual galaxies, one measures the total line emission from a number of galaxies within the volume defined by a spectral-spatial pixel. Fluctuations from pixel to pixel trace large scale structure, and the evolution with redshift is revealed as a function of receiver frequency. A special feature of CO is the existence of multiple lines with a well-defined frequency relationship from the rotational ladder, which allows the possibility of cleanly separating the signal from other lines or foreground structure at other redshifts. Making use of this feature (not available to either HI or [C II] measurements) requires observing multiple frequencies, including the range 40-80 GHz, much of which is inaccessible from the ground or balloons.Specifically, the J=1->0 transition frequency is 115 GHz; J=2->1 is 230 GHz; J=3->2 is 345 GHz, etc. At redshift 7, these lines would appear at 14.4, 28.8, and 43.2 GHz, accessible from the ground. Over a wider range of redshifts, from 3 to 7, these lines would appear at frequencies from 14 to 86 GHz. A ground-based CO Intensity mapping experiment, COMAP, will utilize InP-based HEMT MMIC amplifier front ends in the

  18. Influence of gate metal engineering on small-signal and noise behaviour of silicon nanowire MOSFET for low-noise amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neha; Chaujar, Rishu

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the small-signal behaviour and RF noise performance of gate electrode workfunction engineered (GEWE) silicon nanowire (SiNW) MOSFET, and the results so obtained are simultaneously compared with SiNW and conventional MOSFET at THz frequency range. This work examines reflection and transmission coefficients, noise conductance, minimum noise figure and cross-correlation factor. Results reveal significant reduction in input/output reflection coefficient and an increase in forward/reverse transmission coefficient owing to improved transconductance in GEWE-SiNW in comparison with conventional counterparts. It is also observed that minimum noise figure and noise conductance of GEWE-SiNW is reduced by 17.4 and 31.2 %, respectively, in comparison with SiNW, thus fortifying its potential application for low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) at radio frequencies. Moreover, the efficacy of gate metal workfunction engineering is also studied and the results validate that tuning of workfunction difference results further improvement in device small-signal behaviour and noise performance.

  19. 2.4 GHz CMOS Power Amplifier with Mode-Locking Structure to Enhance Gain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We propose a mode-locking method optimized for the cascode structure of an RF CMOS power amplifier. To maximize the advantage of the typical mode-locking method in the cascode structure, the input of the cross-coupled transistor is modified from that of a typical mode-locking structure. To prove the feasibility of the proposed structure, we designed a 2.4 GHz CMOS power amplifier with a 0.18 μm RFCMOS process for polar transmitter applications. The measured power added efficiency is 34.9%, while the saturated output power is 23.32 dBm. The designed chip size is 1.4 × 0.6 mm2. PMID:25045755

  20. Low-noise low-jitter 32-pixels CMOS single-photon avalanche diodes array for single-photon counting from 300 nm to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto Villa, Federica; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco

    2013-12-15

    We developed a single-photon counting multichannel detection system, based on a monolithic linear array of 32 CMOS SPADs (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes). All channels achieve a timing resolution of 100 ps (full-width at half maximum) and a photon detection efficiency of 50% at 400 nm. Dark count rate is very low even at room temperature, being about 125 counts/s for 50 μm active area diameter SPADs. Detection performance and microelectronic compactness of this CMOS SPAD array make it the best candidate for ultra-compact time-resolved spectrometers with single-photon sensitivity from 300 nm to 900 nm.

  1. Charge pump design in 130 nm SiGe BiCMOS technology for low-noise fractional-N PLLs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharski, M.; Herzel, F.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a numerical comparison of charge pumps (CP) designed for a high linearity and a low noise to be used in a fractional-N phase-locked loop (PLL). We consider a PLL architecture, where two parallel CPs with DC offset are used. The CP for VCO fine tuning is biased at the output to keep the VCO gain constant. For this specific architecture, only one transistor per CP is relevant for phase detector linearity. This can be an nMOSFET, a pMOSFET or a SiGe HBT, depending on the design. The HBT-based CP shows the highest linearity, whereas all charge pumps show similar device noise. An internal supply regulator with low intrinsic device noise is included in the design optimization.

  2. Continuous-Time ΣΔ ADC with Implicit Variable Gain Amplifier for CMOS Image Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Bermak, Amine; Abbes, Amira; Amor Benammar, Mohieddine

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a column-parallel continuous-time sigma delta (CTSD) ADC for mega-pixel resolution CMOS image sensor (CIS). The sigma delta modulator is implemented with a 2nd order resistor/capacitor-based loop filter. The first integrator uses a conventional operational transconductance amplifier (OTA), for the concern of a high power noise rejection. The second integrator is realized with a single-ended inverter-based amplifier, instead of a standard OTA. As a result, the power consumption is reduced, without sacrificing the noise performance. Moreover, the variable gain amplifier in the traditional column-parallel read-out circuit is merged into the front-end of the CTSD modulator. By programming the input resistance, the amplitude range of the input current can be tuned with 8 scales, which is equivalent to a traditional 2-bit preamplification function without consuming extra power and chip area. The test chip prototype is fabricated using 0.18 μm CMOS process and the measurement result shows an ADC power consumption lower than 63.5 μW under 1.4 V power supply and 50 MHz clock frequency. PMID:24772012

  3. Continuous-time ΣΔ ADC with implicit variable gain amplifier for CMOS image sensor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fang; Bermak, Amine; Abbes, Amira; Benammar, Mohieddine Amor

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a column-parallel continuous-time sigma delta (CTSD) ADC for mega-pixel resolution CMOS image sensor (CIS). The sigma delta modulator is implemented with a 2nd order resistor/capacitor-based loop filter. The first integrator uses a conventional operational transconductance amplifier (OTA), for the concern of a high power noise rejection. The second integrator is realized with a single-ended inverter-based amplifier, instead of a standard OTA. As a result, the power consumption is reduced, without sacrificing the noise performance. Moreover, the variable gain amplifier in the traditional column-parallel read-out circuit is merged into the front-end of the CTSD modulator. By programming the input resistance, the amplitude range of the input current can be tuned with 8 scales, which is equivalent to a traditional 2-bit preamplification function without consuming extra power and chip area. The test chip prototype is fabricated using 0.18 μm CMOS process and the measurement result shows an ADC power consumption lower than 63.5 μW under 1.4 V power supply and 50 MHz clock frequency. PMID:24772012

  4. Variable-gain, low-noise amplification for sampling front ends.

    PubMed

    Rieger, R

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a low-noise front-end amplifier with configurable gain, targeting the recording of small signals, such as the electrocardiogram (ECG) or electroneurogram (ENG). The circuit consists of a continuous-time input stage using lateral bipolar transistors realized in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology followed by a switched-capacitor integrating stage. The voltage gain is adjustable by varying the phase delay between two system clocks. Simulated and measured results for a chip fabricated in 0.35-μm CMOS technology are reported. The amplifier occupies an active area of 0.064 mm(2), yields a nominal gain of 630 V/V with more than a 50-dB tuning range, less than 16 nVrms/√Hz input noise and a common-mode rejection of more than 97 dB. Its power consumption is 280 μW with a ±1.5-V supply.

  5. A High Performance CMOS Current Mirror Circuit with Neuron MOSFETs and a Transimpedance Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Akio; Ishikawa, Yohei; Fukai, Sumio; Aikawa, Masayoshi

    In this paper, we propose a high accuracy current mirror circuit suitable for a low-voltage operation. The proposed circuit has a novel negative feedback that is composed of neuron MOSFETs and a transimpedance amplifier. As a result, the proposed circuit achieves a high accuracy current mirror circuit. At the same time, the proposed circuit monitors an error current by a low voltage because the negative feedback operates in a current-mode. The performance of the proposed circuit is evaluated using HSPICE simulation with On-Semiconductor 1.48μm CMOS device parameters. Simulation results show that the output resistance of the proposed circuit is 5.79[GΩ] and minimum operating range is 0.3[V].

  6. A fully integrated 3.5 GHz CMOS differential power amplifier driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaodong, Xu; Haigang, Yang; Tongqiang, Gao; Hongfeng, Zhang

    2013-07-01

    A fully integrated CMOS differential power amplifier driver (PAD) is proposed for WiMAX applications. In order to fulfill the differential application requirements, a transmission line transformer is used as the output matching network. A differential inductance constitutes an inter-stage matching network. Meanwhile, an on chip balun realizes input matching as well as single-end to differential conversion. The PAD is fabricated in a 0.13 μm RFCMOS process. The chip size is 1.1 × 1.1 mm2 with all of the matching network integrated on chip. The saturated power is around 10 dBm and power gain is about 12 dB.

  7. Transmission of wireless neural signals through a 0.18 µm CMOS low-power amplifier.

    PubMed

    Gazziro, M; Braga, C F R; Moreira, D A; Carvalho, A C P L F; Rodrigues, J F; Navarro, J S; Ardila, J C M; Mioni, D P; Pessatti, M; Fabbro, P; Freewin, C; Saddow, S E

    2015-01-01

    In the field of Brain Machine Interfaces (BMI) researchers still are not able to produce clinically viable solutions that meet the requirements of long-term operation without the use of wires or batteries. Another problem is neural compatibility with the electrode probes. One of the possible ways of approaching these problems is the use of semiconductor biocompatible materials (silicon carbide) combined with an integrated circuit designed to operate with low power consumption. This paper describes a low-power neural signal amplifier chip, named Cortex, fabricated using 0.18 μm CMOS process technology with all electronics integrated in an area of 0.40 mm(2). The chip has 4 channels, total power consumption of only 144 μW, and is impedance matched to silicon carbide biocompatible electrodes. PMID:26737437

  8. Low-noise and high-gain Brillouin optical amplifier for narrowband active optical filtering based on a pump-to-signal optoelectronic tracking.

    PubMed

    Souidi, Yahia; Taleb, Fethallah; Zheng, Junbo; Lee, Min Won; Du Burck, Frédéric; Roncin, Vincent

    2016-01-10

    We implement and characterize an optical narrowband amplifier based on stimulated Brillouin scattering with pump-to-signal relative frequency fluctuations overcome thanks to an active pump tracking. We achieve a precise characterization of this amplifier in terms of gain and noise degradation (noise figure). The performances of this stable selective amplification are compared to those of a conventional erbium-doped fiber amplifier in order to highlight the interest of the Brillouin amplification solution for active narrow optical filtering with a bandpass of 10 MHz. Thanks to the simple optoelectronic pump-to-signal tracking, the Brillouin active filter appears as a stable and reliable solution for narrowband optical processing in the coherent optical communication context and optical sensor applications. PMID:26835759

  9. Self-amplified CMOS image sensor using a current-mode readout circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Patrick M.; de Lima Monteiro, Davies W.; Pittet, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The feature size of the CMOS processes decreased during the past few years and problems such as reduced dynamic range have become more significant in voltage-mode pixels, even though the integration of more functionality inside the pixel has become easier. This work makes a contribution on both sides: the possibility of a high signal excursion range using current-mode circuits together with functionality addition by making signal amplification inside the pixel. The classic 3T pixel architecture was rebuild with small modifications to integrate a transconductance amplifier providing a current as an output. The matrix with these new pixels will operate as a whole large transistor outsourcing an amplified current that will be used for signal processing. This current is controlled by the intensity of the light received by the matrix, modulated pixel by pixel. The output current can be controlled by the biasing circuits to achieve a very large range of output signal levels. It can also be controlled with the matrix size and this permits a very high degree of freedom on the signal level, observing the current densities inside the integrated circuit. In addition, the matrix can operate at very small integration times. Its applications would be those in which fast imaging processing, high signal amplification are required and low resolution is not a major problem, such as UV image sensors. Simulation results will be presented to support: operation, control, design, signal excursion levels and linearity for a matrix of pixels that was conceived using this new concept of sensor.

  10. A 65-nm low-noise low-cost ΣΔ modulator for audio applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Lu, Liao; Hao, Luo; Xiaopeng, Liu; Xiaoxia, Han; Yan, Han

    2012-02-01

    This paper introduces a low-noise low-cost ΣΔ modulator for digital audio analog-to-digital conversion. By adopting a low-noise large-output swing operation amplifier, not only is the flicker noise greatly inhibited, but also the power consumption is reduced. Also the area cost is relatively small. The modulator was implemented in a SMIC standard 65-nm CMOS process. Measurement results show it can achieve 96 dB peak signal-to-noise plus distortion ratio (SNDR) and 105 dB dynamic range (DR) over the 22.05-kHz audio band and occupies 0.16 mm2. The power consumption of the proposed modulator is 4.9 mW from a 2.5 V power supply, which is suitable for high-performance, low-cost audio codec applications.

  11. A 180-Vpp Integrated Linear Amplifier for Ultrasonic Imaging Applications in a High-Voltage CMOS SOI Technology

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kexu; Gao, Zheng; Gui, Ping; Wang, Rui; Oguzman, Ismail; Xu, Xiaochen; Vasanth, Karthik; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents a monolithically integrated fully differential linear HV amplifier as the driver of an ultrasonic transducer. The linear amplifier is capable of transmitting HV arbitrary signals with a very low harmonic distortion, which is suitable for tissue harmonic imaging and other ultrasonic modes for enhanced imaging quality. The amplifier is designed and implemented using the 0.7-μm CMOS silicon-on-insulator process with 120-V devices. The amplifier, when driving a load of 300 pF in parallel with 100 Ω, is capable of transmitting a sine-wave signal with a frequency of up to 4.4 MHz, a maximum signal swing of 180 Vpp, and a second-order harmonic distortion (HD2) of −56 dBc but only dissipating an average power of 62 mW with a 0.1% duty cycle. PMID:25914609

  12. EHF low-noise FET receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schellenberg, J. M.; Watkins, E. T.

    1983-01-01

    Extremely high frequency (EHF) receivers for military and NASA programs must be small, lightweight, and highly reliable. In connection with recent advances in the development of mm-wave FET devices and circuits, a basis has been obtained for the eventual replacement of diode mixer front-ends by FET preamplifiers in receivers up to 94 GHz. By placing a low noise amplifier in front of the mixer it is possible to achieve a lower system noise figure than that found in conventional mm-wave receivers. A broader bandwidth can also be provided. Attention is given to the receiver configuration, a low noise FET amplifier, an image rejection filter, a dual-gate FET mixer, a FET local oscillator, and a FET receiver.

  13. A low noise multi-channel readout IC for X-ray cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wang; Hongyan, Yang; Ying, Yuan; Wuchen, Wu

    2013-04-01

    A low noise multi-channel readout integrated circuit (IC) which converts a detector current to analog voltage for X-ray cargo inspection is described. The readout IC provides 32 channels of a circuit having a maximum dynamic range of 15 bit and is comprised of integrator gain selection, timing generator, shift register chain, integrator array, sample/hold (S/H) stage amplifier etc. It was fabricated using 0.6 μm standard CMOS process, and occupies a die area of 2.7 × 13.9 mm2. It operates at 1 MHz, consumes 100 mW from a 5 V supply and 4.096 V as reference, and has a measured output noise of 85 μ Vrms on 63 pF of integrator gain capacitance and 440 pF of photodiode terminal capacitance so that steel plate penetration thickness can reach more than 400 mm.

  14. Concentric Parallel Combining Balun for Millimeter-Wave Power Amplifier in Low-Power CMOS with High-Power Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiang-An; Kong, Zhi-Hui; Ma, Kaixue; Yeo, Kiat Seng; Lim, Wei Meng

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a novel balun for a millimeter-wave power amplifier (PA) design to achieve high-power density in a 65-nm low-power (LP) CMOS process. By using a concentric winding technique, the proposed parallel combining balun with compact size accomplishes power combining and unbalance-balance conversion concurrently. For calculating its power combination efficiency in the condition of various amplitude and phase wave components, a method basing on S-parameters is derived. Based on the proposed parallel combining balun, a fabricated 60-GHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band PA with single-ended I/O achieves an 18.9-dB gain and an 8.8-dBm output power at 1-dB compression and 14.3-dBm saturated output power ( P sat) at 62 GHz. This PA occupying only a 0.10-mm2 core area has demonstrated a high-power density of 269.15 mW/mm2 in 65 nm LP CMOS.

  15. Concentric Parallel Combining Balun for Millimeter-Wave Power Amplifier in Low-Power CMOS with High-Power Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiang-An; Kong, Zhi-Hui; Ma, Kaixue; Yeo, Kiat Seng; Lim, Wei Meng

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a novel balun for a millimeter-wave power amplifier (PA) design to achieve high-power density in a 65-nm low-power (LP) CMOS process. By using a concentric winding technique, the proposed parallel combining balun with compact size accomplishes power combining and unbalance-balance conversion concurrently. For calculating its power combination efficiency in the condition of various amplitude and phase wave components, a method basing on S-parameters is derived. Based on the proposed parallel combining balun, a fabricated 60-GHz industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) band PA with single-ended I/O achieves an 18.9-dB gain and an 8.8-dBm output power at 1-dB compression and 14.3-dBm saturated output power (P sat) at 62 GHz. This PA occupying only a 0.10-mm2 core area has demonstrated a high-power density of 269.15 mW/mm2 in 65 nm LP CMOS.

  16. Studies of the LBL CMOS integrated amplifier/discriminator for randomly timed inputs from fixed target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, J.S.; Yarema, R.J.; Zimmerman, T.

    1988-12-01

    A group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has reported an elegant CMOS VLSI circuit for amplifying, discriminating, and encoding the signals from highly-segmented charge output devices, e.g., silicon strip detectors or pad readout structures in gaseous detectors. The design exploits switched capacitor circuits and the well-known time structure of data acquisition in colliding beam accelerators to cancel leakage effects and switching noise. For random inputs, these methods are not directly applicable. However, the high speed of the reset switches makes possible a mode of operation for fixed target experiments that uses fast resets to erase unwanted data from random triggers. Data acquisition in this mode has been performed. Details of operation and measurements of noise and rate capability will be presented. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  17. A Stimulated Raman Scattering CMOS Pixel Using a High-Speed Charge Modulator and Lock-in Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Lioe, De Xing; Mars, Kamel; Kawahito, Shoji; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) lock-in pixel to observe stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) using a high speed lateral electric field modulator (LEFM) for photo-generated charges and in-pixel readout circuits is presented. An effective SRS signal generated after the SRS process is very small and needs to be extracted from an extremely large offset due to a probing laser signal. In order to suppress the offset components while amplifying high-frequency modulated small SRS signal components, the lock-in pixel uses a high-speed LEFM for demodulating the SRS signal, resistor-capacitor low-pass filter (RC-LPF) and switched-capacitor (SC) integrator with a fully CMOS differential amplifier. AC (modulated) components remained in the RC-LPF outputs are eliminated by the phase-adjusted sampling with the SC integrator and the demodulated DC (unmodulated) components due to the SRS signal are integrated over many samples in the SC integrator. In order to suppress further the residual offset and the low frequency noise (1/f noise) components, a double modulation technique is introduced in the SRS signal measurements, where the phase of high-frequency modulated laser beam before irradiation of a specimen is modulated at an intermediate frequency and the demodulation is done at the lock-in pixel output. A prototype chip for characterizing the SRS lock-in pixel is implemented and a successful operation is demonstrated. The reduction effects of residual offset and 1/f noise components are confirmed by the measurements. A ratio of the detected small SRS to offset a signal of less than 10−5 is experimentally demonstrated, and the SRS spectrum of a Benzonitrile sample is successfully observed. PMID:27089339

  18. A Stimulated Raman Scattering CMOS Pixel Using a High-Speed Charge Modulator and Lock-in Amplifier.

    PubMed

    Lioe, De Xing; Mars, Kamel; Kawahito, Shoji; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) lock-in pixel to observe stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) using a high speed lateral electric field modulator (LEFM) for photo-generated charges and in-pixel readout circuits is presented. An effective SRS signal generated after the SRS process is very small and needs to be extracted from an extremely large offset due to a probing laser signal. In order to suppress the offset components while amplifying high-frequency modulated small SRS signal components, the lock-in pixel uses a high-speed LEFM for demodulating the SRS signal, resistor-capacitor low-pass filter (RC-LPF) and switched-capacitor (SC) integrator with a fully CMOS differential amplifier. AC (modulated) components remained in the RC-LPF outputs are eliminated by the phase-adjusted sampling with the SC integrator and the demodulated DC (unmodulated) components due to the SRS signal are integrated over many samples in the SC integrator. In order to suppress further the residual offset and the low frequency noise (1/f noise) components, a double modulation technique is introduced in the SRS signal measurements, where the phase of high-frequency modulated laser beam before irradiation of a specimen is modulated at an intermediate frequency and the demodulation is done at the lock-in pixel output. A prototype chip for characterizing the SRS lock-in pixel is implemented and a successful operation is demonstrated. The reduction effects of residual offset and 1/f noise components are confirmed by the measurements. A ratio of the detected small SRS to offset a signal of less than 10(-)⁵ is experimentally demonstrated, and the SRS spectrum of a Benzonitrile sample is successfully observed. PMID:27089339

  19. Variable-gain, low-noise amplification for sampling front ends.

    PubMed

    Rieger, R

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a low-noise front-end amplifier with configurable gain, targeting the recording of small signals, such as the electrocardiogram (ECG) or electroneurogram (ENG). The circuit consists of a continuous-time input stage using lateral bipolar transistors realized in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology followed by a switched-capacitor integrating stage. The voltage gain is adjustable by varying the phase delay between two system clocks. Simulated and measured results for a chip fabricated in 0.35-μm CMOS technology are reported. The amplifier occupies an active area of 0.064 mm(2), yields a nominal gain of 630 V/V with more than a 50-dB tuning range, less than 16 nVrms/√Hz input noise and a common-mode rejection of more than 97 dB. Its power consumption is 280 μW with a ±1.5-V supply. PMID:23851476

  20. An inductorless CMOS programmable-gain amplifier with a > 3 GHz bandwidth for 60 GHz wireless transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhu; Baoyong, Chi; Lixue, Kuang; Wen, Jia; Zhihua, Wang

    2014-10-01

    An inductorless wideband programmable-gain amplifier (PGA) for 60 GHz wireless transceivers is presented. To attain wideband characteristics, a modified Cherry—Hooper amplifier with a negative capacitive neutralization technique is employed as the gain cell while a novel circuit technique for gain adjustment is adopted; this technique can be universally applicable in wideband PGA design and greatly simplifying the design of wideband PGA. By cascading two gain cells and an output buffer stage, the PGA achieves the highest gain of 30 dB with the bandwidth much wider than 3 GHz. The PGA has been integrated into one whole 60 GHz wireless transceiver and implemented in the TSMC 65 nm CMOS process. The measurements on the receiver front-end show that the receiver front-end achieves an 18 dB variable gain range with a > 3 GHz bandwidth, which proves the proposed PGA achieves an 18 dB variable gain range with a bandwidth much wider than 3 GHz. The PGA consumes 10.7 mW of power from a 1.2-V supply voltage with a core area of only 0.025 mm2.

  1. A 0.5-V multi-channel low-noise readout front-end for portable EEG acquisition.

    PubMed

    Wen-Yen Huang; Yu-Wei Cheng; Kea-Tiong Tang

    2015-08-01

    This article presents a low-noise readout front-end suitable for Electroencephalogram (EEG) acquisition. The chip includes 8-channel fully-differential instrumentation amplifiers, utilizing chopper stabilization technique for reducing the flicker noise, each amplifier with a small Gm-C low-pass filter, a programmable gain amplifier, and a 10-bit successive approximation register (SAR) ADC with a detect logic for DAC switching. The chip is fabricated with the TSMC 90nm CMOS process. The low-noise readout front-end has simulated frequency response from 0.57 Hz to 213 Hz, programmable gain from 54.4 dB to 87.6 dB, integrated input-referred noise of 0.358 μVrms within EEG bandwidth, a noise efficiency factor (NEF) of 2.43, and a power efficiency factor (PEF) of 2.95. The overall system consumes 32.08 μW under 0.5-V supply. PMID:26736392

  2. Analysis and design of a low-noise ROIC for hybrid InGaAs infrared FPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Huang, SongLei; Huang, ZhangCheng; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2011-08-01

    The noises of CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) for hybrid focal plane array (FPA) may occupy a great part of total noise in conditions that a low resistance or large capacitor detector interfacing with CTIA input stage. A novel low noise low power preamplifier with shared current-mirrors bias is designed. It has a gain of more than 90dB, which makes enough inject efficiency and low detector bias offset. Besides, it has strong detector bias control, because the shared current-mirror copies the DC current of the amplifier and generates the bias control voltage. A pixel level Correlated Double Sample circuits is designed in order to suppress the reset KTC noise and 1/f noise from preamplifier. An experimental chip of 30μm pitch 32×32 array was fabricated in standard 0.5μm CMOS mixed signal process. A few experimental structures are designed to study the allocating of layout area for low noise designing. The ROIC is bonded to an existing back-illuminated 30μm pitch InGaAs photodiode array with indium bump fabrication. The test of both the ROIC chips and InGaAs focal plane array is shown in this paper, and the contrast of different structure is shown and analyzed.

  3. Support assembly for cryogenically coolable low-noise choke waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccrea, F. E. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A compact cryogenically coolable choked waveguide for low-noise input coupling into a cryogenically cooled device, such as a maser or parametric amplifier, utilizes coaxial stainless steel support tubes surrounding the waveguide and connected in cascade to provide a folded low thermal conduction path. The edges of the tubes connected are welded.

  4. A compact rail-to-rail CMOS buffer amplifier with very low quiescent current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Emre; Yıldız, Merih; Minaei, Shahram

    2015-06-01

    In this work, a very compact, rail-to-rail, high-speed buffer amplifier for liquid crystal display (LCD) applications is proposed. Compared to other buffer amplifiers, the proposed circuit has a very simple architecture, occupies a small number of transistors and also has a large driving capacity with very low quiescent current. It is composed of two complementary differential input stages to provide rail-to-rail driving capacity. The push-pull transistors are directly connected to the differential input stage, and the output is taken from an inverter. The proposed buffer circuit is laid out using Mentor Graphics IC Station layout editor using AMS 0.35 μm process parameters. It is shown by post-layout simulations that the proposed buffer can drive a 1 nF capacitive load within a small settling time under a full voltage swing, while drawing only 1.6 μA quiescent current from a 3.3 V power supply.

  5. Analog CMOS design for optical coherence tomography signal detection and processing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Mathine, David L; Barton, Jennifer K

    2008-02-01

    A CMOS circuit was designed and fabricated for optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal detection and processing. The circuit includes a photoreceiver, differential gain stage and lock-in amplifier based demodulator. The photoreceiver consists of a CMOS photodetector and low noise differential transimpedance amplifier which converts the optical interference signal into a voltage. The differential gain stage further amplifies the signal. The in-phase and quadrature channels of the lock-in amplifier each include an analog mixer and switched-capacitor low-pass filter with an external mixer reference signal. The interferogram envelope and phase can be extracted with this configuration, enabling Doppler OCT measurements. A sensitivity of -80 dB is achieved with faithful reproduction of the interferometric signal envelope. A sample image of finger tip is presented. PMID:18269983

  6. Low noise lead screw positioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A very precise and low noise lead screw positioner, for positioning a retroreflector in an interferometer is described. A gas source supplies inert pressurized gas, that flows through narrow holes into the clearance space between a nut and the lead screw. The pressurized gas keeps the nut out of contact with the screw. The gas flows axially along the clearance space, into the environment. The small amount of inert gas flowing into the environment minimizes pollution. By allowing such flow into the environment, no seals are required between the end of the nut and the screw.

  7. Low-noise pulse conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Bird, David A.

    1983-01-01

    A low-noise pulse conditioner is provided for driving electronic digital processing circuitry directly from differentially induced input pulses. The circuit uses a unique differential-to-peak detector circuit to generate a dynamic reference signal proportional to the input peak voltage. The input pulses are compared with the reference signal in an input network which operates in full differential mode with only a passive input filter. This reduces the introduction of circuit-induced noise, or jitter, generated in ground referenced input elements normally used in pulse conditioning circuits, especially speed transducer processing circuits.

  8. Low noise charge ramp electrometer

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, John P.; Piper, Thomas C.

    1992-01-01

    An electrometer capable of measuring small currents without the use of a feedback resistor which tends to contribute a large noise factor to the measured data. The electrometer eliminates the feedback resistor through the use of a feedback capacitor located across the electrometer amplifier. The signal from the electrometer amplifier is transferred to a electrometer buffer amplifier which serves to transfer the signal to several receptors. If the electrometer amplifier is approaching saturation, the buffer amplifier signals a reset discriminator which energizes a coil whose magnetic field closes a magnetic relay switch which in turn resets or zeros the feedback capacitor. In turn, a reset complete discriminator restarts the measurement process when the electrometer amplifier approaches its initial condition. The buffer amplifier also transmits the voltage signal from the electrometer amplifier to a voltage-to-frequency converter. The signals from the voltage-to-frequency converter are counted over a fixed period of time and the information is relayed to a data processor. The timing and sequencing of the small current measuring system is under the control of a sequence control logic unit.

  9. Low noise charge ramp electrometer

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, J.P.; Piper, T.C.

    1992-10-06

    An electrometer capable of measuring small currents without the use of a feedback resistor which tends to contribute a large noise factor to the measured data. The electrometer eliminates the feedback resistor through the use of a feedback capacitor located across the electrometer amplifier. The signal from the electrometer amplifier is transferred to a electrometer buffer amplifier which serves to transfer the signal to several receptors. If the electrometer amplifier is approaching saturation, the buffer amplifier signals a reset discriminator which energizes a coil whose magnetic field closes a magnetic relay switch which in turn resets or zeros the feedback capacitor. In turn, a reset complete discriminator restarts the measurement process when the electrometer amplifier approaches its initial condition. The buffer amplifier also transmits the voltage signal from the electrometer amplifier to a voltage-to-frequency converter. The signals from the voltage-to-frequency converter are counted over a fixed period of time and the information is relayed to a data processor. The timing and sequencing of the small current measuring system is under the control of a sequence control logic unit. 2 figs.

  10. Design of a low noise and high accuracy readout integrated circuit for infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Zhou, Hang-yu; Wang, Jian

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a low noise and high accuracy readout integrated circuit (ROIC) for Infrared detectors is presented. The circuit is made up of capacitor trans-impedance amplifier (CTIA) and correlation double sampling (CDS) circuit. First, the accuracy, and injection efficiency of the CTIA structure which is used to convert the photo-current into voltage are fully discussed. The readout accuracy of weak current signal can be obviously improved by the using of CTIA. Then, the CDS structure with offset calibration technique is used to reduce the fixed pattern noise (FPN) of CTIA. Thus, the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the designed readout circuit is improved. By utilizing the above two techniques, the influence of noise on this circuit was greatly reduced and the precision of the ROIC was improved. Besides, the design of amplifier in CTIA is discussed in more detail, which will bring about important effect on performance of the whole circuit. Simulation results at Cadence Spectre demonstrated that the readout circuit had reached the requirement of application. The final chip was fabricated with Chartered 0.35um standard CMOS process. Testing results show that the linearity of CTIA is 99%, and that the readout accuracy is 10-bit, while the detecting current varies from 10pA to 10nA. Furthermore, the infrared image is shown in this paper, which means that the ROIC has a good performance at the practical application.

  11. Low-noise pulse conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Bird, D.A.

    1981-06-16

    A low-noise pulse conditioner is provided for driving electronic digital processing circuitry directly from differentially induced input pulses. The circuit uses a unique differential-to-peak detector circuit to generate a dynamic reference signal proportional to the input peak voltage. The input pulses are compared with the reference signal in an input network which operates in full differential mode with only a passive input filter. This reduces the introduction of circuit-induced noise, or jitter, generated in ground referenced input elements normally used in pulse conditioning circuits, especially speed transducer processing circuits. This circuit may be used for conditioning the sensor signal from the Fidler coil in a gas centrifuge for separation of isotopic gaseous mixtures.

  12. A low-power 20 GSps track-and-hold amplifier in 0.18 μm SiGe BiCMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Tang; Qiao, Meng; Zhigong, Wang; Yi, Zhang; Kuai, Yin; Ting, Guo

    2013-09-01

    An open-loop 20 GSps track-and-hold amplifier (THA) using fully-differential architecture to mitigate common-mode noise and suppress even-order harmonics is presented. CMOS switch and dummy switches are adopted to achieve high speed and good linearity. A cross-coupled pair is used in the input buffer to suppress the charge injection and clock feedthrough. Both the input and output buffers use an active inductor load to achieve high signal bandwidth. The THA is realized with 0.18 μm SiGe BiCMOS technology using only CMOS devices at a 1.8 V voltage supply and with a core area of 0.024 mm2. The measurement results show that the SFDR is 32.4 dB with a 4 GHz sine wave input at a 20 GSps sampling rate, and the third harmonic distortion is -48 dBc. The effective resolution bandwidth of the THA is 12 GHz and the figure of merit is only 0.028 mW/GHz.

  13. Novel active signal compression in low-noise analog readout at future X-ray FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manghisoni, M.; Comotti, D.; Gaioni, L.; Lodola, L.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.

    2015-04-01

    This work presents the design of a low-noise front-end implementing a novel active signal compression technique. This feature can be exploited in the design of analog readout channels for application to the next generation free electron laser (FEL) experiments. The readout architecture includes the low-noise charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) with dynamic signal compression, a time variant shaper used to process the signal at the preamplifier output and a 10-bit successive approximation register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The channel will be operated in such a way to cope with the high frame rate (exceeding 1 MHz) foreseen for future XFEL machines. The choice of a 65 nm CMOS technology has been made in order to include all the building blocks in the target pixel pitch of 100 μm. This work has been carried out in the frame of the PixFEL Project funded by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Italy.

  14. Low noise multiwasher superconducting interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Carelli, P.; Castellano, M.G.; Torrioli, G.; Leoni, R.

    1998-01-01

    The dc-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is a low-noise converter from magnetic flux to voltage which can have, in principle, an energy sensitivity near the quantum limit of {h_bar}/2. A critical parameter for the ideal performance is the device inductance, which must be kept as small as possible. Minimizing the SQUID inductance, however, is a major concern for a practical device; this requirement implies a small SQUID ring and hence magnetic coupling with an external signal is more difficult to achieve. Here we present an original scheme (called multiwasher) to circumvent this problem, and its implementation in an all-refractory thin-film device. Our scheme not only provides good magnetic coupling with a large input coil (0.5 {mu}H) and very low SQUID inductance, but also shielding from outside uniform fields, such as those generated by ambient disturbances. The measured coupled spectral energy sensitivity in the white region at about 1 kHz is 28{h_bar} at 4.2 K and 5.5{h_bar} in a pumped helium bath at 0.9 K. The flux noise spectral density at 0.1 Hz and 0.9 K is {Phi}{sub n}=1{times}10{sup {minus}6}{Phi}{sub 0}/{radical} (Hz) . {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Low-Power SOI CMOS Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujikawa, Gene (Technical Monitor); Cheruiyot, K.; Cothern, J.; Huang, D.; Singh, S.; Zencir, E.; Dogan, N.

    2003-01-01

    The work aims at developing a low-power Silicon on Insulator Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (SOI CMOS) Transceiver for deep-space communications. RF Receiver must accomplish the following tasks: (a) Select the desired radio channel and reject other radio signals, (b) Amplify the desired radio signal and translate them back to baseband, and (c) Detect and decode the information with Low BER. In order to minimize cost and achieve high level of integration, receiver architecture should use least number of external filters and passive components. It should also consume least amount of power to minimize battery cost, size, and weight. One of the most stringent requirements for deep-space communication is the low-power operation. Our study identified that two candidate architectures listed in the following meet these requirements: (1) Low-IF receiver, (2) Sub-sampling receiver. The low-IF receiver uses minimum number of external components. Compared to Zero-IF (Direct conversion) architecture, it has less severe offset and flicker noise problems. The Sub-sampling receiver amplifies the RF signal and samples it using track-and-hold Subsampling mixer. These architectures provide low-power solution for the short- range communications missions on Mars. Accomplishments to date include: (1) System-level design and simulation of a Double-Differential PSK receiver, (2) Implementation of Honeywell SOI CMOS process design kit (PDK) in Cadence design tools, (3) Design of test circuits to investigate relationships between layout techniques, geometry, and low-frequency noise in SOI CMOS, (4) Model development and verification of on-chip spiral inductors in SOI CMOS process, (5) Design/implementation of low-power low-noise amplifier (LNA) and mixer for low-IF receiver, and (6) Design/implementation of high-gain LNA for sub-sampling receiver. Our initial results show that substantial improvement in power consumption is achieved using SOI CMOS as compared to standard CMOS

  16. 25 Gb/s photoreceiver based on vertical-illumination type Ge-on-Si photodetector and CMOS amplifier circuit for optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Jiho; Jang, Ki-Seok; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, In Gyoo; Oh, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Sun Ae; Kim, Gyungock; Jeong, Gyu-Seob; Chi, Hankyu; Jeong, Deog-Kyoon

    2015-02-01

    We report the silicon photonic receivers based on the hybrid-integrated vertical-illumination-type germanium-on-silicon photodetector and CMOS amplifier circuit, for optical interconnects. The high-speed vertical-illumination-type Ge-on-Si photodetector is defined on a bulk-silicon wafer, and the CMOS amplifier chip was designed with 65nm ground rule. The PCB-packaged 4 channel 25 Gb/s photoreceiver exhibits a resposivity of 0.68A/W. The sensitivity measured at a BER of 10-12 is -8.3 dBm and -2.4dBm for 25Gb/s and 32Gb/s, respectively. The energy efficiency is 2.19 pJ/bit at 25 Gb/s. The single-channel butterfly-packaged photoreceiver exhibits the sensitivity of -11dBm for 25 Gb/s at a BER of 10-12. The energy efficiency is 2.67 pJ/bit at 25 Gb/s.

  17. Column-Parallel Correlated Multiple Sampling Circuits for CMOS Image Sensors and Their Noise Reduction Effects

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Sungho; Itoh, Shinya; Aoyama, Satoshi; Kawahito, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    For low-noise complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors, the reduction of pixel source follower noises is becoming very important. Column-parallel high-gain readout circuits are useful for low-noise CMOS image sensors. This paper presents column-parallel high-gain signal readout circuits, correlated multiple sampling (CMS) circuits and their noise reduction effects. In the CMS, the gain of the noise cancelling is controlled by the number of samplings. It has a similar effect to that of an amplified CDS for the thermal noise but is a little more effective for 1/f and RTS noises. Two types of the CMS with simple integration and folding integration are proposed. In the folding integration, the output signal swing is suppressed by a negative feedback using a comparator and one-bit D-to-A converter. The CMS circuit using the folding integration technique allows to realize a very low-noise level while maintaining a wide dynamic range. The noise reduction effects of their circuits have been investigated with a noise analysis and an implementation of a 1Mpixel pinned photodiode CMOS image sensor. Using 16 samplings, dynamic range of 59.4 dB and noise level of 1.9 e− for the simple integration CMS and 75 dB and 2.2 e− for the folding integration CMS, respectively, are obtained. PMID:22163400

  18. The Alternative Low Noise Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Elliott, David M.; Jeracki, Robert J.; Moore, Royce D.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2000-01-01

    A 106 bladed fan with a design takeoff tip speed of 1100 ft/sec was hypothesized as reducing perceived noise because of the shift of the blade passing harmonics to frequencies beyond the perceived noise rating range. A 22 in. model of this Alternative Low Noise Fan, ALNF, was tested in the NASA Glenn 9x 15 Wind Tunnel. 'Me fan was tested with a 7 vane long chord stator assembly and a 70 vane conventional stator assembly in both hard and acoustically treated configurations. In addition a partially treated 7 vane configuration was tested wherein the acoustic material between the 7 long chord stators was made inactive. The noise data from the 106 bladed fan with 7 long chord stators in a hard configuration was shown to be around 4 EPNdB quieter than a low tip speed Allison fan at takeoff and around 5 EPNdB quieter at approach. Although the tone noise behaved as hypothesized, the majority of this noise reduction was from reduced broadband noise related to the large number of rotor blades. This 106 bladed ALNF is a research fan designed to push the technology limits and as such is probably not a practical device with present materials technology. However, a low tip speed fan with around 50 blades would be a practical device and calculations indicate that it could be 2 to 3 EPNdB quieter at takeoff and 3 to 4 EPNdB quieter at approach than the Allison fan. 7 vane data compared with 70 vane data indicated that the tone noise was controlled by rotor wake-stator interaction but that the broadband noise is probably controlled by the interaction of the rotor with incoming flows. A possible multiple pure tone noise reduction technique for a fan/acoustic treatment system was identified. The data from the fully treated configuration showed significant noise reductions over a large frequency range thereby providing a real tribute to this bulk absorber treatment design. The tone noise data with the partially treated 7 vane configuration indicated that acoustic material in the

  19. A Glucose Biosensor Using CMOS Potentiostat and Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Al Mamun, Khandaker A; Islam, Syed K; Hensley, Dale K; McFarlane, Nicole

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports a linear, low power, and compact CMOS based potentiostat for vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNF) based amperometric glucose sensors. The CMOS based potentiostat consists of a single-ended potential control unit, a low noise common gate difference-differential pair transimpedance amplifier and a low power VCO. The potentiostat current measuring unit can detect electrochemical current ranging from 500 nA to 7 [Formula: see text] from the VACNF working electrodes with high degree of linearity. This current corresponds to a range of glucose, which depends on the fiber forest density. The potentiostat consumes 71.7 [Formula: see text] of power from a 1.8 V supply and occupies 0.017 [Formula: see text] of chip area realized in a 0.18 [Formula: see text] standard CMOS process. PMID:27337723

  20. Note: Broadband low-noise photodetector for Pound-Drever-Hall laser stabilization.

    PubMed

    Potnis, Shreyas; Vutha, Amar C

    2016-07-01

    The Pound-Drever-Hall laser stabilization technique requires a fast, low-noise photodetector. We present a simple photodetector design that uses a transformer as an intermediary between a photodiode and cascaded low-noise radio-frequency amplifiers. Our implementation using a silicon photodiode yields a detector with 50 MHz bandwidth, gain >10(5) V/A, and input current noise <4 pA/Hz, allowing us to obtain shot-noise-limited performance with low optical power.

  1. Note: Broadband low-noise photodetector for Pound-Drever-Hall laser stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potnis, Shreyas; Vutha, Amar C.

    2016-07-01

    The Pound-Drever-Hall laser stabilization technique requires a fast, low-noise photodetector. We present a simple photodetector design that uses a transformer as an intermediary between a photodiode and cascaded low-noise radio-frequency amplifiers. Our implementation using a silicon photodiode yields a detector with 50 MHz bandwidth, gain >105 V/A, and input current noise <4 pA/ √{ Hz } , allowing us to obtain shot-noise-limited performance with low optical power.

  2. Cryogenetically Cooled Field Effect Transistors for Low-Noise Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J.; Rabin, Douglas M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent tends in the design, fabrication and use of High-Electron-Mobility-Transistors (HEMT) in low noise amplifiers are reviewed. Systems employing these devices have achieved the lowest system noise for wavelengths greater than three millimeters with relatively modest cryogenic cooling requirements in a variety of ground and space based applications. System requirements which arise in employing such devices in imaging applications are contrasted with other leading coherent detector candidates at microwave wavelengths. Fundamental and practical limitations which arise in the context of microwave application of field effect devices at cryogenic temperatures will be discussed from a component and systems point of view.

  3. Cryogenically Cooled Field Effect Transistors for Low-Noise Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent tends in the design, fabrication and use of High-Electron-Mobility-Transistors (HEMT) in low noise amplifiers are reviewed. Systems employing these devices have achieved the lowest system noise for wavelengths greater than three millimeters with relatively modest cryogenic cooling requirements in a variety of ground and space based applications. System requirements which arise in employing such devices in imaging applications are contrasted with other leading coherent detector candidates at microwave wavelengths. Fundamental and practical limitations which arise in the context of microwave application of field effect devices at cryogenic temperatures will be discussed from a component and systems point of view.

  4. Superconducting Quantum Arrays for Wideband Antennas and Low Noise Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhanov, O.; Prokopemko, G.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting Quantum Iinetference Filters (SQIF) consist of a two-dimensional array of niobium Josephson Junctions formed into N loops of incommensurate area. This structure forms a magnetic field (B) to voltage transducer with an impulse like response at B0. In principle, the signal-to-noise ratio scales as the square root of N and the noise can be made arbitrarily small (i.e. The SQIF chips are expected to exhibit quantum limited noise performance). A gain of about 20 dB was recently demonstrated at 10 GHz.

  5. Silicon on Insulator MESFETs for RF Amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Seth J; Balijepalli, Asha; Ervin, Joseph; Lepkowski, William; Thornton, Trevor J

    2010-03-01

    CMOS compatible, high voltage SOI MESFETs have been fabricated using a standard 3.3V CMOS process without any changes to the process flow. A 0.6μm gate length device operates with a cut-off frequency of 7.3GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency of 21GHz. There is no degradation in device performance up to its breakdown voltage, which greatly exceeds that of CMOS devices on the same process. Other figures of merit of relevance to RF front-end design are presented, including the maximum stable gain and noise figure. An accurate representation of the device in SPICE has been developed using the commercially available TOM3 model. Using the SOI MESFET model, a source degenerated low noise RF amplifier targeting operation near 1GHz has been designed. The amplifier was fabricated on a PCB board and operates at 940MHz with a minimum NF of 3.8dB and RF gain of 9.9dB while only consuming 5mW of DC power. PMID:20657816

  6. Silicon on Insulator MESFETs for RF Amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Balijepalli, Asha; Ervin, Joseph; Lepkowski, William; Thornton, Trevor J.

    2010-01-01

    CMOS compatible, high voltage SOI MESFETs have been fabricated using a standard 3.3V CMOS process without any changes to the process flow. A 0.6μm gate length device operates with a cut-off frequency of 7.3GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency of 21GHz. There is no degradation in device performance up to its breakdown voltage, which greatly exceeds that of CMOS devices on the same process. Other figures of merit of relevance to RF front-end design are presented, including the maximum stable gain and noise figure. An accurate representation of the device in SPICE has been developed using the commercially available TOM3 model. Using the SOI MESFET model, a source degenerated low noise RF amplifier targeting operation near 1GHz has been designed. The amplifier was fabricated on a PCB board and operates at 940MHz with a minimum NF of 3.8dB and RF gain of 9.9dB while only consuming 5mW of DC power. PMID:20657816

  7. A low-power asynchronous ECG acquisition system in CMOS technology.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sungkil; Trakimas, Michael; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2010-01-01

    An asynchronous electrocardiogram (ECG) acquisition system is presented for wearable ambulatory monitoring. The proposed system consists of a low noise front-end amplifier (AFE) with tunable bandwidth, an asynchronous analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and digital signal processing (DSP). Data compression is achieved by the inherent signal dependent sampling rate of the asynchronous architecture. This makes the system attractive for compact wearable ECG monitoring applications. The AFE and ADC were fabricated in a 0.18 microm CMOS technology and consume a total of 79 microW. Measured results demonstrating ECG monitoring are presented. PMID:21096052

  8. Nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, William B. (Inventor); Kontos, Karen B. (Inventor); Weir, Donald S. (Inventor); Nolcheff, Nick A. (Inventor); Gunaraj, John A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane having a characteristic curve that is characterized by a nonlinear sweep and a nonlinear lean is provided. The stator is in an axial fan or compressor turbomachinery stage that is comprised of a collection of vanes whose highly three-dimensional shape is selected to reduce rotor-stator and rotor-strut interaction noise while maintaining the aerodynamic and mechanical performance of the vane. The nonlinearly stacked low noise turbofan stator vane reduces noise associated with the fan stage of turbomachinery to improve environmental compatibility.

  9. Low-Noise Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Coy, John J.; Henry, Zachary; Thomas, John; Litvin, Faydor L.

    1994-01-01

    Modified spiral bevel gears that generate relatively little noise and vibration designed and fabricated for use in U.S. Army OH-58D helicopter. Noise reduced by 12 to 19 dB. Similar low-noise, low-vibration spiral bevel gears used in other helicopters, with consequent benefits in comfort and health of pilots and passengers, enhancement of pilots' performance and safety through reduction of audible distraction, and reduction in cost and weight of helicopters through reduction in amount of sound-proofing material. Low-noise, low-vibration spiral bevel gears also used in drive axles of cars and trucks for smoother, quieter rides.

  10. Design of ultra-low power biopotential amplifiers for biosignal acquisition applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Holleman, Jeremy; Otis, Brian P

    2012-08-01

    Rapid development in miniature implantable electronics are expediting advances in neuroscience by allowing observation and control of neural activities. The first stage of an implantable biosignal recording system, a low-noise biopotential amplifier (BPA), is critical to the overall power and noise performance of the system. In order to integrate a large number of front-end amplifiers in multichannel implantable systems, the power consumption of each amplifier must be minimized. This paper introduces a closed-loop complementary-input amplifier, which has a bandwidth of 0.05 Hz to 10.5 kHz, an input-referred noise of 2.2 μ Vrms, and a power dissipation of 12 μW. As a point of comparison, a standard telescopic-cascode closed-loop amplifier with a 0.4 Hz to 8.5 kHz bandwidth, input-referred noise of 3.2 μ Vrms, and power dissipation of 12.5 μW is presented. Also for comparison, we show results from an open-loop complementary-input amplifier that exhibits an input-referred noise of 3.6 μ Vrms while consuming 800 nW of power. The two closed-loop amplifiers are fabricated in a 0.13 μ m CMOS process. The open-loop amplifier is fabricated in a 0.5 μm SOI-BiCMOS process. All three amplifiers operate with a 1 V supply.

