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Sample records for cmp-sialic acid synthetase

  1. Characterisation of Drosophila CMP-sialic acid synthetase activity reveals unusual enzymatic properties

    PubMed Central

    Mertsalov, Ilya B.; Novikov, Boris N.; Scott, Hilary; Dangott, Lawrence; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2016-01-01

    CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS) is a key enzyme of the sialylation pathway. CSAS produces the activated sugar donor, CMP-sialic acid, which serves as a substrate for sialyltransferases to modify glycan termini with sialic acid. Unlike other animal CMP-Sia synthetases that normally localize in the nucleus, Drosophila melanogaster CSAS (DmCSAS) localizes in the cell secretory compartment, predominantly in the Golgi, which suggests that this enzyme has properties distinct from those of its vertebrate counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant DmCSAS and characterised its activity in vitro. Our experiments revealed several unique features of this enzyme. DmCSAS displays specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate, shows preference for lower pH and can function with a broad range of metal cofactors. When tested at a pH corresponding to the Golgi compartment, the enzyme showed significant activity with several metal cations, including Zn2+, Fe2+, Co2+ and Mn2+, while the activity with Mg2+ was found to be low. Protein sequence analysis and site-specific mutagenesis identified an aspartic acid residue that is necessary for enzymatic activity and predicted to be involved in coordinating a metal cofactor. DmCSAS enzymatic activity was found to be essential in vivo for rescuing the phenotype of DmCSAS mutants. Finally, our experiments revealed a steep dependence of the enzymatic activity on temperature. Taken together, our results indicate that DmCSAS underwent evolutionary adaptation to pH and ionic environment different from that of counterpart synthetases in vertebrates. Our data also suggest that environmental temperatures can regulate Drosophila sialylation, thus modulating neural transmission. PMID:27114558

  2. Characterization of Drosophila CMP-sialic acid synthetase activity reveals unusual enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Mertsalov, Ilya B; Novikov, Boris N; Scott, Hilary; Dangott, Lawrence; Panin, Vladislav M

    2016-07-01

    CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS) is a key enzyme of the sialylation pathway. CSAS produces the activated sugar donor, CMP-sialic acid, which serves as a substrate for sialyltransferases to modify glycan termini with sialic acid. Unlike other animal CSASs that normally localize in the nucleus, Drosophila melanogaster CSAS (DmCSAS) localizes in the cell secretory compartment, predominantly in the Golgi, which suggests that this enzyme has properties distinct from those of its vertebrate counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant DmCSAS and characterized its activity in vitro Our experiments revealed several unique features of this enzyme. DmCSAS displays specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate, shows preference for lower pH and can function with a broad range of metal cofactors. When tested at a pH corresponding to the Golgi compartment, the enzyme showed significant activity with several metal cations, including Zn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+) and Mn(2+), whereas the activity with Mg(2+) was found to be low. Protein sequence analysis and site-specific mutagenesis identified an aspartic acid residue that is necessary for enzymatic activity and predicted to be involved in co-ordinating a metal cofactor. DmCSAS enzymatic activity was found to be essential in vivo for rescuing the phenotype of DmCSAS mutants. Finally, our experiments revealed a steep dependence of the enzymatic activity on temperature. Taken together, our results indicate that DmCSAS underwent evolutionary adaptation to pH and ionic environment different from that of counterpart synthetases in vertebrates. Our data also suggest that environmental temperatures can regulate Drosophila sialylation, thus modulating neural transmission.

  3. Identification of Arg-12 in the active site of Escherichia coli K1 CMP-sialic acid synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Stoughton, D M; Zapata, G; Picone, R; Vann, W F

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli K1 CMP-sialic acid synthetase catalyses the synthesis of CMP-sialic acid from CTP and sialic acid. The active site of the 418 amino acid E. coli enzyme was localized to its N-terminal half. The bacterial CMP-sialic acid synthetase enzymes have a conserved motif, IAIIPARXXSKGLXXKN, at their N-termini. Several basic residues have been identified at or near the active site of the E. coli enzyme by chemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis. Only one of the lysines in the N-terminal motif, Lys-21, appears to be essential for activity. Mutation of Lys-21 in the N-terminal motif results in an inactive enzyme. Furthermore, Arg-12 of the N-terminal motif appears to be an active-site residue, based on the following evidence. Substituting Arg-12 with glycine or alanine resulted in inactive enzymes, indicating that this residue is required for enzymic activity. The Arg-12-->Lys mutant was partially active, demonstrating that a positive charge is required at this site. Steady-state kinetic analysis reveals changes in k(cat), K(m) and K(s) for CTP, which implicates Arg-12 in catalysis and substrate binding. PMID:10510306

  4. Analysis of CMP-sialic acid transporter-like proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Shou; Seino, Junichi; Nakano, Takeshi; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Tsujimoto, Masafumi; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro

    2009-12-01

    It is commonly accepted that sialic acids do not exist in plants. However, putative gene homologs of animal sialyltransferases and CMP-sialic acid transporters have been detected in the genomes of some plants. To elucidate the physiological functions of these genes, we cloned 2 cDNAs from Oryza sativa (Japanese rice), each of which encodes a CMP-sialic acid transporter-like protein designated as OsCSTLP1 and OsCSTLP2. To examine the CMP-sialic acid transporter activity of OsCSTLP1 and OsCSTLP2, we introduced their expression vectors into CMP-sialic acid transporter activity-deficient Lec2 cells. Transfection with OsCSTLP1 resulted in recovery of the deficit phenotype of Lec2 cells, but transfection with OsCSTLP2 did not. We also performed an in vitro nucleotide sugar transport assay using a yeast expression system. Among the nucleotide sugars examined, the OsCSTLP1-containing yeast microsomal membrane vesicles specifically incorporated CMP-sialic acid, indicating that OsCSTLP1 has CMP-sialic acid transporter activity. On the other hand, OsCSTLP2 did not exhibit any nucleotide sugar transporter activity. T-DNA insertion lines of Arabidopsis thaliana targeting the homologs of the OsCSTLP1 and OsCSTLP2 genes exhibited a lethal phenotype, suggesting that these proteins play important roles in plant development and may transport important nucleotide sugars such as CMP-Kdo in physiological conditions.

  5. A functional splice variant of the human Golgi CMP-sialic acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Marín, Roberta; Mollicone, Rosella; Martínez-Duncker, Iván

    2016-12-01

    The human Golgi Cytidine-5'-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Sia) transporter SLC35A1, a member of the nucleotide sugar transporter family, translocates CMP-Sia from the cytosol into the Golgi lumen where sialyltransferases use it as donor substrate for the synthesis of sialoglycoconjugates. In 2005, we reported a novel Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation (CDG) termed CDG-IIf or SLC35A1-CDG, characterized by macrothrombocytopenia, neutropenia and complete lack of the sialyl-Le(x) antigen (NeuAcα2-3Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc-R) on polymorphonuclear cells. This disease was caused by the presence of inactive SLC35A1 alleles. It was also found that the SLC35A1 generates additional isoforms through alternative splicing. In this work, we demonstrate that one of the reported isoforms, the del177 with exon 6 skipping, is able to maintain sialylation in HepG2 cells submitted to wt knockdown and restore sialylation to normal levels in the Chinese Hamester Ovary (CHO) cell line Lec2 mutant deficient in CMP-Sia transport. The characteristics of the alternatively spliced protein are discussed as well as therapeutic implications of this finding in CDGs caused by mutations in nucleotide sugar transporters (NSTs).

  6. Utilizing CMP-Sialic Acid Analogs to Unravel Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipooligosaccharide-Mediated Complement Resistance and Design Novel Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Sunita; Schoenhofen, Ian C; Whitfield, Dennis M; Cox, Andrew D; Li, Jianjun; St Michael, Frank; Vinogradov, Evgeny V; Stupak, Jacek; Zheng, Bo; Ohnishi, Makoto; Unemo, Magnus; Lewis, Lisa A; Taylor, Rachel E; Landig, Corinna S; Diaz, Sandra; Reed, George W; Varki, Ajit; Rice, Peter A; Ram, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae deploys a novel immune evasion strategy wherein the lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT) structure of lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is capped by the bacterial sialyltransferase, using host cytidine-5'-monophosphate (CMP)-activated forms of the nine-carbon nonulosonate (NulO) sugar N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a sialic acid (Sia) abundant in humans. This allows evasion of complement-mediated killing by recruiting factor H (FH), an inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, and by limiting classical pathway activation ("serum-resistance"). We utilized CMP salts of six additional natural or synthetic NulOs, Neu5Gc, Neu5Gc8Me, Neu5Ac9Ac, Neu5Ac9Az, legionaminic acid (Leg5Ac7Ac) and pseudaminic acid (Pse5Ac7Ac), to define structural requirements of Sia-mediated serum-resistance. While all NulOs except Pse5Ac7Ac were incorporated into the LNnT-LOS, only Neu5Gc incorporation yielded high-level serum-resistance and FH binding that was comparable to Neu5Ac, whereas Neu5Ac9Az and Leg5Ac7Ac incorporation left bacteria fully serum-sensitive and did not enhance FH binding. Neu5Ac9Ac and Neu5Gc8Me rendered bacteria resistant only to low serum concentrations. While serum-resistance mediated by Neu5Ac was associated with classical pathway inhibition (decreased IgG binding and C4 deposition), Leg5Ac7Ac and Neu5Ac9Az incorporation did not inhibit the classical pathway. Remarkably, CMP-Neu5Ac9Az and CMP-Leg5Ac7Ac each prevented serum-resistance despite a 100-fold molar excess of CMP-Neu5Ac in growth media. The concomitant presence of Leg5Ac7Ac and Neu5Ac on LOS resulted in uninhibited classical pathway activation. Surprisingly, despite near-maximal FH binding in this instance, the alternative pathway was not regulated and factor Bb remained associated with bacteria. Intravaginal administration of CMP-Leg5Ac7Ac to BALB/c mice infected with gonorrhea (including a multidrug-resistant isolate) reduced clearance times and infection burden. Bacteria recovered from CMP

  7. Utilizing CMP-Sialic Acid Analogs to Unravel Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipooligosaccharide-Mediated Complement Resistance and Design Novel Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sunita; Schoenhofen, Ian C.; Whitfield, Dennis M.; Cox, Andrew D.; Li, Jianjun; St. Michael, Frank; Vinogradov, Evgeny V.; Stupak, Jacek; Zheng, Bo; Ohnishi, Makoto; Unemo, Magnus; Lewis, Lisa A.; Taylor, Rachel E.; Landig, Corinna S.; Diaz, Sandra; Reed, George W.; Varki, Ajit; Rice, Peter A.; Ram, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae deploys a novel immune evasion strategy wherein the lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT) structure of lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is capped by the bacterial sialyltransferase, using host cytidine-5’-monophosphate (CMP)-activated forms of the nine-carbon nonulosonate (NulO) sugar N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a sialic acid (Sia) abundant in humans. This allows evasion of complement-mediated killing by recruiting factor H (FH), an inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, and by limiting classical pathway activation (“serum-resistance”). We utilized CMP salts of six additional natural or synthetic NulOs, Neu5Gc, Neu5Gc8Me, Neu5Ac9Ac, Neu5Ac9Az, legionaminic acid (Leg5Ac7Ac) and pseudaminic acid (Pse5Ac7Ac), to define structural requirements of Sia-mediated serum-resistance. While all NulOs except Pse5Ac7Ac were incorporated into the LNnT-LOS, only Neu5Gc incorporation yielded high-level serum-resistance and FH binding that was comparable to Neu5Ac, whereas Neu5Ac9Az and Leg5Ac7Ac incorporation left bacteria fully serum-sensitive and did not enhance FH binding. Neu5Ac9Ac and Neu5Gc8Me rendered bacteria resistant only to low serum concentrations. While serum-resistance mediated by Neu5Ac was associated with classical pathway inhibition (decreased IgG binding and C4 deposition), Leg5Ac7Ac and Neu5Ac9Az incorporation did not inhibit the classical pathway. Remarkably, CMP-Neu5Ac9Az and CMP-Leg5Ac7Ac each prevented serum-resistance despite a 100-fold molar excess of CMP-Neu5Ac in growth media. The concomitant presence of Leg5Ac7Ac and Neu5Ac on LOS resulted in uninhibited classical pathway activation. Surprisingly, despite near-maximal FH binding in this instance, the alternative pathway was not regulated and factor Bb remained associated with bacteria. Intravaginal administration of CMP-Leg5Ac7Ac to BALB/c mice infected with gonorrhea (including a multidrug-resistant isolate) reduced clearance times and infection burden. Bacteria recovered from

  8. Fatty Acid Synthetase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harold P.; Volkmann, Carol M.; Chao, Fu-Chuan

    1967-01-01

    A light particle fraction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, obtained from the crude ribosomal material, and containing the fatty acid synthetase, consisted primarily of 27S and 47S components. This fraction has a protein-ribonucleic acid ratio of about 13. Electron micrographs showed particles ranging in diameter between 100 and 300 A in this material. By use of density gradient analysis, the fatty acid synthetase was found in the 47S component. This component contained particles which were predominantly 300 A in diameter and which were considerably flatter than ribosomes, and it consisted almost entirely of protein. Images PMID:6025308

  9. Functional Analysis of Leishmania Cyclopropane Fatty Acid Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Oyola, Samuel O.; Evans, Krystal J.; Smith, Terry K.; Smith, Barbara A.; Hilley, James D.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Kaye, Paul M.; Smith, Deborah F.

    2012-01-01

    The single gene encoding cyclopropane fatty acid synthetase (CFAS) is present in Leishmania infantum, L. mexicana and L. braziliensis but absent from L. major, a causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis. In L. infantum, usually causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis, the CFAS gene is transcribed in both insect (extracellular) and host (intracellular) stages of the parasite life cycle. Tagged CFAS protein is stably detected in intracellular L. infantum but only during the early log phase of extracellular growth, when it shows partial localisation to the endoplasmic reticulum. Lipid analyses of L. infantum wild type, CFAS null and complemented parasites detect a low abundance CFAS-dependent C19Δ fatty acid, characteristic of a cyclopropanated species, in wild type and add-back cells. Sub-cellular fractionation studies locate the C19Δ fatty acid to both ER and plasma membrane-enriched fractions. This fatty acid is not detectable in wild type L. major, although expression of the L. infantum CFAS gene in L. major generates cyclopropanated fatty acids, indicating that the substrate for this modification is present in L. major, despite the absence of the modifying enzyme. Loss of the L. infantum CFAS gene does not affect extracellular parasite growth, phagocytosis or early survival in macrophages. However, while endocytosis is also unaffected in the extracellular CFAS nulls, membrane transporter activity is defective and the null parasites are more resistant to oxidative stress. Following infection in vivo, L. infantum CFAS nulls exhibit lower parasite burdens in both the liver and spleen of susceptible hosts but it has not been possible to complement this phenotype, suggesting that loss of C19Δ fatty acid may lead to irreversible changes in cell physiology that cannot be rescued by re-expression. Aberrant cyclopropanation in L. major decreases parasite virulence but does not influence parasite tissue tropism. PMID:23251490

  10. Myocardial aminoacyl-transfer-ribonucleic acid synthetase and aminoacyl-transferring enzyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, K.; Harris, P.

    1972-01-01

    The properties of cytoplasmic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and aminoacyl-transferring enzymes in the myocardium were examined and methods for the assay of the activity of these enzyme systems were developed. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase activity was measured from the rate of incorporation of 14C-labelled amino acid into aminoacyl-tRNA. Transferase activity was measured from the rate of incorporation of amino[14C]acyl-tRNA into protein in the presence of a standard preparation of hepatic ribosomes. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase activity is labile once the heart has been homogenized, whereas transferase activity is stable. The source of energy for synthetase activity is ATP; that for transferase is GTP. Transferase activity was inhibited by puromycin and stimulated by dithiothreitol, whereas synthetase activity was unaffected. PMID:5071178

  11. Saturated Fatty Acid Mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with an Intact Fatty Acid Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Karl H.; Schweizer, Eckhart

    1974-01-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae conditional mutant, LK 181, is described which grows at 37 C only when supplemented with a saturated fatty acid of 12 to 14 carbon atoms chain length. At 22 C, however, no fatty acid supplementation is required for growth. The fatty acid concentration required for optimal growth at 37 C is about four times lower for LK 181 than for fatty acid synthetase-deficient mutants. In contrast to all fatty acid synthetase mutants so far examined, mutant LK 181 cannot grow with palmitic acid. The addition of palmitic, palmitoleic, or oleic acid to the culture medium prevents LK 181 growth at temperatures between 22 and 37 C. In vivo as well as in vitro, cellular de novo fatty acid biosynthesis from acetate is unimpaired in this mutant. It is suggested that endogenously synthesized fatty acids, due to their chain lengths of 16 and more carbon atoms, cannot supplement the mutant LK 181. It is concluded that the exogeneously supplied fatty acids act as allosteric effectors for a mutationally altered cellular protein to restore its biological function at elevated temperatures, rather than as a substitute for endogenously synthesized long-chain fatty acids. PMID:4590462

  12. Alternative pathways for editing non-cognate amino acids by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowski, H; Fersht, A R

    1981-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the editing mechanisms of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase operate by two alternative pathways: pre-transfer, by hydrolysis of the non-cognate aminoacyl adenylate; post-transfer, by hydrolysis of the mischarged tRNA. The methionyl-tRNA synthetases from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus and isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase from E. coli, for example, are shown to reject misactivated homocysteine rapidly by the pre-transfer route. A novel feature of this reaction is that homocysteine thiolactone is formed by the facile cyclisation of the homocysteinyl adenylate. Valyl-tRNA synthetases, on the other hand, reject the more readily activated non-cognate amino acids by primarily the post-transfer route. The features governing the choice of pathway are discussed. PMID:7024910

  13. SOLUBLE HEPATIC δ-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID SYNTHETASE: END-PRODUCT INHIBITION OF THE PARTIALLY PURIFIED ENZYME*

    PubMed Central

    Scholnick, Perry L.; Hammaker, Lydia E.; Marver, Harvey S.

    1969-01-01

    The present study confirms the existence of hepatic δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase in the cytosol of the liver, suggests that this enzyme may be in transit to the mitochondria, and defines some of the characteristics of the partially purified enzyme. The substrate and cofactor requirements are similar to those of mitochondrial δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase. Heme strongly inhibits the partially purified enzyme. A number of proteins that bind heme block this inhibition, which explains previous failures to demonstrate heme inhibition in crude systems. End-product inhibition of δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase in the mitochondria may play an important role in the regulation of heme biosynthesis in eukaryotic cells. PMID:5257968

  14. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase: double duty in amino acid sensing.

    PubMed

    Durán, Raúl V; Hall, Michael N

    2012-08-01

    The cellular response to amino acids is controlled at the molecular level by TORC1. While many of the elements that participate in TORC1 signaling are known, we still have no clear idea how cells sense amino acids. Two recent studies found that leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LRS) is a leucine sensor for TORC1, in both yeast and mammalian cells.

  15. Discovery and characterization of de novo sialic acid biosynthesis in the phylum Fusobacterium.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Amanda L; Robinson, Lloyd S; Agarwal, Kavita; Lewis, Warren G

    2016-10-01

    Sialic acids are nine-carbon backbone carbohydrates found in prominent outermost positions of glycosylated molecules in mammals. Mimicry of sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid, Neu5Ac) enables some pathogenic bacteria to evade host defenses. Fusobacterium nucleatum is a ubiquitous oral bacterium also linked with invasive infections throughout the body. We employed multidisciplinary approaches to test predictions that F. nucleatum engages in de novo synthesis of sialic acids. Here we show that F. nucleatum sbsp. polymorphum ATCC10953 NeuB (putative Neu5Ac synthase) restores Neu5Ac synthesis to an Escherichia coli neuB mutant. Moreover, purified F. nucleatum NeuB participated in synthesis of Neu5Ac from N-acetylmannosamine and phosphoenolpyruvate in vitro Further studies support the interpretation that F. nucleatum ATCC10953 NeuA encodes a functional CMP-sialic acid synthetase and suggest that it may also contain a C-terminal sialic acid O-acetylesterase. We also performed BLAST queries of F. nucleatum genomes, revealing that only 4/31 strains encode a complete pathway for de novo Neu5Ac synthesis. Biochemical studies including mass spectrometry were consistent with the bioinformatic predictions, showing that F. nucleatum ATCC10953 synthesizes high levels of Neu5Ac, whereas ATCC23726 and ATCC25586 do not express detectable levels above background. While there are a number of examples of sialic acid mimicry in other phyla, these experiments provide the first biochemical and genetic evidence that a member of the phylum Fusobacterium can engage in de novo Neu5Ac synthesis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Discovery and characterization of de novo sialic acid biosynthesis in the phylum Fusobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda L; Robinson, Lloyd S; Agarwal, Kavita; Lewis, Warren G

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acids are nine-carbon backbone carbohydrates found in prominent outermost positions of glycosylated molecules in mammals. Mimicry of sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid, Neu5Ac) enables some pathogenic bacteria to evade host defenses. Fusobacterium nucleatum is a ubiquitous oral bacterium also linked with invasive infections throughout the body. We employed multidisciplinary approaches to test predictions that F. nucleatum engages in de novo synthesis of sialic acids. Here we show that F. nucleatum sbsp. polymorphum ATCC10953 NeuB (putative Neu5Ac synthase) restores Neu5Ac synthesis to an Escherichia coli neuB mutant. Moreover, purified F. nucleatum NeuB participated in synthesis of Neu5Ac from N-acetylmannosamine and phosphoenolpyruvate in vitro. Further studies support the interpretation that F. nucleatum ATCC10953 NeuA encodes a functional CMP-sialic acid synthetase and suggest that it may also contain a C-terminal sialic acid O-acetylesterase. We also performed BLAST queries of F. nucleatum genomes, revealing that only 4/31 strains encode a complete pathway for de novo Neu5Ac synthesis. Biochemical studies including mass spectrometry were consistent with the bioinformatic predictions, showing that F. nucleatum ATCC10953 synthesizes high levels of Neu5Ac, whereas ATCC23726 and ATCC25586 do not express detectable levels above background. While there are a number of examples of sialic acid mimicry in other phyla, these experiments provide the first biochemical and genetic evidence that a member of the phylum Fusobacterium can engage in de novo Neu5Ac synthesis. PMID:27613803

  17. When contemporary aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases invent their cognate amino acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Hervé; Becker, Hubert Dominique; Reinbolt, Joseph; Kern, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Faithful protein synthesis relies on a family of essential enzymes called aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, assembled in a piecewise fashion. Analysis of the completed archaeal genomes reveals that all archaea that possess asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) also display a second ORF encoding an AsnRS truncated from its anticodon binding-domain (AsnRS2). We show herein that Pyrococcus abyssi AsnRS2, in contrast to AsnRS, does not sustain asparaginyl-tRNAAsn synthesis but is instead capable of converting aspartic acid into asparagine. Functional analysis and complementation of an Escherichia coli asparagine auxotrophic strain show that AsnRS2 constitutes the archaeal homologue of the bacterial ammonia-dependent asparagine synthetase A (AS-A), therefore named archaeal asparagine synthetase A (AS-AR). Primary sequence- and 3D-based phylogeny shows that an archaeal AspRS ancestor originated AS-AR, which was subsequently transferred into bacteria by lateral gene transfer in which it underwent structural changes producing AS-A. This study provides evidence that a contemporary aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase can be recruited to sustain amino acid metabolism. PMID:12874385

  18. Amino acid sequence around the active-site serine residue in the acyltransferase domain of goat mammary fatty acid synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, J; Højrup, P; Rasmussen, M M; Roepstorff, P; Knudsen, J

    1985-01-01

    Goat mammary fatty acid synthetase was labelled in the acyltransferase domain by formation of O-ester intermediates by incubation with [1-14C]acetyl-CoA and [2-14C]malonyl-CoA. Tryptic-digest and CNBr-cleavage peptides were isolated and purified by high-performance reverse-phase and ion-exchange liquid chromatography. The sequences of the malonyl- and acetyl-labelled peptides were shown to be identical. The results confirm the hypothesis that both acetyl and malonyl groups are transferred to the mammalian fatty acid synthetase complex by the same transferase. The sequence is compared with those of other fatty acid synthetase transferases. PMID:3922356

  19. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a wild-type control strain, suggesting that Acs2-mediated consumption of acetic acid during fermentation contributes to acetic acid detoxification.

  20. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H.; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a wild-type control strain, suggesting that Acs2-mediated consumption of acetic acid during fermentation contributes to acetic acid detoxification. PMID:25673654

  1. Gene organization around the phenylalanyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase locus in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Comer, M M

    1981-01-01

    The organization of seven genes located at about 38 min on the genetic map of Escherichia coli was examined; these genes included pheS and pheT, which code for the alpha and beta subunits of phenylalanyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase, and thrS, the structural gene for threonyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase. Deletion mutants were isolated from an F-prime-containing merodiploid strain and were characterized genetically. Seventeen different kinds of deletions extending into pheS of pheT were identified. These deletions unambiguously defined the gene order as aroD pps himA pheT pheS thrS pfkB. Mutants with deletions covering either pheS or pheT, but not both, were analyzed further by assay of phenylalanyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase. The phenotype of the mutants with a deletion from pfkB through pheS was anomalous; although the pheT gene was apparently still present, its product, the beta subunit, was much reduced in activity. PMID:7012115

  2. Aminoacyl transfer ribonucleic acid synthetases from cell-free extract of Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Ilan, J; Ilan, J

    1969-05-02

    Aminoacyl transfer ribonucleic acid synthetases for leucine tyrosine, histidine, valine, proline, threonine, and lysine were obtainnned from cell-free extract of Plasmodium berghei. The leucyl-tRNA synthetase cane charge tRNA from liver or Escherichia coli with leucine-c(14), liver tRNA being a better substrate. The amount of aminoacylation increses linerly with respect to the quantity of tRNA added from either source and is dependent on the amount of enzyme added. The rate of aminoacylation is constant for 10 minutes and then decreases. It is enhanced by polyvinylsulfate. One-tenth millimoler pyrimethamine, hydroxystilbamidine, quinacrine, and acriflavine inhibited the formation of C(14)-valyl-tRNA. Species specificity between tRNA and its charging enzyme with respect to the recognition site is discussed.

  3. A CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase purified from a marine bacterium, Photobacterium leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Hitomi; Mine, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    A cytidine 5'-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac) synthetase was found in a crude extract prepared from Photobacterium leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145, a marine bacterium that also produces a β-galactoside α2,6-sialyltransferase. The CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase was purified from the crude extract of the cells by a combination of anion-exchange and gel filtration column chromatography. The purified enzyme migrated as a single band (60 kDa) on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The activity of the enzyme was maximal at 35 °C at pH 9.0, and the synthetase required Mg(2+) for activity. Although these properties are similar to those of other CMP-Neu5Ac synthetases isolated from bacteria, this synthetase produced not only CMP-Neu5Ac from cytidine triphosphate and Neu5Ac, but also CMP-N-glycolylneuraminic acid from cytidine triphosphate and N-glycolylneuraminic acid, unlike CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase purified from Escherichia coli.

  4. Lipoic Acid Synthetase Deficiency Causes Neonatal-Onset Epilepsy, Defective Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism, and Glycine Elevation

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Johannes A.; Zimmermann, Franz A.; Fauth, Christine; Bergheim, Christa; Meierhofer, David; Radmayr, Doris; Zschocke, Johannes; Koch, Johannes; Sperl, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Lipoic acid is an essential prosthetic group of four mitochondrial enzymes involved in the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate, and branched chain amino acids and in the glycine cleavage. Lipoic acid is synthesized stepwise within mitochondria through a process that includes lipoic acid synthetase. We identified the homozygous mutation c.746G>A (p.Arg249His) in LIAS in an individual with neonatal-onset epilepsy, muscular hypotonia, lactic acidosis, and elevated glycine concentration in plasma and urine. Investigation of the mitochondrial energy metabolism showed reduced oxidation of pyruvate and decreased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity. A pronounced reduction of the prosthetic group lipoamide was found in lipoylated proteins. PMID:22152680

  5. Arabidopsis thaliana GH3.5 acyl acid amido synthetase mediates metabolic crosstalk in auxin and salicylic acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Westfall, Corey S; Sherp, Ashley M; Zubieta, Chloe; Alvarez, Sophie; Schraft, Evelyn; Marcellin, Romain; Ramirez, Loren; Jez, Joseph M

    2016-11-29

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the acyl acid amido synthetase Gretchen Hagen 3.5 (AtGH3.5) conjugates both indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and salicylic acid (SA) to modulate auxin and pathogen response pathways. To understand the molecular basis for the activity of AtGH3.5, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the enzyme in complex with IAA and AMP. Biochemical analysis demonstrates that the substrate preference of AtGH3.5 is wider than originally described and includes the natural auxin phenylacetic acid (PAA) and the potential SA precursor benzoic acid (BA). Residues that determine IAA versus BA substrate preference were identified. The dual functionality of AtGH3.5 is unique to this enzyme although multiple IAA-conjugating GH3 proteins share nearly identical acyl acid binding sites. In planta analysis of IAA, PAA, SA, and BA and their respective aspartyl conjugates were determined in wild-type and overexpressing lines of A thaliana This study suggests that AtGH3.5 conjugates auxins (i.e., IAA and PAA) and benzoates (i.e., SA and BA) to mediate crosstalk between different metabolic pathways, broadening the potential roles for GH3 acyl acid amido synthetases in plants.

  6. Interaction of N-acetyl-4-epi-D-neuraminic acid with key enzymes of sialic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gross, H J; Kovac, A; Rose, U; Watzlawick, H; Brossmer, R

    1988-06-14

    In spite of the axially orientated hydroxy group at C-4, the benzyl alpha-glycoside of N-acetyl-4-epi-D-neuraminic acid (4-epi-NeuAc) is a substrate for sialidases from Vibrio cholerae, Clostridium perfringens, and Arthrobacter ureafaciens, although to an extent which differs depending on the enzyme. Surprisingly, V. cholerae sialidase is by far the slowest acting enzyme; this is in contrast to its usual behavior. Fowl plague virus sialidase and bovine testis sialidase also cleave this glycoside slowly. 4-Epi-NeuAc is not a substrate for N-acetylneuraminic acid aldolase from C. perfringens but reversibly inhibits the enzyme with a Ki = 2.3 mM. The N-acetylneuraminic acid analogue is not converted to the corresponding CMP-glycoside by CMP-sialic acid synthase from bovine brain; however, it is an effective reversible inhibitor of the enzyme. The kinetic properties were analyzed with an assay system at pH 9 as well as an assay system at pH 7.5. The results from Dixon and Hanes plots did not agree. Therefore, no conclusions about the mechanism of the inhibition could be reached. This is the first reported sialic acid analogue which can act as an inhibitor of CMP-sialic acid synthase.

  7. Cloning and biochemical characterization of indole-3-acetic acid-amino acid synthetase PsGH3 from pea.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Mierek-Adamska, Agnieszka; Porowińska, Dorota; Goc, Anna; Jakubowska, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Phytohormone conjugation is one of the mechanisms that maintains a proper hormonal homeostasis and that is necessary for the realization of physiological responses. Gretchen Hagen 3 (GH3) acyl acid amido synthetases convert indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to IAA-amino acid conjugates by ATP-dependent reactions. IAA-aspartate (IAA-Asp) exists as a predominant amide conjugate of auxin in pea tissues and acts as an intermediate during IAA catabolism. Here we report a novel recombinant indole-3-acetic acid-amido synthetase in Pisum sativum. In silico analysis shows that amino acid sequence of PsGH3 has the highest homology to Medicago truncatula GH3.3. The recombinant His-tag-PsGH3 fusion protein has been obtained in E. coli cells and is a soluble monomeric polypeptide with molecular mass of 69.18 kDa. The PsGH3 was purified using Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography and native PAGE. Kinetic analysis indicates that the enzyme strongly prefers IAA and L-aspartate as substrates for conjugation revealing Km(ATP) = 0.49 mM, Km(L-Asp) = 2.2 mM, and Km(IAA) = 0.28 mM. Diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) competes with ATP for catalytic site and diminishes the PsGH3 affinity toward ATP approximately 1.11-fold indicating Ki = 8.5 μM. L-Tryptophan acts as an inhibitor of IAA-amido synthesizing activity by competition with L-aspartate. Inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase) hydrolyzing pyrophosphate to two phosphate ions, potentiates IAA-Asp synthetase activity of PsGH3. Our results demonstrate that PsGH3 is a novel enzyme that is involved in auxin metabolism in pea seeds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-standard amino acid recognition by Escherichia coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinis, S. A.; Fox, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant E. coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase was screened for amino acid-dependent pyrophosphate exchange activity using noncognate aliphatic amino acids including norvaline, homocysteine, norleucine, methionine, and homoserine. [32P]-labeled reaction products were separated by thin layer chromatography using a novel solvent system and then quantified by phosphorimaging. Norvaline which differs from leucine by only one methyl group stimulated pyrophosphate exchange activity as did both homocysteine and norleucine to a lesser extent. The KM parameters for leucine and norvaline were measured to be 10 micromoles and 1.5 mM, respectively. Experiments are in progress to determine if norvaline is transferred to tRNA(Leu) and/or edited by a pre- or post-transfer mechanism.

  9. Heterogenous expression of poly-gamma-glutamic acid synthetase complex gene of Bacillus licheniformis WBL-3.

    PubMed

    Wang, N; Yang, G; Che, C; Liu, Y

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus licheniformis WBL-3, one of poly-gamma-glutamic acid (gamma-PGA) producers, depends on the existence of glutamate in the medium. In this paper, gamma-PGA synthetase complex gene (pgsBCA) was cloned from Bacillus licheniformis WBL-3. pgsBCA gene of B. licheniformis WBL-3 was highly homologous with pgsBCA gene of B. licheniformis 14580. The similarity was 97%, but the similarity of pgsBCA gene between B. licheniformis WBL-3 and Bacillus subtilis IF03336 was only 74%. However, when pgsBCA was expressed in Escherichia coli, the E. coli clone produced gamma-PGA extracellularly. The yield of gamma-PGA was 8.624 g/l. This result infers that B. licheniformis and B. subtilis has the similar gamma-PGA biosynthesis mechanism, namely, glutamic acid is catalyzed by an ATP-dependent amide ligase to synthesize gamma-PGA.

  10. Non-standard amino acid recognition by Escherichia coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinis, S. A.; Fox, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant E. coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase was screened for amino acid-dependent pyrophosphate exchange activity using noncognate aliphatic amino acids including norvaline, homocysteine, norleucine, methionine, and homoserine. [32P]-labeled reaction products were separated by thin layer chromatography using a novel solvent system and then quantified by phosphorimaging. Norvaline which differs from leucine by only one methyl group stimulated pyrophosphate exchange activity as did both homocysteine and norleucine to a lesser extent. The KM parameters for leucine and norvaline were measured to be 10 micromoles and 1.5 mM, respectively. Experiments are in progress to determine if norvaline is transferred to tRNA(Leu) and/or edited by a pre- or post-transfer mechanism.

  11. Minireview on Glutamine Synthetase Deficiency, an Ultra-Rare Inborn Error of Amino Acid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Spodenkiewicz, Marta; Diez-Fernandez, Carmen; Rüfenacht, Véronique; Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Häberle, Johannes

    2016-10-19

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a cytosolic enzyme that produces glutamine, the most abundant free amino acid in the human body. Glutamine is a major substrate for various metabolic pathways, and is thus an important factor for the functioning of many organs; therefore, deficiency of glutamine due to a defect in GS is incompatible with normal life. Mutations in the human GLUL gene (encoding for GS) can cause an ultra-rare recessive inborn error of metabolism-congenital glutamine synthetase deficiency. This disease was reported until now in only three unrelated patients, all of whom suffered from neonatal onset severe epileptic encephalopathy. The hallmark of GS deficiency in these patients was decreased levels of glutamine in body fluids, associated with chronic hyperammonemia. This review aims at recapitulating the clinical history of the three known patients with congenital GS deficiency and summarizes the findings from studies done along with the work-up of these patients. It is the aim of this paper to convince the reader that (i) this disorder is possibly underdiagnosed, since decreased concentrations of metabolites do not receive the attention they deserve; and (ii) early detection of GS deficiency may help to improve the outcome of patients who could be treated early with metabolites that are lacking in this condition.

  12. Minireview on Glutamine Synthetase Deficiency, an Ultra-Rare Inborn Error of Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Spodenkiewicz, Marta; Diez-Fernandez, Carmen; Rüfenacht, Véronique; Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Häberle, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a cytosolic enzyme that produces glutamine, the most abundant free amino acid in the human body. Glutamine is a major substrate for various metabolic pathways, and is thus an important factor for the functioning of many organs; therefore, deficiency of glutamine due to a defect in GS is incompatible with normal life. Mutations in the human GLUL gene (encoding for GS) can cause an ultra-rare recessive inborn error of metabolism—congenital glutamine synthetase deficiency. This disease was reported until now in only three unrelated patients, all of whom suffered from neonatal onset severe epileptic encephalopathy. The hallmark of GS deficiency in these patients was decreased levels of glutamine in body fluids, associated with chronic hyperammonemia. This review aims at recapitulating the clinical history of the three known patients with congenital GS deficiency and summarizes the findings from studies done along with the work-up of these patients. It is the aim of this paper to convince the reader that (i) this disorder is possibly underdiagnosed, since decreased concentrations of metabolites do not receive the attention they deserve; and (ii) early detection of GS deficiency may help to improve the outcome of patients who could be treated early with metabolites that are lacking in this condition. PMID:27775558

  13. A non-canonical peptide synthetase adenylates 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid for auriculamide biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Daniel; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Auriculamide is the first natural product known from the predatory bacterium Herpetosiphon aurantiacus. It is composed of three unusual building blocks, including the non-proteinogenic amino acid 3-chloro-L-tyrosine, the α-hydroxy acid L-isoleucic acid, and a methylmalonyl-CoA-derived ethane unit. A candidate genetic locus for auriculamide biosynthesis was identified and encodes four enzymes. Among them, the non-canonical 199 kDa four-domain nonribosomal peptide synthetase, AulA, is extraordinary in that it features two consecutive adenylation domains. Here, we describe the functional characterization of the recombinantly produced AulA. The observed activation of 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid by the enzyme supports the hypothesis that it participates in the biosynthesis of auriculamide. An artificially truncated version of AulA that lacks the first adenylation domain activated this substrate like the full-length enzyme which shows that the first adenylation domain is dispensable. Additionally, we provide evidence that the enzyme tolerates structural variation of the substrate. α-Carbon substituents significantly affected the substrate turnover. While all tested aliphatic α-keto acids were accepted by the enzyme and minor differences in chain size and branches did not interfere with the enzymatic activity, molecules with methylene α-carbons led to low turnover. Such enzymatic plasticity is an important attribute to help in the perpetual search for novel molecules and to access a greater structural diversity by mutasynthesis. PMID:28144348

  14. Zinc-mediated amino acid discrimination in cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Mei; Christian, Thomas; Newberry, Kate J; Perona, John J; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2003-04-11

    Escherichia coli cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (CysRS) achieves a high level of amino acid specificity without an editing reaction. The crystal structure of CysRS bound to substrate cysteine suggested that direct thiol coordination to a tightly bound zinc ion at the base of the active site is the primary determinant of selectivity against non-cognate amino acids. This hypothesis has now been supported by spectroscopic studies of cobalt-substituted CysRS. Binding of cysteine, but not non-cognate amino acids, induces high absorption in the ligand-to-metal charge transfer region, providing evidence for formation of a metal-thiolate bond. In addition, mutations in the zinc ligands alter the absorption spectrum without reducing the discrimination against non-cognate amino acids. These results argue strongly for a major role for the zinc ion in amino acid discrimination by CysRS, where the tight zinc-thiolate interaction and the strict structural geometry of the metal ion are sufficient to reject serine by more than 20,000-fold at the binding step.

  15. Fatty Acid Activation in Cyanobacteria Mediated by Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthetase Enables Fatty Acid Recycling1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarzyk, Danuta; Fulda, Martin

    2010-01-01

    In cyanobacteria fatty acids destined for lipid synthesis can be synthesized de novo, but also exogenous free fatty acids from the culture medium can be directly incorporated into lipids. Activation of exogenous fatty acids is likely required prior to their utilization. To identify the enzymatic activity responsible for activation we cloned candidate genes from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 and identified the encoded proteins as acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetases (Aas). The enzymes catalyze the ATP-dependent esterification of fatty acids to the thiol of acyl carrier protein. The two protein sequences are only distantly related to known prokaryotic Aas proteins but they display strong similarity to sequences that can be found in almost all organisms that perform oxygenic photosynthesis. To investigate the biological role of Aas activity in cyanobacteria, aas knockout mutants were generated in the background of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and S. elongatus PCC 7942. The mutant strains showed two phenotypes characterized by the inability to utilize exogenous fatty acids and by the secretion of endogenous fatty acids into the culture medium. The analyses of extracellular and intracellular fatty acid profiles of aas mutant strains as well as labeling experiments indicated that the detected free fatty acids are released from membrane lipids. The data suggest a considerable turnover of lipid molecules and a role for Aas activity in recycling the released fatty acids. In this model, lipid degradation represents a third supply of fatty acids for lipid synthesis in cyanobacteria. PMID:20061450

  16. The Role of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase and Acetyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase in Fatty Acid Synthesis in Developing Arabidopsis Seeds1

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jinshan; Behal, Robert H.; Back, Stephanie L.; Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Oliver, David J.

    2000-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) formed within the plastid is the precursor for the biosynthesis of fatty acids and, through them, a range of important biomolecules. The source of acetyl-CoA in the plastid is not known, but two enzymes are thought to be involved: acetyl-CoA synthetase and plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase. To determine the importance of these two enzymes in synthesizing acetyl-CoA during lipid accumulation in developing Arabidopsis seeds, we isolated cDNA clones for acetyl-CoA synthetase and for the ptE1α- and ptE1β-subunits of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase. To our knowledge, this is the first reported acetyl-CoA synthetase sequence from a plant source. The Arabidopsis acetyl-CoA synthetase preprotein has a calculated mass of 76,678 D, an apparent plastid targeting sequence, and the mature protein is a monomer of 70 to 72 kD. During silique development, the spatial and temporal patterns of the ptE1β mRNA level are very similar to those of the mRNAs for the plastidic heteromeric acetyl-CoA carboxylase subunits. The pattern of ptE1β mRNA accumulation strongly correlates with the formation of lipid within the developing embryo. In contrast, the level of mRNA for acetyl-CoA synthetase does not correlate in time and space with lipid accumulation. The highest level of accumulation of the mRNA for acetyl-CoA synthetase during silique development is within the funiculus. These mRNA data suggest a predominant role for plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase in acetyl-CoA formation during lipid synthesis in seeds. PMID:10859180

  17. Pyrazinamide inhibits the eukaryotic-like fatty acid synthetase I (FASI) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zimhony, O; Cox, J S; Welch, J T; Vilchèze, C; Jacobs, W R

    2000-09-01

    Tuberculosis treatment is shortened to six months by the indispensable addition of pyrazinamide (PZA) to the drug regimen that includes isoniazid and rifampin. PZA is a pro-drug of pyrazinoic acid (POA) (ref. 3), whose target of action has never been identified. Although PZA is active only against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the PZA analog 5-chloro-pyrazinamide (5-Cl-PZA) displays a broader range of anti-mycobacterial activity. We have found that the eukaryotic-like fas1 gene (encoding fatty acid synthetase I, FASI) from M. avium, M. bovis BCG or M. tuberculosis confers resistance to 5-Cl-PZA when present on multi-copy vectors in M. smegmatis. 5-Cl-PZA and PZA markedly inhibited the activity of M. tuberculosis FASI, the biosynthesis of C16 to C24/C26 fatty acids from acetyl-CoA (ref. 6). Importantly, PZA inhibited FASI in M. tuberculosis in correlation with PZA susceptibility. These results indicate that FASI is a primary target of action for PZA in M. tuberculosis. Further characterization of FASI as a drug target for PZA may allow the development of new drugs to shorten the therapy against M. tuberculosis and may provide more options for treatment against M. bovis, M. avium and drug resistant M. tuberculosis.

  18. Stimulation of Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis by Chloramphenicol in a rel+ Aminoacyl-Transfer Ribonucleic Acid Synthetase Mutant of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yegian, Charles D.; Vanderslice, Rebecca W.

    1971-01-01

    Escherichia coli strain 9D3 possesses a highly temperature-sensitive valyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) synthetase (EC 6.1.1.9). Since 9D3 is a rel+ strain, it cannot carry out net RNA synthesis at high temperature. A 100-μg amount of chloramphenicol (CAP) per ml added in the absence of valine cannot stimulate RNA synthesis. Either 300 μg of CAP or 100 μg of CAP plus 50 μg of valine per ml, however, promotes nearly maximal RNA synthesis. These results can be understood as follows. (i) Valyl-tRNA is required for net RNA synthesis, (ii) the synthetase lesion is incomplete, (iii) the rate of mutant acylation of tRNAval at high temperature is valine-dependent, and (iv) the CAP concentration determines the rate of residual protein synthesis. Data are also presented which demonstrate that the rate of net RNA synthesis can greatly increase long after the addition of CAP, if the amount of valyl-tRNA increases. PMID:4942766

  19. Congenital Visual Impairment and Progressive Microcephaly Due to Lysyl-Transfer Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) Synthetase (KARS) Mutations: The Expanding Phenotype of Aminoacyl-Transfer RNA Synthetase Mutations in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Hugh J; Humphreys, Peter; Smith, Amanda; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Bulman, Dennis E; Beaulieu, Chandree L; Majewski, Jacek; Boycott, Kym M; Geraghty, Michael T

    2015-07-01

    Aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthetases (ARSs) are a group of enzymes required for the first step of protein translation. Each aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase links a specific amino acid to its corresponding transfer RNA component within the cytoplasm, mitochondria, or both. Mutations in ARSs have been linked to a growing number of diseases. Lysyl-transfer RNA synthetase (KARS) links the amino acid lysine to its cognate transfer RNA. We report 2 siblings with severe infantile visual loss, progressive microcephaly, developmental delay, seizures, and abnormal subcortical white matter. Exome sequencing identified mutations within the KARS gene (NM_005548.2):c.1312C>T; p.Arg438Trp and c.1573G>A; p.Glu525Lys occurring within a highly conserved region of the catalytic domain. Our patients' phenotype is remarkably similar to a phenotype recently reported in glutaminyl-transfer RNA synthetase (QARS), another bifunctional ARS gene. This finding expands the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in KARS and draws attention to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase as a group of enzymes that are increasingly being implicated in human disease.

  20. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the thioesterase domain of the rat fatty acid synthetase.

    PubMed

    Naggert, J; Witkowski, A; Mikkelsen, J; Smith, S

    1988-01-25

    A cloned cDNA containing the entire coding sequence for the long-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioester hydrolase (thioesterase I) component as well as the 3'-noncoding region of the fatty acid synthetase has been isolated using an expression vector and domain-specific antibodies. The coding region was assigned to the thioesterase I domain by identification of sequences coding for characterized peptide fragments, amino-terminal analysis of the isolated thioesterase I domain and the presence of the serine esterase active-site sequence motif. The thioesterase I domain is 306 amino acids long with a calculated molecular mass of 33,476 daltons; its DNA is flanked at the 5'-end by a region coding for the acyl carrier protein domain and at the 3'-end by a 1,537-base pairs-long noncoding sequence with a poly(A) tail. The thioesterase I domain exhibits a low, albeit discernible, homology with the discrete medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioester hydrolases (thioesterase II) from rat mammary gland and duck uropygial gland, suggesting a distant but common evolutionary ancestry for these proteins.

  1. Coal fly ash induces hepatic and pulmonary cytochrome P-450 and sigma-aminolevulinic acid synthetase in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.K.; Misra, U.K.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of intratracheal administration of coal fly ash, its benzene-soluble and benzene-insoluble fractions has been studied on the levels of hepatic and pulmonary cytochrome P-450, cytochrome b5, and the activities of sigma-aminolevulinic acid synthetase and heme oxygenase. Fly ash and both its fractions significantly increased the levels of hepatic and pulmonary cytochrome P-450. Benzene-soluble and benzene-insoluble fractions of coal fly ash significantly increased the levels of cytochrome b5 also in both lung and liver. Fly ash and both its fractions increased the activity of sigma-aminolevulinic acid synthetase and reduced the activity of heme oxygenase in lung and liver. Glass bead particles of similar size did not show any effect on hepatic and pulmonary cytochrome P-450 and cytochrome b5.

  2. Chlamydia trachomatis Scavenges Host Fatty Acids for Phospholipid Synthesis via an Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthetase*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Dodson, V. Joshua; Frank, Matthew W.; Rock, Charles O.

    2015-01-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis has a reduced genome but relies on de novo fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis to produce its membrane phospholipids. Lipidomic analyses showed that 8% of the phospholipid molecular species synthesized by C. trachomatis contained oleic acid, an abundant host fatty acid that cannot be made by the bacterium. Mass tracing experiments showed that isotopically labeled palmitic, myristic, and lauric acids added to the medium were incorporated into C. trachomatis-derived phospholipid molecular species. HeLa cells did not elongate lauric acid, but infected HeLa cell cultures elongated laurate to myristate and palmitate. The elongated fatty acids were incorporated exclusively into C. trachomatis-produced phospholipid molecular species. C. trachomatis has adjacent genes encoding the separate domains of the bifunctional acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthetase/2-acylglycerolphosphoethanolamine acyltransferase gene (aas) of Escherichia coli. The CT775 gene encodes an acyltransferase (LpaT) that selectively transfers fatty acids from acyl-ACP to the 1-position of 2-acyl-glycerophospholipids. The CT776 gene encodes an acyl-ACP synthetase (AasC) with a substrate preference for palmitic compared with oleic acid in vitro. Exogenous fatty acids were elongated and incorporated into phospholipids by Escherichia coli-expressing AasC, illustrating its function as an acyl-ACP synthetase in vivo. These data point to an AasC-dependent pathway in C. trachomatis that selectively scavenges host saturated fatty acids to be used for the de novo synthesis of its membrane constituents. PMID:26195634

  3. Increased production of free fatty acids in Aspergillus oryzae by disruption of a predicted acyl-CoA synthetase gene.

    PubMed

    Tamano, Koichi; Bruno, Kenneth S; Koike, Hideaki; Ishii, Tomoko; Miura, Ai; Umemura, Myco; Culley, David E; Baker, Scott E; Machida, Masayuki

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acids are attractive molecules as source materials for the production of biodiesel fuel. Previously, we attained a 2.4-fold increase in fatty acid production by increasing the expression of fatty acid synthesis-related genes in Aspergillus oryzae. In this study, we achieved an additional increase in the production of fatty acids by disrupting a predicted acyl-CoA synthetase gene in A. oryzae. The A. oryzae genome is predicted to encode six acyl-CoA synthetase genes and disruption of AO090011000642, one of the six genes, resulted in a 9.2-fold higher accumulation (corresponding to an increased production of 0.23 mmol/g dry cell weight) of intracellular fatty acid in comparison to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, by introducing a niaD marker from Aspergillus nidulans to the disruptant, as well as changing the concentration of nitrogen in the culture medium from 10 to 350 mM, fatty acid productivity reached 0.54 mmol/g dry cell weight. Analysis of the relative composition of the major intracellular free fatty acids caused by disruption of AO090011000642 in comparison to the wild-type strain showed an increase in stearic acid (7 to 26 %), decrease in linoleic acid (50 to 27 %), and no significant changes in palmitic or oleic acid (each around 20-25 %).

  4. Partial Purification and Characterization of Dihydrodipicolinic Acid Synthetase from Sporulating Bacillus megaterium1

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Francis H.; Lechowich, Richard V.

    1970-01-01

    Sporulation of Bacillus megaterium Km (ATCC 13632) was synchronized by a technique employing three 10% transfers. The culture was harvested when 60% of the cells contained spore forms. Dihydrodipicolinic acid synthetase was purified 150-fold by ammonium sulfate fractionation at pH 6.5, heating for 15 min at 45 C at pH 6.0, ammonium sulfate fractionation at pH 6.0, and subsequent chromatography on diethylaminoethyl cellulose. During the final stage of the purification procedure, the enzyme exhibited sensitivity to refrigeration temperatures. The enzyme had a pH optimum of 7.65 in imidazole buffer. The apparent Km values were 4.6 × 10−4 and 5.0 × 10−4m for β-aspartyl semialdehyde and pyruvate, respectively. All attempts to demonstrate cofactor requirements were unsuccessful. Sulfhydryl inhibiting reagents and lysine did not inhibit the enzymatic reaction. The enzyme exhibited maximal thermal resistance at pH 10.5. The thermal stability of the enzyme at 75 C was increased more than 1,800-fold by the addition of 0.3 m pyruvate. The Ea was 67,300 cal/mole for the thermal denaturation of the enzyme. At 60 C, the ΔF, ΔH, and ΔS values for the thermal denaturation of the enzyme were 22,250, 66,700, and 133 cal per mole per degree, respectively. PMID:4983642

  5. CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase interacts with fragile X related protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yun; Tian, Shuai; Wang, Zongbao; Wang, Changbo; Chen, Xiaowei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yang; He, Shuya

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), fragile X related 1 protein (FXR1P) and FXR2P are the members of the FMR protein family. These proteins contain two KH domains and a RGG box, which are characteristic of RNA binding proteins. The absence of FMRP, causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of hereditary mental retardation. FXR1P is expressed throughout the body and important for normal muscle development, and its absence causes cardiac abnormality. To investigate the functions of FXR1P, a screen was performed to identify FXR1P-interacting proteins and determine the biological effect of the interaction. The current study identified CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase (CMAS) as an interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid system, and the interaction between FXR1P and CMAS was validated in yeast using a β-galactosidase assay and growth studies with selective media. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation was used to analyze the FXR1P/CMAS association and immunofluorescence microscopy was performed to detect expression and intracellular localization of the proteins. The results of the current study indicated that FXR1P and CMAS interact, and colocalize in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of HEK293T and HeLa cells. Accordingly, a fragile X related 1 (FXR1) gene overexpression vector was constructed to investigate the effect of FXR1 overexpression on the level of monosialotetrahexosylganglioside 1 (GM1). The results of the current study suggested that FXR1P is a tissue-specific regulator of GM1 levels in SH-SY5Y cells, but not in HEK293T cells. Taken together, the results initially indicate that FXR1P interacts with CMAS, and that FXR1P may enhance the activation of sialic acid via interaction with CMAS, and increase GM1 levels to affect the development of the nervous system, thus providing evidence for further research into the pathogenesis of FXS. PMID:27357083

  6. Characterization of Clostridium difficile Spores Lacking Either SpoVAC or Dipicolinic Acid Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, M. Lauren; Fimlaid, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The spore-forming obligate anaerobe Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea around the world. In order for C. difficile to cause infection, its metabolically dormant spores must germinate in the gastrointestinal tract. During germination, spores degrade their protective cortex peptidoglycan layers, release dipicolinic acid (DPA), and hydrate their cores. In C. difficile, cortex hydrolysis is necessary for DPA release, whereas in Bacillus subtilis, DPA release is necessary for cortex hydrolysis. Given this difference, we tested whether DPA synthesis and/or release was required for C. difficile spore germination by constructing mutations in either spoVAC or dpaAB, which encode an ion channel predicted to transport DPA into the forespore and the enzyme complex predicted to synthesize DPA, respectively. C. difficile spoVAC and dpaAB mutant spores lacked DPA but could be stably purified and were more hydrated than wild-type spores; in contrast, B. subtilis spoVAC and dpaAB mutant spores were unstable. Although C. difficile spoVAC and dpaAB mutant spores exhibited wild-type germination responses, they were more readily killed by wet heat. Cortex hydrolysis was not affected by this treatment, indicating that wet heat inhibits a stage downstream of this event. Interestingly, C. difficile spoVAC mutant spores were significantly more sensitive to heat treatment than dpaAB mutant spores, indicating that SpoVAC plays additional roles in conferring heat resistance. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SpoVAC and DPA synthetase control C. difficile spore resistance and reveal differential requirements for these proteins among the Firmicutes. IMPORTANCE Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming obligate anaerobe that causes ∼500,000 infections per year in the United States. Although spore germination is essential for C. difficile to cause disease, the factors required for this process have been only partially characterized

  7. CMP‑N‑acetylneuraminic acid synthetase interacts with fragile X related protein 1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun; Tian, Shuai; Wang, Zongbao; Wang, Changbo; Chen, Xiaowei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yang; He, Shuya

    2016-08-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), fragile X related 1 protein (FXR1P) and FXR2P are the members of the FMR protein family. These proteins contain two KH domains and a RGG box, which are characteristic of RNA binding proteins. The absence of FMRP, causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of hereditary mental retardation. FXR1P is expressed throughout the body and important for normal muscle development, and its absence causes cardiac abnormality. To investigate the functions of FXR1P, a screen was performed to identify FXR1P‑interacting proteins and determine the biological effect of the interaction. The current study identified CMP‑N‑acetylneuraminic acid synthetase (CMAS) as an interacting protein using the yeast two‑hybrid system, and the interaction between FXR1P and CMAS was validated in yeast using a β‑galactosidase assay and growth studies with selective media. Furthermore, co‑immunoprecipitation was used to analyze the FXR1P/CMAS association and immunofluorescence microscopy was performed to detect expression and intracellular localization of the proteins. The results of the current study indicated that FXR1P and CMAS interact, and colocalize in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of HEK293T and HeLa cells. Accordingly, a fragile X related 1 (FXR1) gene overexpression vector was constructed to investigate the effect of FXR1 overexpression on the level of monosialotetrahexosylganglioside 1 (GM1). The results of the current study suggested that FXR1P is a tissue‑specific regulator of GM1 levels in SH‑SY5Y cells, but not in HEK293T cells. Taken together, the results initially indicate that FXR1P interacts with CMAS, and that FXR1P may enhance the activation of sialic acid via interaction with CMAS, and increase GM1 levels to affect the development of the nervous system, thus providing evidence for further research into the pathogenesis of FXS.

  8. Kinetic basis for the conjugation of auxin by a GH3 family indole-acetic acid-amido synthetase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingfeng; Westfall, Corey S; Hicks, Leslie M; Wang, Shiping; Jez, Joseph M

    2010-09-24

    The GH3 family of acyl-acid-amido synthetases catalyze the ATP-dependent formation of amino acid conjugates to modulate levels of active plant hormones, including auxins and jasmonates. Initial biochemical studies of various GH3s show that these enzymes group into three families based on sequence relationships and acyl-acid substrate preference (I, jasmonate-conjugating; II, auxin- and salicylic acid-conjugating; III, benzoate-conjugating); however, little is known about the kinetic and chemical mechanisms of these enzymes. Here we use GH3-8 from Oryza sativa (rice; OsGH3-8), which functions as an indole-acetic acid (IAA)-amido synthetase, for detailed mechanistic studies. Steady-state kinetic analysis shows that the OsGH3-8 requires either Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) for maximal activity and is specific for aspartate but accepts asparagine as a substrate with a 45-fold decrease in catalytic efficiency and accepts other auxin analogs, including phenyl-acetic acid, indole butyric acid, and naphthalene-acetic acid, as acyl-acid substrates with 1.4-9-fold reductions in k(cat)/K(m) relative to IAA. Initial velocity and product inhibition studies indicate that the enzyme uses a Bi Uni Uni Bi Ping Pong reaction sequence. In the first half-reaction, ATP binds first followed by IAA. Next, formation of an adenylated IAA intermediate results in release of pyrophosphate. The second half-reaction begins with binding of aspartate, which reacts with the adenylated intermediate to release IAA-Asp and AMP. Formation of a catalytically competent adenylated-IAA reaction intermediate was confirmed by mass spectrometry. These mechanistic studies provide insight on the reaction catalyzed by the GH3 family of enzymes to modulate plant hormone action.

  9. The Cell Wall Teichuronic Acid Synthetase (TUAS) Is an Enzyme Complex Located in the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Micrococcus luteus.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lingyi Lynn; Alexander, Alice A; Lei, Sijin; Anderson, John S

    2010-01-01

    The cell wall teichuronic acid (TUA) of Micrococcus luteus is a long-chain polysaccharide composed of disaccharide repeating units [-4-β-D-ManNAcAp-(1→6)α-D-Glcp-1-](n), which is covalently anchored to the peptidoglycan on the inner cell wall and extended to the outer surface of the cell envelope. An enzyme complex responsible for the TUA chain biosynthesis was purified and characterized. The 440 kDa enzyme complex, named teichuronic acid synthetase (TUAS), is an octomer composed of two kinds of glycosyltransferases, Glucosyltransferase, and ManNAcA-transferase, which is capable of catalyzing the transfer of disaccharide glycosyl residues containing both glucose and the N-acetylmannosaminuronic acid residues. TUAS displays hydrophobic properties and is found primarily associated with the cytoplasmic membrane. The purified TUAS contains carotinoids and lipids. TUAS activity is diminished by phospholipase digestion. We propose that TUAS serves as a multitasking polysaccharide assembling station on the bacterial membrane.

  10. Ferredoxin and Formyltetrahydrofolate Synthetase: Comparative Studies with Clostridium acidiurici, Clostridium cylindrosporum, and Newly Isolated Anaerobic Uric Acid-Fermenting Strains

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Alexander B.; Rabinowitz, Jesse C.

    1977-01-01

    Six strains of Clostridium acidiurici and three strains of C. cylindrosporum were isolated from soil samples by enrichment culture with uric acid as the source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. The newly isolated strains were characterized by their spore morphology and the amounts of glycine and formate formed by the fermentation of uric acid. The strains were easily identified as belonging to one species or the other on the basis of spore morphology and formate production. The crystal properties and spectra of the native ferredoxins of all the strains isolated and the amino acid composition and partial carboxy-terminal sequence of all their apoferredoxins were determined. All the ferredoxins were tested for cross-reactivity with antiserum to C. acidiurici ferredoxin by microcomplement fixation. Five of the six C. acidiurici strains, which had ferredoxins with amino acid compositions identical to that from C. acidiurici, also showed immunological identity (immunological distance = 0.0). These results suggest sequence identity. The one strain with a different amino acid composition failed to show complete cross-reactivity. Two of the three C. cylindrosporum strains have ferredoxin amino acid compositions identical to that from C. cylindrosporum. The third strain had a minimum of five differences in sequence. All C. cylindrosporum strains had ferredoxins that differed considerably from C. acidiurici strains (minimum of eight to nine differences), and none of these ferredoxins cross-reacted with antisera to C. acidiurici ferredoxin. Antisera were prepared to formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from C. acidiurici and C. cylindrosporum, and all possible comparisons were made by using immunodiffusion and microcomplement fixation. There is more intraspecies variation in the synthetases than in the ferredoxins; however, the results suggest considerable interspecies differences in both proteins. These results suggest a low degree of genomic relatedness between the two species

  11. The crystal structure of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase from Thermus thermophilus and its complexes with ATP and asparaginyl-adenylate: the mechanism of discrimination between asparagine and aspartic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Berthet-Colominas, C; Seignovert, L; Härtlein, M; Grotli, M; Cusack, S; Leberman, R

    1998-01-01

    The crystal structure of Thermus thermophilus asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase has been solved by multiple isomorphous replacement and refined at 2.6 A resolution. This is the last of the three class IIb aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase structures to be determined. As expected from primary sequence comparisons, there are remarkable similarities between the tertiary structures of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase and aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, and most of the active site residues are identical except for three key differences. The structure at 2.65 A of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase complexed with a non-hydrolysable analogue of asparaginyl-adenylate permits a detailed explanation of how these three differences allow each enzyme to discriminate between their respective and very similar amino acid substrates, asparagine and aspartic acid. In addition, a structure of the complex of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase with ATP shows exactly the same configuration of three divalent cations as previously observed in the seryl-tRNA synthetase-ATP complex, showing that this a general feature of class II synthetases. The structural similarity of asparaginyl- and aspartyl-tRNA synthetases as well as that of both enzymes to the ammonia-dependent asparagine synthetase suggests that these three enzymes have evolved relatively recently from a common ancestor. PMID:9582288

  12. Covalent modification of Lys19 in the CTP binding site of cytidine 5'-monophosphate N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Tullius, M. V.; Vann, W. F.; Gibson, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    Periodate oxidized CTP (oCTP) was used to investigate the importance of lysine residues in the CTP binding site of the cytidine 5'-monophosphate N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-NeuAc) synthetase (EC 2.7.7.43) from Haemophilus ducreyi. The reaction of oCTP with the enzyme follows pseudo-first-order saturation kinetics, giving a maximum rate of inactivation of 0.6 min(-1) and a K(I) of 6.0 mM at pH 7.1. Mass spectrometric analysis of the modified enzyme provided data that was consistent with beta-elimination of triphosphate after the reaction of oCTP with the enzyme. A fully reduced enzyme-oCTP conjugate, retaining the triphosphate moiety, was obtained by inclusion of NaBH3CN in the reaction solution. The beta-elimination product of oCTP reacted several times more rapidly with the enzyme compared to equivalent concentrations of oCTP. This compound also formed a stable reduced morpholino adduct with CMP-NeuAc synthetase when the reaction was conducted in the presence of NaBH3CN, and was found to be a useful lysine modifying reagent. The substrate CTP was capable of protecting the enzyme to a large degree from inactivation by oCTP and its beta-elimination product. Lys19, a residue conserved in CMP-NeuAc synthetases, was identified as being labeled with the beta-elimination product of oCTP. PMID:10091669

  13. Incorporation of hydrogen atoms from deuterated water and stereospecifically deuterium-labeled nicotin amide nucleotides into fatty acids with the Escherichia coli fatty acid synthetase system.

    PubMed

    Saito, K; Kawaguchi, A; Okuda, S; Seyama, Y; Yamakawa, T

    1980-05-28

    The mechanism of hydrogen incorporation into fatty acids was investigated with intact Escherichia coli cells, a crude enzyme preparation and purified reductases of fatty acid synthetase system. The distributions of deuterium atoms incorporated into fatty acids from 2H2O and stereospecifically deuterium-labeled NADPH or NADH were determined by mass spectrometry. When E. coli was grown in 2H2O, almost every hydrogen atom of cellular fatty acids was incorporated from the medium. When fatty acids were synthesized from acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and NADPH in the presence of a crude enzyme preparation of either E. coli or Bacillus subtilis, almost every hydrogen atom was also incorporated from the medium. In contrast to these results, purified beta-ketoacyl acyl carrier reductase directly transferred the HB hydrogen of NADPH to beta-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein, and purified enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase also transferred the HB hydrogen of NADPH and NADH directly to enoyl acyl carrier protein. In the crude enzyme preparation of E. coli, we found high activities which exchanged the HB hydrogen of NADPH with the deuterium of 2h2o. the conflicting results of the origin of hydrogen atoms of fatty acids mentioned above are explained by the presence of enzymes, which catalyzed the rapid exchange of NADPH with the deterium of 2H2O prior to the reaction of fatty acid synthetase.

  14. Mutation in the structural gene for seryl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase of Escherichia coli which affects formation of its gene product at high temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, R J; Konigsberg, W

    1980-01-01

    The rate of formation of seryl-transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) synthetase activity was temperature dependent in a temperature-sensitive mutant of Escherichia coli (K28) with an altered seryl-tRNA synthetase structural gene and in a class of spontaneous revertants derived from it. These revertants, which were selected by their ability to grow at 45 degrees C, had high levels of the thermolabile enzyme. The rate of formation of seryl-tRNA synthetase activity in the mutant and in the revertants fell from 100% to near zero with a 4 degrees C temperature range from 40 to 44 degrees C. The temperature-dependent rate of formation of seryl-tRNA synthetase activity was reversible. Dropping the temperature from 44 to 37 degrees C resulted, after a 2- to 3-min delay, in a resumption of the initial rate of formation of enzyme activity. The results could not be accounted for by in vivo or in vitro degradation of the active enzyme. Addition of rifampin just before the temperature shift down from 44 to 37 degrees C inhibited the appearance of seryl-tRNA synthetase activity at the lower temperature. Explanations which might account for these phenomena are proposed. PMID:6988407

  15. Study of the Binding Energies between Unnatural Amino Acids and Engineered Orthogonal Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Truong, Tan M.; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2015-07-01

    We utilized several computational approaches to evaluate the binding energies of tyrosine (Tyr) and several unnatural Tyr analogs, to several orthogonal aaRSes derived from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases. The present study reveals the following: (1) AutoDock Vina and ROSETTA were able to distinguish binding energy differences for individual pairs of favorable and unfavorable aaRS-amino acid complexes, but were unable to cluster together all experimentally verified favorable complexes from unfavorable aaRS-Tyr complexes; (2) MD-MM/PBSA provided the best prediction accuracy in terms of clustering favorable and unfavorable enzyme-substrate complexes, but also required the highest computational cost; and (3) MM/PBSA based on single energy-minimized structures has a significantly lower computational cost compared to MD-MM/PBSA, but still produced sufficiently accurate predictions to cluster aaRS-amino acid interactions. Although amino acid-aaRS binding is just the first step in a complex series of processes to acylate a tRNA with its corresponding amino acid, the difference in binding energy, as shown by MD-MM/PBSA, is important for a mutant orthogonal aaRS to distinguish between a favorable unnatural amino acid (unAA) substrate from unfavorable natural amino acid substrates. Our computational study should assist further designing and engineering of orthogonal aaRSes for the genetic encoding of novel unAAs.

  16. Comparison of the effects of ozone on the modification of amino acid residues in glutamine synthetase and bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Berlett, B S; Levine, R L; Stadtman, E R

    1996-02-23

    During exposure to ozone, the methionine and aromatic amino acid residues of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (GS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) are oxidized rapidly in the order Met > Trp > Tyr approximately His > Phe. The loss of His is matched by a nearly equivalent formation of aspartate or of a derivative that is converted to aspartic acid upon acid hydrolysis. Conversion of His to aspartate was confirmed by showing that the oxidation of E. coli protein in which all His residues were uniformly labeled with 14C gave rise to 14C-labeled aspartic acid in 80% yield and also by the demonstration that His residues in the tripeptides Ala-His-Ala or Ala-Ala-His gave rise to nearly stoichiometric amounts of aspartic acid whereas oxidation of His-Ala-Ala yielded only 36% aspartate. The oxidation of BSA and GS led to formation, respectively, of 11 and 3.3 eq of carbonyl groups and 0.5 and 0.3 eq of quinoprotein per subunit. Although BSA and GS contain nearly identical amounts of each kind of aromatic amino acid residues, oxidation of these residues in BSA was about 1.5-2.0 times faster than in GS indicating that the susceptibility to oxidation is dependent on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure of the protein.

  17. Study of the Binding Energies between Unnatural Amino Acids and Engineered Orthogonal Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wei; Truong, Tan M.; Ai, Hui-wang

    2015-01-01

    We utilized several computational approaches to evaluate the binding energies of tyrosine (Tyr) and several unnatural Tyr analogs, to several orthogonal aaRSes derived from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases. The present study reveals the following: (1) AutoDock Vina and ROSETTA were able to distinguish binding energy differences for individual pairs of favorable and unfavorable aaRS-amino acid complexes, but were unable to cluster together all experimentally verified favorable complexes from unfavorable aaRS-Tyr complexes; (2) MD-MM/PBSA provided the best prediction accuracy in terms of clustering favorable and unfavorable enzyme-substrate complexes, but also required the highest computational cost; and (3) MM/PBSA based on single energy-minimized structures has a significantly lower computational cost compared to MD-MM/PBSA, but still produced sufficiently accurate predictions to cluster aaRS-amino acid interactions. Although amino acid-aaRS binding is just the first step in a complex series of processes to acylate a tRNA with its corresponding amino acid, the difference in binding energy, as shown by MD-MM/PBSA, is important for a mutant orthogonal aaRS to distinguish between a favorable unnatural amino acid (unAA) substrate from unfavorable natural amino acid substrates. Our computational study should assist further designing and engineering of orthogonal aaRSes for the genetic encoding of novel unAAs. PMID:26220470

  18. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase in fatty acid metabolism involved in liver and other diseases: An update

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Sheng; Yang, Xue-Feng; Liu, Hao-Lei; Fu, Nian; Ouyang, Yan; Qing, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) family members include five different ACSL isoforms, each encoded by a separate gene and have multiple spliced variants. ACSLs on endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial outer membrance catalyze fatty acids with chain lengths from 12 to 20 carbon atoms to form acyl-CoAs, which are lipid metabolic intermediates and involved in fatty acid metabolism, membrane modifications and various physiological processes. Gain- or loss-of-function studies have shown that the expression of individual ACSL isoforms can alter the distribution and amount of intracellular fatty acids. Changes in the types and amounts of fatty acids, in turn, can alter the expression of intracellular ACSLs. ACSL family members affect not only the proliferation of normal cells, but the proliferation of malignant tumor cells. They also regulate cell apoptosis through different signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms. ACSL members have individual functions in fatty acid metabolism in different types of cells depending on substrate preferences, subcellular location and tissue specificity, thus contributing to liver diseases and metabolic diseases, such as fatty liver disease, obesity, atherosclerosis and diabetes. They are also linked to neurological disorders and other diseases. However, the mechanisms are unclear. This review addresses new findings in the classification and properties of ACSLs and the fatty acid metabolism-associated effects of ACSLs in diseases. PMID:25834313

  19. Crystal Structure of an Indole-3-Acetic Acid Amido Synthetase from Grapevine Involved in Auxin Homeostasis[W

    PubMed Central

    Peat, Thomas S.; Böttcher, Christine; Newman, Janet; Lucent, Del; Cowieson, Nathan; Davies, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Auxins are important for plant growth and development, including the control of fruit ripening. Conjugation to amino acids by indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-amido synthetases is an important part of auxin homeostasis. The structure of the auxin-conjugating Gretchen Hagen3-1 (GH3-1) enzyme from grapevine (Vitis vinifera), in complex with an inhibitor (adenosine-5′-[2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl]phosphate), is presented. Comparison with a previously published benzoate-conjugating enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that grapevine GH3-1 has a highly similar domain structure and also undergoes a large conformational change during catalysis. Mutational analyses and structural comparisons with other proteins have identified residues likely to be involved in acyl group, amino acid, and ATP substrate binding. Vv GH3-1 is a monomer in solution and requires magnesium ions solely for the adenlyation reaction. Modeling of IAA and two synthetic auxins, benzothiazole-2-oxyacetic acid (BTOA) and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), into the active site indicates that NAA and BTOA are likely to be poor substrates for this enzyme, confirming previous enzyme kinetic studies. This suggests a reason for the increased effectiveness of NAA and BTOA as auxins in planta and provides a tool for designing new and effective auxins. PMID:23136372

  20. Propylisopropylacetic acid (PIA), a constitutional isomer of valproic acid, uncompetitively inhibits arachidonic acid acylation by rat acyl-CoA synthetase 4: a potential drug for bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Hiren R.; Basselin, Mireille; Taha, Ameer Y.; Li, Lei O.; Coleman, Rosalind A.; Bialer, Meir; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mood stabilizers used for treating bipolar disorder (BD) selectively downregulate arachidonic acid (AA) turnover (deacylation-reacylation) in brain phospholipids, when given chronically to rats. In vitro studies suggest that one of these, valproic acid (VPA), which is teratogenic, reduces AA turnover by inhibiting the brain acyl-CoA synthetase (Acsl)-4 mediated acylation of AA to AA-CoA. We tested whether non-teratogenic VPA analogues might also inhibit Acsl-4 catalyzed acylation, and thus have potential anti-BD action. Methods Rat Acsl4-flag protein was expressed in E. coli, and the ability of three VPA analogues, propylisopropylacetic acid (PIA), propylisopropylacetamide (PID) and N-methyl-2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropanecarboxamide (MTMCD), and of sodium butyrate, to inhibit conversion of AA to AA-CoA by Acsl4 was quantified using Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Results Acsl4-mediated conversion of AA to AA-CoA in vitro was inhibited uncompetitively by PIA, with a Ki of 11.4 mM compared to a published Ki of 25 mM for VPA, while PID, MTMCD and sodium butyrate had no inhibitory effect. Conclusions PIA's ability to inhibit conversion of AA to AA-CoA by Acsl4 in vitro suggests that, like VPA, PIA may reduce AA turnover in brain phospholipids in unanesthetized rats, and if so, may be effective as a non-teratogenic mood stabilizer in BD patients. PMID:23354024

  1. Propylisopropylacetic acid (PIA), a constitutional isomer of valproic acid, uncompetitively inhibits arachidonic acid acylation by rat acyl-CoA synthetase 4: a potential drug for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Modi, Hiren R; Basselin, Mireille; Taha, Ameer Y; Li, Lei O; Coleman, Rosalind A; Bialer, Meir; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2013-04-01

    Mood stabilizers used for treating bipolar disorder (BD) selectively downregulate arachidonic acid (AA) turnover (deacylation-reacylation) in brain phospholipids, when given chronically to rats. In vitro studies suggest that one of these, valproic acid (VPA), which is teratogenic, reduces AA turnover by inhibiting the brain long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (Acsl)4 mediated acylation of AA to AA-CoA. We tested whether non-teratogenic VPA analogues might also inhibit Acsl4 catalyzed acylation, and thus have a potential anti-BD action. Rat Acsl4-flag protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the ability of three VPA analogues, propylisopropylacetic acid (PIA), propylisopropylacetamide (PID) and N-methyl-2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropanecarboxamide (MTMCD), and of sodium butyrate, to inhibit conversion of AA to AA-CoA by Acsl4 was quantified using Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Acsl4-mediated conversion of AA to AA-CoA in vitro was inhibited uncompetitively by PIA, with a Ki of 11.4mM compared to a published Ki of 25mM for VPA, while PID, MTMCD and sodium butyrate had no inhibitory effect. PIA's ability to inhibit conversion of AA to AA-CoA by Acsl4 in vitro suggests that, like VPA, PIA may reduce AA turnover in brain phospholipids in unanesthetized rats, and if so, may be effective as a non-teratogenic mood stabilizer in BD patients. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. One-step purification and properties of a two-peptide fatty acid synthetase from the uropygial gland of the goose.

    PubMed

    Buckner, J S; Kolattukudy, P E

    1976-05-04

    Cell-free extracts from the uropygial gland of goose catalyzed the incorporation of malonyl-CoA into normal fatty acids and methylmalonyl-CoA into multimethyl branched acids with NADPH as the preferred reductant (J. S. Buckner and P.E. Kolattukudy (1975), Biochemistry 14, 1771). Purification of fatty acid synthetase from this extract was accomplished in one step by gel filtration with Sepharose 4B. Homogeneity of the fatty acid synthetase was shown by analytical ultracentrifugation, immunodiffusion assays, polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis. At a pH of 7.0, apparent Km values of 3.6 X 10(-5) M and 1.5 X 10(-5) M were calculated for malonyl-C0A and NADPH, respectively. The major products synthesized by the enzyme from malonyl-CoA and methylmalonyl-C0A were free hexadecanoic acid and free 2, 4, 6, 8-tetramethyldecanoic acid, respectively, with acetyl-CoA as primer. A molecular weight value of 547 000 was determined for the goose fatty acid synthetase by sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation. The purified enzyme had an s20,w of 13.5S and was partially dissociated in low-ionic strength buffer into a 9.3S species, and this dissociation was accompanied by a corresponding partial inactivation of the enzymatic activity. Reassociation and reactivation of the partially dissociated fatty acid synthetase were accomplished in either 0.2 M KCl or 200 muM NADPH. These properties of the goose enzyme are similar to those of other animal fatty acid synthetases, as was the amino acid composition. Dissociation of the purified enzyme with sodium dodecyl sulfate resulted in only two equal molecular weight polypeptides (269 000), as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis. Injection of labeled pantothenic acid into the uropygial gland resulted in the synthesis of labeled fatty acid synthetase in which the label appeared to be located exclusively in the 4'-phosphopantotheine

  3. Fatty Acid Oxidation Mediated by Acyl-CoA Synthetase Long Chain 3 Is Required for Mutant KRAS Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Padanad, Mahesh S; Konstantinidou, Georgia; Venkateswaran, Niranjan; Melegari, Margherita; Rindhe, Smita; Mitsche, Matthew; Yang, Chendong; Batten, Kimberly; Huffman, Kenneth E; Liu, Jingwen; Tang, Ximing; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Kalhor, Neda; Shay, Jerry W; Minna, John D; McDonald, Jeffrey; Wistuba, Ignacio I; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Scaglioni, Pier Paolo

    2016-08-09

    KRAS is one of the most commonly mutated oncogenes in human cancer. Mutant KRAS aberrantly regulates metabolic networks. However, the contribution of cellular metabolism to mutant KRAS tumorigenesis is not completely understood. We report that mutant KRAS regulates intracellular fatty acid metabolism through Acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase long-chain family member 3 (ACSL3), which converts fatty acids into fatty Acyl-CoA esters, the substrates for lipid synthesis and β-oxidation. ACSL3 suppression is associated with depletion of cellular ATP and causes the death of lung cancer cells. Furthermore, mutant KRAS promotes the cellular uptake, retention, accumulation, and β-oxidation of fatty acids in lung cancer cells in an ACSL3-dependent manner. Finally, ACSL3 is essential for mutant KRAS lung cancer tumorigenesis in vivo and is highly expressed in human lung cancer. Our data demonstrate that mutant KRAS reprograms lipid homeostasis, establishing a metabolic requirement that could be exploited for therapeutic gain.

  4. The Cell Wall Teichuronic Acid Synthetase (TUAS) Is an Enzyme Complex Located in the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Micrococcus luteus

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lingyi Lynn; Alexander, Alice A.; Lei, Sijin; Anderson, John S.

    2010-01-01

    The cell wall teichuronic acid (TUA) of Micrococcus luteus is a long-chain polysaccharide composed of disaccharide repeating units [-4-β-D-ManNAcAp-(1→6)α-D-Glcp−1-]n, which is covalently anchored to the peptidoglycan on the inner cell wall and extended to the outer surface of the cell envelope. An enzyme complex responsible for the TUA chain biosynthesis was purified and characterized. The 440 kDa enzyme complex, named teichuronic acid synthetase (TUAS), is an octomer composed of two kinds of glycosyltransferases, Glucosyltransferase, and ManNAcA-transferase, which is capable of catalyzing the transfer of disaccharide glycosyl residues containing both glucose and the N-acetylmannosaminuronic acid residues. TUAS displays hydrophobic properties and is found primarily associated with the cytoplasmic membrane. The purified TUAS contains carotinoids and lipids. TUAS activity is diminished by phospholipase digestion. We propose that TUAS serves as a multitasking polysaccharide assembling station on the bacterial membrane. PMID:21188072

  5. Inhibition of gastric mucosal prostaglandin synthetase activity by mercaptomethylimidazole, an inducer of gastric acid secretion--plausible involvement of endogenous H2O2.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, M; Chakraborty, T; Ganguly, C; Banerjee, R K

    1998-10-01

    We have reported earlier that mercaptomethylimidazole (MMI), an antithyroid drug of thionamide group, induces gastric acid secretion at least partially through the liberation of histamine, sensitive to cimetidine. Now, we show that the drug has a significant inhibitory effect on the cyclooxygenase and peroxidase activity of the prostaglandin (PG) synthetase of the gastric mucosal microsomal preparation. The effect can also be mimicked by low concentrations of H2O2. While studying the possible intracellular effect of MMI on acid secretion, a cell fraction (F3) enriched in parietal cell was isolated by controlled digestion of the mucosa with protease. This cell fraction is activated by MMI as measured by increased O2 consumption. The activation is sensitive to omeprazole, a proton-pump inhibitor, indicating that the activation is due to increased acid secretion by MMI. MMI was also found to directly inhibit the peroxidase activity of the F3 cell fraction and may thus increase the intracellular level of H2O2. The cyclooxygenase activity of the PG synthetase of the F3 cell fraction is also inhibited by MMI and the effect can be reproduced by low concentrations of H2O2. Both MMI and H2O2 can also inhibit the peroxidase activity of the PG synthetase. We suggest that in addition to the activation of the parietal cell by MMI possibly through endogenous H2O2, MMI induces acid secretion in vivo by inactivating the PG synthetase thereby inhibiting the biosynthesis of PG and removing its inhibitory influence on acid secretion so that the histamine released by MMI can stimulate acid secretion with maximum efficiency.

  6. Nature of the Fatty Acid Synthetase Systems in Parenchymal and Epidermal Cells of Allium porrum L. Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Lessire, Rene; Stumpe, Paul K.

    1983-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis was compared in cell-free extracts of epidermis and parenchyma of Allium porrum L. leaves. Parenchyma extracts had the major fatty acid synthetase (FAS) activity (70-90%) of the whole leaf; palmitic acid was also the major fatty acid synthesized when acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) was the primer, but when acetyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) was employed, C18:0 and C16:0 were synthesized in equal proportion. With the epidermal FAS system when either acetyl-CoA or acetyl-ACP was tested in the presence of labeled malonyl-CoA, palmitic acid was the only product synthesized. Specific activities of the FAS enzyme activities were determined in both tissue extracts. The properties of malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase were examined from the two different tissues. The molecular weights estimated by Sephadex G-200 chromatography were 38,000 for the epidermal enzyme and 45,000 for parenchymal enzyme. The optimal pH was for both enzymes 7.8 to 8.0 and the maximal velocity 0.4 to 0.5 micromoles per milligram protein per minute. These enzymes had different affinities for malonyl-CoA and ACP. For the malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase of epidermis, the Km values were 5.6 and 13.7 micromolar for malonyl-CoA and ACP, respectively, and 4.2 and 21.7 micromolar for the parenchymal enzyme. These results suggest that the FAS system in both tissues are nonassociated, that the malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylases are isozymes, and that both in epidermis and in parenchyma tissue two independent FAS system occur. Evidence would suggest that β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II is present in the parenchymal cells but missing in the epidermal cell. PMID:16663268

  7. Stereospecificity of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and fatty acid synthetase from the uropygial gland of goose.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y S; Kolattukudy, P E

    1980-01-25

    Malonyl-CoA decarboxylase from the uropygial gland of goose decarboxylated (R,S)-methylmalonyl-CoA at a slow rate and introduced 3H from [3H]2O into the resulting propionyl-CoA. Carboxylation of this labeled propionyl-CoA by propionyl-CoA carboxylase from pig heart and acetyl-CoA carboxylase from the uropygial gland completely removed 3H. Repeated treatment of (R,S)-[methyl-14C]methylmalonyl-CoA with the decarboxylase converted 50% of the substrate into propionyl-CoA, whereas (S)-methylmalonyl-CoA, generated by both carboxylases, was completely decarboxylated. Radioactive (R)- (S), and (R,S)-methylmalonyl-CoA were equally incorporated into fatty acids by fatty acid synthetase from the uropygial gland. The residual methylmalonyl-CoA remaining after fatty acid synthetase reaction on (R,S)-methylmalonyl-CoA was also racemic. These results show that: (a) the decarboxylase is stereospecific, (b) replacement of the carboxyl group by hydrogen occurs with retention of configuration, (c) acetyl-CoA carboxylase of the uropygial gland generates (S)-methylmalonyl-CoA from propionyl-CoA, and (d) fatty acid synthetase is not stereospecific for methylmalonyl-CoA.

  8. A Novel Tool for Studying Auxin-Metabolism: The Inhibition of Grapevine Indole-3-Acetic Acid-Amido Synthetases by a Reaction Intermediate Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Christine; Dennis, Eric G.; Booker, Grant W.; Polyak, Steven W.; Boss, Paul K.; Davies, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    An important process for the regulation of auxin levels in plants is the inactivation of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) by conjugation to amino acids. The conjugation reaction is catalysed by IAA-amido synthetases belonging to the family of GH3 proteins. Genetic approaches to study the biological significance of these enzymes have been hampered by large gene numbers and a high degree of functional redundancy. To overcome these difficulties a chemical approach based on the reaction mechanism of GH3 proteins was employed to design a small molecule inhibitor of IAA-amido synthetase activity. Adenosine-5′-[2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl]phosphate (AIEP) mimics the adenylated intermediate of the IAA-conjugation reaction and was therefore proposed to compete with the binding of MgATP and IAA in the initial stages of catalysis. Two grapevine IAA-amido synthetases with different catalytic properties were chosen to test the inhibitory effects of AIEP in vitro. GH3-1 has previously been implicated in the grape berry ripening process and is restricted to two amino acid substrates, whereas GH3-6 conjugated IAA to 13 amino acids. AIEP is the most potent inhibitor of GH3 enzymes so far described and was shown to be competitive against MgATP and IAA binding to both enzymes with Ki-values 17-68-fold lower than the respective Km-values. AIEP also exhibited in vivo activity in an ex planta test system using young grape berries. Exposure to 5–20 µM of the inhibitor led to decreased levels of the common conjugate IAA-Asp and reduced the accumulation of the corresponding Asp-conjugate upon treatment with a synthetic auxin. AIEP therefore represents a novel chemical probe with which to study IAA-amido synthetase function. PMID:22649546

  9. A core of three amino acids at the carboxyl-terminal region of glutamine synthetase defines its regulation in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Saelices, Lorena; Robles-Rengel, Rocío; Florencio, Francisco J; Muro-Pastor, M Isabel

    2015-05-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) type I is a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism, and its activity is finely controlled by cellular carbon/nitrogen balance. In cyanobacteria, a reversible process that involves protein-protein interaction with two proteins, the inactivating factors IF7 and IF17, regulates GS. Previously, we showed that three arginine residues of IFs are critical for binding and inhibition of GS. In this work, taking advantage of the specificity of GS/IFs interaction in the model cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, we have constructed a different chimeric GSs from these two cyanobacteria. Analysis of these proteins, together with a site-directed mutagenesis approach, indicates that a core of three residues (E419, N456 and R459) is essential for the inactivation process. The three residues belong to the last 56 amino acids of the C-terminus of Synechocystis GS. A protein-protein docking modeling of Synechocystis GS in complex with IF7 supports the role of the identified core for GS/IF interaction.

  10. Multiple erythroid isoforms of human long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases are produced by switch of the fatty acid gate domains.

    PubMed

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2006-07-11

    The formation of acyl-CoA by the action of acyl-CoA synthetases plays a crucial role in membrane lipid turnover, including the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. In human, five Acyl-CoA Synthetase Long-chain (ACSL) genes have been identified with as many as 3 different transcript variants for each. Acyl-CoA Synthetase Long-chain member 6 (ACSL6) is responsible for activation of long-chain fatty acids in erythrocytes. Two additional transcript variants were also isolated from brain and testis. We report the expression in reticulocytes of two new variants and of the one isolated from brain. All three represented different spliced variants of a mutually exclusive exon pair. They encode a slightly different short motif which contains a conserved structural domain, the fatty acid Gate domain. The motifs differ in the presence of either the aromatic residue phenylalanine (Phe) or tyrosine (Tyr). Based on homology, two new isoforms for the closely related ACSL1 were predicted and characterized. One represented a switch of the Phe- to the Tyr-Gate domain motif, the other resulted from the exclusion of both. Swapping of this motif also appears to be common in all mammalian ACSL member 1 and 6 homologs. We propose that a Phe to Tyr substitution or deletion of the Gate domain, is the structural reason for the conserved alternative splicing that affects these motifs. Our findings support our hypothesis that this region is structurally important to define the activity of these enzymes.

  11. Role of intramitochondrial arachidonic acid and acyl-CoA synthetase 4 in angiotensin II-regulated aldosterone synthesis in NCI-H295R adrenocortical cell line.

    PubMed

    Mele, Pablo G; Duarte, Alejandra; Paz, Cristina; Capponi, Alessandro; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2012-07-01

    Although the role of arachidonic acid (AA) in angiotensin II (ANG II)- and potassium-stimulated steroid production in zona glomerulosa cells is well documented, the mechanism responsible for AA release is not fully described. In this study we evaluated the mechanism involved in the release of intramitochondrial AA and its role in the regulation of aldosterone synthesis by ANG II in glomerulosa cells. We show that ANG II and potassium induce the expression of acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) thioesterase 2 and acyl-CoA synthetase 4, two enzymes involved in intramitochondrial AA generation/export system well characterized in other steroidogenic systems. We demonstrate that mitochondrial ATP is required for AA generation/export system, steroid production, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein induction. We also demonstrate the role of protein tyrosine phosphatases regulating acyl-CoA synthetase 4 and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein induction, and hence ANG II-stimulated aldosterone synthesis.

  12. The N-terminal region of acyl-CoA synthetase 3 is essential for both the localization on lipid droplets and the function in fatty acid uptake

    PubMed Central

    Poppelreuther, Margarete; Rudolph, Berenice; Du, Chen; Großmann, Regina; Becker, Melanie; Thiele, Christoph; Ehehalt, Robert; Füllekrug, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs) are storage organelles for neutral lipids derived from endogenous metabolism. Acyl-CoA synthetase family proteins are essential enzymes in this biosynthetic pathway, contributing activated fatty acids. Fluorescence microscopy showed that ACSL3 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and LDs, with the distribution dependent on the cell type and the supply of fatty acids. The N-terminus of ACSL3 was necessary and sufficient for targeting reporter proteins correctly, as demonstrated by subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy. The N-terminal region of ACSL3 was also found to be functionally required for the enzyme activity. Selective permeabilization and in silico analysis suggest that ACSL3 assumes a hairpin membrane topology, with the N-terminal hydrophobic amino acids forming an amphipathic helix restricted to the cytosolic leaflet of the ER membrane. ACSL3 was effectively translocated from the ER to nascent LDs when neutral lipid synthesis was stimulated by the external addition of fatty acids. Cellular fatty acid uptake was increased by overexpression and reduced by RNA interference of ACSL3. In conclusion, the structural organization of ACSL3 allows the fast and efficient movement from the ER to emerging LDs. ACSL3 not only esterifies fatty acids with CoA but is also involved in the cellular uptake of fatty acids, presumably indirectly by metabolic trapping. The unique localization of the acyl-CoA synthetase ACSL3 on LDs suggests a function in the local synthesis of lipids. PMID:22357706

  13. The N-terminal region of acyl-CoA synthetase 3 is essential for both the localization on lipid droplets and the function in fatty acid uptake.

    PubMed

    Poppelreuther, Margarete; Rudolph, Berenice; Du, Chen; Großmann, Regina; Becker, Melanie; Thiele, Christoph; Ehehalt, Robert; Füllekrug, Joachim

    2012-05-01

    Cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs) are storage organelles for neutral lipids derived from endogenous metabolism. Acyl-CoA synthetase family proteins are essential enzymes in this biosynthetic pathway, contributing activated fatty acids. Fluorescence microscopy showed that ACSL3 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and LDs, with the distribution dependent on the cell type and the supply of fatty acids. The N-terminus of ACSL3 was necessary and sufficient for targeting reporter proteins correctly, as demonstrated by subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy. The N-terminal region of ACSL3 was also found to be functionally required for the enzyme activity. Selective permeabilization and in silico analysis suggest that ACSL3 assumes a hairpin membrane topology, with the N-terminal hydrophobic amino acids forming an amphipathic helix restricted to the cytosolic leaflet of the ER membrane. ACSL3 was effectively translocated from the ER to nascent LDs when neutral lipid synthesis was stimulated by the external addition of fatty acids. Cellular fatty acid uptake was increased by overexpression and reduced by RNA interference of ACSL3. In conclusion, the structural organization of ACSL3 allows the fast and efficient movement from the ER to emerging LDs. ACSL3 not only esterifies fatty acids with CoA but is also involved in the cellular uptake of fatty acids, presumably indirectly by metabolic trapping. The unique localization of the acyl-CoA synthetase ACSL3 on LDs suggests a function in the local synthesis of lipids.

  14. Oxidative stress and redistribution of glutamine synthetase in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with domoic acid toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Madl, J E; Duncan, C G; Stanhill, J E; Tai, P-Y; Spraker, T R; Gulland, F M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that oxidative stress and glutamine synthetase (GS) redistribution occur in domoic acid (DA) toxicosis in California sea lions (CSLs, Zalophus californianus). Sections of archived hippocampi from seven control and 13 CSLs diagnosed with DA toxicosis were labelled immunohistochemically for GS and for two markers of oxidative stress, malondialdehyde (MDA) and 3-nitrotyrosine (NT). The distribution and intensity of labelling were compared with the pathological changes seen in haematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. Increased expression of MDA and NT occurred in neurons of the hippocampal formation of CSLs with lesions consistent with DA toxicosis. The degree of oxidative stress was not affected significantly by the chronicity or severity of hippocampal damage. In six out of seven CSLs with chronic effects of DA toxicosis, in addition to the normal glial distribution of GS, GS expression was very strong in some neurons of the subiculum. However, neuronal GS labelling was also seen in one control CSL, an effect that may have been due to previous exposure to DA. GS expression in neurons was associated with decreases in GS labelling in neighbouring glial cell processes. DA toxicosis therefore induces increased expression of markers of oxidative stress in neurons consistent with oxidative stress contributing to the initial DA insult and also the epilepsy that often develops in chronic DA toxicosis. GS redistribution occurred primarily in chronic DA toxicosis, perhaps leading to alterations of the glutamine-glutamate-GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) cycle and contributing to the excitotoxicity and seizures often seen in DA toxicosis.

  15. Cloning and sequencing of the medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioester hydrolase cDNA from rat mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Naggert, J; Williams, B; Cashman, D P; Smith, S

    1987-01-01

    cDNA clones coding for the medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioester hydrolase (thioesterase II) from rat mammary gland were identified in a bacteriophage lambda gt11 library and their nucleotide sequences were determined. The predicted coding region spans 263 amino acid residues and includes a sequence identical with that of a peptide derived from the enzyme active site. The rat thioesterase II cDNA sequence exhibits homology with that of a thioesterase found in duck uropygial glands. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3632637

  16. Fatty acid transport by vectorial acylation in mammals: roles played by different isoforms of rat long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fumin; Black, Paul N; Coleman, Rosalind A; DiRusso, Concetta C

    2006-03-01

    Mammals express multiple isoforms of acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL1 and ACSL3-6) in various tissues. These enzymes are essential for fatty acid metabolism providing activated intermediates for complex lipid synthesis, protein modification, and beta-oxidation. Yeast in contrast express four major ACSLs, which have well-defined functions. Two, Faa1p and Faa4p, are specifically required for fatty acid transport by vectorial acylation. Four ACSLs from the rat were expressed in a yeast faa1delta faa4delta strain and their roles in fatty acid transport and trafficking characterized. All four restored ACS activity yet varied in substrate preference. ACSL1, 4, and 6 were able to rescue fatty acid transport activity and triglyceride synthesis. ACSL5, however, was unable to facilitate fatty acid transport despite conferring robust oleoyl-CoA synthetase activity. This is the first study evaluating the role of the mammalian ACSLs in fatty acid transport and supports a role for ACSL1, 4, and 6 in transport by vectorial acylation.

  17. Suppression of long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 decreases hepatic de novo fatty acid synthesis through decreased transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Bu, So Young; Mashek, Mara T; Mashek, Douglas G

    2009-10-30

    Long chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL) and fatty acid transport proteins (FATP) activate fatty acids to acyl-CoAs in the initial step of fatty acid metabolism. Numerous isoforms of ACSL and FATP exist with different tissue distribution patterns, intracellular locations, and substrate preferences, suggesting that each isoform has distinct functions in channeling fatty acids into different metabolic pathways. Because fatty acids, acyl-CoAs, and downstream lipid metabolites regulate various transcription factors that control hepatic energy metabolism, we hypothesized that ACSL or FATP isoforms differentially regulate hepatic gene expression. Using small interference RNA (siRNA), we knocked down each liver-specific ACSL and FATP isoform in rat primary hepatocyte cultures and subsequently analyzed reporter gene activity of numerous transcription factors and performed quantitative mRNA analysis of their target genes. Compared with control cells, which were transfected with control siRNA, knockdown of acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACSL3) significantly decreased reporter gene activity of several lipogenic transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator activation receptor-gamma, carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, and liver X receptor-alpha and the expression of their target genes. These findings were further supported by metabolic labeling studies that showed [1-(14)C]acetate incorporation into lipid extracts was decreased in cells treated with ACSL3 siRNAs and that ACSL3 expression is up-regulated in ob/ob mice and mice fed a high sucrose diet. ACSL3 knockdown decreased total acyl-CoA synthetase activity without substantially altering the expression of other ACSL isoforms. In summary, these results identify a novel role for ACSL3 in mediating transcriptional control of hepatic lipogenesis.

  18. Conformational movements and cooperativity upon amino acid, ATP and tRNA binding in threonyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan; Rees, Bernard; Dock-Bregeon, Anne Catherine; Moras, Dino

    2003-08-01

    The crystal structures of threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) from Staphylococcus aureus, with ATP and an analogue of threonyl adenylate, are described. Together with the previously determined structures of Escherichia coli ThrRS with different substrates, they allow a comprehensive analysis of the effect of binding of all the substrates: threonine, ATP and tRNA. The tRNA, by inserting its acceptor arm between the N-terminal domain and the catalytic domain, causes a large rotation of the former. Within the catalytic domain, four regions surrounding the active site display significant conformational changes upon binding of the different substrates. The binding of threonine induces the movement of as much as 50 consecutive amino acid residues. The binding of ATP triggers a displacement, as large as 8A at some C(alpha) positions, of a strand-loop-strand region of the core beta-sheet. Two other regions move in a cooperative way upon binding of threonine or ATP: the motif 2 loop, which plays an essential role in the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, and the ordering loop, which closes on the active site cavity when the substrates are in place. The tRNA interacts with all four mobile regions, several residues initially bound to threonine or ATP switching to a position in which they can contact the tRNA. Three such conformational switches could be identified, each of them in a different mobile region. The structural analysis suggests that, while the small substrates can bind in any order, they must be in place before productive tRNA binding can occur.

  19. Nutritional and insulin regulation of fatty acid synthetase and leptin gene expression through ADD1/SREBP1.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J B; Sarraf, P; Wright, M; Yao, K M; Mueller, E; Solanes, G; Lowell, B B; Spiegelman, B M

    1998-01-01

    The ability to regulate specific genes of energy metabolism in response to fasting and feeding is an important adaptation allowing survival of intermittent food supplies. However, little is known about transcription factors involved in such responses in higher organisms. We show here that gene expression in adipose tissue for adipocyte determination differentiation dependent factor (ADD) 1/sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) 1, a basic-helix-loop-helix protein that has a dual DNA-binding specificity, is reduced dramatically upon fasting and elevated upon refeeding; this parallels closely the regulation of two adipose cell genes that are crucial in energy homeostasis, fatty acid synthetase (FAS) and leptin. This elevation of ADD1/SREBP1, leptin, and FAS that is induced by feeding in vivo is mimicked by exposure of cultured adipocytes to insulin, the classic hormone of the fed state. We also show that the promoters for both leptin and FAS are transactivated by ADD1/SREBP1. A mutation in the basic domain of ADD1/SREBP1 that allows E-box binding but destroys sterol regulatory element-1 binding prevents leptin gene transactivation but has no effect on the increase in FAS promoter function. Molecular dissection of the FAS promoter shows that most if not all of this action of ADD1/SREBP1 is through an E-box motif at -64 to -59, contained with a sequence identified previously as the major insulin response element of this gene. These results indicate that ADD1/SREBP1 is a key transcription factor linking changes in nutritional status and insulin levels to the expression of certain genes that regulate systemic energy metabolism. PMID:9421459

  20. Expanding tRNA recognition of a tRNA synthetase by a single amino acid change

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Liang; Tumbula-Hansen, Debra; Toogood, Helen; Söll, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (AspRS) occurs in two types: the discriminating enzyme (D-AspRS) forms only Asp-tRNAAsp, whereas the nondiscriminating enzyme (ND-AspRS) also synthesizes Asp-tRNAAsn, which is a required intermediate for protein synthesis in many organisms. We attempted to expand the tRNA recognition of the discriminating Thermococcus kodakaraensis AspRS to that of a ND-AspRS by in vitro mutagenesis. An alignment of 26 archaeal AspRS proteins revealed two positions (26 and 85 in the T. kodakaraensis sequence) whose amino acid identity changes according to the enzymes' tRNA specificity. In their anticodon-binding domain, D-AspRS proteins contain W26 (or Q26) and K85, compared with H26 and P85 in the ND-AspRSs. T. kodakaraensis AspRS gained the ability to form Asp-tRNAAsn in vitro when the W26H or K85P changes were introduced independently or in combination. In the aminoacylation of tRNAAsn or tRNAAsp transcripts, the mutant enzymes displayed at least a 100- to 500-fold change in tRNA specificity, as judged by the ratio of the kcat/Km values of Asp-tRNAAsp vs. Asp-tRNAAsn formation. That T. kodakaraensis mutant AspRSs mischarge tRNAAsn was also manifested in the higher level (1.7%) of aspartylation of unfractionated Pyrococcus tRNA compared with that achieved by the wild-type enzyme (0.9%). Northern blot analysis of the Asp-tRNA separated by acid/urea gel electrophoresis confirmed the in vitro synthesis of Asp-tRNAAsn. A structure-based model points to a direct interaction of K85 in T. kodakaraensis AspRS with the anticodon nucleotide C36 of tRNAAsp. Thus, a switch between D-AspRS and ND-AspRS enzymes could have evolved with only limited amino acid changes. PMID:12730374

  1. Stereochemical studies of hydrogen incorporation from nucleotides with fatty acid synthetase from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes.

    PubMed

    Seyama, Y; Kasama, T; Yamakawa, T; Kawaguchi, A; Okuda, S

    1977-04-01

    The biosynthesis of fatty acids from malonyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA was investigated with an enzyme preparation which was purified 100-fold from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes. Fatty acids synthesized in the presence of D2O and stereospecifically deuterated NADPH and NADH were isolated and analyzed by mass chromatography to examine the localization of deuterium in the molecule. The following results were obtained: 1) HB hydrogen of NADPH was used for beta-ketoacyl reductase. 2) HB hydrogen of NADH was used for enoyl reductase. 3) Hydrogen atoms from water were found on the even-numbered methylene carbon atoms (2-hydrogen atoms per carbon atom) and some were also found on the odd-numbered methylene carbon atoms. 4) Hydrogen atoms from NADPH was found on the odd-numbered methylene carbon atoms (1 hydrogen per carbon). 5) Hydrogen atoms from NADH was also found on the odd-numbered methylene carbon atoms, but the number of incorporated hydrogen atoms was less than expected. The exchange of HB hydrogen of NADH with water catalyzed by enoyl reductase was suspected. 6) The exchange of methylene hydrogen atoms of malonyl-CoA with protons of water was suggested by 13C NMR analysis.

  2. Valnoctamide, a non-teratogenic amide derivative of valproic acid, inhibits arachidonic acid activation in vitro by recombinant acyl-CoA synthetase-4

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Hiren R; Basselin, Mireille; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2014-01-01

    Objective Valproic acid (VPA), a mood stabilizer used for treating bipolar disorder (BD), uncompetitively inhibits acylation of arachidonic acid (AA) by recombinant AA-selective acyl-CoA synthetase (Acsl)-4 at Ki of 25 mM. Inhibition may account for VPA’s ability to reduce AA turnover in brain phospholipids of unanesthetized rats at a therapeutically relevant dose. VPA is teratogenic. We now tested whether valnoctamide (VCD), a non-teratogenic amide derivative of a VPA chiral isomer, which had antimanic potency in a Phase III BD trial, also inhibits recombinant Acsl4. Methods Rat Acsl4-flag protein was expressed in E. coli. We used Michaelis–Menten kinetics to characterize and quantify the ability of VCD to inhibit conversion of AA to AA-CoA by recombinant Acsl4 in vitro. Results Acsl4-mediated activation of AA to AA-CoA by Acsl4 was inhibited uncompetitively by VCD, with Ki equal 6.38 mM. Conclusions VCD’s ability to uncompetitively inhibit AA activation to AA-CoA by Acsl4, at a lower Ki than VPA, suggests that, like VPA, VCD may reduce AA turnover in rat brain phospholipids. If so, VCD and other non-teratogenic Acsl4 inhibitors might be considered further for treating BD. PMID:25041123

  3. Binding free energies and free energy components from molecular dynamics and Poisson-Boltzmann calculations. Application to amino acid recognition by aspartyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Archontis, G; Simonson, T; Karplus, M

    2001-02-16

    Specific amino acid binding by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) is necessary for correct translation of the genetic code. Engineering a modified specificity into aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases has been proposed as a means to incorporate artificial amino acid residues into proteins in vivo. In a previous paper, the binding to aspartyl-tRNA synthetase of the substrate Asp and the analogue Asn were compared by molecular dynamics free energy simulations. Molecular dynamics combined with Poisson-Boltzmann free energy calculations represent a less expensive approach, suitable for examining multiple active site mutations in an engineering effort. Here, Poisson-Boltzmann free energy calculations for aspartyl-tRNA synthetase are first validated by their ability to reproduce selected molecular dynamics binding free energy differences, then used to examine the possibility of Asn binding to native and mutant aspartyl-tRNA synthetase. A component analysis of the Poisson-Boltzmann free energies is employed to identify specific interactions that determine the binding affinities. The combined use of molecular dynamics free energy simulations to study one binding process thoroughly, followed by molecular dynamics and Poisson-Boltzmann free energy calculations to study a series of related ligands or mutations is proposed as a paradigm for protein or ligand design. The binding of Asn in an alternate, "head-to-tail" orientation observed in the homologous asparagine synthetase is analyzed, and found to be more stable than the "Asp-like" orientation studied earlier. The new orientation is probably unsuitable for catalysis. A conserved active site lysine (Lys198 in Escherichia coli) that recognizes the Asp side-chain is changed to a leucine residue, found at the corresponding position in asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase. It is interesting that the binding of Asp is calculated to increase slightly (rather than to decrease), while that of Asn is calculated, as expected, to increase strongly, to

  4. Multiple erythroid isoforms of human long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases are produced by switch of the fatty acid gate domains

    PubMed Central

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2006-01-01

    Background The formation of acyl-CoA by the action of acyl-CoA synthetases plays a crucial role in membrane lipid turnover, including the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. In human, five Acyl-CoA Synthetase Long-chain (ACSL) genes have been identified with as many as 3 different transcript variants for each. Results Acyl-CoA Synthetase Long-chain member 6 (ACSL6) is responsible for activation of long-chain fatty acids in erythrocytes. Two additional transcript variants were also isolated from brain and testis. We report the expression in reticulocytes of two new variants and of the one isolated from brain. All three represented different spliced variants of a mutually exclusive exon pair. They encode a slightly different short motif which contains a conserved structural domain, the fatty acid Gate domain. The motifs differ in the presence of either the aromatic residue phenylalanine (Phe) or tyrosine (Tyr). Based on homology, two new isoforms for the closely related ACSL1 were predicted and characterized. One represented a switch of the Phe- to the Tyr-Gate domain motif, the other resulted from the exclusion of both. Swapping of this motif also appears to be common in all mammalian ACSL member 1 and 6 homologs. Conclusion We propose that a Phe to Tyr substitution or deletion of the Gate domain, is the structural reason for the conserved alternative splicing that affects these motifs. Our findings support our hypothesis that this region is structurally important to define the activity of these enzymes. PMID:16834775

  5. Protein tyrosine phosphatases regulate arachidonic acid release, StAR induction and steroidogenesis acting on a hormone-dependent arachidonic acid-preferring acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Cano, Florencia; Poderoso, Cecilia; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Castilla, Rocío; Maloberti, Paula; Castillo, Fernanda; Neuman, Isabel; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2006-06-01

    The activation of the rate-limiting step in steroid biosynthesis, that is the transport of cholesterol into the mitochondria, is dependent on PKA-mediated events triggered by hormones like ACTH and LH. Two of such events are the protein tyrosine dephosphorylation mediated by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and the release of arachidonic acid (AA) mediated by two enzymes, ACS4 (acyl-CoA synthetase 4) and Acot2 (mitochondrial thioesterase). ACTH and LH regulate the activity of PTPs and Acot2 and promote the induction of ACS4. Here we analyzed the involvement of PTPs on the expression of ACS4. We found that two PTP inhibitors, acting through different mechanisms, are both able to abrogate the hormonal effect on ACS4 induction. PTP inhibitors also reduce the effect of cAMP on steroidogenesis and on the level of StAR protein, which facilitates the access of cholesterol into the mitochondria. Moreover, our results indicate that exogenous AA is able to overcome the inhibition produced by PTP inhibitors on StAR protein level and steroidogenesis. Then, here we describe a link between PTP activity and AA release, since ACS4 induction is under the control of PTP activity, being a key event for AA release, StAR induction and steroidogenesis.

  6. Protein Synthesis During Fungal Spore Germination II. Aminoacyl-soluble Ribonucleic Acid Synthetase Activities During Germination of Botryodiplodia theobromae Spores1

    PubMed Central

    Etten, James L. Van; Brambl, Robert M.