  11. Design of ultra-low power biopotential amplifiers for biosignal acquisition applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Holleman, Jeremy; Otis, Brian P

    2012-08-01

    Rapid development in miniature implantable electronics are expediting advances in neuroscience by allowing observation and control of neural activities. The first stage of an implantable biosignal recording system, a low-noise biopotential amplifier (BPA), is critical to the overall power and noise performance of the system. In order to integrate a large number of front-end amplifiers in multichannel implantable systems, the power consumption of each amplifier must be minimized. This paper introduces a closed-loop complementary-input amplifier, which has a bandwidth of 0.05 Hz to 10.5 kHz, an input-referred noise of 2.2 μ Vrms, and a power dissipation of 12 μW. As a point of comparison, a standard telescopic-cascode closed-loop amplifier with a 0.4 Hz to 8.5 kHz bandwidth, input-referred noise of 3.2 μ Vrms, and power dissipation of 12.5 μW is presented. Also for comparison, we show results from an open-loop complementary-input amplifier that exhibits an input-referred noise of 3.6 μ Vrms while consuming 800 nW of power. The two closed-loop amplifiers are fabricated in a 0.13 μ m CMOS process. The open-loop amplifier is fabricated in a 0.5 μm SOI-BiCMOS process. All three amplifiers operate with a 1 V supply. PMID:23853179

  12. Programmable, very low noise current source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandurra, G.; Cannatà, G.; Giusi, G.; Ciofi, C.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new approach for the realization of very low noise programmable current sources mainly intended for application in the field of low frequency noise measurements. The design is based on a low noise Junction Field Effect Transistor (JFET) acting as a high impedance current source and programmability is obtained by resorting to a low noise, programmable floating voltage source that allows to set the sourced current at the desired value. The floating voltage source is obtained by exploiting the properties of a standard photovoltaic MOSFET driver. Proper filtering and a control network employing super-capacitors allow to reduce the low frequency output noise to that due to the low noise JFET down to frequencies as low as 100 mHz while allowing, at the same time, to set the desired current by means of a standard DA converter with an accuracy better than 1%. A prototype of the system capable of supplying currents from a few hundreds of μA up to a few mA demonstrates the effectiveness of the approach we propose. When delivering a DC current of about 2 mA, the power spectral density of the current fluctuations at the output is found to be less than 25 pA/√Hz at 100 mHz and less than 6 pA/√Hz for f > 1 Hz, resulting in an RMS noise in the bandwidth from 0.1 to 10 Hz of less than 14 pA.

  13. On-chip power-combining techniques for watt-level linear power amplifiers in 0.18 μm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhixiong, Ren; Kefeng, Zhang; Lanqi, Liu; Cong, Li; Xiaofei, Chen; Dongsheng, Liu; Zhenglin, Liu; Xuecheng, Zou

    2015-09-01

    Three linear CMOS power amplifiers (PAs) with high output power (more than watt-level output power) for high data-rate mobile applications are introduced. To realize watt-level output power, there are two 2.4 GHz PAs using an on-chip parallel combining transformer (PCT) and one 1.95 GHz PA using an on-chip series combining transformer (SCT) to combine output signals of multiple power stages. Furthermore, some linearization techniques including adaptive bias, diode linearizer, multi-gated transistors (MGTR) and the second harmonic control are applied in these PAs. Using the proposed power combiner, these three PAs are designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.18 μm RFCMOS process. According to the measurement results, the proposed two linear 2.4 GHz PAs achieve a gain of 33.2 dB and 34.3 dB, a maximum output power of 30.7 dBm and 29.4 dBm, with 29% and 31.3% of peak PAE, respectively. According to the simulation results, the presented linear 1.95 GHz PA achieves a gain of 37.5 dB, a maximum output power of 34.3 dBm with 36.3% of peak PAE. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61076030).

  14. Nano watt power rail-to-rail CMOS amplifier with adaptive biasing circuits for ultralow-power analog LSIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Toshihiro; Hirose, Tetsuya; Tsubaki, Keishi; Kuroki, Nobutaka; Numa, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we present a rail-to-rail folded-cascode amplifier (AMP) with adaptive biasing circuits (ABCs). The circuit uses a nano ampere current reference circuit to achieve ultralow-power and ABCs to achieve high-speed operation. The ABCs are based on conventional circuits and modified to be suitable for rail-to-rail operation. The measurement results demonstrated that the AMP with the proposed ABCs can operate with an ultralow-power of 384 nA when the input voltage was 0.9 V and achieve high speeds of 0.162 V/µs at the rise time and 0.233 V/µs at the fall time when the input pulse frequency and the amplitude were 10 kHz and 1.5 Vpp, respectively.

  15. A fully integrated neural recording amplifier with DC input stabilization.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Pedram; Najafi, Khalil

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a low-power low-noise fully integrated bandpass operational amplifier for a variety of biomedical neural recording applications. A standard two-stage CMOS amplifier in a closed-loop resistive feedback configuration provides a stable ac gain of 39.3 dB at 1 kHz. A subthreshold PMOS input transistor is utilized to clamp the large and random dc open circuit potentials that normally exist at the electrode-electrolyte interface. The low cutoff frequency of the amplifier is programmable up to 50 Hz, while its high cutoff frequency is measured to be 9.1 kHz. The tolerable dc input range is measured to be at least +/- 0.25 V with a dc rejection factor of at least 29 dB. The amplifier occupies 0.107 mm2 in die area, and dissipates 115 microW from a 3 V power supply. The total measured input-referred noise voltage in the frequency range of 0.1-10 kHz is 7.8 microVrms. It is fabricated using AMI 1.5 microm double-poly double-metal n-well CMOS process. This paper presents full characterization of the dc, ac, and noise performance of this amplifier through in vitro measurements in saline using two different neural recording electrodes. PMID:15132510

  16. Front-end receiver electronics for high-frequency monolithic CMUT-on-CMOS imaging arrays.

    PubMed

    Gurun, Gokce; Hasler, Paul; Degertekin, F

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the design of CMOS receiver electronics for monolithic integration with capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays for highfrequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. A custom 8-inch (20-cm) wafer is fabricated in a 0.35-μm two-poly, four-metal CMOS process and then CMUT arrays are built on top of the application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) on the wafer. We discuss advantages of the single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS approach in terms of receive sensitivity and SNR. Low-noise and high-gain design of a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) optimized for a forward-looking volumetric-imaging CMUT array element is discussed as a challenging design example. Amplifier gain, bandwidth, dynamic range, and power consumption trade-offs are discussed in detail. With minimized parasitics provided by the CMUT-on-CMOS approach, the optimized TIA design achieves a 90 fA/√Hz input-referred current noise, which is less than the thermal-mechanical noise of the CMUT element. We show successful system operation with a pulseecho measurement. Transducer-noise-dominated detection in immersion is also demonstrated through output noise spectrum measurement of the integrated system at different CMUT bias voltages. A noise figure of 1.8 dB is obtained in the designed CMUT bandwidth of 10 to 20 MHz.

  17. A low noise high readout speed 512×128 ROIC for shortwave InGaAs FPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, SongLei; Huang, Zhangcheng; Chen, Yu; Tang, Hengjing; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2015-03-01

    A low noise high readout speed 512×128 readout Integrated circuit (ROIC) based on capacitance trans-impedance amplifier (CTIA) is designed in this paper. The ROIC is flip-chip bonded with Indium bumps to InGaAs detectors which cutoff wavelength is 1.7μm, as a hybrid structure (InGaAs FPA). The ROIC with 30μm pixel pitch and 50fF integrated capacitance, is fabricated in 0.5μm DPTM CMOS process. The results show that output noise is about 3.0E-4V which equivalent readout noise is 95e-, output voltage swing is better than 2.5V; the dynamic range of InGaAs FPA reaches 69.7dB@2ms, and the power dissipation is about 175mw. The peak detectivity of InGaAs FPA reaches 2E12cmHz1/2w-1 at 300K without TEC cooling.

  18. A low noise low power 512×256 ROIC for extended wavelength InGaAs FPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Songlei; Huang, Zhangcheng; Chen, Yu; Li, Tao; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2015-05-01

    A low noise low power 512×256 readout integrated circuit (ROIC) based on Capacitance Trans-impedance Amplifier (CTIA) was designed in this paper. The ROIC with 30μm pixel-pitch and 70 fF integrated capacitance as normal structure and test structure capacitance from 5 to 60 fF, was fabricated in 0.5μm DPTM CMOS process. The results showed that output voltage was larger than 2.0V and power consumption was about 150mW, output ROIC noise was about 3.6E-4V which equivalent noise was 160e-, and the test structure noise was from 20e- to 140 e-. Compared the readout noises in Integration Then Readout (ITR) mode and Integration While Readout (IWR) mode, it indicated that in IWR mode, readout noise comes mainly from both integration capacitance and sampling capacitance, while in ITR mode, readout noise comes mostly from sampling capacitance. Finally the ROIC was flip-chip bonded with Indium bumps to extended wavelength InGaAs detectors with cutoff wavelength 2.5μm at 200K. The peak detectivity exceeded 5E11cmHz1/2/w with 70nA/cm2 dark current density at 200K.

  19. Programmable, very low noise current source.

    PubMed

    Scandurra, G; Cannatà, G; Giusi, G; Ciofi, C

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new approach for the realization of very low noise programmable current sources mainly intended for application in the field of low frequency noise measurements. The design is based on a low noise Junction Field Effect Transistor (JFET) acting as a high impedance current source and programmability is obtained by resorting to a low noise, programmable floating voltage source that allows to set the sourced current at the desired value. The floating voltage source is obtained by exploiting the properties of a standard photovoltaic MOSFET driver. Proper filtering and a control network employing super-capacitors allow to reduce the low frequency output noise to that due to the low noise JFET down to frequencies as low as 100 mHz while allowing, at the same time, to set the desired current by means of a standard DA converter with an accuracy better than 1%. A prototype of the system capable of supplying currents from a few hundreds of μA up to a few mA demonstrates the effectiveness of the approach we propose. When delivering a DC current of about 2 mA, the power spectral density of the current fluctuations at the output is found to be less than 25 pA/√Hz at 100 mHz and less than 6 pA/√Hz for f > 1 Hz, resulting in an RMS noise in the bandwidth from 0.1 to 10 Hz of less than 14 pA. PMID:25554328

  20. The low noise limit in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, Roy D.; Weinberger, Leor S.; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L.; Razooky, Brandon S.

    2015-10-21

    Protein noise measurements are increasingly used to elucidate biophysical parameters. Unfortunately noise analyses are often at odds with directly measured parameters. Here we show that these inconsistencies arise from two problematic analytical choices: (i) the assumption that protein translation rate is invariant for different proteins of different abundances, which has inadvertently led to (ii) the assumption that a large constitutive extrinsic noise sets the low noise limit in gene expression. While growing evidence suggests that transcriptional bursting may set the low noise limit, variability in translational bursting has been largely ignored. We show that genome-wide systematic variation in translational efficiency can-and in the case of E. coli does-control the low noise limit in gene expression. Therefore constitutive extrinsic noise is small and only plays a role in the absence of a systematic variation in translational efficiency. Lastly, these results show the existence of two distinct expression noise patterns: (1) a global noise floor uniformly imposed on all genes by expression bursting; and (2) high noise distributed to only a select group of genes.

  1. The low noise limit in gene expression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dar, Roy D.; Weinberger, Leor S.; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L.; Razooky, Brandon S.

    2015-10-21

    Protein noise measurements are increasingly used to elucidate biophysical parameters. Unfortunately noise analyses are often at odds with directly measured parameters. Here we show that these inconsistencies arise from two problematic analytical choices: (i) the assumption that protein translation rate is invariant for different proteins of different abundances, which has inadvertently led to (ii) the assumption that a large constitutive extrinsic noise sets the low noise limit in gene expression. While growing evidence suggests that transcriptional bursting may set the low noise limit, variability in translational bursting has been largely ignored. We show that genome-wide systematic variation in translational efficiencymore » can-and in the case of E. coli does-control the low noise limit in gene expression. Therefore constitutive extrinsic noise is small and only plays a role in the absence of a systematic variation in translational efficiency. Lastly, these results show the existence of two distinct expression noise patterns: (1) a global noise floor uniformly imposed on all genes by expression bursting; and (2) high noise distributed to only a select group of genes.« less

  2. Note: Broadband low-noise photodetector for Pound-Drever-Hall laser stabilization.

    PubMed

    Potnis, Shreyas; Vutha, Amar C

    2016-07-01

    The Pound-Drever-Hall laser stabilization technique requires a fast, low-noise photodetector. We present a simple photodetector design that uses a transformer as an intermediary between a photodiode and cascaded low-noise radio-frequency amplifiers. Our implementation using a silicon photodiode yields a detector with 50 MHz bandwidth, gain >10(5) V/A, and input current noise <4 pA/Hz, allowing us to obtain shot-noise-limited performance with low optical power. PMID:27475611

  3. CAOS-CMOS camera.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; La Torre, Juan Pablo; Amin, M Junaid

    2016-06-13

    Proposed and experimentally demonstrated is the CAOS-CMOS camera design that combines the coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager platform with the CMOS multi-pixel optical sensor. The unique CAOS-CMOS camera engages the classic CMOS sensor light staring mode with the time-frequency-space agile pixel CAOS imager mode within one programmable optical unit to realize a high dynamic range imager for extreme light contrast conditions. The experimentally demonstrated CAOS-CMOS camera is built using a digital micromirror device, a silicon point-photo-detector with a variable gain amplifier, and a silicon CMOS sensor with a maximum rated 51.3 dB dynamic range. White light imaging of three different brightness simultaneously viewed targets, that is not possible by the CMOS sensor, is achieved by the CAOS-CMOS camera demonstrating an 82.06 dB dynamic range. Applications for the camera include industrial machine vision, welding, laser analysis, automotive, night vision, surveillance and multispectral military systems.

  4. CAOS-CMOS camera.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; La Torre, Juan Pablo; Amin, M Junaid

    2016-06-13

    Proposed and experimentally demonstrated is the CAOS-CMOS camera design that combines the coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager platform with the CMOS multi-pixel optical sensor. The unique CAOS-CMOS camera engages the classic CMOS sensor light staring mode with the time-frequency-space agile pixel CAOS imager mode within one programmable optical unit to realize a high dynamic range imager for extreme light contrast conditions. The experimentally demonstrated CAOS-CMOS camera is built using a digital micromirror device, a silicon point-photo-detector with a variable gain amplifier, and a silicon CMOS sensor with a maximum rated 51.3 dB dynamic range. White light imaging of three different brightness simultaneously viewed targets, that is not possible by the CMOS sensor, is achieved by the CAOS-CMOS camera demonstrating an 82.06 dB dynamic range. Applications for the camera include industrial machine vision, welding, laser analysis, automotive, night vision, surveillance and multispectral military systems. PMID:27410361

  5. An integrated CMOS detection system for optical short-pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Gun; Hong, Nam-Pyo; Choi, Young-Wan

    2014-03-01

    We present design of a front-end readout system consisting of charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) and pulse shaper for detection of stochastic and ultra-small semiconductor scintillator signal. The semiconductor scintillator is double sided silicon detector (DSSD) or avalanche photo detector (APD) for high resolution and peak signal reliability of γ-ray or X-ray spectroscopy. Such system commonly uses low noise multichannel CSA. Each CSA in multichannel includes continuous reset system based on tens of MΩ and charge-integrating capacitor in feedback loop. The high value feedback resistor requires large area and huge power consumption for integrated circuits. In this paper, we analyze these problems and propose a CMOS short pulse detection system with a novel CSA. The novel CSA is composed of continuous reset system with combination of diode connected PMOS and 100 fF. This structure has linearity with increased input charge quantity from tens of femto-coulomb to pico-coulomb. Also, the front-end readout system includes both slow and fast shapers for detecting CSA output and preventing pile-up distortion. Shaping times of fast and slow shapers are 150 ns and 1.4 μs, respectively. Simulation results of the CMOS detection system for optical short-pulse implemented in 0.18 μm CMOS technology are presented.

  6. High responsivity CMOS imager pixel implemented in SOI technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, X.; Wrigley, C.; Yang, G.; Pain, B.

    2000-01-01

    Availability of mature sub-micron CMOS technology and the advent of the new low noise active pixel sensor (APS) concept have enabled the development of low power, miniature, single-chip, CMOS digital imagers in the decade of the 1990's.

  7. A 0.13µm CMOS Bluetooth EDR Transceiver with High Sensitivity over Wide Temperature Range and Immunity to Process Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agawa, Kenichi; Ishizuka, Shinichiro; Majima, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Masayuki; Nagano, Takeshi; Arai, Makoto; Shimizu, Yutaka; Maki, Asuka; Urakawa, Go; Terada, Tadashi; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Hamada, Mototsugu; Fujii, Fumie; Kato, Tadamasa; Yoshitomi, Sadayuki; Otsuka, Nobuaki

    A 2.4GHz 0.13µm CMOS transceiver LSI, supporting Bluetooth V2.1 + enhanced data rate (EDR) standard, has achieved a high reception sensitivity and high-quality transmission signals between -40°C and +90°C. A low-IF receiver and direct-conversion transmitter architecture are employed. A temperature compensated receiver chain including a low-noise amplifier accomplishes a sensitivity of -90dBm at frequency shift keying modulation even in the worst environmental condition. Design optimization of phase noise in a local oscillator and linearity of a power amplifier improves transmission signals and enables them to meet Bluetooth radio specifications. Fabrication in scaled 0.13µm CMOS and operation at a low supply voltage of 1.5V result in small area and low power consumption.

  8. Design and performances of a low-noise and radiation-hardened readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Gan; Tingcun, Wei; Wu, Gao; Yongcai, Hu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the design and performances of a low-noise and radiation-hardened front-end readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) dedicated to CdZnTe detectors for a hard X-ray imager in space applications. The readout channel is comprised of a charge sensitive amplifier, a CR-RC shaping amplifier, an analog output buffer, a fast shaper, and a discriminator. An 8-channel prototype ASIC is designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35-μm mixed-signal CMOS technology, the die size of the prototype chip is 2.2 × 2.2 mm2. The input energy range is from 5 to 350 keV. For this 8-channel prototype ASIC, the measured electrical characteristics are as follows: the overall gain of the readout channel is 210 V/pC, the linearity error is less than 2%, the crosstalk is less than 0.36%, The equivalent noise charge of a typical channel is 52.9 e- at zero farad plus 8.2 e- per picofarad, and the power consumption is less than 2.4 mW/channel. Through the measurement together with a CdZnTe detector, the energy resolution is 5.9% at the 59.5-keV line under the irradiation of the radioactive source 241Am. The radiation effect experiments show that the proposed ASIC can resist the total ionization dose (TID) irradiation of higher than 200 krad(Si). Project supported by the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project (No. 2011YQ040082), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475136, 11575144, 61176094), and the Shaanxi Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 2015JM1016).

  9. Design and performances of a low-noise and radiation-hardened readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Gan; Tingcun, Wei; Wu, Gao; Yongcai, Hu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the design and performances of a low-noise and radiation-hardened front-end readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) dedicated to CdZnTe detectors for a hard X-ray imager in space applications. The readout channel is comprised of a charge sensitive amplifier, a CR-RC shaping amplifier, an analog output buffer, a fast shaper, and a discriminator. An 8-channel prototype ASIC is designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35-μm mixed-signal CMOS technology, the die size of the prototype chip is 2.2 × 2.2 mm2. The input energy range is from 5 to 350 keV. For this 8-channel prototype ASIC, the measured electrical characteristics are as follows: the overall gain of the readout channel is 210 V/pC, the linearity error is less than 2%, the crosstalk is less than 0.36%, The equivalent noise charge of a typical channel is 52.9 e‑ at zero farad plus 8.2 e‑ per picofarad, and the power consumption is less than 2.4 mW/channel. Through the measurement together with a CdZnTe detector, the energy resolution is 5.9% at the 59.5-keV line under the irradiation of the radioactive source 241Am. The radiation effect experiments show that the proposed ASIC can resist the total ionization dose (TID) irradiation of higher than 200 krad(Si). Project supported by the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project (No. 2011YQ040082), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475136, 11575144, 61176094), and the Shaanxi Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 2015JM1016).

  10. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-01-03

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

  11. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Plut, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N.times.M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise.

  12. Amplifier arrays for CMB polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd; Lawrence, Charles R.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Wells, Mary M.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Dawson, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Cryogenic low noise amplifier technology has been successfully used in the study of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). MMIC (Monolithic Millimeter wave Integrated Circuit) technology makes the mass production of coherent detection receivers feasible.

  13. A low-noise 64-channel front-end readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors aimed to hard X-ray imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, B.; Wei, T.; Gao, W.; Liu, H.; Hu, Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we report on the recent development of a 64-channel low-noise front-end readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors aimed to hard X-ray imaging systems. The readout channel is comprised of a charge sensitive amplifier, a leakage current compensation circuit, a CR-RC shaper, two S-K filters, an inverse proportional amplifier, a peak-detect-and-hold circuit, a discriminator and trigger logic, a time sequence control circuit and a driving buffer. The readout ASIC is implemented in TSMC 0.35 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology, the die size of the prototype chip is 2.7 mm×8.0 mm. The overall gain of the readout channel is 200 mV/fC, the power consumption is less than 8 mW/channel, the linearity error is less than 1%, the inconsistency among the channels is less than 2.86%, and the equivalent noise charge of a typical channel is 66 e- at zero farad plus 14 e- per picofarad. By connecting this readout ASIC to an 8×8 pixel CdZnTe detector, we obtained an energy spectrum, the energy resolution of which is 4.5% at the 59.5 keV line of 241Am source.

  14. A novel CMOS digital pixel sensor for 1D barcode scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mei; DeGeronimo, Gianluigi; O'Connor, Paul; Carlson, Bradley S.

    2004-06-01

    A 1-D CMOS digital pixel image sensor system architecture is presented. Each pixel contains a photodiode, a low-power charge-sensitive amplifier, low noise sample/hold circuit, an 8-bit single-slope ADC, a 12-bit shift register and timing & control logic. The pixel is laid out on a 4μm pitch to enable a cost efficient implementation of high-resolution pixel arrays. Fixed pattern noise (FPN) is reduced by a charge-sensitive feedback amplifier, and the reset noise is cancelled by correlated double sampling read out. A prototype chip containing 512 pixels has been fabricated in the TSMC .25um logic process. A 40μV/e- conversion gain is measured with 100 e- rms read noise.

  15. Integration of solid-state nanopores in a 0.5 μm cmos foundry process

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, A; Yemenicioglu, S; Chen, C-H; Corigliano, E; Milaninia, K; Theogarajan, L

    2013-01-01

    High-bandwidth and low-noise nanopore sensor and detection electronics are crucial in achieving single-DNA base resolution. A potential way to accomplish this goal is to integrate solid-state nanopores within a CMOS platform, in close proximity to the biasing electrodes and custom-designed amplifier electronics. Here we report the integration of solid-state nanopore devices in a commercial complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) potentiostat chip implemented in On-Semiconductor’s 0.5 μm technology. Nanopore membranes incorporating electrodes are fabricated by post-CMOS micromachining utilizing the N+ polysilicon/SiO2/N+ polysilicon capacitor structure available in the aforementioned process. Nanopores are created in the CMOS process by drilling in a transmission electron microscope and shrinking by atomic layer deposition. We also describe a batch fabrication method to process a large of number of electrode-embedded nanopores with sub-10 nm diameter across CMOS-compatible wafers by electron beam lithography and atomic layer deposition. The CMOS-compatibility of our fabrication process is verified by testing the electrical functionality of on-chip circuitry. We observe high current leakage with the CMOS nanopore devices due to the ionic diffusion through the SiO2 membrane. To prevent this leakage, we coat the membrane with Al2O3 which acts as an efficient diffusion barrier against alkali ions. The resulting nanopore devices also exhibit higher robustness and lower 1/f noise as compared to SiO2 and SiNx. Furthermore, we propose a theoretical model for our low-capacitance CMOS nanopore devices, showing good agreement with the experimental value. In addition, experiments and theoretical models of translocation studies are presented using 48.5 kbp λ-DNA in order to prove the functionality of on-chip pores coated with Al2O3. PMID:23519330

  16. Integration of solid-state nanopores in a 0.5 μm CMOS foundry process.

    PubMed

    Uddin, A; Yemenicioglu, S; Chen, C-H; Corigliano, E; Milaninia, K; Theogarajan, L

    2013-04-19

    High-bandwidth and low-noise nanopore sensor and detection electronics are crucial in achieving single-DNA-base resolution. A potential way to accomplish this goal is to integrate solid-state nanopores within a CMOS platform, in close proximity to the biasing electrodes and custom-designed amplifier electronics. Here we report the integration of solid-state nanopore devices in a commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) potentiostat chip implemented in On-Semiconductor's 0.5 μm technology. Nanopore membranes incorporating electrodes are fabricated by post-CMOS micromachining utilizing the n+ polysilicon/SiO2/n+ polysilicon capacitor structure available in the aforementioned process. Nanopores are created in the CMOS process by drilling in a transmission electron microscope and shrinking by atomic layer deposition. We also describe a batch fabrication method to process a large of number of electrode-embedded nanopores with sub-10 nm diameter across CMOS-compatible wafers by electron beam lithography and atomic layer deposition. The CMOS-compatibility of our fabrication process is verified by testing the electrical functionality of on-chip circuitry. We observe high current leakage with the CMOS nanopore devices due to the ionic diffusion through the SiO2 membrane. To prevent this leakage, we coat the membrane with Al2O3, which acts as an efficient diffusion barrier against alkali ions. The resulting nanopore devices also exhibit higher robustness and lower 1/f noise as compared to SiO2 and SiNx. Furthermore, we propose a theoretical model for our low-capacitance CMOS nanopore devices, showing good agreement with the experimental value. In addition, experiments and theoretical models of translocation studies are presented using 48.5 kbp λ-DNA in order to prove the functionality of on-chip pores coated with Al2O3. PMID:23519330

  17. Low-noise fan exit guide vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G. (Inventor); Parrott, Tony L. (Inventor); Heidelberg, Laurence J. (Inventor); Envia, Edmane (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Low-noise fan exit guide vanes are disclosed. According to the present invention a fan exit guide vane has an outer shell substantially shaped as an airfoil and defining an interior cavity. A porous portion of the outer shell allows communication between the fluctuations in the air passing over the guide vane and the interior cavity. At least one acoustically resonant chamber is located within the interior cavity. The resonant chamber is in communication with the porous portion of the outer perimeter. The resonant chamber is configured to reduce the noise generated at a predetermined frequency. In various preferred embodiments, there is a plurality of acoustically resonant chambers located within the interior cavity. The resonant chambers can be separated by one or more partitions within the interior cavity. In these embodiments, the resonant chambers can be configured to reduce the noise generated over a range of predetermined frequencies.

  18. Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, James D; McClung, David W

    2006-11-06

    This report describes the preliminary design and the effort to date of Phase II of a Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer for use in networks of seismic stations for monitoring underground nuclear explosions. The design uses the latest technology of broadband seismic instrumentation. Each parameter of the seismometer is defined in terms of the known physical limits of the parameter. These limits are defined by the commercially available components, and the physical size constraints. A theoretical design is proposed, and a preliminary prototype model of the proposed instrument has been built. This prototype used the sensor module of the KS2000. The installation equipment (hole locks, etc.) has been designed and one unit has been installed in a borehole. The final design of the sensors and electronics and leveling mechanism is in process. Noise testing is scheduled for the last quarter of 2006.

  19. Low noise and high resolution microchannel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shulin; Pan, Jingsheng; Deng, Guangxu; Su, Detan; Xu, Zhiqing; Zhang, Yanyun

    2008-02-01

    To improve the Figure of Merit (FOM) and reduce the Equivalent Background Input (EBI) and Fixed-Pattern-Noise (FPN) in image intensifier, NVT (North Night Vision Technology Co., Ltd) has been researching and developing a low noise and high resolution Micro Channel Plate (MCP). The density of dark current of this new MCP is less than 0.5PA/cm2 (when MCP voltage at 1000V). The FPN and scintillation noise are reduced remarkably. Channel diameter is 6 μm and open area ratio is 60%~70%. The vacuum bakeout temperature could be as high as 500°C. This new kind of MCP will be extensively used in the supper generation and the third generation image intensifiers.

  20. An inductorless multi-mode RF front end for GNSS receiver in 55 nm CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanbin, Luo; Chengyan, Ma; Yebing, Gan; Min, Qian; Tianchun, Ye

    2015-10-01

    An inductorless multi-mode RF front end for a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receiver is presented. Unlike the traditional topology of a low noise amplifier (LNA), the inductorless current-mode noise-canceling LNA is applied in this design. The high-impedance-input radio frequency amplifier (RFA) further amplifies the GNSS signals and changes the single-end signal path into fully differential. The passive mixer down-converts the signals to the intermediate frequency (IF) band and conveys the signals to the analogue blocks. The local oscillator (LO) buffer divides the output frequency of the voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) and generates 25%-duty-cycle quadrature square waves to drive the mixer. Our measurement results display that the implemented RF front end achieves good overall performance while consuming only 6.7 mA from 1.2 V supply. The input return loss is better than -26 dB and the ultra low noise figure of 1.43 dB leads to high sensitivity of the GNSS receiver. The input 1 dB compression point is -43 dBm at the high gain of 48 dB. The designed circuit is fabricated in 55 nm CMOS technology and the die area, which is much smaller than traditional circuit, is around 220 × 280 μm2.

  1. A low-noise beta-radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Antonenko, G.I.; Savina, V.I.

    1995-12-01

    The two-channel detector for a low-noise (down to 0.06 sec{sup -1}) beta-radiometer for measuring the mass concentration of {sup 90}Sr in the environment after the chemical extraction of strontium by the oxalate-nitrate method was certified at the D.I. Mendeleev Institute of Metrology (certificate No. 137/93). A detector unit using two end-window self-quenching counters with thin input windows (8 {mu}m thick and 60 mm in diameter) operating as a Geiger-Mueller counter and filled with a mixture of 90% helium (atomic gas) and 10% ethanol (organic molecules) can measure the beta-activity of two substrates concurrently. It is often used to detect the beta-radiation of {sup 90}Sr. This isotope produces particles with energies ranging from 180 to 1000 keV, and the detection efficiency is 50% at a level of 0.1 Bq after measuring for 20 min with an uncertainty of 25%.

  2. A gimbaled low noise momentum wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bichler, U.; Eckardt, T.

    1993-01-01

    The bus actuators are the heart and at the same time the Achilles' heel of accurate spacecraft stabilization systems, because both their performance and their perturbations can have a deciding influence on the achievable pointing accuracy of the mission. The main task of the attitude actuators, which are mostly wheels, is the generation of useful torques with sufficiently high bandwidth, resolution and accuracy. This is because the bandwidth of the whole attitude control loop and its disturbance rejection capability is dependent upon these factors. These useful torques shall be provided, without - as far as possible - parasitic noise like unbalance forces and torques and harmonics. This is because such variable frequency perturbations excite structural resonances which in turn disturb the operation of sensors and scientific instruments. High accuracy spacecraft will further require bus actuators for the three linear degrees of freedom (DOF) to damp structural oscillations excited by various sources. These actuators have to cover the dynamic range of these disturbances. Another interesting feature, which is not necessarily related to low noise performance, is a gimballing capability which enables, in a certain angular range, a three axis attitude control with only one wheel. The herein presented Teldix MWX, a five degree of freedom Magnetic Bearing Momentum Wheel, incorporates all the above required features. It is ideally suited to support, as a gyroscopic actuator in the attitude control system, all High Pointing Accuracy and Vibration Sensitive space missions.

  3. GHz low noise short wavelength infrared (SWIR) photoreceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaogang; Yuan, Ping; McDonald, Paul; Boisvert, Joseph; Chang, James; Woo, Robyn; Labios, Eduardo; Sudharsanan, Rengarajan; Krainak, Michael; Yang, Guangning; Sun, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; McIntosh, Dion; Zhou, Qiugui; Campbell, Joe

    2011-06-01

    Next generation LIDAR mapping systems require multiple channels of sensitive photoreceivers that operate in the wavelength region of 1.06 to 1.55 microns, with GHz bandwidth and sensitivity less than 300 fW/√Hz. Spectrolab has been developing high sensitivity photoreceivers using InAlAs impact ionization engineering (I2E) avalanche photodiodes (APDs) structures for this application. APD structures were grown using metal organic vapor epitaxy (MOVPE) and mesa devices were fabricated using these structures. We have achieved low excess noise at high gain in these APD devices; an impact ionization parameter, k, of about 0.15 has been achieved at gains >20 using InAlAs/InGaAlAs as a multiplier layer. Electrical characterization data of these devices show dark current less than 2 nA at a gain of 20 at room temperature; and capacitance of 0.4 pF for a typical 75 micron diameter APD. Photoreceivers were built by integrating I2E APDs with a low noise GHz transimpedance amplifier (TIA). The photoreceivers showed a bandwidth of 1 GHz and a noise equivalent power (NEP) of 150 fW/rt(Hz) at room temperature.

  4. Low noise multichannel circuits for physics and biology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grybos, Pawel

    2005-09-01

    Experimental techniques in physics, material science, biology and medicine want to gain profit from the advantages of the VLSI technology by using a new generation of electronic measurement systems based on parallel signal processing from the multielement sensors. In most cases key problems for building such system are multichannel mixed-mode Application Specific Integrated Circuits, which are capable to process small amplitude signals from multielement sensor. In this class of integrated circuits several important problems like power limitation, low level of noise, good matching performance and crosstalk effects must be solved simultaneously. This presentation shows two ASICs which, given the original solutions implemented and their universal properties, can be used in different applications and are significant milestones in experimental techniques. The first presented ASIC is the 64-channel charge amplifier with binary readout architecture for a low energy X-ray imaging techniques. This integrated circuit connected to silicon strip detector can be used in powder diffractometry and then it reduces the measurement time by two order of magnitude. The second presented ASIC is multichannel low noise readout for extracellular neural recording, which is able to cope with extracellular neuronal recording for the systems comprising several hundreds of electrodes. Important steps forward in this design are a novel solution for band-pass filters for low frequency range, which follow requirements for good matching, low power and small silicon area. This ASIC can be used to monitor the neural activity of such complicated system like retina or brain.

  5. A Low-Noise, Wideband Preamplifier for a Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Raman; Knepper, Ronald W.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    FTMS performance parameters such as limits of detection, dynamic range, sensitivity, and even mass accuracy and resolution can be greatly improved by enhancing its detection circuit. An extended investigation of significant design considerations for optimal signal-to-noise ratio in an FTMS detection circuit are presented. A low noise amplifier for an FTMS is developed based on the discussed design rules. The amplifier has a gain of ≈ 3500 and a bandwidth of 10 kHz - 1 MHz corresponding to m/z range of 100 Da to 10 kDa (at 7 Tesla). The performance of the amplifier was tested on a MALDI-FTMS, and has demonstrated a 25-fold reduction in noise in a mass spectrum of C60 compared to that of a commercial amplifier. PMID:18029195

  6. Low Noise Research Fan Stage Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, David E.; Neubert, Robert J.; Malmborg, Eric W.; Philbrick, Daniel H.; Spear, David A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the design of a Low Noise ADP Research Fan stage. The fan is a variable pitch design which is designed at the cruise pitch condition. Relative to the cruise setting, the blade is closed at takeoff and opened for reverse thrust operation. The fan stage is a split flow design with fan exit guide vanes and core stators. This fan stage design was combined with a nacelle and engine core duct to form a powered fan/nacelle, subscale model. This model is intended for use in aerodynamic performance, acoustic and structural testing in a wind tunnel. The model has a 22-inch outer fan diameter and a hub-to-top ratio of 0.426 which permits the use of existing NASA fan and cowl force balance designs and rig drive system. The design parameters were selected to permit valid acoustic and aerodynamic comparisons with the PW 17-inch rig previously tested under NASA contract. The fan stage design is described in detail. The results of the design axisymmetric analysis at aerodynamic design condition are included. The structural analysis of the fan rotor and attachment is described including the material selections and stress analysis. The blade and attachment are predicted to have adequate low cycle fatigue life, and an acceptable operating range without resonant stress or flutter. The stage was acoustically designed with airfoil counts in the fan exit guide vane and core stator to minimize noise. A fan-FEGV tone analysis developed separately under NASA contract was used to determine these airfoil counts. The fan stage design was matched to a nacelle design to form a fan/nacelle model for wind tunnel testing. The nacelle design was developed under a separate NASA contract. The nacelle was designed with an axisymmetric inlet, cowl and nozzle for convenience in testing and fabrication. Aerodynamic analysis of the nacelle confirmed the required performance at various aircraft operating conditions.

  7. CMOS VLSI Active-Pixel Sensor for Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Sun, Chao; Yang, Guang; Heynssens, Julie

    2004-01-01

    An architecture for a proposed active-pixel sensor (APS) and a design to implement the architecture in a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit provide for some advanced features that are expected to be especially desirable for tracking pointlike features of stars. The architecture would also make this APS suitable for robotic- vision and general pointing and tracking applications. CMOS imagers in general are well suited for pointing and tracking because they can be configured for random access to selected pixels and to provide readout from windows of interest within their fields of view. However, until now, the architectures of CMOS imagers have not supported multiwindow operation or low-noise data collection. Moreover, smearing and motion artifacts in collected images have made prior CMOS imagers unsuitable for tracking applications. The proposed CMOS imager (see figure) would include an array of 1,024 by 1,024 pixels containing high-performance photodiode-based APS circuitry. The pixel pitch would be 9 m. The operations of the pixel circuits would be sequenced and otherwise controlled by an on-chip timing and control block, which would enable the collection of image data, during a single frame period, from either the full frame (that is, all 1,024 1,024 pixels) or from within as many as 8 different arbitrarily placed windows as large as 8 by 8 pixels each. A typical prior CMOS APS operates in a row-at-a-time ( grolling-shutter h) readout mode, which gives rise to exposure skew. In contrast, the proposed APS would operate in a sample-first/readlater mode, suppressing rolling-shutter effects. In this mode, the analog readout signals from the pixels corresponding to the windows of the interest (which windows, in the star-tracking application, would presumably contain guide stars) would be sampled rapidly by routing them through a programmable diagonal switch array to an on-chip parallel analog memory array. The

  8. Large area CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, R.; Guerrini, N.; Sedgwick, I.

    2011-01-01

    CMOS image sensors, also known as CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) or Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), are today the dominant imaging devices. They are omnipresent in our daily life, as image sensors in cellular phones, web cams, digital cameras, ... In these applications, the pixels can be very small, in the micron range, and the sensors themselves tend to be limited in size. However, many scientific applications, like particle or X-ray detection, require large format, often with large pixels, as well as other specific performance, like low noise, radiation hardness or very fast readout. The sensors are also required to be sensitive to a broad spectrum of radiation: photons from the silicon cut-off in the IR down to UV and X- and gamma-rays through the visible spectrum as well as charged particles. This requirement calls for modifications to the substrate to be introduced to provide optimized sensitivity. This paper will review existing CMOS image sensors, whose size can be as large as a single CMOS wafer, and analyse the technical requirements and specific challenges of large format CMOS image sensors.

  9. The Speedster-EXD - A New Event-Triggered Hybrid CMOS X-ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher; Falcone, Abe; Prieskorn, Zach; Burrows, David

    2015-04-01

    We present the characterization of a new event driven x-ray hybrid CMOS detector developed by Penn State University in collaboration with Teledyne Imaging Sensors. Hybrid CMOS detectors currently have many advantages over CCDs including lower susceptibility to radiation damage, lower power consumption, and faster read-out time to avoid pile-up. The Speedster-EXD hybrid CMOS detector has many new features that improve upon the previous generation of detectors including two new in-pixel features that reduce noise from known noise sources: (1) a low-noise, high-gain CTIA amplifier to eliminate interpixel capacitance crosstalk and (2) in-pixel CDS subtraction to reduce kTC noise. The most exciting new feature of the Speedster-EXD is an in-pixel comparator that enables read out of only the pixels which contain signal from an x-ray event. The comparator threshold can be set by the user so that only pixels with signal above the set threshold are read out. This comparator feature can increase effective frame rate by orders of magnitude. We present the read noise, dark current, interpixel capacitance, energy resolution, and gain variation measurements of two Speedster-EXD detectors.

  10. The Speedster-EXD - A New Event-Triggered Hybrid CMOS X-ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher; Falcone, Abraham; Prieskorn, Zachary; Burrows, David N.

    2014-08-01

    We present the characterization of a new event driven x-ray hybrid CMOS detector developed by Teledyne imaging Sensors in collaboration with Penn State University. Hybrid CMOS detectors currently have many advantages over CCD’s including lower susceptibility to radiation damage, lower power consumption, and faster read-out time to avoid pile-up. The Speedster-EXD includes an in-pixel comparator that enables read out of only the pixels with signal from an x-ray event. The comparator threshold can be set by the user and only pixels with signal above this threshold are read out. This event-driven readout feature can increase effective frame rates by orders of magnitude, enabling future x-ray missions. The Speedster-EXD hybrid CMOS detector also has additional features that improve upon our previous generation of detectors including: (1) a low-noise, high-gain CTIA amplifier to eliminate interpixel capacitance crosstalk, (2) four different gain modes to optimize either full well capacity or energy resolution, and (3) in-pixel CDS subtraction to reduce read noise. We present the read noise, dark current, interpixel capacitance, energy resolution, and gain variation measurements of the Speedster-EXD detector.

  11. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.; Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S.; Buffa, F. A.

    2009-05-23

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  12. Low Noise Results From IMS Site Surveys: A Preliminary New High-Frequency Low Noise Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, C.; Astiz, L.; Starovoit, Y.; Tavener, N.; Perez, G.; Given, H. K.; Barrientos, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Hfaiedh, M.; Stewart, R.; Estabrook, C.

    2002-12-01

    Since the establishment of the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) Organization, a vigorous seismic site survey program has been carried out to identify locations as necessary for International Monitoring System (IMS) primary and auxiliary seismic stations listed in Annex 1 to the Protocol to the CTBT. The IMS Seismic Section maintains for this purpose a small pool of seismic equipment comprised of Guralp CMG-3T and CMG-3ESP and Streckeisen STS-2 broadband seismometers, and Reftek and Guralp acquisition systems. Seismic site surveys are carried out by conducting continuous measurements of ground motion at temporary installations for approximately five to seven days. Seismometer installation methods, which depend on instrument type and on local conditions, range from placement within small cement-floored subsurface vaults to near-surface burial. Data are sampled at 40 Hz. Seismic noise levels are evaluated through the analysis of power spectral density distributions. Eleven 10.5-minute-long representative de-trended and mean-removed segments each of daytime and night-time data are chosen randomly, but reviewed to avoid event contamination. Fast Fourier Transforms are calculated for the five windows in each of these segments generated using a 50% overlap for Hanning-tapered sections ~200 s long. Instrument responses are removed. To date, 20 site surveys for primary and auxiliary stations have been carried out by the IMS. The sites surveyed represent a variety of physical and geological environments on most continents. The lowest high frequency (>1.4 Hz) noise levels at five sites with igneous or metamorphic geologies were as much as 6 dB below the USGS New Low Noise Model (NLNM) developed by Peterson (1993). These sites were in Oman (local geology consisting of Ordovician metasediments), Egypt (Precambrian granite), Niger (early Proterozoic tonalite and granodiorite), Saudi Arabia (Precambian metasediments), and

  13. High-performance VGA-resolution digital color CMOS imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agwani, Suhail; Domer, Steve; Rubacha, Ray; Stanley, Scott

    1999-04-01

    This paper discusses the performance of a new VGA resolution color CMOS imager developed by Motorola on a 0.5micrometers /3.3V CMOS process. This fully integrated, high performance imager has on chip timing, control, and analog signal processing chain for digital imaging applications. The picture elements are based on 7.8micrometers active CMOS pixels that use pinned photodiodes for higher quantum efficiency and low noise performance. The image processing engine includes a bank of programmable gain amplifiers, line rate clamping for dark offset removal, real time auto white balancing, per column gain and offset calibration, and a 10 bit pipelined RSD analog to digital converter with a programmable input range. Post ADC signal processing includes features such as bad pixel replacement based on user defined thresholds levels, 10 to 8 bit companding and 5 tap FIR filtering. The sensor can be programmed via a standard I2C interface that runs on 3.3V clocks. Programmable features include variable frame rates using a constant frequency master clock, electronic exposure control, continuous or single frame capture, progressive or interlace scanning modes. Each pixel is individually addressable allowing region of interest imaging and image subsampling. The sensor operates with master clock frequencies of up to 13.5MHz resulting in 30FPS. A total programmable gain of 27dB is available. The sensor power dissipation is 400mW at full speed of operation. The low noise design yields a measured 'system on a chip' dynamic range of 50dB thus giving over 8 true bits of resolution. Extremely high conversion gain result in an excellent peak sensitivity of 22V/(mu) J/cm2 or 3.3V/lux-sec. This monolithic image capture and processing engine represent a compete imaging solution making it a true 'camera on a chip'. Yet in its operation it remains extremely easy to use requiring only one clock and a 3.3V power supply. Given the available features and performance levels, this sensor will be

  14. A low-noise delta-sigma phase modulator for polar transmitters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo

    2014-01-01

    A low-noise phase modulator, using finite-impulse-response (FIR) filtering embedded delta-sigma (ΔΣ) fractional-N phase-locked loop (PLL), is fabricated in 0.18 μ m CMOS for GSM/EDGE polar transmitters. A simplified digital compensation filter with inverse-FIR and -PLL features is proposed to trade off the transmitter noise and linearity. Experimental results show that the presented architecture performs RF phase modulation well with 20 mW power dissipation from 1.6 V supply and achieves the root-mean-square (rms) and peak phase errors of 4° and 8.5°, respectively. The measured and simulated phase noises of -104 dBc/Hz and -120 dBc/Hz at 400-kHz offset from 1.8-GHz carrier frequency are observed, respectively.

  15. A low noise multichannel integrated circuit for recording neuronal signals using microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, W; Grybos, P; Litke, A M

    2004-02-15

    This paper reports on the development of a fully integrated 32-channel integrated circuit (IC) for recording neuronal signals in neurophysiological experiments using microelectrode arrays. The IC consists of 32 channels of low-noise preamplifiers and bandpass filters, and an output analog multiplexer. The continuous-time RC active filters have a typical passband of 20-2000 Hz; the low and the high cut-off frequencies can be separately controlled by external reference currents. This chip provides a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio for neuronal signals with amplitudes greater than 50 microV. For the nominal passband setting, an equivalent input noise of 3 microV rms has been achieved. A single channel occupies 0.35 mm(2) of silicon area and dissipates 1.7 mW of power. The chip was fabricated in a 0.7 microm CMOS process.

  16. A Low-Noise Delta-Sigma Phase Modulator for Polar Transmitters

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bo

    2014-01-01

    A low-noise phase modulator, using finite-impulse-response (FIR) filtering embedded delta-sigma (ΔΣ) fractional-N phase-locked loop (PLL), is fabricated in 0.18 μm CMOS for GSM/EDGE polar transmitters. A simplified digital compensation filter with inverse-FIR and -PLL features is proposed to trade off the transmitter noise and linearity. Experimental results show that the presented architecture performs RF phase modulation well with 20 mW power dissipation from 1.6 V supply and achieves the root-mean-square (rms) and peak phase errors of 4° and 8.5°, respectively. The measured and simulated phase noises of −104 dBc/Hz and −120 dBc/Hz at 400-kHz offset from 1.8-GHz carrier frequency are observed, respectively. PMID:24719578

  17. Low noise frequency synthesizer with self-calibrated voltage controlled oscillator and accurate AFC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qin; Jinbo, Li; Jian, Kang; Xiaoyong, Li; Jianjun, Zhou

    2014-09-01

    A low noise phase locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology is introduced. A VCO noise reduction method suited for short channel design is proposed to minimize PLL output phase noise. A self-calibrated voltage controlled oscillator is proposed in cooperation with the automatic frequency calibration circuit, whose accurate binary search algorithm helps reduce the VCO tuning curve coverage, which reduces the VCO noise contribution at PLL output phase noise. A low noise, charge pump is also introduced to extend the tuning voltage range of the proposed VCO, which further reduces its phase noise contribution. The frequency synthesizer generates 9.75-11.5 GHz high frequency wide band local oscillator (LO) carriers. Tested 11.5 GHz LO bears a phase noise of-104 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz frequency offset. The total power dissipation of the proposed frequency synthesizer is 48 mW. The area of the proposed frequency synthesizer is 0.3 mm2, including bias circuits and buffers.

  18. Low noise 4-channel front end ASIC with on-chip DLL for the upgrade of the LHCb Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picatoste, E.; Bigbeder-Beau, C.; Duarte, O.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Grauges, E.; Lefrançois, J.; Machefert, F.; Mauricio, J.; Vilasis, X.

    2015-04-01

    An integrated circuit for the Upgrade of the LHCb Calorimeter front end electronics is presented. It includes four analog channels, a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) for signal phase synchronization for all channels and an SPI communication protocol based interface. The analog circuit is based on two fully differential interleaved channels with a switched integrator to avoid dead time and it incorporates dedicated solutions to achieve low noise, linearity and spill-over specifications. The included DLL is capable of shifting the phase of the LHC clock (25 ns) in steps of 1 ns. The selected technology is AMS SiGe BiCMOS 0.35 um.

  19. On the design and test of a low noise propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Succi, G. P.

    1981-01-01

    An extensive review of noise and performance of general aviation propellers was performed. Research was done in three areas: The acoustic and aerodynamic theory of general aviation propellers, wind tunnel tests of three one-quarter scale models of general aviation propellers, and flight test of two low noise propellers. The design and testing of the second propeller is reviewed. The general aerodynamic considerations needed to design a new propeller are described. The design point analysis of low noise propellers is reviewed. The predicted and measured noise levels are compared.

  20. Design and Fabrication of Millimeter Wave Hexagonal Nano-Ferrite Circulator on Silicon CMOS Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oukacha, Hassan

    The rapid advancement of Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology has formed the backbone of the modern computing revolution enabling the development of computationally intensive electronic devices that are smaller, faster, less expensive, and consume less power. This well-established technology has transformed the mobile computing and communications industries by providing high levels of system integration on a single substrate, high reliability and low manufacturing cost. The driving force behind this computing revolution is the scaling of semiconductor devices to smaller geometries which has resulted in faster switching speeds and the promise of replacing traditional, bulky radio frequency (RF) components with miniaturized devices. Such devices play an important role in our society enabling ubiquitous computing and on-demand data access. This thesis presents the design and development of a magnetic circulator component in a standard 180 nm CMOS process. The design approach involves integration of nanoscale ferrite materials on a CMOS chip to avoid using bulky magnetic materials employed in conventional circulators. This device constitutes the next generation broadband millimeter-wave circulator integrated in CMOS using ferrite materials operating in the 60GHz frequency band. The unlicensed ultra-high frequency spectrum around 60GHz offers many benefits: very high immunity to interference, high security, and frequency re-use. Results of both simulations and measurements are presented in this thesis. The presented results show the benefits of this technique and the potential that it has in incorporating a complete system-on-chip (SoC) that includes low noise amplifier, power amplier, and antenna. This system-on-chip can be used in the same applications where the conventional circulator has been employed, including communication systems, radar systems, navigation and air traffic control, and military equipment. This set of applications of

  1. Radiation Response of Emerging High Gain, Low Noise Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Farr, William H; Zhu, David Q.