    1968-01-01

    The specific activities of 13 aminoacyl-soluble ribonucleic acid (sRNA) synthetases were measured at various time intervals during the germination of Botryodiplodia theobromae conidiospores. The enzyme activities were low or absent in ungerminated spores, and they increased rapidly as germination proceeded. When extracts of the ungerminated spores were prepared with mortar and pestle, very little or no enzyme activity was detected. When the extracts were prepared with a mechanical homogenizer, however, they exhibited some enzyme activity, although less than did the extracts from germinated spores. Enzyme activities from germinated spores were approximately the same, regardless of the method of preparation. The enzyme fraction from ungerminated spores prepared with a mechanical homogenizer could also stimulate incorporation of phenylalanine into polyphenylalanine in the presence of ribosomes, polyuridylic acid, and sRNA, although the activity was approximately only 15 to 20% that of a similar enzyme fraction from germinated spores. It is concluded that ungerminated spores of B. theobromae contain active aminoacyl-sRNA synthetases and transfer enzymes, although the activities are low when compared to germinated spores. PMID:5685990

  7. Protoporphyrinaemia and decreased activities of 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydrase and uroporphyrinogen I synthetase in erythrocytes of a Vitamin B6-deficient epileptic boy given valproic acid and carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Haust, H L; Poon, H C; Carson, R; VanDeWetering, C; Peter, F

    1989-06-01

    Carbamazepine (CBMZP) has been implicated as an inhibitor of the activities of 5-aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) and uroporphyrinogen I synthetase (URO-S). In an epileptic boy undergoing long-term treatment with valproic acid (VPA), 1.3 g/d, CBMZP, 0.9 g/d and folic acid, 7.5 mg/d, decreased activities of ALA-D and URO-S coincided with increased levels of erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) in the absence of Pb poisoning, iron depletion and erythropoietic protoporphyria. A progressive fall in plasma pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (B6-P) to 7.7 nmol/L (lower reference limit, 14.6 nmol/L) prompted implementation of pyridoxine HCl (B6-HCl), 87.5 mg/d followed by administration of both B6-HCl and preformed B6-P (50 mg/d each). This permitted the eventual withdrawal of VPA and a net reduction of CBMZP to 450 mg/d. During these manipulations, ALA-D and URO-S activities, EP and urinary porphyrins and their precursors were measured serially. An assay system utilizing red cell ALA-D for generation of porphobilinogen (PBG) from added ALA at pH 7.4 was used for determination of ALA-D and URO-S activities in separate aliquots of the same assay mixture both in the absence and presence of Zn and dithiothreitol (DTT). One unit (U) for ALA-D = 1 nmol PBG/L RBC/s; for URO-S = 1 nmol porphyrin/L/s; minimum normal level for ALA-D = 135 U; for URO-S = 6 U. B6-HCl alone entailed increases in ALA-D and URO-S prior to any reduction of CBMZP. After administration of both B6-HCl and B6-P and withdrawal of VPA, the overall increase in ALA-D was from 54.59 to 197.2 U (-Zn; -DTT) and from 50.76 to 217.3 U (+Zn; +DTT). The overall increase in URO-S was from 2.67 to 8.90 U (-Zn; -DTT) and from 3.02 to 8.66 U (+Zn; +DTT). During stepwise reduction of VPA, EP remained elevated to values as high as 2.48 mumol/L (upper reference limit, 1.33 mumol/L). Only after permanent withdrawal of VPA did concentrations of EP fall to normal levels. Values for porphyrins and their precursors in urine were normal

  8. Involvement of acyl-CoA synthetase genes in n-alkane assimilation and fatty acid utilization in yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Tenagy; Park, Jun Seok; Iwama, Ryo; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi

    2015-06-01

    Here, we investigated the roles of YAL1 (FAA1) and FAT1 encoding acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs) and three additional orthologs of ACS genes FAT2-FAT4 of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica in the assimilation or utilization of n-alkanes and fatty acids. ACS deletion mutants were generated to characterize their function. The FAT1 deletion mutant exhibited decreased growth on n-alkanes of 10-18 carbons, whereas the FAA1 mutant showed growth reduction on n-alkane of 16 carbons. However, FAT2-FAT4 deletion mutants did not show any growth defects, suggesting that FAT1 and FAA1 are involved in the activation of fatty acids produced during the metabolism of n-alkanes. In contrast, deletions of FAA1 and FAT1-FAT4 conferred no defect in growth on fatty acids. The wild-type strain grew in the presence of cerulenin, an inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis, by utilizing exogenously added fatty acid or fatty acid derived from n-alkane when oleic acid or n-alkane of 18 carbons was supplemented. However, the FAA1 deletion mutant did not grow, indicating a critical role for FAA1 in the utilization of fatty acids. Fluorescent microscopic observation and biochemical analyses suggested that Fat1p is present in the peroxisome and Faa1p is localized in the cytosol and to membranes.

  9. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and glutamine synthetase (GS) in the area postrema of the cat. Light and electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, Fernando E.; Mehler, William R.; Gibbs, Michael A.; Eng, Lawrence F.; Wu, Jang-Yen

    1987-01-01

    Morphological evidence is presented of the existence of the putative neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in axon terminals and of glutamine synthetase (GS) in ependymoglial cells and astroglial components of the area postrema (AP) of the cat. Purified antiserum directed against the GABA biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and GS antiserum were used. The results showed that punctate structures of variable size corresponding to axon terminals exhibited GAD-immunoreactivity and were distributed in varying densities. The greatest accumulation occurred in the caudal and middle segment of the AP and particularly in the area subpostrema, where the aggregation of terminals was extremely dense. The presence of both GAD-immunoreactive profiles and GS-immunostained ependymoglial cells and astrocytes in the AP provide further evidence of the functional correlation between the two enzymes.

  10. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and glutamine synthetase (GS) in the area postrema of the cat. Light and electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, Fernando E.; Mehler, William R.; Gibbs, Michael A.; Eng, Lawrence F.; Wu, Jang-Yen

    1987-01-01

    Morphological evidence is presented of the existence of the putative neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in axon terminals and of glutamine synthetase (GS) in ependymoglial cells and astroglial components of the area postrema (AP) of the cat. Purified antiserum directed against the GABA biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and GS antiserum were used. The results showed that punctate structures of variable size corresponding to axon terminals exhibited GAD-immunoreactivity and were distributed in varying densities. The greatest accumulation occurred in the caudal and middle segment of the AP and particularly in the area subpostrema, where the aggregation of terminals was extremely dense. The presence of both GAD-immunoreactive profiles and GS-immunostained ependymoglial cells and astrocytes in the AP provide further evidence of the functional correlation between the two enzymes.

  11. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 2 knockdown leads to decreased fatty acid oxidation in fat body and reduced reproductive capacity in the insect Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Alves-Bezerra, Michele; Klett, Eric L; De Paula, Iron F; Ramos, Isabela B; Coleman, Rosalind A; Gondim, Katia C

    2016-07-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA esters are important intermediates in lipid metabolism and are synthesized from fatty acids by long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL). The hematophagous insect Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of Chagas' disease, produces glycerolipids in the midgut after a blood meal, which are stored as triacylglycerol in the fat body and eggs. We identified twenty acyl-CoA synthetase genes in R. prolixus, two encoding ACSL isoforms (RhoprAcsl1 and RhoprAcsl2). RhoprAcsl1 transcripts increased in posterior midgut on the second day after feeding, and RhoprAcsl2 was highly transcribed on the tenth day. Both enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant RhoprACSL1 and RhoprACSL2 had broad pH optima (7.5-9.5 and 6.5-9.5, respectively), were inhibited by triacsin C, and were rosiglitazone-insensitive. Both showed similar apparent Km for palmitic and oleic acid (2-6 μM), but different Km for arachidonic acid (0.5 and 6 μM for RhoprACSL1-Flag and RhoprACSL2-Flag, respectively). The knockdown of RhoprAcsl1 did not result in noticeable phenotypes. However, RhoprACSL2 deficient insects exhibited a 2.5-fold increase in triacylglycerol content in the fat body, and 90% decrease in fatty acid β-oxidation. RhoprAcsl2 knockdown also resulted in 20% increase in lifespan, delayed digestion, 30% reduced oviposition, and 50% reduction in egg hatching. Laid eggs and hatched nymphs showed remarkable alterations in morphology. In summary, R. prolixus ACSL isoforms have distinct roles on lipid metabolism. Although RhoprACSL1 functions remain unclear, we propose that RhoprACSL2 is the main contributor for the formation of the intracellular acyl-CoA pool channeled for β-oxidation in the fat body, and is also required for normal reproduction.

  12. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  13. [Thromboxane synthetase inhibitors. II. Optical resolution of 4-[alpha-hydroxy-5-(1-imidazolyl)-2-methylbenzyl]-3,5-dimethylbenzo ic acid].

    PubMed

    Tsuruda, M; Shiotsuki, T; Matsumoto, T; Oe, T

    1989-01-01

    The optical resolution of racemic 4-[alpha-hydroxy-5-(1-imidazolyl)-2-methylbenzyl]-3,5-dimethylbenzoic acid (dl-I), a new potent and long lasting thromboxane synthetase inhibitor, was investigated. (S)-3-(3,5-Dinitrobenzoylthio)-2-methylpropionyl group was introduced to alpha-hydroxy moiety of methyl ester of dl-I by three steps of reaction to give the corresponding ester compound (VIa). Then, two diastereomers of VIa, alpha-VIa and beta-VIa, were separated by column chromatography using on silica gel. Alkaline hydrolysis of alpha-VIa and beta-VIa, followed by reactions with sodium ethylate gave optically pure sodium salts of (-)-I and (+)-I, respectively. The separative determination methods for the diastereomers of VIa, and for the enantiomers of the sodium salts of dl-I by high performance liquid chromatography were also established.

  14. The Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthetase from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Mediates Fatty Acid Import1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    von Berlepsch, Simon; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Brodesser, Susanne; Fink, Patrick; Marin, Kay; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Gierth, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The transfer of fatty acids across biological membranes is a largely uncharacterized process, although it is essential at membranes of several higher plant organelles like chloroplasts, peroxisomes, or the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we analyzed loss-of-function mutants of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as a model system to circumvent redundancy problems encountered in eukaryotic organisms. Cells deficient in the only cytoplasmic Synechocystis acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (SynAas) were highly resistant to externally provided α-linolenic acid, whereas wild-type cells bleached upon this treatment. Bleaching of wild-type cells was accompanied by a continuous increase of α-linolenic acid in total lipids, whereas no such accumulation could be observed in SynAas-deficient cells (Δsynaas). When SynAas was disrupted in the tocopherol-deficient, α-linolenic acid-hypersensitive Synechocystis mutant Δslr1736, double mutant cells displayed the same resistance phenotype as Δsynaas. Moreover, heterologous expression of SynAas in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutants lacking the major yeast fatty acid import protein Fat1p (Δfat1) led to the restoration of wild-type sensitivity against exogenous α-linolenic acid of the otherwise resistant Δfat1 mutant, indicating that SynAas is functionally equivalent to Fat1p. In addition, liposome assays provided direct evidence for the ability of purified SynAas protein to mediate α-[14C]linolenic acid retrieval from preloaded liposome membranes via the synthesis of [14C]linolenoyl-acyl carrier protein. Taken together, our data show that an acyl-activating enzyme like SynAas is necessary and sufficient to mediate the transfer of fatty acids across a biological membrane. PMID:22535424

  15. A euryarchaeal lysyl-tRNA synthetase: resemblance to class I synthetases.

    PubMed

    Ibba, M; Morgan, S; Curnow, A W; Pridmore, D R; Vothknecht, U C; Gardner, W; Lin, W; Woese, C R; Söll, D

    1997-11-07

    The sequencing of euryarchaeal genomes has suggested that the essential protein lysyl-transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetase (LysRS) is absent from such organisms. However, a single 62-kilodalton protein with canonical LysRS activity was purified from Methanococcus maripaludis, and the gene that encodes this protein was cloned. The predicted amino acid sequence of M. maripaludis LysRS is similar to open reading frames of unassigned function in both Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and Methanococcus jannaschii but is unrelated to canonical LysRS proteins reported in eubacteria, eukaryotes, and the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus solfataricus. The presence of amino acid motifs characteristic of the Rossmann dinucleotide-binding domain identifies M. maripaludis LysRS as a class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, in contrast to the known examples of this enzyme, which are class II synthetases. These data question the concept that the classification of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases does not vary throughout living systems.

  16. Increased Long Chain acyl-Coa Synthetase Activity and Fatty Acid Import Is Linked to Membrane Synthesis for Development of Picornavirus Replication Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Alison J.; Ford, Lauren A.; Pei, Zhengtong; Watkins, Paul A.; Ernst, Robert K.; Belov, George A.

    2013-01-01

    All positive strand (+RNA) viruses of eukaryotes replicate their genomes in association with membranes. The mechanisms of membrane remodeling in infected cells represent attractive targets for designing future therapeutics, but our understanding of this process is very limited. Elements of autophagy and/or the secretory pathway were proposed to be hijacked for building of picornavirus replication organelles. However, even closely related viruses differ significantly in their requirements for components of these pathways. We demonstrate here that infection with diverse picornaviruses rapidly activates import of long chain fatty acids. While in non-infected cells the imported fatty acids are channeled to lipid droplets, in infected cells the synthesis of neutral lipids is shut down and the fatty acids are utilized in highly up-regulated phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Thus the replication organelles are likely built from de novo synthesized membrane material, rather than from the remodeled pre-existing membranes. We show that activation of fatty acid import is linked to the up-regulation of cellular long chain acyl-CoA synthetase activity and identify the long chain acyl-CoA syntheatse3 (Acsl3) as a novel host factor required for polio replication. Poliovirus protein 2A is required to trigger the activation of import of fatty acids independent of its protease activity. Shift in fatty acid import preferences by infected cells results in synthesis of phosphatidylcholines different from those in uninfected cells, arguing that the viral replication organelles possess unique properties compared to the pre-existing membranes. Our data show how poliovirus can change the overall cellular membrane homeostasis by targeting one critical process. They explain earlier observations of increased phospholipid synthesis in infected cells and suggest a simple model of the structural development of the membranous scaffold of replication complexes of picorna-like viruses, that may be

  17. Increased long chain acyl-Coa synthetase activity and fatty acid import is linked to membrane synthesis for development of picornavirus replication organelles.

    PubMed

    Nchoutmboube, Jules A; Viktorova, Ekaterina G; Scott, Alison J; Ford, Lauren A; Pei, Zhengtong; Watkins, Paul A; Ernst, Robert K; Belov, George A

    2013-01-01

    All positive strand (+RNA) viruses of eukaryotes replicate their genomes in association with membranes. The mechanisms of membrane remodeling in infected cells represent attractive targets for designing future therapeutics, but our understanding of this process is very limited. Elements of autophagy and/or the secretory pathway were proposed to be hijacked for building of picornavirus replication organelles. However, even closely related viruses differ significantly in their requirements for components of these pathways. We demonstrate here that infection with diverse picornaviruses rapidly activates import of long chain fatty acids. While in non-infected cells the imported fatty acids are channeled to lipid droplets, in infected cells the synthesis of neutral lipids is shut down and the fatty acids are utilized in highly up-regulated phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Thus the replication organelles are likely built from de novo synthesized membrane material, rather than from the remodeled pre-existing membranes. We show that activation of fatty acid import is linked to the up-regulation of cellular long chain acyl-CoA synthetase activity and identify the long chain acyl-CoA syntheatse3 (Acsl3) as a novel host factor required for polio replication. Poliovirus protein 2A is required to trigger the activation of import of fatty acids independent of its protease activity. Shift in fatty acid import preferences by infected cells results in synthesis of phosphatidylcholines different from those in uninfected cells, arguing that the viral replication organelles possess unique properties compared to the pre-existing membranes. Our data show how poliovirus can change the overall cellular membrane homeostasis by targeting one critical process. They explain earlier observations of increased phospholipid synthesis in infected cells and suggest a simple model of the structural development of the membranous scaffold of replication complexes of picorna-like viruses, that may be

  18. Thermal Death of Temperature-Sensitive Lysyl- and Tryptophanyl-Transfer Ribonucleic Acid Synthetase Mutants of Bacillus subtilis: Effect of Culture Medium and Developmental Stage

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, William

    1974-01-01

    The growth of thermosensitive Bacillus subtilis lysyl- and tryptophanyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase mutants (lysS1 and trypS1) (l-lysine:transfer ribonucleic acid [tRNA] ligase [AMP], EC 6.1.1.6; and l-tryptophan:tRNA ligase [AMP], EC 6.1.1.2) was terminated when exponential phase cells were shifted from 30 to 43 C in a rich medium. Under these conditions, the temperature-inhibited cells undergo thermal death; they rapidly lose their ability to form colonies at 30 C. Another lysyl-tRNA synthetase mutant (lysS2) is refractory to thermal death even though its growth is inhibited at 43 C. The thermal death response of the lysS1 mutant is affected by the stage of cell development. At periods in spore outgrowth and sporogenesis these cells become refractory to thermal death. The refractory state does not result from the production of an inhibitor, or from the degradation of an activator of thermal death. However, culture medium composition does modify the thermal death response. Rich media enhance the effect, and no thermal death occurs in the lysS1 strain grown in a minimal medium. Temperature-sensitive cells can grow in a lysine- (0.25 mM) or tryptophan- (0.25 mM) supplemented minimal medium at 43 C, but amino acid concentrations of 25 mM only transiently protect trypS1 and lysS1 cells from thermal death in a rich medium. Osmotic agents such as sucrose (0.5 M) and NaCl (0.34 M) completely prevent thermal death in the lysS1 strain, although growth is still arrested. On solid media, sucrose stabilized lysS1 cells can form colonies at the restrictive temperature, but neither sucrose (0.5 M) nor NaCl (0.34 M) stabilized the lysS1 enzyme in vitro. Chloramiphenicol increased the rate of thermal death of the lysS1 strain but decreased the thermal death response of the trypS1 mutant. Considering the nature of the enzyme defect in the lysS1 strain, the common genetic origin of the spore and vegetative lysyl-tRNA synthetase, and the protective effects exerted by lysine

  19. Human Fatty Acid Transport Protein 2a/Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase 1 (FATP2a/Acsvl1) Has a Preference in Mediating the Channeling of Exogenous n-3 Fatty Acids into Phosphatidylinositol*

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Elaina M.; Cerny, Ronald L.; Watkins, Paul A.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Black, Paul N.

    2011-01-01

    The trafficking of fatty acids across the membrane and into downstream metabolic pathways requires their activation to CoA thioesters. Members of the fatty acid transport protein/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (FATP/Acsvl) family are emerging as key players in the trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into the cell and in intracellular fatty acid homeostasis. We have expressed two naturally occurring splice variants of human FATP2 (Acsvl1) in yeast and 293T-REx cells and addressed their roles in fatty acid transport, activation, and intracellular trafficking. Although both forms (FATP2a (Mr 70,000) and FATP2b (Mr 65,000 and lacking exon3, which encodes part of the ATP binding site)) were functional in fatty acid import, only FATP2a had acyl-CoA synthetase activity, with an apparent preference toward very long chain fatty acids. To further address the roles of FATP2a or FATP2b in fatty acid uptake and activation, LC-MS/MS was used to separate and quantify different acyl-CoA species (C14–C24) and to monitor the trafficking of different classes of exogenous fatty acids into intracellular acyl-CoA pools in 293T-REx cells expressing either isoform. The use of stable isotopically labeled fatty acids demonstrated FATP2a is involved in the uptake and activation of exogenous fatty acids, with a preference toward n-3 fatty acids (C18:3 and C22:6). Using the same cells expressing FATP2a or FATP2b, electrospray ionization/MS was used to follow the trafficking of stable isotopically labeled n-3 fatty acids into phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. The expression of FATP2a resulted in the trafficking of C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA into both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol but with a distinct preference for phosphatidylinositol. Collectively these data demonstrate FATP2a functions in fatty acid transport and activation and provides specificity toward n-3 fatty acids in which the corresponding n-3 acyl-CoAs are preferentially trafficked into acyl-CoA pools

  20. Characterization of Cereulide Synthetase, a Toxin-Producing Macromolecular Machine

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Diego A.; Magarvey, Nathan A.; Schmeing, T. Martin

    2015-01-01

    Cereulide synthetase is a two-protein nonribosomal peptide synthetase system that produces a potent emetic toxin in virulent strains of Bacillus cereus. The toxin cereulide is a depsipeptide, as it consists of alternating aminoacyl and hydroxyacyl residues. The hydroxyacyl residues are derived from keto acid substrates, which cereulide synthetase selects and stereospecifically reduces with imbedded ketoreductase domains before incorporating them into the growing depsipeptide chain. We present an in vitro biochemical characterization of cereulide synthetase. We investigate the kinetics and side chain specificity of α-keto acid selection, evaluate the requirement of an MbtH-like protein for adenylation domain activity, assay the effectiveness of vinylsulfonamide inhibitors on ester-adding modules, perform NADPH turnover experiments and evaluate in vitro depsipeptide biosynthesis. This work also provides biochemical insight into depsipeptide-synthesizing nonribosomal peptide synthetases responsible for other bioactive molecules such as valinomycin, antimycin and kutzneride. PMID:26042597

  1. Thermosensitive mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 altered in the catalytic Subunit and in a Regulatory factor of the glutamy-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, J; Delcuve, G

    1975-05-01

    The glutamyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase (GluRS) of a partial revertants (ts plus or minus) of the thermosensitive (ts) mutant strain JP1449 (LOcus gltx) and of a ts mutant strain EM111-ts1 with a lesion in or near the locus gltx have been studied to find the relation between these two genetic loci known to influence the GluRS activity in vitro and the presence of a catalytic subunit and of a regulatory subunit in the GluRS purified from Escherichia coli K-12. The ts character of strain JP1449-18ts plus or minus is co-transduced with the marker dsdA at the same frequency as is the ts character of strain JP1449. Its purified GluRS is very thermolabile and its Km for glutamate is higher than that of a wild-type GluRS. These results indicate that the locus gltX is in the structural gene for the catalytic subunit of this enzyme. The location of the mutation causing the partial ts reversion in strain JP1449-18ts plus or minus is discussed. The GluRS purified from the ts mutant strain EM111-ts1 has the same stability as the wild-type enzyme, but its Km forglutamate increases with the temperature, suggesting that the locus gltE codes for a regulatory factor, possibly for the polypeptide chain that is co-purified with the catalytic subunit.

  2. Thermosensitive mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 altered in the catalytic Subunit and in a Regulatory factor of the glutamy-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Lapointe, J; Delcuve, G

    1975-01-01

    The glutamyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase (GluRS) of a partial revertants (ts plus or minus) of the thermosensitive (ts) mutant strain JP1449 (LOcus gltx) and of a ts mutant strain EM111-ts1 with a lesion in or near the locus gltx have been studied to find the relation between these two genetic loci known to influence the GluRS activity in vitro and the presence of a catalytic subunit and of a regulatory subunit in the GluRS purified from Escherichia coli K-12. The ts character of strain JP1449-18ts plus or minus is co-transduced with the marker dsdA at the same frequency as is the ts character of strain JP1449. Its purified GluRS is very thermolabile and its Km for glutamate is higher than that of a wild-type GluRS. These results indicate that the locus gltX is in the structural gene for the catalytic subunit of this enzyme. The location of the mutation causing the partial ts reversion in strain JP1449-18ts plus or minus is discussed. The GluRS purified from the ts mutant strain EM111-ts1 has the same stability as the wild-type enzyme, but its Km forglutamate increases with the temperature, suggesting that the locus gltE codes for a regulatory factor, possibly for the polypeptide chain that is co-purified with the catalytic subunit. PMID:1092645

  3. Adaptive Calcified Matrix Response of Dental Pulp to Bacterial Invasion Is Associated with Establishment of a Network of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein+/Glutamine Synthetase+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Ramin M.; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Simonian, Mary; Hunter, Neil

    2010-01-01

    We report evidence for anatomical and functional changes of dental pulp in response to bacterial invasion through dentin that parallel responses to noxious stimuli reported in neural crest-derived sensory tissues. Sections of resin-embedded carious adult molar teeth were prepared for immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, ultrastructural analysis, and microdissection to extract mRNA for quantitative analyses. In odontoblasts adjacent to the leading edge of bacterial invasion in carious teeth, expression levels of the gene encoding dentin sialo-protein were 16-fold greater than in odontoblasts of healthy teeth, reducing progressively with distance from this site of the carious lesion. In contrast, gene expression for dentin matrix protein-1 by odontoblasts was completely suppressed in carious teeth relative to healthy teeth. These changes in gene expression were related to a gradient of deposited reactionary dentin that displayed a highly modified structure. In carious teeth, interodontoblastic dentin sialo-protein− cells expressing glutamine synthetase (GS) showed up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). These cells extended processes that associated with odontoblasts. Furthermore, connexin 43 established a linkage between adjacent GFAP+/GS+ cells in carious teeth only. These findings indicate an adaptive pulpal response to encroaching caries that includes the deposition of modified, calcified, dentin matrix associated with networks of GFAP+/GS+ interodontoblastic cells. A regulatory role for the networks of GFAP+/GS+ cells is proposed, mediated by the secretion of glutamate to modulate odontoblastic response. PMID:20802180

  4. Antiviral activity of human oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) is mediated by enhancing retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yugen; Ghosh, Arundhati; Cuevas, Rolando A.; Forero, Adriana; Dhar, Jayeeta; Ibsen, Mikkel Søes; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan Leo; Schmidt, Tobias; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K.; Fujita, Takashi; Hartmann, Rune; Barik, Sailen; Hornung, Veit; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Virus infection is sensed in the cytoplasm by retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I, also known as DDX58), which requires RNA and polyubiquitin binding to induce type I interferon (IFN), and activate cellular innate immunity. We show that the human IFN-inducible oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) protein had antiviral activity and mediated RIG-I activation by mimicking polyubiquitin. Loss of OASL expression reduced RIG-I signaling and enhanced virus replication in human cells. Conversely, OASL expression suppressed replication of a number of viruses in a RIG-I-dependent manner and enhanced RIG-I-mediated IFN induction. OASL interacted and colocalized with RIG-I, and through its C-terminal ubiquitin-like domain specifically enhanced RIG-I signaling. Bone marrow derived macrophages from mice deficient for Oasl2 showed that among the two mouse orthologs of human OASL; Oasl2 is functionally similar to human OASL. Our findings show a mechanism by which human OASL contributes to host antiviral responses by enhancing RIG-I activation. PMID:24931123

  5. Reduction of serum free fatty acids and triglycerides by liver-targeted expression of long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minhao; Cao, Aiqin; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2011-05-01

    ACSL3 is a member of the long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) family that consists of 5 isozymes responsible for cellular fatty acid metabolism in various tissues in an isozyme-specific manner. Our previous studies have demonstrated that expression of ACSL3 mRNA and protein in liver was specifically increased after feeding hamsters with a fat- and cholesterol-enriched diet, providing the first in vivo evidence for the regulated expression of ACSL3 in liver tissue. The aim of the current study was to further investigate the role of ACSL3 in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism in vitro and in vivo. We utilized an adenoviral-mediated gene delivery approach to exogenously express hamster ACSL3 in hamster liver as well as in HepG2 cells. Transduction of HepG2 cells with Ad-hamACSL3 adenovirus elevated total cellular ACSL enzyme activity, which was accompanied by a significant reduction of cellular contents of triglycerides and total phospholipids. Immunostaining and confocal microscopy studies revealed that ACSL3 was localized to endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. In vivo, infection of hamsters with Ad-hamACSL3 led to sustained expression of ACSL3 mRNA and protein in liver two weeks after infection. Importantly, compared with Ad-GFP control virus infected hamsters, we observed significantly lower free fatty acids and triglycerides plus modest reduction of phospholipids in the serum of Ad-hamACSL3 infected animals. Furthermore, triglyceride levels were significantly reduced in Ad-hamACSL3 infected hamster liver. Altogether, these results provide important and physiologically relevant evidence that strengthens the link between ACSL3 expression and hepatic reduction of triglycerides and fatty acids.

  6. Inhibition of Arabidopsis growth by the allelopathic compound azetidine-2-carboxylate is due to the low amino acid specificity of cytosolic prolyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyeon; Joshi, Naveen; Pasini, Rita; Dobson, Renwick C J; Allison, Jane; Leustek, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The toxicity of azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (A2C), a structural analogue of L-proline, results from its incorporation into proteins due to misrecognition by prolyl-tRNA synthetase (ProRS). The growth of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling roots is more sensitive to inhibition by A2C than is cotyledon growth. Arabidopsis contains two ProRS isozymes. AtProRS-Org (At5g52520) is localized in chloroplasts/mitochondria, and AtProRS-Cyt (At3g62120) is cytosolic. AtProRS-Cyt mRNA is more highly expressed in roots than in cotyledons. Arabidopsis ProRS isoforms were expressed as His-tagged recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Both enzymes were functionally active in ATP-PPi exchange and aminoacylation assays, and showed similar Km for L-proline. A major difference was observed in the substrate specificity of the two enzymes. AtProRS-Cyt showed nearly identical substrate specificity for L-proline and A2C, but for AtProRS-Org the specificity constant was 77.6 times higher for L-proline than A2C, suggesting that A2C-sensitivity may result from lower amino acid specificity of AtProRS-Cyt. Molecular modelling and simulation results indicate that this specificity difference between the AtProRS isoforms may result from altered modes of substrate binding. Similar kinetic results were obtained with the ProRSs from Zea mays, suggesting that the difference in substrate specificity is a conserved feature of ProRS isoforms from plants that do not accumulate A2C and are sensitive to A2C toxicity. The discovery of the mode of action of A2C toxicity could lead to development of biorational weed management strategies.

  7. Acyl CoA synthetase-1 links facilitated long chain fatty acid uptake to intracellular metabolic trafficking differently in hearts of male versus female mice.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Joseph R; Wang, Xuerong; Lewandowski, E Douglas

    2016-05-01

    Acyl CoA synthetase-1 (ACSL1) is localized at intracellular membranes, notably the mitochondrial membrane. ACSL1 and female sex are suggested to indirectly facilitate lipid availability to the heart and other organs. However, such mechanisms in intact, functioning myocardium remain unexplored, and roles of ACSL1 and sex in the uptake and trafficking of fats are poorly understood. To determine the potential for ACSL1 and sex-dependent differences in metabolic trapping and trafficking effects of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) within cardiomyocytes of intact hearts. (13)C NMR of intact, beating mouse hearts, supplied (13)C palmitate, revealed 44% faster trans-sarcolemmal uptake of LCFA in male hearts overexpressing ACSL1 (MHC-ACSL1) than in non-transgenic (NTG) males (p<0.05). Acyl CoA content was elevated by ACSL1 overexpression, 404% in males and 164% in female, relative to NTG. Despite similar ACSL1 content, NTG females displayed faster LCFA uptake kinetics compared to NTG males, which was reversed by ovariectomy. NTG female LCFA uptake rates were similar to those in ACSL1 males and ACSL1 females. ACSL1 and female sex hormones both accelerated LCFA uptake without affecting triglyceride content or turnover. ACSL1 hearts contained elevated ceramide, particularly C22 ceramide in both sexes and specifically, C24 in males. ACSL1 also induced lower content of fatty acid transporter-6 (FATP6) indicating cooperative regulation with ACSL1. Surprisingly, ACSL1 overexpression did not increase mitochondrial oxidation of exogenous palmitate, which actually dropped in female ACSL1 hearts. ACSL1-mediated metabolic trapping of exogenous LCFA accelerates LCFA uptake rates, albeit to a lesser extent in females, which distinctly affects LCFA trafficking to acyl intermediates but not triglyceride storage or mitochondrial oxidation and is affected by female sex hormones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Acyl CoA synthetase-1 links facilitated long chain fatty acid uptake to intracellular metabolic trafficking differently in hearts of male versus female mice

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Joseph R.; Wang, Xuerong; Lewandowski, E. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Acyl CoA synthetase-1 (ACSL1) is localized at intracellular membranes, notably the mitochondrial membrane. ACSL1 and female sex are suggested to indirectly facilitate lipid availability to the heart and other organs. However, such mechanisms in intact, functioning myocardium remain unexplored, and roles of ACSL1 and sex in the uptake and trafficking of fats are poorly understood. Objective To determine the potential for ACSL1 and sex-dependent differences in metabolic trapping and trafficking effects of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) within cardiomyocytes of intact hearts. Methods and Results 13C NMR of intact, beating mouse hearts, supplied 13C palmitate, revealed 44% faster trans-sarcolemmal uptake of LCFA in male hearts overexpressing ACSL1 (MHC-ACSL1) than in non-transgenic (NTG) males (P<0.05). Acyl CoA content was elevated by ACSL1 overexpression, 404% in males and 164% in female, relative to NTG. Despite similar ACSL1 content, NTG females displayed faster LCFA uptake kinetics compared to NTG males, which was reversed by ovariectomy. NTG female LCFA uptake rates were similar to those in ACSL1 males and ACSL1 females. ACSL1 and female sex hormones both accelerated LCFA uptake without affecting triglyceride content or turnover. ACSL1 hearts contained elevated ceramide, particularly C22 ceramide in both sexes and specifically, C24 in males. ACSL1 also induced lower content of fatty acid transporter-6 (FATP6) indicating cooperative regulation with ACSL1. Surprisingly, ACSL1 overexpression did not increase mitochondrial oxidation of exogenous palmitate, which actually dropped in female ACSL1 hearts. Conclusions ACSL1-mediated metabolic trapping of exogenous LCFA accelerates LCFA uptake rates, albeit to a lesser extent in females, which distinctly affects LCFA trafficking to acyl intermediates but not triglyceride storage or mitochondrial oxidation and is affected by female sex hormones. PMID:26995156

  9. The CP2 domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase is crucial for amino acid activation and post-transfer editing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Long; Zhu, Bin; Wang, En-Duo

    2008-12-26

    Leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) has an insertion domain, called connective peptide 2 (CP2), either directly preceding or following the editing domain (CP1 domain), depending on the species. The global structures of the CP2 domains from all LeuRSs are similar. Although the CP1 domain has been extensively explored to be responsible for hydrolysis of mischarged tRNALeu, the role of the CP2 domain remains undefined. In the present work, deletion of the CP2 domain of Giardia lamblia LeuRS (GlLeuRS) showed that the CP2 domain is indispensable for amino acid activation and post-transfer editing and that it contributes to LeuRS-tRNALeu binding affinity. In addition, its functions are conserved in both eukaryotic/archaeal and prokaryotic LeuRSs from G. lamblia, Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhLeuRS), and Escherichia coli (EcLeuRS). Alanine scanning and site-directed mutagenesis assays of the CP2 domain identified several residues that are crucial for its various functions. Data from the chimeric mutants, which replaced the CP2 domain of GlLeuRS with either PhLeuRS or EcLeuRS, showed that the CP2 domain of PhLeuRS but not that of EcLeuRS can partially restore amino acid activation and post-transfer editing functions, suggesting that the functions of the CP2 domain are dependent on its location in the primary sequence of LeuRS.

  10. Overexpression of human fatty acid transport protein 2/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) reveals distinct patterns of trafficking of exogenous fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, Elaina M.; Cerny, Ronald L.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Black, Paul N.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Roles of FATP2 in fatty acid transport/activation contribute to lipid homeostasis. •Use of 13C- and D-labeled fatty acids provide novel insights into FATP2 function. •FATP2-dependent trafficking of FA into phospholipids results in distinctive profiles. •FATP2 functions in the transport and activation pathways for exogenous fatty acids. -- Abstract: In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4 h. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The

  11. Studies on the reactivity of the essential sulfhydryl groups as a conformational probe for the fatty acid synthetase of chicken liver. Inactivation by 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and intersubunit cross-linking of the inactivated enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tian, W X; Hsu, R Y; Wang, Y S

    1985-09-15

    Fatty acid synthetase of chicken liver is rapidly and reversibly inactivated by 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) at a rate (k2 = 132 mM-1 S-1 in 3 mM EDTA, 1% (v/v) glycerol, pH 7.0, at 25 degrees C) up to 2200 times higher than the reaction of this reagent with simple thiol compounds. The inactivation is caused by the reaction of the phosphopantetheine SH group, since it is protected competitively by either acetyl- or malonyl-CoA, and since the inactivated enzyme is unreactive with the phosphopantetheine label chloroacetyl-CoA but reactive with the cysteine reagent 1,3-dibromopropanone. Moreover, chloroacetyl-CoA prevents the modification of the rapidly reacting essential SH group by DTNB. The number of SH groups involved in inactivation was determined by correlating activity loss with the extent of reaction and by stopped-flow analysis of substrate (or chloroacetyl-CoA) protection. Values between 0.91 and 1.15 SH groups/dimer were obtained, indicating the presence of substoichiometric amounts of the prosthetic group in the fatty acid synthetase preparations used in this study. Inactivation of the synthetase by DTNB is strongly inhibited by increasing salt concentration and protected noncompetitively by NADP+ and NADPH. Treatment of the enzyme inactivated at low salt by salt, NADP+, or NADPH also effectively reduced cross-linking between enzyme subunits. The parallel effects of these treatments on the reaction with DTNB and subsequent dimerization are consistent with a minimum model of two discreet conformation states for fatty acid synthetase. In the low salt conformer, the phosphopantetheine and cysteine SH groups are juxtaposed, and the DTNB reaction (k2 approximately 132 mM-1 S-1) and dimerization are both facilitated. Transition to the high salt conformer by the above treatments is accompanied by an approximately 20-fold reduction of reactivity with DTNB (k2 = 6.8 mM-1 S-1) and reduced dimerization, due to spatial separation of the SH groups

  12. Overexpression of human fatty acid transport protein 2/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) reveals distinct patterns of trafficking of exogenous fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Melton, Elaina M; Cerny, Ronald L; DiRusso, Concetta C; Black, Paul N

    2013-11-01

    In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4h. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The trafficking of exogenous C16:0 and C22:6 into PA was significant where there was 6.9- and 5.3-fold increased incorporation, respectively, over the control; C18:3 and C20:4 also trended to increase in the PA pool while there were no changes for C18:1 and C18:2. The trafficking of C18:3 into PC and PI trended higher and approached significance. In the case of C20:4, expression of

  13. Overexpression of Human Fatty Acid Transport Protein 2/Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) Reveals Distinct Patterns of Trafficking of Exogenous Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Elaina M.; Cerny, Ronald L.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Black, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4hr. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The trafficking of exogenous C16:0 and C22:6 into PA was significant where there was 6.9- and 5.3-fold increased incorporation, respectively, over the control; C18:3 and C20:4 also trended to increase in the PA pool while there were no changes for C18:1 and C18:2. The trafficking of C18:3 into PC and PI trended higher and approached significance. In the case of C20:4, expression of

  14. Characterization of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases which stimulate secretion of fatty acids in green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Jia, Bin; Song, Yanzi; Wu, Min; Lin, Baicheng; Xiao, Kang; Hu, Zhangli; Huang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae biofuel has become the most promising renewable energy over the past few years. But limitations still exist because of its high cost. Although, efforts have been made in enhancement of lipid productivity, the major cost problem in harvesting and oil extraction is still intractable. Thus, the idea of fatty acids (FAs) secretion which can massively facilitate algae harvesting and oil extraction was investigated here. The cDNAs of two long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (LACSs) genes were cloned from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and named as cracs1 and cracs2. They showed different substrate adaptation in the yeast complementation experiments. Cracs2 could utilize FAs C12:0, C14:0, C16:0, C18:0, C16:1 and C18:1, while crac1 could only utilize substrate C14:0, C16:1 and C18:1. Knockdown of cracs1 and cracs2 in C. reinhardtii resulted in accumulation of intracellular lipids. The total intracellular lipids contents of transgenic algae q-15 (knockdown of cracs1) and p-13 (knockdown of cracs2) were 45 and 55 %, respectively higher than that of cc849. Furthermore, FAs secretion was discovered in both transgenic algae. Secreted FAs can reach 8.19 and 9.66 mg/10(9) cells in q-15 and p-13, respectively. These results demonstrated the possibility of FAs secretion by microalgae and may give a new strategy of low-cost oil extraction. According to our findings, we proposed that FAs secretion may also be achieved in other species besides Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by knocking-down cracs genes, which may promote the future industrial application of microalgae biofuels.

  15. Engineering of recombinant Escherichia coli cells co-expressing poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) synthetase and glutamate racemase for differential yielding of γ-PGA.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mingfeng; Geng, Weitao; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Jibin; Wang, Shufang; Feng, Jun; Zheng, Ping; Jiang, Anna; Song, Cunjiang

    2013-11-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a promising environmental-friendly material with outstanding water solubility, biocompatibility and degradability. However, it is tough to determine the relationship between functional synthetic enzyme and the strains' yield or substrate dependency. We cloned γ-PGA synthetase genes pgsBCA and glutamate racemase gene racE from both L-glutamate-dependent γ-PGA-producing Bacillus licheniformis NK-03 and L-glutamate-independent B. amyloliquefaciens LL3 strains. The deduced RacE and PgsA from the two strains shared the identity of 84.5% and 78.53%, while PgsB and PgsC possessed greater similarity with 93.13% and 93.96%. The induced co-expression of pgsBCA and racE showed that the engineered Escherichia coli strains had the capacity of synthesizing γ-PGA, and LL3 derived PgsBCA had higher catalytic activity and enhanced productivity than NK-03 in Luria-Bertani medium containing glucose or L-glutamate. However, the differential effect was weakened when providing sufficient immediateness L-glutamate substrate, that is, the supply of substrate could be served as the ascendance upon γ-PGA production. Furthermore, RacE integration could enhance γ-PGA yield through improving the preferred d-glutamate content. This is the first report about co-expression of pgsBCA and racE from the two Bacillus strains, which will be of great value for the determination of the biosynthetic mechanism of γ-PGA.

  16. A Hybrid Non-Ribosomal Peptide/Polyketide Synthetase Containing Fatty-Acyl Ligase (FAAL) Synthesizes the β-Amino Fatty Acid Lipopeptides Puwainaphycins in the Cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum alatosporum

    PubMed Central

    Mareš, Jan; Hájek, Jan; Urajová, Petra; Kopecký, Jiří; Hrouzek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    A putative operon encoding the biosynthetic pathway for the cytotoxic cyanobacterial lipopeptides puwainphycins was identified in Cylindrospermum alatosporum. Bioinformatics analysis enabled sequential prediction of puwainaphycin biosynthesis; this process is initiated by the activation of a fatty acid residue via fatty acyl-AMP ligase and continued by a multidomain non-ribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthetase. High-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements proved the production of puwainaphycin F/G congeners differing in FA chain length formed by either 3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-methyl dodecanoic acid (4-methyl-Ahdoa) or 3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-methyl tetradecanoic acid (4-methyl-Ahtea). Because only one puwainaphycin operon was recovered in the genome, we suggest that the fatty acyl-AMP ligase and one of the amino acid adenylation domains (Asn/Gln) show extended substrate specificity. Our results provide the first insight into the biosynthesis of frequently occurring β-amino fatty acid lipopeptides in cyanobacteria, which may facilitate analytical assessment and development of monitoring tools for cytotoxic cyanobacterial lipopeptides. PMID:25369527

  17. TRYPTOPHANASE-TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHETASE SYSTEMS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI I.

    PubMed Central

    Freundlich, Martin; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1962-01-01

    Freundlich, Martin (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and Herman C. Lichstein. Tryptophanase-tryptophan synthetase systems in Escherichia coli. I. Effect of tryptophan and related compounds. J. Bacteriol. 84:979–987. 1962.—The effect of tryptophan and related compounds on tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase formation in Escherichia coli was determined. Several of these compounds stimulated the formation of tryptophanase while concomitantly decreasing the production of synthetase. A number of tryptophan analogues were found to inhibit growth. The possible mode of action of these substances was examined further. 5-Hydroxytryptophan greatly inhibited the formation of synthetase and also reduced growth. Its inhibitory action on growth was attributed, at least partially, to the false feedback inhibition of anthranilic acid formation. Tryptamine was found to be a potent inhibitor of the activity of synthetase, as well as of the enzyme(s) involved in the synthesis of anthranilic acid from shikimic acid. However, growth reduction was only partially reversed by tryptophan. Indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-propionic acid decreased growth and increased the formation of synthetase six- to eightfold. The action of these compounds was ascribed to their ability to block the endogenous formation of tryptophan. PMID:13959621

  18. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Stéphanie M; Habash, Dimah Z

    2009-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  19. Decreased Red Cell Uroporphyrinogen I Synthetase Activity in Intermittent Acute Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Strand, L. James; Meyer, Urs A.; Felsher, Bertram F.; Redeker, Allan G.; Marver, Harvey S.

    1972-01-01

    Intermittent acute porphyria has recently been distinguished biochemically from other genetic hepatic porphyrias by the observation of diminished hepatic uroporphyrinogen I synthetase activity and increased δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase activity. Since deficient uroporphyrinogen I synthetase may be reflected in nonhepatic tissues, we have assayed this enzyme in red cell hemolysates from nonporphyric subjects and from patients with genetic hepatic porphyria. Only patients with intermittent acute porphyria had decreased erythrocyte uroporphyrinogen I synthetase activity which was approximately 50% of normal. The apparent Km of partially purified uroporphyrinogen I synthetase was 6 × 10−6m in both nonporphyrics and patients with intermittent acute porphyria. These data provide further evidence for a primary mutation affecting uroporphyrinogen I synthetase in intermittent acute porphyria. Further-more, results of assay of red cell uroporphyrinogen I synthetase activity in a large family with intermittent acute porphyria suggest that this test may be a reliable indicator of the heterozygous state. PMID:5056653

  20. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  1. TRYPTOPHANASE-TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHETASE SYSTEMS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI III.

    PubMed Central

    Freundlich, Martin; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1962-01-01

    Freundlich, Martin (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and Herman C. Lichstein. Tryptophanase-tryptophan synthetase systems in Escherichia coli. III. Requirements for enzyme synthesis. J. Bacteriol. 84:996–1006. 1962.—The requirements for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase in Escherichia coli during repression release were studied. The kinetics of the formation of tryptophan synthetase differed in the two strains examined; this was attributed to differences in the endogenous level of tryptophan in the bacterial cells. The formation of both enzymes was inhibited by chloramphenicol, and by the absence of arginine in an arginine-requiring mutant. These results are indicative of a requirement for protein synthesis for enzyme formation. Requirements for nucleic acid synthesis were examined by use of a uracil- and thymine-requiring mutant, and with purine and pyrimidine analogues. The results obtained suggest that some type of ribonucleic acid synthesis was necessary for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase. PMID:13959620

  2. An arachidonic acid-preferring acyl-CoA synthetase is a hormone-dependent and obligatory protein in the signal transduction pathway of steroidogenic hormones.

    PubMed

    Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Maloberti, Paula; Neuman, Isabel; Cano, Florencia; Castilla, Rocío; Castillo, Fernanda; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2005-06-01

    We have described that, in adrenal and Leydig cells, the hormonal regulation of free arachidonic acid (AA) concentration is mediated by the concerted action of two enzymes: an acyl-CoA thioesterase (MTE-I or ARTISt) and an acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS4). In this study we analyzed the potential regulation of these proteins by hormonal action in steroidogenic cells. We demonstrated that ACS4 is rapidly induced by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and cAMP in Y1 adrenocortical cells. The hormone and its second messenger increased ACS4 protein levels in a time and concentration dependent way. Maximal concentration of ACTH (10 mIU/ml) produced a significant effect after 15 min of treatment and exerted the highest increase (3-fold) after 30 min. Moreover, (35)S-methionine incorporation showed that the increase in ACS4 protein levels is due to an increase in the de novo synthesis of the protein. On the contrary MTE-I protein levels in Y1 and MA-10 cells did not change after steroidogenic stimuli. In contrast with the effect observed on protein levels, stimulation of both cell lines did not change ACS4 RNA levels during the first hour of treatment, indicating that the effect of both stimuli is exerted at the level of ACS4 protein synthesis.StAR protein induction has a key role on the activation of steroidogenesis since this protein increases the rate of the limiting step of the whole process. In agreement with the fact that the inhibition of ACS4 activity by triacsin C blocks cAMP-stimulated progesterone production by MA-10 Leydig cells, here we demonstrated that ACS4 inhibition also reduces StAR protein levels. Moreover, exogenous AA was able to overcome the effect of triacsin C on both events, StAR induction and steroidogenesis. These results were confirmed by experiments using ACS4-targeted siRNA which result in a reduction in both ACS4 and StAR protein levels. The concomitant decrease in steroid production was overcome by the addition of AA to the knocked-out cells. In summary

  3. Distinct transcriptional regulation of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoforms and cytosolic thioesterase 1 in the rodent heart by fatty acids and insulin.

    PubMed

    Durgan, David J; Smith, Justin K; Hotze, Margaret A; Egbejimi, Oluwaseun; Cuthbert, Karalyn D; Zaha, Vlad G; Dyck, Jason R B; Abel, E Dale; Young, Martin E

    2006-06-01

    The molecular mechanism(s) responsible for channeling long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) into oxidative versus nonoxidative pathways is (are) poorly understood in the heart. Intracellular LCFAs are converted to long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs (LCFA-CoAs) by a family of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs). Cytosolic thioesterase 1 (CTE1) hydrolyzes cytosolic LCFA-CoAs to LCFAs, generating a potential futile cycle at the expense of ATP utilization. We hypothesized that ACSL isoforms and CTE1 are differentially regulated in the heart during physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we report that the five known acsl isoforms (acsl1, acsl3, acsl4, acsl5, and acsl6) and cte1 are expressed in whole rat and mouse hearts, as well as adult rat cardiomyocytes (ARCs). Streptozotocin-induced insulin-dependent diabetes (4 wk) and fasting (

  4. [Anti-synthetase syndrome].

    PubMed

    Novak, Srdan

    2012-01-01

    Antysynthetase syndrome is considered as a group ofidiopathic inflammatory myositis with charcteristic serologic hallmark--antibodies which recognise the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetasses (ARS). Clinical picture of those patients contains myositis and/or intersticial lung disease (ILD) and/or arthritis and/or fever and/or Raynaud phenomenon and sometimes characteristic look of mechanic's hands. Myositis can be overt, sometimes even absent, while IBP is major cause of morbidity and determines the outcome of the disease. Untill now eight different any-synthetase autoantibodies are recognised, and most frequent are findings of anti-histidyl-tRNa synthetase antibodies. Patients with other ARS autoantibodies usually have severe ILD. Drug of choice are steroids in dosage of 1 mg/kg with immunosupresive agent (azatioprin or methotrexate) while in severe IBP cyclophosphamide is needed. Recently succsesful treatment with rituximab in combination with cyclophosphamide is reported.

  5. Essentiality Assessment of Cysteinyl and Lysyl-tRNA Synthetases of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Ravishankar, Sudha; Ambady, Anisha; Swetha, Rayapadi G.; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha; Sambandamurthy, Vasan K.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of mupirocin, an antibiotic that targets isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase, established aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase as an attractive target for the discovery of novel antibacterial agents. Despite a high degree of similarity between the bacterial and human aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, the selectivity observed with mupirocin triggered the possibility of targeting other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases as potential drug targets. These enzymes catalyse the condensation of a specific amino acid to its cognate tRNA in an energy-dependent reaction. Therefore, each organism is expected to encode at least twenty aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, one for each amino acid. However, a bioinformatics search for genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases from Mycobacterium smegmatis returned multiple genes for glutamyl (GluRS), cysteinyl (CysRS), prolyl (ProRS) and lysyl (LysRS) tRNA synthetases. The pathogenic mycobacteria, namely, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, were also found to possess two genes each for CysRS and LysRS. A similar search indicated the presence of additional genes for LysRS in gram negative bacteria as well. Herein, we describe sequence and structural analysis of the additional aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes found in M. smegmatis. Characterization of conditional expression strains of Cysteinyl and Lysyl-tRNA synthetases generated in M. smegmatis revealed that the canonical aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase are essential, while the additional ones are not essential for the growth of M. smegmatis. PMID:26794499

  6. Site Directed Mutagenesis of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Glutathione Synthetase Produces an Enzyme with Homoglutathione Synthetase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dworeck, Tamara; Zimmermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Three different His-tagged, mutant forms of the fission yeast glutathione synthetase (GSH2) were derived by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in E. coli DH5α and affinity purified in a two-step procedure. Analysis of enzyme activity showed that it was possible to shift the substrate specificity of GSH2 from Gly (km 0,19; wild-type) to β-Ala or Ser. One mutation (substitution of Ile471, Cy472 to Met and Val and Ala 485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro) increased the affinity of GSH2 for β-Ala (km 0,07) and lowered the affinity for Gly (km 0,83), which is a characteristic of the enzyme homoglutathione synthetase found in plants. Substitution of Ala485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro only, increased instead the affinity of GSH2 for Ser (km 0,23) as a substrate, while affinity to Gly was preserved (km 0,12). This provides a new biosynthetic pathway for hydroxymethyl glutathione, which is known to be synthesized from glutathione and Ser in a reaction catalysed by carboxypeptidase Y. The reported findings provide further insight into how specific amino acids positioned in the GSH2 active site facilitate the recognition of different amino acid substrates, furthermore they support the evolutionary theory that homoglutathione synthetase evolved from glutathione synthetase by a single gene duplication event. PMID:23091597

  7. Peptide Synthetase Gene in Trichoderma virens

    PubMed Central

    Wilhite, S. E.; Lumsden, R. D.; Straney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    Trichoderma virens (synonym, Gliocladium virens), a deuteromycete fungus, suppresses soilborne plant diseases caused by a number of fungi and is used as a biocontrol agent. Several traits that may contribute to the antagonistic interactions of T. virens with disease-causing fungi involve the production of peptide metabolites (e.g., the antibiotic gliotoxin and siderophores used for iron acquisition). We cloned a 5,056-bp partial cDNA encoding a putative peptide synthetase (Psy1) from T. virens using conserved motifs found within the adenylate domain of peptide synthetases. Sequence similarities with conserved motifs of the adenylation domain, acyl transfer, and two condensation domains support identification of the Psy1 gene as a gene that encodes a peptide synthetase. Disruption of the native Psy1 gene through gene replacement was used to identify the function of this gene. Psy1 disruptants produced normal amounts of gliotoxin but grew poorly under low-iron conditions, suggesting that Psy1 plays a role in siderophore production. Psy1 disruptants cannot produce the major T. virens siderophore dimerum acid, a dipetide of acylated Nδ-hydroxyornithine. Biocontrol activity against damping-off diseases caused by Pythium ultimum and Rhizoctonia solani was not reduced by the Psy1 disruption, suggesting that iron competition through dimerum acid production does not contribute significantly to disease suppression activity under the conditions used. PMID:11679326

  8. Innovative use of a bacterial enzyme involved in sialic acid degradation to initiate sialic acid biosynthesis in glycoengineered insect cells

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    The baculovirus/insect cell system is widely used for recombinant protein production, but it is suboptimal for recombinant glycoprotein production because it does not provide sialylation, which is an essential feature of many glycoprotein biologics. This problem has been addressed by metabolic engineering, which has extended endogenous insect cell N-glycosylation pathways and enabled glycoprotein sialylation by baculovirus/insect cell systems. However, further improvement is needed because even the most extensively engineered baculovirus/insect cell systems require media supplementation with N-acetylmannosamine, an expensive sialic acid precursor, for efficient recombinant glycoprotein sialylation. Our solution to this problem focused on E. coli N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate 2′-epimerase (GNPE), which normally functions in bacterial sialic acid degradation. Considering that insect cells have the product, but not the substrate for this enzyme, we hypothesized that GNPE might drive the reverse reaction in these cells, thereby initiating sialic acid biosynthesis in the absence of media supplementation. We tested this hypothesis by isolating transgenic insect cells expressing E. coli GNPE together with a suite of mammalian genes needed for N-glycoprotein sialylation. Various assays showed that these cells efficiently produced sialic acid, CMP-sialic acid, and sialylated recombinant N-glycoproteins even in growth media without N-acetylmannosamine. Thus, this study demonstrated that a eukaryotic recombinant protein production platform can be glycoengineered with a bacterial gene, that a bacterial enzyme which normally functions in sialic acid degradation can be used to initiate sialic acid biosynthesis, and that insect cells expressing this enzyme can produce sialylated N-glycoproteins without N-acetylmannosamine supplementation, which will reduce production costs in glycoengineered baculovirus/insect cell systems. PMID:23022569

  9. Functional expansion of human tRNA synthetases achieved by structural inventions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-01-21

    Known as an essential component of the translational apparatus, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase family catalyzes the first step reaction in protein synthesis, that is, to specifically attach each amino acid to its cognate tRNA. While preserving this essential role, tRNA synthetases developed other roles during evolution. Human tRNA synthetases, in particular, have diverse functions in different pathways involving angiogenesis, inflammation and apoptosis. The functional diversity is further illustrated in the association with various diseases through genetic mutations that do not affect aminoacylation or protein synthesis. Here we review the accumulated knowledge on how human tRNA synthetases used structural inventions to achieve functional expansions.

  10. Purification and properties of glutamine synthetase from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Ericson, M C

    1985-12-01

    The chloroplastic glutamine synthetase of spinach leaves has been purified to homogeneity using affinity chromatography. This involves a tandem ;reactive blue A-agarose' and ;reactive red-A-agarose' as the final step in the procedure. This procedure results in a yield of 18 milligrams of pure glutamine synthetase per kilogram of starting material. The purity of our enzyme has been demonstrated on both one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels.Purified glutamine synthetase has a molecular weight of 360,000 daltons and consists of eight 44,000 dalton subunits. The K(m) is 6.7 millimolar for glutamate, 1.8 millimolar for ATP (synthetase assay), and 37.6 millimolar for glutamine (transferase assay). The isoelectric point is 6.5 and the pH optima are 7.3 in the synthetase assay and 6.4 in the transferase assay. The irreversible, competitive inhibitors methionine sulfoxamine and phosphinothricin have K(i) values of 0.1 millimolar and 6.1 micromolar, respectively. Amino acid analysis has been carried out and the results compared with published analyses for other isoforms of glutamine synthetase.

  11. Rosiglitazone Inhibits Acyl-CoA Synthetase Activity and Fatty Acid Partitioning to Diacylglycerol and Triacylglycerol via a Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor-γ–Independent Mechanism in Human Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Askari, Bardia; Kanter, Jenny E.; Sherrid, Ashley M.; Golej, Deidre L.; Bender, Andrew T.; Liu, Joey; Hsueh, Willa A.; Beavo, Joseph A.; Coleman, Rosalind A.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2010-01-01

    Rosiglitazone is an insulin-sensitizing agent that has recently been shown to exert beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. In addition to peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, rosiglitazone can affect other targets, such as directly inhibiting recombinant long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL)-4 activity. Because it is unknown if ACSL4 is expressed in vascular cells involved in atherosclerosis, we investigated the ability of rosiglitazone to inhibit ACSL activity and fatty acid partitioning in human and murine arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages. Human and murine SMCs and human macrophages expressed Acsl4, and rosiglitazone inhibited Acsl activity in these cells. Furthermore, rosiglitazone acutely inhibited partitioning of fatty acids into phospholipids in human SMCs and inhibited fatty acid partitioning into diacylglycerol and triacylglycerol in human SMCs and macrophages through a PPAR-γ–independent mechanism. Conversely, murine macrophages did not express ACSL4, and rosiglitazone did not inhibit ACSL activity in these cells, nor did it affect acute fatty acid partitioning into cellular lipids. Thus, rosiglitazone inhibits ACSL activity and fatty acid partitioning in human and murine SMCs and in human macrophages through a PPAR-γ–independent mechanism likely to be mediated by ACSL4 inhibition. Therefore, rosiglitazone might alter the biological effects of fatty acids in these cells and in atherosclerosis. PMID:17259370

  12. The microsomal dicarboxylyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Vamecq, J; de Hoffmann, E; Van Hoof, F

    1985-01-01

    Dicarboxylic acids are products of the omega-oxidation of monocarboxylic acids. We demonstrate that in rat liver dicarboxylic acids (C5-C16) can be converted into their CoA esters by a dicarboxylyl-CoA synthetase. During this activation ATP, which cannot be replaced by GTP, is converted into AMP and PPi, both acting as feedback inhibitors of the reaction. Thermolabile at 37 degrees C, and optimally active at pH 6.5, dicarboxylyl-CoA synthetase displays the highest activity on dodecanedioic acid (2 micromol/min per g of liver). Cell-fractionation studies indicate that this enzyme belongs to the hepatic microsomal fraction. Investigations about the fate of dicarboxylyl-CoA esters disclosed the existence of an oxidase, which could be measured by monitoring the production of H2O2. In our assay conditions this H2O2 production is dependent on and closely follows the CoA consumption. It appears that the chain-length specificity of the handling of dicarboxylic acids by this catabolic pathway (activation to acyl-CoA and oxidation with H2O2 production) parallels the pattern of the degradation of exogenous dicarboxylic acids in vivo. PMID:4062873

  13. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA; Anderson, John Christopher [San Diego, CA; Chin, Jason [Cambridge, GB; Liu, David R [Lexington, MA; Magliery, Thomas J [North Haven, CT; Meggers, Eric L [Philadelphia, PA; Mehl, Ryan Aaron [Lancaster, PA; Pastrnak, Miro [San Diego, CA; Santoro, Steven William [Cambridge, MA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2008-04-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  14. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA; Anderson, John Christopher [San Diego, CA; Chin, Jason [Cambridge, GB; Liu, David R [Lexington, MA; Magliery, Thomas J [North Haven, CT; Meggers, Eric L [Philadelphia, PA; Mehl, Ryan Aaron [Lancaster, PA; Pastrnak, Miro [San Diego, CA; Santoro, Steven William [Cambridge, MA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2012-05-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  15. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA; Anderson, John Christopher [San Diego, CA; Chin, Jason W [San Diego, CA; Liu, David R [Lexington, MA; Magliery, Thomas J [North Haven, CT; Meggers, Eric L [Philadelphia, PA; Mehl, Ryan Aaron [San Diego, CA; Pastrnak, Miro [San Diego, CA; Santoro, Stephen William [San Diego, CA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2011-09-06

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  16. Inhibition of Plant Glutamine Synthetases by Substituted Phosphinothricins

    PubMed Central

    Logusch, Eugene W.; Walker, Daniel M.; McDonald, John F.; Franz, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) utilizes various substituted glutamic acids as substrates. We have used this information to design herbicidal α- and γ-substituted analogs of phosphinothricin (l-2-amino-4-(hydroxymethylphosphinyl)butanoic acid, PPT), a naturally occurring GS inhibitor and a potent herbicide. The substituted phosphinothricins inhibit cytosolic sorghum GS1 and chloroplastic GS2 competitively versusl-glutamate, with Ki values in the low micromolar range. At higher concentrations, these inhibitors inactivate glutamine synthetase, while dilution restores activity through enzyme-inhibitor dissociation. Herbicidal phosphinothricins exhibit low Ki values and slow enzyme turnover, as described by reactivation characteristics. Both the GS1 and GS2 isoforms of plant glutamine synthetase are similarly inhibited by the phosphinothricins, consistent with the broad-spectrum herbicidal activity observed for PPT itself as well as other active compounds in this series. PMID:16668090

  17. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases database.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, M; Deniziak, M A; Barciszewski, J

    2001-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) are at the center of the question of the origin of life. They constitute a family of enzymes integrating the two levels of cellular organization: nucleic acids and proteins. AARSs arose early in evolution and are believed to be a group of ancient proteins. They are responsible for attaching amino acid residues to their cognate tRNA molecules, which is the first step in the protein synthesis. The role they play in a living cell is essential for the precise deciphering of the genetic code. The analysis of AARSs evolutionary history was not possible for a long time due to a lack of a sufficiently large number of their amino acid sequences. The emerging picture of synthetases' evolution is a result of recent achievements in genomics [Woese,C., Olsen,G.J., Ibba,M. and Söll,D. (2000) Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev., 64, 202-236]. In this paper we present a short introduction to the AARSs database. The updated database contains 1047 AARS primary structures from archaebacteria, eubacteria, mitochondria, chloroplasts and eukaryotic cells. It is the compilation of amino acid sequences of all AARSs known to date, which are available as separate entries via the WWW at http://biobases.ibch.poznan.pl/aars/.

  18. Down Regulation of Asparagine Synthetase and 3-Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase, and the Up-Regulation of Serine Dehydratase in Rat Liver from Intake of Excess Amount of Leucine Are Not Related to Leucine-Caused Amino Acid Imbalance.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ryoji; Takai, Marie; Namaki, Hiroya; Minami, Kimiko; Imamura, Wataru; Kato, Hisanori; Kamei, Yasutomi; Kanamoto, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine synthetase (ASNS), 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) and serine dehydratase (SDS) in rat liver are expressed in response to protein and amino acid intake. In the present study, we examined the expression of these enzymes in relation to amino acid imbalance caused by leucine. Rats were subjected to leucine administration in the diet or orally between meals. Consumption of more than 2% leucine in a 6% casein diet suppressed food intake and caused growth retardation in a dose-dependent manner, but this was not seen in a 12% or 40% casein diet. ASNS and PHGDH expression in the liver was significantly induced by the 6% casein diet and was suppressed by leucine in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the SDS expression was induced. These effects were leucine specific and not seen with ingestion of isoleucine or valine. However, leucine orally administered between meals did not change the food intake or growth of rats fed a 6% casein die, though it similarly affected the expression of ASNS, PHGDH and SDS in the liver. These results suggest that the growth retardation caused by leucine imbalance was mainly because of the suppression of food intake, and demonstrated that there are no causal relationships between ASNS, PHGDH and SDS expression and amino acid imbalance caused by leucine.

  19. Regulation of glutamine synthetase, aspartokinase, and total protein turnover in Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1985-12-13

    When suspensions of Klebsiella aerogenes are incubated in a nitrogen-free medium there is a gradual decrease in the levels of acid-precipitable protein and of aspartokinase III (lysine-sensitive) and aspartokinase I (threonine-sensitive) activities. In contrast, the level of glutamine synthetase increases slightly and then remains constant. Under these conditions, the glutamine synthetase and other proteins continue to be synthesized as judged by the incorporation of [14C]leucine into the acid-precipitable protein fraction and into protein precipitated by anti-glutamine synthetase antibodies, by the fact that growth-inhibiting concentrations of chloramphenicol also inhibit the incorporation of [14C]leucine into protein and into protein precipitated by anti-glutamine synthetase antibody, and by the fact that chloramphenicol leads to acceleration in the loss of aspartokinases I and III and promotes a net decrease in the level of glutamine synthetase and its cross-reactive protein. The loss of aspartokinases I and III in cell suspensions is stimulated by glucose and is inhibited by 2,4-dinitrophenol. Glucose also stimulates the loss of aspartokinases and glutamine synthetase in the presence of chloramphenicol. Cell-free extracts of K. aerogenes catalyze rapid inactivation of endogenous glutamine synthetase as well as exogenously added pure glutamine synthetase. This loss of glutamine synthetase is not associated with a loss of protein that cross-reacts with anti-glutamine synthetase antibodies. The inactivation of glutamine synthetase in extracts is not due to adenylylation. It is partially prevented by sulfhydryl reagents, Mn2+, antimycin A, 2,4-dinitrophenol, EDTA, anaerobiosis and by dialysis. Following 18 h dialysis, the capacity of extracts to catalyze inactivation of glutamine synthetase is lost but can be restored by the addition of Fe2+ (or Ni2+) together with ATP (or other nucleoside di- and triphosphates. After 40-60 h dialysis Fe3+ together with NADH (but

  20. Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and their connections to disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Gyu; Schimmel, Paul; Kim, Sunghoon

    2008-08-12

    Aminoacylation of transfer RNAs establishes the rules of the genetic code. The reactions are catalyzed by an ancient group of 20 enzymes (one for each amino acid) known as aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (AARSs). Surprisingly, the etiology of specific diseases-including cancer, neuronal pathologies, autoimmune disorders, and disrupted metabolic conditions-is connected to specific aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. These connections include heritable mutations in the genes for tRNA synthetases that are causally linked to disease, with both dominant and recessive disease-causing mutations being annotated. Because some disease-causing mutations do not affect aminoacylation activity or apparent enzyme stability, the mutations are believed to affect functions that are distinct from aminoacylation. Examples include enzymes that are secreted as procytokines that, after activation, operate in pathways connected to the immune system or angiogenesis. In addition, within cells, synthetases form multiprotein complexes with each other or with other regulatory factors and in that way control diverse signaling pathways. Although much has been uncovered in recent years, many novel functions, disease connections, and interpathway connections of tRNA synthetases have yet to be worked out.

  1. tRNA synthetase: tRNA Aminoacylation and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yan Ling Joy; Poruri, Kiranmai; Martinis, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are prominently known for their classic function in the first step of protein synthesis, where they bear the responsibility of setting the genetic code. Each enzyme is exquisitely adapted to covalently link a single standard amino acid to its cognate set of tRNA isoacceptors. These ancient enzymes have evolved idiosyncratically to host alternate activities that go far beyond their aminoacylation role and impact a wide range of other metabolic pathways and cell signaling processes. The family of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases have also been suggested as a remarkable scaffold to incorporate new domains that would drive evolution and the emergence of new organisms with more complex function. Because they are essential, the tRNA synthetases have served as pharmaceutical targets for drug and antibiotic development. The recent unfolding of novel important functions for this family of proteins offers new and promising pathways for therapeutic development to treat diverse human diseases. PMID:24706556

  2. Assignment of the cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase gene (CARS) to 11p15. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Cruzen, M.E.; Bengtsson, U.; McMahon, J.; Wasmuth, J.J.; Arfin, S.M. )

    1993-03-01

    The attachment of each of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids to their cognate tRNA isoaccepting families is catalyzed by a specific aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. The structural genes encoding 10 of these enzymes have been assigned to specific human chromosomes. The HARS, LARS, RARS, and TARS genes, encoding histidyl-, leucyl-, arginyl-, and threonyl-tRNA synthetases, respectively, are all located on chromosome 5( 1, 5, 7, 9, 14). The MARS (methionyl-tRNA synthetase), NARS (asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase), VARS (valyl-tRNA synthetase), and WARS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase) genes have been assigned to chromosomes 12, 18, 6, and 14, respectively (3, 4, 6, 8). A gene originally identified as encoding glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase was mapped to chromosome 1q32-q42 (10). However, a recent study suggests that the product of this gene is, in fact, a multifunctional enzyme with both glutamyl- and prolyl-tRNA synthetase activities (2). The fact that 4 of the 10 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes already mapped are located on chromosome 5 may be fortuitous but might also indicate an evolutionary or regulatory relatedness. It is therefore, of interest to map genes encoding other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to determine if additional examples of synteny exist. The recent isolation of cDNA and genomic DNA clones for human cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase has now enabled us to map the CARS gene to segment p15.5 on chromosome 11 by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

  3. The evolution of Class II Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and the first code.

    PubMed

    Smith, Temple F; Hartman, Hyman

    2015-11-30

    Class II Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are a set of very ancient multi domain proteins. The evolution of the catalytic domain of Class II synthetases can be reconstructed from three peptidyl-hairpins. Further evolution from this primordial catalytic core leads to a split of the Class II synthetases into two divisions potentially associated with the operational code. The earliest form of this code likely coded predominantly Glycine (Gly), Proline (Pro), Alanine (Ala) and "Lysine"/Aspartic acid (Lys/Asp). There is a paradox in these synthetases beginning with a hairpin structure before the Genetic Code existed. A resolution is found in the suggestion that the primordial Aminoacyl synthetases formed in a transition from a Thioester world to a Phosphate ester world. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions glutathione synthetase deficiency glutathione synthetase ...

  5. The C/ebp-Atf response element (CARE) location reveals two distinct Atf4-dependent, elongation-mediated mechanisms for transcriptional induction of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes in response to amino acid limitation.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jixiu; Zhang, Fan; Sharkey, Jason; Tang, Tiffany A; Örd, Tönis; Kilberg, Michael S

    2016-11-16

    The response to amino acid (AA) limitation of the entire aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) gene family revealed that 16/20 of the genes encoding cytoplasmic-localized enzymes are transcriptionally induced by activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4) via C/ebp-Atf-Response-Element (CARE) enhancers. In contrast, only 4/19 of the genes encoding mitochondrial-localized ARSs were weakly induced. Most of the activated genes have a functional CARE near the transcription start site (TSS), but for others the CARE is downstream. Regardless of the location of CARE enhancer, for all ARS genes there was constitutive association of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the general transcription machinery near the TSS. However, for those genes with a downstream CARE, Atf4, C/ebp-homology protein (Chop), Pol II and TATA-binding protein exhibited enhanced recruitment to the CARE during AA limitation. Increased Atf4 binding regulated the association of elongation factors at both the promoter and the enhancer regions, and inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9), that regulates these elongation factors, blocked induction of the AA-responsive ARS genes. Protein pull-down assays indicated that Atf4 directly interacts with CDK9 and its associated protein cyclin T1. The results demonstrate that AA availability modulates the ARS gene family through modulation of transcription elongation. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Identification of critical amino acid residues of Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase: definition of the ATP site involved in carboxy-phosphate formation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, W; Lim, A L; Powers-Lee, S G

    1997-08-15

    Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetases (CPSases) utilize two molecules of ATP at two homologous domains, B and C, with ATP(B) used to form the enzyme-bound intermediate carboxy-phosphate and ATP(C) used to phosphorylate the carbamate intermediate. To further define the role of one CPSase peptide suggested by affinity labeling studies to be near the ATP(B) site, we have carried out site-directed mutagenic analysis of peptide 234-242 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginine-specific CPSase. Mutants E234A, E234D, E236A, E236D and E238A were unable to complement the CPSase-deficient yeast strain LPL26 whereas mutants Y237A, E238D, R241K, R241E and R241P supported LPL26 growth as well as wild-type CPSase. Kinetic analysis of E234A and Y237A indicated impaired utilization of ATP(B) but not of ATP(C). D242A, a temperature-sensitive mutant, retained no detectable activity when assayed in vitro. These findings, together with the affinity labeling data and primary sequence analysis, strongly suggest that the yeast CPSase peptide 234-242 is located at the ATP(B) site and that some of its residues are important for functioning of the enzyme. D242 appears to occupy a critical structural position and E234, E236 and E238 appear to be critical for function, with the spatial arrangement of the carboxyl side chain also critical for E234 and E236.

  7. Recurrent Isolated Neonatal Hemolytic Anemia: Think About Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Signolet, Isabelle; Chenouard, Rachel; Oca, Florine; Barth, Magalie; Reynier, Pascal; Denis, Marie-Christine; Simard, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia (HA) of the newborn should be considered in cases of rapidly developing, severe, or persistent hyperbilirubinemia. Several causes of corpuscular hemolysis have been described, among which red blood cell enzyme defects are of particular concern. We report a rare case of red blood cell enzyme defect in a male infant, who presented during his first months of life with recurrent and isolated neonatal hemolysis. All main causes were ruled out. At 6.5 months of age, the patient presented with gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization; fortuitously, urine organic acid chromatography revealed a large peak of 5-oxoproline. Before the association between HA and 5-oxoprolinuria was noted, glutathione synthetase deficiency was suspected and confirmed by a low glutathione synthetase concentration and a collapse of glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes. Moreover, molecular diagnosis revealed 2 mutations in the glutathione synthetase gene: a previously reported missense mutation (c.[656A>G]; p.[Asp219Gly]) and a mutation not yet described in the binding site of the enzyme (c.[902T>C]; p.[Leu301Pro]). However, 15 days later, a control sample revealed no signs of 5-oxoprolinuria and the clinical history discovered administration of acetaminophen in the 48 hours before hospitalization. Thus, in this patient, acetaminophen exposure allowed the diagnosis of a mild form of glutathione synthetase deficiency, characterized by isolated HA. Early diagnosis is important because treatment with bicarbonate, vitamins C and E, and elimination of trigger factors are recommended to improve long-term outcomes. Glutathione synthetase deficiency should be screened for in cases of unexplained newborn HA. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L; Steitz, Thomas A; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-11-25

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNA(Pyl) have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate N(ε)-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNA(Pyl). Here, we examine an N(ε)-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids.

  9. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M.; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L.; Steitz, Thomas A.; O’Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNAPyl have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate Nε-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNAPyl. Here, we examine an Nε-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids. PMID:25385624

  10. Peptide Mapping of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Evidence for Internal Sequence Homology in Escherichia coli Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Waterson, Robert M.; Konigsberg, William H.

    1974-01-01

    Most aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases contain polypeptide chains of about either 50,000 or 100,000 daltons. Peptide mapping of tryptic, chymotryptic, or Staphylococcus aureus acid protease digests of seryl-tRNA synthetase (100,000, dimer) and leucyl-tRNA synthetase (100,000, monomer) from E. coli was done after selective modification of lysine residues with [14C]succinic anhydride or of methionine residues with [14C]iodoacetate. By use of thin-layer electrophoresis and chromatography on silicagel or cellulose plates followed by radioautography it was possible, depending upon the specific activity of the reagent used, to detect radioactive peptides obtained from as little as l μg of protein. Seryl-tRNA synthetase gave the correct number of tryptic peptides expected for a dimer of identical subunits. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase, on the other hand, gave roughly half the number of radioactive tryptic, chymotryptic, and acid protease peptides expected from the lysine, arginine, and methionine content of the 100,000 monomer. We have interpreted these results as indicating that extensive internal homology exists among lysine- and methionine-containing peptides within the leucyl-tRNA synthetase. The simplest conclusion that can be drawn from these observations is that the NH2- and COOH-terminal halves of leucyl-tRNA synthetase and perhaps other synthetases of 100,000 molecular weight may have evolved through a process of gene duplication and fusion, followed by limited diversification by way of amino-acid substitutions accumulating during evolution. Images PMID:4592690

  11. The C/ebp-Atf response element (CARE) location reveals two distinct Atf4-dependent, elongation-mediated mechanisms for transcriptional induction of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes in response to amino acid limitation

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jixiu; Zhang, Fan; Sharkey, Jason; Tang, Tiffany A.; Örd, Tönis; Kilberg, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The response to amino acid (AA) limitation of the entire aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) gene family revealed that 16/20 of the genes encoding cytoplasmic-localized enzymes are transcriptionally induced by activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4) via C/ebp-Atf-Response-Element (CARE) enhancers. In contrast, only 4/19 of the genes encoding mitochondrial-localized ARSs were weakly induced. Most of the activated genes have a functional CARE near the transcription start site (TSS), but for others the CARE is downstream. Regardless of the location of CARE enhancer, for all ARS genes there was constitutive association of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the general transcription machinery near the TSS. However, for those genes with a downstream CARE, Atf4, C/ebp-homology protein (Chop), Pol II and TATA-binding protein exhibited enhanced recruitment to the CARE during AA limitation. Increased Atf4 binding regulated the association of elongation factors at both the promoter and the enhancer regions, and inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9), that regulates these elongation factors, blocked induction of the AA-responsive ARS genes. Protein pull-down assays indicated that Atf4 directly interacts with CDK9 and its associated protein cyclin T1. The results demonstrate that AA availability modulates the ARS gene family through modulation of transcription elongation. PMID:27471030

  12. Effect of substrate concentration on inhibition of prostaglandin synthetase of bull seminal vesicles by anti-inflammatory drugs and fenamic acid analogs.

    PubMed

    Cushman, D W; Cheung, H S

    1976-03-26

    Although microsomes of bull seminal vesicle synthesize prostaglandins F2alpha, E2 and D2 from arachidonic acid under suitable assay conditions, prostaglandin E2 is the only significant product at either low concentration of arachidonic acid or high concentration of microsomes. Studies of inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis in vitro by anti-inflammatory drugs at both high (1 mM) and low (1 muM) concentrations of arachidonic acid, suggest three distinct mechanisms of inhibition. Benzydamine and flazalone are non-competitive or weakly competitive with arachidonic acid and, at high concentrations of arachidonic acid, they augment sythesis of prostaglandin E2 while inhibiting production of prostaglandins F2alpha and D2. Niflumic acid and the arylacetic acids naproxen and ibuprofen are competitive inhibiting all products equally, but with 100-500-fold greater potency at the low substrate concentration. The fenamic acids, indomethacin, aspirin, and phenylbutazone also inhibit equally all prostaglandin products, but are only 20--50 times more potent at the low substrate concentration. Studies with analogs of the fenamic acids indicate that the diphenylamine protion of their structure is essential for inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, whereas the o-carboxyl and m-alkul substitutents greatly enhance inhibitory potency.

  13. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason W.; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2015-10-20

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  14. Effects of polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors on S-adenosylmethionine synthetase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activities in carrot cell cultures

    Treesearch

    S.C. Minocha; R. Minocha; A. Komamine

    1991-01-01

    Changes in the activites of S-adcnosylmethionine (SAM) synthetase (methionine adenosyltransferase, EC 2.5.1.6.) and SAM decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.50) were studied in carrot (Daucus carota) cell cultures in response to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and several inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis. Activity of SAM synthetase increased...

  15. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA; Anderson, John Christopher [San Diego, CA; Chin, Jason W [San Diego, CA; Liu, David R [Lexington, MA; Magliery, Thomas J [North Haven, CT; Meggers, Eric L [Philadelphia, PA; Mehl, Ryan Aaron [San Diego, CA; Pastrnak, Miro [San Diego, CA; Santoro, Stephen William [San Diego, CA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2012-05-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  16. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2006-08-01

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  17. A Rationally Engineered Misacylating Aminoacyl-Trna Synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, T.L.; Rodriguez-Hernandez, A.; Corigliano, E.M.; Perona, J.J.

    2009-05-12

    Information transfer from nucleic acid to protein is mediated by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which catalyze the specific pairings of amino acids with transfer RNAs. Despite copious sequence and structural information on the 22 tRNA synthetase families, little is known of the enzyme signatures that specify amino acid selectivities. Here, we show that transplanting a conserved arginine residue from glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS) to glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) improves the K{sub M} of GlnRS for noncognate glutamate. Two crystal structures of this C229R GlnRS mutant reveal that a conserved twin-arginine GluRS amino acid identity signature cannot be incorporated into GlnRS without disrupting surrounding protein structural elements that interact with the tRNA. Consistent with these findings, we show that cumulative replacement of other primary binding site residues in GlnRS, with those of GluRS, only slightly improves the ability of the GlnRS active site to accommodate glutamate. However, introduction of 22 amino acid replacements and one deletion, including substitution of the entire primary binding site and two surface loops adjacent to the region disrupted in C229R, improves the capacity of Escherichia coli GlnRS to synthesize misacylated Glu-tRNA{sup Gln} by 16,000-fold. This hybrid enzyme recapitulates the function of misacylating GluRS enzymes found in organisms that synthesize Gln-tRNA{sup Gln} by an alternative pathway. These findings implicate the RNA component of the contemporary GlnRS-tRNA{sup Gln} complex in mediating amino acid specificity. This role for tRNA may persist as a relic of primordial cells in which the evolution of the genetic code was driven by RNA-catalyzed amino acid-RNA pairing.

  18. Crystal structure of the archaeal asparagine synthetase: interrelation with aspartyl-tRNA and asparaginyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Mickaël; Fréchin, Mathieu; Oliéric, Vincent; Charron, Christophe; Sauter, Claude; Lorber, Bernard; Roy, Hervé; Kern, Daniel

    2011-09-23

    Asparagine synthetase A (AsnA) catalyzes asparagine synthesis using aspartate, ATP, and ammonia as substrates. Asparagine is formed in two steps: the β-carboxylate group of aspartate is first activated by ATP to form an aminoacyl-AMP before its amidation by a nucleophilic attack with an ammonium ion. Interestingly, this mechanism of amino acid activation resembles that used by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which first activate the α-carboxylate group of the amino acid to form also an aminoacyl-AMP before they transfer the activated amino acid onto the cognate tRNA. In a previous investigation, we have shown that the open reading frame of Pyrococcus abyssi annotated as asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) 2 is, in fact, an archaeal asparagine synthetase A (AS-AR) that evolved from an ancestral aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (AspRS). We present here the crystal structure of this AS-AR. The fold of this protein is similar to that of bacterial AsnA and resembles the catalytic cores of AspRS and AsnRS. The high-resolution structures of AS-AR associated with its substrates and end-products help to understand the reaction mechanism of asparagine formation and release. A comparison of the catalytic core of AS-AR with those of archaeal AspRS and AsnRS and with that of bacterial AsnA reveals a strong conservation. This study uncovers how the active site of the ancestral AspRS rearranged throughout evolution to transform an enzyme activating the α-carboxylate group into an enzyme that is able to activate the β-carboxylate group of aspartate, which can react with ammonia instead of tRNA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Clone and functional analysis of Seryl-tRNA synthetase and Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingsheng; Tian, Jianghai; Li, Fanchi; Xue, Bin; Hu, Jiahuan; Cheng, Xiaoyu; Li, Jinxin; Shen, Weide; Li, Bing

    2017-01-30

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are the key enzymes for protein synthesis. Glycine, alanine, serine and tyrosine are the major amino acids composing fibroin of silkworm. Among them, the genes of alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) and glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) have been cloned. In this study, the seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS) and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) genes from silkworm were cloned. Their full length are 1709 bp and 1868 bp and contain open reading frame (ORF) of 1485 bp and 1575 bp, respectively. RT-PCR examination showed that the transcription levels of SerRS, TyrRS, AlaRS and GlyRS are significantly higher in silk gland than in other tissues. In addition, their transcription levels are much higher in middle and posterior silk gland than in anterior silk gland. Moreover, treatment of silkworms with phoxim, an inhibitor of silk protein synthesis, but not TiO2 NP, an enhancer of silk protein synthesis, significantly reduced the transcription levels of aaRS and content of free amino acids in posterior silk gland, therefore affecting silk protein synthesis, which may be the mechanism of phoxim-silking disorders. Furthermore, low concentration of TiO2 NPs showed no effect on the transcription of aaRS and content of free amino acids, suggesting that TiO2 NPs promotes silk protein synthesis possibly by increasing the activity of fibroin synthase in silkworm.

  20. Clone and functional analysis of Seryl-tRNA synthetase and Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jingsheng; Tian, Jianghai; Li, Fanchi; Xue, Bin; Hu, Jiahuan; Cheng, Xiaoyu; Li, Jinxin; Shen, Weide; Li, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are the key enzymes for protein synthesis. Glycine, alanine, serine and tyrosine are the major amino acids composing fibroin of silkworm. Among them, the genes of alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) and glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) have been cloned. In this study, the seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS) and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) genes from silkworm were cloned. Their full length are 1709 bp and 1868 bp and contain open reading frame (ORF) of 1485 bp and 1575 bp, respectively. RT-PCR examination showed that the transcription levels of SerRS, TyrRS, AlaRS and GlyRS are significantly higher in silk gland than in other tissues. In addition, their transcription levels are much higher in middle and posterior silk gland than in anterior silk gland. Moreover, treatment of silkworms with phoxim, an inhibitor of silk protein synthesis, but not TiO2 NP, an enhancer of silk protein synthesis, significantly reduced the transcription levels of aaRS and content of free amino acids in posterior silk gland, therefore affecting silk protein synthesis, which may be the mechanism of phoxim-silking disorders. Furthermore, low concentration of TiO2 NPs showed no effect on the transcription of aaRS and content of free amino acids, suggesting that TiO2 NPs promotes silk protein synthesis possibly by increasing the activity of fibroin synthase in silkworm. PMID:28134300

  1. Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase, an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase for genetic code expansion

    PubMed Central

    Crnković, Ana; Suzuki, Tateki; Söll, Dieter; Reynolds, Noah M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic code expansion (GCE) has become a central topic of synthetic biology. GCE relies on engineered aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and a cognate tRNA species to allow codon reassignment by co-translational insertion of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. Introduction of such amino acids increases the chemical diversity of recombinant proteins endowing them with novel properties. Such proteins serve in sophisticated biochemical and biophysical studies both in vitro and in vivo, they may become unique biomaterials or therapeutic agents, and they afford metabolic dependence of genetically modified organisms for biocontainment purposes. In the Methanosarcinaceae the incorporation of the 22nd genetically encoded amino acid, pyrrolysine (Pyl), is facilitated by pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and the cognate UAG-recognizing tRNAPyl. This unique aaRS•tRNA pair functions as an orthogonal translation system (OTS) in most model organisms. The facile directed evolution of the large PylRS active site to accommodate many ncAAs, and the enzyme’s anticodon-blind specific recognition of the cognate tRNAPyl make this system highly amenable for GCE purposes. The remarkable polyspecificity of PylRS has been exploited to incorporate >100 different ncAAs into proteins. Here we review the Pyl-OT system and selected GCE applications to examine the properties of an effective OTS. PMID:28239189

  2. Expression of glutamine synthetase in the mouse kidney: localization in multiple epithelial cell types and differential regulation by hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Verlander, Jill W; Chu, Diana; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I David

    2013-09-01

    Renal glutamine synthetase catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ with glutamate, forming glutamine and decreasing the ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine glutamine synthetase's specific cellular expression in the mouse kidney and its regulation by hypokalemia, a common cause of altered renal ammonia metabolism. Glutamine synthetase mRNA and protein were present in the renal cortex and in both the outer and inner stripes of the outer medulla. Immunohistochemistry showed glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in nonproximal tubule cells. Double immunolabel with cell-specific markers demonstrated glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells, non-A, non-B intercalated cells, and distal convoluted tubule cells, but not in principal cells, type B intercalated cells, or connecting segment cells. Hypokalemia induced by feeding a nominally K+ -free diet for 12 days decreased glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in the distal convoluted tubule and simultaneously increased glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells in both the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct. We conclude that glutamine synthetase is widely and specifically expressed in renal epithelial cells and that the regulation of expression differs in specific cell populations. Glutamine synthetase is likely to mediate an important role in renal ammonia metabolism.

  3. Homology modeling and molecular docking studies of Bacillomycin and Iturin synthetases with novel ligands for the production of therapeutic lipopeptides.

    PubMed

    Eswari, Jujjavarapu Satya; Dhagat, Swasti; Kaser, Shubham; Tiwari, Anoop

    2017-08-15

    Lipopeptide synthetases play an important role in the production of lipopeptides. Lipopeptides are molecules made up of peptides and fatty acid moieties and have shown to have a broad range of antimicrobial activity. As infectious diseases have caused severe health problems mainly resulting from the development of antibiotic resistant strains of disease causing microorganisms there is a need of alternatives to antibiotics. The lipopeptide synthetase of the corresponding lipopeptides can be used as templates to design these as drugs using computational techniques. The objective of this study was homology modeling and molecular docking of two lipopeptide synthetases, bacillomycin D synthetase and iturin A synthetase, with their ligands as a means of drug design. Schrödinger software was used for homology modeling and molecular docking. After the identification of ligands, molecular docking of these ligands with the lipopeptide (bacillomycin and iturin) synthetases was performed. The docking was tested on the parameters of docking score and glide energy. 5 out of 21 ligands were found to dock with bacillomycin D synthetase whereas 8 out of 20 ligands docked with the iturin A synthetase. The knowledge of the docking sites and docking characteristics of the lipopeptide synthetases mentioned in the paper with the ligands can provide advantages of high speed and reliability, reduced costs on chemicals and experiments and the ethical issues concerned with the use of animal models for screening of drug toxicity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Expression of glutamine synthetase in the mouse kidney: localization in multiple epithelial cell types and differential regulation by hypokalemia

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Diana; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Handlogten, Mary E.; Weiner, I. David

    2013-01-01

    Renal glutamine synthetase catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ with glutamate, forming glutamine and decreasing the ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine glutamine synthetase's specific cellular expression in the mouse kidney and its regulation by hypokalemia, a common cause of altered renal ammonia metabolism. Glutamine synthetase mRNA and protein were present in the renal cortex and in both the outer and inner stripes of the outer medulla. Immunohistochemistry showed glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in nonproximal tubule cells. Double immunolabel with cell-specific markers demonstrated glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells, non-A, non-B intercalated cells, and distal convoluted tubule cells, but not in principal cells, type B intercalated cells, or connecting segment cells. Hypokalemia induced by feeding a nominally K+-free diet for 12 days decreased glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in the distal convoluted tubule and simultaneously increased glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells in both the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct. We conclude that glutamine synthetase is widely and specifically expressed in renal epithelial cells and that the regulation of expression differs in specific cell populations. Glutamine synthetase is likely to mediate an important role in renal ammonia metabolism. PMID:23804452

  5. Purification and properties of the dihydrofolate synthetase from Serratia indica.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, M; Kazuo, I

    1976-01-01

    The dihydrofolate synthetase (EC 6.3.2.12) responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of dihydrofolic acid from dihydropteroic acid and L-glutamic acid was purified about 130-fold from extracts of Serratia indica IFO 3759 by ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography, Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, and DEAE-cellulose column chromatography. The enzyme preparation obtained was shown to be homogeneous by DEAE-cellulose column chromatography and ultracentrifugal analysis. The sedimentation coefficient of this enzyme was 3.9 S, and the molecular weight was determined to be about 47,000 by Sephadex G-100. The optimum pH for the reaction was 9.0. The enzymatic reaction required dihydropteroate, L-glutamate and ATP as substrates, and Mg2+ and K+ as cofactors. gamma-L-Glutamyl-L-glutamic acid cannot replace L-glutamic acid as the substrate. Neither pteroic acid nor tetrahydropteroic acid can be used as the substrate. ATP was partially replaced by ITP or GTP. The enzyme reaction was inhibited by the addition of AD, but not by AMP. One mole of dihydrofolate, 1 mole of ADP and 1 mole of orthophosphate were produced from each 1 mole of dihydropteroic acid, L-glutamic acid, and ATP by the following equation: 7,8-Dihydropteroic acid ml-Glutamic acid matp Mg2+, K+ leads to Dihydrofolic acid + ADP + Pi. These results suggest that the systematic name for the dihydrofolate synthetase is 7,8-dihydropteroate: L-glutamate ligase (ADP).

  6. Abscisic acid, H2O2 and nitric oxide interactions mediated cold-induced S-adenosylmethionine synthetase in Medicago sativa subsp. falcata that confers cold tolerance through up-regulating polyamine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenfei; Tan, Jiali; Zhuo, Chunliu; Wang, Congying; Xiang, Bin; Wang, Zengyu

    2014-06-01

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) is the key enzyme catalysing the formation of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a precursor of polyamines and ethylene. To investigate the potential role of SAMS in cold tolerance, we isolated MfSAMS1 from the cold-tolerant germplasm Medicago sativa subsp. falcata and analysed the association of SAM-derived polyamines with cold tolerance. The expression of MfSAMS1 in leaves was greatly induced by cold, abscisic acid (ABA), H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). Our data revealed that ABA, H2O2 and NO interactions mediated the cold-induced MfSAMS1 expression and cold acclimation in falcata. SAM, putrescine, spermidine and spermine levels, ethylene production and polyamine oxidation were sequentially altered in response to cold, indicating that SAMS-derived SAM is preferentially used in polyamine synthesis and homeostasis during cold acclimation. Antioxidant enzyme activities were also induced in response to cold and showed correlation with polyamine oxidation. Overexpression of MfSAMS1 in tobacco resulted in elevated SAM levels, but polyamine levels and ethylene production in the transgenic plants were not significantly changed. Compared to the wild type, transgenic plants had increased levels of apoplastic H2O2, higher transcript levels of genes involved in polyamine synthesis and oxidation, and higher activities of polyamine oxidation and antioxidant enzymes. The results showed that overexpression of MfSAMS1 promoted polyamine synthesis and oxidation, which in turn improved H2 O2 -induced antioxidant protection, as a result enhanced tolerance to freezing and chilling stress in transgenic plants. This is the first report demonstrating that SAMS plays an important role in plant tolerance to cold via up-regulating polyamine oxidation. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Hepatocytes explanted in the spleen preferentially express carbamoylphosphate synthetase rather than glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Lamers, W H; Been, W; Charles, R; Moorman, A F

    1990-10-01

    Urea cycle enzymes and glutamine synthetase are essential for NH3 detoxification and systemic pH homeostasis in mammals. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase, the first and flux-determining enzyme of the cycle, is found only in a large periportal compartment, and glutamine synthetase is found only in a small, complementary pericentral compartment. Because it is not possible to manipulate experimentally the intrahepatic distribution of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and glutamine synthetase, we looked for conditions in which explanted hepatocytes would exhibit either the carbamoylphosphate synthetase phenotype or glutamine synthetase phenotype. In the spleen hepatocytes either settle as individual cells or in small agglomerates. The dispersed cells only express the carbamoylphosphate synthetase phenotype. Within the agglomerates, sinusoids that drain on venules develop. Hepatocytes surrounding the venules stain only weakly for carbamoylphosphate synthetase but are strongly positive for glutamine synthetase. These observations were made for explanted embryonic hepatocytes (no prior expression of either carbamoylphosphate synthetase or glutamine synthetase), neonatal hepatocytes (compartments of gene expression not yet established) and adult periportal and pericentral hepatocytes.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency is an inherited disorder that ...

  9. Dietary lipid levels impact lipoprotein lipase, hormone-sensitive lipase, and fatty acid synthetase gene expression in three tissues of adult GIFT strain of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Tian, Juan; Wu, Fan; Yang, Chang-Geng; Jiang, Ming; Liu, Wei; Wen, Hua

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of dietary lipids on growth performance, body composition, serum parameters, and expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism in adult genetically improved farmed tilapia (GIFT strain) of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. We randomly assigned adult male Nile tilapia (average initial body weight = 220.00 ± 9.54 g) into six groups consisting of four replicates (20 fish per replicate). Fish in each group were hand-fed a semi-purified diets containing different lipid levels [3.3 (the control group), 28.4, 51.4, 75.4, 101.9, and 124.1 g kg(-1)] for 8 weeks. The results indicated that there was no obvious effect in feeding rate among all groups (P > 0.05). The highest weight gain, specific growth rate, and protein efficiency ratio in 75.4 g kg(-1) diet group were increased by 23.31, 16.17, and 22.02 % than that of fish in the control group (P < 0.05). Protein retention ratio was highest in 51.4 g kg(-1) diet group. The results revealed that the optimum dietary lipid level for maximum growth performance is 76.6-87.9 g kg(-1). Increasing dietary lipid levels contributed to increased tissue and whole body lipid levels. Saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) decreased, and polyunsaturated fatty acids increased with increasing dietary lipid levels. With the exception of MUFAs, the fatty acid profiles of liver and muscle were similar. Dietary lipid levels were negatively correlated with low-density lipoprotein- cholesterol content and positively with triacylglycerol and glucose contents. In the lipid-fed groups, there was a significant down-regulation of fatty acid synthase (FAS) mRNA in liver, muscle, and visceral adipose tissues. There was a rapid up-regulation of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mRNA in muscle and liver with increasing dietary lipid levels. In visceral adipose tissue, LPL mRNA was significantly down-regulated in the lipid-fed groups. Dietary lipids increased hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) m

  10. Preparation and cross-reactivity of anti-avian glutamine synthetase antibody.

    PubMed

    Smith, D D; Vorhaben, J E; Campbell, J W

    1983-04-01

    Rabbit antibody to chicken liver mitochondrial glutamine synthetase was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography for analysis of the immunological relatedness of vertebrate glutamine synthetases. The antibody cross-reacted with enzymes from representatives of all five vertebrate classes, indicating a high degree of evolutionary conservatism in the structure of the enzymes. A unique aspect of the immunological similarity of these enzymes is that it exists between cytosolic and mitochondrial enzymes which are, in general, immunologically distinct. The antibody did not cross-react with two insect glutamine synthetases. Compositional difference indices, calculated from the amino acid compositions of glutamine synthetases from several species, gave a mean estimate of over 80% sequence homology for the vertebrate enzymes. The avian mitochondrial enzyme gave a mean 78% homology with the mammalian cytosolic enzyme.

  11. Functional expansion of human tRNA synthetases achieved by structural inventions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-01-01

    Known as an essential component of the translational apparatus, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase family catalyzes the first step reaction in protein synthesis, that is, to specifically attach each amino acid to its cognate tRNA. While preserving this essential role, tRNA synthetases developed other roles during evolution. Human tRNA synthetases, in particular, have diverse functions in different pathways involving angiogenesis, inflammation and apoptosis. The functional diversity is further illustrated in the association with various diseases through genetic mutations that do not affect aminoacylation or protein synthesis. Here we review the accumulated knowledge on how human tRNA synthetases used structural inventions to achieve functional expansions. PMID:19932696

  12. Inhibition of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase by sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y L; Hossler, P A; Calhoun, D H; Meshnick, S R

    1995-08-01

    Forty-four sulfa drugs were screened against crude preparations of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) for p-aminobenzoic acid and 7,8-dihydro-6-hydroxymethylpterin pyrophosphate were 0.34 +/- 0.02 and 2.50 +/- 0.71 microM, respectively. Several sulfa drugs, including sulfathiazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, and sulfathiourea, inhibited dihydropteroate synthetase approximately as well as sulfamethoxazole, as determined by the concentrations which cause 50% inhibition and/or by Ki. For all sulfones and sulfonamides tested, unsubstituted p-amino groups were necessary for activity, and sulfonamides containing an N1-heterocyclic substituent were found to be the most effective inhibitors. Folate biosynthesis in isolated intact P. carinii was approximately equally sensitive to inhibition by sulfamethoxazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfisoxazole, and sulfathiazole. Two of these drugs, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfisoxazole, are known to be less toxic than sulfamethoxazole and should be further evaluated for the treatment of P. carinii pneumonia.

  13. Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Complexes in Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mirande, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are essential enzymes for interpreting the genetic code. They are responsible for the proper pairing of codons on mRNA with amino acids. In addition to this canonical, translational function, they are also involved in the control of many cellular pathways essential for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Association of several of these enzymes within supramolecular assemblies is a key feature of organization of the translation apparatus in eukaryotes. It could be a means to control their oscillation between translational functions, when associated within a multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex (MARS), and nontranslational functions, after dissociation from the MARS and association with other partners. In this review, we summarize the composition of the different MARS described from archaea to mammals, the mode of assembly of these complexes, and their roles in maintenance of cellular homeostasis. PMID:25807264

  14. Pyrrolysyl-tRNA Synthetase: an ordinary enzyme but an outstanding genetic code expansion tool

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Wei; Tharp, Jeffery M.; Liu, Wenshe R.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic incorporation of the 22nd proteinogenic amino acid, pyrolysine (Pyl) at amber codon is achieved by the action of pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) together with its cognate tRNAPyl. Unlike most aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, PylRS displays high substrate side chain promiscuity, low selectivity toward its substrate α-amine, and low selectivity toward the anticodon of tRNAPyl. These unique but ordinary features of PylRS as an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase allow the Pyl incorporation machinery to be easily engineered for the genetic incorporation of more than 100 non-canonical amino acids (NCAAs) or α-hydroxy acids into proteins at amber codon and the reassignment of other codons such as ochre UAA, opal UGA, and four-base AGGA codons to code NCAAs. PMID:24631543

  15. Mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2008-05-01

    Acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes are essential for de novo lipid synthesis, fatty acid catabolism, and remodeling of membranes. Activation of fatty acids requires a two-step reaction catalyzed by these enzymes. In the first step, an acyl-AMP intermediate is formed from ATP. AMP is then exchanged with CoA to produce the activated acyl-CoA. The release of AMP in this reaction defines the superfamily of AMP-forming enzymes. The length of the carbon chain of the fatty acid species defines the substrate specificity for the different acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). On this basis, five sub-families of ACS have been characterized. The purpose of this review is to report on the large family of mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL), which activate fatty acids with chain lengths of 12 to 20 carbon atoms. Five genes and several isoforms generated by alternative splicing have been identified and limited information is available on their localization. The structure of these membrane proteins has not been solved for the mammalian ACSLs but homology to a bacterial form, whose structure has been determined, points at specific structural features that are important for these enzymes across species. The bacterial form acts as a dimer and has a conserved short motif, called the fatty acid Gate domain, that seems to determine substrate specificity. We will discuss the characterization and identification of the different spliced isoforms, draw attention to the inconsistencies and errors in their annotations, and their cellular localizations. These membrane proteins act on membrane-bound substrates probably as homo- and as heterodimer complexes but have often been expressed as single recombinant isoforms, apparently purified as monomers and tested in Triton X-100 micelles. We will argue that such studies have failed to provide an accurate assessment of the activity and of the distinct function of these enzymes in mammalian cells.

  16. Identification of the glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase of Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Van Dommelen, Anne; Spaepen, Stijn; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2009-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is strictly regulated. One means of regulation is the modulation of activity through adenylylation catalyzed by adenylyltransferases. Using PCR primers based on conserved sequences in glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferases, we amplified part of the glnE gene of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7. The complete glnE sequence of A. brasilense Sp245 was retrieved from the draft genome sequence of this organism (http://genomics.ornl.gov/research/azo/). Adenylyltransferase is a bifunctional enzyme consisting of an N-terminal domain responsible for deadenylylation activity and a C-terminal domain responsible for adenylylation activity. Both domains are partially homologous to each other. Residues important for catalytic activity were present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the A. brasilense Sp245 glnE sequence. A glnE mutant was constructed in A. brasilense Sp7 by inserting a kanamycin resistance cassette between the two active domains of the enzyme. The resulting mutant was unable to adenylylate the glutamine synthetase enzyme and was impaired in growth when shifted from nitrogen-poor to nitrogen-rich medium.

  17. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-04-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover.

  18. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-01-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover. Images PMID:6113590

  19. Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in human disease.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Svetlana; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2013-04-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mtARSs) are essential in the process of transferring genetic information from mitochondrial DNA to the complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These synthetases perform an integral step in the initiation of mitochondrial protein synthesis by charging tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. All mtARSs are encoded by nuclear genes, nine of which have recently been described as disease genes for mitochondrial disorders. Unexpectedly, the clinical presentations of these diseases are highly specific to the affected synthetase. Encephalopathy is the most common manifestation but again with gene-specific outcomes. Other clinical presentations include myopathy with anemia, cardiomyopathy, tubulopathy and hearing loss with female ovarian dysgenesis. Here we review the described mutation types and the associated patient phenotypes. The identified mutation spectrum suggests that only mutation types that allow some residual tRNA-charging activity can result in the described mtARS diseases but the molecular mechanisms behind the selective tissue involvement are not currently understood.

  20. Spectrophotometric studies of acyl-coenzyme A synthetases of rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Garland, P. B.; Yates, D. W.; Haddock, B. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. Deca-2,4,6,8-tetraenoic acid is a substrate for both ATP-specific (EC 6.2.1.2 or 3) and GTP-specific (EC 6.2.1.–) acyl-CoA synthetases of rat liver mitochondria. The enzymic synthesis of decatetraenoyl-CoA results in new spectral characteristics. The difference spectrum for the acyl-CoA minus free acid has a maximum at 376nm with εmM 34. Isosbestic points are at 345nm and 440nm. 2. The acylation of CoA by decatetraenoate in mitochondrial suspensions can be continuously measured with a dual-wavelength spectrophotometer. 3. By using this technique, three distinct types of acyl-CoA synthetase activity were demonstrated in rat liver mitochondria. One of these utilized added CoA and ATP, required added Mg2+ and corresponded to a previously described `external' acyl-CoA synthetase. The other two acyl-CoA synthetase activities utilized intramitochondrial CoA and did not require added Mg2+. Of these two `internal' acyl-CoA synthetases, one was insensitive to uncoupling agents, was inhibited by phosphate or arsenate, and corresponded to the GTP-specific enzyme. The other corresponded to the ATP-specific enzyme. 4. Atractylate inhibited the activity of the two internal acyl-CoA synthetases only when the energy source was added ATP. 5. The amount of intramitochondrial CoA acylated by decatetraenoate was independent of whether the internal ATP-specific or GTP-specific acyl-CoA synthetase was active. It is concluded that these two internal acyl-CoA synthetases have access to the same intramitochondrial pool of CoA. 6. The amount of intramitochondrial CoA that could be acylated with decatetraenoate was decreased by the addition of palmitoyl-dl-carnitine, 2-oxoglutarate, or pyruvate. These observations indicated that pyruvate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.4.1), oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.4.2), carnitine palmitoyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.–), citrate synthase (EC 4.1.3.7), and succinyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.2.1.4) all have access to the same intramitochondrial pool of CoA as do

  1. Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Tsai, Fong-Ying

    1993-10-26

    The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

  2. Phosphorylation of human CTP synthetase 1 by protein kinase C: identification of Ser(462) and Thr(455) as major sites of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Fang; Martin, Shelley S; Baldwin, Enoch P; Carman, George M

    2007-06-15

    Phosphorylation of human CTP synthetase 1 by mammalian protein kinase C was examined. Using purified Escherichia coli-expressed CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was time- and dose-dependent and dependent on the concentrations of ATP and CTP synthetase 1. The protein kinase C phosphorylation of the recombinant enzyme was accompanied by a 95-fold increase in CTP synthetase 1 activity. Phosphopeptide mapping and phosphoamino acid analyses showed that CTP synthetase 1 was phosphorylated on multiple serine and threonine residues. The induction of PKC1(R398A)-encoded protein kinase C resulted in a 50% increase for human CTP synthetase 1 phosphorylation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Delta ura8Delta mutant lacking yeast CTP synthetase activity. Synthetic peptides that contain the protein kinase C motif for Ser(462) and Thr(455) were substrates for mammalian protein kinase C, and S462A and T455A mutations resulted in decreases in the extent of CTP synthetase 1 phosphorylation that occurred in vivo. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of S. cerevisiae-expressed CTP synthetase 1 mutant enzymes phosphorylated with mammalian protein kinase C confirmed that Ser(462) and Thr(455) were phosphorylation sites. The S. cerevisiae-expressed and purified S462A mutant enzyme exhibited a 2-fold reduction in CTP synthetase 1 activity, whereas the purified T455A mutant enzyme exhibited a 2-fold elevation in CTP synthetase 1 activity (Choi, M.-G., and Carman, G.M. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 5367-5377). These data indicated that protein kinase C phosphorylation at Ser(462) stimulates human CTP synthetase 1 activity, whereas phosphorylation at Thr(455) inhibits activity.

  3. Phosphorylation of Human CTP Synthetase 1 by Protein Kinase C IDENTIFICATION OF Ser462 AND Thr455 AS MAJOR SITES OF PHOSPHORYLATION*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Fang; Martin, Shelley S.; Baldwin, Enoch P.; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphorylation of human CTP synthetase 1 by mammalian protein kinase C was examined. Using purified Escherichia coli-expressed CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was time-and dose-dependent, and dependent on the concentrations of ATP and CTP synthetase 1. The protein kinase C phosphorylation of the recombinant enzyme was accompanied by a 95-fold increase in CTP synthetase 1 activity. Phosphopeptide mapping and phosphoamino acid analyses showed that CTP synthetase 1 was phosphorylated on multiple serine and threonine residues. The induction of PKC1R398A-encoded protein kinase C resulted in a 50% increase for human CTP synthetase 1 phosphorylation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ mutant lacking yeast CTP synthetase activity. Synthetic peptides that contain the protein kinase C motif for Ser462 and Thr455 were substrates for mammalian protein kinase C, and S462A and T455A mutations resulted in decreases in the extent of CTP synthetase 1 phosphorylation that occurred in vivo. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of S. cerevisiae-expressed CTP synthetase 1 mutant enzymes phosphorylated with mammalian protein kinase C confirmed that Ser462 and Thr455 were phosphorylation sites. The S. cerevisiae-expressed and purified S462A mutant enzyme exhibited a 2-fold reduction in CTP synthetase 1 activity, whereas the purified T455A mutant enzyme exhibits a 2-fold elevation in CTP synthetase 1 activity (Choi, M.-G., and Carman, G.M. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 5367–5377). These data indicated that protein kinase C phosphorylation at Ser462 stimulates human CTP synthetase 1 activity, whereas phosphorylation at Thr455 inhibits activity. PMID:17463002

  4. Interdomain and Intermodule Organization in Epimerization Domain Containing Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hung; Li, Kunhua; Guntaka, Naga Sandhya; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-08-19

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases are large, complex multidomain enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of a wide range of peptidic natural products. Inherent to synthetase chemistry is the thioester templated mechanism that relies on protein/protein interactions and interdomain dynamics. Several questions related to structure and mechanism remain to be addressed, including the incorporation of accessory domains and intermodule interactions. The inclusion of nonproteinogenic d-amino acids into peptide frameworks is a common and important modification for bioactive nonribosomal peptides. Epimerization domains, embedded in nonribosomal peptide synthetases assembly lines, catalyze the l- to d-amino acid conversion. Here we report the structure of the epimerization domain/peptidyl carrier protein didomain construct from the first module of the cyclic peptide antibiotic gramicidin synthetase. Both holo (phosphopantethiene post-translationally modified) and apo structures were determined, each representing catalytically relevant conformations of the two domains. The structures provide insight into domain-domain recognition, substrate delivery during the assembly line process, in addition to the structural organization of homologous condensation domains, canonical players in all synthetase modules.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... use of biotin, a B vitamin found in foods such as liver, egg yolks, and milk. Holocarboxylase synthetase attaches biotin to certain enzymes that are essential for the normal production and breakdown of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates in ...