    2007-01-01

    Data illustrating the radiation response of emerging high gain, low noise detectors are presented. Ionizing dose testing of silicon internal discrete avalanche photodiodes, and 51-MeV proton testing of InGaAs/InAlAs avalanche photodiodes operated in Geiger mode are discussed.

  2. Optical Techniques for Low Noise Microwave Frequency Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2005-01-01

    Optical techniques and mathematical models are described for low noise microwave frequency sources. The contents include: 1) Why Optical Techniques; 2) Wavemixing: Advantages and Disadvantages; 3) Wavemixing with Feedback: The OEO; 4) Feedback in both loops: COEO; and 5) State of the Art and Future Prospects.

  3. Enhanced performance CCD output amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dunham, Mark E.; Morley, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A low-noise FET amplifier is connected to amplify output charge from a che coupled device (CCD). The FET has its gate connected to the CCD in common source configuration for receiving the output charge signal from the CCD and output an intermediate signal at a drain of the FET. An intermediate amplifier is connected to the drain of the FET for receiving the intermediate signal and outputting a low-noise signal functionally related to the output charge signal from the CCD. The amplifier is preferably connected as a virtual ground to the FET drain. The inherent shunt capacitance of the FET is selected to be at least equal to the sum of the remaining capacitances.

  4. A Radiation Hardened by Design CMOS ASIC for Thermopile Readouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quilligan, G.; Aslam, S.; DuMonthier, J.

    2012-01-01

    A radiation hardened by design (RHBD) mixed-signal application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) has been designed for a thermopile readout for operation in the harsh Jovian orbital environment. The multi-channel digitizer (MCD) ASIC includes 18 low noise amplifier channels which have tunable gain/filtering coefficients, a 16-bit sigma-delta analog-digital converter (SDADC) and an on-chip controller. The 18 channels, SDADC and controller were designed to operate with immunity to single event latchup (SEL) and to at least 10 Mrad total ionizing dose (TID). The ASIC also contains a radiation tolerant 16-bit 20 MHz Nyquist ADC for general purpose instrumentation digitizer needs. The ASIC is currently undergoing fabrication in a commercial 180 nm CMOS process. Although this ASIC was designed specifically for the harsh radiation environment of the NASA led JEO mission it is suitable for integration into instrumentation payloads 011 the ESA JUICE mission where the radiation hardness requirements are slightly less stringent.

  5. A saw-less direct conversion long term evolution receiver with 25% duty-cycle LO in 130 nm CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siyuan, He; Changhong, Zhang; Liang, Tao; Weifeng, Zhang; Longyue, Zeng; Wei, Lü; Haijun, Wu

    2013-03-01

    A CMOS long-term evolution (LTE) direct convert receiver that eliminates the interstage SAW filter is presented. The receiver consists of a low noise variable gain transconductance amplifier (TCA), a quadrature passive current commutating mixer with a 25% duty-cycle LO, a trans-impedance amplifier (TIA), a 7th-order Chebyshev filter and programmable gain amplifiers (PGAs). A wide dynamic gain range is allocated in the RF and analog parts. A current commutating passive mixer with a 25% duty-cycle LO improves gain, noise, and linearity. An LPF based on a Tow-Thomas biquad suppresses out-of-band interference. Fabricated in a 0.13 μm CMOS process, the receiver chain achieves a 107 dB maximum voltage gain, 2.7 dB DSB NF (from PAD port), -11 dBm IIP3, and > +65 dBm IIP2 after calibration, 96 dB dynamic control range with 1 dB steps, less than 2% error vector magnitude (EVM) from 2.3 to 2.7 GHz. The total receiver (total I Q path) draws 89 mA from a 1.2-V LDO on chip supply.

  6. A Differential CMOS Common-Gate LNA Linearized by Cross-Coupled Post Distortion Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Benqing; Yang, Guomin; Bin, Xiexian

    2014-05-01

    A linearized differential common-gate CMOS low noise amplifier is proposed. The linearity is improved by a cross-coupled post distortion technique, employing auxiliary PMOS transistors in weak inversion region to cancel the third-order nonlinear currents of common-gate LNA and impair the second-order nonlinear currents of that. The negative conductance characteristic of cross-coupled auxiliary PMOS transistors improves the gain while the resulted NF is little affected. Furthermore, noise contribution and linearity deterioration from the cascode stage is eliminated by an inductor resonating with the parasitic capacitance observed at the source net of the cascode transistor. The LNA implemented in a 0.18 μm CMOS technology demonstrates that IIP3 and gain have about 8.2 dB and 1.4 dB improvements in the designed frequency band, respectively. The noise figure of 3.4 dB is obtained with a power dissipation of 6.8 mW under a 1.8 V power supply.

  7. An Integrated CMOS Front-End Receiver with a Frequency Tripler for V-Band Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Hung; Chen, Min-Chiao; Ko, Chun-Lin; Wu, Chung-Yu

    A direct-conversion receiver integrated with the CMOS subharmonic frequency tripler (SFT) for V-band applications is designed, fabricated and measured using 0.13-µm CMOS technology. The receiver consists of a low-noise amplifier, a down-conversion mixer, an output buffer, and an SFT. A fully differential SFT is introduced to relax the requirements on the design of the frequency synthesizer. Thus, the operational frequency of the frequency synthesizer in the proposed receiver is only 20GHz. The fabricated receiver has a maximum conversion gain of 19.4dB, a minimum single-side band noise figure of 10.2dB, the input-referred 1-dB compression point of -20dBm and the input third order inter-modulation intercept point of -8.3dB. It draws only 15.8mA from a 1.2-V power supply with a total chip area of 0.794mm × 0.794mm. As a result, it is feasible to apply the proposed receiver in low-power wireless transceiver in the V-band applications.

  8. A 3.1-4.8 GHz CMOS receiver for MB-OFDM UWB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guang, Yang; Wang, Yao; Jiangwei, Yin; Renliang, Zheng; Wei, Li; Ning, Li; Junyan, Ren

    2009-01-01

    An integrated fully differential ultra-wideband CMOS receiver for 3.1-4.8 GHz MB-OFDM systems is presented. A gain controllable low noise amplifier and a merged quadrature mixer are integrated as the RF front-end. Five order Gm-C type low pass filters and VGAs are also integrated for both I and Q IF paths in the receiver. The ESD protected chip is fabricated in a Jazz 0.18 μm RF CMOS process and achieves a maximum total voltage gain of 65 dB, an AGC range of 45 dB with about 6 dB/step, an averaged total noise figure of 6.4 to 8.8 dB over 3 bands and an in-band IIP3 of -5.1 dBm. The receiver occupies 2.3 mm2 and consumes 110 mA from a 1.8 V supply including test buffers and a digital module.

  9. Ultra-high amplified strain on 200 mm optical Germanium-On-Insulator (GeOI) substrates: towards CMOS compatible Ge lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboud, V.; Gassenq, A.; Guilloy, K.; Osvaldo Dias, G.; Escalante, J. M.; Tardif, S.; Pauc, N.; Hartmann, J. M.; Widiez, J.; Gomez, E.; Bellet Amalric, E.; Fowler, D.; Rouchon, D.; Duchemin, I.; Niquet, Y. M.; Rieutord, F.; Faist, J.; Geiger, R.; Zabel, T.; Marin, E.; Sigg, H.; Chelnokov, A.; Calvo, V.

    2016-03-01

    Currently, one of the main challenges in the field of silicon photonics is the fabrication of efficient laser sources compatible with the microelectronic fabrication technology. An alternative to the complexity of integration of group III-V laser compounds is advancing from high tensile strains applied to germanium leading to improved emission properties by transforming the material from an indirect to a direct bandgap semiconductor. Theory predicts this transformation occurs at around 4.7% uniaxial tensile strain or 2.0% bi-axial tensile strain. Here, we report on ultrahigh strains obtained by amplifying the residual strain from novel optical Germanium-On-Insulator (GeOI) substrates fabricated by Smart CutTM technology and patterned with micro-bridges and micro-crosses. The high crystalline quality of the GeOI layers dramatically declined the mechanical failure limits when liberating the Ge microbridges. Record level Raman shift of 8.1 cm-1 for biaxial (micro-crosses) and 8.7 cm-1 for uniaxial stress (micro-bridges) were reached by carefully designing the geometry of the micro-structures. The photoluminescence (PL) evolution is compared to theoretical calculations based on the tight-binding model revealing a detailed understanding of the influence of strain on the germanium optical properties.

  10. Design and Testing of a Low Noise Flight Guidance Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David H.; Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Lewis, Elliot T.

    2004-01-01

    A flight guidance concept was developed to assist in flying continuous descent approach (CDA) procedures designed to lower the noise under the flight path of jet transport aircraft during arrival operations at an airport. The guidance consists of a trajectory prediction algorithm that was tuned to produce a high-efficiency, low noise flight profile with accompanying autopilot and flight display elements needed by the flight control system and pilot to fly the approach. A key component of the flight guidance was a real-time display of energy error relative to the predicted flight path. The guidance was integrated with the conventional Flight Management System (FMS) guidance of a modern jet transport airplane and tested in a high fidelity flight simulation. A charted arrival procedure, which allowed flying conventional arrivals, CDA arrivals with standard guidance, and CDA arrivals with the new low noise guidance, was developed to assist in the testing and evaluation of the low noise guidance concept. Results of the simulation testing showed the low noise guidance was easy to use by airline pilot test subjects and effective in achieving the desired noise reduction. Noise under the flight path was reduced by at least 2 decibels in Sound Exposure Level (SEL) at distances from about 3 nautical miles out to about 17.5 nautical miles from the runway, with a peak reduction of 8.5 decibels at about 10.5 nautical miles. Fuel consumption was also reduced by about 17% for the LNG conditions compared to baseline runs for the same flight distance. Pilot acceptance and understanding of the guidance was quite high with favorable comments and ratings received from all test subjects.

  11. Low noise, 0.4-3 GHz cryogenic receiver for radio astronomy.

    PubMed

    Gawande, R; Bradley, R; Langston, G

    2014-10-01

    We present the design and measurement of a radio telescope receiver front end cooled to 100 K physical temperature, and working over 400 MHz to 3 GHz frequency band. The system uses a frequency independent feed developed for operation as a feed for parabola using sinuous elements and integrated with an ultra-wideband low noise amplifier. The ambient temperature system is tested on the 43 m radio telescope in Green Bank, WV and the system verification results on the sky are presented. The cryogenic receiver is developed using a Stirling cycle, one stage cryocooler. The measured far field patterns and the system noise less than 80 K over a 5:1 bandwidth are presented.

  12. Low noise, 0.4-3 GHz cryogenic receiver for radio astronomy.

    PubMed

    Gawande, R; Bradley, R; Langston, G

    2014-10-01

    We present the design and measurement of a radio telescope receiver front end cooled to 100 K physical temperature, and working over 400 MHz to 3 GHz frequency band. The system uses a frequency independent feed developed for operation as a feed for parabola using sinuous elements and integrated with an ultra-wideband low noise amplifier. The ambient temperature system is tested on the 43 m radio telescope in Green Bank, WV and the system verification results on the sky are presented. The cryogenic receiver is developed using a Stirling cycle, one stage cryocooler. The measured far field patterns and the system noise less than 80 K over a 5:1 bandwidth are presented. PMID:25362437

  13. A low power low noise analog front end for portable healthcare system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanchao, Wang; Keren, Ke; Wenhui, Qin; Yajie, Qin; Ting, Yi; Zhiliang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    The presented analog front end (AFE) used to process human bio-signals consists of chopping instrument amplifier (IA), chopping spikes filter and programmable gain and bandwidth amplifier. The capacitor-coupling input of AFE can reject the DC electrode offset. The power consumption of current-feedback based IA is reduced by adopting capacitor divider in the input and feedback network. Besides, IA's input thermal noise is decreased by utilizing complementary CMOS input pairs which can offer higher transconductance. Fabricated in Global Foundry 0.35 μm CMOS technology, the chip consumes 3.96 μA from 3.3 V supply. The measured input noise is 0.85 μVrms (0.5-100 Hz) and the achieved noise efficient factor is 6.48. Project supported by the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (No. 13511501100), the State Key Laboratory Project of China (No. 11MS002), and the State Key Laboratory of ASIC & System, Fudan University.

  14. Fully Integrated Low-Noise Readout Circuit with Automatic Offset Cancellation Loop for Capacitive Microsensors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haryong; Park, Yunjong; Kim, Hyungseup; Cho, Dong-il Dan; Ko, Hyoungho

    2015-01-01

    Capacitive sensing schemes are widely used for various microsensors; however, such microsensors suffer from severe parasitic capacitance problems. This paper presents a fully integrated low-noise readout circuit with automatic offset cancellation loop (AOCL) for capacitive microsensors. The output offsets of the capacitive sensing chain due to the parasitic capacitances and process variations are automatically removed using AOCL. The AOCL generates electrically equivalent offset capacitance and enables charge-domain fine calibration using a 10-bit R-2R digital-to-analog converter, charge-transfer switches, and a charge-storing capacitor. The AOCL cancels the unwanted offset by binary-search algorithm based on 10-bit successive approximation register (SAR) logic. The chip is implemented using 0.18 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process with an active area of 1.76 mm2. The power consumption is 220 μW with 3.3 V supply. The input parasitic capacitances within the range of −250 fF to 250 fF can be cancelled out automatically, and the required calibration time is lower than 10 ms. PMID:26473877

  15. Fully integrated low-noise readout circuit with automatic offset cancellation loop for capacitive microsensors.

    PubMed

    Song, Haryong; Park, Yunjong; Kim, Hyungseup; Cho, Dong-Il Dan; Ko, Hyoungho

    2015-10-14

    Capacitive sensing schemes are widely used for various microsensors; however, such microsensors suffer from severe parasitic capacitance problems. This paper presents a fully integrated low-noise readout circuit with automatic offset cancellation loop (AOCL) for capacitive microsensors. The output offsets of the capacitive sensing chain due to the parasitic capacitances and process variations are automatically removed using AOCL. The AOCL generates electrically equivalent offset capacitance and enables charge-domain fine calibration using a 10-bit R-2R digital-to-analog converter, charge-transfer switches, and a charge-storing capacitor. The AOCL cancels the unwanted offset by binary-search algorithm based on 10-bit successive approximation register (SAR) logic. The chip is implemented using 0.18 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process with an active area of 1.76 mm². The power consumption is 220 μW with 3.3 V supply. The input parasitic capacitances within the range of -250 fF to 250 fF can be cancelled out automatically, and the required calibration time is lower than 10 ms.

  16. Fully integrated low-noise readout circuit with automatic offset cancellation loop for capacitive microsensors.

    PubMed

    Song, Haryong; Park, Yunjong; Kim, Hyungseup; Cho, Dong-Il Dan; Ko, Hyoungho

    2015-01-01

    Capacitive sensing schemes are widely used for various microsensors; however, such microsensors suffer from severe parasitic capacitance problems. This paper presents a fully integrated low-noise readout circuit with automatic offset cancellation loop (AOCL) for capacitive microsensors. The output offsets of the capacitive sensing chain due to the parasitic capacitances and process variations are automatically removed using AOCL. The AOCL generates electrically equivalent offset capacitance and enables charge-domain fine calibration using a 10-bit R-2R digital-to-analog converter, charge-transfer switches, and a charge-storing capacitor. The AOCL cancels the unwanted offset by binary-search algorithm based on 10-bit successive approximation register (SAR) logic. The chip is implemented using 0.18 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process with an active area of 1.76 mm². The power consumption is 220 μW with 3.3 V supply. The input parasitic capacitances within the range of -250 fF to 250 fF can be cancelled out automatically, and the required calibration time is lower than 10 ms. PMID:26473877

  17. Low Noise 1.2 THz SIS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpov, A.; Miller, D.; Rice, F.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Stern, J. A.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2001-01-01

    We present the development of a low noise superconductor insulator superconductor (SIS) mixer for the 1.1 - 1.25 THz heterodyne receiver of FIRST space radiotelescope. The quasi-optical SIS mixer has two NbTiN/AlN/Nb junctions with critical current density 30 kA/sq cm. The individual junction area is close to 0.65 square micrometers. The SIS junctions are coupled to the optical input beam through a planar double slot antenna and a Si hyperhemispherical lens. The minimum DSB receiver noise temperature is 650 K, about 12 hv/k.

  18. 40 CFR 203.4 - Low-noise-emission product determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Low-noise-emission product determination. 203.4 Section 203.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS LOW-NOISE-EMISSION PRODUCTS § 203.4 Low-noise-emission product determination. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 203.6 - Contracts for low-noise-emission products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Contracts for low-noise-emission products. 203.6 Section 203.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS LOW-NOISE-EMISSION PRODUCTS § 203.6 Contracts for low-noise-emission products. (a)...

  20. 40 CFR 203.4 - Low-noise-emission product determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Low-noise-emission product determination. 203.4 Section 203.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS LOW-NOISE-EMISSION PRODUCTS § 203.4 Low-noise-emission product determination. (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 203.6 - Contracts for low-noise-emission products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Contracts for low-noise-emission products. 203.6 Section 203.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS LOW-NOISE-EMISSION PRODUCTS § 203.6 Contracts for low-noise-emission products. (a)...

  2. Built-in self-test (BIST) techniques for millimeter wave CMOS transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahzabeen, Tabassum

    The seamless integration of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transceivers with a digital CMOS process enhances on-chip testability, thus reducing production and testing costs. Built in self testability also improves yield by offering on-chip compensation. This work focuses on built in self test techniques for CMOS based millimeter wave (mm-wave) transceivers. Built-in-self-test (BIST) using the loopback method is one cost-effective method for testing these transceivers. Since the loopback switch is always present during the normal operation of the transceiver, the requirement of the switch is different than for a conventional switch. The switch needs to have high isolation and high impedance during its OFF period. Two 80 GHz single pole single throw (SPST) switches have been designed, fabricated in standard CMOS process, and measured to connect the loopback path for BIST applications. The loopback switches in this work provide the required criteria for loopback BIST. A stand alone 80 GHz low noise amplifier (LNA) and the same LNA integrated with one of the loopback switches have been fabricated, and measured to observe the difference in performance when the loopback switch is present. Besides the loopback switch, substrate leakage also forms a path between the transmitter and receiver. Substrate leakage has been characterized as a function of distance between the transmitter and receiver for consideration in using the BIST method. A BIST algorithm has been developed to estimate the process variation in device sizes by probing a low frequency ring oscillator to estimate the device variation and map this variation to the 80 GHz LNA. Probing a low frequency circuit is cheaper compared to the probing of a millimeter wave circuit and reduces the testing costs. The performance of the LNA degrades due to variation in device size. Once the shift in the device size is being estimated (from the ring oscillator's shifted frequency), the LNA's performance can be

  3. Low-noise magnetic sensing for marine munitions characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Gregory; Keranen, Joe; Billings, Stephen; Fonda, Raul; Foley, Jack; Bassani, Chet

    2011-06-01

    Because the recovery of underwater munitions is many times more expensive than recovering the same items on dry land, there is a continuing need to advance marine geophysical characterization methods. To efficiently and reliably conduct surveying in marine environments, low-noise geophysical sensors are being configured to operate close to the sea bottom. We describe systems that are deployed from surface vessels via rigid or flexible tow cables or mounted directly to submersible platforms such as unmanned underwater vehicles. Development and testing of a towed configuration has led to a 4 meter wide hydrodynamically stable tow wing with an instrumented top-side assembly mounted on the stern of a surface survey vessel. An integrated positioning system combined with an instrumented cable management system, vessel and wing attitude and wing depth measurements to provide sub-meter positional accuracy in up to 25 meter water depths and within 1 to 2 meters of the seafloor. We present the results of data collected during an instrument validation survey over a series of targets emplaced at measured locations. Performance of the system was validated through analyses of data collected at varying speeds, headings, and height above the seafloor. Implementation of the system during live-site operations has demonstrated its capability to survey hundreds of acres of marine or lacustrine environment. Unique deployment concepts that utilize new miniaturized and very low noise sensors show promise for expanding the applicability of magnetic sensing at marine sites.

  4. Recent progress and development of a speedster-EXD: a new event-triggered hybrid CMOS x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher V.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Prieskorn, Zachary R.; Burrows, David N.

    2015-08-01

    We present the characterization of a new event-driven X-ray hybrid CMOS detector developed by Penn State University in collaboration with Teledyne Imaging Sensors. Along with its low susceptibility to radiation damage, low power consumption, and fast readout time to avoid pile-up, the Speedster-EXD has been designed with the capability to limit its readout to only those pixels containing charge, thus enabling even faster effective frame rates. The threshold for the comparator in each pixel can be set by the user so that only pixels with signal above the set threshold are read out. The Speedster-EXD hybrid CMOS detector also has two new in-pixel features that reduce noise from known noise sources: (1) a low-noise, high-gain CTIA amplifier to eliminate crosstalk from interpixel capacitance (IPC) and (2) in-pixel CDS subtraction to reduce kTC noise. We present the read noise, dark current, IPC, energy resolution, and gain variation measurements of one Speedster-EXD detector.

  5. Proposal of Switching Power Amplifier Using Small Capacity Linear Amplifier and LC Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Jo; Funato, Hirohito; Ogasawara, Satoshi

    The higher efficiency and the low noise in output voltage and current has been required in some applications, i.e. audio-video equipment, medical equipment and so on. This paper proposes a power amplifier in which a PWM inverter is used as a main circuit. In the proposed power amplifier, a hybrid filter composed of a simple and general LC filter and a small capacity linear amplifier is connected to the output of the inverter. The linear amplifier is inserted in series to the filter capacitor to improve the filtering effect of the LC filter. Switching ripples and LC resonances are considerably suppressed by controlling the amplifier using the proposed method and a low distortion switching power amplifier is realized. The effects of the proposal circuit are verified by simulations and experiments. As a result, the proposed circuit achieves low noise about THD=0.68% in simulation and THD=1.7% in experiment.

  6. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, James H.; Lavietes, Anthony D.

    1998-05-29

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

  7. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

    1998-05-26

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

  8. Multidisciplinary design optimization of low-noise transport aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifsson, Leifur Thor

    The objective of this research is to examine how to design low-noise transport aircraft using Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO). The subject is approached by designing for low-noise both implicitly and explicitly. The explicit design approach involves optimizing an aircraft while explicitly constraining the noise level. An MDO framework capable of optimizing both a cantilever wing and a Strut-Braced-Wing (SBW) aircraft was developed. The objective is to design aircraft for low-airframe-noise at the approach conditions and quantify the change in weight and performance with respect to a traditionally designed aircraft. The results show that reducing airframe noise by reducing approach speed alone, will not provide significant noise reduction without a large performance and weight penalty. Therefore, more dramatic changes to the aircraft design are needed to achieve a significant airframe noise reduction. Another study showed that the trailing-edge flap can be eliminated, as well as all the noise associated with that device, without incurring a significant weight and performance penalty. Lastly, an airframe noise analysis showed that a SBW aircraft with short fuselage-mounted landing gear could have a similar or potentially a lower airframe noise level than a comparable cantilever wing aircraft. The implicit design approach involves selecting a configuration that supports a low-noise operation, and optimizing for performance. In this study a Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) transport aircraft, with a conventional and a distributed propulsion system, was optimized for minimum take-off gross weight. The effects of distributed propulsion were studied using an MDO framework previously developed at Virginia Tech. The results show that more than two thirds of the theoretical savings of distributed propulsion are required for the BWB designs with a distributed propulsion system to have comparable gross weight as those with a conventional propulsion system. Therefore

  9. Fundamental study on identification of CMOS cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, Kenji; Saitoh, Naoki

    2003-08-01

    In this study, we discussed individual camera identification of CMOS cameras, because CMOS (complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor) imaging detectors have begun to make their move into the CCD (charge-coupled-device) fields for recent years. It can be identified whether or not the given images have been taken with the given CMOS camera by detecting the imager's intrinsic unique fixed pattern noise (FPN) just like the individual CCD camera identification method proposed by the authors. Both dark and bright pictures taken with the CMOS cameras can be identified by the method, because not only dark current in the photo detectors but also MOS-FET amplifiers incorporated in each pixel may produce pixel-to-pixel nonuniformity in sensitivity. Each pixel in CMOS detectors has the amplifier, which degrades image quality of bright images due to the nonuniformity of the amplifier gain. Two CMOS cameras were evaluated in our experiments. They were WebCamGoPlus (Creative), and EOS D30 (Canon). WebCamGoPlus is a low-priced web camera, whereas EOS D30 is for professional use. Image of a white plate were recorded with the cameras under the plate's luminance condition of 0cd/m2 and 150cd/m2. The recorded images were multiply integrated to reduce the random noise component. From the images of both cameras, characteristic dots patterns were observed. Some bright dots were observed in the dark images, whereas some dark dots were in the bright images. The results show that the camera identification method is also effective for CMOS cameras.

  10. XV-15 Low-Noise Terminal Area Operations Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, B. D.

    1998-01-01

    Test procedures related to XV-15 noise tests conducted by NASA-Langley and Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. are discussed. The tests. which took place during October and November 1995, near Waxahachie, Texas, documented the noise signature of the XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft at a wide variety of flight conditions. The stated objectives were to: -provide a comprehensive acoustic database for NASA and U.S. Industry -validate noise prediction methodologies, and -develop and demonstrate low-noise flight profiles. The test consisted of two distinct phases. Phase 1 provided an acoustic database for validating analytical noise prediction techniques; Phase 2 directly measured noise contour information at a broad range of operating profiles, with emphasis on minimizing 'approach' noise. This report is limited to a documentation of the test procedures, flight conditions, microphone locations, meteorological conditions, and test personnel used in the test. The acoustic results are not included.

  11. Low-noise photodiode detector for optical fluctuation diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Fonck, R.J.; Ashley, R.; Durst, R. ); Paul, S.F.; Renda, G. )

    1992-10-01

    The beam emission spectroscopy optical fluctuation diagnostic requires the highest possible quantum efficiency detector at 656 nm to minimize the photon statistical baseline limit to the detectable fluctuation level. A photoconductive photodiode detector with an extremely low-noise preamplifier and a reactive feedback circuit provides quantum efficiencies up to 70%--80% for a useful frequency range of at least 0--150 kHz with incident powers of {similar to}10 nW. The diodes are chosen for negligible leakage current and hence do not require active cooling. These detectors have provided increase in the sensitivity to plasma fluctuation amplitude by a factor of {similar to}14 over photomultipliers and a factor of 4 over large area avalanche photodiodes.

  12. Ultra-low noise optical phase-locked loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayotte, Simon; Babin, André; Costin, François

    2014-03-01

    The relative phase between two fiber lasers is controlled via a high performance optical phase-locked loop (OPLL). Two parameters are of particular importance for the design: the intrinsic phase noise of the laser (i.e. its linewidth) and a high-gain, low-noise electronic locking loop. In this work, one of the lowest phase noise fiber lasers commercially available was selected (i.e. NP Photonics Rock fiber laser module), with sub-kHz linewidth at 1550.12 nm. However, the fast tuning mechanism of such lasers is through stretching its cavity length with a piezoelectric transducer which has a few 10s kHz bandwidth. To further increase the locking loop bandwidth to several MHz, a second tuning mechanism is used by adding a Lithium Niobate phase modulator in the laser signal path. The OPLL is thus divided into two locking loops, a slow loop acting on the laser piezoelectric transducer and a fast loop acting on the phase modulator. The beat signal between the two phase-locked lasers yields a highly pure sine wave with an integrated phase error of 0.0012 rad. This is orders of magnitude lower than similar existing systems such as the Laser Synthesizer used for distribution of photonic local oscillator (LO) for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array radio telescope in Chile. Other applications for ultra-low noise OPLL include coherent power combining, Brillouin sensing, light detection and ranging (LIDAR), fiber optic gyroscopes, phased array antenna and beam steering, generation of LOs for next generation coherent communication systems, coherent analog optical links, terahertz generation and coherent spectroscopy.

  13. Advanced Low-Noise Research Fan Stage Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubert, Robert; Bock, Larry; Malmborg, Eric; Owen-Peer, William

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the design of the Advanced Low-Noise Research Fan stage. The fan is a variable pitch design, which is designed at the cruise pitch condition. Relative to the cruise setting, the blade is closed at takeoff and opened for reverse thrust operation. The fan stage is a split flow design with fan exit guide vanes (FEGVs) and core stators. The fan stage design is combined with a nacelle and engine core duct to form a powered fan/nacelle subscale model. This model is intended for use in combined aerodynamic, acoustic, and structural testing in a wind tunnel. The fan has an outer diameter of 22 in. and a hub-to-tip of 0.426 in., which allows the use of existing NASA fan and cowl force balance and rig drive systems. The design parameters were selected to permit valid acoustic and aerodynamic comparisons with the Pratt & Whitney (P&W) 17- and 22-in. rigs previously tested under NASA contract. The fan stage design is described in detail. The results of the design axisymmetric and Navier-Stokes aerodynamic analysis are presented at the critical design conditions. The structural analysis of the fan rotor and attachment is included. The blade and attachment are predicted to have adequate low-cycle fatigue life and an acceptable operating range without resonant stress or flutter. The stage was acoustically designed with airfoil counts in the FEGV and core stator to minimize noise. A fan/FEGV tone analysis developed separately under NASA contract was used to determine the optimum airfoil counts. The fan stage was matched to the existing nacelle, designed under the previous P&W low-noise contract, to form a fan/nacelle model for wind tunnel testing. It is an axisymmetric nacelle for convenience in testing and analysis. Previous testing confirmed that the nacelle performed as required at various aircraft operating conditions.

  14. Ultra-low noise mechanically cooled germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.; Amman, M.; Martin, R.; Vetter, K.

    2016-03-01

    Low capacitance, large volume, high purity germanium (HPGe) radiation detectors have been successfully employed in low-background physics experiments. However, some physical processes may not be detectable with existing detectors whose energy thresholds are limited by electronic noise. In this paper, methods are presented which can lower the electronic noise of these detectors. Through ultra-low vibration mechanical cooling and wire bonding of a CMOS charge sensitive preamplifier to a sub-pF p-type point contact HPGe detector, we demonstrate electronic noise levels below 40 eV-FWHM.

  15. A Highly Responsive Silicon Nanowire/Amplifier MOSFET Hybrid Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Jang, Jaeman; Choi, Bongsik; Yoon, Jinsu; Kim, Jee-Yeon; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Myong Kim, Dong; Hwan Kim, Dae; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates a hybrid biosensor comprised of a silicon nanowire (SiNW) integrated with an amplifier MOSFET to improve the current response of field-effect-transistor (FET)-based biosensors. The hybrid biosensor is fabricated using conventional CMOS technology, which has the potential advantage of high density and low noise performance. The biosensor shows a current response of 5.74 decades per pH for pH detection, which is 2.5 × 105 times larger than that of a single SiNW sensor. In addition, we demonstrate charged polymer detection using the biosensor, with a high current change of 4.5 × 105 with a 500 nM concentration of poly(allylamine hydrochloride). In addition, we demonstrate a wide dynamic range can be obtained by adjusting the liquid gate voltage. We expect that this biosensor will be advantageous and practical for biosensor applications which requires lower noise, high speed, and high density. PMID:26197105

  16. A high and low noise model for strong motion accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, J. F.; Cauzzi, C.; Olivieri, M.

    2010-12-01

    We present reference noise models for high-quality strong motion accelerometer installations. We use continuous accelerometer data acquired by the Swiss Seismological Service (SED) since 2006 and other international high-quality accelerometer network data to derive very broadband (50Hz-100s) high and low noise models. The proposed noise models are compared to the Peterson (1993) low and high noise models designed for broadband seismometers; the datalogger self-noise; background noise levels at existing Swiss strong motion stations; and typical earthquake signals recorded in Switzerland and worldwide. The standard strong motion station operated by the SED consists of a Kinemetrics Episensor (2g clip level; flat acceleration response from 200 Hz to DC; <155dB dynamic range) coupled with a 24-bit Nanometrics Taurus datalogger. The proposed noise models are based on power spectral density (PSD) noise levels for each strong motion station computed via PQLX (McNamara and Buland, 2004) from several years of continuous recording. The 'Accelerometer Low Noise Model', ALNM, is dominated by instrument noise from the sensor and datalogger. The 'Accelerometer High Noise Model', AHNM, reflects 1) at high frequencies the acceptable site noise in urban areas, 2) at mid-periods the peak microseismal energy, as determined by the Peterson High Noise Model and 3) at long periods the maximum noise observed from well insulated sensor / datalogger systems placed in vault quality sites. At all frequencies, there is at least one order of magnitude between the ALNM and the AHNM; at high frequencies (> 1Hz) this extends to 2 orders of magnitude. This study provides remarkable confirmation of the capability of modern strong motion accelerometers to record low-amplitude ground motions with seismic observation quality. In particular, an accelerometric station operating at the ALNM is capable of recording the full spectrum of near source earthquakes, out to 100 km, down to M2. Of particular

  17. Nanosecond monolithic CMOS readout cell

    DOEpatents

    Souchkov, Vitali V.

    2004-08-24

    A pulse shaper is implemented in monolithic CMOS with a delay unit formed of a unity gain buffer. The shaper is formed of a difference amplifier having one input connected directly to an input signal and a second input connected to a delayed input signal through the buffer. An elementary cell is based on the pulse shaper and a timing circuit which gates the output of an integrator connected to the pulse shaper output. A detector readout system is formed of a plurality of elementary cells, each connected to a pixel of a pixel array, or to a microstrip of a plurality of microstrips, or to a detector segment.

  18. Design and characterization of avalanche photodiodes in submicron CMOS technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancheri, L.; Bendib, T.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Stoppa, D.

    2014-03-01

    The fabrication of Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs) in CMOS processes can be exploited in several application domains, including telecommunications, time-resolved optical detection and scintillation detection. CMOS integration allows the realization of systems with a high degree of parallelization which are competitive with hybrid solutions in terms of cost and complexity. In this work, we present a linear-mode APD fabricated in a 0.15μm process, and report its gain and noise characterization. The experimental observations can be accurately predicted using Hayat dead-space noise model. Device simulations based on dead-space model are then used to discuss the current status and the perspectives for the integration of high-performance low-noise devices in standard CMOS processes.

  19. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): Developments and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, R.; Fant, A.; Gasiorek, P.; Esbrand, C.; Griffiths, J. A.; Metaxas, M. G.; Royle, G. J.; Speller, R.; Venanzi, C.; van der Stelt, P. F.; Verheij, H.; Li, G.; Theodoridis, S.; Georgiou, H.; Cavouras, D.; Hall, G.; Noy, M.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Machin, D.; Greenwood, S.; Khaleeq, M.; Schulerud, H.; Østby, J. M.; Triantis, F.; Asimidis, A.; Bolanakis, D.; Manthos, N.; Longo, R.; Bergamaschi, A.

    2007-12-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end applications, for example web-cams, and is slowly pervading the high-end applications, for example in prosumer digital cameras. Higher specifications are required for scientific applications: very low noise, high speed, high dynamic range, large format and radiation hardness are some of these requirements. This paper will present a brief overview of the CMOS Image Sensor technology and of the requirements for scientific applications. As an example, a sensor for X-ray imaging will be presented. This sensor was developed within a European FP6 Consortium, intelligent imaging sensors (I-ImaS).

  20. Low-noise THz MgB2 Josephson mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunnane, Daniel; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; Acharya, Narendra; Wolak, Matthäus A.; Xi, X. X.; Karasik, Boris S.

    2016-09-01

    The potential applications for high frequency operation of the Josephson effect in MgB2 include THz mixers, direct detectors, and digital circuits. Here we report on MgB2 weak links which exhibit the Josephson behavior up to almost 2 THz and using them for low-noise heterodyne detection of THz radiation. The devices are made from epitaxial film grown in the c-axis direction by the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition method. The current in the junctions travels parallel to the surface of the film, thus making possible a large contribution of the quasi-two-dimensional σ-gap in transport across the weak link. These devices are connected to a planar spiral antenna with a dielectric substrate lens to facilitate coupling to free-space radiation for use as a detector. The IcRn product of the junction is 5.25 mV, giving confirmation of a large gap parameter. The sensitivity of the mixer was measured from 0.6 THz to 1.9 THz. At a bath temperature of over 20 K, a mixer noise temperature less than 2000 K (DSB) was measured near 0.6 THz.

  1. Follow-on Low Noise Fan Aerodynamic Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidegger, Nathan J.; Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    The focus of the project was to investigate the effects of turbulence models on the prediction of rotor wake structures. The Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis (ADPAC) code was modified through the incorporation of the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. Suitable test cases were solved numerically using ADPAC employing the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model and another prediction code for comparison. A near-wall spacing study was also completed to determine the adequate spacing of the first computational cell off the wall. Solutions were also collected using two versions of the algebraic Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model in ADPAC. The effects of the turbulence model on the rotor wake definition was examined by obtaining ADPAC solutions for the Low Noise Fan rotor-only steady-flow case using the standard algebraic Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, a modified version of the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The results from the three different turbulence modeling techniques were compared with each other and the available experimental data. These results include overall rotor performance, spanwise exit profiles, and contours of axial velocity taken along constant axial locations and along blade-to-blade surfaces. Wake characterizations were also performed on the experimental and ADPAC predicted results including the definition of a wake correlation function. Correlations were evaluated for wake width and wake depth. Similarity profiles of the wake shape were also compared between all numerical solutions and experimental data.

  2. A compact, multichannel, and low noise arbitrary waveform generator.

    PubMed

    Govorkov, S; Ivanov, B I; Il'ichev, E; Meyer, H-G

    2014-05-01

    A new type of high functionality, fast, compact, and easy programmable arbitrary waveform generator for low noise physical measurements is presented. The generator provides 7 fast differential waveform channels with a maximum bandwidth up to 200 MHz frequency. There are 6 fast pulse generators on the generator board with 78 ps time resolution in both duration and delay, 3 of them with amplitude control. The arbitrary waveform generator is additionally equipped with two auxiliary slow 16 bit analog-to-digital converters and four 16 bit digital-to-analog converters for low frequency applications. Electromagnetic shields are introduced to the power supply, digital, and analog compartments and with a proper filter design perform more than 110 dB digital noise isolation to the output signals. All the output channels of the board have 50 Ω SubMiniature version A termination. The generator board is suitable for use as a part of a high sensitive physical equipment, e.g., fast read out and manipulation of nuclear magnetic resonance or superconducting quantum systems and any other application, which requires electromagnetic interference free fast pulse and arbitrary waveform generation.

  3. A compact, multichannel, and low noise arbitrary waveform generator

    SciTech Connect

    Govorkov, S.; Ivanov, B. I.; Il'ichev, E.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2014-05-15

    A new type of high functionality, fast, compact, and easy programmable arbitrary waveform generator for low noise physical measurements is presented. The generator provides 7 fast differential waveform channels with a maximum bandwidth up to 200 MHz frequency. There are 6 fast pulse generators on the generator board with 78 ps time resolution in both duration and delay, 3 of them with amplitude control. The arbitrary waveform generator is additionally equipped with two auxiliary slow 16 bit analog-to-digital converters and four 16 bit digital-to-analog converters for low frequency applications. Electromagnetic shields are introduced to the power supply, digital, and analog compartments and with a proper filter design perform more than 110 dB digital noise isolation to the output signals. All the output channels of the board have 50 Ω SubMiniature version A termination. The generator board is suitable for use as a part of a high sensitive physical equipment, e.g., fast read out and manipulation of nuclear magnetic resonance or superconducting quantum systems and any other application, which requires electromagnetic interference free fast pulse and arbitrary waveform generation.

  4. The speedster-EXD: a new event-triggered hybrid CMOS x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher V.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Prieskorn, Zachary R.; Burrows, David N.

    2014-07-01

    We present preliminary characterization of the Speedster-EXD, a new event driven hybrid CMOS detector (HCD) developed in collaboration with Penn State University and Teledyne Imaging Systems. HCDs have advantages over CCDs including lower susceptibility to radiation damage, lower power consumption, and faster read-out time to avoid pile-up. They are deeply depleted and able to detect x-rays down to approximately 0.1 keV. The Speedster-EXD has additional in-pixel features compared to previously published HCDs including: (1) an in-pixel comparator that enables read out of only the pixels with signal from an x-ray event, (2) four different gain modes to optimize either full well capacity or energy resolution, (3) in-pixel CDS subtraction to reduce read noise, and (4) a low-noise, high-gain CTIA amplifier to eliminate interpixel capacitance crosstalk. When using the comparator feature, the user can set a comparator threshold and only pixels above the threshold will be read out. This feature can be run in two modes including single pixel readout in which only pixels above the threshold are read out and 3x3 readout where a 3×3 region centered on the central pixel of the X-ray event is read out. The comparator feature of the Speedster-EXD increases the detector array effective frame rate by orders of magnitude. The new features of the Speedster-EXD hybrid CMOS x-ray detector are particularly relevant to future high throughput x-ray missions requiring large-format silicon imagers.

  5. The Speedster-EXD- A New Event-Driven Hybrid CMOS X-ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher V.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Prieskorn, Zachary R.; Burrows, David N.

    2016-01-01

    The Speedster-EXD is a new 64×64 pixel, 40-μm pixel pitch, 100-μm depletion depth hybrid CMOS x-ray detector with the capability of reading out only those pixels containing event charge, thus enabling fast effective frame rates. A global charge threshold can be specified, and pixels containing charge above this threshold are flagged and read out. The Speedster detector has also been designed with other advanced in-pixel features to improve performance, including a low-noise, high-gain capacitive transimpedance amplifier that eliminates interpixel capacitance crosstalk (IPC), and in-pixel correlated double sampling subtraction to reduce reset noise. We measure the best energy resolution on the Speedster-EXD detector to be 206 eV (3.5%) at 5.89 keV and 172 eV (10.0%) at 1.49 keV. The average IPC to the four adjacent pixels is measured to be 0.25%±0.2% (i.e., consistent with zero). The pixel-to-pixel gain variation is measured to be 0.80%±0.03%, and a Monte Carlo simulation is applied to better characterize the contributions to the energy resolution.

  6. An Autonomous Wireless Sensor Node With Asynchronous ECG Monitoring in 0.18 μ m CMOS.

    PubMed

    Mansano, Andre L; Li, Yongjia; Bagga, Sumit; Serdijn, Wouter A

    2016-06-01

    The design of a 13.56 MHz/402 MHz autonomous wireless sensor node with asynchronous ECG monitoring for near field communication is presented. The sensor node consists of an RF energy harvester (RFEH), a power management unit, an ECG readout, a data encoder and an RF backscattering transmitter. The energy harvester supplies the system with 1.25 V and offers a power conversion efficiency of 19% from a -13 dBm RF source at 13.56 MHz. The power management unit regulates the output voltage of the RFEH to supply the ECG readout with VECG = 0.95 V and the data encoder with VDE = 0.65 V . The ECG readout comprises an analog front-end (low noise amplifier and programmable voltage to current converter) and an asynchronous level crossing ADC with 8 bits resolution. The ADC output is encoded by a pulse generator that drives a backscattering transmitter at 402 MHz. The total power consumption of the sensor node circuitry is 9.7 μ W for a data rate of 90 kb/s and a heart rate of 70 bpm. The chip has been designed in a 0.18 μm CMOS process and shows superior RF input power sensitivity and lower power consumption when compared to previous works. PMID:26812734

  7. High-dynamic-range 4-Mpixel CMOS image sensor for scientific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Paul; Fowler, Boyd; Liu, Chiao; Mims, Steve; Bartkovjak, Peter; Do, Hung; Li, Wang; Appelbaum, Jeff; Lopez, Angel

    2012-03-01

    As bio-technology transitions from research and development to high volume production, dramatic improvements in image sensor performance will be required to support the throughput and cost requirements of this market. This includes higher resolution, higher frame rates, higher quantum efficiencies, increased system integration, lower read-noise, and lower device costs. We present the performance of a recently developed low noise 2048(H) x 2048(V) CMOS image sensor optimized for scientific applications such as life science imaging, microscopy, as well as industrial inspection applications. The sensor architecture consists of two identical halves which can be operated independently and the imaging array consists of 4T pixels with pinned photodiodes on a 6.5μm pitch with integrated micro-lens. The operation of the sensor is programmable through a SPI interface. The measured peak quantum efficiency of the sensor is 73% at 600nm, and the read noise is about 1.1e- RMS at 100 fps data rate. The sensor features dual gain column parallel ouput amplifiers with 11-bit single slope ADCs. The full well capacity is greater than 36ke-, the dark current is less than 7pA/cm2 at 20°C. The sensor achieves an intra-scene linear dynamic range of greater than 91dB (36000:1) at room temperature.

  8. Compact, Low-Force, Low-Noise Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Actuators are critical to all the robotic and manipulation mechanisms that are used in current and future NASA missions, and are also needed for many other industrial, aeronautical, and space activities. There are many types of actuators that were designed to operate as linear or rotary motors, but there is still a need for low-force, low-noise linear actuators for specialized applications, and the disclosed mechanism addresses this need. A simpler implementation of a rotary actuator was developed where the end effector controls the motion of a brush for cleaning a thermal sensor. The mechanism uses a SMA (shape-memory alloy) wire for low force, and low noise. The linear implementation of the actuator incorporates a set of springs and mechanical hard-stops for resetting and fault tolerance to mechanical resistance. The actuator can be designed to work in a pull or push mode, or both. Depending on the volume envelope criteria, the actuator can be configured for scaling its volume down to 4 2 1 cm3. The actuator design has an inherent fault tolerance to mechanical resistance. The actuator has the flexibility of being designed for both linear and rotary motion. A specific configuration was designed and analyzed where fault-tolerant features have been implemented. In this configuration, an externally applied force larger than the design force does not damage the active components of the actuator. The actuator housing can be configured and produced using cost-effective methods such as injection molding, or alternatively, its components can be mounted directly on a small circuit board. The actuator is driven by a SMA -NiTi as a primary active element, and it requires energy on the order of 20 Ws(J) per cycle. Electrical connections to points A and B are used to apply electrical power in the resistive NiTi wire, causing a phase change that contracts the wire on the order of 5%. The actuation period is of the order of a second for generating the stroke, and 4 to 10 seconds

  9. Compact, Low-Force, Low-Noise Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Actuators are critical to all the robotic and manipulation mechanisms that are used in current and future NASA missions, and are also needed for many other industrial, aeronautical, and space activities. There are many types of actuators that were designed to operate as linear or rotary motors, but there is still a need for low-force, low-noise linear actuators for specialized applications, and the disclosed mechanism addresses this need. A simpler implementation of a rotary actuator was developed where the end effector controls the motion of a brush for cleaning a thermal sensor. The mechanism uses a SMA (shape-memory alloy) wire for low force, and low noise. The linear implementation of the actuator incorporates a set of springs and mechanical hard-stops for resetting and fault tolerance to mechanical resistance. The actuator can be designed to work in a pull or push mode, or both. Depending on the volume envelope criteria, the actuator can be configured for scaling its volume down to 4x2x1 cu cm. The actuator design has an inherent fault tolerance to mechanical resistance. The actuator has the flexibility of being designed for both linear and rotary motion. A specific configuration was designed and analyzed where fault-tolerant features have been implemented. In this configuration, an externally applied force larger than the design force does not damage the active components of the actuator. The actuator housing can be configured and produced using cost-effective methods such as injection molding, or alternatively, its components can be mounted directly on a small circuit board. The actuator is driven by a SMA -NiTi as a primary active element, and it requires energy on the order of 20 Ws(J) per cycle. Electrical connections to points A and B are used to apply electrical power in the resistive NiTi wire, causing a phase change that contracts the wire on the order of 5%. The actuation period is of the order of a second for generating the stroke, and 4 to 10

  10. High grain, low noise organic and nanoelectronic photodetectors (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinsong

    2015-08-01

    The dramatically reduction of cost of photodetectors without comprising their performance will enable new applications in many fields. In this talk, I will brief our progress in the development of sensitive photodetectors/photon counters using low-cost solution processable organic and nano-electronic materials. Four types of device structures will be compared in terms of device gain, noise, sensitivity, response speed and linear dynamic range: 1) traditional diode structure, 2) a structure combine the photodiode and photoconductor through the interface trap triggered secondary charge injection, 3) an organic phototransistor that has combined photoconductive gain and photovoltaic gain, and 4) quantum dots modulated transistor channel conductance. Broad response spectrum from UV to NIR will be demonstrated, and active material limited performance will be discussed. Solution-Processed Nanoparticle Super-Float-Gated Organic Field-Effect Transistor as Un-cooled Ultraviolet and Infrared Photon Counter Yongbo Yuan, Qingfeng Dong, Bin Yang, Fawen Guo, Qi Zhang, Ming Han, and Jinsong Huang*, Scientific Reports, 3, 2707 (2013) A nanocomposite ultraviolet photodetector enabled by interfacial trap-controlled charge injection Fawen Guo, Bin Yang, Yongbo Yuan, Zhengguo Xiao, Qingfeng Dong, Yu Bi, and Jinsong Huang*, Nature Nanotechnology, 7, 798-802, (2012) Large Gain, Low Noise Nanocomposite Ultraviolet Photodetectors with a Linear Dynamic Range of 120 dB Yanjun Fang, Fawen Guo,Zhengguo Xiao, Jinsong Huang*, Advanced Optical Materials, 348-353 (2014) High Gain and Low-Driving-Voltage Photodetectors Based on Organolead Triiodide Perovskites Rui Dong, Yanjun Fang, Jungseok Chae, Jun Dai, Zhengguo Xiao, Qingfeng Dong,Yongbo Yuan, Andrea Centrone,Xiao Cheng Zeng , Jinsong Huang*. ,Advanced Materials, 2015

  11. Development of Ultra-Low-Noise TES Bolometer Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Khosropanah, P.; Ridder, M. L.; Hijmering, R. A.; Gao, J. R.; Akamatsu, H.; Gottardi, L.; van der Kuur, J.; Jackson, B. D.