  6. Covalent aspartylation of aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from Bakers' yeast by its cognat aspartyl adenylate: identification of the labeled residues

    SciTech Connect

    Mejdoub, H.; Kern, D.; Giege, R.; Ebel, J.P.; Boulanger, Y.; Reinbolt, J.

    1987-04-07

    Aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from bakers' yeast gives an unstable complex with the cognate adenylate, which reacts after dissociation with amino acid side chains of the protein. This leads to a covalent incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-aspartic acid into aspartyl-tRNA synthetase via amide or ester bonds formed between the ..cap alpha..-carboxyl group of activated aspartic acid and accessible lysines, serines, and threonines. This property is used to label the peptides at the surface of the enzyme. The main labeled residues have been identified, and their location in the primary structure is discussed in relation to structural properties of aspartyl-tRNA synthetase.

  7. Chemical modification of E. coli glutamine synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    DiIanni, C.L.; Colanduoni, J.A.; Collins, R.; Villafranca, J.J.

    1986-05-01

    Thiourea trioxide partially inactivates E. coli glutamine synthetase (GS) (approx.25%) by reacting only with lysine residues, producing homoarginine. Thiourea dioxide totally inactivates GS by reacting with both lysine and histidine residues. The K/sub m/ values for thiourea trioxide modified enzyme are 0.21 mM for ATP and 10 mM for glutamate which are about threefold higher than for native GS. Using (/sup 14/C) thiourea trioxide, 2.3 +/- 0.2 moles of reagent were incorporated per monomer. The same number of homoarginine residues were found by amino acid analysis. Modification of GS with hydroxylamine results in total inactivation resulting from reaction with histidine. Fluorescence titrations indicate that substrate binding to the modified enzyme is weaker than to the native enzyme. EPR spectra of bound Mn/sup 2 +/ indicate that metal ion binding is unaffected by hydroxylamine modification. However, metal ion binding is weaker to the modified enzyme. Protection from hydroxylamine inactivation is observed with ATP + Glutamate, AMPPNP + Glutamate, and MgCl/sub 2/.

  8. Enhanced sialylation of recombinant erythropoietin in genetically engineered Chinese-hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yeon Tae; Choi, One; Son, Young Dok; Park, Seung Yeol; Kim, Jung Hoe

    2009-04-01

    Sialic acid, the terminal sugar in N-linked complex glycans, is usually found in glycoproteins and plays a major role in determining the circulatory lifespan of glycoproteins. In the present study we attempted to enhance the sialylation of recombinant EPO (erythropoietin) in CHO (Chinese-hamster ovary) cells. To enhance EPO sialylation, we introduced human alpha2,3-ST (alpha2,3-sialyltransferase) and CMP-SAS (CMP-sialic acid synthase) into recombinant human EPO-producing CHO cells. The sialylation of EPO was increased by the expression of alpha2,3-ST alone. Although the co-expression of alpha2,3-ST and CMP-SAS did not further increase sialylation, an increase in the intracellular pool of CMP-sialic acid was noted. On the basis of these observations, it was postulated that the transport capacity of CMP-sialic acid into the Golgi lumen was limited, thereby causing the reduced availability of CMP-sialic acid substrate for sialylation. Therefore, we co-expressed human alpha2,3-ST and CMP-SAS, as well as overexpress Chinese hamster CMP-sialic acid transporter (CMP-SAT) in CHO cells, which produced recombinant human EPO. When alpha2,3-ST, CMP-SAS, and CMP-SAT were overexpressed in CHO cells, there was a corresponding increase in sialylation compared with the co-expression of alpha2,3-ST and CMP-SAS. The present study provides a useful strategy for enhancing the sialylation of therapeutic glycoproteins produced in CHO cells.

  9. Effect of single base substitutions at glycine-870 codon of gramicidin S synthetase 2 gene on proline activation.

    PubMed

    Tokita, K; Hori, K; Kurotsu, T; Kanda, M; Saito, Y

    1993-10-01

    The mutant gene coding for a proline-activating domain (grs2-pro) was cloned and sequenced from Bacillus brevis Nagano, BII-3 strain, which produces gramicidin S synthetase 2 defective in proline-activation. By comparison of the nucleotide sequence with the wild-type sequence, a single point mutation was found at the 2609th guanine, which was replaced with adenine, resulting in the change of the 870th glycine to glutamic acid. Homology search for the deduced amino acid sequence of grs2-pro gene revealed that the 870th glycine was conserved in adenylate-forming enzymes, and its flanking sequence was highly conserved among the aminoacyl adenylate-forming enzymes, such as antibiotic peptide synthetases: gramicidin S synthetase 1 and 2 (GS1, GS2), tyrocidine synthetase 1 (TS1), and delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS); and other aminoacyl adenylation enzymes: alpha-aminoadipate reductase (LYS2), EntF, and AngR. On the other hand, this flanking sequence was not conserved in the other adenylate-forming enzymes lacking amino acid activation, such as acetyl-CoA synthetase, long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase, luciferase, and 4-coumarate CoA ligase. Single base substitutions at the 870th GGG codon were carried out by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis. Four mutagenized clones were isolated, containing grs2-pro genes which exchange 870-Gly for alanine, valine, arginine, and tryptophan. The translated products from these clones could scarcely catalyze proline-dependent ATP-32PPi exchange reaction. The coil structure of 870-Gly region was lost in the mutants. These results suggest that the 870-Gly residue of grs2-pro protein is essential for aminoacyl-adenylation in the antibiotic peptide synthetase family.

  10. Phosphorylation of Human CTP Synthetase 1 by Protein Kinase A: IDENTIFICATION OF Thr455 AS A MAJOR SITE OF PHOSPHORYLATION*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    CTP synthetase is an essential enzyme that generates the CTP required for the synthesis of nucleic acids and membrane phospholipids. In this work, we examined the phosphorylation of the human CTPS1-encoded CTP synthetase 1 by protein kinase A. CTP synthetase 1 was expressed and purified from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ double mutant that lacks CTP synthetase activity. Using purified CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase A activity was time- and dose-dependent. The phosphorylation, which primarily occurred on a threonine residue, was accompanied by a 50% decrease in CTP synthetase 1 activity. The synthetic peptide LGKRRTLFQT that contains the protein kinase A motif for Thr455 was a substrate for protein kinase A. A Thr455 to Ala (T455A) mutation in CTP synthetase 1 was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and was expressed and purified from the S. cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ mutant. The T455A mutation caused a 78% decrease in protein kinase A phosphorylation, and the loss of the phosphothreonine residue and a major phosphopeptide that were present in the purified wild type enzyme phosphorylated by protein kinase A. The CTP synthetase 1 activity of the T455A mutant enzyme was 2-fold higher than the wild type enzyme. In addition, the T455A mutation caused a 44% decrease in the amount of human CTP synthetase 1 that was phosphorylated in S. cerevisiae cells, and this was accompanied by a 2.5-fold increase in the cellular concentration of CTP and a 1.5-fold increase in the choline-dependent synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. PMID:17189248

  11. Ligand co-crystallization of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases from infectious disease organisms.

    PubMed

    Moen, Spencer O; Edwards, Thomas E; Dranow, David M; Clifton, Matthew C; Sankaran, Banumathi; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Sharma, Amit; Manoil, Colin; Staker, Bart L; Myler, Peter J; Lorimer, Donald D

    2017-03-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) charge tRNAs with their cognate amino acid, an essential precursor step to loading of charged tRNAs onto the ribosome and addition of the amino acid to the growing polypeptide chain during protein synthesis. Because of this important biological function, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases have been the focus of anti-infective drug development efforts and two aaRS inhibitors have been approved as drugs. Several researchers in the scientific community requested aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to be targeted in the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) structure determination pipeline. Here we investigate thirty-one aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases from infectious disease organisms by co-crystallization in the presence of their cognate amino acid, ATP, and/or inhibitors. Crystal structures were determined for a CysRS from Borrelia burgdorferi bound to AMP, GluRS from Borrelia burgdorferi and Burkholderia thailandensis bound to glutamic acid, a TrpRS from the eukaryotic pathogen Encephalitozoon cuniculi bound to tryptophan, a HisRS from Burkholderia thailandensis bound to histidine, and a LysRS from Burkholderia thailandensis bound to lysine. Thus, the presence of ligands may promote aaRS crystallization and structure determination. Comparison with homologous structures shows conformational flexibility that appears to be a recurring theme with this enzyme class.

  12. The yeast VAS1 gene encodes both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Chatton, B; Walter, P; Ebel, J P; Lacroute, F; Fasiolo, F

    1988-01-05

    S1 mapping on the VAS1 structural gene indicates the existence of two classes of transcripts initiating at distinct in-frame translation start codons. The longer class of VAS1 transcripts initiates upstream of both ATG codons located 138 base pairs away and the shorter class downstream of the first ATG. A mutation that destroys the first AUG on the long message results in respiratory deficiency but does not affect viability. Mutation of the ATG at position 139 leads to lethality because the initiating methionine codon of the essential cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetase has been destroyed. N-terminal protein sequence data further confirm translation initiation at ATG-139 for the cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetase. From these results, we conclude that the VAS1 single gene encodes both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetases. The presequence of the mitochondrial valyl-tRNA synthetase shows amino acid composition but not the amphiphilic character of imported mitochondrial proteins. From mutagenesis of the ATG-139 we conclude that the presequence specifically targets the cytoplasmically synthesized mitochondrial valyl-tRNA synthetase to the mitochondrial outer membrane and prevents binding of the enzyme core to cytoplasmic tRNAVal.

  13. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.

  14. Glutamate-Dependent Translational Control of Glutamine Synthetase in Bergmann Glia Cells.

    PubMed

    Tiburcio-Félix, Reynaldo; Escalante-López, Miguel; López-Bayghen, Bruno; Martínez, Daniel; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Zinker, Samuel; Hernández-Melchor, Dinorah; López-Bayghen, Esther; Olivares-Bañuelos, Tatiana N; Ortega, Arturo

    2017-09-05

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter of the vertebrate brain. It exerts its actions through the activation of specific plasma membrane receptors expressed both in neurons and in glial cells. Recent evidence has shown that glutamate uptake systems, particularly enriched in glia cells, trigger biochemical cascades in a similar fashion as receptors. A tight regulation of glutamate extracellular levels prevents neuronal overstimulation and cell death, and it is critically involved in glutamate turnover. Glial glutamate transporters are responsible of the majority of the brain glutamate uptake activity. Once internalized, this excitatory amino acid is rapidly metabolized to glutamine via the astrocyte-enriched enzyme glutamine synthetase. A coupling between glutamate uptake and glutamine synthesis and release has been commonly known as the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. Taking advantage of the established model of cultured Bergmann glia cells, in this contribution, we explored the gene expression regulation of glutamine synthetase. A time- and dose-dependent regulation of glutamine synthetase protein and activity levels was found. Moreover, glutamate exposure resulted in the transient shift of glutamine synthetase mRNA from the monosomal to the polysomal fraction. These results demonstrate a novel mode of glutamate-dependent glutamine synthetase regulation and strengthen the notion of an exquisite glia neuronal interaction in glutamatergic synapses.

  15. Inactivation and covalent modification of CTP synthetase by thiourea dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, J. G.; Sparvero, L. J.; Villafranca, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Thiourea dioxide was used in chemical modification studies to identify functionally important amino acids in Escherichia coli CTP synthetase. Incubation at pH 8.0 in the absence of substrates led to rapid, time dependent, and irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. The second-order rate constant for inactivation was 0.18 M-1 s-1. Inactivation also occurred in the absence of oxygen and in the presence of catalase, thereby ruling out mixed-function oxidation/reduction as the mode of amino acid modification. Saturating concentrations of the substrates ATP and UTP, and the allosteric activator GTP prevented inactivation by thiourea dioxide, whereas saturating concentrations of glutamine (a substrate) did not. The concentration dependence of nucleotide protection revealed cooperative behavior with respect to individual nucleotides and with respect to various combinations of nucleotides. Mixtures of nucleotides afforded greater protection against inactivation than single nucleotides alone, and a combination of the substrates ATP and UTP provided the most protection. The Hill coefficient for nucleotide protection was approximately 2 for ATP, UTP, and GTP. In the presence of 1:1 ratios of ATP:UTP, ATP:GTP, and UTP:GTP, the Hill coefficient was approximately 4 in each case. Fluorescence and circular dichroism measurements indicated that modification by thiourea dioxide causes detectable changes in the structure of the protein. Modification with [14C]thiourea dioxide demonstrated that complete inactivation correlates with incorporation of 3 mol of [14C]thiourea dioxide per mole of CTP synthetase monomer. The specificity of thiourea dioxide for lysine residues indicates that one or more lysines are most likely involved in CTP synthetase activity. The data further indicate that nucleotide binding prevents access to these functionally important residues. PMID:1303749

  16. Cloning and characterization of the C. elegans histidyl-tRNA synthetase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Amaar, Y G; Baillie, D L

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we report the cloning and sequencing of the C. elegans histidyl-tRNA synthetase gene. The complete genomic sequence, and most of the cDNA sequence, of this gene is now determined. The gene size including flanking and coding regions is 2230 nucleotides long. Three small introns (45-50 bp long) are found to interrupt the open reading frame. The open reading frame translates to 523 amino acids. This putative protein sequence shows extensive homology with the human and yeast histidyl-tRNA the histidyl-tRNA synthetase gene is a single copy gene. Hence, it is very likely that it encodes both the cytoplasmic and the mitochondrial histidyl-tRNA synthetases. It is likely to be trans-spliced since it contains a trans-splice site in its 5' untranslated region. PMID:8414990

  17. Novel insights into regulation of asparagine synthetase in conifers.

    PubMed

    Canales, Javier; Rueda-López, Marina; Craven-Bartle, Blanca; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2012-01-01

    Asparagine, a key amino acid for nitrogen storage and transport in plants, is synthesized via the ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the enzyme asparagine synthetase (AS; EC 6.3.5.4). In this work, we present the molecular analysis of two full-length cDNAs that encode asparagine synthetase in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), PpAS1, and PpAS2. Phylogenetic analyses of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that both genes are class II AS, suggesting an ancient origin of these genes in plants. A comparative study of PpAS1 and PpAS2 gene expression profiles showed that PpAS1 gene is highly regulated by developmental and environmental factors, while PpAS2 is expressed constitutively. To determine the molecular mechanisms underpinning the differential expression of PpAS1, the promoter region of the gene was isolated and putative binding sites for MYB transcription factors were identified. Gel mobility shift assays showed that a MYB protein from Pinus taeda (PtMYB1) was able to interact with the promoter region of PpAS1. Furthermore, transient expression analyses in pine cells revealed a negative effect of PtMYB1 on PpAS1 expression. The potential role of MYB factors in the transcriptional regulation of PpAS1 in vascular cells is discussed.

  18. Novel Insights into Regulation of Asparagine Synthetase in Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Canales, Javier; Rueda-López, Marina; Craven-Bartle, Blanca; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M.

    2012-01-01

    Asparagine, a key amino acid for nitrogen storage and transport in plants, is synthesized via the ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the enzyme asparagine synthetase (AS; EC 6.3.5.4). In this work, we present the molecular analysis of two full-length cDNAs that encode asparagine synthetase in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), PpAS1, and PpAS2. Phylogenetic analyses of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that both genes are class II AS, suggesting an ancient origin of these genes in plants. A comparative study of PpAS1 and PpAS2 gene expression profiles showed that PpAS1 gene is highly regulated by developmental and environmental factors, while PpAS2 is expressed constitutively. To determine the molecular mechanisms underpinning the differential expression of PpAS1, the promoter region of the gene was isolated and putative binding sites for MYB transcription factors were identified. Gel mobility shift assays showed that a MYB protein from Pinus taeda (PtMYB1) was able to interact with the promoter region of PpAS1. Furthermore, transient expression analyses in pine cells revealed a negative effect of PtMYB1 on PpAS1 expression. The potential role of MYB factors in the transcriptional regulation of PpAS1 in vascular cells is discussed. PMID:22654888

  19. A new mechanism of post-transfer editing by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases: catalysis of hydrolytic reaction by bacterial-type prolyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Boyarshin, Konstantin S; Priss, Anastasia E; Rayevskiy, Alexsey V; Ilchenko, Mykola M; Dubey, Igor Ya; Kriklivyi, Ivan A; Yaremchuk, Anna D; Tukalo, Michael A

    2017-02-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases are enzymes that specifically attach amino acids to cognate tRNAs for use in the ribosomal stage of translation. For many aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, the required level of amino acid specificity is achieved either by specific hydrolysis of misactivated aminoacyl-adenylate intermediate (pre-transfer editing) or by hydrolysis of the mischarged aminoacyl-tRNA (post-transfer editing). To investigate the mechanism of post-transfer editing of alanine by prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the pathogenic bacteria Enterococcus faecalis, we used molecular modeling, molecular dynamic simulations, quantum mechanical (QM) calculations, site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme, and tRNA modification. The results support a new tRNA-assisted mechanism of hydrolysis of misacylated Ala-tRNA(Pro). The most important functional element of this catalytic mechanism is the 2'-OH group of the terminal adenosine 76 of Ala-tRNA(Pro), which forms an intramolecular hydrogen bond with the carbonyl group of the alanine residue, strongly facilitating hydrolysis. Hydrolysis was shown by QM methods to proceed via a general acid-base catalysis mechanism involving two functionally distinct water molecules. The transition state of the reaction was identified. Amino acid residues of the editing active site participate in the coordination of substrate and both attacking and assisting water molecules, performing the proton transfer to the 3'-O atom of A76.

  20. Ammonia Fixation via Glutamine Synthetase and Glutamate Synthase in the CAM Plant Cissus quadrangularis L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael G.; Sprengart, Michael L.; Kusnan, Misri; Fock, Heinrich P.

    1986-01-01

    Succulent stems of Cissus quadrangularis L. (Vitaceae) contain glutamine synthetase, glutamate synthase, and glutamate dehydrogenase. The CO2 and water gas exchanges of detached internodes were typical for Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. During three physiological phases, e.g. in the dark, in the early illumination period after stomata closure, and during the late light phase with the stomata wide open, 15NH4Cl was injected into the central pith of stem sections. The kinetics of 15N labeling in glutamate and glutamine suggested that glutamine synthetase was involved in the initial ammonia fixation. In the presence of methionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, the incorporation of 15N derived from 15NH4Cl was almost completely inhibited. Injections of amido-15N glutamine demonstrated a potential for 15N transfer from the amido group of glutamine into glutamate which was suppressed by the glutamate synthase inhibitor, azaserine. The evidence indicates that glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase could assimilate ammonia and cycle nitrogen during all phases of Crassulacean acid metabolism. PMID:16664820

  1. Ammonia Fixation via Glutamine Synthetase and Glutamate Synthase in the CAM Plant Cissus quadrangularis L.

    PubMed

    Berger, M G; Sprengart, M L; Kusnan, M; Fock, H P

    1986-06-01

    Succulent stems of Cissus quadrangularis L. (Vitaceae) contain glutamine synthetase, glutamate synthase, and glutamate dehydrogenase. The CO(2) and water gas exchanges of detached internodes were typical for Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. During three physiological phases, e.g. in the dark, in the early illumination period after stomata closure, and during the late light phase with the stomata wide open, (15)NH(4)Cl was injected into the central pith of stem sections. The kinetics of (15)N labeling in glutamate and glutamine suggested that glutamine synthetase was involved in the initial ammonia fixation. In the presence of methionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, the incorporation of (15)N derived from (15)NH(4)Cl was almost completely inhibited. Injections of amido-(15)N glutamine demonstrated a potential for (15)N transfer from the amido group of glutamine into glutamate which was suppressed by the glutamate synthase inhibitor, azaserine. The evidence indicates that glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase could assimilate ammonia and cycle nitrogen during all phases of Crassulacean acid metabolism.

  2. Positive newborn screen in the biochemically normal infant of a mother with treated holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, W L; Willis, M; Barshop, B A; Gangoiti, J

    2009-12-01

    Expanded programmes of newborn screening permit early diagnosis in time to prevent serious complications. These programmes have begun to detect patients who might otherwise remain asymptomatic. An additional confounding variable is the positive screen that results from maternal rather than neonatal disease. This was the case in an infant in whom elevated hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (C(5)OH) in his newborn screen was the result of placental transfer from his mother, whose holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency was being successfully treated with biotin. The mother had been diagnosed and treated with biotin prenatally. She had no phenotypic feature of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency, most importantly no episodes ever of acute metabolic acidosis. In the infant a repeat screen was also positive. On day 28 the infant's plasma C(5)OH carnitine was 0.05 mumol/L (normal) and urinary organic acids on day 39 were normal. The mother's excretion of 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid was 109 mmol/mol creatinine. These observations indicate that holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is one more maternal metabolic disease which may lead to a positive screen in her unaffected newborn infant. They also make the point that holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in an infant should be detectable in programmes of neonatal screening, which was not clear previously.

  3. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    DOEpatents

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  4. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  5. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T Ashton; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, J Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of glutamine synthetase, a tegumental protein from Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chunhui; Hong, Yang; Cao, Yan; Wang, Fei; Fu, Zhiqiang; Shi, Yaojun; Wei, Meimei; Liu, Shengfa; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2012-12-01

    Glutamine synthetase catalyzes the synthesis of glutamine, providing nitrogen for the production of purines, pyrimidines, amino acids, and other compounds required in many pivotal cellular events. Herein, a full-length cDNA encoding Schistosoma japonicum glutamine synthetase (SjGS) was isolated from 21-day schistosomes. The entire open reading frame of SjGS contains a 1,095-bp coding region corresponding to 364 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 40.7 kDa. NCBIP blast shows that the putative amino acid of SjGS contains a classic β-grasp domain and a catalytic domain of glutamine synthetase. The relative mRNA expression of SjGS was evaluated in 7-, 13-, 21-, 28-, 35-, and 42-day worms of S. japonicum in the final host and higher expression at day 21, and 42 worms were observed. This protein was also detected in worm extracts using Western blot. Immunofluorescence studies indicated that the SjGS protein was mainly distributed on tegument and parenchyma in 28-day adult worms. The recombinant glutamine synthetase with a molecular weight of 45 kDa was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified in its active form. The enzyme activity of the recombinant protein was 3.30 ± 0.67 U.μg-1. The enzyme activity was highly stable over a wide range of pH (6-9) and temperature (25-40 °C) under physiological conditions. The transcription of SjGS was upregulated in praziquantel-treated worms at 2-, 4-, and 24-h posttreatment compared with the untreated control. As a first step towards the clarification of the role of glutamine synthetase in schistosome species, we have cloned and characterized cDNAs encoding SjGS in S. japonicum, and the data presented suggest that SjGS is an important molecule in the development of the schistosome.

  7. Redesigning the stereospecificity of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Thomas; Ye-Lehmann, Shixin; Palmai, Zoltan; Amara, Najette; Wydau-Dematteis, Sandra; Bigan, Erwan; Druart, Karen; Moch, Clara; Plateau, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    D-Amino acids are largely excluded from protein synthesis, yet they are of great interest in biotechnology. Unnatural amino acids have been introduced into proteins using engineered aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs), and this strategy might be applicable to D-amino acids. Several aaRSs can aminoacylate their tRNA with a D-amino acid; of these, tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) has the weakest stereospecificity. We use computational protein design to suggest active site mutations in Escherichia coli TyrRS that could increase its D-Tyr binding further, relative to L-Tyr. The mutations selected all modify one or more sidechain charges in the Tyr binding pocket. We test their effect by probing the aminoacyl-adenylation reaction through pyrophosphate exchange experiments. We also perform extensive alchemical free energy simulations to obtain L-Tyr/D-Tyr binding free energy differences. Agreement with experiment is good, validating the structural models and detailed thermodynamic predictions the simulations provide. The TyrRS stereospecificity proves hard to engineer through charge-altering mutations in the first and second coordination shells of the Tyr ammonium group. Of six mutants tested, two are active towards D-Tyr; one of these has an inverted stereospecificity, with a large preference for D-Tyr. However, its activity is low. Evidently, the TyrRS stereospecificity is robust towards charge rearrangements near the ligand. Future design may have to consider more distant and/or electrically neutral target mutations, and possibly design for binding of the transition state, whose structure however can only be modeled.

  8. Biochemical characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Alderwick, Luke J; Lloyd, Georgina S; Lloyd, Adrian J; Lovering, Andrew L; Eggeling, Lothar; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis arabinogalactan (AG) is an essential cell wall component. It provides a molecular framework serving to connect peptidoglycan to the outer mycolic acid layer. The biosynthesis of the arabinan domains of AG and lipoarabinomannan (LAM) occurs via a combination of membrane bound arabinofuranosyltransferases, all of which utilize decaprenol-1-monophosphorabinose as a substrate. The source of arabinose ultimately destined for deposition into cell wall AG or LAM originates exclusively from phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (pRpp), a central metabolite which is also required for other essential metabolic processes, such as de novo purine and pyrimidine biosyntheses. In M. tuberculosis, a single pRpp synthetase enzyme (Mt-PrsA) is solely responsible for the generation of pRpp, by catalyzing the transfer of pyrophosphate from ATP to the C1 hydroxyl position of ribose-5-phosphate. Here, we report a detailed biochemical and biophysical study of Mt-PrsA, which exhibits the most rapid enzyme kinetics reported for a pRpp synthetase. PMID:21045009

  9. MANAGEMENT OF A PATIENT WITH HOLOCARBOXYLASE SYNTHETASE DEFICIENCY

    PubMed Central

    Van Hove, Johan LK; Josefsberg, Sagi; Freehauf, Cynthia; Thomas, Janet A.; Thuy, Le Phuc; Barshop, Bruce A.; Woontner, Michael; Mock, Donald M; Chiang, Pei-Wen; Spector, Elaine; Meneses-Morales, Iván; Cervantes-Roldán, Rafael; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    We investigated in a patient with holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency, the relation between the biochemical and genetic factors of the mutant protein with the pharmacokinetic factors of successful biotin treatment. A girl exhibited abnormal skin at birth, and developed in the first days of life neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and metabolic abnormalities diagnostic of multiple carboxylase deficiency. Enzyme assays showed low carboxylase activities. Fibroblast analysis showed poor incorporation of biotin into the carboxylases, and low transfer of biotin by the holocarboxylase synthetase enzyme. Kinetic studies identified an increased Km but a preserved Vmax. Mutation analysis showed the child to be a compound heterozygote for a new nonsense mutation Q379X and for a novel missense mutation Y663H. This mutation affects a conserved amino acid, which is located the most 3′ of all recorded missense mutations thus far described, and extends the region of functional biotin interaction. Treatment with biotin 100 mg/day gradually improved the biochemical abnormalities in blood and in cerebrospinal fluid, corrected the carboxylase enzyme activities, and provided clinical stability and a normal neurodevelopmental outcome. Plasma concentrations of biotin were increased to more than 500 nM, thus exceeding the increased Km of the mutant enzyme. At these pharmacological concentrations, the CSF biotin concentration was half the concentration in blood. Measuring these pharmacokinetic variables can aid in optimizing treatment, as individual tailoring of dosing to the needs of the mutation may be required. PMID:18974016

  10. Management of a patient with holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Van Hove, Johan L K; Josefsberg, Sagi; Freehauf, Cynthia; Thomas, Janet A; Thuy, Le Phuc; Barshop, Bruce A; Woontner, Michael; Mock, Donald M; Chiang, Pei-Wen; Spector, Elaine; Meneses-Morales, Iván; Cervantes-Roldán, Rafael; León-Del-Río, Alfonso

    2008-12-01

    We investigated in a patient with holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency, the relation between the biochemical and genetic factors of the mutant protein with the pharmacokinetic factors of successful biotin treatment. A girl exhibited abnormal skin at birth, and developed in the first days of life neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and metabolic abnormalities diagnostic of multiple carboxylase deficiency. Enzyme assays showed low carboxylase activities. Fibroblast analysis showed poor incorporation of biotin into the carboxylases, and low transfer of biotin by the holocarboxylase synthetase enzyme. Kinetic studies identified an increased Km but a preserved Vmax. Mutation analysis showed the child to be a compound heterozygote for a new nonsense mutation Q379X and for a novel missense mutation Y663H. This mutation affects a conserved amino acid, which is located the most 3' of all recorded missense mutations thus far described, and extends the region of functional biotin interaction. Treatment with biotin 100mg/day gradually improved the biochemical abnormalities in blood and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), corrected the carboxylase enzyme activities, and provided clinical stability and a normal neurodevelopmental outcome. Plasma concentrations of biotin were increased to more than 500 nM, thus exceeding the increased Km of the mutant enzyme. At these pharmacological concentrations, the CSF biotin concentration was half the concentration in blood. Measuring these pharmacokinetic variables can aid in optimizing treatment, as individual tailoring of dosing to the needs of the mutation may be required.

  11. Prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase and the activation of benzo(a)pyrene to reactive metabolites in vivo in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Garattini, E.; Coccia, P.; Romano, M.; Jiritano, L.; Noseda, A.; Salmona, M.

    1984-11-01

    The role of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase in the in vivo activation of benzo(a)pyrene to reactive metabolites capable of interacting irreversibly with cellular macromolecules was studied in guinea pig liver, lung, kidney, spleen, small intestine, colon, and brain. DNA and protein covalent binding experiments were made after systemic administration of acetylsalicylic acid (200 mg/kg) followed by radiolabeled benzo(a)pyrene (4 microgram/kg). Results are compared with a control situation in which the prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase inhibitor (acetylsalicylic acid) was not administered. No decrease in the level of DNA or protein benzo(a)pyrene-derived covalent binding was observed in any of the tissues studied.

  12. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun [San Diego, CA; Xie, Jianming [San Diego, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA

    2012-06-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  13. Genetically encoded fluorescent coumarin amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Xie, Jianming; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-10-05

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the coumarin unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl) ethylglycine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid L-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine and related translation systems.

  14. Acyl-CoA Synthetase Is Located in the Outer Membrane and Acyl-CoA Thioesterase in the Inner Membrane of Pea Chloroplast Envelopes 1

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jaen; Keegstra, Kenneth

    1983-01-01

    Both acyl-CoA synthetase and acyl-CoA thioesterase activities are present in chloroplast envelope membranes. The functions of these enzymes in lipid metabolism remains unresolved, although the synthetase has been proposed to be involved in either plastid galactolipid synthesis or the export of plastid-synthesized fatty acids to the cytoplasm. We have examined the locations of both enzymes within the two envelope membranes of pea (Pisum sativum var Laxton's Progress No. 9) chloroplasts. Inner and outer envelope membranes were purified from unfractionated envelope preparations by linear density sucrose gradient centrifugation. Acyl-CoA synthetase was located in the outer envelope membrane while acyl-CoA thioesterase was located in the inner envelope membrane. Thus, it seems unlikely that the synthetase is directly involved in galactolipid assembly. Instead, its localization supports the hypothesis that it functions in the transport of plastid-synthesized fatty acids to the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:16663076

  15. A decrease in S-adenosylmethionine synthetase activity increases the probability of spontaneous sporulation.

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, K; Freese, E

    1982-01-01

    Starting with a relaxed (relA) strain, mutants with reduced activity of adenosine triphosphate:L-methionine S-adenosyl transferase (EC 2.5.1.6; SAM synthetase) were isolated in Bacillus subtilis. One such mutant (gene symbol metE1) had only 3% of the normal SAM synthetase activity but grew almost as well as the parent strain. Another mutant was isolated (gene symbol spdC1) as being able to sporulate continually at a high frequency; it had one-half the normal SAM synthetase activity at 33 degrees C. Both mutants continually and spontaneously entered spore development at a higher frequency than the parent strain in a medium containing excess glucose, ammonium ions, and phosphate. Sporulation was prevented by a high concentration of SAM (1 mM or more) or by the combination of adenosine and methionine (0.5 mM or more each), both of which are precursors of SAM. In contrast to this continual increase in the spore titer, addition of decoyinine, an inhibitor of GMP synthetase, rapidly initiated massive sporulation. Various amino acid analogs also induced sporulation in the relA strain, the methionine analogs ethionine and selenomethionine being most effective. PMID:6811558

  16. Pseudomonas syringae Phytotoxins: Mode of Action, Regulation, and Biosynthesis by Peptide and Polyketide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Carol L.; Alarcón-Chaidez, Francisco; Gross, Dennis C.

    1999-01-01

    Coronatine, syringomycin, syringopeptin, tabtoxin, and phaseolotoxin are the most intensively studied phytotoxins of Pseudomonas syringae, and each contributes significantly to bacterial virulence in plants. Coronatine functions partly as a mimic of methyl jasmonate, a hormone synthesized by plants undergoing biological stress. Syringomycin and syringopeptin form pores in plasma membranes, a process that leads to electrolyte leakage. Tabtoxin and phaseolotoxin are strongly antimicrobial and function by inhibiting glutamine synthetase and ornithine carbamoyltransferase, respectively. Genetic analysis has revealed the mechanisms responsible for toxin biosynthesis. Coronatine biosynthesis requires the cooperation of polyketide and peptide synthetases for the assembly of the coronafacic and coronamic acid moieties, respectively. Tabtoxin is derived from the lysine biosynthetic pathway, whereas syringomycin, syringopeptin, and phaseolotoxin biosynthesis requires peptide synthetases. Activation of phytotoxin synthesis is controlled by diverse environmental factors including plant signal molecules and temperature. Genes involved in the regulation of phytotoxin synthesis have been located within the coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters; however, additional regulatory genes are required for the synthesis of these and other phytotoxins. Global regulatory genes such as gacS modulate phytotoxin production in certain pathovars, indicating the complexity of the regulatory circuits controlling phytotoxin synthesis. The coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters have been intensively characterized and show potential for constructing modified polyketides and peptides. Genetic reprogramming of peptide and polyketide synthetases has been successful, and portions of the coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters could be valuable resources in developing new antimicrobial agents. PMID:10357851

  17. Aminoacylation of tRNA in the evolution of an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Lipman, Richard S. A.; Hou, Ya-Ming

    1998-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases catalyze aminoacylation of tRNAs by joining an amino acid to its cognate tRNA. The selection of the cognate tRNA is jointly determined by separate structural domains that examine different regions of the tRNA. The cysteine-tRNA synthetase of Escherichia coli has domains that select for tRNAs containing U73, the GCA anticodon, and a specific tertiary structure at the corner of the tRNA L shape. The E. coli enzyme does not efficiently recognize the yeast or human tRNACys, indicating the evolution of determinants for tRNA aminoacylation from E. coli to yeast to human and the coevolution of synthetase domains that interact with these determinants. By successively modifying the yeast and human tRNACys to ones that are efficiently aminoacylated by the E. coli enzyme, we have identified determinants of the tRNA that are important for aminoacylation but that have diverged in the course of evolution. These determinants provide clues to the divergence of synthetase domains. We propose that the domain for selecting U73 is conserved in evolution. In contrast, we propose that the domain for selecting the corner of the tRNA L shape diverged early, after the separation between E. coli and yeast, while that for selecting the GCA-containing anticodon loop diverged late, after the separation between yeast and human. PMID:9811828

  18. The multifunctional peptide synthetase performing the first step of penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum is a 421,073 dalton protein similar to Bacillus brevis peptide antibiotic synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; Earl, A J; Turner, G

    1990-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Penicillium chrysogenum Oli13 acvA gene encoding delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase, which performs the first step in penicillin biosynthesis, has been determined. The acvA gene contains an open reading frame of 11,238 bp encoding a protein of 3746 amino acids with a predicted mol. wt of 421,073 dalton. Three domains within the protein of approximately 570 amino acids have between 38% and 43% identity with each other and share similarity with two antibiotic peptide synthetases from Bacillus brevis as well as two other enzymes capable of performing ATP-pyrophosphate exchange reactions. The acvA gene is located close to the pcbC gene encoding isopenicillin N synthetase, the enzyme for the second step of beta-lactam biosynthesis, and is transcribed in the opposite orientation to it. The intergenic region of 1107 bp from which the acvA and pcbC genes are divergently transcribed has also been sequenced. PMID:2118102

  19. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in medicine and disease

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Peng; Fox, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) are essential and ubiquitous ‘house-keeping’ enzymes responsible for charging amino acids to their cognate tRNAs and providing the substrates for global protein synthesis. Recent studies have revealed a role of multiple ARSs in pathology, and their potential use as pharmacological targets and therapeutic reagents. The ongoing discovery of genetic mutations in human ARSs is increasing exponentially and can be considered an important determinant of disease etiology. Several chemical compounds target bacterial, fungal and human ARSs as antibiotics or disease-targeting medicines. Remarkably, ongoing exploration of noncanonical functions of ARSs has shown important contributions to control of angiogenesis, inflammation, tumourigenesis and other important physiopathological processes. Here, we summarize the roles of ARSs in human diseases and medicine, focusing on the most recent and exciting discoveries. PMID:23427196

  20. Versatility of acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetases

    DOE PAGES

    Beld, Joris; Finzel, Kara; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-10-09

    The acyl carrier protein (ACP) requires posttranslational modification with a 4'-phosphopantetheine arm for activity, and this thiol-terminated modification carries cargo between enzymes in ACP-dependent metabolic pathways. In this paper, we show that acyl-ACP synthetases (AasSs) from different organisms are able to load even, odd, and unnatural fatty acids onto E. coli ACP in vitro. Vibrio harveyi AasS not only shows promiscuity for the acid substrate, but also is active upon various alternate carrier proteins. AasS activity also extends to functional activation in living organisms. We show that exogenously supplied carboxylic acids are loaded onto ACP and extended by the E.more » coli fatty acid synthase, including unnatural fatty acid analogs. These analogs are further integrated into cellular lipids. Finally, in vitro characterization of four different adenylate-forming enzymes allowed us to disambiguate CoA-ligases and AasSs, and further in vivo studies show the potential for functional application in other organisms.« less

  1. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases: versatile players in the changing theater of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Francklyn, Christopher; Perona, John J; Puetz, Joern; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases attach amino acids to the 3' termini of cognate tRNAs to establish the specificity of protein synthesis. A recent Asilomar conference (California, January 13-18, 2002) discussed new research into the structure-function relationship of these crucial enzymes, as well as a multitude of novel functions, including participation in amino acid biosynthesis, cell cycle control, RNA splicing, and export of tRNAs from nucleus to cytoplasm in eukaryotic cells. Together with the discovery of their role in the cellular synthesis of proteins to incorporate selenocysteine and pyrrolysine, these diverse functions of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases underscore the flexibility and adaptability of these ancient enzymes and stimulate the development of new concepts and methods for expanding the genetic code. PMID:12458790

  2. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  3. Purification of glutathionylspermidine and trypanothione synthetases from Crithidia fasciculata.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, K.; Nadeau, K.; Bradley, M.; Walsh, C.; Fairlamb, A. H.

    1992-01-01

    Two enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the trypanosomatid-specific dithiol trypanothione-glutathionylspermidine (Gsp) synthetase and trypanothione (TSH) synthetase--have been identified and purified individually from Crithidia fasciculata. The Gsp synthetase has been purified 93-fold and the TSH synthetase 52-fold to apparent homogeneity from a single DEAE fraction that contained both activities. This constitutes the first indication that the enzymatic conversion of two glutathione molecules and one spermidine to the N1,N8-bis(glutathionyl)spermidine (TSH) occurs in two discrete enzymatic steps. Gsp synthetase, which has a kcat of 600/min, shows no detectable TSH synthetase activity, whereas TSH synthetase does not make any detectable Gsp and has a kcat of 75/min. The 90-kDa Gsp synthetase and 82-kDa TSH synthetase are separable on phenyl Superose and remain separated on gel filtration columns in high salt (0.8 M NaCl). Active complexes can be formed under low to moderate salt conditions (0.0-0.15 M NaCl), consistent with a functional complex in vivo. PMID:1304372

  4. Dexamethasone regulates glutamine synthetase expression in rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase by glucocorticoids in rat skeletal muscles was studied. Administration of dexamethasone strikingly enhanced glutamine synthetase activity in plantaris and soleus muscles. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked to a significant extent by orally administered RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves dramatically increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. The induction of glutamine synthetase was selective in that glutaminase activity of soleus and plantaris muscles was not increased by dexamethasone. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment resulted in only a small increase in glutamine synthetase activity in the heart. Accordingly, there was only a slight change in glutamine synthetase mRNA level in this tissue. Thus, glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase gene expression in rat muscles at the transcriptional level via interaction with intracellular glutamine production by muscle and to mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  5. Thiol synthetases of legumes: immunogold localization and differential gene regulation by phytohormones.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Maria R; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Loscos, Jorge; James, Euan K; Pérez-Rontomé, Carmen; Navascués, Joaquín; Gay, Marina; Becana, Manuel

    2012-06-01

    In plants and other organisms, glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis is catalysed sequentially by γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γECS) and glutathione synthetase (GSHS). In legumes, homoglutathione (hGSH) can replace GSH and is synthesized by γECS and a specific homoglutathione synthetase (hGSHS). The subcellular localization of the enzymes was examined by electron microscopy in several legumes and gene expression was analysed in Lotus japonicus plants treated for 1-48 h with 50 μM of hormones. Immunogold localization studies revealed that γECS is confined to chloroplasts and plastids, whereas hGSHS is also in the cytosol. Addition of hormones caused differential expression of thiol synthetases in roots. After 24-48 h, abscisic and salicylic acids downregulated GSHS whereas jasmonic acid upregulated it. Cytokinins and polyamines activated GSHS but not γECS or hGSHS. Jasmonic acid elicited a coordinated response of the three genes and auxin induced both hGSHS expression and activity. Results show that the thiol biosynthetic pathway is compartmentalized in legumes. Moreover, the similar response profiles of the GSH and hGSH contents in roots of non-nodulated and nodulated plants to the various hormonal treatments indicate that thiol homeostasis is independent of the nitrogen source of the plants. The differential regulation of the three mRNA levels, hGSHS activity, and thiol contents by hormones indicates a fine control of thiol biosynthesis at multiple levels and strongly suggests that GSH and hGSH play distinct roles in plant development and stress responses.

  6. Thiol synthetases of legumes: immunogold localization and differential gene regulation by phytohormones

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Maria R.; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Loscos, Jorge; James, Euan K.; Pérez-Rontomé, Carmen; Navascués, Joaquín; Gay, Marina; Becana, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    In plants and other organisms, glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis is catalysed sequentially by γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γECS) and glutathione synthetase (GSHS). In legumes, homoglutathione (hGSH) can replace GSH and is synthesized by γECS and a specific homoglutathione synthetase (hGSHS). The subcellular localization of the enzymes was examined by electron microscopy in several legumes and gene expression was analysed in Lotus japonicus plants treated for 1–48 h with 50 μM of hormones. Immunogold localization studies revealed that γECS is confined to chloroplasts and plastids, whereas hGSHS is also in the cytosol. Addition of hormones caused differential expression of thiol synthetases in roots. After 24–48 h, abscisic and salicylic acids downregulated GSHS whereas jasmonic acid upregulated it. Cytokinins and polyamines activated GSHS but not γECS or hGSHS. Jasmonic acid elicited a coordinated response of the three genes and auxin induced both hGSHS expression and activity. Results show that the thiol biosynthetic pathway is compartmentalized in legumes. Moreover, the similar response profiles of the GSH and hGSH contents in roots of non-nodulated and nodulated plants to the various hormonal treatments indicate that thiol homeostasis is independent of the nitrogen source of the plants. The differential regulation of the three mRNA levels, hGSHS activity, and thiol contents by hormones indicates a fine control of thiol biosynthesis at multiple levels and strongly suggests that GSH and hGSH play distinct roles in plant development and stress responses. PMID:22442424

  7. In vivo modification of Azotobacter chroococcum glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Centeno, M C; Cejudo, F J; Paneque, A

    1994-03-15

    A monospecific anti-(glutamine synthetase) antibody raised against glutamine synthetase of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 immunoreacted with glutamine synthetase from the N2-fixing heterotrophic bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum. In Western-blotting experiments this antibody recognized a single protein of a molecular mass of 59 kDa corresponding to glutamine synthetase subunit. This protein was in vivo-labelled in response to addition of ammonium, both [3H]adenine and H(3)32PO4 preincubation of the cells being equally effective. Nevertheless, the amount of glutamine synthetase present in A. chroococcum was independent of the available nitrogen source. Modified, inactive glutamine synthetase was re-activated by treatment with snake-venom phosphodiesterase but not by alkaline phosphatase. L-Methionine-DL-sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, prevented the enzyme from being covalently modified. We conclude that, in A. chroococcum, glutamine synthetase is adenylylated in response to ammonium and that for the modification to take place ammonium must be metabolized.

  8. In vivo modification of Azotobacter chroococcum glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Centeno, M C; Cejudo, F J; Paneque, A

    1994-01-01

    A monospecific anti-(glutamine synthetase) antibody raised against glutamine synthetase of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 immunoreacted with glutamine synthetase from the N2-fixing heterotrophic bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum. In Western-blotting experiments this antibody recognized a single protein of a molecular mass of 59 kDa corresponding to glutamine synthetase subunit. This protein was in vivo-labelled in response to addition of ammonium, both [3H]adenine and H(3)32PO4 preincubation of the cells being equally effective. Nevertheless, the amount of glutamine synthetase present in A. chroococcum was independent of the available nitrogen source. Modified, inactive glutamine synthetase was re-activated by treatment with snake-venom phosphodiesterase but not by alkaline phosphatase. L-Methionine-DL-sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, prevented the enzyme from being covalently modified. We conclude that, in A. chroococcum, glutamine synthetase is adenylylated in response to ammonium and that for the modification to take place ammonium must be metabolized. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7908189

  9. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.].

  10. Proofreading in vivo: Editing of homocysteine by methionyl-tRNA synthetase in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, H. )

    1990-06-01

    Previous in vitro studies have established a pre-transfer proofreading mechanism for editing of homocysteine by bacterial methionyl-, isoleucyl-, and valyl-tRNA synthetases. The unusual feature of the editing is the formation of a distinct compound, homocysteine thiolactone. Now, two-dimensional TLC analysis of 35S-labeled amino acids extracted from cultures of the bacterium Escherichia coli reveals that the thiolactone is also synthesized in vivo. In E. coli, the thiolactone is made from homocysteine in a reaction catalyzed by methionyl-tRNA synthetase. One molecule of homocysteine is edited as thiolactone per 109 molecules of methionine incorporated into protein in vivo. These results not only directly demonstrate that the adenylate proofreading pathway for rejection of misactivated homocysteine operates in vivo in E. coli but, in general, establish the importance of error-editing mechanisms in living cells.

  11. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Mirando, Adam C; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K; Ebert, Alicia M; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S

    2015-08-14

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans.

  12. let-65 is cytoplasmic methionyl tRNA synthetase in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Alriyami, Maha Z.; Jones, Martin R.; Johnsen, Robert C.; Banerjee, Yajnavalka; Baillie, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic methionyl tRNA synthetase (MetRS) is one of more than 20 cytoplasmic aminoacyl tRNA synthetase enzymes (ARS). This family of enzymes catalyzes a process fundamental for protein translation. Using a combination of genetic mapping, oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization, and phenotypic correlation, we show that mutations in the essential gene, let-65, reside within the predicted Caenorhabditis elegans homologue of MetRS, which we have named mars-1. We demonstrate that the lethality associated with alleles of let-65 is fully rescued by a transgenic array that spans the mars-1 genomic region. Furthermore, sequence analysis reveals that six let-65 alleles lead to the alteration of highly conserved amino acids. PMID:25606464

  13. Genetic incorporation of histidine derivatives using an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Han; Peters, Francis B; Yang, Peng-Yu; Reed, Sean; Chittuluru, Johnathan R; Schultz, Peter G

    2014-05-16

    A polyspecific amber suppressor aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA pair was evolved that genetically encodes a series of histidine analogues in both Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. In combination with tRNACUA(Pyl), a pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase mutant was able to site-specifically incorporate 3-methyl-histidine, 3-pyridyl-alanine, 2-furyl-alanine, and 3-(2-thienyl)-alanine into proteins in response to an amber codon. Substitution of His66 in the blue fluorescent protein (BFP) with these histidine analogues created mutant proteins with distinct spectral properties. This work further expands the structural and chemical diversity of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) that can be genetically encoded in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and affords new probes of protein structure and function.

  14. Proofreading in vivo: editing of homocysteine by methionyl-tRNA synthetase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowski, H

    1990-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies have established a pre-transfer proofreading mechanism for editing of homocysteine by bacterial methionyl-, isoleucyl-, and valyl-tRNA synthetases. The unusual feature of the editing is the formation of a distinct compound, homocysteine thiolactone. Now, two-dimensional TLC analysis of 35S-labeled amino acids extracted from cultures of the bacterium Escherichia coli reveals that the thiolactone is also synthesized in vivo. In E. coli, the thiolactone is made from homocysteine in a reaction catalyzed by methionyl-tRNA synthetase. One molecule of homocysteine is edited as thiolactone per 109 molecules of methionine incorporated into protein in vivo. These results not only directly demonstrate that the adenylate proofreading pathway for rejection of misactivated homocysteine operates in vivo in E. coli but, in general, establish the importance of error-editing mechanisms in living cells. Images PMID:2191291

  15. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Mirando, Adam C.; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F.; Baldor, Linda C.; Howe, Alan K.; Ebert, Alicia M.; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M.; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans. PMID:26271225

  16. Adenosine tetraphosphoadenosine drives a continuous ATP-release assay for aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and other adenylate-forming enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Adrian J; Potter, Nicola J; Fishwick, Colin W G; Roper, David I; Dowson, Christopher G

    2013-10-18

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are essential for the correct linkage of amino acids to cognate tRNAs to maintain the fidelity of protein synthesis. Tractable, continuous assays are valuable for characterizing the functions of synthetases and for their exploitation as drug targets. We have exploited the unexplored ability of these enzymes to consume adenosine tetraphosphoadenosine (diadenosine 5',5‴ P(1) P(4) tetraphosphate; Ap4A) and produce ATP to develop such an assay. We have used this assay to probe the stereoselectivity of isoleucyl-tRNA(Ile) and Valyl-tRNA(Val) synthetases and the impact of tRNA on editing by isoleucyl-tRNA(Ile) synthetase (IleRS) and to identify analogues of intermediates of these enzymes that might allow targeting of multiple synthetases. We further report the utility of Ap4A-based assays for identification of synthetase inhibitors with nanomolar to millimolar affinities. Finally, we demonstrate the broad application of Ap4A utilization with a continuous Ap4A-driven RNA ligase assay.

  17. FRET monitoring of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase.

    PubMed

    Alfermann, Jonas; Sun, Xun; Mayerthaler, Florian; Morrell, Thomas E; Dehling, Eva; Volkmann, Gerrit; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Yang, Haw; Mootz, Henning D

    2017-09-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are multidomain enzyme templates for the synthesis of bioactive peptides. Large-scale conformational changes during peptide assembly are obvious from crystal structures, yet their dynamics and coupling to catalysis are poorly understood. We have designed an NRPS FRET sensor to monitor, in solution and in real time, the adoption of the productive transfer conformation between phenylalanine-binding adenylation (A) and peptidyl-carrier-protein domains of gramicidin synthetase I from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. The presence of ligands, substrates or intermediates induced a distinct fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) readout, which was pinpointed to the population of specific conformations or, in two cases, mixtures of conformations. A pyrophosphate switch and lysine charge sensors control the domain alternation of the A domain. The phenylalanine-thioester and phenylalanine-AMP products constitute a mechanism of product inhibition and release that is involved in ordered assembly-line peptide biosynthesis. Our results represent insights from solution measurements into the conformational dynamics of the catalytic cycle of NRPSs.

  18. Molecular cloning of rat acss3 and characterization of mammalian propionyl-CoA synthetase in the liver mitochondrial matrix.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Maruta, Hitomi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-12-21

    Among the three acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family members (ACSS), ACSS3 is poorly characterized. To characterize ACSS3, we performed molecular cloning and protein expression of rat acss3 and determined its intracellular localization, tissue distribution, and substrate specificity. Transient expression of rat ACSS3 in HeLa cells resulted in a 10-fold increase of acetyl-CoA synthetase activity compared with that in control cells. The acss3 transcripts are expressed in a wide range of tissues, with the highest levels observed in liver tissue followed by kidney tissue. Subcellular fractionation using liver tissue showed that ACSS3 is localized into the mitochondrial matrix. Among the short-chain fatty acids examined, recombinant ACSS3, purified from Escherichia coli cells transformed with the plasmid containing rat acss3, preferentially utilized propionate with a KM value of 0.19 mM. Knockdown of acss3 in HepG2 cells resulted in a significant decrease of ACSS3 expression level and propionyl-CoA synthetase activity in cell lysates. Levels of ACSS3 in the liver and the activity of propionyl-CoA synthetase in the mitochondria were significantly increased by fasting. These results suggested that ACSS3 is a liver mitochondrial matrix enzyme with high affinity to propionic acid, and its expression level is upregulated under ketogenic conditions.

  19. Novel acyl-CoA synthetase in adrenoleukodystrophy target tissues.

    PubMed

    Moriya-Sato, A; Hida, A; Inagawa-Ogashiwa, M; Wada, M R; Sugiyama, K; Shimizu, J; Yabuki, T; Seyama, Y; Hashimoto, N

    2000-12-09

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by demyelination of white matter. The X-ALD gene product adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP) is expressed broadly among various tissues. However, deficiency of functional ALDP exclusively impairs brain, adrenal gland, and testis. Thus, loss of ALDP function is assumed to involve inactivation of a putative mediating factor that functions in a tissue-specific manner. Here we cloned a mouse cDNA encoding a novel protein, Lipidosin, that possesses long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (LCAS) activity. Lipidosin is expressed exclusively in mouse brain, adrenal gland, and testis, which are affected by X-ALD. LCAS activity of Lipidosin was diminished by mutation of conserved amino acids within the AMP-binding domain. Mutation of the Drosophila homologue of Lipidosin has been reported to cause neuronal degeneration. Thus, Lipidosin may mediate the link between ALDP dysfunction and the impairment of fatty acid metabolism in X-ALD. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  20. Structural Biology of Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Bradley R.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The non-ribosomal peptide synthetases are modular enzymes that catalyze synthesis of important peptide products from a variety of standard and non-proteinogenic amino acid substrates. Within a single module are multiple catalytic domains that are responsible for incorporation of a single residue. After the amino acid is activated and covalently attached to an integrated carrier protein domain, the substrates and intermediates are delivered to neighboring catalytic domains for peptide bond formation or, in some modules, chemical modification. In the final module, the peptide is delivered to a terminal thioesterase domain that catalyzes release of the peptide product. This multi-domain modular architecture raises questions about the structural features that enable this assembly line synthesis in an efficient manner. The structures of the core component domains have been determined and demonstrate insights into the catalytic activity. More recently, multi-domain structures have been determined and are providing clues to the features of these enzyme systems that govern the functional interaction between multiple domains. This chapter describes the structures of NRPS proteins and the strategies that are being used to assist structural studies of these dynamic proteins, including careful consideration of domain boundaries for generation of truncated proteins and the use of mechanism-based inhibitors that trap interactions between the catalytic and carrier protein domains. PMID:26831698

  1. Regulation of Acetyl Coenzyme A Synthetase in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Suman; Beatty, Christine M.; Browning, Douglas F.; Busby, Stephen J. W.; Simel, Erica J.; Hovel-Miner, Galadriel; Wolfe, Alan J.

    2000-01-01

    Cells of Escherichia coli growing on sugars that result in catabolite repression or amino acids that feed into glycolysis undergo a metabolic switch associated with the production and utilization of acetate. As they divide exponentially, these cells excrete acetate via the phosphotransacetylase-acetate kinase pathway. As they begin the transition to stationary phase, they instead resorb acetate, activate it to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) by means of the enzyme acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs) and utilize it to generate energy and biosynthetic components via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glyoxylate shunt, respectively. Here, we present evidence that this switch occurs primarily through the induction of acs and that the timing and magnitude of this induction depend, in part, on the direct action of the carbon regulator cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) and the oxygen regulator FNR. It also depends, probably indirectly, upon the glyoxylate shunt repressor IclR, its activator FadR, and many enzymes involved in acetate metabolism. On the basis of these results, we propose that cells induce acs, and thus their ability to assimilate acetate, in response to rising cyclic AMP levels, falling oxygen partial pressure, and the flux of carbon through acetate-associated pathways. PMID:10894724

  2. Secondary NAD+ deficiency in the inherited defect of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liyan; Ibrahim, Khalid; Stucki, Martin; Frapolli, Michele; Shahbeck, Noora; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter; Penberthy, W Todd; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Häberle, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency is an ultra-rare inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been described in only three patients so far. The disease is characterized by neonatal onset of severe encephalopathy, low levels of glutamine in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, chronic moderate hyperammonemia, and an overall poor prognosis in the absence of an effective treatment. Recently, enteral glutamine supplementation was shown to be a safe and effective therapy for this disease but there are no data available on the long-term effects of this intervention. The amino acid glutamine, severely lacking in this disorder, is central to many metabolic pathways in the human organism and is involved in the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) starting from tryptophan or niacin as nicotinate, but not nicotinamide. Using fibroblasts, leukocytes, and immortalized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from a patient carrying a GLUL gene point mutation associated with impaired GS activity, we tested whether glutamine deficiency in this patient results in NAD(+) depletion and whether it can be rescued by supplementation with glutamine, nicotinamide or nicotinate. The present study shows that congenital GS deficiency is associated with NAD(+) depletion in fibroblasts, leukocytes and PBSC, which may contribute to the severe clinical phenotype of the disease. Furthermore, it shows that NAD(+) depletion can be rescued by nicotinamide supplementation in fibroblasts and leukocytes, which may open up potential therapeutic options for the treatment of this disorder.

  3. Food safety: Structure and expression of the asparagine synthetase gene family of wheat

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Runhong; Curtis, Tanya Y.; Powers, Stephen J.; Xu, Hongwei; Huang, Jianhua; Halford, Nigel G.

    2016-01-01

    Asparagine is an important nitrogen storage and transport molecule, but its accumulation as a free amino acid in crops has implications for food safety because free asparagine is a precursor for acrylamide formation during cooking and processing. Asparagine synthesis occurs by the amidation of aspartate, catalysed by asparagine synthetase, and this study concerned the expression of asparagine synthetase (TaASN) genes in wheat. The expression of three genes, TaASN1-3, was studied in different tissues and in response to nitrogen and sulphur supply. The expression of TaASN2 in the embryo and endosperm during mid to late grain development was the highest of any of the genes in any tissue. Both TaASN1 and TaASN2 increased in expression through grain development, and in the grain of field-grown plants during mid-development in response to sulphur deprivation. However, only TaASN1 was affected by nitrogen or sulphur supply in pot-based experiments, showing complex tissue-specific and developmentally-changing responses. A putative N-motif or GCN4-like regulatory motif was found in the promoter of TaASN1 genes from several cereal species. As the study was completed, a fourth gene, TaASN4, was identified from recently available genome data. Phylogenetic analysis showed that other cereal species have similar asparagine synthetase gene families to wheat. PMID:27110058

  4. Food safety: Structure and expression of the asparagine synthetase gene family of wheat.

    PubMed

    Gao, Runhong; Curtis, Tanya Y; Powers, Stephen J; Xu, Hongwei; Huang, Jianhua; Halford, Nigel G

    2016-03-01

    Asparagine is an important nitrogen storage and transport molecule, but its accumulation as a free amino acid in crops has implications for food safety because free asparagine is a precursor for acrylamide formation during cooking and processing. Asparagine synthesis occurs by the amidation of aspartate, catalysed by asparagine synthetase, and this study concerned the expression of asparagine synthetase (TaASN) genes in wheat. The expression of three genes, TaASN1-3, was studied in different tissues and in response to nitrogen and sulphur supply. The expression of TaASN2 in the embryo and endosperm during mid to late grain development was the highest of any of the genes in any tissue. Both TaASN1 and TaASN2 increased in expression through grain development, and in the grain of field-grown plants during mid-development in response to sulphur deprivation. However, only TaASN1 was affected by nitrogen or sulphur supply in pot-based experiments, showing complex tissue-specific and developmentally-changing responses. A putative N-motif or GCN4-like regulatory motif was found in the promoter of TaASN1 genes from several cereal species. As the study was completed, a fourth gene, TaASN4, was identified from recently available genome data. Phylogenetic analysis showed that other cereal species have similar asparagine synthetase gene families to wheat.

  5. Dual binding sites for translocation catalysis by Escherichia coli glutathionylspermidine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Pai, Chien-Hua; Chiang, Bing-Yu; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Chong, Cheong-Meng; Yen, Fang-Jiun; Chen, Shoujun; Coward, James K; Wang, Andrew H-J; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2006-12-13

    Most organisms use glutathione to regulate intracellular thiol redox balance and protect against oxidative stress; protozoa, however, utilize trypanothione for this purpose. Trypanothione biosynthesis requires ATP-dependent conjugation of glutathione (GSH) to the two terminal amino groups of spermidine by glutathionylspermidine synthetase (GspS) and trypanothione synthetase (TryS), which are considered as drug targets. GspS catalyzes the penultimate step of the biosynthesis-amide bond formation between spermidine and the glycine carboxylate of GSH. We report herein five crystal structures of Escherichia coli GspS in complex with substrate, product or inhibitor. The C-terminal of GspS belongs to the ATP-grasp superfamily with a similar fold to the human glutathione synthetase. GSH is likely phosphorylated at one of two GSH-binding sites to form an acylphosphate intermediate that then translocates to the other site for subsequent nucleophilic addition of spermidine. We also identify essential amino acids involved in the catalysis. Our results constitute the first structural information on the biochemical features of parasite homologs (including TryS) that underlie their broad specificity for polyamines.

  6. Beneficial consequences of a selective glutamine synthetase inhibitor in oats and legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1988-01-01

    We report on the effects of administering a unique glutamine synthetase inhibitor to cereals and N/sub 2/-fixing legumes. A bacterium (Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci) delivers this inhibitor to provide extended treatment periods; we inoculated the root systems of oat and legume plants with pv. tabaci to provide for delivery of this inhibitor to their root or root/nodule systems. Inoculation of legumes is accompanied by increased plant growth, total plant nitrogen, nodulation, and nitrogen fixation activity. Inoculation of the oats is accompanied by either of two results depending upon the genotype of the oat plant. One result is inhibition of plant growth followed by plant death as consequences of the loss of all of the glutamine synthetase activities in the plant and the subsequent accumulation of ammonia and cessation of nitrate uptake. The second and opposite result is observed in a small population of oats screened from a commercial cultivar and includes increased plant growth and leaf protein. The effects of this inhibitor can be beneficial when applied to appropriate plant material. In an attempt to effectively communicate these findings to the reader, we first introduce the inhibitor (a novel amino acid) and its bacterial delivery systems, the target of the inhibitor (glutamine synthetase-catalyzed ammonia assimilation), and the two different nitrogen economics in the legume and cereal plants used experimentally. The physiological, biochemical, and molecular genetic consequences of the inhibitor action in cereals and legumes, as we presently understand them, are then presented. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.,

  7. Plasmodium falciparum mitochondria import tRNAs along with an active phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arvind; Sharma, Amit

    2015-02-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum protein translation enzymes aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are an emergent family of drug targets. The aaRS ensemble catalyses transfer of amino acids to cognate tRNAs, thus providing charged tRNAs for ribosomal consumption. P. falciparum proteome expression relies on a total of 36 aaRSs for the three translationally independent compartments of cytoplasm, apicoplast and mitochondria. In the present study, we show that, of this set of 36, a single genomic copy of mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (mFRS) is targeted to the parasite mitochondria, and that the mFRS gene is exclusive to malaria parasites within the apicomplexan phyla. Our protein cellular localization studies based on immunofluorescence data show that, along with mFRS, P. falciparum harbours two more phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (FRS) assemblies that are localized to its apicoplast and cytoplasm. The 'extra' mFRS is found in mitochondria of all asexual blood stage parasites and is competent in aminoacylation. We show further that the parasite mitochondria import tRNAs from the cytoplasmic tRNA pool. Hence drug targeting of FRSs presents a unique opportunity to potentially stall protein production in all three parasite translational compartments.

  8. A fluorescence-based coupling reaction for monitoring the activity of recombinant human NAD synthetase.

    PubMed

    Bembenek, Michael E; Kuhn, Eric; Mallender, William D; Pullen, Lester; Li, Ping; Parsons, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    NAD synthetase is responsible for the conversion of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. This reaction provides a biosynthetic route of the coenzyme and, thus, a source of cellular reducing equivalents. Alterations in the oxidative reductive potential of the cell have been implicated as a contributing factor in many disease states. Thus, this enzyme represents a new class of potential drug targets, and, hence, our efforts were focused upon developing a robust assay for utilization in a high throughput screen. Toward that end, we describe a coupled enzyme assay format for the measurement of recombinant human NAD synthetase by employing lactate dehydrogenase in a cycling/amplification reaction linked ultimately to the fluorescence generation of resorufin from resazurin via diaphorase. We present kinetics of the reaction of NAD synthetase in the coupled assay format, optimization conditions, and inhibition of the reaction by gossypol [1,1',6,6',7,7'-hexahydroxy-3,3'-dimethyl-5,5'-bis(1-methylethyl)-[2,2'- binaphthalene]-8,8'-dicarboxaldehyde] and illustrate the robustness of the assay by demonstrating 384-well microtiter plate uniformity statistics. Collectively, our results show that the assay method is both robust and well suited for this class of enzymes involved in the NAD+ biosynthetic pathway.

  9. Glutamine synthetase gene expression and glutamate transporters in C6-glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Baber, Zafeer; Haghighat, Nasrin

    2010-12-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the major glutamate-forming enzyme of vertebrae and is accepted to be a marker of astroglial cells. Maturation of astroglial cells is characterized by an increase in GS activity, and the regulation of this enzyme is the topic of many publications. The amino acid glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and mediates normal excitatory synaptic transmission by interaction with postsynaptic receptors. Glutamate also acts as a potent neurotoxin when present at high concentration. Glutamate neurotoxicity plays an important role in the pathophysiology of many neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In the normal condition, L-glutamate is predominantly taken up, metabolized and recycled by astrocytes through the glutamate transporters (GLAST/GLT1) and glutamine synthetase (GS) catalytic activity. Because of the fundamental role of these glutamate transporters and the glutamine synthetase enzyme in controlling cerebral glutamate level, regulation of GS and studying of the glutamate transporters in glial cells is important. Astrocytes are supportive cells and act as the site of detoxification of glutamate in the brain. However, their isolation from the brain is a tedious, costly and time consuming procedure. On the other hand, the C6-glioma cells are readily available on the market. They are well characterized and have been a useful model for CNS glia in many laboratories. For this study, we used the C6-glioma cell line as a model system. We examined the presence or absence of glial specific glutamate transporters (GLTI and GLAST) in C6-glioma cells, which was done by immunocytochemistry. We also examined glutamine synthetase gene expression in these cells by treatment of the C6-glioma cells with estrogen (17ß estradiol). The findings from this study provide useful information about C6-glioma cells which makes the study of the CNS tremendously inexpensive.

  10. Mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase mutations underlie fatal infantile Alpers encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Elo, Jenni M; Yadavalli, Srujana S; Euro, Liliya; Isohanni, Pirjo; Götz, Alexandra; Carroll, Christopher J; Valanne, Leena; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Uusimaa, Johanna; Paetau, Anders; Caruso, Eric M; Pihko, Helena; Ibba, Michael; Tyynismaa, Henna; Suomalainen, Anu

    2012-10-15

    Next-generation sequencing has turned out to be a powerful tool to uncover genetic basis of childhood mitochondrial disorders. We utilized whole-exome analysis and discovered novel compound heterozygous mutations in FARS2 (mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA synthetase), encoding the mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetase (mtPheRS) in two patients with fatal epileptic mitochondrial encephalopathy. The mutations affected highly conserved amino acids, p.I329T and p.D391V. Recently, a homozygous FARS2 variant p.Y144C was reported in a Saudi girl with mitochondrial encephalopathy, but the pathogenic role of the variant remained open. Clinical features, including postnatal onset, catastrophic epilepsy, lactic acidemia, early lethality and neuroimaging findings of the patients with FARS2 variants, resembled each other closely, and neuropathology was consistent with Alpers syndrome. Our structural analysis of mtPheRS predicted that p.I329T weakened ATP binding in the aminoacylation domain, and in vitro studies with recombinant mutant protein showed decreased affinity of this variant to ATP. Furthermore, p.D391V and p.Y144C were predicted to disrupt synthetase function by interrupting the rotation of the tRNA anticodon stem-binding domain from a closed to an open form. In vitro characterization indicated reduced affinity of p.D391V mutant protein to phenylalanine, whereas p.Y144C disrupted tRNA binding. The stability of p.I329T and p.D391V mutants in a refolding assay was impaired. Our results imply that the three FARS2 mutations directly impair aminoacylation function and stability of mtPheRS, leading to a decrease in overall tRNA charging capacity. This study establishes a new genetic cause of infantile mitochondrial Alpers encephalopathy and reports a new mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase as a cause of mitochondrial disease.

  11. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2008-10-07

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  12. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2011-03-22

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  13. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G; Wang, Lei

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  14. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G; Wang, Lei

    2011-12-06

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  15. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2009-04-28

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  16. In Situ Glutamine Synthetase Activity in a Marine Unicellular Alga (Development of a Sensitive Colorimetric Assay and the Effects of Nitrogen Status on Enzyme Activity).

    PubMed Central

    Rees, TAV.; Larson, T. R.; Heldens, JWG.; Huning, FGJ.

    1995-01-01

    A malachite green colorimetric assay for glutamine synthetase is described. Glutamine synthetase activity was determined in situ in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin using cells permeabilized by freeze/thawing. Higher activities were obtained with cells permeabilized in N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N[prime]-2-ethanesulfonic acid compared with N-tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl-3-aminopropanesulfonic acid, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane, or imidazole, and the optimum pH was 7.9. Activities were higher in cells permeabilized in the presence of reductant, particularly dithiothreitol. Glutamine synthetase activities were markedly decreased in the presence of methionine sulfoximine. In the presence of saturating concentrations of glutamate and ATP, the apparent Km for ammonia was 320 [mu]M, but this value decreased to 110 [mu]M with subsaturating concentrations of glutamate and ATP. The apparent Km values for glutamate and ATP, in the presence of saturating concentrations of ammonia, were 9.7 and 2.9 mM, respectively. Ammonia-grown cells had lower glutamine synthetase activities than did nitrate-grown cells. During nitrogen starvation of both ammonia- and nitrate-grown cells, glutamine synthetase activities increased rapidly during the first 8 h, reaching maximum values after 24 to 48 h. Moreover, the time course for the increases in glutamine synthetase activities and rate of methylamine uptake following the transfer of nitrate-grown cells to nitrogen-deficient medium were very similar. In nitrate-grown cells and cells deprived of combined nitrogen, glutamine synthetase activities and maximum rates of ammonia uptake gave comparable values when measured at the same temperature (20[deg]C). PMID:12228676

  17. Characterization of Two Members among the Five ADP-Forming Acyl Coenzyme A (Acyl-CoA) Synthetases Reveals the Presence of a 2-(Imidazol-4-yl)Acetyl-CoA Synthetase in Thermococcus kodakarensis

    PubMed Central

    Awano, Tomotsugu; Wilming, Anja; Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Fukui, Toshiaki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2014-01-01

    The genome of Thermococcus kodakarensis, along with those of most Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species, harbors five paralogous genes encoding putative α subunits of nucleoside diphosphate (NDP)-forming acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetases. The substrate specificities of the protein products for three of these paralogs have been clarified through studies on the individual enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus and T. kodakarensis. Here we have examined the biochemical properties of the remaining two acyl-CoA synthetase proteins from T. kodakarensis. The TK0944 and TK2127 genes encoding the two α subunits were each coexpressed with the β subunit-encoding TK0943 gene. In both cases, soluble proteins with an α2β2 structure were obtained and their activities toward various acids in the ADP-forming reaction were examined. The purified TK0944/TK0943 protein (ACS IIITk) accommodated a broad range of acids that corresponded to those generated in the oxidative metabolism of Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, Met, Phe, and Cys. In contrast, the TK2127/TK0943 protein exhibited relevant levels of activity only toward 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetate, a metabolite of His degradation, and was thus designated 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase (ICSTk), a novel enzyme. Kinetic analyses were performed on both proteins with their respective substrates. In T. kodakarensis, we found that the addition of histidine to the medium led to increases in intracellular ADP-forming 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase activity, and 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetate was detected in the culture medium, suggesting that ICSTk participates in histidine catabolism. The results presented here, together with those of previous studies, have clarified the substrate specificities of all five known NDP-forming acyl-CoA synthetase proteins in the Thermococcales. PMID:24163338

  18. Characterization of two members among the five ADP-forming acyl coenzyme A (Acyl-CoA) synthetases reveals the presence of a 2-(Imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase in Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    PubMed

    Awano, Tomotsugu; Wilming, Anja; Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Fukui, Toshiaki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2014-01-01

    The genome of Thermococcus kodakarensis, along with those of most Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species, harbors five paralogous genes encoding putative α subunits of nucleoside diphosphate (NDP)-forming acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetases. The substrate specificities of the protein products for three of these paralogs have been clarified through studies on the individual enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus and T. kodakarensis. Here we have examined the biochemical properties of the remaining two acyl-CoA synthetase proteins from T. kodakarensis. The TK0944 and TK2127 genes encoding the two α subunits were each coexpressed with the β subunit-encoding TK0943 gene. In both cases, soluble proteins with an α2β2 structure were obtained and their activities toward various acids in the ADP-forming reaction were examined. The purified TK0944/TK0943 protein (ACS IIITk) accommodated a broad range of acids that corresponded to those generated in the oxidative metabolism of Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, Met, Phe, and Cys. In contrast, the TK2127/TK0943 protein exhibited relevant levels of activity only toward 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetate, a metabolite of His degradation, and was thus designated 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase (ICSTk), a novel enzyme. Kinetic analyses were performed on both proteins with their respective substrates. In T. kodakarensis, we found that the addition of histidine to the medium led to increases in intracellular ADP-forming 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase activity, and 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetate was detected in the culture medium, suggesting that ICSTk participates in histidine catabolism. The results presented here, together with those of previous studies, have clarified the substrate specificities of all five known NDP-forming acyl-CoA synthetase proteins in the Thermococcales.

  19. Glutamine Synthetase: Role in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Norenberg, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an ATP-dependent enzyme found in most species that synthesizes glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In brain, GS is exclusively located in astrocytes where it serves to maintain the glutamate-glutamine cycle, as well as nitrogen metabolism. Changes in the activity of GS, as well as its gene expression, along with excitotoxicity, have been identified in a number of neurological conditions. The literature describing alterations in the activation and gene expression of GS, as well as its involvement in different neurological disorders, however, is incomplete. This review summarizes changes in GS gene expression/activity and its potential contribution to the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders, including hepatic encephalopathy, ischemia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, and astroglial neoplasms. This review also explores the possibility of targeting GS in the therapy of these conditions.

  20. Mechanistic issues in asparagine synthetase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Richards, N G; Schuster, S M

    1998-01-01

    The enzymatic synthesis of asparagine is an ATP-dependent process that utilizes the nitrogen atom derived from either glutamine or ammonia. Despite a long history of kinetic and mechanistic investigation, there is no universally accepted catalytic mechanism for this seemingly straightforward carboxyl group activating enzyme, especially as regards those steps immediately preceding amide bond formation. This chapter considers four issues dealing with the mechanism: (a) the structural organization of the active site(s) partaking in glutamine utilization and aspartate activation; (b) the relationship of asparagine synthetase to other amidotransferases; (c) the way in which ATP is used to activate the beta-carboxyl group; and (d) the detailed mechanism by which nitrogen is transferred.

  1. Substrate specificity of L-delta-(alpha-aminoadipoyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase from Cephalosporium acremonium: demonstration of the structure of several unnatural tripeptide products.

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, J E; Shiau, C Y; Byford, M F; Schofield, C J

    1994-01-01

    Potential substrates for L-delta-(alpha-aminoadipoyl)-L-(cysteinyl)-D-valine (ACV) synthetase were initially identified using both the amino-acid-dependent ATP<-->pyrophosphate exchange reaction catalysed by the enzyme and the incorporation of 14C-radiolabelled cysteine and valine into potential peptide products. S-Carboxymethylcysteine was an effective substitute for alpha-aminoadipate and both allylglycine and vinylglycine could substitute for cysteine, indicating that the thiol group of cysteine is not essential for peptide formation. L-allo-Isoleucine but not L-isoleucine substituted effectively for valine. The structures of the presumed peptide products derived from these amino acids were confirmed by combined use of electrospray-ionization m.s. (e.s.m.s.) and 1H n.m.r. These results clearly indicate that, in common with other peptide synthetases, but in contrast with ribosomal peptide synthesis, ACV synthetase has a relatively broad substrate specificity. PMID:8042979

  2. Structural modeling of tissue-specific mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS2) defects predicts differential effects on aminoacylation.

    PubMed

    Euro, Liliya; Konovalova, Svetlana; Asin-Cayuela, Jorge; Tulinius, Már; Griffin, Helen; Horvath, Rita; Taylor, Robert W; Chinnery, Patrick F; Schara, Ulrike; Thorburn, David R; Suomalainen, Anu; Chihade, Joseph; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of mitochondrial protein synthesis is dependent on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mtARSs) and the mitochondrial DNA-encoded tRNAs. The recent advances in whole-exome sequencing have revealed the importance of the mtARS proteins for mitochondrial pathophysiology since nearly every nuclear gene for mtARS (out of 19) is now recognized as a disease gene for mitochondrial disease. Typically, defects in each mtARS have been identified in one tissue-specific disease, most commonly affecting the brain, or in one syndrome. However, mutations in the AARS2 gene for mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (mtAlaRS) have been reported both in patients with infantile-onset cardiomyopathy and in patients with childhood to adulthood-onset leukoencephalopathy. We present here an investigation of the effects of the described mutations on the structure of the synthetase, in an effort to understand the tissue-specific outcomes of the different mutations. The mtAlaRS differs from the other mtARSs because in addition to the aminoacylation domain, it has a conserved editing domain for deacylating tRNAs that have been mischarged with incorrect amino acids. We show that the cardiomyopathy phenotype results from a single allele, causing an amino acid change R592W in the editing domain of AARS2, whereas the leukodystrophy mutations are located in other domains of the synthetase. Nevertheless, our structural analysis predicts that all mutations reduce the aminoacylation activity of the synthetase, because all mtAlaRS domains contribute to tRNA binding for aminoacylation. According to our model, the cardiomyopathy mutations severely compromise aminoacylation whereas partial activity is retained by the mutation combinations found in the leukodystrophy patients. These predictions provide a hypothesis for the molecular basis of the distinct tissue-specific phenotypic outcomes.

  3. Crystal structures and biochemical analyses suggest a unique mechanism and role for human glycyl-tRNA synthetase in Ap4A homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rey-Ting; Chong, Yeeting E; Guo, Min; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2009-10-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases catalyze the attachment of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs for protein synthesis. However, the aminoacylation reaction can be diverted to produce diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), a universal pleiotropic signaling molecule needed for cell regulation pathways. The only known mechanism for Ap4A production by a tRNA synthetase is through the aminoacylation reaction intermediate aminoacyl-AMP, thus making Ap4A synthesis amino acid-dependent. Here, we demonstrate a new mechanism for Ap4A synthesis. Crystal structures and biochemical analyses show that human glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) produces Ap4A by direct condensation of two ATPs, independent of glycine concentration. Interestingly, whereas the first ATP-binding pocket is conserved for all class II tRNA synthetases, the second ATP pocket is formed by an insertion domain that is unique to GlyRS, suggesting that GlyRS is the only tRNA synthetase catalyzing direct Ap4A synthesis. A special role for GlyRS in Ap4A homeostasis is proposed.

  4. Nucleotide triphosphate promiscuity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis dethiobiotin synthetase.

    PubMed

    Salaemae, Wanisa; Yap, Min Y; Wegener, Kate L; Booker, Grant W; Wilce, Matthew C J; Polyak, Steven W

    2015-05-01

    Dethiobiotin synthetase (DTBS) plays a crucial role in biotin biosynthesis in microorganisms, fungi, and plants. Due to its importance in bacterial pathogenesis, and the absence of a human homologue, DTBS is a promising target for the development of new antibacterials desperately needed to combat antibiotic resistance. Here we report the first X-ray structure of DTBS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtDTBS) bound to a nucleotide triphosphate (CTP). The nucleoside base is stabilized in its pocket through hydrogen-bonding interactions with the protein backbone, rather than amino acid side chains. This resulted in the unexpected finding that MtDTBS could utilise ATP, CTP, GTP, ITP, TTP, or UTP with similar Km and kcat values, although the enzyme had the highest affinity for CTP in competitive binding and surface plasmon resonance assays. This is in contrast to other DTBS homologues that preferentially bind ATP primarily through hydrogen-bonds between the purine base and the carboxamide side chain of a key asparagine. Mutational analysis performed alongside in silico experiments revealed a gate-keeper role for Asn175 in Escherichia coli DTBS that excludes binding of other nucleotide triphosphates. Here we provide evidence to show that MtDTBS has a broad nucleotide specificity due to the absence of the gate-keeper residue.

  5. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiongming; Marygold, Steven J; Gharib, Walid H; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, allowing them to decode the triplet code during translation. Through different mechanisms aaRSs also perform several non-canonical functions in transcription, translation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and inflammation. Drosophila has become a preferred system to model human diseases caused by mutations in aaRS genes, to dissect effects of reduced translation or non-canonical activities, and to study aminoacylation and translational fidelity. However, the lack of a systematic annotation of this gene family has hampered such studies. Here, we report the identification of the entire set of aaRS genes in the fly genome and we predict their roles based on experimental evidence and/or orthology. Further, we propose a new, systematic and logical nomenclature for aaRSs. We also review the research conducted on Drosophila aaRSs to date. Together, our work provides the foundation for further research in the fly aaRS field. PMID:26761199

  6. Evidence that tRNA synthetase-directed proton transfer stops mistranslation.

    PubMed

    Waas, William F; Schimmel, Paul

    2007-10-30

    To prevent mistranslation, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) discriminate against noncognate amino acids and cellular metabolites. Defects in specificity produce statistical proteins which, in mammalian cells, lead to activation of the unfolded protein response and cell death. Because of inherent limitations in amino acid discrimination by a single active site, AARSs evolved a separate domain to clear mischarged amino acids. Although the structure of a widely distributed editing domain for ThrRS and AlaRS is known, the mechanism of amino acid clearance remains elusive. This domain has two motifs that together have four conserved residues in the pocket used to clear serine from mischarged tRNAs. Here, using ThrRS as an example, rapid single-turnover kinetics, mutagenesis, and solvent isotope analysis show that a strictly conserved histidine (between ThrRS and AlaRS) extracts a proton in the chemical step of the editing reaction. Three other conserved residues, and two additional residues in the editing pocket, are not directly implicated in the chemical step. These results are relevant to the previously reported mutagenesis of the homologous editing pocket of alanyl-tRNA synthetase, where even a mild defect in editing causes neurodegeneration in the mouse. Thus, a single proton-transfer event needed to prevent mistranslation can have profound implications for disease.

  7. Structural Insights into the Polyphyletic Origins of Glycyl tRNA Synthetases.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; Santamaría-Suárez, Hugo Aníbal; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Beinsteiner, Brice; Mertens, Haydyn; Svergun, Dmitri; Brieba, Luis G; Grøtli, Morten; Torres-Larios, Alfredo

    2016-07-08

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. A structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor.

  8. Structural Insights into the Polyphyletic Origins of Glycyl tRNA Synthetases*♦

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; Santamaría-Suárez, Hugo Aníbal; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Beinsteiner, Brice; Brieba, Luis G.; Grøtli, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. A structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor. PMID:27226617

  9. Structural insights into the polyphyletic origins of glycyl tRNA synthetases

    DOE PAGES

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; ...

    2016-05-23

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifexmore » aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. Furthermore, a structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor.« less

  10. Structural insights into the polyphyletic origins of glycyl tRNA synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; Santamaría-Suárez, Hugo Aníbal; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Beinsteiner, Brice; Mertens, Haydyn; Svergun, Dmitri; Brieba, Luis G.; Grøtli, Morten; Torres-Larios, Alfredo

    2016-05-23

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. Furthermore, a structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor.

  11. Evolution of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase quaternary structure and activity: Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Sanni, A; Walter, P; Boulanger, Y; Ebel, J P; Fasiolo, F

    1991-01-01

    Phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases [L-phenylalanine:tRNAPhe ligase (AMP-forming), EC 6.1.1.20] from Escherichia coli, yeast cytoplasm, and mammalian cytoplasm have an unusual conserved alpha 2 beta 2 quaternary structure that is shared by only one other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. Both subunits are required for activity. We show here that a single mitochondrial polypeptide from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an active phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase. This protein (the MSF1 gene product) is active as a monomer. It has all three characteristic sequence motifs of the class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and its activity may result from the recruitment of additional sequences into an alpha-subunit-like structure. Images PMID:1924298

  12. Orthogonal translation components for the in vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Alfonta, Lital; Chittuluru, Johnathan R.; Deiters, Alexander; Groff, Dan; Summerer, Daniel; Tsao, Meng -Lin; Wang, Jiangyun; Wu, Ning; Xie, Jianming; Zeng, Huaqiang; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad; Turner, James

    2015-08-11

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that can incorporate unnatural amino acid into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli, or in a eukaryotic host such as a yeast cell. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing unnatural amino acids, and translation systems.

  13. Orthogonal translation components for the in vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.; Xie, Jianming; Zeng, Huaqiang

    2012-07-10

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli, or in a eukaryotic host such as a yeast cell. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal synthetases, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing unnatural amino acids, and translation systems.

  14. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  16. Structural diversity and protein engineering of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Perona, John J; Hadd, Andrew

    2012-11-06

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are the enzymes that ensure faithful transmission of genetic information in all living cells, and are central to the developing technologies for expanding the capacity of the translation apparatus to incorporate nonstandard amino acids into proteins in vivo. The 24 known aaRS families are divided into two classes that exhibit functional evolutionary convergence. Each class features an active site domain with a common fold that binds ATP, the amino acid, and the 3'-terminus of tRNA, embellished by idiosyncratic further domains that bind distal portions of the tRNA and enhance specificity. Fidelity in the expression of the genetic code requires that the aaRS be selective for both amino acids and tRNAs, a substantial challenge given the presence of structurally very similar noncognate substrates of both types. Here we comprehensively review central themes concerning the architectures of the protein structures and the remarkable dual-substrate selectivities, with a view toward discerning the most important issues that still substantially limit our capacity for rational protein engineering. A suggested general approach to rational design is presented, which should yield insight into the identities of the protein-RNA motifs at the heart of the genetic code, while also offering a basis for improving the catalytic properties of engineered tRNA synthetases emerging from genetic selections.

  17. Glutamine synthetase induced spinal seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Won; Yoon, Young Sul; Matsumoto, Masato; Huang, Wencheng; Ceraulo, Phil; Young, Wise

    2003-02-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a key enzyme in the regulation of glutamate neurotransmission in the central nervous system. It is responsible for converting glutamate to glutamine, consuming one ATP and NH3 in the process. Glutamate is neurotoxic when it accumulates in extracellular fluids. We investigated the effects of GS in both a spinal cord injury (SCI) model and normal rats. 0.1-ml of low (2- micro M) and high (55- micro M) concentrations of GS were applied, intrathecally, to the spinal cord of rats under pentobarbital anesthesia. Immediately after an intrathecal injection into the L1-L3 space, the rats developed convulsive movements. These movements initially consisted of myoclonic twitches of the paravertebral muscles close to the injection site, repeated tonic and clonic contractions and extensions of the hind limbs (hind limb seizures) that spread to the fore limbs, and finally rotational axial movements of the body. An EMG of the paravertebral muscles, fore and hind limbs, showed the extent of the muscle activities. GS (2- micro M) caused spinal seizures in the rats after the SCI, and GS (6- micro M) produced seizures in the uninjured anesthetized rats. Denatured GS (70 degrees C, 1 hour) also produced spinal seizures, although higher concentrations were required. We suggest that GS may be directly blocking the release of GABA, or the receptors, in the spinal cord.

  18. Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) ablation in mice increases energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and delays fat absorption

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: The family of acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes (ACSL) activates fatty acids within cells to generate long chain fatty acyl CoA (FACoA). The differing metabolic fates of FACoAs such as incorporation into neutral lipids, phospholipids, and oxidation pathways are differentially regulated by the ...

  19. Isolation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae long chain fatty acyl:CoA synthetase gene (FAA1) and assessment of its role in protein N- myristoylation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Regulation of myristoylCoA pools in Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays an important role in modulating the activity of myristoylCoA:protein N- myristoyltransferase (NMT), an essential enzyme with an ordered Bi Bi reaction that catalyzes the transfer of myristate from myristoylCoA to greater than or equal to 12 cellular proteins. At least two pathways are available for generating myristoylCoA: de novo synthesis by the multifunctional, multisubunit fatty acid synthetase complex (FAS) and activation of exogenous myristate by acylCoA synthetase. The FAA1 (fatty acid activation) gene has been isolated by genetic complementation of a faal mutant. This single copy gene, which maps to the right arm of chromosome XV, specifies a long chain acylCoA synthetase of 700 amino acids. Analyses of strains containing NMT1 and a faal null mutation indicated that FAA1 is not essential for vegetative growth when an active de novo pathway for fatty acid synthesis is present. The role of FAA1 in cellular lipid metabolism and protein N-myristoylation was therefore assessed in strains subjected to biochemical or genetic blockade of FAS. At 36 degrees C, FAA1 is required for the utilization of exogenous myristate by NMT and for the synthesis of several phospholipid species. This requirement is not apparent at 24 or 30 degrees C, suggesting that S. cerevisiae contains another acylCoA synthetase activity whose chain length and/or temperature optima may differ from Faalp. PMID:1572893

  20. Xylan synthetase activity in differentiated xylem cells of sycamore trees (Acer pseudoplatanus).

    PubMed

    Dalessandro, G; Northcote, D H

    1981-01-01

    Particulate enzymic preparations obtained from homogenates of differentiated xylem cells isolated from sycamore trees, catalyzed the formation of a radioactive xylan in the presence of UDP-D-[U-(14)C]xylose as substrate. The synthesized xylan was not dialyzable through Visking cellophane tubing. Successive extraction with cold water, hot water and 5% NaOH dissolved respectively 15, 5 and 80% of the radioactive polymer. Complete acid hydrolysis of the water-insoluble polysaccharide synthesized from UDP-D-[U-(14)C]xylose released all the radioactivity as xylose. β-1,4-Xylodextrins, degree of polymerization 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, were obtained by partial acid hydrolysis (fuming HCl or 0.1 M HCl) of radioactive xylan. The polymer was hydrolysed to xylose, xylobiose and xylotriose by Driselase which contains 1,4-β xylanase activities. Methylation and then hydrolysis of the xylan released two methylated sugars which were identified as di-O-methyl[(14)C]xylose and tri-O-methyl-[(14)C]xylose, suggesting a 1→4-linked polymer. The linkage was confirmed by periodate oxidation studies. The apparent Km value of the synthetase for UDP-D-xylose was 0.4 mM. Xylan synthetase activity was not potentiated in the presence of a detergent. The enzymic activity was stimulated by Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) ions, although EDTA in the range of concentrations between 0.01 and 1 mM did not affect the reaction rate. It appears that the xylan synthetase system associated with membranes obtained from differentiated xylem cells of sycamore trees may serve for catalyzing the in vivo synthesis of the xylan main chain during the biogenesis of the plant cell wall.

  1. Dihydrofolate synthetase and folylpolyglutamate synthetase: direct evidence for intervention of acyl phosphate intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, R.V.; Shane, B.; McGuire, J.J.; Coward, J.K.

    1988-12-13

    The transfer of /sup 17/O and/or /sup 18/O from (COOH-/sup 17/O or -/sup 18/O) enriched substrates to inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/) has been demonstrated for two enzyme-catalyzed reactions involved in folate biosynthesis and glutamylation. COOH-/sup 18/O-labeled folate, methotrexate, and dihydropteroate, in addition to (/sup 17/O)-glutamate, were synthesized and used as substrates for folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) isolated from Escherichia coli, hog liver, and rat liver and for dihydrofolate synthetase (DHFS) isolated from E. coli. P/sub i/ was purified from the reaction mixtures and converted to trimethyl phosphate (TMP), which was then analyzed for /sup 17/O and /sup 18/O enrichment by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and/or mass spectroscopy. In the reactions catalyzed by the E. coli enzymes, both NMR and quantitative mass spectral analyses established that transfer of the oxygen isotope from the substrate /sup 18/O-enriched carboxyl group to P/sub i/ occurred, thereby providing strong evidence for an acyl phosphate intermediate in both the FPGS- and DHFS-catalyzed reactions. Similar oxygen-transfer experiments were carried out by use of two mammalian enzymes. The small amounts of P/sub i/ obtained from reactions catalyzed by these less abundant FPGS proteins precluded the use of NMR techniques. However, mass spectral analysis of the TMP derived from the mammalian FPGS-catalyzed reactions showed clearly that /sup 18/O transfer had occurred.

  2. Functional linkage between the glutaminase and synthetase domains of carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase. Role of serine 44 in carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase-aspartate carbamoyltransferase-dihydroorotase (cad).

    PubMed

    Hewagama, A; Guy, H I; Vickrey, J F; Evans, D R

    1999-10-01

    Mammalian carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase is part of carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase-aspartate carbamoyltransferase-dihydroorotase (CAD), a multifunctional protein that also catalyzes the second and third steps of pyrimidine biosynthesis. Carbamoyl phosphate synthesis requires the concerted action of the glutaminase (GLN) and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domains of CAD. There is a functional linkage between these domains such that glutamine hydrolysis on the GLN domain does not occur at a significant rate unless ATP and HCO(3)(-), the other substrates needed for carbamoyl phosphate synthesis, bind to the synthetase domain. The GLN domain consists of catalytic and attenuation subdomains. In the separately cloned GLN domain, the catalytic subdomain is down-regulated by interactions with the attenuation domain, a process thought to be part of the functional linkage. Replacement of Ser(44) in the GLN attenuation domain with alanine increases the k(cat)/K(m) for glutamine hydrolysis 680-fold. The formation of a functional hybrid between the mammalian Ser(44) GLN domain and the Escherichia coli carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase large subunit had little effect on glutamine hydrolysis. In contrast, ATP and HCO(3)(-) did not stimulate the glutaminase activity, indicating that the interdomain linkage had been disrupted. In accord with this interpretation, the rate of glutamine hydrolysis and carbamoyl phosphate synthesis were no longer coordinated. Approximately 3 times more glutamine was hydrolyzed by the Ser(44) --> Ala mutant than that needed for carbamoyl phosphate synthesis. Ser(44), the only attenuation subdomain residue that extends into the GLN active site, appears to be an integral component of the regulatory circuit that phases glutamine hydrolysis and carbamoyl phosphate synthesis.

  3. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming) is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1) and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2). Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types. PMID:21867507

  4. Citric acid cycle and the origin of MARS.

    PubMed

    Eswarappa, Sandeepa M; Fox, Paul L

    2013-05-01

    The vertebrate multiaminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex (MARS) is an assemblage of nine aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and three non-synthetase scaffold proteins, aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex-interacting multifunctional protein (AIMP)1, AIMP2, and AIMP3. The evolutionary origin of the MARS is unclear, as is the significance of the inclusion of only nine of 20 tRNA synthetases. Eight of the nine amino acids corresponding to ARSs of the MARS are derived from two citric acid cycle intermediates, α-ketoglutatrate and oxaloacetate. We propose that the metabolic link with the citric acid cycle, the appearance of scaffolding proteins AIMP2 and AIMP3, and the subsequent disappearance of the glyoxylate cycle, together facilitated the origin of the MARS in a common ancestor of metazoans and choanoflagellates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Citric acid cycle and the origin of MARS

    PubMed Central

    Eswarappa, Sandeepa M.; Fox, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate multi-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex (MARS) is an assemblage of nine aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and three non-synthetase scaffold proteins, AIMP1 (aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex-interacting multifunctional protein-1), AIMP2, and AIMP3. The evolutionary origin of the MARS is unclear, as is the significance of the inclusion of only nine of twenty tRNA synthetases. Eight of the nine amino acids corresponding to ARSs of the MARS are derived from two citric acid cycle intermediates, α-ketoglutatrate and oxaloacetate. We propose that the metabolic link with the citric acid cycle, the appearance of scaffolding proteins AIMP2 and AIMP3, and the subsequent disappearance of the glyoxylate cycle, together facilitated the origin of the MARS in a common ancestor of metazoans and choanoflagellates. PMID:23415030

  6. Cloning and sequencing of the gltX gene, encoding the glutamyl-tRNA synthetase of Rhizobium meliloti A2.

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, S; Gagnon, Y; Bordeleau, L M; Lapointe, J

    1989-01-01

    The gltX gene, coding for the glutamyl-tRNA synthetase of Rhizobium meliloti A2, was cloned by using as probe a synthetic oligonucleotide corresponding to the amino acid sequence of a segment of the glutamyl-tRNA synthetase. The codons chosen for this 42-mer were those most frequently used in a set of R. meliloti genes. DNA sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 484 codons, encoding a polypeptide of Mr 54,166 containing the amino acid sequences of an NH2-terminal and various internal fragments of the enzyme. Compared with the amino acid sequence of the glutamyl-tRNA synthetase of Escherichia coli, the N-terminal third of the R. meliloti enzyme was strongly conserved (52% identity); the second third was moderately conserved (38% identity) and included a few highly conserved segments, whereas no significant similarity was found in the C-terminal third. These results suggest that the C-terminal part of the protein is probably not involved in the recognition of substrates, a feature shared with other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Images PMID:2661539

  7. Antipeptide antibodies that can distinguish specific subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, X.; Henry, R. L.; Takemoto, L. J.; Guikema, J. A.; Wong, P. P.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) root nodules are very similar. However, there are small regions within the sequences that are significantly different between the two polypeptides. The sequences between amino acids 2 and 9 and between 264 and 274 are examples. Three peptides (gamma 2-9, gamma 264-274, and beta 264-274) corresponding to these sequences were synthesized. Antibodies against these peptides were raised in rabbits and purified with corresponding peptide-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bean nodule proteins demonstrated that the anti-beta 264-274 antibodies reacted specifically with the beta polypeptide and the anti-gamma 264-274 and anti-gamma 2-9 antibodies reacted specifically with the gamma polypeptide of the native and denatured glutamine synthetase. These results showed the feasibility of using synthetic peptides in developing antibodies that are capable of distinguishing proteins with similar primary structures.

  8. Antipeptide antibodies that can distinguish specific subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, X.; Henry, R. L.; Takemoto, L. J.; Guikema, J. A.; Wong, P. P.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) root nodules are very similar. However, there are small regions within the sequences that are significantly different between the two polypeptides. The sequences between amino acids 2 and 9 and between 264 and 274 are examples. Three peptides (gamma 2-9, gamma 264-274, and beta 264-274) corresponding to these sequences were synthesized. Antibodies against these peptides were raised in rabbits and purified with corresponding peptide-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bean nodule proteins demonstrated that the anti-beta 264-274 antibodies reacted specifically with the beta polypeptide and the anti-gamma 264-274 and anti-gamma 2-9 antibodies reacted specifically with the gamma polypeptide of the native and denatured glutamine synthetase. These results showed the feasibility of using synthetic peptides in developing antibodies that are capable of distinguishing proteins with similar primary structures.

  9. A single Danio rerio hars gene encodes both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial histidyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Ashley L; Cahan, Sara Helms; Franklyn, Christopher S; Ebert, Alicia M

    2017-01-01

    Histidyl tRNA Synthetase (HARS) is a member of the aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (ARS) family of enzymes. This family of 20 enzymes is responsible for attaching specific amino acids to their cognate tRNA molecules, a critical step in protein synthesis. However, recent work highlighting a growing number of associations between ARS genes and diverse human diseases raises the possibility of new and unexpected functions in this ancient enzyme family. For example, mutations in HARS have been linked to two different neurological disorders, Usher Syndrome Type IIIB and Charcot Marie Tooth peripheral neuropathy. These connections raise the possibility of previously undiscovered roles for HARS in metazoan development, with alterations in these functions leading to complex diseases. In an attempt to establish Danio rerio as a model for studying HARS functions in human disease, we characterized the Danio rerio hars gene and compared it to that of human HARS. Using a combination of bioinformatics, molecular biology, and cellular approaches, we found that while the human genome encodes separate genes for cytoplasmic and mitochondrial HARS protein, the Danio rerio genome encodes a single hars gene which undergoes alternative splicing to produce the respective cytoplasmic and mitochondrial versions of Hars. Nevertheless, while the HARS genes of humans and Danio differ significantly at the genomic level, we found that they are still highly conserved at the amino acid level, underscoring the potential utility of Danio rerio as a model organism for investigating HARS function and its link to human diseases in vivo.

  10. Promiscuous methionyl-tRNA synthetase mediates adaptive mistranslation to protect cells against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Young; Kim, Dae Gyu; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Yang, Won Suk; Hong, Jeena; Kang, Taehee; Oh, Young Sun; Kim, Kyung Rok; Han, Byung Woo; Hwang, Byung Joon; Kang, Beom Sik; Kang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Kim, Sunghoon

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) acylate transfer (t)RNAs with amino acids. Charging tRNAs with the right amino acids is the first step in translation; therefore, the accurate and error-free functioning of ARSs is an essential prerequisite for translational fidelity. A recent study found that methionine (Met) can be incorporated into non-Met residues of proteins through methionylation of non-cognate tRNAs under conditions of oxidative stress. However, it was not understood how this mis-methionylation is achieved. Here, we report that methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MRS) is phosphorylated at Ser209 and Ser825 by extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2) under conditions of stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), and that this phosphorylated MRS shows increased affinity for non-cognate tRNAs with lower affinity for tRNAMet, leading to an increase in Met residues in cellular proteins. The expression of a mutant MRS containing the substitutions S209D and S825D, mimicking dual phosphorylation, reduced ROS levels and cell death. This controlled inaccuracy of MRS seems to serve as a defense mechanism against ROS-mediated damage at the cost of translational fidelity. PMID:25097229

  11. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  12. Antimalarial Benzoxaboroles Target Plasmodium falciparum Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Palencia, Andres; Guo, Denghui; Ahyong, Vida; Dong, Chen; Li, Xianfeng; Hernandez, Vincent S.; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Choi, Wai; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Cooper, Roland; Alley, M. R. K.; Freund, Yvonne R.; DeRisi, Joseph; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for new antimalarials, ideally with novel mechanisms of action. Benzoxaboroles have been shown to be active against bacteria, fungi, and trypanosomes. Therefore, we investigated the antimalarial activity and mechanism of action of 3-aminomethyl benzoxaboroles against Plasmodium falciparum. Two 3-aminomethyl compounds, AN6426 and AN8432, demonstrated good potency against cultured multidrug-resistant (W2 strain) P. falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 310 nM and 490 nM, respectively) and efficacy against murine Plasmodium berghei infection when administered orally once daily for 4 days (90% effective dose [ED90], 7.4 and 16.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively). To characterize mechanisms of action, we selected parasites with decreased drug sensitivity by culturing with stepwise increases in concentration of AN6426. Resistant clones were characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Three generations of resistant parasites had polymorphisms in the predicted editing domain of the gene encoding a P. falciparum leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS; PF3D7_0622800) and in another gene (PF3D7_1218100), which encodes a protein of unknown function. Solution of the structure of the P. falciparum LeuRS editing domain suggested key roles for mutated residues in LeuRS editing. Short incubations with AN6426 and AN8432, unlike artemisinin, caused dose-dependent inhibition of [14C]leucine incorporation by cultured wild-type, but not resistant, parasites. The growth of resistant, but not wild-type, parasites was impaired in the presence of the unnatural amino acid norvaline, consistent with a loss of LeuRS editing activity in resistant parasites. In summary, the benzoxaboroles AN6426 and AN8432 offer effective antimalarial activity and act, at least in part, against a novel target, the editing domain of P. falciparum LeuRS. PMID:27270277

  13. Heterogeneity of Glutamine Synthetase Polypeptides in Phaseolus vulgaris L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Miguel; Porta, Helena; Padilla, Jaime; Folch, Jorge; Sánchez, Federico

    1984-01-01

    Glutamine synthetases from roots, nodules, and leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris L. have been purified to homogeneity and their polypeptide composition determined. The leaf enzyme is composed of six polypeptides. The cytosolic fraction contains two 43,000 dalton polypeptides and the chloroplastic enzyme is formed by four 45,000 dalton polypeptides. Root glutamine synthetase consists only of the same two polypeptides of 43,000 dalton that are present in the leaf enzyme. The nodule enzyme is formed by two polypeptides of 43,000 dalton, one is common to the leaf and root enzyme but the other is specific for N2-fixing nodule tissue. The two glutamine synthetase forms of the nodule contain a different proportion of the 43,000 dalton polypeptides. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:16663942

  14. Identification of Bacillus subtilis men mutants which lack O-succinylbenzoyl-coenzyme A synthetase and dihydroxynaphthoate synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Meganathan, R; Bentley, R; Taber, H

    1981-01-01

    Menaquinone (vitamin K2)-deficient mutants of Bacillus subtilis, whose growth requirement is satisfied by 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid but not by o-succinylbenzoic acid (OSB), have been analyzed for enzymatic defects. Complementation analysis of cell-free extracts of the mutants revealed that there are two groups, as already indicated by genetic analysis. The missing enzyme in each group was identified by complementation of the cell-free extracts with o-succinylbenzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase and dihydroxynaphthoate synthase extracted from Mycobacterium phlei. Mutants found to lack dihydroxynaphthoate synthase, and which therefore complement with dihydroxynaphthoate synthase of M. phlei, were designated as menB; those lacking o-succinylbenzoyl-CoA synthetase, and therefore complementing with o-succinylbenzoyl-CoA synthetase, were designated as menE. The menB mutants RB413 (men-325) and RB415 (men-329), when incubated with [2,3-14C2]OSB, produced only the spirodilactone form of OSB in a reaction that was CoA and adenosine 5'-triphosphate dependent. PMID:6780515

  15. The mammalian enzyme which replaces B protein of E. coli quinolinate synthetase is D-aspartate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Nasu, S; Wicks, F D; Gholson, R K

    1982-06-04

    In Escherichia coli quinolinic acid, a precursor of NAD+, is synthesized from L-aspartate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate by two enzymes, an FAD-containing 'B protein' and 'A protein'. An enzyme which can replace the B protein in the E. coli quinolinate synthetase system when D-aspartate replaces L-aspartate as a substrate has been purified 300-fold from bovine kidney. This enzyme is shown to be identical with the previously described D-aspartate oxidase (D-aspartate:oxygen oxidoreductase (deaminating), EC 1.4.3.1). The immediate reaction product of D-aspartate oxidase (iminoaspartate) is condensed with dihydroxyacetone phosphate to form quinolinate in a reaction catalyzed by E. coli quinolinate synthetase A protein. In the absence of A protein (or dihydroxyacetone phosphate) iminoaspartate is spontaneously hydrolyzed to form oxaloacetate with a half-life of about 2.5 min at 25 degrees C and pH 8.0.

  16. Neurodegenerative disease-associated mutants of a human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase present individual molecular signatures

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Claude; Lorber, Bernard; Gaudry, Agnès; Karim, Loukmane; Schwenzer, Hagen; Wien, Frank; Roblin, Pierre; Florentz, Catherine; Sissler, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are associated with a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. The effects of these mutations on the structure and function of the enzymes remain to be established. Here, we investigate six mutants of the aspartyl-tRNA synthetase correlated with leukoencephalopathies. Our integrated strategy, combining an ensemble of biochemical and biophysical approaches, reveals that mutants are diversely affected with respect to their solubility in cellular extracts and stability in solution, but not in architecture. Mutations with mild effects on solubility occur in patients as allelic combinations whereas those with strong effects on solubility or on aminoacylation are necessarily associated with a partially functional allele. The fact that all mutations show individual molecular and cellular signatures and affect amino acids only conserved in mammals, points towards an alternative function besides aminoacylation. PMID:26620921

  17. Genetically programmed expression of proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-09-07

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, polynucleotides encoding the novel synthetase molecules, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine and translation systems. The invention further provides methods for producing modified proteins (e.g., lipidated proteins) through targeted modification of the phenylselenocysteine residue in a protein.

  18. Genetically programmed expression of proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-07-10

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, polynucleotides encoding the novel synthetase molecules, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine and translation systems. The invention further provides methods for producing modified proteins (e.g., lipidated proteins) through targeted modification of the phenylselenocysteine residue in a protein.

  19. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital [San Diego, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Zhang, Zhiwen [Austin, TX

    2011-08-30

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  20. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital [San Diego, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  1. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta; Lital , Schultz; Peter G. , Zhang; Zhiwen

    2010-10-12

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  2. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  3. Magnesium dependence of the measured equilibrium constants of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Airas, R Kalervo

    2007-12-01

    The apparent equilibrium constants (K') for six reactions catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases from Escherichia coli were measured, the equations for the magnesium dependence of the equilibrium constants were derived, and best-fit analyses between the measured and calculated values were used. The K' values at 1 mM Mg(2+) ranged from 0.49 to 1.13. The apparent equilibrium constants increased with increasing Mg(2+) concentrations. The values were 2-3 times higher at 20 mM Mg(2+) than at 1 mM Mg(2+), and the dependence was similar in the class I and class II synthetases. The main reason for the Mg(2+) dependence is the existence of PP(i) as two magnesium complexes, but only one of them is the real product. AMP exists either as free AMP or as MgAMP, and therefore also has some effect on the measured equilibrium constant. However, these dependences alone cannot explain the measured results. The measured dependence of the K' on the Mg(2+) concentration is weaker than that caused by PP(i) and AMP. Different bindings of the Mg(2+) ions to the substrate tRNA and product aminoacyl-tRNA can explain this observation. The best-fit analysis suggests that tRNA reacts as a magnesium complex in the forward aminoacylation direction but this given Mg(2+) ion is not bound to aminoacyl-tRNA at the start of the reverse reaction. Thus Mg(2+) ions seem to have an active catalytic role, not only in the activation of the amino acid, but in the posttransfer steps of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase reaction, too.

  4. Continuous recording of long-chain acyl-coenzyme a synthetase activity using fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Demant, E J; Nystrøm, B T

    2001-08-01

    The fluorescence-based long-chain fatty acid probe BSA-HCA (bovine serum albumin labeled with 7-hydroxycoumarin-4-acetic acid) is shown to respond to binding of long-chain acyl-CoA thioesters by quenching of the 450 nm fluorescence emission. As determined by spectrofluorometric titration, binding affinities for palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-CoA (Kd = 0.2-0.4 microM) are 5-10 times lower than those for the corresponding nonesterified fatty acids. In the presence of detergent (Chaps, Triton X-100, n-octylglucoside) above the critical micelle concentration, acyl-CoA partitions from BSA-HCA and into the detergent micelles. This allows BSA-HCA to be used as a fluorescent probe for continuous recording of fatty acid concentrations in detergent solution with little interference from acyl-CoA. Using a calibration of the fluorescence signal with fatty acids in the C14 to C20 chain-length range, fatty acid consumption by Pseudomonas fragi and rat liver microsomal acyl-CoA synthetase activities are measured down to 0.05 microM/min with a data sampling rate of 10 points per second. This new method provides a very promising spectrofluorometric approach to the study of acyl-CoA synthetase reaction kinetics at physiologically relevant (nM) aqueous phase concentrations of fatty acid substrates and at a time resolution that cannot be obtained in isotopic sampling or enzyme-coupled assays.

  5. Proximal Tubule Glutamine Synthetase Expression is Necessary for the Normal Response to Dietary Protein Restriction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2017-03-22

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during changes in dietary protein intake. Dietary protein restriction decreases endogenous acid production and ¬decreases urinary ammonia excretion, a major component of net acid excretion. Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ and glutamate, which regenerates the essential amino acid glutamine and decreases net ammonia generation. Because renal proximal tubule GS expression increases during dietary protein restriction, this could contribute to the decreased ammonia excretion. The current study's purpose was to determine proximal tubule GS's role in the renal response to protein restriction. We generated mice with proximal tubule-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Cre-negative (Control) and PT-GS-KO mice in metabolic cages were provided 20% protein diet for 2 days and were then changed to low protein (6%) diet for the next 7 days. Additional PT-GS-KO mice were maintained on 20% protein diet. Dietary protein restriction caused a rapid decrease in urinary ammonia excretion in both genotypes, but PT-GS-KO blunted this adaptive response significantly. This occurred despite no significant genotype-dependent differences in urinary pH or in serum electrolytes. There were no significant differences between Control and PT-GS-KO mice in expression of multiple other proteins involved in renal ammonia handling. We conclude that proximal tubule glutamine synthetase expression is necessary for the appropriate decrease in ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction.