    2016-07-01

    SRON is developing ultra-low-noise transition edge sensors (TESs) based on a superconducting Ti/Au bilayer on a suspended SiN island with SiN legs for SAFARI aboard SPICA. We have two major concerns about realizing TESs with an ultra-low NEP of 2× 10^{-19} hbox {W}/√{{ {Hz}}}: achieving lower thermal conductance and no excess noise with respect to the phonon noise. To realize TESs with phonon-noise-limited NEPs, we need to make thinner ({<}0.25 \\upmu hbox {m}) and narrower ({<}1 \\upmu hbox {m}) SiN legs. With deep reactive-ion etching, three types of TESs were fabricated in combination with different SiN island sizes and the presence or absence of an optical absorber. Those TESs have a thin (0.20 \\upmu hbox {m}), narrow (0.5-0.7 \\upmu hbox {m}), and long (340-460 \\upmu hbox {m}) SiN legs and show Tc of {˜ }93 hbox {mK} and Rn of {˜ }158 hbox {m}{Ω }. These TESs were characterized under AC bias using our frequency-division multiplexing readout (1-3 MHz) system. TESs without the absorber show NEPs as low as 1.1 × 10^{-19} hbox {W}/√{{ {Hz}}} with a reasonable response speed ({<}1 hbox {ms}), which achieved the phonon noise limit. For TESs with the absorber, we confirmed a higher hbox {NEP}_{el} ({˜ }5 × 10^{-19} hbox {W}/√{{ {Hz}}}) than that of TESs without the absorber likely due to stray light. The lowest NEP can make the new version of SAFARI with a grating spectrometer feasible.

  12. Evaluation of a Low-Noise Formate Spiral-Bevel Gear Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David g.; Woods, Ron L.; Litvin, Faydor L.; Fuentes, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    Studies to evaluate low-noise Formate spiral-bevel gears were performed. Experimental tests were performed on the OH-58D helicopter main-rotor transmission in the NASA Glenn 500-hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. Low-noise Formate spiral-bevel gears were compared to the baseline OH-58D spiral-bevel gear design, a high-strength design, and previously tested low-noise designs (including an original low-noise design and an improved-bearing-contact low-noise design). Noise, vibration, and tooth strain tests were performed. The Formate design showed a decrease in noise and vibration compared to the baseline OH-58D design, and was similar to that of the previously tested improved-bearing contact low-noise design. The pinion tooth stresses for the Formate design significantly decreased in comparison to the baseline OH-58D design. Also similar to that of the improved bearing-contact low-noise design, the maximum stresses of the Formate design shifted toward the heel, compared to the center of the face width for the baseline, high-strength, and previously tested low-noise designs.

  13. Low noise preamplifier ASIC for the PANDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemming, H.; Wieczorek, P.

    2011-12-01

    For the electromagnetic calorimeter of the PANDA detector a preamplifier ASIC named APFEL (ASIC for Panda Front-end ELectronics) has been developed at GSI. It is optimized for the readout of large area avalanche photodiodes (LAAPDs) with a capacitance of 300 pF and an event rate of 350 kHz. The ASIC has two equivalent analog channels each consisting of a charge sensitive amplifier, a shaper stage and differential output drivers. For operating the ASIC in a wide temperature range programmable voltage references are implemented on chip.

  14. CMOS front end electronics for the ATLAS muon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Huth, J.; Oliver, J.; Hazen, E.; Shank, J.

    1997-12-31

    An all-CMOS design for an integrated ASD (Amplifier-Shaper-Discriminator) chip for readout of the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tubes (MDTs) is presented. Eight channels of charge-sensitive preamp, two-stage pole/zero shaper, Wilkinson ADC and discriminator with programmable hysteresis are integrated on a single IC. Key elements have been prototyped in 1.2 and 0.5 micron CMOS operating at 5V and 3.3V respectively.

  15. A discrete component low-noise preamplifier readout for a linear (1×16) SiC photodiode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahle, Duncan; Aslam, Shahid; Herrero, Federico A.; Waczynski, Augustyn

    2016-09-01

    A compact, low-noise and inexpensive preamplifier circuit has been designed and fabricated to optimally readout a common cathode (1×16) channel 4H-SiC Schottky photodiode array for use in ultraviolet experiments. The readout uses an operational amplifier with 10 pF capacitor in the feedback loop in parallel with a low leakage switch for each of the channels. This circuit configuration allows for reiterative sample, integrate and reset. A sampling technique is given to remove Johnson noise, enabling a femtoampere level readout noise performance. Commercial-off-the-shelf acquisition electronics are used to digitize the preamplifier analog signals. The data logging acquisition electronics has a different integration circuit, which allows the bandwidth and gain to be independently adjusted. Using this readout, photoresponse measurements across the array between spectral wavelengths 200 nm and 370 nm are made to establish the array pixels external quantum efficiency, current responsivity and noise equivalent power.

  16. CMOS Detector Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Alan; Loose, Markus; Suntharalingam, Vyshnavi

    2005-01-01

    An entry level overview of state-of-the-art CMOS detector technology is presented. Operating principles and system architecture are explained in comparison to the well-established CCD technology, followed by a discussion of important benefits of modern CMOS-based detector arrays. A number of unique CMOS features including different shutter modes and scanning concepts are described. In addition, sub-field stitching is presented as a technique for producing very large imagers. After a brief introduction to the concept of monolithic CMOS sensors, hybrid detectors technology is introduced. A comparison of noise reduction methods for CMOS hybrids is presented. The final sections review CMOS fabrication processes for monolithic and vertically integrated image sensors.

  17. Ambient and Cryogenic, Decade Bandwidth, Low Noise Receiving System for Radio Astronomy Using Sinuous Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawande, Rohit Sudhir

    Traditionally, radio astronomy receivers have been limited to bandwidths less than an octave, and as a result multiple feeds and receivers are necessary to observe over a wide bandwidth. Next generation of instruments for radio astronomy will benefit greatly from reflector antenna feeds that demonstrate very wide instantaneous bandwidth, and exhibit low noise behavior. There is an increasing interest in wideband systems from both the cost and science point of view. A wideband feed will allow simultaneous observations or sweeps over a decade or more bandwidth. Instantaneous wide bandwidth is necessary for detection of short duration pulses. Future telescopes like square kilometer array (SKA), consisting of 2000 to 3000 coherently connected antennas and covering a frequency range of 70 MHz to 30 GHz, will need decade bandwidth single pixel feeds (SPFs) along with integrated LNAs to achieve the scientific objectives in a cost effective way. This dissertation focuses on the design and measurement of a novel decade bandwidth sinuous-type, dual linear polarized, fixed phase center, low loss feed with an integrated LNA. A decade bandwidth, low noise amplifier is specially designed for noise match to the higher terminal impedance encountered by this antenna yielding an improved sensitivity over what is possible with conventional 50 O amplifiers. The self-complementary, frequency independent nature of the planar sinuous geometry results in a nearly constant beam pattern and fixed phase center over more than a 10:1 operating frequency range. In order to eliminate the back-lobe response over such a wide frequency range, we have projected the sinuous pattern onto a cone, and a ground plane is placed directly behind the cone's apex. This inverted, conical geometry assures wide bandwidth operation by locating each sinuous resonator a quarter wavelength above the ground plane. The presence of a ground plane near a self complementary antenna destroys the self complementary nature

  18. A very low noise, high accuracy, programmable voltage source for low frequency noise measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandurra, Graziella; Giusi, Gino; Ciofi, Carmine

    2014-04-01

    In this paper an approach for designing a programmable, very low noise, high accuracy voltage source for biasing devices under test in low frequency noise measurements is proposed. The core of the system is a supercapacitor based two pole low pass filter used for filtering out the noise produced by a standard DA converter down to 100 mHz with an attenuation in excess of 40 dB. The high leakage current of the supercapacitors, however, introduces large DC errors that need to be compensated in order to obtain high accuracy as well as very low output noise. To this end, a proper circuit topology has been developed that allows to considerably reduce the effect of the supercapacitor leakage current on the DC response of the system while maintaining a very low level of output noise. With a proper design an output noise as low as the equivalent input voltage noise of the OP27 operational amplifier, used as the output buffer of the system, can be obtained with DC accuracies better that 0.05% up to the maximum output of 8 V. The expected performances of the proposed voltage source have been confirmed both by means of SPICE simulations and by means of measurements on actual prototypes. Turn on and stabilization times for the system are of the order of a few hundred seconds. These times are fully compatible with noise measurements down to 100 mHz, since measurement times of the order of several tens of minutes are required in any case in order to reduce the statistical error in the measured spectra down to an acceptable level.

  19. A very low noise, high accuracy, programmable voltage source for low frequency noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Scandurra, Graziella; Giusi, Gino; Ciofi, Carmine

    2014-04-01

    In this paper an approach for designing a programmable, very low noise, high accuracy voltage source for biasing devices under test in low frequency noise measurements is proposed. The core of the system is a supercapacitor based two pole low pass filter used for filtering out the noise produced by a standard DA converter down to 100 mHz with an attenuation in excess of 40 dB. The high leakage current of the supercapacitors, however, introduces large DC errors that need to be compensated in order to obtain high accuracy as well as very low output noise. To this end, a proper circuit topology has been developed that allows to considerably reduce the effect of the supercapacitor leakage current on the DC response of the system while maintaining a very low level of output noise. With a proper design an output noise as low as the equivalent input voltage noise of the OP27 operational amplifier, used as the output buffer of the system, can be obtained with DC accuracies better that 0.05% up to the maximum output of 8 V. The expected performances of the proposed voltage source have been confirmed both by means of SPICE simulations and by means of measurements on actual prototypes. Turn on and stabilization times for the system are of the order of a few hundred seconds. These times are fully compatible with noise measurements down to 100 mHz, since measurement times of the order of several tens of minutes are required in any case in order to reduce the statistical error in the measured spectra down to an acceptable level. PMID:24784633

  20. MEMS-based redundancy ring for low-noise millimeter-wave front-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, Patrick; Dubuc, David; Flourens, Federic; Saddaoui, Mohammad; Melle, Samuel; Tackacs, Alex; Tao, Junwu; Aubert, Herve; Boukabache, Ali; Paillot, T.; Blondy, Pierre; Vendier, Olivier; Grenier, Katia M.; Plana, Robert

    2004-08-01

    This paper reports on the investigation of the potentialities of the MEMS technologies to develop innovative microsystem for millimetre wave communication essentially for space applications. One main issue deals with the robustness and the reliability of the equipment as it may difficult to replace or to repair them when a satellite has been launched. One solution deals with the development of redundancy rings that are making the front end more robust. Usually, the architecture of such system involves waveguide or diode technologies, which present severe limitations in term of weight, volume and insertion loss. The concept considered in this paper is to replace some key elements of such system by MEMS based devices (Micromachined transmission lines, switches) in order to optimize both the weight and the microwave performance of the module. A specific technological process has been developed consisting in the fabrication of the devices on a dielectric membrane on air suspended in order to improve the insertion loss and the isolation. To prove the concept, building blocks have been already fabricated and measured (i.e micromachined transmission and filter featuring very low insertion loss, single pole double through circuits to address the appropriate path of the redundancy ring). We have to outline that MEMS technology have allowed a simplification of the architecture and a different system partitioning which gives more degree of freedom for the system designer. Furthermore, it has been conducted an exhaustive reliability study in order to identify the failure mechanisms. Again, from the results obtained, we have proposed an original topology for the SPDT circuit that takes into account the reliability behaviour of the MEMS devices and that allow to prevent most of the failure mechanisms reported so far (mainly related to the dielectric charging effect). Finally, the active device (millimetre wave low noise amplifier) will be reported on the MEMS based chip using

  1. A high-efficiency, low-noise power solution for a dual-channel GNSS RF receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Shi; Taishan, Mo; Jianlian, Le; Yebing, Gan; Chengyan, Ma; Tianchun, Ye

    2012-08-01

    A high-efficiency low-noise power solution for a dual-channel GNSS RF receiver is presented. The power solution involves a DC—DC buck converter and a followed low-dropout regulator (LDO). The pulse-width-modulation (PWM) control method is adopted for better noise performance. An improved low-power high-frequency PWM control circuit is proposed, which halves the average quiescent current of the buck converter to 80 μA by periodically shutting down the OTA. The size of the output stage has also been optimized to achieve high efficiency under a light load condition. In addition, a novel soft-start circuit based on a current limiter has been implemented to avoid inrush current. Fabricated with commercial 180-nm CMOS technology, the DC—DC converter achieves a peak efficiency of 93.1% under a 2 MHz working frequency. The whole receiver consumes only 20.2 mA from a 3.3 V power supply and has a noise figure of 2.5 dB.

  2. Low-noise custom VLSI for CdZnTe pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Walter R.; Burnham, Jill A.; Harrison, Fiona A.

    1998-11-01

    A custom analog VLSI chip is being developed for the readout of pixelated CdZnTe detectors in the focal plane of an astronomical hard x-ray telescope. The chip is intended for indium bump bonding to a pixel detector having pitch near 0.5 mm. A complete precision analog signal processing chain, including charge sensitive preamplifier, shaping amplifiers and peak detect and hold circuit, is provided for each pixel. Here we describe the circuitry and discus the performance of a functional prototype fabricated in a 1.2 micrometers CMOS process at Orbit Semiconductor. Dynamic performance is found to be close to SPICE model predictions over a self-triggering range extending from 1 to 50 keV. Integral non-linearity and noise while acceptable ar not as god as predicted. Power consumption is only 250 uW per pixel. Layout and design techniques are discussed which permit successful self-triggering operation at the low 1 keV threshold.

  3. On noise in time-delay integration CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levski, Deyan; Choubey, Bhaskar

    2016-05-01

    Time delay integration sensors are of increasing interest in CMOS processes owing to their low cost, power and ability to integrate with other circuit readout blocks. This paper presents an analysis of the noise contributors in current day CMOS Time-Delay-Integration image sensors with various readout architectures. An analysis of charge versus voltage domain readout modes is presented, followed by a noise classification of the existing Analog Accumulator Readout (AAR) and Digital Accumulator Readout (DAR) schemes for TDI imaging. The analysis and classification of existing readout schemes include, pipelined charge transfer, buffered direct injection, voltage as well as current-mode analog accumulators and all-digital accumulator techniques. Time-Delay-Integration imaging modes in CMOS processes typically use an N-number of readout steps, equivalent to the number of TDI pixel stages. In CMOS TDI sensors, where voltage domain readout is used, the requirements over speed and noise of the ADC readout chain are increased due to accumulation of the dominant voltage readout and ADC noise with every stage N. Until this day, the latter is the primary reason for a leap-back of CMOS TDI sensors as compared to their CCD counterparts. Moreover, most commercial CMOS TDI implementations are still based on a charge-domain readout, mimicking a CCD-like operation mode. Thus, having a good understanding of each noise contributor in the signal chain, as well as its magnitude in different readout architectures, is vital for the design of future generation low-noise CMOS TDI image sensors based on a voltage domain readout. This paper gives a quantitative classification of all major noise sources for all popular implementations in the literature.

  4. On noise in time-delay integration CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levski, Deyan; Choubey, Bhaskar

    2016-05-01

    Time delay integration sensors are of increasing interest in CMOS processes owing to their low cost, power and ability to integrate with other circuit readout blocks. This paper presents an analysis of the noise contributors in current day CMOS Time-Delay-Integration image sensors with various readout architectures. An analysis of charge versus voltage domain readout modes is presented, followed by a noise classification of the existing Analog Accumulator Readout (AAR) and Digital Accumulator Readout (DAR) schemes for TDI imaging. The analysis and classification of existing readout schemes include, pipelined charge transfer, buffered direct injection, voltage as well as current-mode analog accumulators and all-digital accumulator techniques. Time-Delay-Integration imaging modes in CMOS processes typically use an N-number of readout steps, equivalent to the number of TDI pixel stages. In CMOS TDI sensors, where voltage domain readout is used, the requirements over speed and noise of the ADC readout chain are increased due to accumulation of the dominant voltage readout and ADC noise with every stage N. Until this day, the latter is the primary reason for a leap-back of CMOS TDI sensors as compared to their CCD counterparts. Moreover, most commercial CMOS TDI implementations are still based on a charge-domain readout, mimicking a CCD-like operation mode. Thus, having a good understanding of each noise contributor in the signal chain, as well as its magnitude in different readout architectures, is vital for the design of future generation low-noise CMOS TDI image sensors based on a voltage domain readout. This paper gives a quantitative classification of all major noise sources for all popular implementations in the literature.

  5. Design and optimization of BCCD in CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing; Li, Yi; Gao, Zhi-yuan; Luo, Tao

    2016-09-01

    This paper optimizes the buried channel charge-coupled device (BCCD) structure fabricated by complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The optimized BCCD has advantages of low noise, high integration and high image quality. The charge transfer process shows that interface traps, weak fringing fields and potential well between adjacent gates all cause the decrease of charge transfer efficiency ( CTE). CTE and well capacity are simulated with different operating voltages and gap sizes. CTE can achieve 99.999% and the well capacity reaches up to 25 000 electrons for the gap size of 130 nm and the maximum operating voltage of 3 V.

  6. PULSE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-06-17

    The improvement of pulse amplifiers used with scintillation detectors is described. The pulse amplifier circuit has the advantage of reducing the harmful effects of overloading cause by large signal inputs. In general the pulse amplifier circuit comprises two amplifier tubes with the input pulses applied to one amplifier grid and coupled to the second amplifier tube through a common cathode load. The output of the second amplifier is coupled from the plate circuit to a cathode follower tube grid and a diode tube in connected from grid to cathode of the cathode follower tube. Degenerative feedback is provided in the second amplifier by coupling a signal from the cathode follower cathode to the second amplifier grid. The circuit proqides moderate gain stability, and overload protection for subsequent pulse circuits.

  7. Development of a low-noise, 4th-order readout ASIC for CdZnTe detectors in gamma spectrometer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia; Su, Lin; Wei, Xiaomin; Zheng, Ran; Hu, Yann

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an ASIC readout circuit development, which aims to achieve low noise. In order to compensate the leakage current and improve gain, a dual-stage CSA has been utilized. A 4th-order high-linearity shaper is proposed to obtain a Semi-Gaussian wave and further decrease the noise induced by the leakage current. The ASIC has been designed and fabricated in a standard commercial 2P4M 0.35 μm CMOS process. Die area of one channel is about 1190 μm×147 μm. The input charge range is 1.8 fC. The peaking time can be adjusted from 1 μs to 3 μs. Measured ENC is about 55e- (rms) at input capacitor of 0 F. The gain is 271 mV/fC at the peaking time of 1 μs.

  8. Ultra-low-noise EEG/MEG systems enable bimodal non-invasive detection of spike-like human somatosensory evoked responses at 1 kHz.

    PubMed

    Fedele, T; Scheer, H J; Burghoff, M; Curio, G; Körber, R

    2015-02-01

    Non-invasive EEG detection of very high frequency somatosensory evoked potentials featuring frequencies up to and above 1 kHz has been recently reported. Here, we establish the detectability of such components by combined low-noise EEG/MEG. We recorded SEP/SEF simultaneously using median nerve stimulation in five healthy human subjects inside an electromagnetically shielded room, combining a low-noise EEG custom-made amplifier (4.7 nV/√Hz) and a custom-made single-channel low-noise MEG (0.5 fT/√Hz @ 1 kHz). Both, low-noise EEG and MEG revealed three spectrally distinct and temporally overlapping evoked components: N20 (<100 Hz), sigma-burst (450-750 Hz), and kappa-burst (850-1200 Hz). The two recording modalities showed similar relative scaling of signal amplitude in all three frequencies domains (EEG [10 nV] ≅ MEG [1 fT]). Pronounced waveform (peak-by-peak) overlap of EEG and MEG signals is observed in the sigma band, whereas in the kappa band overlap was only partial. A decreasing signal-to-noise ratio (SNR; calculated for n = 12.000 averages) from sigma to kappa components characterizes both, electric and magnetic field recordings: Sigma-band SNR was 12.9  ±  5.5/19.8  ±  12.6 for EEG/MEG, and kappa-band SNR at 3.77  ±  0.8/4.5  ±  2.9. High-frequency performance of a tailor-made MEG matches closely with simultaneously recorded low-noise EEG for the non-invasive detection of somatosensory evoked activity at and above 1 kHz. Thus, future multi-channel dual-mode low-noise technology could offer complementary views for source reconstruction of the neural generators underlying such high-frequency responses, and render neural high-frequency processes related to multi-unit spike discharges accessible in non-invasive recordings.

  9. Inertia Wheel on Low-Noise Active Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are particularly suited for space applications for a number of reasons: - they are ideally suited for vacuum applications; - the lack of lubrication and wear enhances the reliability and guaranties a long maintenance-free operation - the low drag torque decreases power consumption and reduces the torque exerted on the stator of the machine. - the possibility of insulating actively the spacecraft from the excitation due to unbalance of the rotating system In the case of reaction wheels, a well designed magnetic suspension allows high speed operation with a very low power consumption and vibration level. Conversely, microgravity (and possibly vacuum) operation is an advantage for magnetic bearings. The absence of static forces allows to operate with low current levels, thus reducing electrical noise and allowing to reach even lower vibration levels than in Earth applications of magnetic bearings. Active magnetic bearings (AMB) allow to adapt the working characteristics of the system to the operating needs: it is possible to use the actuators to lock the system during launch (absence of grabbers) and to stiffen the suspension when the spacecraft is accelerated (impulsive phases), while working in conditions optimised for microgravity when this is needed. Magnetic suspension systems designed for microgravity environment cannot be correctly tested on the ground. Testing in ground conditions results in the need of grossly overdesigning the levitation device; furthermore, in some cases ground testing is completely impossible, if not by introducing devices which compensate for the Earth gravitational field. If the compensation for the gravitational force is supplied by the same actuators used for microgravity operation, the actuators and the power amplifiers must be overdesigned and in some cases the suspension can be altogether impossible. They work in conditions which are much different from nominal ones and, above all, it is impossible to reach the

  10. A 90 GHz Amplifier Assembled Using Flip-Chip Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, L.; Pinsukanjana, P.; Gaier, T.; Smith, R.; Ksendzov, A.; Fitzsimmons, M.; Martin, S.; Lai, R.

    1999-01-01

    This letter reports the performance of a novel single-stage W-band amplifier fabricated utilizing flip-chip bump-bonding. We have bump-bonded a high-speed, low-noise InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) device onto a separately fabricated passive circuit having a GaAs substrate.

  11. A travelling-wave parametric amplifier utilizing Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeny, M.; Mahler, R.

    1985-03-01

    Josephson junction parametric amplifiers of travelling-wave design have been designed for use as low-noise millimeter wave amplifiers. These devices have non-reciprocal gain, very wide bandwidths, power dissipations of a few tens of nanowatts, and an input impedance that can be as high as 50 ohms. The design is described and performance estimates, based on a small-signal model, are summarized.

  12. An amplifier for VUV photomultiplier operating in cryogenic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Dahal, S.; Di Giovanni, A.; d`Inzeo, M.; Franchi, G.; Pazos Clemens, L.

    2016-07-01

    We present the characterisation of an amplifier potentially interesting for noble liquid detectors. The design has been conceived considering the requirements of low power consumption (less than 30 mW), low noise, amplification factor of 10 at 100 MHz and use of commercial components. The amplifier has been integrated onto an electronic board with a voltage divider to operate an Hamamatsu R11410 photomultiplier tube (used in XENON1T, Aprile et al. (2014) [1] dark matter experiment).

  13. LOGARITHMIC AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    De Shong, J.A. Jr.

    1957-12-31

    A logarithmic current amplifier circuit having a high sensitivity and fast response is described. The inventor discovered the time constant of the input circuit of a system utilizing a feedback amplifier, ionization chamber, and a diode, is inversely proportional to the input current, and that the amplifier becomes unstable in amplifying signals in the upper frequency range when the amplifier's forward gain time constant equals the input circuit time constant. The described device incorporates impedance networks having low frequency response characteristic at various points in the circuit to change the forward gain of the amplifler at a rate of 0.7 of the gain magnitude for every two times increased in frequency. As a result of this improvement, the time constant of the input circuit is greatly reduced at high frequencies, and the amplifier response is increased.

  14. Reducing Printed Circuit Board Emissions with Low-Noise Design Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Fowler, Jennifer; Yavoich, Brian J.; Jennings, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experiment designed to determine the effectiveness of adopting several low-noise printed circuit board (PCB) design practices. Two boards were designed and fabricated, each consisting of identical mixed signal circuitry. Several important differences were introduced between the board layouts: one board was constructed using recommended low-noise practices and the other constructed without such attention. The emissions from the two boards were then measured and compared, demonstrating an improvement in radiated emissions of up to 22 dB.

  15. Monolithic CMOS imaging x-ray spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenter, Almus; Kraft, Ralph; Gauron, Thomas; Murray, Stephen S.

    2014-07-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in collaboration with SRI/Sarnoff is developing monolithic CMOS detectors optimized for x-ray astronomy. The goal of this multi-year program is to produce CMOS x-ray imaging spectrometers that are Fano noise limited over the 0.1-10keV energy band while incorporating the many benefits of CMOS technology. These benefits include: low power consumption, radiation "hardness", high levels of integration, and very high read rates. Small format test devices from a previous wafer fabrication run (2011-2012) have recently been back-thinned and tested for response below 1keV. These devices perform as expected in regards to dark current, read noise, spectral response and Quantum Efficiency (QE). We demonstrate that running these devices at rates ~> 1Mpix/second eliminates the need for cooling as shot noise from any dark current is greatly mitigated. The test devices were fabricated on 15μm, high resistivity custom (~30kΩ-cm) epitaxial silicon and have a 16 by 192 pixel format. They incorporate 16μm pitch, 6 Transistor Pinned Photo Diode (6TPPD) pixels which have ~40μV/electron sensitivity and a highly parallel analog CDS signal chain. Newer, improved, lower noise detectors have just been fabricated (October 2013). These new detectors are fabricated on 9μm epitaxial silicon and have a 1k by 1k format. They incorporate similar 16μm pitch, 6TPPD pixels but have ~ 50% higher sensitivity and much (3×) lower read noise. These new detectors have undergone preliminary testing for functionality in Front Illuminated (FI) form and are presently being prepared for back thinning and packaging. Monolithic CMOS devices such as these, would be ideal candidate detectors for the focal planes of Solar, planetary and other space-borne x-ray astronomy missions. The high through-put, low noise and excellent low energy response, provide high dynamic range and good time resolution; bright, time varying x-ray features could be temporally and

  16. Operational Amplifiers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxcroft, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the introduction of low cost equipment into high school and college physical science classes. Examines the properties of an "ideal" operational amplifier and discusses how it might be used under saturated and non-saturated conditions. Notes the action of a "real" operational amplifier. (TW)

  17. Amplifier Distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeports, David

    2006-12-01

    By definition, a high fidelity amplifier's instantaneous output voltage is directly proportional to its instantaneous input voltage. While high fidelity is generally valued in the amplification of recorded music, nonlinearity, also known as distortion, is desirable in the amplification of some musical instruments. In particular, guitar amplifiers exploit nonlinearity to increase both the harmonic content and sustain of a guitar's sound. I will discuss how both modifications in sound result from saturation of triode tubes and transistors. Additionally, I will describe the difference in the symmetry of saturation curves for transistors and tubes and the reason why tube guitar amplifiers are generally considered to be superior to solid-state amplifiers. Finally, I will discuss attempts to use solid-state electronics to replicate the sound of tube amplifiers.

  18. Single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS front-end system for real-time volumetric IVUS and ICE imaging.

    PubMed

    Gurun, Gokce; Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Xu, Toby; Satir, Sarp; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Jennifer; Degertekin, F Levent

    2014-02-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echography (ICE) catheters with real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging capability can provide unique benefits to many interventional procedures used in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary and structural heart diseases. Integration of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays with front-end electronics in single-chip configuration allows for implementation of such catheter probes with reduced interconnect complexity, miniaturization, and high mechanical flexibility. We implemented a single-chip forward-looking (FL) ultrasound imaging system by fabricating a 1.4-mm-diameter dual-ring CMUT array using CMUT-on-CMOS technology on a front-end IC implemented in 0.35-μm CMOS process. The dual-ring array has 56 transmit elements and 48 receive elements on two separate concentric annular rings. The IC incorporates a 25-V pulser for each transmitter and a low-noise capacitive transimpedance amplifier (TIA) for each receiver, along with digital control and smart power management. The final shape of the silicon chip is a 1.5-mm-diameter donut with a 430-μm center hole for a guide wire. The overall front-end system requires only 13 external connections and provides 4 parallel RF outputs while consuming an average power of 20 mW. We measured RF A-scans from the integrated single- chip array which show full functionality at 20.1 MHz with 43% fractional bandwidth. We also tested and demonstrated the image quality of the system on a wire phantom and an ex vivo chicken heart sample. The measured axial and lateral point resolutions are 92 μm and 251 μm, respectively. We successfully acquired volumetric imaging data from the ex vivo chicken heart at 60 frames per second without any signal averaging. These demonstrative results indicate that single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS systems have the potential to produce realtime volumetric images with image quality and speed suitable for catheter-based clinical applications.

  19. Single-Chip CMUT-on-CMOS Front-End System for Real-Time Volumetric IVUS and ICE Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gurun, Gokce; Tekes, Coskun; Zahorian, Jaime; Xu, Toby; Satir, Sarp; Karaman, Mustafa; Hasler, Jennifer; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echography (ICE) catheters with real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging capability can provide unique benefits to many interventional procedures used in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary and structural heart diseases. Integration of CMUT arrays with front-end electronics in single-chip configuration allows for implementation of such catheter probes with reduced interconnect complexity, miniaturization, and high mechanical flexibility. We implemented a single-chip forward-looking (FL) ultrasound imaging system by fabricating a 1.4-mm-diameter dual-ring CMUT array using CMUT-on-CMOS technology on a front-end IC implemented in 0.35-µm CMOS process. The dual-ring array has 56 transmit elements and 48 receive elements on two separate concentric annular rings. The IC incorporates a 25-V pulser for each transmitter and a low-noise capacitive transimpedance amplifier (TIA) for each receiver, along with digital control and smart power management. The final shape of the silicon chip is a 1.5-mm-diameter donut with a 430-µm center hole for a guide wire. The overall front-end system requires only 13 external connections and provides 4 parallel RF outputs while consuming an average power of 20 mW. We measured RF A-scans from the integrated single-chip array which show full functionality at 20.1 MHz with 43% fractional bandwidth. We also tested and demonstrated the image quality of the system on a wire phantom and an ex-vivo chicken heart sample. The measured axial and lateral point resolutions are 92 µm and 251 µm, respectively. We successfully acquired volumetric imaging data from the ex-vivo chicken heart with 60 frames per second without any signal averaging. These demonstrative results indicate that single-chip CMUT-on-CMOS systems have the potential to produce real-time volumetric images with image quality and speed suitable for catheter based clinical applications. PMID:24474131

  20. Delta-Doped Back-Illuminated CMOS Imaging Arrays: Progress and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Jones, Todd J.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Greer, Frank; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Blazejewski, Edward; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report the latest results on our development of delta-doped, thinned, back-illuminated CMOS imaging arrays. As with charge-coupled devices, thinning and back-illumination are essential to the development of high performance CMOS imaging arrays. Problems with back surface passivation have emerged as critical to the prospects for incorporating CMOS imaging arrays into high performance scientific instruments, just as they did for CCDs over twenty years ago. In the early 1990's, JPL developed delta-doped CCDs, in which low temperature molecular beam epitaxy was used to form an ideal passivation layer on the silicon back surface. Comprising only a few nanometers of highly-doped epitaxial silicon, delta-doping achieves the stability and uniformity that are essential for high performance imaging and spectroscopy. Delta-doped CCDs were shown to have high, stable, and uniform quantum efficiency across the entire spectral range from the extreme ultraviolet through the near infrared. JPL has recently bump-bonded thinned, delta-doped CMOS imaging arrays to a CMOS readout, and demonstrated imaging. Delta-doped CMOS devices exhibit the high quantum efficiency that has become the standard for scientific-grade CCDs. Together with new circuit designs for low-noise readout currently under development, delta-doping expands the potential scientific applications of CMOS imaging arrays, and brings within reach important new capabilities, such as fast, high-sensitivity imaging with parallel readout and real-time signal processing. It remains to demonstrate manufacturability of delta-doped CMOS imaging arrays. To that end, JPL has acquired a new silicon MBE and ancillary equipment for delta-doping wafers up to 200mm in diameter, and is now developing processes for high-throughput, high yield delta-doping of fully-processed wafers with CCD and CMOS imaging devices.

  1. Development of a low noise induction magnetic sensor using magnetic flux negative feedback in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, X G; Shang, X L; Lin, J

    2016-05-01

    Time-domain electromagnetic system can implement great depth detection. As for the electromagnetic system, the receiver utilized an air coil sensor, and the matching mode of the sensor employed the resistance matching method. By using the resistance matching method, the vibration of the coil in the time domain can be effectively controlled. However, the noise of the sensor, especially the noise at the resonance frequency, will be increased as well. In this paper, a novel design of a low noise induction coil sensor is proposed, and the experimental data and noise characteristics are provided. The sensor is designed based on the principle that the amplified voltage will be converted to current under the influence of the feedback resistance of the coil. The feedback loop around the induction coil exerts a magnetic field and sends the negative feedback signal to the sensor. The paper analyses the influence of the closed magnetic feedback loop on both the bandwidth and the noise of the sensor. The signal-to-noise ratio is improved dramatically.

  2. Development of a low noise induction magnetic sensor using magnetic flux negative feedback in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, X G; Shang, X L; Lin, J

    2016-05-01

    Time-domain electromagnetic system can implement great depth detection. As for the electromagnetic system, the receiver utilized an air coil sensor, and the matching mode of the sensor employed the resistance matching method. By using the resistance matching method, the vibration of the coil in the time domain can be effectively controlled. However, the noise of the sensor, especially the noise at the resonance frequency, will be increased as well. In this paper, a novel design of a low noise induction coil sensor is proposed, and the experimental data and noise characteristics are provided. The sensor is designed based on the principle that the amplified voltage will be converted to current under the influence of the feedback resistance of the coil. The feedback loop around the induction coil exerts a magnetic field and sends the negative feedback signal to the sensor. The paper analyses the influence of the closed magnetic feedback loop on both the bandwidth and the noise of the sensor. The signal-to-noise ratio is improved dramatically. PMID:27250444

  3. Broadband Characterization of a 100 to 180 GHz Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Deal, W. R.; Mei, X. B.; Lai, R.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric science and weather forecasting require measurements of the temperature and humidity vs. altitude. These sounding measurements are obtained at frequencies close to the resonance frequencies of oxygen (118 GHz) and water (183 GHz) molecules. We have characterized a broadband amplifier that will increase the sensitivity of sounding and other instruments at these frequencies. This study demonstrated for the first t1me continuous low noise amplification from 100 to 180 GHz. The measured InP monolithic millimeter-wave Integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier had more than 18 dB of gain from 100 to 180 GHz and 15 dB of gain up to 220 GHz. This is the widest bandwidth low noise amplifier result at these frequencies to date. The circuit was fabricated in Northrop Grumman Corporation 35 nm InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT).

  4. Gyromagnetron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Y.-Y.; Barnett, L. R.

    1985-10-29

    A gyromagnetron amplifier for radiation at millimeter wavelengths comprising a tapered waveguide tube with longitudinally running vanes in the walls of the tube with the number of vanes chosen to coincide with a desired cyclotron harmonic frequency to be amplified. A beam of spiralling mildly relativistic electrons with an energy of 100 keV or less is directed into the small end of the tapered waveguide tube. A tapered axial magnetic field is set up within the waveguide tube with a low value appropriate to the amplification of a cyclotron harmonic frequency. An electromagnetic wave to be amplified is launched into the waveguide tube to co-propagate and be amplified by the spiralling electron beam. This device is characterized by a wide bandwidth, a low operating magnetic field, a relatively low operating beam voltage, with high power, and the capability of continuous wave operation.

  5. Noise sources and noise suppression in CMOS imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Hancock, Bruce R.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanisms for noise coupling in CMOS imagers are complex, since unlike a CCD, a CMOS imager has to be considered as a full digital-system-on-a-chip, with a highly sensitive front-end. In this paper, we analyze the noise sources in a photodiode CMOS imager, and model their propagation through the signal chain to determine the nature and magnitude of noise coupling. We present methods for reduction of noise, and present measured data to show their viability. For temporal read noise reduction, we present pixel signal chain design techniques to achieve near 2 electrons read noise. We model the front-end reset noise both for conventional photodiode and CTIA type of pixels. For the suppression of reset noise, we present a column feedback-reset method to reduce reset noise below 6 electrons. For spatial noise reduction, we present the design of column signal chain that suppresses both spatial noise and power supply coupling noise. We conclude by identifying problems in low-noise design caused by dark current spatial distribution.

  6. Jet Propulsion Laboratory/NASA Lewis Research Center space qualified hybrid high temperature superconducting/semiconducting 7.4 GHz low-noise downconverter for NRL HTSSE-II program

    SciTech Connect

    Javadi, H.H.S.; Bowen, J.G.; Rascoe, D.L.; Romanofsky, R.R.; Bhasin, K.B.; Chorey, C.M.

    1996-07-01

    A deep space satellite downconverter receiver was proposed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) for the Naval Research Laboratory`s (NRL) high temperature superconductivity space experiment, phase-II (HTSSE-II) program. Space qualified low-noise cryogenic downconverter receivers utilizing thin-film high temperature superconducting (HTS) passive circuitry and semiconductor active devices were developed and delivered to NRL. The downconverter consists of an HTS preselect filter, a cryogenic low-noise amplifier, a cryogenic mixer, and a cryogenic oscillator with an HTS resonator. HTS components were inserted as the front-end filter and the local oscillator resonator for their superior 77 K performance over the conventional components. The semiconducting low noise amplifier also benefited from cooling to 77 K. The mixer was designed specifically for cryogenic applications and provided low conversion loss and low power consumption. In addition to an engineering model, two space qualified units (qualification, flight) were built and delivered to NRL. Manufacturing, integration and test of the space qualified downconverters adhered to the requirements of JPL class-D space instruments and partially to MIL-STD-883D specifications. The qualification unit has {approximately}50 K system noise temperature which is a factor of three better than a conventional downconverter at room temperature.

  7. Miniature Low-Noise G-Band I-Q Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Pukala, David M.; Gaier, Todd C.; Tanner, Alan B.; O'Dwyer, Ian J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjom H.; Soria, Mary M.; Owen, Heather R.; Lai, Richard; Mei, Xiaobing

    2010-01-01

    Weather forecasting, hurricane tracking, and atmospheric science applications depend on humidity sounding of atmosphere. Current instruments provide these measurements from groundbased, airborne, and low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites by measuring radiometric temperature on the flanks of the 183-GHz water vapor line. Miniature, low-noise receivers have been designed that will enable these measurements from a geostationary, thinned array sounder, which is based on hundreds of low-noise receivers that convert the 180-GHz signal directly to baseband in-phase and in-quadrature signals for digitization and correlation. The developed receivers provide a noise temperature of 450 K from 165 to 183 GHz (NF = 4.1 dB), and have a mass of 3 g while consuming 24 mW of power. These are the most sensitive broadband I-Q receivers at this frequency range that operate at room temperature, and are significantly lower in mass and power consumption than previously reported receivers.

  8. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  9. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-15

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17 fm/{radical}(Hz) by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  10. Fluids and Combustion Facility Acoustic Emissions Controlled by Aggressive Low-Noise Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Beth A.; Young, Judith A.

    2004-01-01

    The Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) is a dual-rack microgravity research facility that is being developed by Northrop Grumman Information Technology (NGIT) for the International Space Station (ISS) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. As an on-orbit test bed, FCF will host a succession of experiments in fluid and combustion physics. The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) must meet ISS acoustic emission requirements (ref. 1), which support speech communication and hearing-loss-prevention goals for ISS crew. To meet these requirements, the NGIT acoustics team implemented an aggressive low-noise design effort that incorporated frequent acoustic emission testing for all internal noise sources, larger-scale systems, and fully integrated racks (ref. 2). Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ref. 3) provided acoustical testing services (see the following photograph) as well as specialized acoustical engineering support as part of the low-noise design process (ref. 4).

  11. Improved PHIP polarization using a precision, low noise, voltage controlled current source.

    PubMed

    Agraz, Jose; Grunfeld, Alexander; Cunningham, Karl; Li, Debiao; Wagner, Shawn

    2013-10-01

    Existing para-hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) instrumentation relies on magnetic fields to hyperpolarize substances. These hyperpolarized substances have enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals over 10,000 fold, allowing for MRI at the molecular level. Required magnetic fields are generated by energizing a solenoid coil with current produced by a voltage controlled voltage source (VCVS), also known as a power supply. A VCVS lacks the current regulation necessary to keep magnetic field fluctuations to a minimum, which results in low PHIP polarization. A voltage controlled current source (VCCS) is an electric circuit that generates a steady flow of electrons proportional to an input voltage. A low noise VCCS provides the solenoid current flow regulation necessary to generate a stable static magnetic field (Bo). We discuss the design and implementation of a low noise, high stability, VCCS for magnetic field generation with minimum variations. We show that a precision, low noise, voltage reference driving a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) based current sink, results in the current flow control necessary for generating a low noise and high stability Bo. In addition, this work: (1) compares current stability for ideal VCVS and VCCS models using transfer functions (TF), (2) develops our VCCS design's TF, (3) measures our VCCS design's thermal & 1/f noise, and (4) measures and compares hydroxyethyl-propionate (HEP) polarization obtained using a VCVS and our VCCS. The hyperpolarization of HEP was done using a PHIP instrument developed in our lab. Using our VCCS design, HEP polarization magnitude data show a statistically significant increase in polarization over using a VCVS. Circuit schematic, bill of materials, board layout, TF derivation, and Matlab simulations code are included as supplemental files.

  12. Improved PHIP polarization using a precision, low noise, voltage controlled current source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agraz, Jose; Grunfeld, Alexander; Cunningham, Karl; Li, Debiao; Wagner, Shawn

    2013-10-01

    Existing para-hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) instrumentation relies on magnetic fields to hyperpolarize substances. These hyperpolarized substances have enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals over 10,000 fold, allowing for MRI at the molecular level. Required magnetic fields are generated by energizing a solenoid coil with current produced by a voltage controlled voltage source (VCVS), also known as a power supply. A VCVS lacks the current regulation necessary to keep magnetic field fluctuations to a minimum, which results in low PHIP polarization. A voltage controlled current source (VCCS) is an electric circuit that generates a steady flow of electrons proportional to an input voltage. A low noise VCCS provides the solenoid current flow regulation necessary to generate a stable static magnetic field (Bo). We discuss the design and implementation of a low noise, high stability, VCCS for magnetic field generation with minimum variations. We show that a precision, low noise, voltage reference driving a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) based current sink, results in the current flow control necessary for generating a low noise and high stability Bo. In addition, this work: (1) compares current stability for ideal VCVS and VCCS models using transfer functions (TF), (2) develops our VCCS design's TF, (3) measures our VCCS design's thermal & 1/f noise, and (4) measures and compares hydroxyethyl-propionate (HEP) polarization obtained using a VCVS and our VCCS. The hyperpolarization of HEP was done using a PHIP instrument developed in our lab. Using our VCCS design, HEP polarization magnitude data show a statistically significant increase in polarization over using a VCVS. Circuit schematic, bill of materials, board layout, TF derivation, and Matlab simulations code are included as supplemental files.

  13. Improved PHIP polarization using a precision, low noise, voltage controlled current source.

    PubMed

    Agraz, Jose; Grunfeld, Alexander; Cunningham, Karl; Li, Debiao; Wagner, Shawn

    2013-10-01

    Existing para-hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) instrumentation relies on magnetic fields to hyperpolarize substances. These hyperpolarized substances have enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals over 10,000 fold, allowing for MRI at the molecular level. Required magnetic fields are generated by energizing a solenoid coil with current produced by a voltage controlled voltage source (VCVS), also known as a power supply. A VCVS lacks the current regulation necessary to keep magnetic field fluctuations to a minimum, which results in low PHIP polarization. A voltage controlled current source (VCCS) is an electric circuit that generates a steady flow of electrons proportional to an input voltage. A low noise VCCS provides the solenoid current flow regulation necessary to generate a stable static magnetic field (Bo). We discuss the design and implementation of a low noise, high stability, VCCS for magnetic field generation with minimum variations. We show that a precision, low noise, voltage reference driving a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) based current sink, results in the current flow control necessary for generating a low noise and high stability Bo. In addition, this work: (1) compares current stability for ideal VCVS and VCCS models using transfer functions (TF), (2) develops our VCCS design's TF, (3) measures our VCCS design's thermal & 1/f noise, and (4) measures and compares hydroxyethyl-propionate (HEP) polarization obtained using a VCVS and our VCCS. The hyperpolarization of HEP was done using a PHIP instrument developed in our lab. Using our VCCS design, HEP polarization magnitude data show a statistically significant increase in polarization over using a VCVS. Circuit schematic, bill of materials, board layout, TF derivation, and Matlab simulations code are included as supplemental files. PMID:23988431

  14. Low-noise Josephson mixers at 115 GHz using recyclable point contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taur, Y.; Kerr, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermally recyclable Nb point-contact Josephson junctions are investigated as low-noise mixers with an external local oscillator at 115 GHz. The best single sideband mixer noise temperature achieved is 140 (+ or - 20) K with a single sideband conversion loss of 2.4 (+ or - 0.5) dB. Such rugged junctions are suitable for use in practical receivers and should give unprecedented sensitivity at the shorter millimeter wavelengths.

  15. An Extremely Wide Bandwidth, Low Noise SIS Heterodyne Receiver Design for Millimeter and Submillimeter Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    2004-01-01

    Our group has designed a heterodyne submillimeter receiver that offers a very wide IF bandwidth of 12 GHz, while still maintaining a low noise temperature. The 180-300 GHz double-sideband design uses a single SI5 device excited by a full bandwidth, fixed-tuned waveguide probe on a silicon substrate. The IF output frequency (limited by the MMIC low noise IF preamplifier) is 6-18 GHz. providing an instantaneous RF bandwidth of 24 GHz (double-sideband). Intensive simulations predict that the junction will achieve a conversion loss better than 1-2 dB and a mixer noise temperature of less than 20 K across the band (twice the quantum limit). The single sideband receiver noise temperature goal is 70 K. The wide instantaneous bandwidth and low noise will result in an instrument capable of a variety of important astrophysical and environmental observations beyond the capabilities of current instruments. Lab testing of the receiver will begin this summer, and first light on the CSO should be in the Spring of 2003. At the CSO, we plan to use receiver with WASP2, a wideband spectrometer, to search for spectral lines from SCUBA sources. This approach should allow us to rapidly develop a catalog of redshifts for these objects.

  16. LOGARITHMIC AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.; Stone, R.S.

    1959-03-10

    Electronic,amplifier circuits, especially a logai-ithmic amplifier characterizxed by its greatly improved strability are discussed. According to the in ention, means are provided to feed bach the output valtagee to a diode in the amplifier input circuit, the diode being utilized to produce the logarithmic characteristics. The diode is tics, The diode isition therewith and having its filament operated from thc same source s the filament of the logarithmic diode. A bias current of relatively large value compareii with the signal current is continuously passed through the compiting dioie to render the diode insensitivy to variations in the signal current. by this odes kdu to variaelled, so that the stability of the amlifier will be unimpaired.

  17. Cryogenic low noise and low dissipation multiplexing electronics, using HEMT+SiGe ASICs, for the readout of high impedance sensors: New version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Broïse, Xavier; Lugiez, Francis; Bounab, Ayoub; Le Coguie, Alain

    2015-07-01

    High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs), optimized by CNRS/LPN laboratory for ultra-low noise at very low temperature, have demonstrated their capacity to be used in place of Si JFETs when working temperatures below 100 K are required. We associated them with specific SiGe ASICs that we developed, to implement a complete readout channel able to read highly segmented high impedance detectors within a framework of very low thermal dissipation. Our electronics is dimensioned to read 4096 detection channels, of typically 1 MΩ impedance, and performs 32:1 multiplexing and amplifying, dissipating only 6 mW at 2.5 K and 100 mW at 15 K thanks to high impedance commuting of input stage, with a typical noise of 1 nV/√Hz at 1 kHz.

  18. Bidirectional amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Wright, James T.

    1986-01-01

    A bilateral circuit is operable for transmitting signals in two directions without generation of ringing due to feedback caused by the insertion of the circuit. The circuit may include gain for each of the signals to provide a bidirectional amplifier. The signals are passed through two separate paths, with a unidirectional amplifier in each path. A controlled sampling device is provided in each path for sampling the two signals. Any feedback loop between the two signals is disrupted by providing a phase displacement between the control signals for the two sampling devices.

  19. Bidirectional amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Wright, J.T.

    1984-02-02

    A bilateral circuit is operable for transmitting signals in two directions without generation of ringing due to feedback caused by the insertion of the circuit. The circuit may include gain for each of the signals to provide a bidirectional amplifier. The signals are passed through two separate paths, with a unidirectional amplifier in each path. A controlled sampling device is provided in each path for sampling the two signals. Any feedback loop between the two signals is disrupted by providing a phase displacement between the control signals for the two sampling devices.

  20. Low-power low-noise mixed-mode VLSI ASIC for infinite dynamic range imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, Renato; Hu, Y.; Zinzius, Y.; Colledani, C.; Loge, A.

    1998-11-01

    Solid state solutions for imaging are mainly represented by CCDs and, more recently, by CMOS imagers. Both devices are based on the integration of the total charge generated by the impinging radiation, with no processing of the single photon information. The dynamic range of these devices is intrinsically limited by the finite value of noise. Here we present the design of an architecture which allows efficient, in-pixel, noise reduction to a practically zero level, thus allowing infinite dynamic range imaging. A detailed calculation of the dynamic range is worked out, showing that noise is efficiently suppressed. This architecture is based on the concept of single-photon counting. In each pixel, we integrate both the front-end, low-noise, low-power analog part and the digital part. The former consists of a charge preamplifier, an active filter for optimal noise bandwidth reduction, a buffer and a threshold comparator, and the latter is simply a counter, which can be programmed to act as a normal shift register for the readout of the counters' contents. Two different ASIC's based on this concept have been designed for different applications. The first one has been optimized for silicon edge-on microstrips detectors, used in a digital mammography R and D project. It is a 32-channel circuit, with a 16-bit binary static counter.It has been optimized for a relatively large detector capacitance of 5 pF. Noise has been measured to be equal to 100 + 7*Cd (pF) electron rms with the digital part, showing no degradation of the noise performances with respect to the design values. The power consumption is 3.8mW/channel for a peaking time of about 1 microsecond(s) . The second circuit is a prototype for pixel imaging. The total active area is about (250 micrometers )**2. The main differences of the electronic architecture with respect to the first prototype are: i) different optimization of the analog front-end part for low-capacitance detectors, ii) in- pixel 4-bit comparator

  1. Improved Space Object Observation Techniques Using CMOS Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, T.; Hinze, A.; Schlatter, P.; Silha, J.; Peltonen, J.; Santti, T.; Flohrer, T.

    2013-08-01

    CMOS-sensors, or in general Active Pixel Sensors (APS), are rapidly replacing CCDs in the consumer camera market. Due to significant technological advances during the past years these devices start to compete with CCDs also for demanding scientific imaging applications, in particular in the astronomy community. CMOS detectors offer a series of inherent advantages compared to CCDs, due to the structure of their basic pixel cells, which each contain their own amplifier and readout electronics. The most prominent advantages for space object observations are the extremely fast and flexible readout capabilities, feasibility for electronic shuttering and precise epoch registration, and the potential to perform image processing operations on-chip and in real-time. Presently applied and proposed optical observation strategies for space debris surveys and space surveillance applications had to be analyzed. The major design drivers were identified and potential benefits from using available and future CMOS sensors were assessed. The major challenges and design drivers for ground-based and space-based optical observation strategies have been analyzed. CMOS detector characteristics were critically evaluated and compared with the established CCD technology, especially with respect to the above mentioned observations. Similarly, the desirable on-chip processing functionalities which would further enhance the object detection and image segmentation were identified. Finally, the characteristics of a particular CMOS sensor available at the Zimmerwald observatory were analyzed by performing laboratory test measurements.

  2. Amplified Policymaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Katherine; Woempner, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    This brief examines the policy implications of two drivers of change presented in the "2020 Forecast: Creating the Future of Learning"-- Pattern Recognition and Amplified Organization. These drivers point toward a series of cultural shifts and illuminate how we are developing new ways of organizing, constructing, and managing knowledge.…

  3. A low noise single-transistor transimpedance preamplifier for Fourier-transform mass spectrometry using a T feedback network

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-Yung; Green, Roger J.; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    A novel single-transistor transimpedance preamplifier has been introduced for improving performance in Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. A low noise junction field-effect transistor (JFET), BF862, is used as the main amplification stage of this trans-impedance preamplifier, and a T-shaped feedback network is introduced as both the feedback and the gate biasing solutions. The T feedback network has been studied using an operational amplifier (Op Amp), AD8099. Such a feedback system allows ∼100-fold less feedback resistance at a given transimpedance, hence preserving bandwidth, which is beneficial to applications demanding high gain. The single-transistor preamplifier yields a tested transimpedance of ∼104 Ω (80 dBΩ) in the frequency range between 1 kHz and 1 MHz (mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of around 180-180k for a 12-T FT-ICR system), with a low power consumption of ∼6 mW, which implies that this preamplifier is well suited to a 12-T FT-ICR mass spectrometer. In trading noise performance for higher trans-impedance, an alternative preamplifier design, an AD8099 preamplifier with the T feedback network, has also been studied with a capability of ∼106 Ω (120 dBΩ) transimpedance in the same frequency range. The resistive components in the T feedback network reported here can be replaced by complex impedances, which allows adaptation of this feedback system to other frequency, transimpedance, and noise characteristics for applications not only in other mass spectrometers, such as Orbitrap, time-of-flight (TOF), and ion trap systems, but also in other charge/current detecting systems such as spectroscopy systems, microscopy systems, optical communication systems, or charge-coupled devices (CCDs). PMID:23020394

  4. Low-noise reset technique of an asynchronous charge-pulse-detecting pixel for single-photon X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Sik; Han, Kwan-Young

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a low-noise reset technique of an asynchronous charge-pulse-detecting pixel for single-photon X-ray imaging. The proposed slow-slope ramp (S2R) reset scheme provides a reset-noise-discharging loop circuit and effectively eliminates the residual noise charge stored on the sampling capacitor by extending the falling transition time of the reset signal. In addition, the presented S2R reset signal generation circuit accurately and effectively controls the optimum switching voltage and the falling transition time of the reset signal. The prototype detector chip was implemented by using a 130-nm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. With the quantitative analysis and the measurement results, we were able to verify that the reset noise was reduced exponentially, corresponding to the falling transition time of the reset signal. Based on the chip measurement results, the reset-noise level could be decreased by more than seven-fold by virtue of the proposed reset technique.

  5. Toward VIP-PIX: A Low Noise Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Gamma-Ray Detectors for Use in the Next Generation of PET Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Puigdengoles, Carles; Lorenzo, Gianluca De; Martínez, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    VIP-PIX will be a low noise and low power pixel readout electronics with digital output for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors. The proposed pixel will be part of a 2D pixel-array detector for various types of nuclear medicine imaging devices such as positron-emission tomography (PET) scanners, Compton gamma cameras, and positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanners. Each pixel will include a SAR ADC that provides the energy deposited with 10-bit resolution. Simultaneously, the self-triggered pixel which will be connected to a global time-to-digital converter (TDC) with 1 ns resolution will provide the event’s time stamp. The analog part of the readout chain and the ADC have been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and characterized with an external test pulse. The power consumption of these parts is 200 μW from a 2.5 V supply. It offers 4 switchable gains from ±10 mV/fC to ±40 mV/fC and an input charge dynamic range of up to ±70 fC for the minimum gain for both polarities. Based on noise measurements, the expected equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 65 e− RMS at room temperature. PMID:24187382

  6. Toward VIP-PIX: A Low Noise Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Gamma-Ray Detectors for Use in the Next Generation of PET Scanners.

    PubMed

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Puigdengoles, Carles; Lorenzo, Gianluca De; Martínez, Ricardo

    2013-08-01

    VIP-PIX will be a low noise and low power pixel readout electronics with digital output for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors. The proposed pixel will be part of a 2D pixel-array detector for various types of nuclear medicine imaging devices such as positron-emission tomography (PET) scanners, Compton gamma cameras, and positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanners. Each pixel will include a SAR ADC that provides the energy deposited with 10-bit resolution. Simultaneously, the self-triggered pixel which will be connected to a global time-to-digital converter (TDC) with 1 ns resolution will provide the event's time stamp. The analog part of the readout chain and the ADC have been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and characterized with an external test pulse. The power consumption of these parts is 200 μW from a 2.5 V supply. It offers 4 switchable gains from ±10 mV/fC to ±40 mV/fC and an input charge dynamic range of up to ±70 fC for the minimum gain for both polarities. Based on noise measurements, the expected equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 65 e(-) RMS at room temperature.

  7. Development of a low noise 10 K J-T refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, William A.

    1987-06-01

    This report summarizes work done on the development of a low noise Joule-Thompson, microminiature refrigeration system designed for 10 K operation. Topics discussed include: calculation of phase diagram of mixtures of certain hydrocarbon gases with nitrogen using the Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state, the set up of a magnetron-enhanced sputtering system to allow us to sputter a layer of adhesive on the glass substrates with a much better defined thickness than can be laid down using the older screen printing method, Redesign of H2 Refrigerator Test Stage, Redesign of Mixed Gas Heat Exchanger, Refrigerator Fabrication, Gas Cleaner.

  8. Low noise wing slat system with rigid cove-filled slat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmilovich, Arvin (Inventor); Yadlin, Yoram (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Concepts and technologies described herein provide for a low noise aircraft wing slat system. According to one aspect of the disclosure provided herein, a cove-filled wing slat is used in conjunction with a moveable panel rotatably attached to the wing slat to provide a high lift system. The moveable panel rotates upward against the rear surface of the slat during deployment of the slat, and rotates downward to bridge a gap width between the stowed slat and the lower wing surface, completing the continuous outer mold line shape of the wing, when the cove-filled slat is retracted to the stowed position.

  9. A programmable, low noise, multichannel asic for readout of pixelated amorphous silicon arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, R. J.

    1998-08-01

    Pixelated amorphous silicon arrays used for detecting X-rays have a number of special requirements for the readout electronics. Because the pixel detector is a high density array, custom integrated circuits are very desirable for reading out the column signals and addressing the rows of pixels to be read out. In practice, separate chips are used for readout and addressing. This paper discusses a custom integrated circuit for processing the analog column signals. The chip has 32 channels of low noise integrators followed by sample and hold circuits which perform a correlated double sample. The chip has several programmable features including gain, bandwidth, and readout configuration.

  10. V-band low-noise integrated circuit receiver. [for space communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K.; Louie, K.; Grote, A. J.; Tahim, R. S.; Mlinar, M. J.; Hayashibara, G. M.; Sun, C.

    1983-01-01

    A compact low-noise V-band integrated circuit receiver has been developed for space communication systems. The receiver accepts an RF input of 60-63 GHz and generates an IF output of 3-6 GHz. A Gunn oscillator at 57 GHz is phaselocked to a low-frequency reference source to achieve high stability and low FM noise. The receiver has an overall single sideband noise figure of less than 10.5 dB and an RF to IF gain of 40 dB over a 3-GHz RF bandwidth. All RF circuits are fabricated in integrated circuits on a Duroid substrate.

  11. Air backed mandrel type fiber optic hydrophone with low noise floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, R.; V, Sreehari C.; N, Praveen Kumar; Awasthi, R. L.; K, Vivek; B, Vishnu M.; Santhanakrishnan, T.; Moosad, K. P. B.; Mathew, Basil

    2014-10-01

    Low noise fiber optic hydrophone based on optical fiber coil wound on air-backed mandrel was developed. The sensor can be effectively used for underwater acoustic sensing. The design and characterization of the hydrophone is illustrated in this paper. A fiber Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) was developed and coupled with a Distributed Feedback (DFB) fiber laser source and an optical phase demodulation system, with an active modulation in one of the arms. The sensor head design was optimized to achieve noise spectral density <10 μrad/√Hz, for yielding sufficient sensitivity to sense acoustic pressure close to Deep Sea Sate Zero (DSS0).

  12. A 20 GHz low noise, low cost receiver for digital satellite communication system, ground terminal applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Glen

    1988-01-01

    A 45 month effort for the development of a 20 GHz, low-noise, low-cost receiver for digital, satellite communication system, ground terminal applications is discussed. Six proof-of-concept receivers were built in two lots of three each. Performance was generally consistent between the two lots. Except for overall noise figure, parameters were within or very close to specification. While noise figure was specified as 3.5 dB, typical performance was measured at 3.0 to 5.5 dB, over the full temperature range of minus 30 C to plus 75 C.

  13. Mixed-signal 0.18μm CMOS and SiGe BiCMOS foundry technologies for ROIC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar-Roy, Arjun; Howard, David; Racanelli, Marco; Scott, Mike; Hurwitz, Paul; Zwingman, Robert; Chaudhry, Samir; Jordan, Scott

    2010-10-01

    Today's readout integrated-circuits (ROICs) require a high level of integration of high performance analog and low power digital logic. TowerJazz offers a commercial 0.18μm CMOS technology platform for mixed-signal, RF, and high performance analog applications which can be used for ROIC applications. The commercial CA18HD dual gate oxide 1.8V/3.3V and CA18HA dual gate oxide 1.8V/5V RF/mixed signal processes, consisting of six layers of metallization, have high density stacked linear MIM capacitors, high-value resistors, triple-well isolation and thick top aluminum metal. The CA18HA process also has scalable drain extended LDMOS devices, up to 40V Vds, for high-voltage sensor applications, and high-performance bipolars for low noise requirements in ROICs. Also discussed are the available features of the commercial SBC18 SiGe BiCMOS platform with SiGe NPNs operating up to 200/200GHz (fT/fMAX frequencies in manufacturing and demonstrated to 270 GHz fT, for reduced noise and integrated RF capabilities which could be used in ROICs. Implementation of these technologies in a thick film SOI process for integrated RF switch and power management and the availability of high fT vertical PNPs to enable complementary BiCMOS (CBiCMOS), for RF enabled ROICs, are also described in this paper.

  14. Low noise amplification of an optically carried microwave signal: application to atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lévèque, T.; Gauguet, A.; Chaibi, W.; Landragin, A.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we report a new scheme to amplify a microwave signal carried on a laser light at λ=852 nm. The amplification is done via a semiconductor tapered amplifier and this scheme is used to drive stimulated Raman transitions in an atom interferometer. Sideband generation in the amplifier, due to self-phase and amplitude modulation, is investigated and characterized. We also demonstrate that the amplifier does not induce any significant phase-noise on the beating signal. Finally, the degradation of the performances of the interferometer due to the amplification process is shown to be negligible.

  15. Quasi-optical constrained lens amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenberg, Jon S.

    1995-09-01

    A major goal in the field of quasi-optics is to increase the power available from solid state sources by combining the power of individual devices in free space, as demonstrated with grid oscillators and grid amplifiers. Grid amplifiers and most amplifier arrays require a plane wave feed, provided by a far field source or at the beam waist of a dielectric lens pair. These feed approaches add considerable loss and size, which is usually greater than the quasi-optical amplifier gain. In addition, grid amplifiers require external polarizers for stability, further increasing size and complexity. This thesis describes using constrained lens theory in the design of quasi optical amplifier arrays with a focal point feed, improving the power coupling between the feed and the amplifier for increased gain. Feed and aperture arrays of elements, input/output isolation and stability, amplifier circuitry, delay lines and bias distribution are all contained on a single planar substrate, making monolithic circuit integration possible. Measured results of X band transmission lenses and a low noise receive lens are presented, including absolute power gain up to 13 dB, noise figure as low as 1.7 dB, beam scanning to +/-30 deg, beam forming and beam switching of multiple sources, and multiple level quasi-optical power combining. The design and performance of millimeter wave power combining amplifier arrays is described, including a Ka Band hybrid array with 1 watt output power, and a V Band 36 element monolithic array with a 5 dB on/off ratio.

  16. Low Noise Cruise Efficient Short Take-Off and Landing Transport Vehicle Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Jones, Scott M.

    2007-01-01

    The saturation of the airspace around current airports combined with increasingly stringent community noise limits represents a serious impediment to growth in world aviation travel. Breakthrough concepts that both increase throughput and reduce noise impacts are required to enable growth in aviation markets. Concepts with a 25 year horizon must facilitate a 4x increase in air travel while simultaneously meeting community noise constraints. Attacking these horizon issues holistically is the concept study of a Cruise Efficient Short Take-Off and Landing (CESTOL) high subsonic transport under the NASA's Revolutionary Systems Concepts for Aeronautics (RSCA) project. The concept is a high-lift capable airframe with a partially embedded distributed propulsion system that takes a synergistic approach in propulsion-airframe-integration (PAI) by fully integrating the airframe and propulsion systems to achieve the benefits of both low-noise short take-off and landing (STOL) operations and efficient high speed cruise. This paper presents a summary of the recent study of a distributed propulsion/airframe configuration that provides low-noise STOL operation to enable 24-hour use of the untapped regional and city center airports to increase the capacity of the overall airspace while still maintaining efficient high subsonic cruise flight capability.

  17. A Wide-Bandwidth, Low-Noise SIS Receiver Design for Millimeter and Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, Matthew; Blain, Andrew; Harris, Andrew; Hu, Robert; LeDuc, Henry G.; Miller, David; Rice, Frank; Weinreb, Sander; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2004-01-01

    In principle, millimeter and submillimeter heterodyne receivers using state-of-the-art SIS detectors are capable of extremely large instantaneous bandwidths with noise temperatures within a few Kelvin of the quantum limit. We are applying modem design tools, such as 3D electromagnetic simulators and Caltech's SuperMix SIS analysis package, to develop a new generation of waveguide SIS mixers with very broad RF and IF bandwidths. Our initial design consists of a double-sideband mixer targeted for the 180- 300 GHz band that uses a single SIS junction excited by a full bandwidth, fixed-tuned waveguide probe on a silicon substrate. The IF output band, limited by the MMIC low-noise IF preamplifier, is 6-18 GHz, providing an instantaneous RF bandwidth of 24 GHz (double-sideband). The SIS mixer conversion loss is predicted to be no more than 1-2 dB (single-sideband) with mixer noise temperatures across the band within 10 Kelvin of the quantum limit. The single-sideband receiver noise temperature goal is 70 Kelvin. The wide instantaneous bandwidth and low noise will result in an instrument capable of a variety of important astrophysical observations beyond the capabilities of current instruments. Lab testing of the receiver will begin in the summer of 2002, and a demonstration on the CSO should occur in the spring of 2003.

  18. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Birkl, Gerhard; Andelkovic, Zoran; Vogel, Manuel; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan

    2015-11-15

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles’ beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar{sup 13+}) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  19. An Extremely Wide Bandwidth, Low-Noise SIS Heterodyne Receiver Design for Millimeter and Submillimeter Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, Matthew; Blain, Andrew; Harris, Andrew; Hu, Robert; Rice, Frank; LeDuc, H. G.; Weinreb, Sander; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2002-01-01

    Millimeter and submillimeter heterodyne receivers using state-of-the-art SIS detectors are capable of extremely large instantaneous bandwidths with noise temperatures within a few Kelvin of the quantum limit. We present the design for a broadband, sensitive, heterodyne spectrometer under development for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). The 180-300 GHz double-sideband design uses a single SIS device excited by a full bandwidth, fixed-tuned waveguide probe on a silicon substrate. The IF output frequency (limited by the MMIC low noise IF preamplifier) is 6-18 GHz, providing an instantaneous RF bandwidth of 24 GHz (double-sideband). The SIS mixer conversion loss should be no more than 1-2 dB with mixer noise temperatures across the band within 10 K of the quantum limit. The single-sideband receiver noise temperature goal is 70 K. The wide instantaneous bandwidth and low noise will result in an instrument capable of a variety of important astrophysical observations beyond the capabilities of current instruments. Lab testing of the receiver will begin in the summer of 2002, and the first use on the CSO should occur in the spring of 2003.

  20. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Andelkovic, Zoran; Birkl, Gerhard; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan; Vogel, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles' beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar13+) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  1. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Andelkovic, Zoran; Birkl, Gerhard; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan; Vogel, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles' beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar(13+)) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections. PMID:26628124

  2. A Low Noise, High QE, Large Format CCD Camera System for the NASA MIGHTI Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, J. J.; Cardon, J.; Watson, M.; Cook, J.; Whiteley, M.; Beukers, J.; Englert, C. R.; Brown, C. M.; Harlander, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Michelson Interferometer for Global High-resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI) instrument is part of the NASA Ionspheric Connection Explorer (ICON) mission designed to uncover the mysteries of the extreme variability of the Earth's ionosphere. MIGHTI consists of two identical units positioned to observe the Earth's low latitude thermosphere from perpendicular viewing directions. The MIGHTI instrument is a spatial heterodyne spectrometer and requires a low noise, high QE, large format camera system to detect slight phase changes in the fringe patterns which reveal the neutral wind velocity. The MIGHTI camera system uses a single control electronics box to operate two identical CCD camera heads and communicate with the ICON payload electronics. The control electronics are carefully designed for a low noise implementation of CCD biases, clocking, and CCD output digitization. The camera heads consist of a 2k by 2K, back-illuminated, frame transfer CCD provided by e2v. The CCD's are both TEC cooled and have butcher-block filters mounted in close proximity of the active area. The CCDs are nominally operated in binned mode, the control electronics register settings provide flexibility for binning and gain control. An engineering model of the camera system has been assembled and tested. The EM camera system characterization meets all performance requirements. Performance highlights include a measured read noise of 5.7 electrons and dark current of 0.01 electronics/pixel/second. The camera system design and characterization results will be presented.

  3. IR CMOS: the digital nightvision solution to sub-1 mLux imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pralle, M. U.; Carey, J. E.; Vineis, C.; Palsule, C.; Jiang, J.; Joy, T.

    2015-05-01

    SiOnyx has demonstrated imaging at light levels below 1 mLux at 60 FPS with a 720P CMOS image sensor in a compact, low latency camera. The camera contains a 1 inch (16 mm) optical format sensor and streams uncompressed video over CameraLink with row wise image latency below 1 msec. Sub mLux imaging is enabled by the combination of enhanced quantum efficiency in the near infrared together with state of the art low noise image sensor design. The quantum efficiency enhancement is achieved by utilizing SiOnyx's proprietary ultrafast laser semiconductor processing technology that enhances the absorption of light within a thin pixel layer. Our technology demonstrates a 10 fold improvement in infrared sensitivity over incumbent imaging technology while maintaining complete compatibility with standard CMOS image sensor process flows. Applications include surveillance, nightvision, and 1064nm laser see-spot.

  4. A CMOS detection chip for amperometric sensors with chopper stabilized incremental ΔΣ ADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Chen; Yuntao, Liu; Jingbo, Xiao; Jie, Chen

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a low noise complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) detection chip for amperometric electrochemical sensors. In order to effectively remove the input offset of the cascaded integrators and the low frequency noise in the modulator, a novel offset cancellation chopping scheme was proposed in the Incremental ΔΣ analog to digital converter (IADC). A novel low power potentiostat was employed in this chip to provide the biasing voltage for the sensor while mirroring the sensor current out for detection. The chip communicates with FPGA through standard built in I2C interface and SPI bus. Fabricated in 0.18-μm CMOS process, this chip detects current signal with high accuracy and high linearity. A prototype microsystem was produced to verify the detection chip performance with current input as well as micro-sensors. Project supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2015CB352100).

  5. A CMOS detection chip for amperometric sensors with chopper stabilized incremental ΔΣ ADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Chen; Yuntao, Liu; Jingbo, Xiao; Jie, Chen

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a low noise complimentary metal–oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) detection chip for amperometric electrochemical sensors. In order to effectively remove the input offset of the cascaded integrators and the low frequency noise in the modulator, a novel offset cancellation chopping scheme was proposed in the Incremental ΔΣ analog to digital converter (IADC). A novel low power potentiostat was employed in this chip to provide the biasing voltage for the sensor while mirroring the sensor current out for detection. The chip communicates with FPGA through standard built in I2C interface and SPI bus. Fabricated in 0.18-μm CMOS process, this chip detects current signal with high accuracy and high linearity. A prototype microsystem was produced to verify the detection chip performance with current input as well as micro-sensors. Project supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2015CB352100).

  6. Regenerative switching CMOS system

    DOEpatents

    Welch, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a seriesed combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided.

  7. Regenerative switching CMOS system

    DOEpatents

    Welch, J.D.

    1998-06-02

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a series combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electrically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided. 14 figs.

  8. IR CMOS: near infrared enhanced digital imaging (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pralle, Martin U.; Carey, James E.; Joy, Thomas; Vineis, Chris J.; Palsule, Chintamani

    2015-08-01

    SiOnyx has demonstrated imaging at light levels below 1 mLux (moonless starlight) at video frame rates with a 720P CMOS image sensor in a compact, low latency camera. Low light imaging is enabled by the combination of enhanced quantum efficiency in the near infrared together with state of the art low noise image sensor design. The quantum efficiency enhancements are achieved by applying Black Silicon, SiOnyx's proprietary ultrafast laser semiconductor processing technology. In the near infrared, silicon's native indirect bandgap results in low absorption coefficients and long absorption lengths. The Black Silicon nanostructured layer fundamentally disrupts this paradigm by enhancing the absorption of light within a thin pixel layer making 5 microns of silicon equivalent to over 300 microns of standard silicon. This results in a demonstrate 10 fold improvements in near infrared sensitivity over incumbent imaging technology while maintaining complete compatibility with standard CMOS image sensor process flows. Applications include surveillance, nightvision, and 1064nm laser see spot. Imaging performance metrics will be discussed. Demonstrated performance characteristics: Pixel size : 5.6 and 10 um Array size: 720P/1.3Mpix Frame rate: 60 Hz Read noise: 2 ele/pixel Spectral sensitivity: 400 to 1200 nm (with 10x QE at 1064nm) Daytime imaging: color (Bayer pattern) Nighttime imaging: moonless starlight conditions 1064nm laser imaging: daytime imaging out to 2Km

  9. Wide-Temperature-Range Integrated Operational Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad; Levanas, Greg; Chen, Yuan; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Cozy, Raymond; Blalock, Benjamin; Greenwell, Robert; Terry, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    A document discusses a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated- circuit operational amplifier to be replicated and incorporated into sensor and actuator systems of Mars-explorer robots. This amplifier is designed to function at a supply potential less than or equal to 5.5 V, at any temperature from -180 to +120 C. The design is implemented on a commercial radiation-hard SOI CMOS process rated for a supply potential of less than or equal to 3.6 V and temperatures from -55 to +110 C. The design incorporates several innovations to achieve this, the main ones being the following: NMOS transistor channel lengths below 1 m are generally not used because research showed that this change could reduce the adverse effect of hot carrier injection on the lifetimes of transistors at low temperatures. To enable the amplifier to withstand the 5.5-V supply potential, a circuit topology including cascade devices, clamping devices, and dynamic voltage biasing was adopted so that no individual transistor would be exposed to more than 3.6 V. To minimize undesired variations in performance over the temperature range, the transistors in the amplifier are biased by circuitry that maintains a constant inversion coefficient over the temperature range.

  10. Development of Submillimeter SIS Mixers and Broadband HEMT Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a new generation of superconducting tunnel junction (SIS) receivers with extremely wide instantaneous (intermediate-frequency, or IF) bandwidths, of order 12 GHz. Such mixers would allow rapid submillimeter wavelength spectral line surveys to be carried out with SOFIA, and could potentially be used for future submillimeter space missions such as SAFIR. There are two major components which are being developed: (1) SIS mixers with broad (12 GHz) IF bandwidths; and (2) low-noise, broadband microwave, (6-18 GHz) amplifiers, which amplify the IF output from the SIS mixer. The work on these components is discussed in two sections

  11. NV-CMOS HD camera for day/night imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelsong, T.; Tower, J.; Sudol, Thomas; Senko, T.; Chodelka, D.

    2014-06-01

    SRI International (SRI) has developed a new multi-purpose day/night video camera with low-light imaging performance comparable to an image intensifier, while offering the size, weight, ruggedness, and cost advantages enabled by the use of SRI's NV-CMOS HD digital image sensor chip. The digital video output is ideal for image enhancement, sharing with others through networking, video capture for data analysis, or fusion with thermal cameras. The camera provides Camera Link output with HD/WUXGA resolution of 1920 x 1200 pixels operating at 60 Hz. Windowing to smaller sizes enables operation at higher frame rates. High sensitivity is achieved through use of backside illumination, providing high Quantum Efficiency (QE) across the visible and near infrared (NIR) bands (peak QE <90%), as well as projected low noise (<2h+) readout. Power consumption is minimized in the camera, which operates from a single 5V supply. The NVCMOS HD camera provides a substantial reduction in size, weight, and power (SWaP) , ideal for SWaP-constrained day/night imaging platforms such as UAVs, ground vehicles, fixed mount surveillance, and may be reconfigured for mobile soldier operations such as night vision goggles and weapon sights. In addition the camera with the NV-CMOS HD imager is suitable for high performance digital cinematography/broadcast systems, biofluorescence/microscopy imaging, day/night security and surveillance, and other high-end applications which require HD video imaging with high sensitivity and wide dynamic range. The camera comes with an array of lens mounts including C-mount and F-mount. The latest test data from the NV-CMOS HD camera will be presented.

  12. Low-noise monolithic bipolar front-end for silicon drift detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, W.; Bialas, W.; Bonazzola, G.; Bonvicini, W.; Casati, L.; Ceretto, F.; Giubellino, P.; Prest, M.; Riccati, L.; Zampa, N.

    1999-01-01

    A very low noise, 32-channel preamplifier/shaper chip has been designed for the analogue readout of silicon detectors. The circuit has been optimized in view of the operation of silicon drift detectors, which have very low capacitance and produce gaussian signals of σ of few tens of ns. The chip (OLA) has been designed and manufactured using the SHPi full-custom bipolar process by Tektronix. Each channel is composed by a preamplifier, a shaper and a symmetrical line driver, which allows to drive either a positive and a negative single ended output separately on 50 Ω impedance or a differential twisted pair. The intrinsic peaking time of the circuit is ˜60 ns, and the noise is below 250 electrons at zero input load capacitance. The power consumption is 2 mW/channel, mostly due to the output driver.

  13. Low-noise magnetic observatory variometer with race-track sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janošek, M.; Petrucha, V.; Vlk, M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a low-noise, high-stability observatory magnetometer with race-track sensors, as developed by the Czech Technical University in Prague for National Observatory of Athens. As opposed to the standard instruments, we used our novel race-track fluxgate sensors with planar oval core which were cut by state-of-the art pico-second UV-laser. The noise performance of the complete electronics and sensor chain is below 6 pT/√Hz @ 1 Hz. The electronics uses 24-bit 200-Hz A/D converter with simultaneous sampling and all digital processing is done in FPGA. The variometer with the sensors mounted on a MACOR cube has been successfully calibrated by scalar method.

  14. Low-noise humidity controller for imaging water mediated processes in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gaponenko, I; Gamperle, L; Herberg, K; Muller, S C; Paruch, P

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the construction of a novel low-noise continuous flow humidity controller and its integration with a commercial variable-temperature atomic force microscope fluid cell, allowing precise control of humidity and temperature at the sample during nanoscale measurements. Based on wet and dry gas mixing, the design allows a high mechanical stability to be achieved by means of an ultrasonic atomiser for the generation of water-saturated gas, improving upon previous bubbler-based architectures. Water content in the flow is measured both at the inflow and outflow of the fluid cell, enabling the monitoring of water condensation and icing, and allowing controlled variation of the sample temperature independently of the humidity. To benchmark the performance of the controller, the results of detailed noise studies and time-based imaging of the formation of ice layers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite are shown. PMID:27370461

  15. Low-noise humidity controller for imaging water mediated processes in atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaponenko, I.; Gamperle, L.; Herberg, K.; Muller, S. C.; Paruch, P.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the construction of a novel low-noise continuous flow humidity controller and its integration with a commercial variable-temperature atomic force microscope fluid cell, allowing precise control of humidity and temperature at the sample during nanoscale measurements. Based on wet and dry gas mixing, the design allows a high mechanical stability to be achieved by means of an ultrasonic atomiser for the generation of water-saturated gas, improving upon previous bubbler-based architectures. Water content in the flow is measured both at the inflow and outflow of the fluid cell, enabling the monitoring of water condensation and icing, and allowing controlled variation of the sample temperature independently of the humidity. To benchmark the performance of the controller, the results of detailed noise studies and time-based imaging of the formation of ice layers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite are shown.

  16. Review of the latest developments in fast low noise detectors for wavefront sensing in the visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Sean M.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we describe the development of fast low noise detectors intended primarily for use in Shack Hartmann wavefront sensors for natural and laser guide star wavefront sensing in the future adaptive optics systems of the Thirty Meter Telescope Project and the Next Generation Adaptive Optics system at the W. M. Keck Observatory. This work results from collaboration among the W. M. Keck Observatory, the Thirty Meter Telescope Project, the Lincoln Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Starfire Optical Range of the Air Force Research Laboratory. Testing of backside thinned, packaged detectors has been completed and performance results including read noise, readout speed, charge diffusion, dark current, and quantum efficiency will be reported. Proposed developments of readout systems to compliment this detector will be described, and performance compared to alternative detector solutions.

  17. Low-noise multiple watermarks technology based on complex double random phase encoding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jihong; Lu, Rongwen; Sun, Liujie; Zhuang, Songlin

    2010-11-01

    Based on double random phase encoding method (DRPE), watermarking technology may provide a stable and robust method to protect the copyright of the printing. However, due to its linear character, DRPE exist the serious safety risk when it is attacked. In this paper, a complex coding method, which means adding the chaotic encryption based on logistic mapping before the DRPE coding, is provided and simulated. The results testify the complex method will provide better security protection for the watermarking. Furthermore, a low-noise multiple watermarking is studied, which means embedding multiple watermarks into one host printing and decrypt them with corresponding phase keys individually. The Digital simulation and mathematic analysis show that with the same total embedding weight factor, multiply watermarking will improve signal noise ratio (SNR) of the output printing image significantly. The complex multiply watermark method may provide a robust, stability, reliability copyright protection with higher quality printing image.

  18. Computerized Design and Generation of Low-noise Helical Gears with Modified Surface Topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Chen, N. X.; Lu, J.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    An approach for design and generation of low-noise helical gears with localized bearing contact is proposed. The approach is applied to double circular arc helical gears and modified involute helical gears. The reduction of noise and vibration is achieved by application of a predesigned parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to absorb a discontinuous linear function of transmission errors caused by misalignment. The localization of the bearing contact is achieved by the mismatch of pinion-gear tooth surfaces. Computerized simulation of meshing and contact of the designed gears demonstrated that the proposed approach will produce a pair of gears that has a parabolic transmission error function even when misalignment is present. Numerical examples for illustration of the developed approach are given.

  19. A 1014 nm linearly polarized low noise narrow-linewidth single-frequency fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Mo, Shupei; Xu, Shanhui; Huang, Xiang; Zhang, Weinan; Feng, Zhouming; Chen, Dongdan; Yang, Tong; Yang, Zhongming

    2013-05-20

    We present the demonstration of a compact linearly polarized low noise narrow-linewidth single-frequency fiber laser at 1014 nm. The compact fiber laser is based on a 5-mm-long homemade Yb(3+)-doped phosphate fiber. Over 164 mW stable continuous-wave single transverse and longitudinal mode lasing at 1014 nm has been achieved. The measured relative intensity noise is less than -135 dB/Hz at frequencies of over 2.5 MHz. The signal-to-noise ratio of the laser is larger than 70 dB, and the linewidth is less than 7 kHz, while the obtained linear polarization extinction ratio is higher than 30 dB.

  20. Using the Moon As A Low-Noise Seismic Detector For Strange Quark Nuggets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. Bruce; Chui, Talso; Griggs, Cornelius E.; Herrin, Eugene T.; Nakamura, Yosio; Paik, Ho Jung; Penanen, Konstantin; Rosenbaum, Doris; Teplitz, Vigdor L.; Young, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Strange quark matter made of up, down and strange quarks has been postulated by Witten [1]. Strange quark matter would be nearly charge neutral and would have density of nuclear matter (10(exp 14) gm/cu cm). Witten also suggested that nuggets of strange quark matter, or strange quark nuggets (SQNs), could have formed shortly after the Big Bang, and that they would be viable candidates for cold dark matter. As suggested by de Rujula and Glashow [2], an SQN may pass through a celestial body releasing detectable seismic energy along a straight line. The Moon, being much quieter seismically than the Earth, would be a favorable place to search for such events. We review previous searches for SQNs to illustrate the parameter space explored by using the Moon as a low-noise detector of SQNs. We also discuss possible detection schemes using a single seismometer, and using an International Lunar Seismic Network.

  1. Low-Noise Operation of All-Fiber Femtosecond Cherenkov Laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaomin; Villanueva, Guillermo E.; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Møller, Uffe; Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the noise properties of a femtosecond all-fiber Cherenkov radiation source with emission wavelength 600 nm, based on an Yb-fiber laser and a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber. A relative intensity noise as low as 103 dBc/Hz, corresponding to 2.48% pulse-to-pulse fluctuation in energy, is observed at the Cherenkov radiation output power of 4.3 mW, or 150 pJ-pulse energy. This pulse-to-pulse fluctuation is at least 10.6-dB lower compared to spectrally sliced supercontinuum sources traditionally used for ultrafast fiber-based generation at visible wavelengths. Low noise makes all-fiber Cherenkov sources promising for biophotonics applications such as multiphoton microscopy, where minimum pulse-to-pulse energy fluctuation is required. We present the dependency of the noise figure on both the Cherenkov radiation output power and its spectrum. PMID:24532961

  2. Low-noise submillimeter-wave NbTiN superconducting tunnel junction mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Jonathan; Chen, Jian; Miller, David; Kooi, Jacob; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.; Stern, Jeff A.

    1999-12-01

    We have developed a low-noise 850 GHz superconductor-insulator-superconductor quasiparticle mixer with NbTiN thin-film microstrip tuning circuits and hybrid Nb/AlN/NbTiN tunnel junctions. The mixer uses a quasioptical configuration with a planar twin-slot antenna feeding a two-junction tuning circuit. At 798 GHz, we measured an uncorrected double-sideband receiver noise temperature of TRX=260 K at 4.2 K bath temperature. This mixer outperforms current Nb SIS mixers by a factor of nearly 2 near 800 GHz. The high-gap frequency and low loss at 800 GHz make NbTiN an attractive material with which to fabricate tuning circuits for SIS mixers. NbTiN mixers can potentially operate up to the gap frequency, 2Δ/h˜1.2 THz.

  3. Low-Noise High-Performance Current Controllers for Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.

    2011-06-01

    Quantum cascade lasers have ushered in a new era of enhanced capability for chemical sensing. The higher current and voltage demands of these devices over their laser diode counterparts has also ushered in the demand for more capable drive electronics. The current-sensitivity and high frequency response of these devices has continued the desire for low noise, stability and agility enjoyed by the laser diode community for many years. This article addresses the issue of maintaining these characteristics at the currents and voltages required, and presents example performance of current controllers developed by the author at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, achieving output currents up to two amperes and compliance voltages of 15 volts, with noise levels close to the Johnson noise of the internal resistors, typically a few nA/rt-Hz. Full current depth rapid modulation up to 100 kHz is also demonstrated.

  4. A gas microstrip detector with low noise preamplifier/shaper integrated onto a common silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, M.; Beuville, E.; Cwetanski, P.; Retiere, F.; Smirnov, N.; Trentalange, S.; Wieman, H.

    1999-03-01

    Gas microstrip detectors have been integrated with low noise preamplifier and shaper electronics on a common silicon substrate. These devices were fabricated at the Hewlett-Packard company using a standard 0.8 μm process. This unique approach offers advantages over conventional microstrip design: ease of fabrication, lower noise, and higher channel density. The detector/electronics assembly was tested in a small drift chamber. An energy resolution of 18% FWHM and a noise level of 80 e - r.m.s per channel were obtained with a gas gain of about 200. These integrated microstrip detectors are being developed as the readout devices for a small, high-resolution Time Projection Chamber (MicroTPC). Low mass and high resolution make the MicroTPC well suited for use as a vertex detector, especially in high track-density environments such as RHIC and the LHC.

  5. An ultrahigh stability, low-noise laser current driver with digital control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Van Zijll, Marshall; Doermann, Greg; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2008-07-01

    We present a low-noise, high modulation-bandwidth design for a laser current driver with excellent long-term stability. The driver improves upon the commonly used Hall-Libbrecht design. The current driver can be operated remotely by way of a microprocessing unit, which controls the current set point digitally. This allows precise repeatability and improved accuracy and stability. It also allows the driver to be placed near the laser for reduced noise and for lower phase lag when using the modulation input. We present the theory of operation for our driver in detail, and give a thorough characterization of its stability, noise, set-point accuracy and repeatability, temperature dependence, transient response, and modulation bandwidth.

  6. Low-noise high-performance current controllers for quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Taubman, Matthew S

    2011-06-01

    Quantum cascade lasers have ushered in a new era of enhanced capability for chemical sensing. The higher current and voltage demands of these devices over their laser diode counterparts have also ushered in the demand for more capable drive electronics. The current-sensitivity and high frequency response of these devices have continued the desire for low noise, stability, and agility enjoyed by the laser diode community for many years. This article addresses the issue of maintaining these characteristics at the currents and voltages required, and presents example performance of current controllers developed by the author at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, achieving output currents up to 2 A and compliance voltages of 15 V, with noise levels close to the Johnson noise of the internal resistors, typically a few nA/√Hz. Rapid full-depth current modulation up to 100 kHz is also demonstrated.

  7. Rapid single-flux-quantum circuits for low noise mK operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intiso, Samuel; Pekola, Jukka; Savin, Alexander; Devyatov, Ygor; Kidiyarova-Shevchenko, Anna

    2006-05-01

    Rapid single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) technology has been proposed as control electronics for superconducting quantum bits because of the material and working temperature compatibility. In this work, we consider practical aspects of RSFQ circuit design for low noise low power operation. At the working temperature of 20 mK and operational frequency of 2 GHz, dissipated power per junction is reduced to 25 pW by using 6 µA critical current junctions available at the Hypres and VTT low Jc fabrication process. To limit phonon temperature to 30 mK, a maximum of 40 junctions can be placed on a 5 mm × 5 mm chip. Electron temperature in resistive shunts of Josephson junctions is minimized by use of cooling fins, giving minimum electron temperatures of about 150 mK for the Hypres process and 70 mK for the VTT process.

  8. Low-Noise Submillimeter-Wave NbTiN Superconducting Tunnel Junction Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, J.; Chen, J.; Miller, D.; Kooi, J.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.; Stern, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a low-noise 850 GHz superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) quasi-particle mixer with NbTiN thin-film microstrip tuning circuits and hybrid Nb/AlN/NbTiN tunnel junctions. The mixer uses a quasioptical configuration with a planar twin-slot antenna feeding a two-junction tuning circuit. At 798 GHz, we measured an uncorrected double-sideband receiver noise temperature of T(sub RX) = 260 K at 4.2 K bath temperature. This mixer outperforms current Nb SIS mixers by a factor of nearly 2 near 800 GHz. The high gap frequency and low loss at 800 GHz make NbTiN an attractive material with which to fabricate tuning circuits for SIS mixers. NbTiN mixers can potentially operate up to the gap frequency, 2(delta)/h is approximately 1.2THz.

  9. A bootstrapped, low-noise, and high-gain photodetector for shot noise measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haijun; Yang, Wenhai; Li, Zhixiu; Li, Xuefeng; Zheng, Yaohui

    2014-01-01

    We presented a low-noise, high-gain photodetector based on the bootstrap structure and the L-C (inductance and capacitance) combination. Electronic characteristics of the photodetector, including electronic noise, gain and frequency response, and dynamic range, were verified through a single-frequency Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm with coherent output. The measured shot noise of 50 μW laser was 13 dB above the electronic noise at the analysis frequency of 2 MHz, and 10 dB at 3 MHz. And a maximum clearance of 28 dB at 2 MHz was achieved when 1.52 mW laser was illuminated. In addition, the photodetector showed excellent linearities for both DC and AC amplifications in the laser power range between 12.5 μW and 1.52 mW.

  10. A bootstrapped, low-noise, and high-gain photodetector for shot noise measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Haijun; Yang, Wenhai; Li, Zhixiu; Li, Xuefeng; Zheng, Yaohui

    2014-01-15

    We presented a low-noise, high-gain photodetector based on the bootstrap structure and the L-C (inductance and capacitance) combination. Electronic characteristics of the photodetector, including electronic noise, gain and frequency response, and dynamic range, were verified through a single-frequency Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser at 1064 nm with coherent output. The measured shot noise of 50 μW laser was 13 dB above the electronic noise at the analysis frequency of 2 MHz, and 10 dB at 3 MHz. And a maximum clearance of 28 dB at 2 MHz was achieved when 1.52 mW laser was illuminated. In addition, the photodetector showed excellent linearities for both DC and AC amplifications in the laser power range between 12.5 μW and 1.52 mW.

  11. Design and Stress Analysis of Low-Noise Adjusted Bearing Contact Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuentes, A.; Litvin, F. L.; Mullins, B. R.; Woods, R.; Handschuh, R. F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2002-01-01

    An integrated computerized approach for design and stress analysis of low-noise spiral bevel gear drives with adjusted bearing contact is proposed. The procedure of computations is an iterative process that requires four separate procedures and provide: (a) a parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to reduce the effect of errors of alignment on noise and vibration, and (b) reduction of the shift of bearing contact caused by misalignment. Application of finite element analysis enables us to determine the contact and bending stresses and investigate the formation of the bearing contact. The design of finite element models and boundary conditions is automated and does not require intermediate CAD computer programs for application of general purpose computer program for finite element analysis.

  12. Design and Stress Analysis of Low-Noise Adjusted Bearing Contact Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Fuentes, Alfonso; Mullins, Baxter R.; Woods, Ron

    2002-01-01

    An integrated computerized approach for design and stress analysis of low-noise spiral bevel gear drives with adjusted bearing contact has been developed. The computation procedure is an iterative process, requiring four separate steps that provide: (a) a parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to reduce the effect of errors of alignment, and (b) reduction of the shift of bearing contact caused by misalignment. Application of finite element analysis permits the contact and bending stresses to be determined and investigate the formation of the bearing contact. The design of finite element models and boundary conditions is automated and does not require an intermediate CAD computer program. A commercially available finite element analysis computer program with contact capability was used to conduct the stress analysis. The theory developed is illustrated with numerical examples.

  13. CMOS Imaging of Temperature Effects on Pin-Printed Xerogel Sensor Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Lei Yao; Ka Yi Yung; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Bright, Frank V

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of temperature on the operation and performance of a xerogel-based sensor microarrays coupled to a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager integrated circuit (IC) that images the photoluminescence response from the sensor microarray. The CMOS imager uses a 32 × 32 (1024 elements) array of active pixel sensors and each pixel includes a high-gain phototransistor to convert the detected optical signals into electrical currents. A correlated double sampling circuit and pixel address/digital control/signal integration circuit are also implemented on-chip. The CMOS imager data are read out as a serial coded signal. The sensor system uses a light-emitting diode to excite target analyte responsive organometallic luminophores doped within discrete xerogel-based sensor elements. As a proto type, we developed a 3 × 3 (9 elements) array of oxygen (O2) sensors. Each group of three sensor elements in the array (arranged in a column) is designed to provide a different and specific sensitivity to the target gaseous O2 concentration. This property of multiple sensitivities is achieved by using a mix of two O2 sensitive luminophores in each pin-printed xerogel sensor element. The CMOS imager is designed to be low noise and consumes a static power of 320.4 μW and an average dynamic power of 624.6 μW when operating at 100-Hz sampling frequency and 1.8-V dc power supply.

  14. CMOS Imaging of Temperature Effects on Pin-Printed Xerogel Sensor Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Lei Yao; Ka Yi Yung; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Bright, Frank V

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of temperature on the operation and performance of a xerogel-based sensor microarrays coupled to a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager integrated circuit (IC) that images the photoluminescence response from the sensor microarray. The CMOS imager uses a 32 × 32 (1024 elements) array of active pixel sensors and each pixel includes a high-gain phototransistor to convert the detected optical signals into electrical currents. A correlated double sampling circuit and pixel address/digital control/signal integration circuit are also implemented on-chip. The CMOS imager data are read out as a serial coded signal. The sensor system uses a light-emitting diode to excite target analyte responsive organometallic luminophores doped within discrete xerogel-based sensor elements. As a proto type, we developed a 3 × 3 (9 elements) array of oxygen (O2) sensors. Each group of three sensor elements in the array (arranged in a column) is designed to provide a different and specific sensitivity to the target gaseous O2 concentration. This property of multiple sensitivities is achieved by using a mix of two O2 sensitive luminophores in each pin-printed xerogel sensor element. The CMOS imager is designed to be low noise and consumes a static power of 320.4 μW and an average dynamic power of 624.6 μW when operating at 100-Hz sampling frequency and 1.8-V dc power supply. PMID:23851206

  15. The high speed low noise multi-data processing signal process circuit research of remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lei; Jiang, Haibin; Dong, Wang

    2013-08-01

    The high speed, low noise and integration characteristic are the main technology and the main development directions on the signal process circuit of the image sensor, especially in high resolution remote sensing. With these developments, the high noise limiting circuits, high speed data transfer system and the integrated design of the signal process circuit become more and more important. Therefore the requirement of the circuit system simulation is more and more important during the system design and PCB board design process. A CCD signal process circuit system which has the high speed, low noise and several selectable operate modes function was designed and certificated in this paper, during the CCD signal process circuit system design, simulation was made which include the signal integrity and the power integrity. The important devices such as FPGA and the DDR2 device were simulated, using the power integrity simulation the sensitive power planes of the FPGA on the PCB was modified to make the circuit operate more stabilize on a higher frequency. The main clock path and the high speed data path of the PCB board were simulated with the signal integrity. All the simulation works make the signal process circuit system's image's SNR value get higher and make the circuit system could operate well on higher frequency. In the board testing process, the PCB time diagrams were listed on the testing chapter and the wave's parameter meets the request. The real time diagram and the simulated result of the PCB board was listed respectively. The CCD signal process circuit system's images' SNR (Signal Noise Ratio) value, the 14bit AFE slew rate and the data transfer frequency is listed in the paper respective.

  16. A low noise and high precision linear power supply with thermal foldback protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Pessina, G.

    2016-05-01

    A low noise and high precision linear power supply was designed for use in rare event search experiments with macrobolometers. The circuit accepts at the input a "noisy" dual supply voltage up to ±15 V and gives at the output precise, low noise, and stable voltages that can be set between ±3.75 V and ±12.5 V in eight 1.25 V steps. Particular care in circuit design, component selection, and proper filtering results in a noise spectral density of 50 nV / √{ Hz } at 1 Hz and 20 nV / √{ Hz } white when the output is set to ±5 V. This corresponds to 125 nV RMS (0.8 μV peak to peak) between 0.1 Hz and 10 Hz, and 240 nV RMS (1.6 μV peak to peak) between 0.1 Hz and 100 Hz. The power supply rejection ratio (PSRR) of the circuit is 100 dB at low frequency, and larger than 40 dB up to high frequency, thanks to a proper compensation design. Calibration allows to reach a precision in the absolute value of the output voltage of ±70 ppm, or ±350 μV at ±5 V, and to reduce thermal drifts below ±1 ppm/∘C in the expected operating range. The maximum peak output current is about 6 A from each output. An original foldback protection scheme was developed that dynamically limits the maximum output current to keep the temperature of the output transistors within their safe operating range. An add-on card based on an ARM Cortex-M3 microcontroller is devoted to the monitoring and control of all circuit functionalities and provides remote communication via CAN bus.

  17. A Demonstration of TIA Using FD-SOI CMOS OPAMP for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Koichi; Wada, Takehiko; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Arai, Yasuo; Ohno, Morifumi; Hanaoka, Misaki; Kanada, Hidehiro; Oyabu, Shinki; Hattori, Yasuki; Ukai, Sota; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Watanabe, Kentaroh; Baba, Shunsuke; Kochi, Chihiro; Yamamoto, Keita

    2016-07-01

    We are developing a fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (FD-SOI) CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) operated at temperatures below ˜ 4 K. Its application is planned for the readout circuit of high-impedance far-infrared detectors for astronomical observations. We designed a trans-impedance amplifier (TIA) using a CMOS operational amplifier (OPAMP) with FD-SOI technique. The TIA is optimized to readout signals from a germanium blocked impurity band (Ge BIB) detector which is highly sensitive to wavelengths of up to ˜ 200 \\upmu m. For the first time, we demonstrated the FD-SOI CMOS OPAMP combined with the Ge BIB detector at 4.5 K. The result promises to solve issues faced by conventional cryogenic ROICs.