  6. A dual-specificity aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase in the deep-rooted eukaryote Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Bunjun, Shipra; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Graham, David; Min, Bokkee; Kitabatake, Makoto; Wang, Alice L.; Wang, Ching C.; Vivarès, Christian P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Söll, Dieter

    2000-01-01

    Cysteinyl-tRNA (Cys-tRNA) is essential for protein synthesis. In most organisms the enzyme responsible for the formation of Cys-tRNA is cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (CysRS). The only known exceptions are the euryarchaea Methanococcus jannaschii and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, which do not encode a CysRS. Deviating from the accepted concept of one aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase per amino acid, these organisms employ prolyl-tRNA synthetase as the enzyme that carries out Cys-tRNA formation. To date this dual-specificity prolyl-cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (ProCysRS) is only known to exist in archaea. Analysis of the preliminary genomic sequence of the primitive eukaryote Giardia lamblia indicated the presence of an archaeal prolyl-tRNA synthetase (ProRS). Its proS gene was cloned and the gene product overexpressed in Escherichia coli. By using G. lamblia, M. jannaschii, or E. coli tRNA as substrate, this ProRS was able to form Cys-tRNA and Pro-tRNA in vitro. Cys-AMP formation, but not Pro-AMP synthesis, was tRNA-dependent. The in vitro data were confirmed in vivo, as the cloned G. lamblia proS gene was able to complement a temperature-sensitive E. coli cysS strain. Inhibition studies of CysRS activity with proline analogs (thiaproline and 5′-O-[N-(l-prolyl)-sulfamoyl]adenosine) in a Giardia S-100 extract predicted that the organism also contains a canonical CysRS. This prediction was confirmed by cloning and analysis of the corresponding cysS gene. Like a number of archaea, Giardia contains two enzymes, ProCysRS and CysRS, for Cys-tRNA formation. In contrast, the purified Saccharomyces cerevisiae and E. coli ProRS enzymes were unable to form Cys-tRNA under these conditions. Thus, the dual specificity is restricted to the archaeal genre of ProRS. G. lamblia's archaeal-type prolyl- and alanyl-tRNA synthetases refine our understanding of the evolution and interaction of archaeal and eukaryal translation systems. PMID:11078517

  7. Acetylation of prostaglandin synthetase by aspirin. Purification and properties of the acetylated protein from sheep vesicular gland.

    PubMed

    Roth, G J; Stanford, N; Jacobs, J W; Majerus, P W

    1977-09-20

    We previously presented evidence that aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) inhibits prostaglandin synthetase by acetylating and active site of the enzyme. In the current work, we have labeled the enzyme from an aceton-pentane powder of sheep vesicular gland using [acetyl-3H]aspirin and purified the [3H]acetyl-protein to near homogeneity. The final preparation contains protein of a single molecular weight (85 000) and an amino-terminal sequence of Asp-Ala-Gly-Arg-Ala. The [3H]acetyl-protein contained 0.5 mol of acetyl residues per mol of protein based on amino acid composition but only a single sequence was found.

  8. Role of very-long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, S J; Kemp, S; Braiterman, L T; Watkins, P A

    1999-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is characterized biochemically by decreased ability of cells to activate (via very-long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase [VLCS]) and subsequently degrade very-long-chain fatty acids in peroxisomes. It is noteworthy that the gene defective in X-ALD encodes ALDP, a peroxisomal membrane protein unrelated to VLCS. We cloned human VLCS (hVLCS) and found that peroxisomes from X-ALD fibroblasts contained immunoreactive hVLCS, refuting the earlier hypothesis that ALDP is required to anchor VLCS to the peroxisomal membrane. Furthermore, hVLCS was topographically oriented facing the peroxisomal matrix in both control and X-ALD fibroblasts, contradicting the alternative hypothesis that ALDP is required to translocate VLCS into peroxisomes. However, overexpression of both hVLCS and ALDP in X-ALD fibroblasts synergistically increased very-long-chain fatty acid beta-oxidation, indicating that these proteins interact functionally.

  9. Arabidopsis plastidial folylpolyglutamate synthetase is required for nitrogen metabolism under nitrate-limited condition in darkness.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hongyan; Xu, Bosi; Zhang, Chunyi; Jiang, Ling

    2017-01-08

    Folates play an important role in plant metabolism. Here we report a T-DNA insertion mutant (atdfb-3) of the plastidial folylpolyglutamate synthetase gene (AtDFB) was defective in folate metabolism and nitrogen metabolism under nitrate-limited conditions in darkness. Exogenous applied 5-formyl-tetrahydrofolate (5-F-THF) completely restored nitrogen content, soluble protein, total amino acids, individual amino acids including Glu, Gln, Asp, Asn, Pro, Arg and Met, nitrate, and endogenous 5-F-THF in atdfb-3 to the wild-type level. At the same time the application of 5-F-THF partially restored the content of Ser and nitrite in the mutant. Taken together, these results indicated that intact folate metabolism was necessary for nitrogen metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana under nitrate-limited condition in darkness, providing novel insights into function of folate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. β-Lactone formation during product release from a nonribosomal peptide synthetase.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Jason E; Reck, Margaret R; Prasad, Neha K; Wencewicz, Timothy A

    2017-07-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are multidomain modular biosynthetic assembly lines that polymerize amino acids into a myriad of biologically active nonribosomal peptides (NRPs). NRPS thioesterase (TE) domains employ diverse release strategies for off-loading thioester-tethered polymeric peptides from termination modules typically via hydrolysis, aminolysis, or cyclization to provide mature antibiotics as carboxylic acids/esters, amides, and lactams/lactones, respectively. Here we report the enzyme-catalyzed formation of a highly strained β-lactone ring during TE-mediated cyclization of a β-hydroxythioester to release the antibiotic obafluorin (Obi) from an NRPS assembly line. The Obi NRPS (ObiF) contains a type I TE domain with a rare catalytic cysteine residue that plays a direct role in β-lactone ring formation. We present a detailed genetic and biochemical characterization of the entire Obi biosynthetic gene cluster in plant-associated Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 39502 that establishes a general strategy for β-lactone biogenesis.

  11. The Puzzle of Ligand Binding to Corynebacterium ammoniagenes FAD Synthetase*

    PubMed Central

    Frago, Susana; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Medina, Milagros

    2009-01-01

    In bacteria, riboflavin phosphorylation and subsequent conversion of FMN into FAD are carried out by FAD synthetase, a single bifunctional enzyme. Both reactions require ATP and Mg2+. The N-terminal domain of FAD synthetase appears to be responsible for the adenylyltransferase activity, whereas the C-terminal domain would be in charge of the kinase activity. Binding to Corynebacterium ammoniagenes FAD synthetase of its products and substrates, as well as of several analogues, is analyzed. Binding parameters for adenine nucleotides to each one of the two adenine nucleotide sites are reported. In addition, it is demonstrated for the first time that the enzyme presents two independent flavin sites, each one related with one of the enzymatic activities. The binding parameters of flavins to these sites are also provided. The presence of Mg2+ and of both adenine nucleotides and flavins cooperatively modulates the interaction parameters for the other ligands. Our data also suggest that during its double catalytic cycle FAD synthetase must suffer conformational changes induced by adenine nucleotide-Mg2+ or flavin binding. They might include not only rearrangement of the different protein loops but also alternative conformations between domains. PMID:19136717

  12. Trans-oligomerization of duplicated aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases maintains genetic code fidelity under stress.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Napolitano, Mauro; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A G; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Patterson, Carl J; Foster, Andrew W; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Robinson, Nigel J; Luque, Ignacio

    2015-11-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play a key role in deciphering the genetic message by producing charged tRNAs and are equipped with proofreading mechanisms to ensure correct pairing of tRNAs with their cognate amino acid. Duplicated aaRSs are very frequent in Nature, with 25,913 cases observed in 26,837 genomes. The oligomeric nature of many aaRSs raises the question of how the functioning and oligomerization of duplicated enzymes is organized. We characterized this issue in a model prokaryotic organism that expresses two different threonyl-tRNA synthetases, responsible for Thr-tRNA(Thr) synthesis: one accurate and constitutively expressed (T1) and another (T2) with impaired proofreading activity that also generates mischarged Ser-tRNA(Thr). Low zinc promotes dissociation of dimeric T1 into monomers deprived of aminoacylation activity and simultaneous induction of T2, which is active for aminoacylation under low zinc. T2 either forms homodimers or heterodimerizes with T1 subunits that provide essential proofreading activity in trans. These findings evidence that in organisms with duplicated genes, cells can orchestrate the assemblage of aaRSs oligomers that meet the necessities of the cell in each situation. We propose that controlled oligomerization of duplicated aaRSs is an adaptive mechanism that can potentially be expanded to the plethora of organisms with duplicated oligomeric aaRSs.

  13. Exploring the Catalytic Mechanism of Human Glutamine Synthetase by Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Issoglio, Federico M; Campolo, Nicolas; Zeida, Ari; Grune, Tilman; Radi, Rafael; Estrin, Dario A; Bartesaghi, Silvina

    2016-10-13

    Glutamine synthetase is an important enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In mammals, it plays a key role in preventing excitotoxicity in the brain and detoxifying ammonia in the liver. In plants and bacteria, it is fundamental for nitrogen metabolism, being critical for the survival of the organism. In this work, we show how the use of classical molecular dynamics simulations and multiscale quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations allowed us to examine the structural properties and dynamics of human glutamine synthetase (HsGS), as well as the reaction mechanisms involved in the catalytic process with atomic level detail. Our results suggest that glutamine formation proceeds through a two-step mechanism that includes a first step in which the γ-glutamyl phosphate intermediate forms, with a 5 kcal/mol free energy barrier and a -8 kcal/mol reaction free energy, and then a second rate-limiting step involving the ammonia nucleophilic attack, with a free energy barrier of 19 kcal/mol and a reaction free energy of almost zero. A detailed analysis of structural features within each step exposed the relevance of the acid-base equilibrium related to protein residues and substrates in the thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions. These results provide a comprehensive study of HsGS dynamics and establish the groundwork for further analysis regarding changes in HsGS activity, as occur in natural variants and post-translational modifications.

  14. Comparison of histidine recognition in human and trypanosomatid histidyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Koh, Cho Yeow; Wetzel, Allan B; de van der Schueren, Will J; Hol, Wim G J

    2014-11-01

    As part of a project aimed at obtaining selective inhibitors and drug-like compounds targeting tRNA synthetases from trypanosomatids, we have elucidated the crystal structure of human cytosolic histidyl-tRNA synthetase (Hs-cHisRS) in complex with histidine in order to be able to compare human and parasite enzymes. The resultant structure of Hs-cHisRS•His represents the substrate-bound state (H-state) of the enzyme. It provides an interesting opportunity to compare with ligand-free and imidazole-bound structures Hs-cHisRS published recently, both of which represent the ligand-free state (F-state) of the enzyme. The H-state Hs-cHisRS undergoes conformational changes in active site residues and several conserved motif of HisRS, compared to F-state structures. The histidine forms eight hydrogen bonds with HisRS of which six engage the amino and carboxylate groups of this amino acid. The availability of published imidazole-bound structure provides a unique opportunity to dissect the structural roles of individual chemical groups of histidine. The analysis revealed the importance of the amino and carboxylate groups, of the histidine in leading to these dramatic conformational changes of the H-state. Further, comparison with previously published trypanosomatid HisRS structures reveals a pocket in the F-state of the parasite enzyme that may provide opportunities for developing specific inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei HisRS.

  15. The Enterococcal Cytolysin Synthetase Coevolves with Substrate for Stereoselective Lanthionine Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weixin; Thibodeaux, Gabrielle N; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2016-09-16

    Stereochemical control is critical in natural product biosynthesis. For ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs), the mechanism(s) by which stereoselectivity is achieved is still poorly understood. In this work, we focused on the stereoselective lanthionine synthesis in lanthipeptides, a major class of RiPPs formed by the addition of Cys residues to dehydroalanine (Dha) or dehydrobutyrine (Dhb). Nonenzymatic cyclization of the small subunit of a virulence lanthipeptide, the enterococcal cytolysin, resulted in the native modified peptide as the major product, suggesting that both regioselectivity and stereoselectivity are inherent to the dehydrated peptide sequence. These results support previous computational studies that a Dhx-Dhx-Xxx-Xxx-Cys motif (Dhx = Dha or Dhb; Xxx = any amino acid except Dha, Dhb, and Cys) preferentially cyclizes by attack on the Re face of Dha or Dhb. Characterization of the stereochemistry of the products formed enzymatically with substrate mutants revealed that the lanthionine synthetase actively reinforces Re face attack. These findings support the hypothesis of substrate-controlled selectivity in lanthionine synthesis but also reveal likely coevolution of substrates and lanthionine synthetases to ensure the stereoselective synthesis of lanthipeptides with defined biological activities.

  16. The Enterococcal Cytolysin Synthetase Coevolves with Substrate for Stereoselective Lanthionine Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weixin; Thibodeaux, Gabrielle N.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2017-01-01

    Stereochemical control is critical in natural product biosynthesis. For ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs), the mechanism(s) by which stereoselectivity is achieved is still poorly understood. In this work, we focused on the stereoselective lanthionine synthesis in lanthipeptides, a major class of RiPPS formed by addition of Cys residues to dehydroalanine (Dha) or dehydrobutyrine (Dhb). Non-enzymatic cyclization of the small subunit of a virulent lanthipeptide, the enterococcal cytolysin, resulted in the native modified peptide as the major product, suggesting that both regioselectivity and stereoselectivity are inherent to the dehydrated peptide sequence. These results support previous computational studies that a DhxDhxXxxXxxCys motif (Dhx = Dha or Dhb; Xxx = any amino acid except Dha, Dhb, and Cys) preferentially cyclizes by attack on the Re face of Dha or Dhb. Characterization of the stereochemistry of the products formed enzymatically with substrate mutants revealed that the lanthionine synthetase actively reinforces Re face attack. These findings support the hypothesis of substrate-controlled selectivity in lanthionine synthesis but also reveal likely coevolution of substrates and lanthionine synthetases to ensure the stereoselective synthesis of lanthipeptides with defined biological activities. PMID:27348535

  17. Archaeal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases interact with the ribosome to recycle tRNAs.

    PubMed

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Greber, Basil J; Franke, Vedran; Hodnik, Vesna; Anderluh, Gregor; Ban, Nenad; Weygand-Durasevic, Ivana

    2014-04-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are essential enzymes catalyzing the formation of aminoacyl-tRNAs, the immediate precursors for encoded peptides in ribosomal protein synthesis. Previous studies have suggested a link between tRNA aminoacylation and high-molecular-weight cellular complexes such as the cytoskeleton or ribosomes. However, the structural basis of these interactions and potential mechanistic implications are not well understood. To biochemically characterize these interactions we have used a system of two interacting archaeal aaRSs: an atypical methanogenic-type seryl-tRNA synthetase and an archaeal ArgRS. More specifically, we have shown by thermophoresis and surface plasmon resonance that these two aaRSs bind to the large ribosomal subunit with micromolar affinities. We have identified the L7/L12 stalk and the proteins located near the stalk base as the main sites for aaRS binding. Finally, we have performed a bioinformatics analysis of synonymous codons in the Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus genome that supports a mechanism in which the deacylated tRNAs may be recharged by aaRSs bound to the ribosome and reused at the next occurrence of a codon encoding the same amino acid. These results suggest a mechanism of tRNA recycling in which aaRSs associate with the L7/L12 stalk region to recapture the tRNAs released from the preceding ribosome in polysomes.

  18. Trans-oligomerization of duplicated aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases maintains genetic code fidelity under stress

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Napolitano, Mauro; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A. G.; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Patterson, Carl J.; Foster, Andrew W.; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Robinson, Nigel J.; Luque, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play a key role in deciphering the genetic message by producing charged tRNAs and are equipped with proofreading mechanisms to ensure correct pairing of tRNAs with their cognate amino acid. Duplicated aaRSs are very frequent in Nature, with 25,913 cases observed in 26,837 genomes. The oligomeric nature of many aaRSs raises the question of how the functioning and oligomerization of duplicated enzymes is organized. We characterized this issue in a model prokaryotic organism that expresses two different threonyl-tRNA synthetases, responsible for Thr-tRNAThr synthesis: one accurate and constitutively expressed (T1) and another (T2) with impaired proofreading activity that also generates mischarged Ser-tRNAThr. Low zinc promotes dissociation of dimeric T1 into monomers deprived of aminoacylation activity and simultaneous induction of T2, which is active for aminoacylation under low zinc. T2 either forms homodimers or heterodimerizes with T1 subunits that provide essential proofreading activity in trans. These findings evidence that in organisms with duplicated genes, cells can orchestrate the assemblage of aaRSs oligomers that meet the necessities of the cell in each situation. We propose that controlled oligomerization of duplicated aaRSs is an adaptive mechanism that can potentially be expanded to the plethora of organisms with duplicated oligomeric aaRSs. PMID:26464444

  19. Adenylosuccinate lyase of Bacillus subtilis regulates the activity of the glutamyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, N; Breton, R; Champagne, N; Lapointe, J

    1992-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the glutamyl-tRNA synthetase [L-glutamate:tRNA(Glu) ligase (AMP-forming), EC 6.1.1.17] is copurified with a polypeptide of M(r) 46,000 that influences its affinity for its substrates and increases its thermostability. The gene encoding this regulatory factor was cloned with the aid of a 41-mer oligonucleotide probe corresponding to the amino acid sequence of an NH2-terminal segment of this factor. The nucleotide sequence of this gene and the physical map of the 1475-base-pair fragment on which it was cloned are identical to those of purB, which encodes the adenylosuccinate lyase (adenylosuccinate AMP-lyase, EC 4.3.2.2), an enzyme involved in the de novo synthesis of purines. This gene complements the purB mutation of Escherichia coli JK268, and its presence on a multicopy plasmid behind the trc promoter in the purB- strain gives an adenylosuccinate lyase level comparable to that in wild-type B. subtilis. A complex between the adenylosuccinate lyase and the glutamyl-tRNA synthetase was detected by centrifugation on a density gradient. The interaction between these enzymes may play a role in the coordination of purine metabolism and protein biosynthesis. Images PMID:1608947

  20. Does Lowering Glutamine Synthetase Activity in Nodules Modify Nitrogen Metabolism and Growth of Lotus japonicus?1

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Judith; Pou de Crescenzo, Marie-Anne; Sené, Olivier; Hirel, Bertrand

    2003-01-01

    A cDNA encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS) from Lotus japonicus was fused in the antisense orientation relative to the nodule-specific LBC3 promoter of soybean (Glycine max) and introduced into L. japonicus via transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Among the 12 independent transformed lines into which the construct was introduced, some of them showed diminished levels of GS1 mRNA and lower levels of GS activity. Three of these lines were selected and their T1 progeny was further analyzed both for plant biomass production and carbon and nitrogen (N) metabolites content under symbiotic N-fixing conditions. Analysis of these plants revealed an increase in fresh weight in nodules, roots and shoots. The reduction in GS activity was found to correlate with an increase in amino acid content of the nodules, which was primarily due to an increase in asparagine content. Thus, this study supports the hypothesis that when GS becomes limiting, other enzymes (e.g. asparagine synthetase) that have the capacity to assimilate ammonium may be important in controlling the flux of reduced N in temperate legumes such as L. japonicus. Whether these alternative metabolic pathways are important in the control of plant biomass production still remains to be fully elucidated. PMID:12970491

  1. Malonyl-CoA Synthetase, Encoded by ACYL ACTIVATING ENZYME13, Is Essential for Growth and Development of Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Kim, Hyun Uk; Weng, Hua; Browse, John

    2011-01-01

    Malonyl-CoA is the precursor for fatty acid synthesis and elongation. It is also one of the building blocks for the biosynthesis of some phytoalexins, flavonoids, and many malonylated compounds. In plants as well as in animals, malonyl-CoA is almost exclusively derived from acetyl-CoA by acetyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.2). However, previous studies have suggested that malonyl-CoA may also be made directly from malonic acid by malonyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.2.1.14). Here, we report the cloning of a eukaryotic malonyl-CoA synthetase gene, Acyl Activating Enzyme13 (AAE13; At3g16170), from Arabidopsis thaliana. Recombinant AAE13 protein showed high activity against malonic acid (Km = 529.4 ± 98.5 μM; Vm = 24.0 ± 2.7 μmol/mg/min) but little or no activity against other dicarboxylic or fatty acids tested. Exogenous malonic acid was toxic to Arabidopsis seedlings and caused accumulation of malonic and succinic acids in the seedlings. aae13 null mutants also grew poorly and accumulated malonic and succinic acids. These defects were complemented by an AAE13 transgene or by a bacterial malonyl-CoA synthetase gene under control of the AAE13 promoter. Our results demonstrate that the malonyl-CoA synthetase encoded by AAE13 is essential for healthy growth and development, probably because it is required for the detoxification of malonate. PMID:21642549

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of recombinant phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase from the Thermophilic thermus thermophilus strain HB27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramchik, Yu. A.; Timofeev, V. I.; Muravieva, T. I.; Sinitsyna, E. V.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetases (PRPP synthetases) are among the key enzymes essential for vital functions of organisms and are involved in the biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, coenzymes, and the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. These enzymes are used in biotechnology for the combined chemoenzymatic synthesis of natural nucleotide analogs. Recombinant phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase I from the thermophilic strain HB27 of the bacterium Thermus thermophilus ( T. th HB27) has high thermal stability and shows maximum activity at 75°C, due to which this enzyme holds promise for biotechnological applications. In order to grow crystals and study them by X-ray crystallography, an enzyme sample, which was produced using a highly efficient producer strain, was purified by affinity and gel-filtration chromatography. The screening of crystallization conditions was performed by the vapor-diffusion technique. The crystals of the enzyme suitable for X-ray diffraction were grown by the counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. These crystals were used to collect the X-ray diffraction data set at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility (Japan) to 3-Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P21 and have the following unitcell parameters: a = 107.7 Å, b = 112.6 Å, c = 110.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 116.6°. The X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for determining the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme at 3.0-Å resolution.

  3. Sequence and structural similarities between the leucine-specific binding protein and leucyl-tRNA synthetase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, R M; Oxender, D L

    1990-01-01

    A role for the leucyl-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.1.4) has been established for regulating the transport of leucine across the inner membrane of Escherichia coli by the leucine, isoleucine, valine (LIV-I) transport system. This transport system is mediated by interactions of periplasmic binding proteins with a complex of membrane-associated proteins, and transcription of the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system genes is repressed by growth of E. coli on high levels of leucine. We now report results from sequence comparisons and structural modeling studies, which indicate that the leucine-specific binding protein, one of the periplasmic components of the LIV-I transport system, contains a 121-residue stretch, representing 36% of the mature protein, which displays both sequence and structural similarities to a region within the putative nucleotide-binding domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase. Early fusion events between ancestral genes for the leucine-specific binding protein and leucyl-tRNA synthetase could account for the similarity and suggest that processes of aminoacylation and transport for leucine in E. coli may be performed by evolutionarily interrelated proteins. PMID:2191293

  4. A Previously Unknown Oxalyl-CoA Synthetase Is Important for Oxalate Catabolism in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Justin; Kim, Hyun Uk; Nakata, Paul A.; Browse, John

    2012-01-01

    Oxalate is produced by several catabolic pathways in plants. The best characterized pathway for subsequent oxalate degradation is via oxalate oxidase, but some species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, have no oxalate oxidase activity. Previously, an alternative pathway was proposed in which oxalyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.2.1.8) catalyzes the first step, but no gene encoding this function has been found. Here, we identify ACYL-ACTIVATING ENZYME3 (AAE3; At3g48990) from Arabidopsis as a gene encoding oxalyl-CoA synthetase. Recombinant AAE3 protein has high activity against oxalate, with Km = 149.0 ± 12.7 μM and Vmax = 11.4 ± 1.0 μmol/min/mg protein, but no detectable activity against other organic acids tested. Allelic aae3 mutants lacked oxalyl-CoA synthetase activity and were unable to degrade oxalate into CO2. Seeds of mutants accumulated oxalate to levels threefold higher than the wild type, resulting in the formation of oxalate crystals. Crystal formation was associated with seed coat defects and substantially reduced germination of mutant seeds. Leaves of mutants were damaged by exogenous oxalate and more susceptible than the wild type to infection by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, which produces oxalate as a phytotoxin to aid infection. Our results demonstrate that, in Arabidopsis, oxalyl-CoA synthetase encoded by AAE3 is required for oxalate degradation, for normal seed development, and for defense against an oxalate-producing fungal pathogen. PMID:22447686

  5. pH-sensitive CDP-diglyceride synthetase mutants of Escherichia coli: phenotypic suppression by mutations at a second site.

    PubMed Central

    Ganong, B R; Raetz, C R

    1983-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, mutations which lower the level of CDP-diglyceride synthetase are designated cds and map at min 4. The cds-8 mutation resulted in strikingly defective enzyme activity and also rendered cells pH sensitive for growth. Both the inhibition of growth and the massive accumulation of phosphatidic acid which occur in a cds-8 mutant at pH 8 were suppressed by mutations at a second locus, designated cdsS, which mapped between argG and gltB near min 68. The cdsS3 mutation by itself did not affect CDP-diglyceride synthetase activity in wild-type cells, but it caused a twofold stimulation of the residual activity present in strains harboring cds-8. Both the insensitivity to pH and the twofold stimulation of residual activity were lost by introduction of an F' strain carrying cdsS+ into a recA1 cds-8 cdsS3 host. When a culture of a cds-8 cdsS+ strain was shifted to pH 8, the residual specific activity of synthetase dropped by 75% within 100 min. In a cds-8 cdsS3 double mutant under the same conditions, the activity declined appreciably less, about to the level found in the cds-8 cdsS+ strain under permissive conditions (pH 6). Thus, it appears that mutations in the cdsS gene suppress the pH sensitivity of cds mutants by inhibiting the decay of residual CDP-diglyceride synthetase activity at the nonpermissive pH. The cdsS locus appears to be distinct from any known nonsense or missense suppressor. PMID:6296051

  6. Arabidopsis CER8 encodes LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE 1 (LACS1) that has overlapping functions with LACS2 in plant wax and cutin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lü, Shiyou; Song, Tao; Kosma, Dylan K; Parsons, Eugene P; Rowland, Owen; Jenks, Matthew A

    2009-08-01

    Plant cuticle is an extracellular lipid-based matrix of cutin and waxes, which covers aerial organs and protects them from many forms of environmental stress. We report here the characterization of CER8/LACS1, one of nine Arabidopsis long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases thought to activate acyl chains. Mutations in LACS1 reduced the amount of wax in all chemical classes on the stem and leaf, except in the very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) class wherein acids longer than 24 carbons (C(24)) were elevated more than 155%. The C(16) cutin monomers on lacs1 were reduced by 37% and 22%, whereas the C(18) monomers were increased by 28% and 20% on stem and leaf, respectively. Amounts of wax and cutin on a lacs1-1 lacs2-3 double mutant were much lower than on either parent, and lacs1-1 lacs2-3 had much higher cuticular permeability than either parent. These additive effects indicate that LACS1 and LACS2 have overlapping functions in both wax and cutin synthesis. We demonstrated that LACS1 has synthetase activity for VLCFAs C(20)-C(30), with highest activity for C(30) acids. LACS1 thus appears to function as a very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase in wax metabolism. Since C(16) but not C(18) cutin monomers are reduced in lacs1, and C(16) acids are the next most preferred acid (behind C(30)) by LACS1 in our assays, LACS1 also appears to be important for the incorporation of C(16) monomers into cutin polyester. As such, LACS1 defines a functionally novel acyl-CoA synthetase that preferentially modifies both VLCFAs for wax synthesis and long-chain (C(16)) fatty acids for cutin synthesis.

  7. Isolation of an acetyl-CoA synthetase gene (ZbACS2) from Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fernando; Zeeman, Anne-Marie; Cardoso, Helena; Sousa, Maria João; Steensma, H Yde; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Leão, Cecília

    2004-03-01

    A gene homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae ACS genes, coding for acetyl-CoA synthetase, has been cloned from the yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii ISA 1307, by using reverse genetic approaches. A probe obtained by PCR amplification from Z. bailii DNA, using primers derived from two conserved regions of yeast ACS proteins, RIGAIHSVVF (ScAcs1p; 210-219) and RVDDVVNVSG (ScAcs1p; 574-583), was used for screening a Z. bailii genomic library. Nine clones with partially overlapping inserts were isolated. The sequenced DNA fragment contains a complete ORF of 2027 bp (ZbACS2) and the deduced polypeptide shares significant homologies with the products of ACS2 genes from S. cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lactis (81% and 82% identity and 84% and 89% similarity, respectively). Phylogenetic analysis shows that the sequence of Zbacs2 is more closely related to the sequences from Acs2 than to those from Acs1 proteins. Moreover, this analysis revealed that the gene duplication producing Acs1 and Acs2 proteins has occurred in the common ancestor of S. cerevisiae, K. lactis, Candida albicans, C. glabrata and Debaryomyces hansenii lineages. Additionally, the cloned gene allowed growth of S. cerevisiae Scacs2 null mutant, in medium containing glucose as the only carbon and energy source, indicating that it encodes a functional acetyl-CoA synthetase. Also, S. cerevisiae cells expressing ZbACS2 have a shorter lag time, in medium containing glucose (2%, w/v) plus acetic acid (0.1-0.35%, v/v). No differences in cell response to acetic acid stress were detected both by specific growth and death rates. The mode of regulation of ZbACS2 appears to be different from ScACS2 and KlACS2, being subject to repression by a glucose pulse in acetic acid-grown cells.

  8. Characterization of cDNAs and genomic DNAs for human threonyl- and cysteinyl-tRNA synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Cruzen, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    Techniques of molecular biology were used to clone, sequence and map two human aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) cDNAs: threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) a class II enzyme and cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (CysRS) a class I enzyme. The predicted protein sequence of human ThrRS is highly homologous to that of lower eukaryotic and prokaryotic ThRSs, particularly in the regions containing the three structural motifs common to all class II synthetases. Signature regions 1 and 2, which characterize the class IIa subgroup (SerRS, ThrRS and HisRS) are highly conserved from bacteria to human. Structural predictions for human ThrRS based on the known structure of the closely related SerRS from E.coli implicate strongly conserved residues in the signature sequences to be important in substrate binding. The amino terminal 100 residues of the deduced amino acid sequence of ThrRS shares structural similarity to SerRS consistent with forming an antiparallel helix implicated in tRNA binding. The 5' untranslated sequence of the human ThrRS gene shares short stretches of common sequence with the gene for hamster HisRS including a binding site for the promoter specific transcription factor sp-1. The deduced amino acid sequence of human CysRS has a high degree of sequence identify to E. coli CysRS. Human CysRS possesses the classic characteristics of a class I synthetase and is most closely related to the MetRS subgroup. The amino terminal half of human CysRS can be modeled as a nucleotide binding fold and shares significant sequence and structural similarity to the other enzymes in this subgroup. The CysRS structural gene (CARS) was mapped to human chromosome 11p15.5 by fluorescent in situ hybridization. CARS is the first aaRS gene to be mapped to chromosome 11. The steady state of both CysRS and ThrRs mRNA were quantitated in several human tissues. Message levels for these enzymes appear to be subjected to differential regulation in different cell types.

  9. Activation of LXR increases acyl-CoA synthetase activity through direct regulation of ACSL3 in human placental trophoblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Weedon-Fekjaer, M. Susanne; Dalen, Knut Tomas; Solaas, Karianne; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Duttaroy, Asim K.; Nebb, Hilde Irene

    2010-01-01

    Placental fatty acid transport and metabolism are important for proper growth and development of the feto-placental unit. The nuclear receptors, liver X receptors α and β (LXRα and LXRβ), are key regulators of lipid metabolism in many tissues, but little is known about their role in fatty acid transport and metabolism in placenta. The current study investigates the LXR-mediated regulation of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACSL3) and its functions in human placental trophoblast cells. We demonstrate that activation of LXR increases ACSL3 expression, acyl-CoA synthetase activity, and fatty acid uptake in human tropholast cells. Silencing of ACSL3 in these cells attenuates the LXR-mediated increase in acyl-CoA synthetase activity. Furthermore, we show that ACSL3 is directly regulated by LXR through a conserved LXR responsive element in the ACSL3 promoter. Our results suggest that LXR plays a regulatory role in fatty acid metabolism by direct regulation of ACSL3 in human placental trophoblast cells. PMID:20219900

  10. Activation of LXR increases acyl-CoA synthetase activity through direct regulation of ACSL3 in human placental trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Weedon-Fekjaer, M Susanne; Dalen, Knut Tomas; Solaas, Karianne; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Duttaroy, Asim K; Nebb, Hilde Irene

    2010-07-01

    Placental fatty acid transport and metabolism are important for proper growth and development of the feto-placental unit. The nuclear receptors, liver X receptors alpha and beta (LXRalpha and LXRbeta), are key regulators of lipid metabolism in many tissues, but little is known about their role in fatty acid transport and metabolism in placenta. The current study investigates the LXR-mediated regulation of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACSL3) and its functions in human placental trophoblast cells. We demonstrate that activation of LXR increases ACSL3 expression, acyl-CoA synthetase activity, and fatty acid uptake in human tropholast cells. Silencing of ACSL3 in these cells attenuates the LXR-mediated increase in acyl-CoA synthetase activity. Furthermore, we show that ACSL3 is directly regulated by LXR through a conserved LXR responsive element in the ACSL3 promoter. Our results suggest that LXR plays a regulatory role in fatty acid metabolism by direct regulation of ACSL3 in human placental trophoblast cells.

  11. Measurement of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Adenylation Domain Activity Using a Continuous Hydroxylamine Release Assay.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Benjamin P; Wilson, Daniel J; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2016-01-01

    Adenylation is a crucial enzymatic process in the biosynthesis of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) derived natural products. Adenylation domains are considered the gatekeepers of NRPSs since they select, activate, and load the carboxylic acid substrate onto a downstream peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) domain of the NRPS. We describe a coupled continuous kinetic assay for NRPS adenylation domains that substitutes the PCP domain with hydroxylamine as the acceptor molecule. The pyrophosphate released from the first-half reaction is then measured using a two-enzyme coupling system, which detects conversion of the chromogenic substrate 7-methylthioguanosine (MesG) to 7-methylthioguanine. From profiling substrate specificity of unknown or engineered adenylation domains to studying chemical inhibition of adenylating enzymes, this robust assay will be of widespread utility in the broad field NRPS enzymology.

  12. Recovery and Analysis of Formyltetrahydrofolate Synthetase Gene Sequences from Natural Populations of Acetogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Leaphart, Adam B.; Lovell, Charles R.

    2001-01-01

    Primers for PCR amplification of partial (1,102 of 1,680 bp) formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS) gene sequences were developed and tested. Partial FTHFS sequences were successfully amplified from DNA from pure cultures of known acetogens, from other FTHFS-producing organisms, from the roots of the smooth cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora, and from fresh horse manure. The amplimers recovered were cloned, their nucleotide sequences were determined, and their translated amino acid sequences were used to construct phylogenetic trees. We found that FTHFS sequences from homoacetogens formed a monophyletic cluster that did not contain sequences from nonhomoacetogens and that FTHFS sequences appear to be informative regarding major physiological features of FTHFS-producing organisms. PMID:11229939

  13. Site specific incorporation of heavy atom-containing unnatural amino acids into proteins for structure determination

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Jianming [San Diego, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA; Wu, Ning [Boston, MA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA

    2008-07-15

    Translation systems and other compositions including orthogonal aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases that preferentially charge an orthogonal tRNA with an iodinated or brominated amino acid are provided. Nucleic acids encoding such synthetases are also described, as are methods and kits for producing proteins including heavy atom-containing amino acids, e.g., brominated or iodinated amino acids. Methods of determining the structure of a protein, e.g., a protein into which a heavy atom has been site-specifically incorporated through use of an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase pair, are also described.

  14. Pristinamycin I biosynthesis in Streptomyces pristinaespiralis: molecular characterization of the first two structural peptide synthetase genes.

    PubMed Central

    de Crécy-Lagard, V; Blanc, V; Gil, P; Naudin, L; Lorenzon, S; Famechon, A; Bamas-Jacques, N; Crouzet, J; Thibaut, D

    1997-01-01

    Two genes involved in the biosynthesis of the depsipeptide antibiotics pristinamycins I (PI) produced by Streptomyces pristinaespiralis were cloned and sequenced. The 1.7-kb snbA gene encodes a 3-hydroxypicolinic acid:AMP ligase, and the 7.7-kb snbC gene encodes PI synthetase 2, responsible for incorporating L-threonine and L-aminobutyric acid in the PI macrocycle. snbA and snbC, which encode the two first structural enzymes of PI synthesis, are not contiguous. Both genes are located in PI-specific transcriptional units, as disruption of one gene or the other led to PI-deficient strains producing normal levels of the polyunsaturated macrolactone antibiotic pristinamycin II, also produced by S. pristinaespiralis. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences showed that the SnbA protein is a member of the adenylate-forming enzyme superfamily and that the SnbC protein contains two amino acid-incorporating modules and a C-terminal epimerization domain. A model for the initiation of PI synthesis analogous to the established model of initiation of fatty acid synthesis is proposed. PMID:9006024

  15. Biochemical and inhibition studies of glutamine synthetase from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay; Yadav, Shailendra; Soumya, Neelagiri; Kumar, Rohit; Babu, Neerupudi Kishore; Singh, Sushma

    2017-03-25

    Leishmaniasis is a group of tropical diseases caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Leishmania donovani is a protozoan parasite that causes visceral leishmaniasis, a fatal disease if left untreated. Chemotherapy for leishmaniasis is problematic as the available drugs are toxic, costly and shows drug resistance, hence, there is a necessity to look out for the novel drug targets, chemical entities and vaccine. Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In the present study, we have identified and characterized GS from L. donovani. The nucleotide sequence encoding putative glutamine synthetase like sequence from L. donovani (LdGS, LDBPK_060370) was cloned. A 43.5 kDa protein with 6X-His tag at the C-terminal end was obtained by overexpression of LdGS in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain. Expression of native LdGS in promastigotes and recombinant L. donovani glutamine synthetase (rLdGS) was confirmed by western blot analysis. An increase in expression of GS was observed at different phases of growth of the parasite. Expression of LdGS in promastigote and amastigote was confirmed by western blot analysis. Immunofluorescence studies of both the promastigote and amastigote stages of the parasite revealed the presence of LdGS in cytoplasm. GS exists as a single copy gene in parasite genome. Kinetic analysis of GS enzyme revealed Km value of 26.3 ± 0.4 mM for l- glutamate and Vmax value of 2.15 ± 0.07 U mg(-1). Present study confirms the presence of glutamine synthetase in L. donovani and provides comprehensive overview of LdGS for further validating it as a potential drug target.

  16. Positional isotope exchange analysis of the pantothenate synthetase reaction.

    PubMed

    Williams, LaKenya; Zheng, Renjian; Blanchard, John S; Raushel, Frank M

    2003-05-06

    Pantothenate synthetase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyzes the formation of pantothenate from ATP, D-pantoate, and beta-alanine. The formation of a kinetically competent pantoyl-adenylate intermediate was established by the observation of a positional isotope exchange (PIX) reaction within (18)O-labeled ATP in the presence of d-pantoate. When [betagamma-(18)O(6)]-ATP was incubated with pantothenate synthetase in the presence of d-pantoate, an (18)O label gradually appeared in the alphabeta-bridge position from both the beta- and the gamma-nonbridge positions. The rates of these two PIX reactions were followed by (31)P NMR spectroscopy and found to be identical. These results are consistent with the formation of enzyme-bound pantoyl-adenylate and pyrophosphate upon the mixing of ATP, D-pantoate, and enzyme. In addition, these results require the complete torsional scrambling of the two phosphoryl groups of the labeled pyrophosphate product. The rate of the PIX reaction increased as the D-pantoate concentration was elevated and then decreased to zero at saturating levels of D-pantoate. These inhibition results support the ordered binding of ATP and D-pantoate to the enzyme active site. The PIX reaction was abolished with the addition of pyrophosphatase; thus, PP(i) must be free to dissociate from the active site upon formation of the pantoyl-adenylate intermediate. The PIX reaction rate diminished when the concentrations of ATP and D-pantoate were held constant and the concentration of the third substrate, beta-alanine, was increased. This observation is consistent with a kinetic mechanism that requires the binding of beta-alanine after the release of pyrophosphate from the active site of pantothenate synthetase. Positional isotope exchange reactions have therefore demonstrated that pantothenate synthetase catalyzes the formation of a pantoyl-adenylate intermediate upon the ordered addition of ATP and pantoate.

  17. The structural basis of cysteine aminoacylation of tRNAPro by prolyl-tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Kamtekar, Satwik; Kennedy, W. Dexter; Wang, Jimin; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Söll, Dieter; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2003-01-01

    Cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase is an essential enzyme required for protein synthesis. Genes encoding this protein have not been identified in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, or Methanopyrus kandleri. It has previously been proposed that the prolyl-tRNA synthetase (ProRS) enzymes in these organisms recognize either proline or cysteine and can aminoacylate their cognate tRNAs through a dual-specificity mechanism. We report five crystal structures at resolutions between 2.6 and 3.2 Å: apo M. jannaschii ProRS, and M. thermautotrophicus ProRS in apo form and in complex with cysteinyl-sulfamoyl-, prolyl-sulfamoyl-, and alanyl-sulfamoyl-adenylates. These aminoacyl-adenylate analogues bind to a single active-site pocket and induce an identical set of conformational changes in loops around the active site when compared with the ligand-free conformation of ProRS. The cysteinyl- and prolyl-adenylate analogues have similar, nanomolar affinities for M. thermautotrophicus ProRS. Homology modeling of tRNA onto these adenylate complexes places the 3′-OH of A76 in an appropriate position for the transfer of any of the three amino acids to tRNA. Thus, these structures explain recent biochemical experiments showing that M. jannaschii ProRS misacylates tRNAPro with cysteine, and argue against the proposal that these archaeal ProRS enzymes possess the dual capacity to aminoacylate both tRNAPro and tRNACys with their cognate amino acids. PMID:12578991

  18. A non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Alexander Machado; Polycarpo, Carla; Martins, Orlando Bonifácio; Söll, Dieter

    2006-07-01

    The tRNA-dependent transamidation pathway is the essential route for Asn-tRNA(Asn) formation in organisms that lack an asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase. This pathway relies on a nondiscriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (ND-AspRS encoded by aspS), an enzyme with relaxed tRNA specificity, to form Asp-tRNA(Asn). The misacylated tRNA is then converted to Asn-tRNA(Asn) by the action of an Asp-tRNA(Asn) amidotransferase. Here we show that Asn-tRNA(Asn) formation in the extreme halophile Halobacterium salinarum also occurs by this transamidation mechanism, and we explore the property of the haloarchaeal AspRS to aspartylate tRNA(Asn) in vivo and in vitro. Transformation of the E. coli trpA34 strain with the H. salinarum aspS and tRNA(Asn) genes led to restoration of tryptophan prototrophy by missense suppression of the trpA34 mutant with heterologously in vivo formed Asp-tRNA(Asn). The haloarchaeal AspRS works well at low and high (0.1-3 M) salt concentrations but it is unable to use Escherichia coli tRNA as substrate. We show that mutations of two amino acids (H26 and P84) located in the AspRS anticodon binding domain limit the specificity of this nondiscriminating enzyme towards tRNA(Asn). Thus, as was observed in an archaeal discriminating AspRS and a bacterial ND-AspRS, amino acids in these positions influence the enzyme's tRNA selection.

  19. Effects of GSH1 and GSH2 Gene Mutation on Glutathione Synthetases Activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Jia, Haiyan; Zhang, Longmei; Wang, Haiyan; Tang, Hui; Zhang, Liping

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, three mutants from wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae HBU2.558, called U2.558, UN2.558, and UNA2.558, were screened by UV, sodium nitrite, Atmospheric and room temperature plasma, respectively. Glutathione production of the three mutants increased by 41.86, 72.09 and 56.76%, respectively. We detected the activity of glutathione synthetases and found that its activity was improved. Amino acid sequences of three mutant colonies were compared with HBU2.558. Four mutants: Leu51→Pro51 (L51P), Glu62→Val62 (E62V), Ala332→Glu332 (A332E) and Ser653→Gly653 (S653G) were found in the analysis of γ-glutamylcysteine ligase. L51 is located adjacently to the two active sites of GCL/E/Mg(2+)/ADP complex in the overall GCL structure. L51P mutant spread distortion on the β-sheet due to the fact that the φ was changed from -50.4° to -40.2°. A mutant Leu54→Pro54 (L54P) was found in the analysis of glutathione synthetase, and L54 was an amino acid located between an α-helix and a β-sheet. The results confirm that introduction of proline located at the middle of the β-sheet or at the N- or C-terminal between α-helix and β-sheet or, i.e., L51P and L54P, changed the φ, rigidity, hydrophobicity and conformational entropy, thus increased protein stability and improved the enzyme activity.

  20. L-delta-(alpha-Aminoadipoyl)-L-cysteine-D-valine synthetase: production of dipeptides containing valine residue at its C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Chia-Yang; Liu, Yu-Tien

    2002-04-12

    L-delta-(alpha-Aminoadipoyl)-L-cysteine-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) has been recently studied as a model enzyme for peptide synthetases. It was found that in the absence of alpha-aminoadipic acid but in the presence of several cysteine analogues it was incorporated into several analogue dipeptides upon incubation of the potential cysteine analogues with ACVS. [(14)C]Cysteine was incorporated into the[(14)C]cysteinyl-valine analogue dipeptides. Notably, [(14)C]valine incorporation in the presence of N-acylated cysteine analogues was observed. The alpha-aminoadipic acid activation site is influential, inhibitory or promotive, on the production of these putative dipeptide products. The production of dipeptide analogues, containing valine or analogues at the C-terminus, leads to the speculation that the biosynthetic direction of ACV could be from the C-terminus to the N-terminus.

  1. Structure and Activity of an Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase that Charges tRNA with Nitro-Tryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Buddha,M.; Crane, B.

    2005-01-01

    The most divergent of two tryptophanyl tRNA synthetases (TrpRS II) found in Deinococcus radiodurans interacts with a nitric oxide synthase protein that produces 4-nitro-tryptophan (4-NRP). TrpRS II efficiently charges transfer RNATrp with 4-NRP and 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HRP). The crystal structures of TrpRS II bound to tryptophan and 5-HRP reveal residue substitutions that accommodate modified indoles. A class of auxiliary bacterial TrpRSs conserve this capacity to charge tRNA with nonstandard amino acids.

  2. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of NAD synthetase from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Arbade, Gajanan Kashinathrao; Srivastava, Sandeep Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human and animal pathogen that causes a wide range of infections. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant S. aureus strains in both hospital and community settings makes it imperative to characterize new drug targets to combat S. aureus infections. In this context, enzymes involved in NAD metabolism and synthesis are significant drug targets as NAD is a central player in several cellular processes. NAD synthetase catalyzes the last step in the biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, making it a crucial intermediate enzyme linked to the biosynthesis of several amino acids, purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, coenzymes and antibiotics.

  3. Expression of glutamine synthetase in balloon cells: a basis of their antiepileptic role?

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Barba, Carmen; Giordano, Flavio; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Guerrini, Renzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is an enzyme involved in the clearance of glutamate, the most potent excitatory neurotransmitter. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of glutamine synthetase in neocortical samples from 5 children who underwent surgery for pharmacoresistant epilepsy and a histological diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia IIb. In all cases, balloon cells, but not dysmorphic neurons, were immunopositive for glutamine synthetase. This finding suggests that balloon cells can be involved in the neutralization of glutamate and play a protective anti-seizure role.

  4. Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase: the first crystallization of a human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefond, Luc; Frugier, Magali; Touzé, Elodie; Lorber, Bernard; Florentz, Catherine; Giegé, Richard Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; Sauter, Claude

    2007-04-01

    Crystals of human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase lacking the C-terminal S4-like domain diffract to 2.7 Å resolution and are suitable for structure determination. Human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and a truncated version with its C-terminal S4-like domain deleted were purified and crystallized. Only the truncated version, which is active in tyrosine activation and Escherichia coli tRNA{sup Tyr} charging, yielded crystals suitable for structure determination. These tetragonal crystals, belonging to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, were obtained in the presence of PEG 4000 as a crystallizing agent and diffracted X-rays to 2.7 Å resolution. Complete data sets could be collected and led to structure solution by molecular replacement.

  5. Repeated batch production of theanine by coupled fermentation with energy transfer using membrane-enclosed gamma-glutamylmethylamide synthetase and dried yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Sachiko; Morihara, Yosuke; Wakayama, Mamoru; Tachiki, Takashi

    2009-12-01

    Gamma-glutamylmethylamide synthetase and dried baker's yeast cells were enclosed together in a dialysis membrane tube to produce theanine repeatedly by coupled fermentation with energy transfer. The membrane-enclosed enzyme preparation (M-EEP) formed approximately 600 mM theanine from glutamic acid and ethylamine at a 100% conversion rate. M-EEP maintained its productivity of theanine during six consecutive reactions in a mixture containing NAD(+).

  6. Nucleotide sequence and functional analysis of the luxE gene encoding acyl-protein synthetase of the lux operon from Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Lin, J W; Chao, Y F; Weng, S F

    1996-11-21

    Nucleotide sequence of the luxE gene GenBank Accession No. U66407 from Photobacterium leiognathi PL741 has been determined, and the amino acid sequence of acyl-protein synthetase encoded by the luxE gene is deduced. Nucleotide sequence reveals that the luxE gene encodes acyl-protein synthetase, which is a component of the fatty acid reductase complex that is responsible for converting fatty acid to aldehyde as substrate in the luciferase-catalyzed bioluminescence reaction. The acyl-protein synthetase encoded by the luxE gene has a calculated M, 43,128 and comprises 373 amino acid residues. Alignment and comparison of acyl-protein synthetases from P. leiognathi, P. phosphoreum, Vibrio fischeri, V. harveyi and Xenorhabdus luminescens shows that they are homologous; there is 75.5% homologous (44.2% identity and 31.3% similarity) among these species. Functional analysis illustrates that the specific segment sequence lying before or in the luxE gene might from potential loops omega o omega e1, omega e2 as mRNA stability loop and/or for sub-regulation by alternative modulation in the lux operon. The gene order of the luxE gene in the lux and the lum operons is<--ter-lumQ-lumP-R&R-luxC-luxD-luxA-luxB -luxN-luxE-->(R&R: regulatory region; ter; transcriptional terminator), whereas the R&R is the regulatory region for the lum and the lux operons, and ter is the transcriptional terminator for the lum operon.

  7. CMT-associated mutations in glycyl- and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases exhibit similar pattern of toxicity and share common genetic modifiers in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ermanoska, Biljana; Motley, William W; Leitão-Gonçalves, Ricardo; Asselbergh, Bob; Lee, LaTasha H; De Rijk, Peter; Sleegers, Kristel; Ooms, Tinne; Godenschwege, Tanja A; Timmerman, Vincent; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Jordanova, Albena

    2014-08-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are ubiquitously expressed proteins that charge tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. By ensuring the fidelity of protein synthesis, these enzymes are essential for the viability of every cell. Yet, mutations in six tRNA synthetases specifically affect the peripheral nerves and cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. The CMT-causing mutations in tyrosyl- and glycyl-tRNA synthetases (YARS and GARS, respectively) alter the activity of the proteins in a range of ways (some mutations do not impact charging function, while others abrogate it), making a loss of function in tRNA charging unlikely to be the cause of disease pathology. It is currently unknown which cellular mechanisms are triggered by the mutant enzymes and how this leads to neurodegeneration. Here, by expressing two pathogenic mutations (G240R, P234KY) in Drosophila, we generated a model for GARS-associated neuropathy. We observed compromised viability, and behavioral, electrophysiological and morphological impairment in flies expressing the cytoplasmic isoform of mutant GARS. Their features recapitulated several hallmarks of CMT pathophysiology and were similar to the phenotypes identified in our previously described Drosophila model of YARS-associated neuropathy. Furthermore, CG8316 and CG15599 - genes identified in a retinal degeneration screen to modify mutant YARS, also modified the mutant GARS phenotypes. Our study presents genetic evidence for common mutant-specific interactions between two CMT-associated aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, lending support for a shared mechanism responsible for the synthetase-induced peripheral neuropathies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T Ashton; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, J Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  9. Evolution of the Glx-tRNA synthetase family: the glutaminyl enzyme as a case of horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Lamour, V; Quevillon, S; Diriong, S; N'Guyen, V C; Lipinski, M; Mirande, M

    1994-01-01

    An important step ensuring the fidelity in protein biosynthesis is the aminoacylation of tRNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. The accuracy of this process rests on a family of 20 enzymes, one for each amino acid. One exception is the formation of Gln-tRNA(Gln) that can be accomplished by two different pathways: aminoacylation of tRNA(Gln) with Gln by glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS; EC 6.1.1.18) or transamidation of Glu from Glu-tRNA(Gln) mischarged by glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS; EC 6.1.1.17). The latter pathway is widespread among bacteria and organelles that, accordingly, lack GlnRS. However, some bacterial species, such as Escherichia coli, do possess a GlnRS activity, which is responsible for Gln-tRNA(Gln) formation. In the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, both GluRS and GlnRS activities can be detected. To gain more insight into the evolutionary relationship between GluRS and GlnRS enzyme species, we have now isolated and characterized a human cDNA encoding GlnRS. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a strong similarity with other known GlnRSs and with eukaryotic GluRSs. A molecular phylogenetic analysis was conducted on the 14 GlxRS (GluRS or GlnRS) sequences available to date. Our data suggest that bacterial GlnRS has a eukaryotic origin and was acquired by a mechanism of horizontal gene transfer. Images PMID:8078941

  10. Site-specific immobilization of enzymes on magnetic nanoparticles and their use in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ching-Ching; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Liang, Chien-Fu; Chien, Wei-Ting; Wu, Huan-Ting; Chang, Tsung-Che; Jan, Fan-Dan; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2012-04-18

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are attractive materials that serve as a support for enzyme immobilization and facilitate separations by applying an external magnetic field; this could facilitate the recycling of enzymes and broaden their applications in organic synthesis. Herein, we report the methods for the immobilization of water-soluble and membrane-bound enzymes, and the activity difference between free and immobilized enzymes is discussed. Sialyltransferase (PmST1, from Pasteurella multocida ) and cytidine monophosphate (CMP)-sialic acid synthetase (CSS, from Neisseria meningitides ) were chosen as water-soluble enzymes and expressed using an intein expression system. The enzymes were site-specifically and covalently immobilized on PEGylated-N-terminal cysteine MNPs through native chemical ligation (NCL). Increasing the length of the PEG linker between the enzyme and the MNP surface increased the activity of the immobilized enzymes relative to the free parent enzymes. In addition, the use of a fluorescent acceptor tag for PmST1 affected enzyme kinetics. In contrast, sialyltransferase from Neisseria gonorrheae (NgST, a membrane-bound enzyme) was modified with a biotin-labeled cysteine at the C-terminus using NCL, and the enzyme was then assembled on streptavidin-functionalized MNPs. Using a streptavidin-biotin interaction, it was possible to immobilize NgST on a solid support under mild ligation conditions, which prevented the enzyme from high-temperature decomposition and provided an approximately 2-fold increase in activity compared to other immobilization methods on MNPs. Finally, the ganglioside GM3-derivative (sialyl-lactose derivative) was synthesized in a one-pot system by combining the use of immobilized PmST1 and CSS. The enzymes retained 50% activity after being reused ten times. Furthermore, the results obtained using the one-pot two-immobilized-enzyme system demonstrated that it can be applied to large-scale reactions with acceptable yields and

  11. Murine bubblegum orthologue is a microsomal very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Fraisl, Peter; Forss-Petter, Sonja; Zigman, Mihaela; Berger, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that a gene termed bubblegum (Bgm), encoding an acyl-CoA synthetase, could be involved in the pathogenesis of the inherited neurodegenerative disorder X-ALD (X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy). The precise function of the ALDP (ALD protein) still remains unclear. Aldp deficiency in mammals and Bgm deficiency in Drosophila led to accumulation of VLCFAs (very long-chain fatty acids). As a first step towards studying this interaction in wild-type versus Aldp-deficient mice, we analysed the expression pattern of the murine orthologue of the Bgm gene. In contrast with the ubiquitously expressed Ald gene, Bgm expression is restricted to the tissues that are affected by X-ALD such as brain, testis and adrenals. During mouse brain development, Bgm mRNA was first detected by Northern-blot analysis on embryonic day 18 and increased steadily towards adulthood, whereas the highest level of Ald mRNA was found on embryonic day 12 and decreased gradually during differentiation. Protein fractionation and confocal laser imaging of Bgm-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins revealed a microsomal localization that was different from peroxisomes (where Aldp is detected), endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. Mouse Bgm showed acyl-CoA synthetase activity towards a VLCFA substrate in addition to LCFAs, and this activity was enriched in the microsomal compartment. Speculating that Bgm expression could be regulated by Ald deficiency, we compared the abundance of Bgm mRNA in wild-type and Ald knockout mice but observed no difference. Although mouse Bgm is capable of activating VLCFA, we conclude that a direct interaction between the mouse Bgm and the Aldp seems unlikely.