  18. A fully-integrated 12.5-Gb/s 850-nm CMOS optical receiver based on a spatially-modulated avalanche photodetector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung-Jae; Youn, Jin-Sung; Park, Kang-Yeob; Choi, Woo-Young

    2014-02-10

    We present a fully integrated 12.5-Gb/s optical receiver fabricated with standard 0.13-µm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology for 850-nm optical interconnect applications. Our integrated optical receiver includes a newly proposed CMOS-compatible spatially-modulated avalanche photodetector, which provides larger photodetection bandwidth than previously reported CMOS-compatible photodetectors. The receiver also has high-speed CMOS circuits including transimpedance amplifier, DC-balanced buffer, equalizer, and limiting amplifier. With the fabricated optical receiver, detection of 12.5-Gb/s optical data is successfully achieved at 5.8 pJ/bit. Our receiver achieves the highest data rate ever reported for 850-nm integrated CMOS optical receivers.

  19. A CMOS integrated timing discriminator circuit for fast scintillation counters

    SciTech Connect

    Jochmann, M.W.

    1998-06-01

    Based on a zero-crossing discriminator using a CR differentiation network for pulse shaping, a new CMOS integrated timing discriminator circuit is proposed for fast (t{sub r} {ge} 2 ns) scintillation counters at the cooler synchrotron COSY-Juelich. By eliminating the input signal`s amplitude information by means of an analog continuous-time divider, a normalized pulse shape at the zero-crossing point is gained over a wide dynamic input amplitude range. In combination with an arming comparator and a monostable multivibrator this yields in a highly precise timing discriminator circuit, that is expected to be useful in different time measurement applications. First measurement results of a CMOS integrated logarithmic amplifier, which is part of the analog continuous-time divider, agree well with the corresponding simulations. Moreover, SPICE simulations of the integrated discriminator circuit promise a time walk well below 200 ps (FWHM) over a 40 dB input amplitude dynamic range.

  20. A CMOS image sensor dedicated to medical gamma camera application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahuddin, Nur S.; Paindavoine, Michel; Ginhac, Dominique; Parmentier, Michel; Tamda, Najia

    2005-03-01

    Generally, medical Gamma Camera are based on the Anger principle. These cameras use a scintillator block coupled to a bulky array of photomultiplier tube (PMT). To simplify this, we designed a new integrated CMOS image sensor in order to replace bulky PMT photodetetors. We studied several photodiodes sensors including current mirror amplifiers. These photodiodes have been fabricated using a CMOS 0.6 micrometers process from Austria Mikro Systeme (AMS). Each sensor pixel in the array occupies respectively, 1mm x 1mm area, 0.5mm x 0.5mm area and 0.2mm 0.2mm area with fill factor 98 % and total chip area is 2 square millimeters. The sensor pixels show a logarithmic response in illumination and are capable of detecting very low green light emitting diode (less than 0.5 lux) . These results allow to use our sensor in new Gamma Camera solid-state concept.

  1. Reconfigurable RF CMOS Circuit for Cognitive Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masu, Kazuya; Okada, Kenichi

    Cognitive radio and/or SDR (Software Defined Radio) inherently requires multi-band and multi standard wireless circuit. The circuit is implemented based on Si CMOS technology. In this article, the recent progress of Si RF CMOS is described and the reconfigurable RF CMOS circuit which was proposed by the authors is introduced. At the present and in the future, several kind of Si CMOS technology can be used for RF CMOS circuit implementation. The realistic RF CMOS circuit implementation toward cognitive and/or SDR is discussed.

  2. Amplifier Module for 260-GHz Band Using Quartz Waveguide Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padmanabhan, Sharmila; Fung, King Man; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Peralta, Alejandro; Soria, Mary M.; Pukala, David M.; Sin, Seth; Samoska, Lorene A.; Sarkozy, Stephen; Lai, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Packaging of MMIC LNA (monolithic microwave integrated circuit low-noise amplifier) chips at frequencies over 200 GHz has always been problematic due to the high loss in the transition between the MMIC chip and the waveguide medium in which the chip will typically be used. In addition, above 200 GHz, wire-bond inductance between the LNA and the waveguide can severely limit the RF matching and bandwidth of the final waveguide amplifier module. This work resulted in the development of a low-loss quartz waveguide transition that includes a capacitive transmission line between the MMIC and the waveguide probe element. This capacitive transmission line tunes out the wirebond inductance (where the wire-bond is required to bond between the MMIC and the probe element). This inductance can severely limit the RF matching and bandwidth of the final waveguide amplifier module. The amplifier module consists of a quartz E-plane waveguide probe transition, a short capacitive tuning element, a short wire-bond to the MMIC, and the MMIC LNA. The output structure is similar, with a short wire-bond at the output of the MMIC, a quartz E-plane waveguide probe transition, and the output waveguide. The quartz probe element is made of 3-mil quartz, which is the thinnest commercially available material. The waveguide band used is WR4, from 170 to 260 GHz. This new transition and block design is an improvement over prior art because it provides for better RF matching, and will likely yield lower loss and better noise figure. The development of high-performance, low-noise amplifiers in the 180-to- 700-GHz range has applications for future earth science and planetary instruments with low power and volume, and astrophysics array instruments for molecular spectroscopy. This frequency band, while suitable for homeland security and commercial applications (such as millimeter-wave imaging, hidden weapons detection, crowd scanning, airport security, and communications), also has applications to

  3. III-V HEMTs: low-noise devices for high-frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, Javier

    2003-05-01

    With the recent development of broadband and satellite communications, one of the main engines for the advance of modern Microelectronics is the fabrication of devices with increasing cutoff frequency and lowest possible level of noise. Even if heterojunction bipolar devices (HBTs) have reached a good frequency performance, the top end of high frequency low-noise applications is monopolized by unipolar devices, mainly HEMTs (High Electron Mobility Transistors). In particular, within the vast family of heterojunction devices, the best results ever reported in the W-band have been obtained with InP based HEMTs using the AlInAs/InGaAs material system, improving those of usual GaAs based pseudomorphic HEMTs. In field effect devices, the reduction of the gate length (Lg) up to the technological limit is the main way to achieve the maximum performances. But the design of the devices is not so simple, when reducing the gate length it is convenient to keep constant the aspect ratio (gate length over gate-to-channel distance) in order to limit short channel effects. This operation can lead to the appearance of other unwanted effects, like the depletion of the channel due to the surface potential or the tunneling of electrons from the channel to the gate. Therefore, in order to optimize the high frequency or the low-noise behavior of the devices (that usually can not be reached together) not only the gate-to-channel distance must be chosen carefully, but also many other technological parameters (both geometrical and electrical): composition of materials, width of the device, length, depth and position of the recess, thickness and doping of the different layers, etc. Historically, these parameters have been optimized by classical simulation techniques or, when such simulations are not physically applicable, by the expensive 'test and error' procedure. With the use of computer simulation, the design optimization can be made in a short time and with no money spent. However

  4. CMOS mm-wave transceivers for Gbps wireless communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoyong, Chi; Zheng, Song; Lixue, Kuang; Haikun, Jia; Xiangyu, Meng; Zhihua, Wang

    2016-07-01

    The challenges in the design of CMOS millimeter-wave (mm-wave) transceiver for Gbps wireless communication are discussed. To support the Gbps data rate, the link bandwidth of the receiver/transmitter must be wide enough, which puts a lot of pressure on the mm-wave front-end as well as on the baseband circuit. This paper discusses the effects of the limited link bandwidth on the transceiver system performance and overviews the bandwidth expansion techniques for mm-wave amplifiers and IF programmable gain amplifier. Furthermore, dual-mode power amplifier (PA) and self-healing technique are introduced to improve the PA's average efficiency and to deal with the process, voltage, and temperature variation issue, respectively. Several fully-integrated CMOS mm-wave transceivers are also presented to give a short overview on the state-of-the-art mm-wave transceivers. Project supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61331003).

  5. Implantable neurotechnologies: a review of integrated circuit neural amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Elliot; Xu, Yong Ping; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2016-01-01

    Neural signal recording is critical in modern day neuroscience research and emerging neural prosthesis programs. Neural recording requires the use of precise, low-noise amplifier systems to acquire and condition the weak neural signals that are transduced through electrode interfaces. Neural amplifiers and amplifier-based systems are available commercially or can be designed in-house and fabricated using integrated circuit (IC) technologies, resulting in very large-scale integration or application-specific integrated circuit solutions. IC-based neural amplifiers are now used to acquire untethered/portable neural recordings, as they meet the requirements of a miniaturized form factor, light weight and low power consumption. Furthermore, such miniaturized and low-power IC neural amplifiers are now being used in emerging implantable neural prosthesis technologies. This review focuses on neural amplifier-based devices and is presented in two interrelated parts. First, neural signal recording is reviewed, and practical challenges are highlighted. Current amplifier designs with increased functionality and performance and without penalties in chip size and power are featured. Second, applications of IC-based neural amplifiers in basic science experiments (e.g., cortical studies using animal models), neural prostheses (e.g., brain/nerve machine interfaces) and treatment of neuronal diseases (e.g., DBS for treatment of epilepsy) are highlighted. The review concludes with future outlooks of this technology and important challenges with regard to neural signal amplification. PMID:26798055

  6. Implantable neurotechnologies: a review of integrated circuit neural amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kian Ann; Greenwald, Elliot; Xu, Yong Ping; Thakor, Nitish V

    2016-01-01

    Neural signal recording is critical in modern day neuroscience research and emerging neural prosthesis programs. Neural recording requires the use of precise, low-noise amplifier systems to acquire and condition the weak neural signals that are transduced through electrode interfaces. Neural amplifiers and amplifier-based systems are available commercially or can be designed in-house and fabricated using integrated circuit (IC) technologies, resulting in very large-scale integration or application-specific integrated circuit solutions. IC-based neural amplifiers are now used to acquire untethered/portable neural recordings, as they meet the requirements of a miniaturized form factor, light weight and low power consumption. Furthermore, such miniaturized and low-power IC neural amplifiers are now being used in emerging implantable neural prosthesis technologies. This review focuses on neural amplifier-based devices and is presented in two interrelated parts. First, neural signal recording is reviewed, and practical challenges are highlighted. Current amplifier designs with increased functionality and performance and without penalties in chip size and power are featured. Second, applications of IC-based neural amplifiers in basic science experiments (e.g., cortical studies using animal models), neural prostheses (e.g., brain/nerve machine interfaces) and treatment of neuronal diseases (e.g., DBS for treatment of epilepsy) are highlighted. The review concludes with future outlooks of this technology and important challenges with regard to neural signal amplification.

  7. Processing of optical combs with fiber optic parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Slavík, R; Kakande, J; Petropoulos, P; Richardson, D J

    2012-04-23

    Low noise optical frequency combs consist of equally spaced narrow-linewidth optical tones. They are useful in many applications including, for example, line-by-line pulse shaping, THz generation, and coherent communications. In such applications the comb spacing, extent of spectral coverage, degree of spectral flatness, optical tone power and tone-to-noise ratio represent key considerations. Simultaneously achieving the level of performance required in each of these parameters is often challenging using existing comb generation technologies. Herein we suggest and demonstrate how fiber optic parametric amplifiers can be used to enhance all of these key comb parameters, allowing frequency span multiplication, low noise amplification with simultaneous comb spectrum flattening, and improvement in optical tone-to-noise ratio through various phase insensitive as well as phase sensitive implementations.

  8. Low cost instrumentation amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Amplifier can be used for many applications requiring high input impedance and common mode rejection, low drift, and gain accuracy on order of one percent. Performance of inexpensive amplifier approaches that of some commercial instrumentation amplifiers in many specifications.

  9. Efficient and low-noise single-photon-level frequency conversion interfaces using silicon nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Davanço, Marcelo; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-06-01

    Optical frequency conversion has applications ranging from tunable light sources to telecommunications-band interfaces for quantum information science. Here, we demonstrate efficient, low-noise frequency conversion on a nanophotonic chip through four-wave-mixing Bragg scattering in compact (footprint <0.5 × 10-4 cm2) Si3N4 microring resonators. We investigate three frequency conversion configurations: spectral translation over a few nanometres within the 980 nm band; upconversion from 1,550 nm to 980 nm and downconversion from 980 nm to 1,550 nm. With conversion efficiencies ranging from 25% for the first process to >60% for the last two processes, a signal conversion bandwidth of >1 GHz, a required continuous-wave pump power of <60 mW and background noise levels between a few femtowatts and a few picowatts, these devices are suitable for quantum frequency conversion of single-photon states from InAs/GaAs quantum dots. Simulations based on coupled mode equations and the Lugiato-Lefever equation are used to model device performance, and show quantitative agreement with measurements.

  10. A Low-Noise Solid-State Nanopore Platform Based on a Highly Insulating Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Hyun; Kumar, Ashvani; Park, Kyeong-Beom; Cho, Seong-Yong; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Lim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Young-Rok; Kim, Ki-Bum

    2014-01-01

    A solid-state nanopore platform with a low noise level and sufficient sensitivity to discriminate single-strand DNA (ssDNA) homopolymers of poly-A40 and poly-T40 using ionic current blockade sensing is proposed and demonstrated. The key features of this platform are (a) highly insulating dielectric substrates that are used to mitigate the effect of parasitic capacitance elements, which decrease the ionic current RMS noise level to sub-10 pA and (b) ultra-thin silicon nitride membranes with a physical thickness of 5 nm (an effective thickness of 2.4 nm estimated from the ionic current) are used to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio and the spatial depth resolution. The utilization of an ultra-thin membrane and a nanopore diameter as small as 1.5 nm allow the successful discrimination of 40 nucleotide ssDNA poly-A40 and poly-T40. Overall, we demonstrate that this platform overcomes several critical limitations of solid-state nanopores and opens the door to a wide range of applications in single-molecule-based detection and analysis. PMID:25502421

  11. Implications of physiological and behavioral states of extremely low noise-levels for acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Freed, S

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of reported results it is here postulated that acupuncture induces states of exceptionally low noise-level and that it shares essential features with the "quiet" of meditation. Noise, in the present context, can be represented by physiological interactions with factors that have no relevance to the nature of the essential physiological activities. These are "disturbed" by the noise. Decreasing relative noise-levels for a given signal are illustrated informationally by thermal noise in physics, chemistry, and physiological chemistry. Information, as noise decreases, becomes less diffuse and concurrently the perceived signals becomes sharper, more specific, and effectively more intense. Sharp differentiation becomes evident between formerly blurred signals. Weak signals ordinarily lost in the background become recognizable. Equivalent refinements in perception are cited by Zen Buddhist practitioners during and because of meditation. We are thus led to ascribe similar refinement during acupuncture to physiological activities, in particular, to those of the cerebral cortex. Thus, the processing and flow of physiological information have become more specific, sensitive, and comprehensive for regulation and for restoration to normal function.

  12. NASA/ARMY/BELL XV-15 Tiltrotor Low Noise Terminal Area Operations Flight Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, David A.; Edwards, Bryan D.; Decker, William A.; Marcolini, Michael A.; Klein, Peter D.

    2000-01-01

    A series of three XV-15 acoustic flight tests have been conducted over a five year period by a NASA/Army/Bell Helicopter team to evaluate the noise reduction potential for tiltrotor aircraft during terminal area operations. Lower hemispherical noise characteristics for a wide range of steady-state terminal area type operating conditions were measured during the phase 1 test and indicated that the takeoff and level flight conditions were not significant contributors to the total noise of tiltrotor operations. Phase 1 results were used to design low noise approach profiles that were tested during the phase 2 and phase 3 tests, which used large area microphone arrays to directly measure the ground noise footprints. Approach profile designs emphasized noise reduction while maintaining handling qualities sufficient for tiltrotor commercial passenger ride comfort and flight safety under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) conditions. This paper will discuss the weather, aircraft, tracking, guidance, and acoustic instrumentation systems, as well as the approach profile design philosophy, and the overall test program philosophy. Acoustic results are presented documenting the variation in tiltrotor noise due to changes in operating condition, indicating the potential for significant noise reduction using the unique tiltrotor capability of nacelle tilt.

  13. NASA/ARMY/BELL XV-15 Tiltrotor Low-Noise Terminal Area Operations Flight Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Bryan D.; Conner, David A.; Decker, William A.; Marcolini, Michael A.; Klein, Peter D.

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the noise reduction potential for tiltrotor aircraft, a series of three XV- 15 acoustic flight tests were conducted over a five-year period by a NASA/Army/Bell Helicopter team. Lower hemispherical noise characteristics for a wide range of steady-state terminal area type operating conditions were measured during the Phase I test and indicated that the takeoff and level flight conditions were not significant contributors to the total noise of tiltrotor operations. Phase I results were also used to design low-noise approach profiles that were tested later during the Phase 2 and Phase 3 tests. These latter phases used large area microphone arrays to directly measure ground noise footprints. Approach profiles emphasized noise reduction while maintaining handling qualities sufficient for tiltrotor commercial passenger ride comfort and flight safety under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) conditions. This paper will discuss the weather, aircraft, tracking, guidance, and acoustic instrumentation systems, as well as the approach profile design philosophy, and the overall test program philosophy. Acoustic results are presented to document the variation in tiltrotor noise due to changes in operating condition, indicating the potential for significant noise reduction using the unique tiltrotor capability of nacelle tilt. Recommendations are made for a final XV-15 test to define the acoustic benefits of the automated approach capability which has recently been added to this testbed aircraft.

  14. Development of a Low-Noise SQUID-Based Microtesla MRI System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Whittier; Mößle, Michael; Lee, Seungkyun; Keslo, Nathan; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2004-03-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an untuned Superconducting QUantum Intereference Device (SQUID) detector can produce 1-mm resolution images. The protons in the sample were prepolarized in a 0.3 T field, manipulated by ˜100 μT/m gradient fields for image encoding, and detected by the SQUID in the 130 μT measurement field. To reduce the effect of environmental noise, the input coil of the SQUID was connected to a superconducting second order gradiometer; both SQUID and gradiometer were contained in a low noise dewar. A 3-mm thick aluminum box enclosing the experiment further attenuated external noise. A superconducting weak link in series with the gradiometer protected the SQUID by limiting the current induced during polarizing pulses. Progressive improvements have reduced the system noise to below the 1.5 fT Hz-1/2 SQUID noise. A typical phase-encoded two-dimensional image taken in a 300 Hz imaging band has a signal to noise ratio of 15 and takes 100 s to acquire. Supported by USDOE.

  15. Method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth, low noise mechanical I/O for computer systems

    DOEpatents

    Rosenberg, Louis B.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  16. The Majorana low-noise low-background front-end electronics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; et al

    2015-03-24

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ(0ν)) of the isotope ⁷⁶Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ββ(0ν)-decay searches, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the ⁷⁶Ge ββ(0ν)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level significantly constrains the design of the readout electronics, which is further driven by noise and energy resolutionmore » performances. We present here the low-noise low-background front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance p-type point contact (P-PC) germanium detectors of the Majorana Demonstrator. This resistive-feedback front-end, specifically designed to have low mass, is fabricated on a radioassayed fused-silica substrate where the feedback resistor consists of a sputtered thin film of high purity amorphous germanium and the feedback capacitor is based on the capacitance between gold conductive traces.« less

  17. Fabrication of Low Noise Borosilicate Glass Nanopores for Single Molecule Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Bafna, Jayesh A.; Soni, Gautam V.

    2016-01-01

    We show low-cost fabrication and characterization of borosilicate glass nanopores for single molecule sensing. Nanopores with diameters of ~100 nm were fabricated in borosilicate glass capillaries using laser assisted glass puller. We further achieve controlled reduction and nanometer-size control in pore diameter by sculpting them under constant electron beam exposure. We successfully fabricate pore diameters down to 6 nm. We next show electrical characterization and low-noise behavior of these borosilicate nanopores and compare their taper geometries. We show, for the first time, a comprehensive characterization of glass nanopore conductance across six-orders of magnitude (1M-1μM) of salt conditions, highlighting the role of buffer conditions. Finally, we demonstrate single molecule sensing capabilities of these devices with real-time translocation experiments of individual λ-DNA molecules. We observe distinct current blockage signatures of linear as well as folded DNA molecules as they undergo voltage-driven translocation through the glass nanopores. We find increased signal to noise for single molecule detection for higher trans-nanopore driving voltages. We propose these nanopores will expand the realm of applications for nanopore platform. PMID:27285088

  18. The Majorana low-noise low-background front-end electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y. -D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Phillips, II, D. G.; Poon, A. W.P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G.H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.

    2015-03-24

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ(0ν)) of the isotope ⁷⁶Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ββ(0ν)-decay searches, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the ⁷⁶Ge ββ(0ν)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level significantly constrains the design of the readout electronics, which is further driven by noise and energy resolution performances. We present here the low-noise low-background front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance p-type point contact (P-PC) germanium detectors of the Majorana Demonstrator. This resistive-feedback front-end, specifically designed to have low mass, is fabricated on a radioassayed fused-silica substrate where the feedback resistor consists of a sputtered thin film of high purity amorphous germanium and the feedback capacitor is based on the capacitance between gold conductive traces.

  19. An ultra-low noise optical head for liquid environment atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, I; Kuchuk, K; Sivan, U

    2015-08-01

    The design considerations and eventual performance of a new, ultra-low noise optical head for dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) are presented. The head, designed specifically for the study of hydration layers and ion organization next to solid surfaces and biomolecules, displays an integrated tip-sample distance noise below 3 pm. The sensitivity of the optical beam deflection sensor, operating at frequencies up to 8.6 MHz (3 dB roll-off), is typically below 10 fm/√Hz, enabling utilization of high frequency cantilevers of low thermal noise for fundamental and higher mode imaging. Exceptional signal stability and low optical noise are achieved by replacing the commonly used laser diode with a helium-neon laser. An integral photothermal excitation of the cantilever produces pure harmonic oscillations, minimizing the generation of higher cantilever modes and deleterious sound waves characterizing the commonly used excitation by a piezoelectric crystal. The optical head is designed to fit on top of the widespread Multimode(®) (Bruker) piezo-tube and accommodate its commercial liquid cell. The performance of the new AFM head is demonstrated by atomic resolution imaging of a muscovite mica surface in aqueous solution. PMID:26329201

  20. A low noise clock generator for high-resolution time-to-digital convertors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinzie, J.; Christiaensen, J.; Moreira, P.; Steyaert, M.; Leroux, P.

    2016-02-01

    A robust PLL clock generator has been designed for the harsh environment in high-energy physics applications. The PLL operates with a reference clock frequency of 40 MHz to 50 MHz and performs a multiplication by 64. An LC tank VCO with low internal phase noise can generate a frequency from 2.2 GHz up to 3.2 GHz with internal discrete bank switching. The PLL includes an automatic bank selection algorithm to correctly select the correct range of the oscillator. The PLL has been fabricated in a 65 nm CMOS technology and consumes less than 30 mW. The additive jitter of the PLL has been measured to be less than 400 fs RMS.

  1. A Low-Noise, Modular, and Versatile Analog Front-End Intended for Processing In Vitro Neuronal Signals Detected by Microelectrode Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Regalia, Giulia; Biffi, Emilia; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The collection of good quality extracellular neuronal spikes from neuronal cultures coupled to Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) is a binding requirement to gather reliable data. Due to physical constraints, low power requirement, or the need of customizability, commercial recording platforms are not fully adequate for the development of experimental setups integrating MEA technology with other equipment needed to perform experiments under climate controlled conditions, like environmental chambers or cell culture incubators. To address this issue, we developed a custom MEA interfacing system featuring low noise, low power, and the capability to be readily integrated inside an incubator-like environment. Two stages, a preamplifier and a filter amplifier, were designed, implemented on printed circuit boards, and tested. The system is characterized by a low input-referred noise (<1 μV RMS), a high channel separation (>70 dB), and signal-to-noise ratio values of neuronal recordings comparable to those obtained with the benchmark commercial MEA system. In addition, the system was successfully integrated with an environmental MEA chamber, without harming cell cultures during experiments and without being damaged by the high humidity level. The devised system is of practical value in the development of in vitro platforms to study temporally extended neuronal network dynamics by means of MEAs. PMID:25977683

  2. A low-noise, modular, and versatile analog front-end intended for processing in vitro neuronal signals detected by microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Regalia, Giulia; Biffi, Emilia; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The collection of good quality extracellular neuronal spikes from neuronal cultures coupled to Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) is a binding requirement to gather reliable data. Due to physical constraints, low power requirement, or the need of customizability, commercial recording platforms are not fully adequate for the development of experimental setups integrating MEA technology with other equipment needed to perform experiments under climate controlled conditions, like environmental chambers or cell culture incubators. To address this issue, we developed a custom MEA interfacing system featuring low noise, low power, and the capability to be readily integrated inside an incubator-like environment. Two stages, a preamplifier and a filter amplifier, were designed, implemented on printed circuit boards, and tested. The system is characterized by a low input-referred noise (<1 μV RMS), a high channel separation (>70 dB), and signal-to-noise ratio values of neuronal recordings comparable to those obtained with the benchmark commercial MEA system. In addition, the system was successfully integrated with an environmental MEA chamber, without harming cell cultures during experiments and without being damaged by the high humidity level. The devised system is of practical value in the development of in vitro platforms to study temporally extended neuronal network dynamics by means of MEAs.

  3. Implementation of Surface Acoustic Wave Vapor Sensor Using Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chia-Sung; Chang, Ching-Chun; Ku, Chia-Lin; Peng, Kang-Ming; Jeng, Erik S.; Chen, Wen-Lin; Huang, Guo-Wei; Wu, Lin-Kun

    2009-04-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) vapor sensor is presented in this work. A SAW delay line oscillator on quartz substrate with the high gain complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) amplifier using a two-poly-two-metal (2P2M) 0.35 µm process was designed. The gain of the CMOS amplifier and its total power consumption are 20 dB and 70 mW, respectively. The achieved phase noise of this SAW oscillator is -150 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The sensing is successfully demonstrated by a thin poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH) polymer film on a SAW oscillator with alcohol vapor. This two-in-one sensor unit includes the SAW device and the CMOS amplifier provides designers with comprehensive model for using these components for sensor circuit fabrication. Furthermore it will be promising for future chemical and biological sensing applications.

  4. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Effect of collector bias current on the linearity of common-emitter BJT amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Li; Jianfu, Teng; Xiuwei, Xuan

    2010-12-01

    Using a Volterra series, an explicit formula is derived for the connection between input 3rd-order intercept point and collector bias current (ICQ) in a common-emitter bipolar junction transistor amplifier. The analysis indicates that the larger ICQ is, the more linear the amplifier is. Furthermore, this has been verified by experiment. This study also integrates a method called dynamic bias current for expanding the dynamic range of an LNA (low noise amplifier) as an application of the analysis result obtained above. IMR3 (3rd-order intermodulation rate) is applied to evaluate the LNA's performance with and without adopting this method in this study.

  5. Thermal Radiometer Signal Processing Using Radiation Hard CMOS Application Specific Integrated Circuits for Use in Harsh Planetary Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quilligan, G.; DuMonthier, J.; Aslam, S.; Lakew, B.; Kleyner, I.; Katz, R.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal radiometers such as proposed for the Europa Clipper flyby mission require low noise signal processing for thermal imaging with immunity to Total Ionizing Dose (TID) and Single Event Latchup (SEL). Described is a second generation Multi- Channel Digitizer (MCD2G) Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) that accurately digitizes up to 40 thermopile pixels with greater than 50 Mrad (Si) immunity TID and 174 MeV-sq cm/mg SEL. The MCD2G ASIC uses Radiation Hardened By Design (RHBD) techniques with a 180 nm CMOS process node.

  6. Thermal Radiometer Signal Processing using Radiation Hard CMOS Application Specific Integrated Circuits for use in Harsh Planetary Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilligan, G.; DuMonthier, J.; Aslam, S.; Lakew, B.; Kleyner, I.; Katz, R.

    2015-10-01

    Thermal radiometers such as proposed for the Europa Clipper flyby mission [1] require low noise signal processing for thermal imaging with immunity to Total Ionizing Dose (TID) and Single Event Latchup (SEL). Described is a second generation Multi- Channel Digitizer (MCD2G) Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) that accurately digitizes up to 40 thermopile pixels with greater than 50 Mrad (Si) immunity TID and 174 MeV-cm2/mg SEL. The MCD2G ASIC uses Radiation Hardened By Design (RHBD) techniques with a 180 nm CMOS process node.

  7. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    DOEpatents

    Hilbert, Claude; Martinis, John M.; Clarke, John

    1986-01-01

    A low noise radiofrequency amplifier (10), using a dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the input amplifying element. The dc SQUID (11) and an input coil (12) are maintained at superconductivity temperatures in a superconducting shield (13), with the input coil (12) inductively coupled to the superconducting ring (17) of the dc SQUID (11). A radiofrequency signal from outside the shield (13) is applied to the input coil (12), and an amplified radiofrequency signal is developed across the dc SQUID ring (17) and transmitted to exteriorly of the shield (13). A power gain of 19.5.+-.0.5 dB has been achieved with a noise temperature of 1.0.+-.0.4 K. at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  8. Improved Signal Chains for Readout of CMOS Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Hancock, Bruce; Cunningham, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    An improved generic design has been devised for implementing signal chains involved in readout from complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors and for other readout integrated circuits (ICs) that perform equivalent functions. The design applies to any such IC in which output signal charges from the pixels in a given row are transferred simultaneously into sampling capacitors at the bottoms of the columns, then voltages representing individual pixel charges are read out in sequence by sequentially turning on column-selecting field-effect transistors (FETs) in synchronism with source-follower- or operational-amplifier-based amplifier circuits. The improved design affords the best features of prior source-follower-and operational- amplifier-based designs while overcoming the major limitations of those designs. The limitations can be summarized as follows: a) For a source-follower-based signal chain, the ohmic voltage drop associated with DC bias current flowing through the column-selection FET causes unacceptable voltage offset, nonlinearity, and reduced small-signal gain. b) For an operational-amplifier-based signal chain, the required bias current and the output noise increase superlinearly with size of the pixel array because of a corresponding increase in the effective capacitance of the row bus used to couple the sampled column charges to the operational amplifier. The effect of the bus capacitance is to simultaneously slow down the readout circuit and increase noise through the Miller effect.

  9. Acoustical Testing Laboratory Developed to Support the Low-Noise Design of Microgravity Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Beth A.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has designed and constructed an Acoustical Testing Laboratory to support the low-noise design of microgravity space flight hardware. This new laboratory will provide acoustic emissions testing and noise control services for a variety of customers, particularly for microgravity space flight hardware that must meet International Space Station limits on noise emissions. These limits have been imposed by the space station to support hearing conservation, speech communication, and safety goals as well as to prevent noise-induced vibrations that could impact microgravity research data. The Acoustical Testing Laboratory consists of a 23 by 27 by 20 ft (height) convertible hemi/anechoic chamber and separate sound-attenuating test support enclosure. Absorptive 34-in. fiberglass wedges in the test chamber provide an anechoic environment down to 100 Hz. A spring-isolated floor system affords vibration isolation above 3 Hz. These criteria, along with very low design background levels, will enable the acquisition of accurate and repeatable acoustical measurements on test articles, up to a full space station rack in size, that produce very little noise. Removable floor wedges will allow the test chamber to operate in either a hemi/anechoic or anechoic configuration, depending on the size of the test article and the specific test being conducted. The test support enclosure functions as a control room during normal operations but, alternatively, may be used as a noise-control enclosure for test articles that require the operation of noise-generating test support equipment.

  10. A Low-Noise DC Seismic Accelerometer Based on a Combination of MET/MEMS Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Neeshpapa, Alexander; Antonov, Alexander; Agafonov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Molecular-electronic transducers (MET) have a high conversion coefficient and low power consumption, and do not require precision mechanical components thus allowing the construction of cost- and power-efficient seismic accelerometers. Whereas the instrumental resolution of a MET accelerometer within the 0.1–100 Hz frequency range surpasses that of the best Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and even some force-balanced accelerometers, the fundamental inability to register gravity or, in other words, zero frequency acceleration, significantly constrains the further spread of MET-based accelerometers. Ways of obviating this inherent zero frequency insensitivity within MET technology have so far, not been found. This article explores a possible approach to the construction of a hybrid seismic accelerometer combining the superb performance of a MET sensor in the middle and high frequency range with a conventional on chip MEMS accelerometer covering the lower frequencies and gravity. Though the frequency separation of a signal is widely used in various applications, the opposite task, i.e., the combining of two signals with different bandwidths is less common. Based on theoretical research and the analysis of actual sensors' performance, the authors determined optimal parameters for building a hybrid sensor. Description and results for implementation of the hybrid sensor are given in the Experimental section of the article. Completing a MET sensor with a cost-effective MEMS permitted the construction of a low noise DC accelerometer preserving the noise performance of a MET sensing element. The work presented herein may prove useful in designing other combined sensors based on different technologies. PMID:25549175

  11. A Low-Noise DC seismic accelerometer based on a combination of MET/MEMS sensors.

    PubMed

    Neeshpapa, Alexander; Antonov, Alexander; Agafonov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Molecular-electronic transducers (MET) have a high conversion coefficient and low power consumption, and do not require precision mechanical components thus allowing the construction of cost- and power-efficient seismic accelerometers. Whereas the instrumental resolution of a MET accelerometer within the 0.1-100 Hz frequency range surpasses that of the best Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and even some force-balanced accelerometers, the fundamental inability to register gravity or, in other words, zero frequency acceleration, significantly constrains the further spread of MET-based accelerometers. Ways of obviating this inherent zero frequency insensitivity within MET technology have so far, not been found. This article explores a possible approach to the construction of a hybrid seismic accelerometer combining the superb performance of a MET sensor in the middle and high frequency range with a conventional on chip MEMS accelerometer covering the lower frequencies and gravity. Though the frequency separation of a signal is widely used in various applications, the opposite task, i.e., the combining of two signals with different bandwidths is less common. Based on theoretical research and the analysis of actual sensors' performance, the authors determined optimal parameters for building a hybrid sensor. Description and results for implementation of the hybrid sensor are given in the Experimental section of the article. Completing a MET sensor with a cost-effective MEMS permitted the construction of a low noise DC accelerometer preserving the noise performance of a MET sensing element. The work presented herein may prove useful in designing other combined sensors based on different technologies.

  12. Aerodynamic Performance of Scale-Model Turbofan Outlet Guide Vanes Designed for Low Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.

    2001-01-01

    The design of effective new technologies to reduce aircraft propulsion noise is dependent on an understanding of the noise sources and noise generation mechanisms in the modern turbofan engine. In order to more fully understand the physics of noise in a turbofan engine, a comprehensive aeroacoustic wind tunnel test programs was conducted called the 'Source Diagnostic Test.' The text was cooperative effort between NASA and General Electric Aircraft Engines, as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program. A 1/5-scale model simulator representing the bypass stage of a current technology high bypass ratio turbofan engine was used in the test. The test article consisted of the bypass fan and outlet guide vanes in a flight-type nacelle. The fan used was a medium pressure ratio design with 22 individual, wide chord blades. Three outlet guide vane design configurations were investigated, representing a 54-vane radial Baseline configuration, a 26-vane radial, wide chord Low Count configuration and a 26-vane, wide chord Low Noise configuration with 30 deg of aft sweep. The test was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9 by 15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel at velocities simulating the takeoff and approach phases of the aircraft flight envelope. The Source Diagnostic Test had several acoustic and aerodynamic technical objectives: (1) establish the performance of a scale model fan selected to represent the current technology turbofan product; (2) assess the performance of the fan stage with each of the three distinct outlet guide vane designs; (3) determine the effect of the outlet guide vane configuration on the fan baseline performance; and (4) conduct detailed flowfield diagnostic surveys, both acoustic and aerodynamic, to characterize and understand the noise generation mechanisms in a turbofan engine. This paper addresses the fan and stage aerodynamic performance results from the Source Diagnostic Test.

  13. Spatial resolution of SQUID magnetometers and comparison with low noise room temperature magnetic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolabdjian, C.; Qasimi, A.; Bloyet, D.; Mosser, V.

    2002-03-01

    Any magnetic sensor placed in a spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field delivers a signal proportional the mean field value taken over an effective area or volume which depends on the type of sensor considered. In the case of the field produced by a magnetic dipole and detected by a square or circular planar sensor, the overall measured spatial resolution ideally depends on the ratio of the mean dipole-sensor distance z0 to the square root of the effective sensor area AE. For Z 0/ A E≪1 , the spatial resolution is limited by the size of the sensor, whereas for z 0/ A E≫1 the dipole-sensor distance is the predominant factor. To compare various low noise magnetic sensors operating either at low temperature or at room temperature, we have measured their sensitivities and spatial responses to the field produced by a magnetic moment having the form of a tiny circular current loop. The sensors could be moved in all directions with respect to the current loop. The transfer of each sensor to the magnetic dipole field was compared to their response in a homogeneous field so as to deduce their effective area and compare this area to that deduced from independent spatial resolution measurements. We report the experimental results given by four types of sensors namely a dc-SQUID, a Hall effect sensor, a giant magneto-resistive sensor and a flux-gate sensor and discuss them by mean of a “figure of merit” criterion combining their spatial resolution and their sensitivity.

  14. High finesse external cavity VCSELs: from very low noise lasers to dual frequency lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baili, Ghaya; Alouini, Medhi; Morvan, Loic; Bretenaker, Fabien; Sagnes, Isabelle; Garnache, Arnaud; Dolfi, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Low noise-level optical sources are required for numerous applications such as microwave photonics, fiber-optic sensing and time/frequency references distribution. In this paper, we demonstrate how inserting a SC active medium into a centimetric high-Q external cavity is a simple way to obtain a shot-noise-limited laser source over a very wide frequency bandwidth. This approach ensures, with a compact design, a sufficiently long photon lifetime to reach the oscillation-relaxation- free class-A regime. This concept has been illustrated by inserting a 1/2-VCSEL in an external cavity including an etalon filter. A -156dB/Hz relative intensity noise level is obtained over the 100 MHz to 18 GHz bandwidth of interest. This is several orders of magnitude better than the noise, previously observed in VCSELs, belonging to the class-B regime. The optimization, in terms of noise, is shown to be a trade-off between the cavity length and the laser mode filtering. The transition between the class-B and class-A dynamical behaviors is directly observed by continuously controlling the photon lifetime is a sub-millimetric to a centimetric cavity length. It's proven that the transition occurs progressively, without any discontinuity. Based on the same laser architecture, tunable dual-frequency oscillation is demonstrated by reducing the polarized eigenstates overlap in the gain medium. The class-A dynamics of such a laser, free of relaxation oscillations, enables to suppress the electrical phase noise in excess, usually observed in the vicinity of the beat note. An original technique for jitter reduction in mode-locked VECSELs is also investigated. Such lasers are needed for photonic analog to digital converters.

  15. Rapid manufacturing of low-noise membranes for nanopore sensors by trans-chip illumination lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Xander J. A.; Jonsson, Magnus P.; Plesa, Calin; Soni, Gautam V.; Dekker, Cees; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2012-11-01

    In recent years, the concept of nanopore sensing has matured from a proof-of-principle method to a widespread, versatile technique for the study of biomolecular properties and interactions. While traditional nanopore devices based on a nanopore in a single layer membrane supported on a silicon chip can be rapidly fabricated using standard microfabrication methods, chips with additional insulating layers beyond the membrane region can provide significantly lower noise levels, but at the expense of requiring more costly and time-consuming fabrication steps. Here we present a novel fabrication protocol that overcomes this issue by enabling rapid and reproducible manufacturing of low-noise membranes for nanopore experiments. The fabrication protocol, termed trans-chip illumination lithography, is based on illuminating a membrane-containing wafer from its backside such that a photoresist (applied on the wafer’s top side) is exposed exclusively in the membrane regions. Trans-chip illumination lithography permits the local modification of membrane regions and hence the fabrication of nanopore chips containing locally patterned insulating layers. This is achieved while maintaining a well-defined area containing a single thin membrane for nanopore drilling. The trans-chip illumination lithography method achieves this without relying on separate masks, thereby eliminating time-consuming alignment steps as well as the need for a mask aligner. Using the presented approach, we demonstrate rapid and reproducible fabrication of nanopore chips that contain small (12 μm × 12 μm) free-standing silicon nitride membranes surrounded by insulating layers. The electrical noise characteristics of these nanopore chips are shown to be superior to those of simpler designs without insulating layers and comparable in quality to more complex designs that are more challenging to fabricate.

  16. The low-noise 115-GHz receiver on the Columbia-GISS 4-ft radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cong, H.-I.; Kerr, A. R.; Mattauch, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The superheterodyne millimeter-wave radiometer on the Columbia-GISS 4-ft telescope is described. This receiver uses a room-temperature Schottky diode mixer, with a resonant-ring filter as LO diplexer. The diplexer has low signal loss, efficient LO power coupling, and suppresses most of the LO noise at both sidebands. The receiver IF section has a parametric amplifier as its first stage with sufficient gain to overcome the second-stage amplifier noise. A broad-banded quarter-wave impedance transformer minimizes the mismatch between mixer and paramp. At 115 GHz, the SSB receiver noise temperature is 860 K, which is believed to be the lowest figure so far reported for a room-temperature receiver at this frequency.

  17. Optimization of a low noise detection circuit for probing the structure of damage cascades with IBIC

    SciTech Connect

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Doyle, Barney L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Wampler, William R.

    2015-06-18

    Optimal detector / pre-amplifier combinations have been identified for the use of light ion IBIC (ion beam induced charge) to probe the physical structure of electrically active defects in damage cascades caused by heavy ion implantation. The ideal detector must have a sufficiently thin dead layer that incident ions will produce the majority of damage cascades in the depletion region of the detector rather than the dead layer. Detector and circuit noise must be low enough to detect the implantation of a single heavy ion as well as the decrease in the light ion IBIC signal caused by Shockley-Read-Hall recombination when the beam scans regions of the detector damaged by the heavy ion. The IBIC signals from three detectors irradiated with 750 keV He⁺ ions are measured with commercial and bespoke charge sensitive pre-amplifiers to identify the combination with the lowest noise.

  18. Optimization of a low noise detection circuit for probing the structure of damage cascades with IBIC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Doyle, Barney L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Wampler, William R.

    2015-06-18

    Optimal detector / pre-amplifier combinations have been identified for the use of light ion IBIC (ion beam induced charge) to probe the physical structure of electrically active defects in damage cascades caused by heavy ion implantation. The ideal detector must have a sufficiently thin dead layer that incident ions will produce the majority of damage cascades in the depletion region of the detector rather than the dead layer. Detector and circuit noise must be low enough to detect the implantation of a single heavy ion as well as the decrease in the light ion IBIC signal caused by Shockley-Read-Hall recombinationmore » when the beam scans regions of the detector damaged by the heavy ion. The IBIC signals from three detectors irradiated with 750 keV He⁺ ions are measured with commercial and bespoke charge sensitive pre-amplifiers to identify the combination with the lowest noise.« less

  19. Parametric Amplifier and Oscillator Based on Josephson Junction Circuitry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Koshino, K.; Nakamura, Y.

    While the demand for low-noise amplification is ubiquitous, applications where the quantum-limited noise performance is indispensable are not very common. Microwave parametric amplifiers with near quantum-limited noise performance were first demonstrated more than 20 years ago. However, there had been little effort until recently to improve the performance or the ease of use of these amplifiers, partly because of a lack of any urgent motivation. The emergence of the field of quantum information processing in superconducting systems has changed this situation dramatically. The need to reliably read out the state of a given qubit using a very weak microwave probe within a very short time has led to renewed interest in these quantum-limited microwave amplifiers, which are already widely used as tools in this field. Here, we describe the quantum mechanical theory for one particular parametric amplifier design, called the flux-driven Josephson parametric amplifier, which we developed in 2008. The theory predicts the performance of this parametric amplifier, including its gain, bandwidth, and noise temperature. We also present the phase detection capability of this amplifier when it is operated with a pump power that is above the threshold, i.e., as a parametric phase-locked oscillator or parametron.

  20. Silicon CMOS optical receiver circuits with integrated thin-film compound semiconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, Martin A.; Lee, Myunghee; Jokerst, Nan Marie; Camperi-Ginestet, C.

    1995-04-01

    While many circuit designers have tackled the problem of CMOS digital communications receiver design, few have considered the problem of circuitry suitable for an all CMOS digital IC fabrication process. Faced with a high speed receiver design the circuit designer will soon conclude that a high speed analog-oriented fabrication process provides superior performance advantages to a digital CMOS process. However, for applications where there are overwhelming reasons to integrate the receivers on the same IC as large amounts of conventional digital circuitry, the low yield and high cost of the exotic analog-oriented fabrication is no longer an option. The issues that result from a requirement to use a digital CMOS IC process cut across all aspects of receiver design, and result in significant differences in circuit design philosophy and topology. Digital ICs are primarily designed to yield small, fast CMOS devices for digital logic gates, thus no effort is put into providing accurate or high speed resistances, or capacitors. This lack of any reliable resistance or capacitance has a significant impact on receiver design. Since resistance optimization is not a prerogative of the digital IC process engineer, the wisest option is thus to not use these elements, opting instead for active circuitry to replace the functions normally ascribed to resistance and capacitance. Depending on the application receiver noise may be a dominant design constraint. The noise performance of CMOS amplifiers is different than bipolar or GaAs MESFET circuits, shot noise is generally insignificant when compared to channel thermal noise. As a result the optimal input stage topology is significantly different for the different technologies. It is found that, at speeds of operation approaching the limits of the digital CMOS process, open loop designs have noise-power-gain-bandwidth tradeoff performance superior to feedback designs. Furthermore, the lack of good resisters and capacitors

  1. A fully integrated CMOS VCXO-IC with low phase noise, wide tuning range and high tuning linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanjun, Yang; Yun, Zeng

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a low phase noise, wide tuning range and high tuning linearity CMOS voltage controlled crystal oscillator IC (VCXO-IC) with LVCMOS and LVPECL output. A differential coupled frequency doubling Colpitts oscillator is adopted to obtain low noise 2× frequency output. Wide tuning range and high linearity are simultaneously achieved by using MOS varactor arrays. The measurement results show that the designed VCXO-IC achieves -134 dBc/Hz phase noise at 1 kHz offset frequency and ± 135 ppm output frequency tuning range within 3% linearity by using 40 MHz fundamental AT-cut crystal. The VCXO-IC is fabricated in the chartered 0.35 μm standard CMOS process and occupies a total silicon area of 2.4 mm2. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61350007).

  2. High gain low noise L-band preamplifier with cascade double-pass structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Dongfang; Wang, Yanyong; Bao, Huanmin; Yang, Tianxin; Li, Shichen

    2005-06-01

    An optimized two-stage-cascade double-pass structure L-band preamplifier was proposed and experimentally studied to overcome the shortcomings of low gain coefficient and high noise figure of L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA). The fiber lengthes of 6.5 and 32.5 m, pump powers of 130 and 119 mW for the first and second stages respectively are used in the experiment. When input signal power is -30 dBm, the amplifier can provide gain above 38.84 dB in a wavelength range of 34 nm (1568---1602 nm), gain ripple less than 2.04 dB (40.88---38.84 dB), and noise figures lower than 5.29 dB with the lowest value of 3.95 dB at 1590 nm. Experimental and simulation results show that this low cost and high pump efficiency amplifier is suitable for the application as an L-band preamplifier in the broadband fiber communication system.

  3. LLNL/Lion Precision LVDT amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, D.J.

    1994-04-01

    A high-precision, low-noise, LVDT amplifier has been developed which is a significant advancement on the current state of the art in contact displacement measurement. This amplifier offers the dynamic range of a typical LVDT probe but with a resolution that rivals that of non contact displacement measuring systems such as capacitance gauges and laser interferometers. Resolution of 0.1 {mu} in with 100 Hz bandwidth is possible. This level of resolution is over an order of magnitude greater than what is now commercially available. A front panel switch can reduce the bandwidth to 2.5 Hz and attain a resolution of 0.025 {mu} in. This level of resolution meets or exceeds that of displacement measuring laser interferometry or capacitance gauge systems. Contact displacement measurement offers high part spatial resolution and therefore can measure not only part contour but surface finish. Capacitance gauges and displacement laser interferometry offer poor part spatial resolution and can not provide good surface finish measurements. Machine tool builders, meteorologists and quality inspection departments can immediately utilize the higher accuracy and capabilities that this amplifier offers. The precision manufacturing industry can improve as a result of improved capability to measure parts that help reduce costs and minimize material waste.

  4. SQUARE WAVE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Leavitt, M.A.; Lutz, I.C.

    1958-08-01

    An amplifier circuit is described for amplifying sigmals having an alternating current component superimposed upon a direct current component, without loss of any segnnent of the alternating current component. The general circuit arrangement includes a vibrator, two square wave amplifiers, and recombination means. The amplifier input is connected to the vibrating element of the vibrator and is thereby alternately applied to the input of each square wave amplifier. The detailed circuitry of the recombination means constitutes the novelty of the annplifier and consists of a separate, dual triode amplifier coupled to the output of each square wave amplifier with a recombination connection from the plate of one amplifier section to a grid of one section of the other amplifier. The recombination circuit has provisions for correcting distortion caused by overlapping of the two square wave voltages from the square wave amplifiers.

  5. Low-dose performance of wafer-scale CMOS-based X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Willem H.; Peters, Inge M.; Smit, Chiel; Kessener, Yves; Bosiers, Jan

    2015-03-01

    Compared to published amorphous-silicon (TFT) based X-ray detectors, crystalline silicon CMOS-based active-pixel detectors exploit the benefits of low noise, high speed, on-chip integration and featuring offered by CMOS technology. This presentation focuses on the specific advantage of high image quality at very low dose levels. The measurement of very low dose performance parameters like Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) and Noise Equivalent Dose (NED) is a challenge by itself. Second-order effects like defect pixel behavior, temporal and quantization noise effects, dose measurement accuracy and limitation of the x-ray source settings will influence the measurements at very low dose conditions. Using an analytical model to predict the low dose behavior of a detector from parameters extracted from shot-noise limited dose levels is presented. These models can also provide input for a simulation environment for optimizing the performance of future detectors. In this paper, models for predicting NED and the DQE at very low dose are compared to measurements on different CMOS detectors. Their validity for different sensor and optical stack combinations as well as for different x-ray beam conditions was validated.

  6. Design of an ultra low power CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Hu-Guo, C.; Husson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-01

    Despite a continuously increasing demand, neutron electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) are still far from being completely established because their development is a very difficult task. A low-noise, ultra low power consumption CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter has been implemented in a 0.35 {mu}m CMOS technology. The prototype is composed of a pixel array for detection of charged particles, and the readout electronics is integrated on the same substrate for signal processing. The excess electrons generated by an impinging particle are collected by the pixel array. The charge collection time and the efficiency are the crucial points of a CMOS detector. The 3-D device simulations using the commercially available Synopsys-SENTAURUS package address the detailed charge collection process. Within a time of 1.9 {mu}s, about 59% electrons created by the impact particle are collected in a cluster of 4 x 4 pixels with the pixel pitch of 80 {mu}m. A charge sensitive preamplifier (CSA) and a shaper are employed in the frond-end readout. The tests with electrical signals indicate that our prototype with a total active area of 2.56 x 2.56 mm{sup 2} performs an equivalent noise charge (ENC) of less than 400 e - and 314 {mu}W power consumption, leading to a promising prototype. (authors)

  7. Low-noise sub-harmonic injection locked multiloop ring oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilin, Xu; Di, Wu; Xueming, Wei; Baolin, Wei; Jihai, Duan; Fadi, Gui

    2016-09-01

    A three-stage differential voltage-controlled ring oscillator is presented for wide-tuning and low-phase noise requirement of clock and data recovery circuit in ultra wideband (UWB) wireless body area network. To improve the performance of phase noise of delay cell with coarse and fine frequency tuning, injection locked technology together with pseudo differential architecture are adopted. In addition, a multiloop is employed for frequency boosting. Two RVCOs, the standard RVCO without the IL block and the proposed IL RVCO, were fabricated in SMIC 0.18 μm 1P6M Salicide CMOS process. The proposed IL RVCO exhibits a measured phase noise of ‑112.37 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset from the center frequency of 1 GHz, while dissipating a current of 8 mA excluding the buffer from a 1.8-V supply voltage. It shows a 16.07 dB phase noise improvement at 1 MHz offset compared to the standard topology. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61264001), the Guangxi Natural Science Foundation (Nos. 2013GXNSFAA019333, 2015GXNSFAA139301, 2014GXNSFAA118386), the Graduate Education Innovation Program of GUET (No. GDYCSZ201457), the Project of Guangxi Education Department (No. LD14066B) and the High-Level-Innovation Team and Outstanding Scholar Project of Guangxi Higher Education Institutes.

  8. Segmented amplifier configurations for laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hagen, Wilhelm F.

    1979-01-01

    An amplifier system for high power lasers, the system comprising a compact array of segments which (1) preserves high, large signal gain with improved pumping efficiency and (2) allows the total amplifier length to be shortened by as much as one order of magnitude. The system uses a three dimensional array of segments, with the plane of each segment being oriented at substantially the amplifier medium Brewster angle relative to the incident laser beam and with one or more linear arrays of flashlamps positioned between adjacent rows of amplifier segments, with the plane of the linear array of flashlamps being substantially parallel to the beam propagation direction.

  9. Development of CMOS integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertino, F.; Feller, A.; Greenhouse, J.; Lombardi, T.; Merriam, A.; Noto, R.; Ozga, S.; Pryor, R.; Ramondetta, P.; Smith, A.

    1979-01-01

    Report documents life cycles of two custom CMOS integrated circuits: (1) 4-bit multiplexed register with shift left and shift right capabilities, and (2) dual 4-bit registers. Cycles described include conception as logic diagrams through design, fabrication, testing, and delivery.

  10. Improved Space Object Orbit Determination Using CMOS Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, T.; Peltonen, J.; Sännti, T.; Silha, J.; Flohrer, T.

    2014-09-01

    CMOS-sensors, or in general Active Pixel Sensors (APS), are rapidly replacing CCDs in the consumer camera market. Due to significant technological advances during the past years these devices start to compete with CCDs also for demanding scientific imaging applications, in particular in the astronomy community. CMOS detectors offer a series of inherent advantages compared to CCDs, due to the structure of their basic pixel cells, which each contains their own amplifier and readout electronics. The most prominent advantages for space object observations are the extremely fast and flexible readout capabilities, feasibility for electronic shuttering and precise epoch registration, and the potential to perform image processing operations on-chip and in real-time. The major challenges and design drivers for ground-based and space-based optical observation strategies have been analyzed. CMOS detector characteristics were critically evaluated and compared with the established CCD technology, especially with respect to the above mentioned observations. Similarly, the desirable on-chip processing functionalities which would further enhance the object detection and image segmentation were identified. Finally, we simulated several observation scenarios for ground- and space-based sensor by assuming different observation and sensor properties. We will introduce the analyzed end-to-end simulations of the ground- and space-based strategies in order to investigate the orbit determination accuracy and its sensitivity which may result from different values for the frame-rate, pixel scale, astrometric and epoch registration accuracies. Two cases were simulated, a survey using a ground-based sensor to observe objects in LEO for surveillance applications, and a statistical survey with a space-based sensor orbiting in LEO observing small-size debris in LEO. The ground-based LEO survey uses a dynamical fence close to the Earth shadow a few hours after sunset. For the space-based scenario

  11. Characterization of Low Noise, Precision Voltage Reference REF5025-HT Under Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    The performance of Texas Instruments precision voltage reference REF5025-HT was assessed under extreme temperatures. This low noise, 2.5 V output chip is suitable for use in high temperature down-hole drilling applications, but no data existed on its performance at cryogenic temperatures. The device was characterized in terms of output voltage and supply current at different input voltage levels as a function of temperature between +210 C and -190 C. Line and load regulation characteristics were also established at six load levels and at different temperatures. Restart capability at extreme temperatures and the effects of thermal cycling, covering the test temperature range, on its operation and stability were also investigated. Under no load condition, the voltage reference chip exhibited good stability in its output over the temperature range of -50 C to +200 C. Outside that temperature range, output voltage did change as temperature was changed. For example, at the extreme temperatures of +210 C and - 190 C, the output level dropped to 2.43 V and 2.32 V, respectively as compared to the nominal value of 2.5 V. At cryogenic test temperatures of -100 C and -150 C the output voltage dropped by about 20%. The quiescent supply current of the voltage reference varied slightly with temperature but remained close to its specified value. In terms of line regulation, the device exhibited excellent stability between -50 C and +150 C over the entire input voltage range and load levels. At the other test temperatures, however, while line regulation became poor at cryogenic temperatures of -100 C and below, it suffered slight degradation at the extreme high temperature but only at the high load level of 10 mA. The voltage reference also exhibited very good load regulation with temperature down to -100 C, but its output dropped sharply at +210 C only at the heavy load of 10 mA. The semiconductor chip was able restart at the extreme temperatures of -190 C and +210 C, and the

  12. System Noise Assessment and the Potential for a Low Noise Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft with Open Rotor Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burley, Casey L.; Lopes, Leonard V.; Bahr, Christopher J.; Gern, Frank H.; VanZante, Dale E.

    2014-01-01

    An aircraft system noise assessment was conducted for a hybrid wing body freighter aircraft concept configured with three open rotor engines. The primary objective of the study was to determine the aircraft system level noise given the significant impact of installation effects including shielding the open rotor noise by the airframe. The aircraft was designed to carry a payload of 100,000 lbs on a 6,500 nautical mile mission. An experimental database was used to establish the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic installation effects including those from shielding by the airframe planform, interactions with the control surfaces, and additional noise reduction technologies. A second objective of the study applied the impacts of projected low noise airframe technology and a projection of advanced low noise rotors appropriate for the NASA N+2 2025 timeframe. With the projection of low noise rotors and installation effects, the aircraft system level was 26.0 EPNLdB below Stage 4 level with the engine installed at 1.0 rotor diameters upstream of the trailing edge. Moving the engine to 1.5 rotor diameters brought the system level noise to 30.8 EPNLdB below Stage 4. At these locations on the airframe, the integrated level of installation effects including shielding can be as much as 20 EPNLdB cumulative in addition to lower engine source noise from advanced low noise rotors. And finally, an additional set of technology effects were identified and the potential impact at the system level was estimated for noise only without assessing the impact on aircraft performance. If these additional effects were to be included it is estimated that the potential aircraft system noise could reach as low as 38.0 EPNLdB cumulative below Stage 4.

  13. A 12 GHz satellite video receiver: Low noise, low cost prototype model for TV reception from broadcast satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hreha, M. A.; Baprawski, J. G.; Chamaneria, C. N.; Ferry, S. J.; Keithly, G.; Kuklin, H. S.; Lockyear, W. H.; Schifter, L. H.; Swanberg, N. E.; Swift, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    A 12-channel synchronous phase lock video receiver consisting of an outdoor downconverter unit and an indoor demodulator unit was developed to provide both low noise performance and low cost in production quantities of 1000 units. The prototype receiver can be mass produced at a cost under $1540 without sacrificing system performance. The receiver also has the capability of selecting any of the twelve assigned satellite broadcast channels in the frequency range 11.7 to 12.2 GHz.

  14. Surface-micromachined 1MHz oscillator with low-noise Pierce configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Roessig, T.A.; Howe, R.T.; Pisano, A.P.; Smith, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    A prototype high frequency tuning fork oscillator has been fabricated and tested in an integrated surface micromachining technology. The amplifier circuitry uses a capacitive current detection method, which offers superior noise performance over previous resistive methods. The prototype device has an output frequency of 1.022 MHz and exhibits a noise floor of {minus}88 dBc/Hz at a distance of 500 Hz from the carrier. The dominant source of frequency instability is the nonlinearity introduced by the use of parallel plate actuation.

  15. Compact, low-noise, all-solid-state laser system for stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Steinle, Tobias; Kumar, Vikas; Steinmann, Andy; Marangoni, Marco; Cerullo, Giulio; Giessen, Harald

    2015-02-15

    We present a highly stable and compact laser source for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. cw-seeding of an optical parametric amplifier pumped by a bulk femtosecond Yb-oscillator and self-phase modulation in a tapered fiber allow for broad tunability without any optical or electronic synchronization. The source features noise levels of the Stokes beam close to the shot-noise limit at MHz modulation frequencies. We demonstrate the superior performance of our system by SRS imaging of micrometer-sized polymer beads. PMID:25680158

  16. A global shutter CMOS image sensor for hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanov, Konstantin D.; Dryer, Ben J.; Hall, David J.; Holland, Andrew D.; Pratlong, Jérôme; Fryer, Martin; Pike, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has been providing vital information on the Earth landscape in response to the changing environment, land use and natural phenomena. While conventional hyperspectral imaging instruments have typically used rows of linescan CCDs, CMOS image sensors (CIS) have been slowly penetrating space instrumentation for the past decade, and Earth observation (EO) is no exception. CIS provide distinct advantages over CCDs that are relevant to EO hyperspectral imaging. The lack of charge transfer through the array allows the reduction of cross talk usually present in CCDs due to imperfect charge transfer efficiency, and random pixel addressing makes variable integration time possible, and thus improves the camera sensitivity and dynamic range. We have developed a 10T pixel design that integrates a pinned photodiode with global shutter and in-pixel correlated double sampling (CDS) to increase the signal to noise ratio in less intense spectral regimes, allowing for both high resolution and low noise hyperspectral imaging for EO. This paper details the characterization of a test device, providing baseline performance measurements of the array such as noise, responsivity, dark current and global shutter efficiency, and also discussing benchmark hyperspectral imaging requirements such as dynamic range, pixel crosstalk, and image lag.

  17. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  18. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  19. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  20. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  1. High-Sensitivity Low-Noise Miniature Fluxgate Magnetometers Using a Flip Chip Conceptual Design

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Jeff; Chiu, Po-Kai; Chiu, Shih-Liang; Jeng, Jen-Tzong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel class of miniature fluxgate magnetometers fabricated on a print circuit board (PCB) substrate and electrically connected to each other similar to the current “flip chip” concept in semiconductor package. This sensor is soldered together by reversely flipping a 5 cm × 3 cm PCB substrate to the other identical one which includes dual magnetic cores, planar pick-up coils, and 3-D excitation coils constructed by planar Cu interconnections patterned on PCB substrates. Principles and analysis of the fluxgate sensor are introduced first, and followed by FEA electromagnetic modeling and simulation for the proposed sensor. Comprehensive characteristic experiments of the miniature fluxgate device exhibit favorable results in terms of sensitivity (or “responsivity” for magnetometers) and field noise spectrum. The sensor is driven and characterized by employing the improved second-harmonic detection technique that enables linear V-B correlation and responsivity verification. In addition, the double magnitude of responsivity measured under very low frequency (1 Hz) magnetic fields is experimentally demonstrated. As a result, the maximum responsivity of 593 V/T occurs at 50 kHz of excitation frequency with the second harmonic wave of excitation; however, the minimum magnetic field noise is found to be 0.05 nT/Hz1/2 at 1 Hz under the same excitation. In comparison with other miniature planar fluxgates published to date, the fluxgate magnetic sensor with flip chip configuration offers advances in both device functionality and fabrication simplicity. More importantly, the novel design can be further extended to a silicon-based micro-fluxgate chip manufactured by emerging CMOS-MEMS technologies, thus enriching its potential range of applications in modern engineering and the consumer electronics market. PMID:25196107

  2. High-sensitivity low-noise miniature fluxgate magnetometers using a flip chip conceptual design.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Jeff; Chiu, Po-Kai; Chiu, Shih-Liang; Jeng, Jen-Tzong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel class of miniature fluxgate magnetometers fabricated on a print circuit board (PCB) substrate and electrically connected to each other similar to the current "flip chip" concept in semiconductor package. This sensor is soldered together by reversely flipping a 5 cm × 3 cm PCB substrate to the other identical one which includes dual magnetic cores, planar pick-up coils, and 3-D excitation coils constructed by planar Cu interconnections patterned on PCB substrates. Principles and analysis of the fluxgate sensor are introduced first, and followed by FEA electromagnetic modeling and simulation for the proposed sensor. Comprehensive characteristic experiments of the miniature fluxgate device exhibit favorable results in terms of sensitivity (or "responsivity" for magnetometers) and field noise spectrum. The sensor is driven and characterized by employing the improved second-harmonic detection technique that enables linear V-B correlation and responsivity verification. In addition, the double magnitude of responsivity measured under very low frequency (1 Hz) magnetic fields is experimentally demonstrated. As a result, the maximum responsivity of 593 V/T occurs at 50 kHz of excitation frequency with the second harmonic wave of excitation; however, the minimum magnetic field noise is found to be 0.05 nT/Hz(1/2) at 1 Hz under the same excitation. In comparison with other miniature planar fluxgates published to date, the fluxgate magnetic sensor with flip chip configuration offers advances in both device functionality and fabrication simplicity. More importantly, the novel design can be further extended to a silicon-based micro-fluxgate chip manufactured by emerging CMOS-MEMS technologies, thus enriching its potential range of applications in modern engineering and the consumer electronics market. PMID:25196107

  3. High-sensitivity low-noise miniature fluxgate magnetometers using a flip chip conceptual design.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Jeff; Chiu, Po-Kai; Chiu, Shih-Liang; Jeng, Jen-Tzong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel class of miniature fluxgate magnetometers fabricated on a print circuit board (PCB) substrate and electrically connected to each other similar to the current "flip chip" concept in semiconductor package. This sensor is soldered together by reversely flipping a 5 cm × 3 cm PCB substrate to the other identical one which includes dual magnetic cores, planar pick-up coils, and 3-D excitation coils constructed by planar Cu interconnections patterned on PCB substrates. Principles and analysis of the fluxgate sensor are introduced first, and followed by FEA electromagnetic modeling and simulation for the proposed sensor. Comprehensive characteristic experiments of the miniature fluxgate device exhibit favorable results in terms of sensitivity (or "responsivity" for magnetometers) and field noise spectrum. The sensor is driven and characterized by employing the improved second-harmonic detection technique that enables linear V-B correlation and responsivity verification. In addition, the double magnitude of responsivity measured under very low frequency (1 Hz) magnetic fields is experimentally demonstrated. As a result, the maximum responsivity of 593 V/T occurs at 50 kHz of excitation frequency with the second harmonic wave of excitation; however, the minimum magnetic field noise is found to be 0.05 nT/Hz(1/2) at 1 Hz under the same excitation. In comparison with other miniature planar fluxgates published to date, the fluxgate magnetic sensor with flip chip configuration offers advances in both device functionality and fabrication simplicity. More importantly, the novel design can be further extended to a silicon-based micro-fluxgate chip manufactured by emerging CMOS-MEMS technologies, thus enriching its potential range of applications in modern engineering and the consumer electronics market.

  4. A varied shaping time noise analysis of Al0.8Ga0.2As and GaAs soft X-ray photodiodes coupled to a low-noise charge sensitive preamplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, A. M.; Lees, J. E.; Bassford, D. J.; Ng, J. S.

    2012-05-01

    The noise sources affecting Al0.8Ga0.2As and GaAs spectroscopic X-ray photon counting p+-i-n+ photodiodes connected to a custom low-noise charge sensitive preamplifier are quantified by analysing the system's response to pulses from a signal generator and varying the system's shaping amplifier's shaping time (from 0.5 μs to 10 μs). The system is investigated at three temperatures (-10 °C, +20 °C and +50 °C) in order to characterise the variation of the component noise sources and optimum shaping time with temperature for Al0.8Ga0.2As and GaAs diodes. The analysis shows that the system is primarily limited by dielectric noise, hypothesised to be mainly from the packaging surrounding the detector, for both types of diode and at each temperature.

  5. A 16-channel CMOS preamplifier for laser ranging radar receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ru-qing; Zhu, Jing-guo; Jiang, Yan; Li, Meng-lin; Li, Feng

    2015-10-01

    A 16-channal front-end preamplifier array has been design in a 0.18um CMOS process for pulse Laser ranging radar receiver. This front-end preamplifier array incorporates transimpedance amplifiers(TIAs) and differential voltage post-amplifier(PAMP),band gap reference and other interface circuits. In the circuit design, the regulated cascade (RGC) input stage, Cherry-Hooper and active inductor peaking were employed to enhance the bandwidth. And in the layout design, by applying the layout isolation structure combined with P+ guard-ring(PGR), N+ guard-ring(NGR),and deep-n-well(DNW) for amplifier array, the crosstalk and the substrate noise coupling was reduced effectively. The simulations show that a single channel receiver front-end preamplifier achieves 95 dBΩ transimpedance gain and 600MHz bandwidth for 3 PF photodiode capacitance. The total power of 16-channel front-end amplifier array is about 800mW for 1.8V supply.

  6. Portable musical instrument amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Christian, David E.

    1990-07-24

    The present invention relates to a musical instrument amplifier which is particularly useful for electric guitars. The amplifier has a rigid body for housing both the electronic system for amplifying and processing signals from the guitar and the system's power supply. An input plug connected to and projecting from the body is electrically coupled to the signal amplifying and processing system. When the plug is inserted into an output jack for an electric guitar, the body is rigidly carried by the guitar, and the guitar is operatively connected to the electrical amplifying and signal processing system without use of a loose interconnection cable. The amplifier is provided with an output jack, into which headphones are plugged to receive amplified signals from the guitar. By eliminating the conventional interconnection cable, the amplifier of the present invention can be used by musicians with increased flexibility and greater freedom of movement.

  7. Low-Noise Large-Area Photoreceivers with Low Capacitance Photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Abhay M. (Inventor); Datta, Shubhashish (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A quad photoreceiver includes a low capacitance quad InGaAs p-i-n photodiode structure formed on an InP (100) substrate. The photodiode includes a substrate providing a buffer layer having a metal contact on its bottom portion serving as a common cathode for receiving a bias voltage, and successive layers deposited on its top portion, the first layer being drift layer, the second being an absorption layer, the third being a cap layer divided into four quarter pie shaped sections spaced apart, with metal contacts being deposited on outermost top portions of each section to provide output terminals, the top portions being active regions for detecting light. Four transimpedance amplifiers have input terminals electrically connected to individual output terminals of each p-i-n photodiode.

  8. Silicon array detector system for high-rate, low-noise x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Krieger, B.; Maier, M.R.; Yaver, H.; Lindstrom, D.; Rutgersson, M.; Tull, C.R.

    1999-08-01

    A silicon array detector system is being developed for x-ray fluorescence applications at synchrotron light sources. The detector is wire-bonded to integrated circuits, which feature 32 channels of charge-sensitive preamplifiers followed by variable-gain pulse shaping amplifiers. The ICs directly drive CAMAC-based A/D boards designed for this application. The data are transferred from the custom designed 16-channel ADC modules via FERABUS readout to commercially available histogramming modules and memory lookup units. The system features fully parallel signal processing to maintain high count-rate capability and to preserve the position information. Special LabVIEW-based software has been developed for data acquisition and analysis. The system, currently being assembled for 64 channels, can easily be expanded by increasing the number of detection channels and hardware modules.

  9. High-voltage CMOS detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrler, F.; Blanco, R.; Leys, R.; Perić, I.

    2016-07-01

    High-voltage CMOS (HVCMOS) pixel sensors are depleted active pixel sensors implemented in standard commercial CMOS processes. The sensor element is the n-well/p-substrate diode. The sensor electronics are entirely placed inside the n-well which is at the same time used as the charge collection electrode. High voltage is used to deplete the part of the substrate around the n-well. HVCMOS sensors allow implementation of complex in-pixel electronics. This, together with fast signal collection, allows a good time resolution, which is required for particle tracking in high energy physics. HVCMOS sensors will be used in Mu3e experiment at PSI and are considered as an option for both ATLAS and CLIC (CERN). Radiation tolerance and time walk compensation have been tested and results are presented.

  10. A fully integrated low-noise amplifier in SiGe 0.35 μm technology for 802.11a WIFI applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido, R.; Khemchandani, S. L.; Goni-Iturri, A.; Diaz, R.; Hernandez, A.; del Pino, J.

    2005-06-01

    In the last years, WIFI market has shown an incredible growth, exceeding expectations. This paper presents the design of two fully integrated LNAs using a low cost SiGe 0.35 um technology for the 5 GHz band, according to the IEEE 802.11a WIFI standard. One LNA has an asymmetric configuration and the other a balanced configuration. A comparison between the two LNAs has been made. All passives devices are on chip, including integrated inductors which have been designed by electromagnetic simulations. This work demonstrates the feasibility of a low cost silicon technology for the design of 5 GHz band circuits

  11. CMOS output buffer wave shaper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, L.; Whitaker, S.; Merrell, R.

    1990-01-01

    As the switching speeds and densities of Digital CMOS integrated circuits continue to increase, output switching noise becomes more of a problem. A design technique which aids in the reduction of switching noise is reported. The output driver stage is analyzed through the use of an equivalent RLC circuit. The results of the analysis are used in the design of an output driver stage. A test circuit based on these techniques is being submitted to MOSIS for fabrication.

  12. Using CMOS image sensors to detect photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chenzhi; Tong, Xiaobo; Zhou, Xiang; Zheng, Xiaodong; Xu, Yunfei

    2010-05-01

    A research is carried out on the characteristics of CMOS (Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) image sensors. A CMOS image sensor is used to probe the fluorescence intensity of atoms or absorbed photons in order to measure the shape and atomicity density of Rb (Rubidium) cold-atom-cloud. A series of RGB data of images is obtained and the spectrum response curve of CMOS image sensor is deduced. After filtering out the noise of the pixel signals of CMOS image sensor, the number of photons received by every pixel of the CMOS image sensor is obtained. Compared with CCD camera, the CMOS image sensor has some advantages in measuring the properties of cold-atom-cloud,such as quick response, large sensory area, low cost, and so on.

  13. Fabrication of CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovich, Yacov; Koltin, Ephie; Choen, David; Shkuri, Moshe; Ben-Simon, Meir

    1999-04-01

    In order to provide its customers with sub-micron CMOS fabrication solutions for imaging applications, Tower Semiconductor initiated a project to characterize the optical parameters of Tower's 0.5-micron process. A special characterization test chip was processed using the TS50 process. The results confirmed a high quality process for optical applications. Perhaps the most important result is the process' very low dark current, of 30-50 pA/cm2, using the entire window of process. This very low dark current characteristic was confirmed for a variety of pixel architectures. Additionally, we have succeeded to reduce and virtually eliminate the white spots on large sensor arrays. As a foundry Tower needs to support fabrication of many different imaging products. Therefore we have developed a fabrication methodology that is adjusted to the special needs of optical applications. In order to establish in-line process monitoring of the optical parameters, Tower places a scribe line optical test chip that enables wafer level measurements of the most important parameters, ensuring the optical quality and repeatability of the process. We have developed complementary capabilities like in house deposition of color filter and fabrication of very large are dice using sub-micron CMOS technologies. Shellcase and Tower are currently developing a new CMOS image sensor optical package.

  14. Amplified spontaneous emission in Cassegrainian amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eimerl, David

    1987-05-01

    The paper considers all possible paths for amplifed spontaneous emission (ASE) in multipass laser amplifiers using a Cassegranian telescope geometry. In particular, ASE which is reflected back into the medium off the telescope mirrors themselves is studied. These ASE components are unavoidable in this amplifier geometry. It is shown that there is a component of the ASE which makes approximately double the number of passes through the amplifier as the laser signal makes. It is also shown that these high-order ASE components are also present in amplifiers which are almost Cassegrainian. They cannot be eliminated by changing the ratio of the scraper and hole radii or the separation of the mirrors. It is likely that these ASE components will be more significant in pulsed lasers than CW lasers.

  15. Laser amplifier chain

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-10-20

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain. 6 figs.

  16. Laser amplifier chain

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain.

  17. a CMOS Millimeter-Wave Transceiver Embedded in a Semi-Confocal Fabry-Perot Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Brian; Tang, Adrian; Schlecht, Erich T.; Brageot, Emily; Daly, Adam M.; Gu, Qun Jane; Ye, Yu; Shu, Ran; Chang, M.-C. Frank; Kim, Rod M.

    2016-06-01

    The extension of radio-frequency CMOS circuitry into millimeter wavelengths promises the extension of spectroscopic techniques in compact, power efficient systems. We are now exploring the use of CMOS millimeter devices for low-mass, low-power instrumentation capable of remote or in-situ detection of gas composition during space missions. We have chosen to develop a Flygare-Balle type spectrometer, with a semi-confocal Fabry-Perot cavity to amplify the pump power of a mm-wavelength CMOS transmitter that is directly coupled to the planar mirror of the cavity. Since the initial report last year describing the designs, we have built a pulsed transceiver system at 89-104 GHz inside a 5 cm base length cavity and demonstrated cavity finesse up to 3000, allowing for modes with 30 MHz bandwidth and a sufficient cavity amplification factor for mW class transmitters. System and component testing revealed that the power-amplifier design (embedded in the chip) was faulty and the transceiver peak power is only 10 microwatts, which is insufficient for molecular excitation on the timescale of the gas residence time within the beam. An improved power amplifier circuit has been designed and is currently under fabrication, meanwhile, we have also developed a tunable synthesizer (embedded in the same chip) that allows for tuning over the full bandwidth at increments of 10 MHz. The presentation will cover these capabilities, describing the system and component tests, as well as any new developments.

  18. High dynamic range CMOS-based mammography detector for FFDM and DBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Inge M.; Smit, Chiel; Miller, James J.; Lomako, Andrey

    2016-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) requires excellent image quality in a dynamic mode at very low dose levels while Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) is a static imaging modality that requires high saturation dose levels. These opposing requirements can only be met by a dynamic detector with a high dynamic range. This paper will discuss a wafer-scale CMOS-based mammography detector with 49.5 μm pixels and a CsI scintillator. Excellent image quality is obtained for FFDM as well as DBT applications, comparing favorably with a-Se detectors that dominate the X-ray mammography market today. The typical dynamic range of a mammography detector is not high enough to accommodate both the low noise and the high saturation dose requirements for DBT and FFDM applications, respectively. An approach based on gain switching does not provide the signal-to-noise benefits in the low-dose DBT conditions. The solution to this is to add frame summing functionality to the detector. In one X-ray pulse several image frames will be acquired and summed. The requirements to implement this into a detector are low noise levels, high frame rates and low lag performance, all of which are unique characteristics of CMOS detectors. Results are presented to prove that excellent image quality is achieved, using a single detector for both DBT as well as FFDM dose conditions. This method of frame summing gave the opportunity to optimize the detector noise and saturation level for DBT applications, to achieve high DQE level at low dose, without compromising the FFDM performance.

  19. Development of a new free wake model considering a blade vane interaction for a low noise axial fan planform optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyungki; Sun, Hyosung; Lee, Soogab

    2006-03-01

    Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) is an essential part for low noise axial fan design since various parameters, such as flow rate, efficiency, noise etc., should be considered. For this reason, Response Surface Method (RSM) design technique is adopted as an axial fan design method. RSM has an advantage of choosing objective functions and constraint conditions unrestrictedly on a design space. However, RSM needs a lot of independent variables to construct a proper response surface. Thus an efficient and accurate flow analysis tool is indispensable for optimization. In an axial fan, the discrete (commonly called Blade-Passage-Frequency) components are usually dominant in the noise spectrum. Especially the blade-guide vane interaction is one of most important noise sources. In order to predict this noise component efficiently at the design stage, a new free wake model named Finite Vortex Element (FVE) is devised to simulate this blade-guide vane interaction, which is very difficult to analyze numerically in a conventional free wake model. In this new free wake model, the blade-wake-guide vane interaction is described by cutting a vortex filament when the filament collides with a guide vane. This FVE model is compared with a conventional curved vortex methodology and verified by a comparison with measured data to show its effectiveness and validity. Then FVE model is coupled with RSM to implement a low noise axial fan blade optimization. Using this method, a reduction of 8 dB(A) at 2 m from fan hub in the overall noise level is achieved while the flow rate and the efficiency are maintained as the values of the baseline blade, which implies that FVE wake model coupled with RSM is very effective methodology for MDO problems such as a low noise axial fan design.

  20. Radiofrequency amplifier based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    DOEpatents

    Hilbert, C.; Martinis, J.M.; Clarke, J.

    1984-04-27

    A low noise radiofrequency amplifer, using a dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the input amplifying element. The dc SQUID and an input coil are maintained at superconductivity temperatures in a superconducting shield, with the input coil inductively coupled to the superconducting ring of the dc SQUID. A radiofrequency signal from outside the shield is applied to the input coil, and an amplified radiofrequency signal is developed across the dc SQUID ring and transmitted to exteriorly of the shield. A power gain of 19.5 +- 0.5 dB has been achieved with a noise temperature of 1.0 +- 0.4 K at a frequency of 100 MHz.

  1. A low-noise low-power EEG acquisition node for scalable brain-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Thomas J.; Deiss, Stephen R.; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2007-05-01

    Electroencephalograph (EEG) recording systems offer a versatile, noninvasive window on the brain's spatio-temporal activity for many neuroscience and clinical applications. Our research aims at improving the spatial resolution and mobility of EEG recording by reducing the form factor, power drain and signal fanout of the EEG acquisition node in a scalable sensor array architecture. We present such a node integrated onto a dimesized circuit board that contains a sensor's complete signal processing front-end, including amplifier, filters, and analog-to-digital conversion. A daisy-chain configuration between boards with bit-serial output reduces the wiring needed. The circuit's low power consumption of 423 μW supports EEG systems with hundreds of electrodes to operate from small batteries for many hours. Coupling between the bit-serial output and the highly sensitive analog input due to dense integration of analog and digital functions on the circuit board results in a deterministic noise component in the output, larger than the intrinsic sensor and circuit noise. With software correction of this noise contribution, the system achieves an input-referred noise of 0.277 μVrms in the signal band of 1 to 100 Hz, comparable to the best medical-grade systems in use. A chain of seven nodes using EEG dry electrodes created in micro-electrical-mechanical system (MEMS) technology is demonstrated in a real-world setting.

  2. Integrated circuit amplifiers for multi-electrode intracortical recording.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Thomas; Denison, Timothy; Wolf, Patrick

    2009-02-01

    Significant progress has been made in systems that interpret the electrical signals of the brain in order to control an actuator. One version of these systems senses neuronal extracellular action potentials with an array of up to 100 miniature probes inserted into the cortex. The impedance of each probe is high, so environmental electrical noise is readily coupled to the neuronal signal. To minimize this noise, an amplifier is placed close to each probe. Thus, the need has arisen for many amplifiers to be placed near the cortex. Commercially available integrated circuits do not satisfy the area, power and noise requirements of this application, so researchers have designed custom integrated-circuit amplifiers. This paper presents a comprehensive survey of the neural amplifiers described in publications prior to 2008. Methods to achieve high input impedance, low noise and a large time-constant high-pass filter are reviewed. A tutorial on the biological, electrochemical, mechanical and electromagnetic phenomena that influence amplifier design is provided. Areas for additional research, including sub-nanoampere electrolysis and chronic cortical heating, are discussed. Unresolved design concerns, including teraohm circuitry, electrical overstress and component failure, are identified.

  3. V-band monolithic two stage HEMT amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aust, M.; Yonaki, J.; Nakano, K.; Berenz, J.; Dow, G.

    Two different types of HEMT (high-electron-mobility transistor) monolithic low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) using AlGaAs/GaAs and pseudomorphic InGaAs/GaAs materials have been developed and have demonstrated excellent performance at 60 GHz. These monolithic LNAs have achieved noise figures of 5 dB, as well as associated gains of 11 dB. These two-stage circuits both utilize 0.2- x 60-micron HEMT devices for both bandpass and low-pass circuit topologies. Noise figures as low as 4.5 dB have been observed for single-stage MMIC- (monolithic-microwave-integrated-circuit) implemented LNAs, and gains in excess of 20 dB have been observed for three-stage versions of this amplifier with a 5-dB noise figure in the V band. This result represents the state-of-the art monolithic HEMT amplifier performance for AlGaAs and pseudomorphic InGaAs materials. This MMIC amplifier can occupy about less than one-third the size of existing MIC hybrid V-band LNAs. This represents a significant size reduction and cost saving due to repeatable circuit performance with monolithic technology. The chip sizes are both 1.6 x 2.7 mm for these two-stage amplifiers.

  4. A compact, low input capacitance neural recording amplifier.

    PubMed

    Ng, K A; Xu, Yong Ping

    2013-10-01

    Conventional capacitively coupled neural recording amplifiers often present a large input load capacitance to the neural signal source and hence take up large circuit area. They suffer due to the unavoidable trade-off between the input capacitance and chip area versus the amplifier gain. In this work, this trade-off is relaxed by replacing the single feedback capacitor with a clamped T-capacitor network. With this simple modification, the proposed amplifier can achieve the same mid-band gain with less input capacitance, resulting in a higher input impedance and a smaller silicon area. Prototype neural recording amplifiers based on this proposal were fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS, and their performance is reported. The amplifiers occupy smaller area and have lower input loading capacitance compared to conventional neural amplifiers. One of the proposed amplifiers occupies merely 0.056 mm(2). It achieves 38.1-dB mid-band gain with 1.6 pF input capacitance, and hence has an effective feedback capacitance of 20 fF. Consuming 6 μW, it has an input referred noise of 13.3 μVrms over 8.5 kHz bandwidth and NEF of 7.87. In-vivo recordings from animal experiments are also demonstrated.

  5. Low noise multi-channel biopotential wireless data acquisition system for dry electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandian, P. S.; Whitchurch, Ashwin K.; Abraham, Jose K.; Bhusan Baskey, Himanshu; Radhakrishnan, J. K.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Padaki, V. C.; Bhasker Rao, K. U.; Harbaugh, R. E.

    2008-03-01

    The bioelectrical potentials generated within the human body are the result of electrochemical activity in the excitable cells of the nervous, muscular or glandular tissues. The ionic potentials are measured using biopotential electrodes which convert ionic potentials to electronic potentials. The commonly monitored biopotential signals are Electrocardiogram (ECG), Electroencephalogram (EEG) and Electromyogram (EMG). The electrodes used to monitor biopotential signals are Ag-AgCl and gold, which require skin preparation by means of scrubbing to remove the dead cells and application of electrolytic gel to reduce the skin contact resistance. The gels used in biopotential recordings dry out when used for longer durations and add noise to the signals and also prolonged use of gels cause irritations and rashes to skin. Also noises such as motion artifact and baseline wander are added to the biopotential signals as the electrode floats over the electrolytic gel during monitoring. To overcome these drawbacks, dry electrodes are used, where the electrodes are held against the skin surface to establish contact with the skin without the need for electrolytic fluids or gels. The major drawback associated with the dry electrodes is the high skin-electrode impedance in the low frequency range between 0.1-120 Hz, which makes it difficult to acquire clean and noise free biopotential signals. The paper presents the design and development of biopotential data acquisition and processing system to acquire biopotential signals from dry electrodes. The electrode-skin-electrode- impedance (ESEI) measurements was carried out for the dry electrodes by impedance spectroscopy. The biopotential signals are processed using an instrumentation amplifier with high CMRR and high input impedance achieved by boot strapping the input terminals. The signals are band limited by means of a second order Butterworth band pass filters to eliminate noise. The processed biopotential signals are digitized

  6. Acoustic Prediction Methodology and Test Validation for an Efficient Low-Noise Hybrid Wing Body Subsonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Ronald T. (Compiler)

    2011-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to: (1) Develop a hybrid wing body subsonic transport configuration with noise prediction methods to meet the circa 2007 NASA Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) N+2 noise goal of -52 dB cum relative to FAR 36 Stage 3 (-42 dB cum re: Stage 4) while achieving a -25% fuel burned compared to current transports (re :B737/B767); (2) Develop improved noise prediction methods for ANOPP2 for use in predicting FAR 36 noise; (3) Design and fabricate a wind tunnel model for testing in the LaRC 14 x 22 ft low speed wind tunnel to validate noise predictions and determine low speed aero characteristics for an efficient low noise Hybrid Wing Body configuration. A medium wide body cargo freighter was selected to represent a logical need for an initial operational capability in the 2020 time frame. The Efficient Low Noise Hybrid Wing Body (ELNHWB) configuration N2A-EXTE was evolved meeting the circa 2007 NRA N+2 fuel burn and noise goals. The noise estimates were made using improvements in jet noise shielding and noise shielding prediction methods developed by UC Irvine and MIT. From this the Quiet Ultra Integrated Efficient Test Research Aircraft #1 (QUIET-R1) 5.8% wind tunnel model was designed and fabricated.

  7. Very High Current Density Nb/AlN/Nb Tunnel Junctions for Low-Noise Submillimeter Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, Jonathan; Miller, David; Chen, Jian; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.; Stern, Jeff A.

    2000-01-01

    We have fabricated and tested submillimeter-wave superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers using very high current density Nb/AlN/Nb tunnel junctions (J(sub c) approximately equal 30 kA/sq cm) . The junctions have low resistance-area products (R(sub N)A approximately 5.6 Omega.sq micron), good subgap to normal resistance ratios R(sub sg)/R(sub N) approximately equal 10, and good run-to-run reproducibility. From Fourier transform spectrometer measurements, we infer that omega.R(sub N)C = 1 at 270 GHz. This is a factor of 2.5 improvement over what is generally available with Nb/AlO(x)/Nb junctions suitable for low-noise mixers. The AlN-barrier junctions are indeed capable of low-noise operation: we measure an uncorrected receiver noise temperature of T(sub RX) = 110 K (DSB) at 533 GHz for an unoptimized device. In addition to providing wider bandwidth operation at lower frequencies, the AlN-barrier junctions will considerably improve the performance of THz SIS mixers by reducing RF loss in the tuning circuits.

  8. Very high-current-density Nb/AlN/Nb tunnel junctions for low-noise submillimeter mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Jonathan; Miller, David; Chen, Jian; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.; Stern, Jeff A.

    2000-04-01

    We have fabricated and tested submillimeter-wave superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixers using very high-current-density Nb/AlN/Nb tunnel junctions (Jc≈30 kA cm-2). The junctions have low-resistance-area products (RNA≈5.6 Ω μm2), good subgap-to-normal resistance ratios Rsg/RN≈10, and good run-to-run reproducibility. From Fourier transform spectrometer measurements, we infer that ωRNC=1 at 270 GHz. This is a factor of 2.5 improvement over what is generally available with Nb/AlOx/Nb junctions suitable for low-noise mixers. The AlN-barrier junctions are indeed capable of low-noise operation: we measure an uncorrected double-sideband receiver noise temperature of TRX=110 K at 533 GHz for an unoptimized device. In addition to providing wider bandwidth operation at lower frequencies, the AlN-barrier junctions will considerably improve the performance of THz SIS mixers by reducing rf loss in the tuning circuits.

  9. Design of a CMOS Potentiostat Circuit for Electrochemical Detector Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Sunitha; Gillis, Kevin D.; Lindau, Manfred; Minch, Bradley A.

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput electrode arrays are required for advancing devices for testing the effect of drugs on cellular function. In this paper, we present design criteria for a potentiostat circuit that is capable of measuring transient amperometric oxidation currents at the surface of an electrode with submillisecond time resolution and picoampere current resolution. The potentiostat is a regulated cascode stage in which a high-gain amplifier maintains the electrode voltage through a negative feedback loop. The potentiostat uses a new shared amplifier structure in which all of the amplifiers in a given row of detectors share a common half circuit permitting us to use fewer transistors per detector. We also present measurements from a test chip that was fabricated in a 0.5-μm, 5-V CMOS process through MOSIS. Each detector occupied a layout area of 35μm × 15μm and contained eight transistors and a 50-fF integrating capacitor. The rms current noise at 2kHz bandwidth is ≈ 110fA. The maximum charge storage capacity at 2kHz is 1.26 × 106 electrons. PMID:20514150

  10. Wireless Josephson amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Narla, A.; Sliwa, K. M.; Hatridge, M.; Shankar, S.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Devoret, M. H.

    2014-06-09

    Josephson junction parametric amplifiers are playing a crucial role in the readout chain in superconducting quantum information experiments. However, their integration with current 3D cavity implementations poses the problem of transitioning between waveguide, coax cables, and planar circuits. Moreover, Josephson amplifiers require auxiliary microwave components, like directional couplers and/or hybrids, that are sources of spurious losses and impedance mismatches that limit measurement efficiency and amplifier tunability. We have developed a wireless architecture for these parametric amplifiers that eliminates superfluous microwave components and interconnects. This greatly simplifies their assembly and integration into experiments. We present an experimental realization of such a device operating in the 9–11 GHz band with about 100 MHz of amplitude gain-bandwidth product, on par with devices mounted in conventional sample holders. The simpler impedance environment presented to the amplifier also results in increased amplifier tunability.

  11. CMOS foveal image sensor chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandera, Cesar (Inventor); Scott, Peter (Inventor); Sridhar, Ramalingam (Inventor); Xia, Shu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A foveal image sensor integrated circuit comprising a plurality of CMOS active pixel sensors arranged both within and about a central fovea region of the chip. The pixels in the central fovea region have a smaller size than the pixels arranged in peripheral rings about the central region. A new photocharge normalization scheme and associated circuitry normalizes the output signals from the different size pixels in the array. The pixels are assembled into a multi-resolution rectilinear foveal image sensor chip using a novel access scheme to reduce the number of analog RAM cells needed. Localized spatial resolution declines monotonically with offset from the imager's optical axis, analogous to biological foveal vision.

  12. A CMOS In-Pixel CTIA High Sensitivity Fluorescence Imager

    PubMed Central

    Murari, Kartikeya; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Thakor, Nitish; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, charge coupled device (CCD) based image sensors have held sway over the field of biomedical imaging. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) based imagers so far lack sensitivity leading to poor low-light imaging. Certain applications including our work on animal-mountable systems for imaging in awake and unrestrained rodents require the high sensitivity and image quality of CCDs and the low power consumption, flexibility and compactness of CMOS imagers. We present a 132×124 high sensitivity imager array with a 20.1 μm pixel pitch fabricated in a standard 0.5 μ CMOS process. The chip incorporates n-well/p-sub photodiodes, capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) based in-pixel amplification, pixel scanners and delta differencing circuits. The 5-transistor all-nMOS pixel interfaces with peripheral pMOS transistors for column-parallel CTIA. At 70 fps, the array has a minimum detectable signal of 4 nW/cm2 at a wavelength of 450 nm while consuming 718 μA from a 3.3 V supply. Peak signal to noise ratio (SNR) was 44 dB at an incident intensity of 1 μW/cm2. Implementing 4×4 binning allowed the frame rate to be increased to 675 fps. Alternately, sensitivity could be increased to detect about 0.8 nW/cm2 while maintaining 70 fps. The chip was used to image single cell fluorescence at 28 fps with an average SNR of 32 dB. For comparison, a cooled CCD camera imaged the same cell at 20 fps with an average SNR of 33.2 dB under the same illumination while consuming over a watt. PMID:23136624

  13. Compact laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, R.B.

    1974-02-26

    A compact laser amplifier system is described in which a plurality of face-pumped annular disks, aligned along a common axis, independently radially amplify a stimulating light pulse. Partially reflective or lasing means, coaxially positioned at the center of each annualar disk, radially deflects a stimulating light directed down the common axis uniformly into each disk for amplification, such that the light is amplified by the disks in a parallel manner. Circumferential reflecting means coaxially disposed around each disk directs amplified light emission, either toward a common point or in a common direction. (Official Gazette)

  14. Development of a HgCdTe photomixer and impedance matched GaAs FET amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanley, J. F.; Paulauskas, W. A.; Taylor, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    A research program for the development of a 10.6 micron HgCdTe photodiode/GaAs field effect transistor amplifier package for use at cryogenic temperatures (77k). The photodiode/amplifier module achieved a noise equivalent power per unit bandwidth of 5.7 times 10 to the 20th power W/Hz at 2.0 GHz. The heterodyne sensitivity of the HgCdTe photodiode was improved by designing and building a low noise GaAs field effect transistor amplifier operating at 77K. The Johnson noise of the amplifier was reduced at 77K, and thus resulted in an increased photodiode heterodyne sensitivity.

  15. A 50Mbit/Sec. CMOS Video Linestore System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeung, Yeun C.

    1988-10-01

    This paper reports the architecture, design and test results of a CMOS single chip programmable video linestore system which has 16-bit data words with 1024 bit depth. The delay is fully programmable from 9 to 1033 samples by a 10 bit binary control word. The large 16 bit data word width makes the chip useful for a wide variety of digital video signal processing applications such as DPCM coding, High-Definition TV, and Video scramblers/descramblers etc. For those applications, the conventional large fixed-length shift register or static RAM scheme is not very popular because of its lack of versatility, high power consumption, and required support circuitry. The very high throughput of 50Mbit/sec is made possible by a highly parallel, pipelined dynamic memory architecture implemented in a 2-um N-well CMOS technology. The basic cell of the programmable video linestore chip is an four transistor dynamic RAM element. This cell comprises the majority of the chip's real estate, consumes no static power, and gives good noise immunity to the simply designed sense amplifier. The chip design was done using Bellcore's version of the MULGA virtual grid symbolic layout system. The chip contains approximately 90,000 transistors in an area of 6.5 x 7.5 square mm and the I/Os are TTL compatible. The chip is packaged in a 68-pin leadless ceramic chip carrier package.

  16. Triple inverter pierce oscillator circuit suitable for CMOS

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf; Kurt O.

    2007-02-27

    An oscillator circuit is disclosed which can be formed using discrete field-effect transistors (FETs), or as a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit. The oscillator circuit utilizes a Pierce oscillator design with three inverter stages connected in series. A feedback resistor provided in a feedback loop about a second inverter stage provides an almost ideal inverting transconductance thereby allowing high-Q operation at the resonator-controlled frequency while suppressing a parasitic oscillation frequency that is inherent in a Pierce configuration using a "standard" triple inverter for the sustaining amplifier. The oscillator circuit, which operates in a range of 10 50 MHz, has applications for use as a clock in a microprocessor and can also be used for sensor applications.

  17. Using a large area CMOS APS for direct chemiluminescence detection in Western blotting electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Michela; Newcombe, Jane; Anaxagoras, Thalis; Allinson, Nigel M.; Wells, Kevin

    2012-03-01

    Western blotting electrophoretic sequencing is an analytical technique widely used in Functional Proteomics to detect, recognize and quantify specific labelled proteins in biological samples. A commonly used label for western blotting is Enhanced ChemiLuminescence (ECL) reagents based on fluorescent light emission of Luminol at 425nm. Film emulsion is the conventional detection medium, but is characterized by non-linear response and limited dynamic range. Several western blotting digital imaging systems have being developed, mainly based on the use of cooled Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) and single avalanche diodes that address these issues. Even so these systems present key drawbacks, such as a low frame rate and require operation at low temperature. Direct optical detection using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Active Pixel Sensors (APS)could represent a suitable digital alternative for this application. In this paper the authors demonstrate the viability of direct chemiluminescent light detection in western blotting electrophoresis using a CMOS APS at room temperature. Furthermore, in recent years, improvements in fabrication techniques have made available reliable processes for very large imagers, which can be now scaled up to wafer size, allowing direct contact imaging of full size western blotting samples. We propose using a novel wafer scale APS (12.8 cm×13.2 cm), with an array architecture using two different pixel geometries that can deliver an inherently low noise and high dynamic range image at the same time representing a dramatic improvement with respect to the current western blotting imaging systems.

  18. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Accelerated life tests were performed on CMOS microcircuits to predict their long term reliability. The consistency of the CMOS microcircuit activation energy between the range of 125 C to 200 C and the range 200 C to 250 C was determined. Results indicate CMOS complexity and the amount of moisture detected inside the devices after testing influences time to failure of tested CMOS devices.

  19. DIRECT COUPLED AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Dandl, R.A.

    1961-09-19

    A transistor amplifier is designed for vyery small currents below 10/sup -8/ amperes. The filrst and second amplifier stages use unusual selected transistors in which the current amplification increases markedly for values of base current below 10/sup -6/ amperes.

  20. Linearly polarized fiber amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Kliner, Dahv A.; Koplow, Jeffery P.

    2004-11-30

    Optically pumped rare-earth-doped polarizing fibers exhibit significantly higher gain for one linear polarization state than for the orthogonal state. Such a fiber can be used to construct a single-polarization fiber laser, amplifier, or amplified-spontaneous-emission (ASE) source without the need for additional optical components to obtain stable, linearly polarized operation.

  1. DISTRIBUTED AMPLIFIER INCORPORATING FEEDBACK

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R. Jr.

    1958-10-21

    An improved distributed amplifier system employing feedback for stabilization is presented. In accordance with the disclosed invention, a signal to be amplified is applled to one end of a suitable terminated grid transmission line. At intervals along the transmission line, the signal is fed to stable, resistance-capacitance coupled amplifiers incorporating feedback loops therein. The output current from each amplifier is passed through an additional tube to minimize the electrostatic capacitance between the tube elements of the last stage of the amplifier, and fed to appropriate points on an output transmission line, similar to the grid line, but terminated at the opposite (input) end. The output taken from the unterminated end of the plate transmission line is proportional to the input voltage impressed upon the grid line.

  2. Digital automatic gain amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, L. D.; Ward, J. O. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A circuit is described for adjusting the amplitude of a reference signal to a predetermined level so as to permit subsequent data signals to be interpreted correctly. The circuit includes an operational amplifier having a feedback circuit connected between an output terminal and an input terminal; a bank of relays operably connected to a plurality of resistors; and a comparator comparing an output voltage of the amplifier with a reference voltage and generating a compared signal responsive thereto. Means is provided for selectively energizing the relays according to the compared signal from the comparator until the output signal from the amplifier equals to the reference signal. A second comparator is provided for comparing the output of the amplifier with a second voltage source so as to illuminate a lamp when the output signal from the amplifier exceeds the second voltage.

  3. Cross-correlation measurement of quantum shot noise using homemade transimpedance amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Hashisaka, Masayuki Ota, Tomoaki; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Fujisawa, Toshimasa; Muraki, Koji

    2014-05-15

    We report a cross-correlation measurement system, based on a new approach, which can be used to measure shot noise in a mesoscopic conductor at milliKelvin temperatures. In contrast to other measurement systems in which high-speed low-noise voltage amplifiers are commonly used, our system employs homemade transimpedance amplifiers (TAs). The low input impedance of the TAs significantly reduces the crosstalk caused by unavoidable parasitic capacitance between wires. The TAs are designed to have a flat gain over a frequency band from 2 kHz to 1 MHz. Low-noise performance is attained by installing the TAs at a 4 K stage of a dilution refrigerator. Our system thus fulfills the technical requirements for cross-correlation measurements: low noise floor, high frequency band, and negligible crosstalk between two signal lines. Using our system, shot noise generated at a quantum point contact embedded in a quantum Hall system is measured. The good agreement between the obtained shot-noise data and theoretical predictions demonstrates the accuracy of the measurements.

  4. A Low Noise, Microprocessor-Controlled, Internally Digitizing Rotating-Vane Electric Field Mill for Airborne Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateman, M. G.; Stewart, M. F.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Podgorny, s. J.; Christian, H. J.; Mach, D. M.; Bailey, J. C.; Daskar, D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a new generation of aircraft-based rotating-vane style electric field mills designed and built at NASA's Marshall Spaceflight Center. The mills have individual microprocessors that digitize the electric field signal at the mill and respond to commands from the data system computer. The mills are very sensitive (1 V/m per bit), have a wide dynamic range (115 dB), and are very low noise (+/-1 LSB). Mounted on an aircraft, these mills can measure fields from +/-1 V/m to +/-500 kV/m. Once-per-second commanding from the data collection computer to each mill allows for precise timing and synchronization. The mills can also be commanded to execute a self-calibration in flight, which is done periodically to monitor the status and health of each mill.

  5. 100 nm AlSb/InAs HEMT for Ultra-Low-Power Consumption, Low-Noise Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bagumako, Sonia; Desplanque, Ludovic; Wichmann, Nicolas; Bollaert, Sylvain; Danneville, François; Wallart, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    We report on high frequency (HF) and noise performances of AlSb/InAs high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with 100 nm gate length at room temperature in low-power regime. Extrinsic cut-off frequencies fT/fmax of 100/125 GHz together with minimum noise figure NFmin = 0.5 dB and associated gain Gass = 12 dB at 12 GHz have been obtained at drain bias of only 80 mV, corresponding to 4 mW/mm DC power dissipation. This demonstrates the great ability of AlSb/InAs HEMT for high-frequency operation combined with low-noise performances in ultra-low-power regime. PMID:24707193

  6. Implementation of a galvanically isolated low-noise power supply board for multi-channel headstage preamplifiers.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Attila; Máthé, Kálmán; Petykó, Zoltán; Szabó, Imre; Czurkó, András

    2008-06-15

    Custom made multi-channel headstage preamplifiers are traditionally powered by battery. By the use of an isolated unregulated DC/DC converter integrated circuit (DCP010512B from Texas Instruments Inc., TX, USA), here we describe the implementation of a galvanically isolated low-noise power supply board for multi-channel headstage preamplifiers. The implemented galvanically isolated power supply board provides the same quality noise free recording as the battery power supply. The non-isolated part of the power supply board is powered by standard 230 V AC/6 V DC wall mount adapter or USB cable. The described galvanically isolated power supply board can replace the batteries in preamplifier power supplies without any deterioration of the quality of recordings.

  7. Hybrid and electric low-noise cars cause an increase in traffic accidents involving vulnerable road users in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Brand, Stephan; Petri, Maximilian; Haas, Philipp; Krettek, Christian; Haasper, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Due to resource scarcity, the number of low-noise and electric cars is expected to increase rapidly. The frequent use of these cars will lead to a significant reduction of traffic related noise and pollution. On the other hand, due to the adaption and conditioning of vulnerable road users the number of traffic accidents involving pedestrians and bicyclists is postulated to increase as well. Children, older people with reduced eyesight and the blind are especially reliant on a combination of acoustic and visual warning signals with approaching or accelerating vehicles. This is even more evident in urban areas where the engine sound is the dominating sound up to 30 kph (kilometres per hour). Above this, tyre-road interaction is the main cause of traffic noise. With the missing typical engine sound a new sound design is necessary to prevent traffic accidents in urban areas. Drivers should not be able to switch the sound generator off.

  8. Hybrid and electric low-noise cars cause an increase in traffic accidents involving vulnerable road users in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Brand, Stephan; Petri, Maximilian; Haas, Philipp; Krettek, Christian; Haasper, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Due to resource scarcity, the number of low-noise and electric cars is expected to increase rapidly. The frequent use of these cars will lead to a significant reduction of traffic related noise and pollution. On the other hand, due to the adaption and conditioning of vulnerable road users the number of traffic accidents involving pedestrians and bicyclists is postulated to increase as well. Children, older people with reduced eyesight and the blind are especially reliant on a combination of acoustic and visual warning signals with approaching or accelerating vehicles. This is even more evident in urban areas where the engine sound is the dominating sound up to 30 kph (kilometres per hour). Above this, tyre-road interaction is the main cause of traffic noise. With the missing typical engine sound a new sound design is necessary to prevent traffic accidents in urban areas. Drivers should not be able to switch the sound generator off. PMID:23083396

  9. 100 nm AlSb/InAs HEMT for ultra-low-power consumption, low-noise applications.

    PubMed

    Gardès, Cyrille; Bagumako, Sonia; Desplanque, Ludovic; Wichmann, Nicolas; Bollaert, Sylvain; Danneville, François; Wallart, Xavier; Roelens, Yannick

    2014-01-01

    We report on high frequency (HF) and noise performances of AlSb/InAs high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with 100 nm gate length at room temperature in low-power regime. Extrinsic cut-off frequencies fT/f max of 100/125 GHz together with minimum noise figure NF(min) = 0.5 dB and associated gain G(ass) = 12 dB at 12 GHz have been obtained at drain bias of only 80 mV, corresponding to 4 mW/mm DC power dissipation. This demonstrates the great ability of AlSb/InAs HEMT for high-frequency operation combined with low-noise performances in ultra-low-power regime.

  10. A low noise front end electronics for micro-channel plate detector with wedge and strip anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, K.; Li, F.; Liang, F.; Chen, L.; Jin, G.

    2016-03-01

    A low noise Front End Electronics (FEE) for two-dimensional position sensitive Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detector has been developed. The MCP detector is based on Wedge and Strip Anode (WSA) with induction readout mode. The WSA has three electrodes, the wedge electrode, the strip electrode, and the zigzag electrode. Then, three readout channels are designed in the Printed Circuit Board (PCB). The FEE is calibrated by a pulse generator from Agilent. We also give an analysis of the charge loss from the CSA. The noise levels of the three channels are less than 1 fC RMS at the shaping time of 200 ns. The experimental result shows that the position resolution of the MCP detector coupled with the designed PCB can reach up to 110 μm.

  11. Dual-frequency Brillouin fiber laser for optical generation of tunable low-noise radio frequency/microwave frequency.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jihong; Staines, Sean; Jiang, Shibin

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a new approach, i.e., a cw dual-frequency Brillouin fiber laser pumped by two independent single-frequency Er-doped fiber lasers, for the generation of tunable low-noise rf/microwave optical signals. Its inherent features of both linewidth narrowing effect in a Brillouin fiber cavity and common mode noise cancellation between two laser modes sharing a common cavity allow us to achieve high frequency stability without using a supercavity. Beat frequency of the dual-frequency Brillouin fiber laser can be tuned from tens of megahertz up to 100 GHz by thermally tuning the wavelengths of the two pump lasers with tuning sensitivity of approximately 1.4 GHz/ degrees C. Allan variance measurements show the beat signals have the hertz-level frequency stability.

  12. Implementation of a galvanically isolated low-noise power supply board for multi-channel headstage preamplifiers.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Attila; Máthé, Kálmán; Petykó, Zoltán; Szabó, Imre; Czurkó, András

    2008-06-15

    Custom made multi-channel headstage preamplifiers are traditionally powered by battery. By the use of an isolated unregulated DC/DC converter integrated circuit (DCP010512B from Texas Instruments Inc., TX, USA), here we describe the implementation of a galvanically isolated low-noise power supply board for multi-channel headstage preamplifiers. The implemented galvanically isolated power supply board provides the same quality noise free recording as the battery power supply. The non-isolated part of the power supply board is powered by standard 230 V AC/6 V DC wall mount adapter or USB cable. The described galvanically isolated power supply board can replace the batteries in preamplifier power supplies without any deterioration of the quality of recordings. PMID:18372046

  13. A Tool for Low Noise Procedures Design and Community Noise Impact Assessment: The Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, David A.; Page, Juliet A.

    2002-01-01

    To improve aircraft noise impact modeling capabilities and to provide a tool to aid in the development of low noise terminal area operations for rotorcraft and tiltrotors, the Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM) was developed by the NASA Langley Research Center and Wyle Laboratories. RNM is a simulation program that predicts how sound will propagate through the atmosphere and accumulate at receiver locations located on flat ground or varying terrain, for single and multiple vehicle flight operations. At the core of RNM are the vehicle noise sources, input as sound hemispheres. As the vehicle "flies" along its prescribed flight trajectory, the source sound propagation is simulated and accumulated at the receiver locations (single points of interest or multiple grid points) in a systematic time-based manner. These sound signals at the receiver locations may then be analyzed to obtain single event footprints, integrated noise contours, time histories, or numerous other features. RNM may also be used to generate spectral time history data over a ground mesh for the creation of single event sound animation videos. Acoustic properties of the noise source(s) are defined in terms of sound hemispheres that may be obtained from theoretical predictions, wind tunnel experimental results, flight test measurements, or a combination of the three. The sound hemispheres may contain broadband data (source levels as a function of one-third octave band) and pure-tone data (in the form of specific frequency sound pressure levels and phase). A PC executable version of RNM is publicly available and has been adopted by a number of organizations for Environmental Impact Assessment studies of rotorcraft noise. This paper provides a review of the required input data, the theoretical framework of RNM's propagation model and the output results. Code validation results are provided from a NATO helicopter noise flight test as well as a tiltrotor flight test program that used the RNM as a tool to aid in

  14. Spectrometry with consumer-quality CMOS cameras.

    PubMed

    Scheeline, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Many modern spectrometric instruments use diode arrays, charge-coupled arrays, or CMOS cameras for detection and measurement. As portable or point-of-use instruments are desirable, one would expect that instruments using the cameras in cellular telephones and tablet computers would be the basis of numerous instruments. However, no mass market for such devices has yet developed. The difficulties in using megapixel CMOS cameras for scientific measurements are discussed, and promising avenues for instrument development reviewed. Inexpensive alternatives to use of the built-in camera are also mentioned, as the long-term question is whether it is better to overcome the constraints of CMOS cameras or to bypass them.

  15. A CMOS millimeter-wave transceiver embedded in a semi-confocal Fabry-Perot cavity for molecular spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Brian J; Tang, Adrian; Schlecht, Erich; Brageot, Emily; Gu, Q Jane; Ye, Y; Shu, R; Frank Chang, Mau-Chung; Kim, Y

    2016-08-21

    The extension of radio frequency complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry into millimeter wavelengths promises the extension of spectroscopic techniques in compact, power efficient systems. We are now beginning to use CMOS millimeter devices for low-mass, low-power instrumentation capable of remote or in situ detection of gas composition during space missions. We have chosen to develop a Flygare-Balle type spectrometer, with a semi-confocal Fabry-Perot cavity to amplify the pump power of a mm-wavelength CMOS transmitter that is directly coupled to the planar mirror of the cavity. We have built a pulsed transceiver system at 92-105 GHz inside a 3 cm base length cavity and demonstrated quality factor up to 4680, allowing for modes with 20 MHz bandwidth, with a sufficient cavity amplification factor for mW class transmitters. This work describes the initial gas measurements and outlines the challenges and next steps. PMID:27544098

  16. A CMOS millimeter-wave transceiver embedded in a semi-confocal Fabry-Perot cavity for molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Tang, Adrian; Schlecht, Erich; Brageot, Emily; Gu, Q. Jane; Ye, Y.; Shu, R.; Frank Chang, Mau-chung; Kim, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The extension of radio frequency complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry into millimeter wavelengths promises the extension of spectroscopic techniques in compact, power efficient systems. We are now beginning to use CMOS millimeter devices for low-mass, low-power instrumentation capable of remote or in situ detection of gas composition during space missions. We have chosen to develop a Flygare-Balle type spectrometer, with a semi-confocal Fabry-Perot cavity to amplify the pump power of a mm-wavelength CMOS transmitter that is directly coupled to the planar mirror of the cavity. We have built a pulsed transceiver system at 92-105 GHz inside a 3 cm base length cavity and demonstrated quality factor up to 4680, allowing for modes with 20 MHz bandwidth, with a sufficient cavity amplification factor for mW class transmitters. This work describes the initial gas measurements and outlines the challenges and next steps.

  17. A CMOS millimeter-wave transceiver embedded in a semi-confocal Fabry-Perot cavity for molecular spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Brian J; Tang, Adrian; Schlecht, Erich; Brageot, Emily; Gu, Q Jane; Ye, Y; Shu, R; Frank Chang, Mau-Chung; Kim, Y

    2016-08-21

    The extension of radio frequency complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry into millimeter wavelengths promises the extension of spectroscopic techniques in compact, power efficient systems. We are now beginning to use CMOS millimeter devices for low-mass, low-power instrumentation capable of remote or in situ detection of gas composition during space missions. We have chosen to develop a Flygare-Balle type spectrometer, with a semi-confocal Fabry-Perot cavity to amplify the pump power of a mm-wavelength CMOS transmitter that is directly coupled to the planar mirror of the cavity. We have built a pulsed transceiver system at 92-105 GHz inside a 3 cm base length cavity and demonstrated quality factor up to 4680, allowing for modes with 20 MHz bandwidth, with a sufficient cavity amplification factor for mW class transmitters. This work describes the initial gas measurements and outlines the challenges and next steps.

  18. A 10-bit ratio-independent cyclic ADC with offset canceling for a CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiming, Nie; Suying, Yao; Jiangtao, Xu; Zhaorui, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    A 10-bit ratio-independent switch-capacitor (SC) cyclic analog-to-digital converter (ADC) with offset canceling for a CMOS image sensor is presented. The proposed ADC completes an N-bit conversion in 1.5N clock cycles with one operational amplifier. Combining ratio-independent and polarity swapping techniques, the conversion characteristic of the proposed cyclic ADC is inherently insensitive both to capacitor ratio and to amplifier offset voltage. Therefore, the circuit can be realized in a small die area and it is suitable to serve as the column-parallel ADC in CMOS image sensors. A prototype ADC is fabricated in 0.18-μm one-poly four-metal CMOS technology. The measured results indicate that the ADC has a signal-to-noise and distortion ratio (SNDR) of 53.6 dB and a DNL of +0:12/-0:14 LSB at a conversion rate of 600 kS/s. The standard deviation of the offset variation of the ADC is reduced from 2.5 LSB to 0.5 LSB. Its power dissipation is 250 μW with a 1.8 V supply, and its area is 0.03 × 0.8 mm2.

  19. A generalized CMOS-MEMS platform for micromechanical resonators monolithically integrated with circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Chien; Fang, Weileun; Li, Sheng-Shian

    2011-06-01

    A generalized foundry-oriented CMOS-MEMS platform well suited for integrated micromechanical resonators alongside IC amplifiers has been developed for commercial multi-user purpose and demonstrated with a fast turnaround time of only 3 months and a variety of design flexibilities for resonator applications. With this platform, different configurations of capacitively-transduced resonators monolithically integrated with their amplifier circuits, spanning frequencies from 500 kHz to 14.5 MHz, have been realized with resonator Q's ranging between 700 and 3500. This platform, specifically featured with various configurations of structural materials, multi-dimensional displacements, different arrangements of mechanical boundary conditions, tiny supports of resonators, large transduction areas, well-defined anchors and performance enhancement scaling with IC fabrication technology, offers a variety of flexible design options targeted for sensor, timing reference, and RF applications. In addition, resonators consisting of metal-oxide composite structures fabricated by this platform offer an effective temperature compensation scheme for the first time in CMOS-MEMS resonators, showing TCf six times better than that of resonators merely made by CMOS metals.

  20. Integrated on-chip 0.35 μm BiCMOS current-mode DC-DC buck converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Kim, Nam-Soo; Gendensuren, Munkhsuld; Choi, Jae-Ho; Choi, Joong-Ho

    2012-12-01

    A current-mode DC-DC buck converter with a fully integrated power module is presented in this article. The converter is implemented using BiCMOS technology in amplifier and power MOSFET in a current sensor. The current sensor is realised by the power lateral double-diffused MOSFET with the aspect ratio much larger than that of a matched p-MOSFET. In addition, BiCMOS technology is applied in the error amplifier for an accurate current sensing and a fast transient response. The DC-DC converter is fabricated with 0.35 µm BiCMOS process. Experimental results show that the fully integrated converter operates at 1.3 MHz switching frequency with a supply voltage of 5 V. The output DC voltage is obtained as expected and the output ripple is controlled to be within 2% with a 30 µH off-chip inductor and 100 µF off-chip capacitor.

  1. Tuning Broadband Microwave Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Alaniz, Gabriel

    2003-09-05

    The PEP-II/DA {Phi} NE/ALS longitudinal feedback systems are complex wide bandwidth systems requiring analog, digital and microwave circuits. The solid-state amplifier is one of the components in the microwave circuit that is required to suppress the coupled bunch instabilities that exist in the PEP-II accelerator. The suppression is achieved by using an antenna as a kicker structure that provides an electric field in order to increase or decrease the energy of particles passing through the structure. The amplifier is made up of sixteen 30 to 35W microstrip GaAs FET modules that are combined to obtain 500W over a bandwidth of 850MHz to 1850MHz. The amplifier malfunctioned causing a reduction in the functionality and power output of the individual GaAs FET modules. The amplifier must be repaired. After repair, the amplifier must be tuned to optimize the gain while maintaining proper power output. The amplifier is tuned using microstrip circuit techniques. A variety of microstrip methods are used to obtain the proper line impedance. The result is a working amplifier that operates efficiently.

  2. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Hallberg, Carl; Cecil, Jim

    1994-01-01

    A state-of-the-art instrumentation amplifier capable of being used with most types of transducers has been developed at the Kennedy Space Center. This Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) can eliminate costly measurement setup item and troubleshooting, improve system reliability and provide more accurate data than conventional amplifiers. The USCA can configure itself for maximum resolution and accuracy based on information read from a RAM chip attached to each transducer. Excitation voltages or current are also automatically configured. The amplifier uses both analog and digital state-of-the-art technology with analog-to-digital conversion performed in the early stages in order to minimize errors introduced by offset and gain drifts in the analog components. A dynamic temperature compensation scheme has been designed to achieve and maintain 12-bit accuracy of the amplifier from 0 to 70 C. The digital signal processing section allows the implementation of digital filters up to 511th order. The amplifier can also perform real-time linearizations up to fourth order while processing data at a rate of 23.438 kS/s. Both digital and analog outputs are available from the amplifier.

  3. Multipass optical parametric amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Jeys, T.H.

    1996-08-01

    A compact, low-threshold, multipass optical parametric amplifier has been developed for the conversion of short-pulse (360-ps) 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser radiation into eye-safe 1572-nm radiation for laser ranging and radar applications. The amplifier had a threshold pump power of as low as 45{mu}J, and at three to four times this threshold pump power the amplifier converted 30{percent} of the input 1064-nm radiation into 1572-nm output radiation. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  4. Amplify Interest in STS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiappetta, Eugene L; Mays, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Presents activities in which students construct simple crystal radio sets and amplifiers out of diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits. Provides conceptual background, materials needed, instructions, diagrams, and classroom applications. (MDH)

  5. Fully relayed regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Alexander J.

    1981-01-01

    A regenerative laser apparatus and method using the optical relay concept to maintain high fill factors, to suppress diffraction effects, and to minimize phase distortions in a regenerative amplifier.

  6. A low-temperature bridge-input CMOS circuit for low-impedance detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, HongHui; Chen, YongPing

    2014-09-01

    Low-impedance long-wave infrared detectors (the wavelength longer than 10 microns) have very important applications in cryogenic aim detection, super-distance detection, anti-jamming target identify and so on. Therefore the research in the field of infrared detector technology is of importance. At present, no low-impedance photoconductive detectors are integrated with CMOS circuit. To design low-temperature CMOS circuit being fit for low impedance infrared photoconductive detector and realize high performance IR imaging, using differential amplifier with symmetrical positive and negative power is necessary, the low-resist detector is connected between an input and grounding, the corresponding low resistance is connected between another input and grounding, a larger feedback resistor is used between negative input and output, this structure can effectively solve the matching problem of low-impedance and high-impedance CMOS. In addition, the noise voltage from VBIAS terminal can be effectively reduced by increasing the ratio of the bias resistor and the detector resistance. The whole circuit is designed two grade. The first grade is adopted bridge input structure, this structure is fit for low impedance detector. The positive amplifying method is applied in second grade . The first grade feedback resistance is designed 1M ohm, the circuit is supplied by +/-1.5V. The testing showed that the circuit can work well when it connects with low-impedance infrared photoconductive detector at the liquid nitrogen low temperature. The magnification is up to 30000 times, 3dB bandwidth is more than 4kHz, the equivalent input noise is near 1.5 micron volts. This circuit has perfectly solved the matching problem between high impedance CMOS circuit and low impedance detector.

  7. Ways to suppress click and pop for class D amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haishi, Wang; Bo, Zhang; Jiang, Sun

    2012-08-01

    Undesirable audio click and pop may be generated in a speaker or headphone. Compared to linear (class A/B/AB) amplifiers, class D amplifiers that comprise of an input stage and a modulation stage are more prone to producing click and pop. This article analyzes sources that generate click and pop in class D amplifiers, and corresponding ways to suppress them. For a class D amplifier with a single-ended input, click and pop is likely to be due to two factors. One is from a voltage difference (VDIF) between the voltage of an input capacitance (VCIN) and a reference voltage (VREF) of the input stage, and the other one is from the non-linear switching during the setting up of the bias and feedback voltages/currents (BFVC) of the modulation stage. In this article, a fast charging loop is introduced into the input stage to charge VCIN to roughly near VREF. Then a correction loop further charges or discharges VCIN, substantially equalizing it with VREF. Dummy switches are introduced into the modulation stage to provide switching signals for setting up BFVC, and the power switches are disabled until the BFVC are set up successfully. A two channel single-ended class D amplifier with the above features is fabricated with 0.5 μm Bi-CMOS process. Road test and fast Fourier transform analysis indicate that there is no noticeable click and pop.

  8. Effects of shallow trench isolation on low frequency noise characteristics of source-follower transistors in CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sung-Kyu; Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Choi, Woon-Il; Song, Hyeong-Sub; Lee, Hi-Deok

    2016-05-01

    The effects of the shallow trench isolation (STI) edge on low frequency noise characteristics of source-follower (SF) transistors in CMOS image sensors (CIS) were investigated. Random telegraph signal (RTS) noise and 1/f noise were measured in a CIS operating voltage region for a realistic assessment. SF transistor with STI edge in contact with channel shows a lower probability of generating RTS noise but greater RTS amplitude due to the enhanced trap density induced by STI-induced damage. SF MOSFETs without STI exhibit a much lower 1/f noise power spectral density in spite of the greater RTS generation probability, which is due to the decreased trap density. Therefore, SF transistors without STI edge in contact with channel are promising candidates for low noise CIS applications.

  9. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A 1.5 Gb/s monolithically integrated optical receiver in the standard CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xindong, Xiao; Luhong, Mao; Changliang, Yu; Shilin, Zhang; Sheng, Xie

    2009-12-01

    A monolithically integrated optical receiver, including the photodetector, has been realized in Chartered 0.35 μm EEPROM CMOS technology for 850 nm optical communication. The optical receiver consists of a differential photodetector, a differential transimpedance amplifier, three limiting amplifiers and an output circuit. The experiment results show that the receiver achieves an 875 MHz 3 dB bandwidth, and a data rate of 1.5 Gb/s is achieved at a bit-error-rate of 10-9. The chip dissipates 60 mW under a single 3.3 V supply.

  10. Low-noise SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Dantsker, Eugene; Clarke, John

    2000-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high-transition-temperature superconducting device having low-magnitude low-frequency noise-characteristics in magnetic fields comprising superconducting films wherein the films have a width that is less than or equal to a critical width, w.sub.C, which depends on an ambient magnetic field. For operation in the Earth's magnetic field, the critical width is about 6 micrometers (.mu.m). When made with film widths of about 4 .mu.m an inventive high transition-temperature, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) excluded magnetic flux vortices up to a threshold ambient magnetic field of about 100 microTesla (.mu.T). SQUIDs were fabricated having several different film strip patterns. When the film strip width was kept at about 4 .mu.m, the SQUIDs exhibited essentially no increase in low-frequency noise, even when cooled in static magnetic fields of magnitude up to 100 .mu.T. Furthermore, the mutual inductance between the inventive devices and a seven-turn spiral coil was at least 85% of that for inductive coupling to a conventional SQUID.

  11. New package for CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diot, Jean-Luc; Loo, Kum Weng; Moscicki, Jean-Pierre; Ng, Hun Shen; Tee, Tong Yan; Teysseyre, Jerome; Yap, Daniel

    2004-02-01

    Cost is the main drawback of existing packages for C-MOS sensors (mainly CLCC family). Alternative packages are thus developed world-wide. And in particular, S.T.Microelectronics has studied a low cost alternative packages based on QFN structure, still with a cavity. Intensive work was done to optimize the over-molding operation forming the cavity onto a metallic lead-frame (metallic lead-frame is a low cost substrate allowing very good mechanical definition of the final package). Material selection (thermo-set resin and glue for glass sealing) was done through standard reliability tests for cavity packages (Moisture Sensitivity Level 3 followed by temperature cycling, humidity storage and high temperature storage). As this package concept is new (without leads protruding the molded cavity), the effect of variation of package dimensions, as well as board lay-out design, are simulated on package life time (during temperature cycling, thermal mismatch between board and package leads to thermal fatigue of solder joints). These simulations are correlated with an experimental temperature cycling test with daisy-chain packages.

  12. Future of nano CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Although Si MOS devices have dominated the integrated circuit applications over the four decades, it has been anticipated that the development of CMOS would reach its limits after the next decade because of the difficulties in the technologies for further downscaling and also because of some fundamental limits of MOSFETs. However, there have been no promising candidates yet, which can replace Si MOSFETs with better performance with low cost. Thus, for the moment, it seems that we have to stick to the Si MOSFET devices until their end. The downsizing is limited by the increase of off-leakage current between source and drain. In order to suppress the off-leakage current, multi-gate structures (FinFET, Tri-gate, and Si-nanowire MOSFETs) are replacing conventional planar MOSFETs, and continuous innovation of high-k/metal gate technologies has enabled EOT scaling down to 0.9 nm in production. However, it was found that the multi-gate structures have a future big problem of significant conduction reduction with decrease in fin width. Also it is not easy to further decrease EOT because of the mobility and reliability degradation. Furthermore, the development of EUV (Extremely Ultra-Violet) lithography, which is supposed to be essential for sub-10 nm lithography, delays significantly because of insufficient illumination intensity for production. Thus, it is now expected that the reduction rate of the gate length, which has a strong influence on the off-leakage current, will become slower in near future.

  13. Electrospun amplified fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-03-11

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm(-1)). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics.

  14. Electrospun Amplified Fiber Optics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm–1). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics. PMID:25710188

  15. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, S.; Kapteyn, H.C.; Murnane, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethrough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate. 7 figs.

  16. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, Sterling; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    1997-01-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate.

  17. Ge/graded-SiGe multiplication layers for low-voltage and low-noise Ge avalanche photodiodes on Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Yuji; Hiraki, Tatsurou; Okazaki, Kota; Takeda, Kotaro; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Yamada, Koji; Wada, Kazumi; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    A new structure is examined for low-voltage and low-noise Ge-based avalanche photodiodes (APDs) on Si, where a Ge/graded-SiGe heterostructure is used as the multiplication layer of a separate-absorption-carrier-multiplication structure. The Ge/SiGe heterojunction multiplication layer is theoretically shown to be useful for preferentially enhancing impact ionization for photogenerated holes injected from the Ge optical-absorption layer via the graded SiGe, reflecting the valence band discontinuity at the Ge/SiGe interface. This property is effective not only for the reduction of operation voltage/electric field strength in Ge-based APDs but also for the reduction of excess noise resulting from the ratio of the ionization coefficients between electrons and holes being far from unity. Such Ge/graded-SiGe heterostructures are successfully fabricated by ultrahigh-vacuum chemical vapor deposition. Preliminary pin diodes having a Ge/graded-SiGe multiplication layer act reasonably as photodetectors, showing a multiplication gain larger than those for diodes without the Ge/SiGe heterojunction.

  18. Photonic crystal-based flat lens integrated on a Bragg mirror for high-Q external cavity low noise laser.

    PubMed

    Seghilani, M S; Sellahi, M; Devautour, M; Lalanne, P; Sagnes, I; Beaudoin, G; Myara, M; Lafosse, X; Legratiet, L; Yang, J; Garnache, A

    2014-03-10

    We demonstrate a high reflectivity (> 99%), low-loss (< 0.1%) and aberrations-free (2% of λ rms phase fluctuations) concave Bragg mirror (20mm radius of curvature) integrating a photonic crystal with engineered spherical phase and amplitude transfer functions, based on a III-V semiconductors flat photonics technology. This mirror design is of high interest for highly coherent high power stable external cavity semiconductor lasers, exhibiting very low noise. We design the photonic crystal for operation in the pass band. The approach incorporates spatial, spectral (filter bandwidth= 5nm) and polarization filtering capabilities. Thanks to the mirror, a compact single mode TEM(00) 2mm-long air gap high finesse (cold cavity Q-factor 10(6) - 10(7)) stable laser cavity is demonstrated with a GaAs-based quantum-wells 1/2-VCSEL gain structure at 1μm. Excellent laser performances are obtained in single frequency operation: low threshold density of 2kW/cm(2) with high differential efficiency (21%). And high spatial, temporal and polarization coherence: TEM(00) beam close to diffraction limit, linear light polarization (> 60dB), Side Mode Suppression Ratio > 46dB, relative intensity noise at quantum limit (< -150dB) in 1MHz-84GHz radio frequency range, and a theoretical linewidth fundamental limit at 10 Hz (Q-factor ∼ 3.10(13)). PMID:24663933

  19. A low-noise wide-dynamic-range UV detector with pixel-level A/D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Bao, Xichang; Wang, Ling; Li, Chao; Yuan, Yonggang; Li, Xiangyang

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a low-power low-noise wide-dynamic-range GaN-based UV detector with pixel-level A/D conversion. The detector comprised an array of 50×50μm2 pixels with a multi-channel bit serial (MCBS) ADC in each pixel. Each pixel contains a UV photo-detector, a 1-bit comparator and a 3-T memory cell. The A/D conversion is performed simultaneously for all pixels. The digital data is read out from the pixel array in manner of a random access digital memory. Since there are many ADCs operating simultaneously, power consumption for each ADC must be minimized. To satisfy the low power consumption, A power-down circuit is introduced in. The minimal value for ADC resolution and the frame rate are 10bits and 100f/s respectively. A high GBW comparator is designed to satisfy this demand. In order to suppress the FPN and 1/f noise a digital correlated double sampling (CDS) is adopted in this application.

  20. Low-Noise Free-Running High-Rate Photon-Counting for Space Communication and Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guangning; Sun, Xiaoli; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for low-noise free-running high-rate photon counting method for space optical communication and ranging. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and logic AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects without using other method of Time Gating The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated very high photon detection efficiencies ((is) greater than 50%) at near infrared wavelength. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output. NASA GSFC has tested both detectors for their potential application for space communications and ranging. We developed and compare their performances using both the 2 detected photon threshold and coincidence methods.

  1. Low-Noise Free-Running High-Rate Photon-Counting for Space Communication and Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for low-noise free-running high-rate photon counting method for space optical communication and ranging. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and logic AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects without using other method of Time Gating The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated very high photon detection efficiencies (50) at near infrared wavelength. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output. NASA GSFC has tested both detectors for their potential application for space communications and ranging. We developed and compare their performances using both the 2 detected photon threshold and coincidence methods.

  2. Photonic crystal-based flat lens integrated on a Bragg mirror for high-Q external cavity low noise laser.

    PubMed

    Seghilani, M S; Sellahi, M; Devautour, M; Lalanne, P; Sagnes, I; Beaudoin, G; Myara, M; Lafosse, X; Legratiet, L; Yang, J; Garnache, A

    2014-03-10

    We demonstrate a high reflectivity (> 99%), low-loss (< 0.1%) and aberrations-free (2% of λ rms phase fluctuations) concave Bragg mirror (20mm radius of curvature) integrating a photonic crystal with engineered spherical phase and amplitude transfer functions, based on a III-V semiconductors flat photonics technology. This mirror design is of high interest for highly coherent high power stable external cavity semiconductor lasers, exhibiting very low noise. We design the photonic crystal for operation in the pass band. The approach incorporates spatial, spectral (filter bandwidth= 5nm) and polarization filtering capabilities. Thanks to the mirror, a compact single mode TEM(00) 2mm-long air gap high finesse (cold cavity Q-factor 10(6) - 10(7)) stable laser cavity is demonstrated with a GaAs-based quantum-wells 1/2-VCSEL gain structure at 1μm. Excellent laser performances are obtained in single frequency operation: low threshold density of 2kW/cm(2) with high differential efficiency (21%). And high spatial, temporal and polarization coherence: TEM(00) beam close to diffraction limit, linear light polarization (> 60dB), Side Mode Suppression Ratio > 46dB, relative intensity noise at quantum limit (< -150dB) in 1MHz-84GHz radio frequency range, and a theoretical linewidth fundamental limit at 10 Hz (Q-factor ∼ 3.10(13)).

  3. Low noise InGaAs/InP single-photon negative feedback avalanche diodes: characterization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boso, Gianluca; Korzh, Boris; Lunghi, Tommaso; Zbinden, Hugo

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, many applications have been proposed that require detection of light signals in the near-infrared range with single-photon sensitivity and time resolution down to few hundreds of picoseconds. InGaAs/InP singlephoton avalanche diodes (SPADs) are a viable choice for these tasks thanks to their compactness and ease-of-use. Unfortunately, their performance is traditionally limited by high dark count rates (DCRs) and afterpulsing effects. However, a recent demonstration of negative feedback avalanche diodes (NFADs), operating in the free-running regime, achieved a DCR down to 1 cps at 10 % photon detection efficiency (PDE) at telecom wavelengths. Here we present our recent results on the characterization of NFAD detectors for temperatures down to approximately 150 K. A FPGA controlled test-bench facilitates the acquisition of all the parameters of interest like PDE, DCR, afterpulsing probability etc. We also demonstrate the performance of the detector in different applications: In particular, with low-temperature NFADs, we achieved high secret key rates with quantum key distribution over fiber links between 100-300 km. But low noise InGaAs/InP SPADs will certainly find applications in yet unexplored fields like photodynamic therapy, near infrared diffuse optical spectroscopy and many more. For example with a large area detector, we made time-resolved measurements of singlet-oxygen luminescence from a standard Rose Bengal dye in aqueous solution.

  4. A Low Noise Planar-Type Avalanche Photodiode using a Single-Diffusion Process in Geiger-Mode Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kiwon; Lee, Byoungwook; Yoon, Sunwoong; Hong, Jung-ho; Yang, Kyounghoon

    2013-07-01

    We report the performances of a planar-type Geiger-mode InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiode (APD) using a single-diffusion process based on a single wet recess-etching technique at a wavelength of 1.55 µm. The recess-etched window region is found to have a smoothly etched sidewall with a large slope width of 0.9 µm. The Geiger-mode characteristics have been measured at 240-280 K for a 20 µm diameter device. The fabricated Geiger-mode APD shows a low dark count probability (DCP) per gate pulse of 2.8×10-3, a high photon detection efficiency (PDE) of 17.4%, and a low noise equivalent power (NEP) of 1.74×10-16 W/Hz1/2 at 240 K. The results are the first demonstration of a planar-type single-diffused Geiger-mode APD using a single wet recess-etching.

  5. Raman-Enhanced Phase-Sensitive Fibre Optical Parametric Amplifier.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xuelei; Guo, Xiaojie; Shu, Chester

    2016-01-01

    Phase-sensitive amplification is of great research interest owing to its potential in noiseless amplification. One key feature in a phase-sensitive amplifier is the gain extinction ratio defined as the ratio of the maximum to the minimum gains. It quantifies the capability of the amplifier in performing low-noise amplification for high phase-sensitive gain. Considering a phase-sensitive fibre optical parametric amplifier for linear amplification, the gain extinction ratio increases with the phase-insensitive parametric gain achieved from the same pump. In this work, we use backward Raman amplification to increase the phase-insensitive parametric gain, which in turn improves the phase-sensitive operation. Using a 955 mW Raman pump, the gain extinction ratio is increased by 9.2 dB. The improvement in the maximum phase-sensitive gain is 18.7 dB. This scheme can significantly boost the performance of phase-sensitive amplification in a spectral range where the parametric pump is not sufficiently strong but broadband Raman amplification is available.

  6. Characteristics research on self-amplified distributed feedback fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhiqiang; Qi, Haifeng; Guo, Jian; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gangding

    2014-09-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser with a ratio of the backward to forward output power of 1:100 was composed by a 45-mm-length asymmetrical phase-shifted fiber grating fabricated on the 50-mm erbium-doped photosensitive fiber. Forward output laser was amplified using a certain length of Nufern EDFL-980-Hp erbium-doped fiber to absorb the surplus pump power after the active phase-shifted fiber grating and get population inversion. By using OptiSystem software, the best fiber length of the EDFL to get the highest gain was simulated. In order to keep the amplified laser with the narrow line-width and low noise, a narrow-band light filter consisting of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with the same Bragg wavelength as the laser and an optical circulator was used to filter the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise of the out-cavity erbium-doped fiber. The designed laser structure sufficiently utilized the pump power, and a DFB fiber laser with the 32.5-mW output power, 11.5-kHz line width, and -87-dB/Hz relative intensity noise (RIN) at 300 mW of 980 nm pump power was brought out.

  7. Raman-Enhanced Phase-Sensitive Fibre Optical Parametric Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xuelei; Guo, Xiaojie; Shu, Chester

    2016-01-01

    Phase-sensitive amplification is of great research interest owing to its potential in noiseless amplification. One key feature in a phase-sensitive amplifier is the gain extinction ratio defined as the ratio of the maximum to the minimum gains. It quantifies the capability of the amplifier in performing low-noise amplification for high phase-sensitive gain. Considering a phase-sensitive fibre optical parametric amplifier for linear amplification, the gain extinction ratio increases with the phase-insensitive parametric gain achieved from the same pump. In this work, we use backward Raman amplification to increase the phase-insensitive parametric gain, which in turn improves the phase-sensitive operation. Using a 955 mW Raman pump, the gain extinction ratio is increased by 9.2 dB. The improvement in the maximum phase-sensitive gain is 18.7 dB. This scheme can significantly boost the performance of phase-sensitive amplification in a spectral range where the parametric pump is not sufficiently strong but broadband Raman amplification is available. PMID:26830136

  8. STABILIZED FEEDBACK AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Fishbine, H.L.; Sewell, C. Jr.

    1957-08-01

    Negative feedback amplifiers, and particularly a negative feedback circuit which is economical on amode power consumption, are described. Basically, the disclosed circuit comprises two tetrode tubes where the output of the first tube is capacitamce coupled to the grid of the second tube, which in turn has its plate coupled to the cathode of the first tube to form a degenerative feedback circuit. Operating potential for screen of the second tube is supplied by connecting the cathode resistor of the first tube to the screen, while the screen is by-passed to the cathode of its tube for the amplified frequencies. Also, the amplifier incorporates a circuit to stabilize the transconductance of the tubes by making the grid potential of each tube interdependent on anode currents of both lubes by voltage divider circuitry.

  9. A CMOS frontend chip for implantable neural recording with wide voltage supply range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jialin, Liu; Xu, Zhang; Xiaohui, Hu; Yatao, Guo; Peng, Li; Ming, Liu; Bin, Li; Hongda, Chen

    2015-10-01

    A design for a CMOS frontend integrated circuit (chip) for neural signal acquisition working at wide voltage supply range is presented in this paper. The chip consists of a preamplifier, a serial instrumental amplifier (IA) and a cyclic analog-to-digital converter (CADC). The capacitive-coupled and capacitive-feedback topology combined with MOS-bipolar pseudo-resistor element is adopted in the preamplifier to create a -3 dB upper cut-off frequency less than 1 Hz without using a ponderous discrete device. A dual-amplifier instrumental amplifier is used to provide a low output impedance interface for ADC as well as to boost the gain. The preamplifier and the serial instrumental amplifier together provide a midband gain of 45.8 dB and have an input-referred noise of 6.7 μVrms integrated from 1 Hz to 5 kHz. The ADC digitizes the amplified signal at 12-bits precision with a highest sampling rate of 130 kS/s. The measured effective number of bits (ENOB) of the ADC is 8.7 bits. The entire circuit draws 165 to 216 μA current from the supply voltage varied from 1.34 to 3.3 V. The prototype chip is fabricated in the 0.18-μm CMOS process and occupies an area of 1.23 mm2 (including pads). In-vitro recording was successfully carried out by the proposed frontend chip. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61474107, 61372060, 61335010, 61275200, 61178051) and the Key Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. KJZD-EW-L11-01).

  10. Spatial Light Amplifier Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Sverre T.; Olsson, N. Anders

    1992-01-01

    Spatial light amplifier modulators (SLAM's) are conceptual devices that effect two-dimensional spatial modulation in optical computing and communication systems. Unlike current spatial light modulators, these provide gain. Optical processors incorporating SLAM's designed to operate in reflection or transmission mode. Each element of planar SLAM array is optical amplifier - surface-emitting diode laser. Array addressed electrically with ac modulating signals superimposed on dc bias currents supplied to lasers. SLAM device provides both desired modulation and enough optical gain to enable splitting of output signal into many optical fibers without excessive loss of power.

  11. A grid amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Moonil; Weikle, Robert M., II; Hacker, Jonathan B.; Delisio, Michael P.; Rutledge, David B.; Rosenberg, James J.; Smith, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    A 50-MESFET grid amplifier is reported that has a gain of 11 dB at 3.3 GHz. The grid isolates the input from the output by using vertical polarization for the input beam and horizontal polarization for the transmitted output beam. The grid unit cell is a two-MESFET differential amplifier. A simple calibration procedure allows the gain to be calculated from a relative power measurement. This grid is a hybrid circuit, but the structure is suitable for fabrication as a monolithic wafer-scale integrated circuit, particularly at millimeter wavelengths.

  12. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Hallberg, Carl; Medelius, Pedro J.

    1994-01-01

    Engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center have designed a signal conditioning amplifier which automatically matches itself to almost any kind of transducer. The product, called Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA), uses state-of-the-art technologies to deliver high accuracy measurements. USCA's features which can be either programmable or automated include: voltage, current, or pulsed excitation, unlimited resolution gain, digital filtering and both analog and digital output. USCA will be used at Kennedy Space Center's launch pads for environmental measurements such as vibrations, strains, temperatures and overpressures. USCA is presently being commercialized through a co-funded agreement between NASA, the State of Florida, and Loral Test and Information Systems, Inc.

  13. Packaging commercial CMOS chips for lab on a chip integration.

    PubMed

    Datta-Chaudhuri, Timir; Abshire, Pamela; Smela, Elisabeth

    2014-05-21

    Combining integrated circuitry with microfluidics enables lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices to perform sensing, freeing them from benchtop equipment. However, this integration is challenging with small chips, as is briefly reviewed with reference to key metrics for package comparison. In this paper we present a simple packaging method for including mm-sized, foundry-fabricated dies containing complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits within LOCs. The chip is embedded in an epoxy handle wafer to yield a level, large-area surface, allowing subsequent photolithographic post-processing and microfluidic integration. Electrical connection off-chip is provided by thin film metal traces passivated with parylene-C. The parylene is patterned to selectively expose the active sensing area of the chip, allowing direct interaction with a fluidic environment. The method accommodates any die size and automatically levels the die and handle wafer surfaces. Functionality was demonstrated by packaging two different types of CMOS sensor ICs, a bioamplifier chip with an array of surface electrodes connected to internal amplifiers for recording extracellular electrical signals and a capacitance sensor chip for monitoring cell adhesion and viability. Cells were cultured on the surface of both types of chips, and data were acquired using a PC. Long term culture (weeks) showed the packaging materials to be biocompatible. Package lifetime was demonstrated by exposure to fluids over a longer duration (months), and the package was robust enough to allow repeated sterilization and re-use. The ease of fabrication and good performance of this packaging method should allow wide adoption, thereby spurring advances in miniaturized sensing systems. PMID:24682025

  14. CMOS front-end for duobinary data over 50-m SI-POF links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, J.; Guerrero, E.; Gimeno, C.; Sánchez-Azqueta, C.; Celma, S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a front-end for short-reach high-speed optical communications that compensates the limited bandwidth of 1-mm 50-m step-index plastic optical fiber (SI-POF). For that purpose, it combines two techniques: continuous-time equalization and duobinary modulation. An addition of both enables the receiver to operate at 3.125 Gbps. The prototype contains a transimpedance amplifier, a continuous-time equalizer and a duobinary decoder. The prototype has been implemented in a cost-effective 0.18-μm CMOS process and is fed with 1.8 V.

  15. Ultra compact 45 GHz CMOS compatible Germanium waveguide photodiode with low dark current.

    PubMed

    DeRose, Christopher T; Trotter, Douglas C; Zortman, William A; Starbuck, Andrew L; Fisher, Moz; Watts, Michael R; Davids, Paul S

    2011-12-01

    We present a compact 1.3 × 4 μm2 Germanium waveguide photodiode, integrated in a CMOS compatible silicon photonics process flow. This photodiode has a best-in-class 3 dB cutoff frequency of 45 GHz, responsivity of 0.8 A/W and dark current of 3 nA. The low intrinsic capacitance of this device may enable the elimination of transimpedance amplifiers in future optical data communication receivers, creating ultra low power consumption optical communications. PMID:22273883

  16. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  17. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  18. Characterization and reliability of CMOS microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedder, Gary K.; Blanton, Ronald D. S.

    1999-08-01

    This paper provides an overview of high-aspect-ratio CMOS micromachining, focusing on materials characterization, reliability, and fault analysis. Composite microstrutural beam widths and gaps down to 1.2 micrometers are etched out of conventional CMOS dielectric, aluminum, and gate-polysilicon thin films using post-CMOS dry etching for both structural sidewall definition and for release from the substrate. Differences in stress between the multiple metal and dielectric layers cause vertical stress gradients and curl, while misalignment between layers causes lateral stress gradients and curl. Cracking is induced in a resonant fatigue structures at 620 MPa of repetitive stress after over 50 million cycles. Beams have withstood over 1.3 billion cycles at 124 MPa stress levels induced by electrostatic actuation. Failures due to process defects are classified according to the geometrical features of the defective structures. Relative probability of occurrence of each defect type is extracted from the process simulation results.

  19. Nanopore-CMOS Interfaces for DNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Magierowski, Sebastian; Huang, Yiyun; Wang, Chengjie; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencers based on nanopore sensors present an opportunity for a significant break from the template-based incumbents of the last forty years. Key advantages ushered by nanopore technology include a simplified chemistry and the ability to interface to CMOS technology. The latter opportunity offers substantial promise for improvement in sequencing speed, size and cost. This paper reviews existing and emerging means of interfacing nanopores to CMOS technology with an emphasis on massively-arrayed structures. It presents this in the context of incumbent DNA sequencing techniques, reviews and quantifies nanopore characteristics and models and presents CMOS circuit methods for the amplification of low-current nanopore signals in such interfaces. PMID:27509529

  20. Nanopore-CMOS Interfaces for DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Magierowski, Sebastian; Huang, Yiyun; Wang, Chengjie; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencers based on nanopore sensors present an opportunity for a significant break from the template-based incumbents of the last forty years. Key advantages ushered by nanopore technology include a simplified chemistry and the ability to interface to CMOS technology. The latter opportunity offers substantial promise for improvement in sequencing speed, size and cost. This paper reviews existing and emerging means of interfacing nanopores to CMOS technology with an emphasis on massively-arrayed structures. It presents this in the context of incumbent DNA sequencing techniques, reviews and quantifies nanopore characteristics and models and presents CMOS circuit methods for the amplification of low-current nanopore signals in such interfaces. PMID:27509529