  12. Murine bubblegum orthologue is a microsomal very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Fraisl, Peter; Forss-Petter, Sonja; Zigman, Mihaela; Berger, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that a gene termed bubblegum (Bgm), encoding an acyl-CoA synthetase, could be involved in the pathogenesis of the inherited neurodegenerative disorder X-ALD (X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy). The precise function of the ALDP (ALD protein) still remains unclear. Aldp deficiency in mammals and Bgm deficiency in Drosophila led to accumulation of VLCFAs (very long-chain fatty acids). As a first step towards studying this interaction in wild-type versus Aldp-deficient mice, we analysed the expression pattern of the murine orthologue of the Bgm gene. In contrast with the ubiquitously expressed Ald gene, Bgm expression is restricted to the tissues that are affected by X-ALD such as brain, testis and adrenals. During mouse brain development, Bgm mRNA was first detected by Northern-blot analysis on embryonic day 18 and increased steadily towards adulthood, whereas the highest level of Ald mRNA was found on embryonic day 12 and decreased gradually during differentiation. Protein fractionation and confocal laser imaging of Bgm-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins revealed a microsomal localization that was different from peroxisomes (where Aldp is detected), endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. Mouse Bgm showed acyl-CoA synthetase activity towards a VLCFA substrate in addition to LCFAs, and this activity was enriched in the microsomal compartment. Speculating that Bgm expression could be regulated by Ald deficiency, we compared the abundance of Bgm mRNA in wild-type and Ald knockout mice but observed no difference. Although mouse Bgm is capable of activating VLCFA, we conclude that a direct interaction between the mouse Bgm and the Aldp seems unlikely. PMID:14516277

  13. Cytoplasmic Leucyl-Trna Synthetase of Neurospora Crassa Is Not Specified by the Leu-5 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Benarous, R.; Chow, C. M.; RajBhandary, U. L.

    1988-01-01

    We generated a λgt11 Neurospora crassa cDNA library and screened the library for the cytoplasmic leucyl-tRNA synthetase (cyto LeuRS) clones using cyto LeuRS specific antibody. Two clones, λNCLRSC1 and λNCLRSC2, were obtained which have inserts of ~2 kbp and ~1.3 kbp, and which overlap by about 0.6 kbp. The following lines of evidence indicate that λNCLRSC1 and λNCLRSC2 encode parts of cyto LeuRS. (1) Antibodies affinity purified using either of the fusion proteins encoded by λNCLRSC1 or λNCLRSC2 inhibit cyto LeuRS activity. Thus, the fusion protein and cyto LeuRS share immunological determinants. (2) The same antibodies also react with an ~115-kDa protein, which comigrates with purified cyto LeuRS, in immunoblots of total N. crassa proteins. We used the cDNA clones to probe a N. crassa genomic DNA library and isolated two genomic DNA clones. Partial sequence analysis of cDNA and genomic DNA clones shows a methionine initiated open reading frame, which includes a stretch of amino acid residues that are highly conserved and that are at the ATP binding site in aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Using the cloned DNA as probe, we show that the cyto LeuRS mRNA is ~3900 nucleotides long. Finally, we have used restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping to show that the cyto LeuRS gene resides on the far right of linkage group II and not on linkage group V where the leu-5 mutation, which was previously reported to specify cyto LeuRS, is located. PMID:2842224

  14. Recombinant expression, purification, and crystallization of the glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase from Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    van Rooyen, Jason M; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Belrhali, Hassan

    2015-06-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases play a critical role in protein synthesis by providing precursor transfer-RNA molecules correctly charged with their cognate amino-acids. The essential nature of these enzymes make them attractive targets for designing new drugs against important pathogenic protozoans like Toxoplasma. Because no structural data currently exists for a protozoan glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (QRS), an understanding of its potential as a drug target and its function in the assembly of the Toxoplasma multi-aminoacyl tRNA (MARS) complex is therefore lacking. Here we describe the optimization of expression and purification conditions that permitted the recovery and crystallization of both domains of the Toxoplasma QRS enzyme from a heterologous Escherichia coli expression system. Expression of full-length QRS was only achieved after the addition of an N-terminal histidine affinity tag and the isolated protein was active on both cellular and in vitro produced Toxoplasma tRNA. Taking advantage of the proteolytic susceptibility of QRS to cleavage into component domains, N-terminal glutathione S-transferase (GST) motif-containing domain fragments were isolated and crystallization conditions discovered. Isolation of the C-terminal catalytic domain was accomplished after subcloning the domain and optimizing expression conditions. Purified catalytic domain survived cryogenic storage and yielded large diffraction-quality crystals over-night after optimization of screening conditions. This work will form the basis of future structural studies into structural-functional relationships of both domains including potential targeted drug-design studies and investigations into the assembly of the Toxoplasma MARS complex.

  15. Metabolic regulation of the gene encoding glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, H M; Peng, S S; Coruzzi, G M

    1994-01-01

    Here, we characterize a cDNA encoding a glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase (ASN1) from Arabidopsis thaliana and assess the effects of metabolic regulation on ASN1 mRNA levels. Sequence analysis shows that the predicted ASN1 peptide contains a purF-type glutamine-binding domain. Southern blot experiments and cDNA clone analysis suggest that ASN1 is the only gene encoding glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase in A. thaliana. The ASN1 gene is expressed predominantly in shoot tissues, where light has a negative effect on its mRNA accumulation. This negative effect of light on ASN1 mRNA levels was shown to be mediated, at least in part, via the photoreceptor phytochrome. We also investigated whether light-induced changes in nitrogen to carbon ratios might exert a metabolic regulation of the ASN1 mRNA accumulation. These experiments demonstrated that the accumulation of ASN1 mRNA in dark-grown plants is strongly repressed by the presence of exogenous sucrose. Moreover, this sucrose repression of ASN1 expression can be partially rescued by supplementation with exogenous amino acids such as asparagine, glutamine, and glutamate. These findings suggest that the expression of the ASN1 gene is under the metabolic control of the nitrogen to carbon ratio in cells. This is consistent with the fact that asparagine, synthesized by the ASN1 gene product, is a favored compound for nitrogen storage and nitrogen transport in dark-grown plants. We have put forth a working model suggesting that when nitrogen to carbon ratios are high, the gene product of ASN1 functions to re-direct the flow of nitrogen into asparagine, which acts as a shunt for storage and/or long-distance transport of nitrogen. PMID:7846154

  16. Succinyl-CoA Synthetase: New Antigen Candidate of Bartonella bacilliformis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Cláudia; Palma, Noemí; Pons, Maria J.; Magallón-Tejada, Ariel; Sandoval, Isabel; Tinco-Valdez, Carmen; Gutarra, Carlos; del Valle-Mendoza, Juana; Ruiz, Joaquim; Matsuoka, Mayumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Bartonella bacilliformis is the causative agent of Carrion’s disease, a neglected illness with mortality rates of 40–85% in the absence of treatment. The lack of a diagnostic technique to overcome misdiagnosis and treat asymptomatic carriers is of note. This study aimed to identify new B. bacilliformis antigenic candidates that could lead to a new diagnostic tool able to be implemented in endemic rural areas. Methodology/Principal Findings Blood (n = 198) and serum (n = 177) samples were collected in northern Peru. Clinical data were recorded. Specific 16S rRNA amplification by RT-PCR, IFA and ELISA for IgM/IgG with whole cells as antigens was done. Western blot analysis and N-terminal amino acid sequencing detected seroreactive proteins. ELISAs for IgM/IgG for the antigenic candidates were performed. Of the population 33.3% reported at least one symptom compatible with Carrion’s disease; 25.4% (IFA), 27.1% (ELISA-IgG), 33.9% (ELISA-IgM) and 38.9% (RT-PCR) of samples were positive. Four proteins were considered potential antigenic candidates, including two new antigenic candidates, succinyl-CoA synthetase subunit α (SCS-α) and succinyl-CoA synthetase subunit β (SCS-β). On Western blot both Pap31 and SCS-α interacted with IgM, while GroEL and SCS-β interacted with IgG. The presence of specific antibodies against the antigenic candidates varied from 34.5% (IgG against SCS-α) to 97.2% (IgM against Pap31). Conclusions/Significance RT-PCR and the high levels of positivity for specific ELISAs demonstrate high levels of B. bacilliformis exposure and asymptomatic carriers among inhabitants. The new antigens identified might be used as a new rapid diagnostic tool to diagnose acute Carrion’s disease and identify asymptomatic carriers. PMID:27627803

  17. Multiple adaptive mechanisms affect asparagine synthetase substrate availability in asparaginase-resistant MOLT-4 human leukaemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Aslanian, A M; Kilberg, M S

    2001-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is treated by combination chemotherapy with a number of drugs, almost always including the enzyme L-asparaginase (ASNase). Although the initial remission rate is quite high, relapse and associated drug resistance remain a problem. In vitro studies have demonstrated an adaptive increase in asparagine synthetase (AS) expression in ASNase-resistant cells, which is believed to permit ASNase-resistant human leukaemia cells to survive in vivo. The present results, obtained with ASNase-sensitive and -resistant human MOLT-4 leukaemia cell lines, illustrate that several other adaptive processes occur to provide sufficient amounts of the AS substrates, aspartate and glutamine, required to support this increased enzymic activity. In both cell populations, aspartate is derived almost exclusively from intracellular sources, whereas the necessary glutamine arises from both intracellular and extracellular sources. Transport of glutamine into ASNase-resistant cells is significantly enhanced compared with the parental cells, whereas amino acid efflux (e.g. asparagine) is reduced. Most of the adaptive change for the amino acid transporters, Systems A, ASC and L, is rapidly (12 h) reversed following ASNase removal. The enzymic activity of glutamine synthetase is also enhanced in ASNase-resistant cells by a post-transcriptional mechanism. The results demonstrate that there are several sites of metabolic adaptation in ASNase-treated leukaemia cells that serve to promote the replenishment of both glutamine and asparagine. PMID:11485552

  18. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase editing domain functions as a molecular rheostat to control codon ambiguity in Mycoplasma pathogens.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Palencia, Andrés; Lukk, Tiit; Li, Zhi; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida A; Cusack, Stephen; Martinis, Susan A; Boniecki, Michal T

    2013-03-05

    Mycoplasma leucyl-tRNA synthetases (LeuRSs) have been identified in which the connective polypeptide 1 (CP1) amino acid editing domain that clears mischarged tRNAs are missing (Mycoplasma mobile) or highly degenerate (Mycoplasma synoviae). Thus, these enzymes rely on a clearance pathway called pretransfer editing, which hydrolyzes misactivated aminoacyl-adenylate intermediate via a nebulous mechanism that has been controversial for decades. Even as the sole fidelity pathway for clearing amino acid selection errors in the pathogenic M. mobile, pretransfer editing is not robust enough to completely block mischarging of tRNA(Leu), resulting in codon ambiguity and statistical proteins. A high-resolution X-ray crystal structure shows that M. mobile LeuRS structurally overlaps with other LeuRS cores. However, when CP1 domains from different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and origins were fused to this common LeuRS core, surprisingly, pretransfer editing was enhanced. It is hypothesized that the CP1 domain evolved as a molecular rheostat to balance multiple functions. These include distal control of specificity and enzyme activity in the ancient canonical core, as well as providing a separate hydrolytic active site for clearing mischarged tRNA.

  19. Phosphinothricin Tripeptide Synthetases in Streptomyces viridochromogenes Tü494

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Dirk; Grammel, Nicolas; Heinzelmann, Eva; Keller, Ullrich; Wohlleben, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    The tripeptide backbone of phosphinothricin (PT) tripeptide (PTT), a compound with herbicidal activity from Streptomyces viridochromogenes, is assembled by three stand-alone peptide synthetase modules. The enzyme PhsA (66 kDa) recruits the PT-precursor N-acetyl-demethylphosphinothricin (N-Ac-DMPT), whereas the two alanine residues of PTT are assembled by the enzymes PhsB and PhsC (129 and 119 kDa, respectively). During or after assembly, the N-Ac-DMPT residue in the peptide is converted to PT by methylation and deacetylation. Both phsB and phsC appear to be cotranscribed together with two other genes from a single promoter and they are located at a distance of 20 kb from the gene phsA, encoding PhsA, in the PTT biosynthesis gene cluster of S. viridochromogenes. PhsB and PhsC represent single nonribosomal peptide synthetase elongation modules lacking a thioesterase domain. Gene inactivations, genetic complementations, determinations of substrate specificity of the heterologously produced proteins, and comparison of PhsC sequence with the amino terminus of the alanine-activating nonribosomal peptide synthetase PTTSII from S. viridochromogenes confirmed the role of the two genes in the bialanylation of Ac-DMPT. The lack of an integral thioesterase domain in the PTT assembly system points to product release possibly involving two type II thioesterase genes (the1 and the2) located in the PTT gene cluster alone or in conjunction with an as yet unknown mechanism of product release. PMID:16251301

  20. Glutamine versus Ammonia Utilization in the NAD Synthetase Family

    PubMed Central

    Shatalin, Konstantin; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Sorci, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    NAD is a ubiquitous and essential metabolic redox cofactor which also functions as a substrate in certain regulatory pathways. The last step of NAD synthesis is the ATP-dependent amidation of deamido-NAD by NAD synthetase (NADS). Members of the NADS family are present in nearly all species across the three kingdoms of Life. In eukaryotic NADS, the core synthetase domain is fused with a nitrilase-like glutaminase domain supplying ammonia for the reaction. This two-domain NADS arrangement enabling the utilization of glutamine as nitrogen donor is also present in various bacterial lineages. However, many other bacterial members of NADS family do not contain a glutaminase domain, and they can utilize only ammonia (but not glutamine) in vitro. A single-domain NADS is also characteristic for nearly all Archaea, and its dependence on ammonia was demonstrated here for the representative enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannaschi. However, a question about the actual in vivo nitrogen donor for single-domain members of the NADS family remained open: Is it glutamine hydrolyzed by a committed (but yet unknown) glutaminase subunit, as in most ATP-dependent amidotransferases, or free ammonia as in glutamine synthetase? Here we addressed this dilemma by combining evolutionary analysis of the NADS family with experimental characterization of two representative bacterial systems: a two-subunit NADS from Thermus thermophilus and a single-domain NADS from Salmonella typhimurium providing evidence that ammonia (and not glutamine) is the physiological substrate of a typical single-domain NADS. The latter represents the most likely ancestral form of NADS. The ability to utilize glutamine appears to have evolved via recruitment of a glutaminase subunit followed by domain fusion in an early branch of Bacteria. Further evolution of the NADS family included lineage-specific loss of one of the two alternative forms and horizontal gene transfer events. Lastly, we identified NADS structural

  1. Structural analysis of FAD synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes

    PubMed Central

    Frago, Susana; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Serrano, Ana; Medina, Milagros

    2008-01-01

    Background The prokaryotic FAD synthetase family – a group of bifunctional enzymes that catalyse riboflavin phosphorylation and FMN adenylylation within a single polypeptide chain- was analysed in terms of sequence and structure. Results Sequences of nearly 800 prokaryotic species were aligned. Those related with bifunctional FAD synthetase activities showed conservation of several consensus regions and highly conserved residues. A 3D model for the FAD synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes (CaFADS) was generated. This model confirms that the N-terminal and C-terminal domains are related to nucleotydyltransferases and riboflavin kinases, respectively. Models for the interaction of CaFADS with its substrates were also produced, allowing location of all the protein substrates in their putative binding pockets. These include two independent flavin binding sites for each CaFADS activity. Conclusion For the first time, the putative presence of a flavin binding site for the adenylylation activity, independent from that related with the phosphorylation activity, is shown. Additionally, these models suggest the functional relevance of some residues putatively involved in the catalytic processes. Their relevant roles were analysed by site-directed mutagenesis. A role was confirmed for H28, H31, S164 and T165 in the stabilisation of the P groups and the adenine moiety of ATP and, the P of FMN for the adenylylation. Similarly, T208, N210 and E268 appear critical for accommodation of the P groups of ATP and the ribityl end of RF in the active site for the phosphorylation process. Finally, the C-terminal domain was shown to catalyse the phosphorylation process on its own, but no reaction at all was observed with the individually expressed N-terminal domain. PMID:18811972

  2. Structural analysis of FAD synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes.

    PubMed

    Frago, Susana; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Serrano, Ana; Medina, Milagros

    2008-09-23

    The prokaryotic FAD synthetase family - a group of bifunctional enzymes that catalyse riboflavin phosphorylation and FMN adenylylation within a single polypeptide chain- was analysed in terms of sequence and structure. Sequences of nearly 800 prokaryotic species were aligned. Those related with bifunctional FAD synthetase activities showed conservation of several consensus regions and highly conserved residues. A 3D model for the FAD synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes (CaFADS) was generated. This model confirms that the N-terminal and C-terminal domains are related to nucleotydyltransferases and riboflavin kinases, respectively. Models for the interaction of CaFADS with its substrates were also produced, allowing location of all the protein substrates in their putative binding pockets. These include two independent flavin binding sites for each CaFADS activity. For the first time, the putative presence of a flavin binding site for the adenylylation activity, independent from that related with the phosphorylation activity, is shown. Additionally, these models suggest the functional relevance of some residues putatively involved in the catalytic processes. Their relevant roles were analysed by site-directed mutagenesis. A role was confirmed for H28, H31, S164 and T165 in the stabilisation of the P groups and the adenine moiety of ATP and, the P of FMN for the adenylylation. Similarly, T208, N210 and E268 appear critical for accommodation of the P groups of ATP and the ribityl end of RF in the active site for the phosphorylation process. Finally, the C-terminal domain was shown to catalyse the phosphorylation process on its own, but no reaction at all was observed with the individually expressed N-terminal domain.

  3. Chemical modification of cysteine and tyrosine residues in formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.I.; Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1982-04-01

    The chemical modification of cysteine and tyrosine residues in formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from Clostridium thermoaceticum has been examined relative to enzymatic activity and reactivity of these groups in the native protein. 4,4'-Dipyridyl disulfide, dansylaziridine, and fluorescein mercuric acetate all reacted with just one of six sulfhydryls per enzyme subunit, resulting in activities of 100, 95 and 70%, respectively. The K/sub m/ values for MgATP, formate, and tetrahydrofolate were unaltered in the modified enzymes. ATP did produce a 2.5-fold reduction in the rate of reaction between the enzyme and 4,4'-dipyridyl disulfide. Tetranitromethane reacted most rapidly with a single sulfhydryl group per subunit to produce a 20 to 30% loss in activity. Subsequent additions of tetranitromethane modified 2.2 tyrosines per subunit which was proportional to the loss of the remaining enzymatic activity. Folic acid, a competitive inhibitor, protected against modification of the tyrosines and the associated activity losses; however, the oxidation of the single sulfhydryl group and the initial 20 to 30% activity loss were unaffected. In the presence of folic acid, higher concentrations of tetranitromethane produced a loss of the remaining activity proportional to the modification of 1.2 tyrosines per subunit. It is proposed that at least 1 tyrosine critical for enzymatic activity is located at or near the folic acid/tetrahydrofolate binding site.

  4. A unique insertion in the CP1 domain of Giardia lamblia leucyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Long; Yao, Peng; Ruan, Liang-Liang; Zhu, Bin; Luo, Jun; Qu, Liang-Hu; Wang, En-Duo

    2009-02-17

    Leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) catalyzes the esterification of the tRNA(Leu) isoacceptor with leucine. It contains a large insertion domain, connective peptide 1 (CP1), for amino acid editing. Here, we cloned the gene encoding LeuRS from Giardia lamblia (GlLeuRS), one of the most ancient eukaryotes. GlLeuRS was purified from an Escherichia coli overproduction strain, and its properties were investigated. The isolated CP1 domain of GlLeuRS (GlLeuRS-CP1) was an active protein for editing mischarged G. lamblia tRNA(Leu)(AAG) (GltRNA(Leu)). Insertion of 49 amino acid residues within the CP1 domain (the so-called 49-amino acid motif) was important for the optimal aminoacylation activity of GlLeuRS and was crucial for the editing capacity of GlLeuRS-CP1. Additionally, the motif can confer editing activity on the editing-defective isolated CP1 domain from E. coli LeuRS (EcLeuRS-CP1). We also found that GlLeuRS could not rescue a Saccharomyces cerevisiae leuS null strain, suggesting different recognition modes for these two LeuRSs with respect to tRNA(Leu).

  5. Characterization of a Bacillus subtilis surfactin synthetase knockout and antimicrobial activity analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Qu, Xiaoxu; Gao, Ling; Zhao, Shengming; Lu, Zhaoxin; Zhang, Chong; Bie, Xiaomei

    2016-11-10

    Gene knockout is an important approach to improve the production of antimicrobial compounds. B. subtilis PB2-LS10, derived from B. subtilis PB2-L by a surfactin synthetase (srf) genes knockout, exhibits stronger inhibitory action than its parental strain against all tested pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The antimicrobial extracts produced by B. subtilis PB2-L and B. subtilis PB2-LS10 respectively were characterized by the high-resolution LC-ESI-MS. To provide further insight into the distinct antimicrobial activities, we investigated the impact of the srf genes deletion on the growth and gene transcriptional profile of the strains. The mutant strain grew quickly and reached stationary phase 2h earlier than the wild-type. Prominent expression changes in the modified strain involved genes that were essential to metabolic pathways and processes. Genes related to amino acid transport, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and protein export were up-regulated in strain PB2-LS10. However, amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and fatty acid metabolism were repressed. Because of its excellent antimicrobial activity, strain PB2-LS10 has potential for use in food preservation.

  6. Chemical modification of cysteine and tyrosine residues in formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.I.; Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1982-04-01

    The chemical modification of cysteine and tyrosine residues in formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from Clostridium thermoaceticum has been examined relative to enzymatic activity and reactivity of these groups in the native protein. 4,4'-Dipyridyl disulfide, dansylaziridine, and fluorescein mercuric acetate all reacted with just one of six sulfhydryls per enzyme subunit, resulting in activities of 100, 95 and 70%, respectively. The K/sub m/ values for MgATP, formate, and tetrahydrofolate were unaltered in the modified enzymes. ATP did produce a 2.5-fold reduction in the rate of reaction between the enzyme and 4,4'-dipyridyl disulfide. Tetranitromethane reacted most rapidly with a single sulfhydryl group per subunit to produce a 20 to 30% loss in activity. Subsequent additions of tetranitromethane modified 2.2 tyrosines per subunit which was proportional to the loss of the remaining enzymatic activity. Folic acid, a competitive inhibitor, protected against modification of the tyrosines and the associated activity losses; however, the oxidation of the single sulfhydryl group and the initial 20 to 30% activity loss were unaffected. In the presence of folic acid, higher concentrations of tetranitromethane produced a loss of the remaining activity proportional to the modification of 1.2 tyrosines per subunit. It is proposed that at least 1 tyrosine critical for enzymatic activity is located at or near the folic acid/tetrahydrofolate binding site.

  7. Deletion of Type I glutamine synthetase deregulates nitrogen metabolism and increases ethanol production in Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Rydzak, Thomas; Garcia, David; Stevenson, David M; Sladek, Margaret; Klingeman, Dawn M; Holwerda, Evert K; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M

    2017-04-08

    Clostridium thermocellum rapidly deconstructs cellulose and ferments resulting hydrolysis products into ethanol and other products, and is thus a promising platform organism for the development of cellulosic biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. While recent metabolic engineering strategies have targeted eliminating canonical fermentation products (acetate, lactate, formate, and H2), C. thermocellum also secretes amino acids, which has limited ethanol yields in engineered strains to approximately 70% of the theoretical maximum. To investigate approaches to decrease amino acid secretion, we attempted to reduce ammonium assimilation by deleting the Type I glutamine synthetase (glnA) in an essentially wild type strain of C. thermocellum. Deletion of glnA reduced levels of secreted valine and total amino acids by 53% and 44% respectively, and increased ethanol yields by 53%. RNA-seq analysis revealed that genes encoding the RNF-complex were more highly expressed in ΔglnA and may have a role in improving NADH-availability for ethanol production. While a significant up-regulation of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation and urea uptake suggested that deletion of glnA induces a nitrogen starvation response, metabolomic analysis showed an increase in intracellular glutamine levels indicative of nitrogen-rich conditions. We propose that deletion of glnA causes deregulation of nitrogen metabolism, leading to overexpression of nitrogen metabolism genes and, in turn, elevated glutamine levels. Here we demonstrate that perturbation of nitrogen assimilation is a promising strategy to redirect flux from the production of nitrogenous compounds toward biofuels in C. thermocellum.

  8. Specific disulfide cross-linking to constrict the mobile carrier domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Tarry, Michael J.; Schmeing, T. Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases are large, multi-domain enzymes that produce peptide molecules with important biological activity such as antibiotic, antiviral, anti-tumor, siderophore and immunosuppressant action. The adenylation (A) domain catalyzes two reactions in the biosynthetic pathway. In the first reaction, it activates the substrate amino acid by adenylation and in the second reaction it transfers the amino acid onto the phosphopantetheine arm of the adjacent peptide carrier protein (PCP) domain. The conformation of the A domain differs significantly depending on which of these two reactions it is catalyzing. Recently, several structures of A–PCP di-domains have been solved using mechanism-based inhibitors to trap the PCP domain in the A domain active site. Here, we present an alternative strategy to stall the A–PCP di-domain, by engineering a disulfide bond between the native amino acid substrate and the A domain. Size exclusion studies showed a significant shift in apparent size when the mutant A–PCP was provided with cross-linking reagents, and this shift was reversible in the presence of high concentrations of reducing agent. The cross-linked protein crystallized readily in several of the conditions screened and the best crystals diffracted to ≈8 Å. PMID:25713404

  9. A dispensable peptide from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase affects tRNA binding.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, Roberto; Salazar, Juan; Canales, Mauricio; Orellana, Omar

    2002-12-18

    The activation domain of class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which contains the Rossmann fold and the signature sequences HIGH and KMSKS, is generally split into two halves by the connective peptides (CP1, CP2) whose amino acid sequences are idiosyncratic. CP1 has been shown to participate in the binding of tRNA as well as the editing of the reaction intermediate aminoacyl-AMP or the aminoacyl-tRNA. No function has been assigned to CP2. The amino acid sequence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans TrpRS was predicted from the genome sequence. Protein sequence alignments revealed that A. ferrooxidans TrpRS contains a 70 amino acids long CP2 that is not found in any other bacterial TrpRS. However, a CP2 in the same relative position was found in the predicted sequence of several archaeal TrpRSs. A. ferrooxidans TrpRS is functional in vivo in Escherichia coli. A deletion mutant of A. ferrooxidans trpS lacking the coding region of CP2 was constructed. The in vivo activity of the mutant TrpRS in E. coli, as well as the kinetic parameters of the in vitro activation of tryptophan by ATP, were not altered by the deletion. However, the K(m) value for tRNA was seven-fold higher upon deletion, reducing the efficiency of aminoacylation. Structural modeling suggests that CP2 binds to the inner corner of the L shape of tRNA.

  10. Stability of Rat Brain Glutamine Synthetase to Oxygen Toxicity (Oxygen at High Pressure).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    Enzyme assays using the gamma-glutamyl transferase method provided estimates of glutamine synthetase activity in rat brain homogenates subjected to a...supports the lack of any connection between convulsions caused by in vivo inhibition of glutamine synthetase and convulsions caused by oxygen toxicity (oxygen at high pressure). (Author)

  11. Circumstantial evidence for a role of glutamine-synthetase in suicide.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, Hans O

    2011-06-01

    Suicide occurs during depression, schizophrenia, diabetes and epilepsy. A common denominator of these disorders is the presence of inflammation. Inflammatory cytokines affect function and expression of the glial enzyme glutamine synthetase and post mortem studies indicate that brain glutamine synthetase function is suppressed in mood disorders and epilepsy. In a study of schizophrenia brains, the expression of glutamine synthetase was reduced in those cases where the cause of death was suicide. The glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) inhibitor, lithium, which has a proven efficacy against suicide, increased in an animal experiment the expression of glutamine synthetase. Based on these data one could reason that suicide may be prevented by centrally acting GSK3 inhibitors. However, since inhibition of glutamine synthetase may lead to a deficit in glutamine and as consequence a GABA and glutamate deficit, even simple food supplementation with glutamine might help to reduce suicide.

  12. Inhibition of rabbit gastric glucosamine synthetase activity by Cu2+, Zn2+ and Se4+.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Sakuma, S; Takahashi, K; Bohtani, Y; Nishida, H; Fujimoto, Y

    1997-05-01

    The effects of Fe2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Se4+ on the activity of glucosamine synthetase, the rate-limiting enzyme of mucus synthesis, in rabbit gastric corporal mucosa were examined. Cu2+, Zn2+ and Se4+ inhibited the glucosamine synthetase activity at concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 microM (Cu2+, 8-98% inhibition; Zn2+, 10-99% inhibition; Se4+, 32-89% inhibition). The inhibitory effects of these three ions were much stronger than that of UDP-N-acetylglúcosamine known as a representative inhibitor of the glucosamine synthetase activity (10 microM, 52% inhibition). Fe2+ had no significant effect on the glucosamine synthetase activity up to 100 microM. These results suggest that Cu2+, Zn2+ and Se4+ can be potent inhibitors of gastric glucosamine synthetase activity.

  13. Application of a Propionyl Coenzyme A Synthetase for Poly(3-Hydroxypropionate-co-3-Hydroxybutyrate) Accumulation in Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Henry E.; Mitsky, Timothy A.; Mahadeo, Debbie A.; Tran, Minhtien; Gruys, Kenneth J.

    2000-01-01

    The genetic operon for propionic acid degradation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium contains an open reading frame designated prpE which encodes a propionyl coenzyme A (propionyl-CoA) synthetase (A. R. Horswill and J. C. Escalante-Semerena, Microbiology 145:1381–1388, 1999). In this paper we report the cloning of prpE by PCR, its overexpression in Escherichia coli, and the substrate specificity of the enzyme. When propionate was utilized as the substrate for PrpE, a Km of 50 μM and a specific activity of 120 μmol · min−1 · mg−1 were found at the saturating substrate concentration. PrpE also activated acetate, 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP), and butyrate to their corresponding coenzyme A esters but did so much less efficiently than propionate. When prpE was coexpressed with the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biosynthetic genes from Ralstonia eutropha in recombinant E. coli, a PHA copolymer containing 3HP units accumulated when 3HP was supplied with the growth medium. To compare the utility of acyl-CoA synthetases to that of an acyl-CoA transferase for PHA production, PHA-producing recombinant strains were constructed to coexpress the PHA biosynthetic genes with prpE, with acoE (an acetyl-CoA synthetase gene from R. eutropha [H. Priefert and A. Steinbüchel, J. Bacteriol. 174:6590–6599, 1992]), or with orfZ (an acetyl-CoA:4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA transferase gene from Clostridium propionicum [H. E. Valentin, S. Reiser, and K. J. Gruys, Biotechnol. Bioeng. 67:291–299, 2000]). Of the three enzymes, PrpE and OrfZ enabled similar levels of 3HP incorporation into PHA, whereas AcoE was significantly less effective in this capacity. PMID:11097899

  14. The RNA sequence context defines the mechanistic routes by which yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase charges tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sissler, M; Giegé, R; Florentz, C

    1998-01-01

    Arginylation of tRNA transcripts by yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase can be triggered by two alternate recognition sets in anticodon loops: C35 and U36 or G36 in tRNA(Arg) and C36 and G37 in tRNA(Asp) (Sissler M, Giegé R, Florentz C, 1996, EMBO J 15:5069-5076). Kinetic studies on tRNA variants were done to explore the mechanisms by which these sets are expressed. Although the synthetase interacts in a similar manner with tRNA(Arg) and tRNA(Asp), the details of the interaction patterns are idiosyncratic, especially in anticodon loops (Sissler M, Eriani G, Martin F, Giegé R, Florentz C, 1997, Nucleic Acids Res 25:4899-4906). Exchange of individual recognition elements between arginine and aspartate tRNA frameworks strongly blocks arginylation of the mutated tRNAs, whereas full exchange of the recognition sets leads to efficient arginine acceptance of the transplanted tRNAs. Unpredictably, the similar catalytic efficiencies of native and transplanted tRNAs originate from different k(cat) and Km combinations. A closer analysis reveals that efficient arginylation results from strong anticooperative effects between individual recognition elements. Nonrecognition nucleotides as well as the tRNA architecture are additional factors that tune efficiency. Altogether, arginyl-tRNA synthetase is able to utilize different context-dependent mechanistic routes to be activated. This confers biological advantages to the arginine aminoacylation system and sheds light on its evolutionary relationship with the aspartate system. PMID:9622124

  15. MS_RHII-RSD, a Dual-Function RNase HII-(p)ppGpp Synthetase from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Murdeshwar, Maya S.

    2012-01-01

    In the noninfectious soil saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis, intracellular levels of the stress alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate and guanosine pentaphosphate, together termed (p)ppGpp, are regulated by the enzyme RelMsm. This enzyme consists of a single, bifunctional polypeptide chain that is capable of both synthesizing and hydrolyzing (p)ppGpp. The relMsm knockout strain of M. smegmatis (ΔrelMsm) is expected to show a (p)ppGpp null [(p)ppGpp0] phenotype. Contrary to this expectation, the strain is capable of synthesizing (p)ppGpp in vivo. In this study, we identify and functionally characterize the open reading frame (ORF), MSMEG_5849, that encodes a second functional (p)ppGpp synthetase in M. smegmatis. In addition to (p)ppGpp synthesis, the 567-amino-acid-long protein encoded by this gene is capable of hydrolyzing RNA·DNA hybrids and bears similarity to the conventional RNase HII enzymes. We have classified this protein as actRelMsm in accordance with the recent nomenclature proposed and have named it MS_RHII-RSD, indicating the two enzymatic activities present [RHII, RNase HII domain, originally identified as domain of unknown function 429 (DUF429), and RSD, RelA_SpoT nucleotidyl transferase domain, the SYNTH domain responsible for (p)ppGpp synthesis activity]. MS_RHII-RSD is expressed and is constitutively active in vivo and behaves like a monofunctional (p)ppGpp synthetase in vitro. The occurrence of the RNase HII and (p)ppGpp synthetase domains together on the same polypeptide chain is suggestive of an in vivo role for this novel protein as a link connecting the essential life processes of DNA replication, repair, and transcription to the highly conserved stress survival pathway, the stringent response. PMID:22636779

  16. Replacement of the folC gene, encoding folylpolyglutamate synthetase-dihydrofolate synthetase in Escherichia coli, with genes mutagenized in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, C; Bognar, A L

    1992-01-01

    The folylpolyglutamate synthetase-dihydrofolate synthetase gene (folC) in Escherichia coli was deleted from the bacterial chromosome and replaced by a selectable Kmr marker. The deletion strain required a complementing gene expressing folylpolyglutamate synthetase encoded on a plasmid for viability, indicating that folC is an essential gene in E. coli. The complementing folC gene was cloned into the vector pPM103 (pSC101, temperature sensitive for replication), which segregated spontaneously at 42 degrees C in the absence of selection. This complementing plasmid was replaced in the folC deletion strain by compatible pUC plasmids containing folC genes with mutations generated in vitro, producing strains which express only mutant folylpolyglutamate synthetase. Mutant folC genes expressing insufficient enzyme activity could not complement the chromosomal deletion, resulting in retention of the pPM103 plasmid. Some mutant genes expressing low levels of enzyme activity replaced the complementing plasmid, but the strains produced were auxotrophic for products of folate-dependent pathways. The folylpolyglutamate synthetase gene from Lactobacillus casei, which may lack dihydrofolate synthetase activity, replaced the complementing plasmid, but the strain was auxotrophic for all folate end products. Images PMID:1548226

  17. Purification and comparison of two forms of S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase from rat liver.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, C; Puerta, J; Alemany, S

    1987-12-30

    Only two S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase forms exist in rat liver: high-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase and low-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase, which have been purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. High-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase had an apparent molecular mass, determined by gel filtration, of 210 kDa and was a tetramer constituted by 48.5-kDa subunits, estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The apparent molecular mass of low-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase, as estimated by gel filtration, was 110 kDa and was constituted by two subunits of 47 kDa. An antiserum against low-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase cross-reacted with the two forms. Reverse-phase HPLC runs of tryptic digestions of high-Mr and low-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase showed that the peptide maps of the two forms were very similar, if not identical. High-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase activity was inhibited by S-adenosyl-L-methionine and pyrophosphate. Depending on the dose used, S-adenosyl-L-methionine activated or inhibited low-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase and pyrophosphate had no effect on this form. The two synthetases showed a different specific activity at the physiological concentration of methionine. This report shows that even though the two forms are constructed of the same polypeptide chains, they are regulated in a different manner by methionine and by the products of the reaction.

  18. Regulation of the nuclear genes encoding the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetases of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, C M; Rajbhandary, U L

    1989-01-01

    We show that the nuclear genes for the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) of Neurospora crassa are distinct in their encoded proteins, codon usage, mRNA levels, and regulation. The 4.2-kilobase-pair region representing the structural gene for cytoplasmic LeuRS and flanking regions has been sequenced. The positions of the 5' and 3' ends of mRNA and of a single 62-base-pair intron have been mapped. The methionine-initiated open reading frame encoded a protein of 1,123 amino acids and displayed a strong codon bias. Although cytoplasmic LeuRS shares with mitochondrial LeuRS some general features common to most aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, there is little amino acid sequence similarity between them, mRNA levels for cytoplasmic LeuRS were much higher than those for mitochondrial LeuRS. This observation and the strong codon bias in the cytoplasmic LeuRS gene may contribute to a greater abundance of cytoplasmic LeuRS than mitochondrial LeuRS. The genes for cytoplasmic and mitochondrial LeuRS are regulated independently. The cytoplasmic LeuRS gene is regulated by the cross-pathway control system in N. crassa, which is analogous to general amino acid control in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cytoplasmic LeuRS mRNA levels are induced by amino acid starvation resulting from the addition of aminotriazole. Part of this increase is due to utilization of new transcription start sites. In contrast, the mitochondrial LeuRS gene is not induced by amino acid limitation. However, the mitochondrial LeuRS mRNA levels did increase dramatically upon inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis by chloramphenicol or ethidium bromide or in the temperature-sensitive strain leu-5 carrying a mutation in the mitochondrial LeuRS structural gene. Images PMID:2532300

  19. Mammalian folylpoly-. gamma. -glutamate synthetase. 3. Specificity for folate analogues

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.; Cichowicz, D.J.; Shane, B.

    1987-01-27

    A variety of folate analogues were synthesized to explore the specificity of the folate binding site of hog liver folypolyglutamate synthetase and the requirements for catalysis. Modifications of the internal and terminal glutamate moieties of folate cause large drops in on rates and/or affinity for the protein. The only exceptions are glutamine, homocysteate, and ornithine analogues, indicating a less stringent specificity around the delta-carbon of glutamate. It is proposed that initial folate binding to the enzyme involves low-affinity interactions at a pterin and a glutamate site and that the first glutamate bound is the internal residue adjacent to the benzoyl group. Processive movement of the polyglutamate chain through the glutamate site and a possible conformational change in the protein when the terminal residue is bound would result in tight binding and would position the ..gamma..-carboxyl of the terminal glutamate in the correct position for catalysis. The 4-amino substitution of folate increases the on rate for monoglutamate derivatives but severely impairs catalysis with diglutamate derivatives. Pteroylornithine derivatives are the first potent and specific inhibitors of folylpolyglutamate synthetase to be identified and may act as analogues of reaction intermediates. Other folate derivatives with tetrahedral chemistry replacing the peptide bond, such as pteroyl-..gamma..-glutamyl-(psi,CH/sub 2/-NH)-glutamate, retain affinity for the protein but are considerably less effective inhibitors than the ornithine derivatives. Enzyme activity was assayed using (/sup 14/C)glutamate.

  20. Systematic unravelling of the biosynthesis of poly (L-diaminopropionic acid) in Streptomyces albulus PD-1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhaoxian; Sun, Zhuzhen; Li, Sha; Xu, Zheng; Cao, Changhong; Xu, Zongqi; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Poly(L-diaminopropionic acid) (PDAP) is one of the four homopoly(amino acid)s that have been discovered in nature. However, the molecular mechanism of PDAP biosynthesis has yet to be described. In this work, the general layout of the PDAP biosynthetic pathway is characterised in Streptomyces albulus PD-1 by genome mining, gene disruption, heterologous expression and in vitro feeding experiments. As a result, L-diaminopropionic acid (L-DAP), which is the monomer of PDAP, is shown to be jointly synthesised by two protein homologues of cysteine synthetase and ornithine cyclodeaminase. Then, L-DAP is assembled into PDAP by a novel nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) with classical adenylation and peptidyl carrier protein domains. However, instead of the traditional condensation or thioesterase domain of NRPSs, this NRPS has seven transmembrane domains surrounding three tandem soluble domains at the C-terminus. As far as we know, this novel single-module NRPS structure has only been reported in poly(ε-L-lysine) synthetase. The similar NRPS structure of PDAP synthetase and poly(ε-L-lysine) synthetase may be a common characteristic of homopoly(amino acid)s synthetases. In this case, we may discover and/or design more homopoly(amino acid)s by mining this kind of novel NRPS structure in the future. PMID:26632244

  1. A simple method for isolation and construction of markerless cyanobacterial mutants defective in acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kouji; Keta, Sumie; Uesaka, Kazuma; Kato, Akihiro; Takatani, Nobuyuki; Ihara, Kunio; Omata, Tatsuo; Aichi, Makiko

    2016-12-01

    Cyanobacterial mutants defective in acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (Aas) secrete free fatty acids (FFAs) into the external medium and hence have been used for the studies aimed at photosynthetic production of biofuels. While the wild-type strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is highly sensitive to exogenously added linolenic acid, mutants defective in the aas gene are known to be resistant to the externally provided fatty acid. In this study, the wild-type Synechocystis cells were shown to be sensitive to lauric, oleic, and linoleic acids as well, and the resistance to these fatty acids was shown to be enhanced by inactivation of the aas gene. On the basis of these observations, we developed an efficient method to isolate aas-deficient mutants from cultures of Synechocystis cells by counter selection using linoleic acid or linolenic acid as the selective agent. A variety of aas mutations were found in about 70 % of the FFA-resistant mutants thus selected. Various aas mutants were isolated also from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, using lauric acid as a selective agent. Selection using FFAs was useful also for construction of markerless aas knockout mutants from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Thus, genetic engineering of FFA-producing cyanobacterial strains would be greatly facilitated by the use of the FFAs for counter selection.

  2. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway by adiponectin and insulin in mouse adipocytes: requirement of acyl-CoA synthetases FATP1 and Acsl1 and association with an elevation in AMP/ATP ratio.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingqing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Sun, Lei; Ruderman, Neil; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-11-01

    Adiponectin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in adipocytes, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that AMP, generated in activating fatty acids to their CoA derivatives, catalyzed by acyl-CoA synthetases, is involved in AMPK activation by adiponectin. Moreover, in adipocytes, insulin affects the subcellular localization of acyl-CoA synthetase FATP1. Thus, we also tested whether insulin activates AMPK in these cells and, if so, whether it activates through a similar mechanism. We examined these hypotheses by measuring the AMP/ATP ratio and AMPK activation on adiponectin and insulin stimulation and after knocking down acyl-CoA synthetases in adipocytes. We show that adiponectin activation of AMPK is accompanied by an ∼2-fold increase in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio. Moreover, FATP1 and Acsl1, the 2 major acyl-CoA synthetase isoforms in adipocytes, are essential for AMPK activation by adiponectin. We also show that after 40 min. insulin activated AMPK in adipocytes, which was coupled with a 5-fold increase in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio. Knockdown studies show that FATP1 and Acsl1 are required for these processes, as well as for stimulation of long-chain fatty acid uptake by adiponection and insulin. These studies demonstrate that a change in cellular energy state is associated with AMPK activation by both adiponectin and insulin, which requires the activity of FATP1 and Acsl1.

  3. Holocarboxylase Synthetase: A Moonlighting Transcriptional Coregulator of Gene Expression and a Cytosolic Regulator of Biotin Utilization.

    PubMed

    León-Del-Río, Alfonso; Valadez-Graham, Viviana; Gravel, Roy A

    2017-08-21

    The vitamin biotin is an essential nutrient for the metabolism and survival of all organisms owing to its function as a cofactor of enzymes collectively known as biotin-dependent carboxylases. These enzymes use covalently attached biotin as a vector to transfer a carboxyl group between donor and acceptor molecules during carboxylation reactions. In human cells, biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze key reactions in gluconeogenesis, fatty acid synthesis, and amino acid catabolism. Biotin is attached to apocarboxylases by a biotin ligase: holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) in mammalian cells and BirA in microbes. Despite their evolutionary distance, these proteins share structural and sequence similarities, underscoring their importance across all life forms. However, beyond its role in metabolism, HCS participates in the regulation of biotin utilization and acts as a nuclear transcriptional coregulator of gene expression. In this review, we discuss the function of HCS and biotin in metabolism and human disease, a putative role for the enzyme in histone biotinylation, and its participation as a nuclear factor in chromatin dynamics. We suggest that HCS be classified as a moonlighting protein, with two biotin-dependent cytosolic metabolic roles and a distinct biotin-independent nuclear coregulatory function.

  4. Reculation of folylpolyglutamate synthetase in extracts of H35 hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.B.; Galivan, J.; Nair, M.G. )

    1987-05-01

    Folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) in extracts of H35 hepatoma cells was assayed using 250 {mu}M methotrexate (MTX) as the substrate under conditions where ({sup 3}H)glutamate incorporation was linear with respect to time and rotein concentration. Extracts from confluent cultures with reduced cellular folates exhibited nearly 1.7-fold higher FPGS specific activity than extracts of control cultures (600 pmol/hr/mg). Extracts of rapidly dividing cells (72 hrs) showed nearly a 2.3-fold increase. The addition of reduced exogenous folates such as folinic acid and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (20 {mu}M, 24 hrs) to confluent cultures of folate-depleted cells typically lowered the FPGS activity in the resultant extracts by 40%, while a 42-hour exclusion of methionine from the media reduced the activity by half. The combination of methionine exclusion and folate addition for 42 hrs resulted in 75% lower FPGS activity vs extracts of control cultures of folate-depleted cells. These data suggest that the change sin the glutamylation rate of MTX in whole cells due to culture conditions such as folate restriction, reduced folate addition, methionine exclusion, and growth state are at least in part a consequence of alterations in FPGS activity. Using MTX or N{sup 10}-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid (CB3717) as the starting substrate under appropriate assay conditions, FPGS from extracts catalyzed the formation of similar polyglutamate products as seen in analogous whole cell experiments.

  5. Molecular evolution of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase proteins in the early history of life.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Gregory P; Andam, Cheryl P; Alm, Eric J; Gogarten, J Peter

    2011-12-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) consist of several families of functionally conserved proteins essential for translation and protein synthesis. Like nearly all components of the translation machinery, most aaRS families are universally distributed across cellular life, being inherited from the time of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). However, unlike the rest of the translation machinery, aaRS have undergone numerous ancient horizontal gene transfers, with several independent events detected between domains, and some possibly involving lineages diverging before the time of LUCA. These transfers reveal the complexity of molecular evolution at this early time, and the chimeric nature of genomes within cells that gave rise to the major domains. Additionally, given the role of these protein families in defining the amino acids used for protein synthesis, sequence reconstruction of their pre-LUCA ancestors can reveal the evolutionary processes at work in the origin of the genetic code. In particular, sequence reconstructions of the paralog ancestors of isoleucyl- and valyl- RS provide strong empirical evidence that at least for this divergence, the genetic code did not co-evolve with the aaRSs; rather, both amino acids were already part of the genetic code before their cognate aaRSs diverged from their common ancestor. The implications of this observation for the early evolution of RNA-directed protein biosynthesis are discussed.

  6. Molecular Evolution of Aminoacyl tRNA Synthetase Proteins in the Early History of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Gregory P.; Andam, Cheryl P.; Alm, Eric J.; Gogarten, J. Peter

    2011-12-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) consist of several families of functionally conserved proteins essential for translation and protein synthesis. Like nearly all components of the translation machinery, most aaRS families are universally distributed across cellular life, being inherited from the time of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). However, unlike the rest of the translation machinery, aaRS have undergone numerous ancient horizontal gene transfers, with several independent events detected between domains, and some possibly involving lineages diverging before the time of LUCA. These transfers reveal the complexity of molecular evolution at this early time, and the chimeric nature of genomes within cells that gave rise to the major domains. Additionally, given the role of these protein families in defining the amino acids used for protein synthesis, sequence reconstruction of their pre-LUCA ancestors can reveal the evolutionary processes at work in the origin of the genetic code. In particular, sequence reconstructions of the paralog ancestors of isoleucyl- and valyl- RS provide strong empirical evidence that at least for this divergence, the genetic code did not co-evolve with the aaRSs; rather, both amino acids were already part of the genetic code before their cognate aaRSs diverged from their common ancestor. The implications of this observation for the early evolution of RNA-directed protein biosynthesis are discussed.

  7. Resveratrol compounds inhibit human holocarboxylase synthetase and cause a lean phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Cordonier, Elizabeth L.; Adjam, Riem; Camara Teixeira, Daniel; Onur, Simone; Zbasnik, Richard; Read, Paul E.; Döring, Frank; Schlegel, Vicki L.; Zempleni, Janos

    2015-01-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) is the sole protein-biotin ligase in the human proteome. HLCS has key regulatory functions in intermediary metabolism, including fatty acid metabolism, and in gene repression through epigenetic mechanisms. The objective of this study was to identify foodborne inhibitors of HLCS that alter HLCS-dependent pathways in metabolism and gene regulation. When libraries of extracts from natural products and chemically pure compounds were screened for HLCS inhibitor activity, resveratrol compounds in grape materials caused an HLCS inhibition of >98% in vitro. The potency of these compounds was piceatannol > resveratrol > piceid. Grape-borne compounds other than resveratrol metabolites also contributed toward HLCS inhibition, e.g., p-coumaric acid and cyanidin chloride. HLCS inhibitors had meaningful effects on body fat mass. When Drosophila melanogaster brummer mutants, which are genetically predisposed to storing excess amounts of lipids, were fed diets enriched with grape leaf extracts and piceid, body fat mass decreased by more than 30% in males and females. However, Drosophila responded to inhibitor treatment with an increase in the expression of HLCS, which elicited an increase in the abundance of biotinylated carboxylases in vivo. We conclude that mechanisms other than inhibition of HLCS cause body fat loss in flies. We propose that the primary candidate is the inhibition of the insulin receptor/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:26303405

  8. Identification of a phosphinothricin-resistant mutant of rice glutamine synthetase using DNA shuffling

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Xiao-Juan; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Peng, Ri-He; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2015-01-01

    To date, only bar/pat gene derived from Streptomyces has been used to generate the commercial PPT-resistant crops currently available in the market. The limited source of bar/pat gene is probably what has caused the decrease in PPT-tolerance, which has become the main concern of those involved in field management programs. Although glutamine synthetase (GS) is the target enzyme of PPT, little study has been reported about engineering PPT-resisitant plants with GS gene. Then, the plant-optimized GS gene from Oryza sativa (OsGS1S) was chemically synthesized in the present study by PTDS to identify a GS gene for developing PPT-tolerant plants. However, OsGS1S cannot be directly used for developing PPT-tolerant plants because of its poor PPT-resistance. Thus, we performed DNA shuffling on OsGS1S, and one highly PPT-resistant mutant with mutations in four amino acids (A63E, V193A, T293A and R295K) was isolated after three rounds of DNA shuffling and screening. Among the four amino acids substitutions, only R295K was identified as essential in altering PPT resistance. The R295K mutation has also never been previously reported as an important residue for PPT resistance. Furthermore, the mutant gene has been transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis to confirm its potential in developing PPT-resistant crops. PMID:26492850

  9. Adenosine kinase, glutamine synthetase and EAAT2 as gene therapy targets for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Young, D; Fong, D M; Lawlor, P A; Wu, A; Mouravlev, A; McRae, M; Glass, M; Dragunow, M; During, M J

    2014-12-01

    Astrocytes are an attractive cell target for gene therapy, but the validation of new therapeutic candidates is needed. We determined whether adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated overexpression of glutamine synthetase (GS) or excitatory amino-acid transporter 2 (EAAT2), or expression of microRNA targeting adenosine kinase (miR-ADK) in hippocampal astrocytes in the rat brain could modulate susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures and neuronal cell loss. Transgene expression was found predominantly in astrocytes following direct injection of glial-targeting AAV9 vectors by 3 weeks postinjection. ADK expression in miR-ADK vector-injected rats was reduced by 94-96% and was associated with an ~50% reduction in the duration of kainate-induced seizures and greater protection of dentate hilar neurons but not CA3 neurons compared with miR-control vector-injected rats. In contrast, infusion of AAV-GS and EAAT2 vectors did not afford any protection against seizures or neuronal damage as the level of transcriptional activity of the glial fibrillary acidic promoter was too low to drive any significant increase in transgenic GS or EAAT2 relative to the high endogenous levels of these proteins. Our findings support ADK as a prime therapeutic target for gene therapy of temporal lobe epilepsy and suggest that alternative approaches including the use of stronger glial promoters are needed to increase transgenic GS and EAAT2 expression to levels that may be required to affect seizure induction and propagation.

  10. Identification of acyl-CoA synthetases involved in the mammalian sphingosine 1-phosphate metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Ohkuni, Aya; Ohno, Yusuke; Kihara, Akio

    2013-12-13

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) plays important roles both as a bioactive lipid molecule and an intermediate of the sphingolipid-to-glycerophospholipid metabolic pathway. To identify human acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs) involved in S1P metabolism, we cloned all 26 human ACS genes and examined their abilities to restore deficient sphingolipid-to-glycerophospholipid metabolism in a yeast mutant lacking two ACS genes, FAA1 and FAA4. Here, in addition to the previously identified ACSL family members (ACSL1, 3, 4, 5, and 6), we found that ACSVL1, ACSVL4, and ACSBG1 also restored metabolism. All 8 ACSs were localized either exclusively or partly to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where S1P metabolism takes place. We previously proposed the entire S1P metabolic pathway from results obtained using yeast cells, i.e., S1P is metabolized to glycerophospholipids via trans-2-hexadecenal, trans-2-hexadecenoic acid, trans-2-hexadecenoyl-CoA, and palmitoyl-CoA. However, as S1P is not a naturally occurring long-chain base 1-phosphate in yeast, the validity of this pathway required further verification using mammalian cells. In the present study, we treated HeLa cells with the ACS inhibitor triacsin C and found that inhibition of ACSs resulted in accumulation of trans-2-hexadecenoic acid as in ACS mutant yeast. From these results, we conclude that S1P is metabolized by a common pathway in eukaryotes.

  11. Identification of a phosphinothricin-resistant mutant of rice glutamine synthetase using DNA shuffling.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Xiao-Juan; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Peng, Ri-He; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2015-10-23

    To date, only bar/pat gene derived from Streptomyces has been used to generate the commercial PPT-resistant crops currently available in the market. The limited source of bar/pat gene is probably what has caused the decrease in PPT-tolerance, which has become the main concern of those involved in field management programs. Although glutamine synthetase (GS) is the target enzyme of PPT, little study has been reported about engineering PPT-resistant plants with GS gene. Then, the plant-optimized GS gene from Oryza sativa (OsGS1S) was chemically synthesized in the present study by PTDS to identify a GS gene for developing PPT-tolerant plants. However, OsGS1S cannot be directly used for developing PPT-tolerant plants because of its poor PPT-resistance. Thus, we performed DNA shuffling on OsGS1S, and one highly PPT-resistant mutant with mutations in four amino acids (A63E, V193A, T293A and R295K) was isolated after three rounds of DNA shuffling and screening. Among the four amino acids substitutions, only R295K was identified as essential in altering PPT resistance. The R295K mutation has also never been previously reported as an important residue for PPT resistance. Furthermore, the mutant gene has been transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis to confirm its potential in developing PPT-resistant crops.

  12. Evolution of selenophosphate synthetases: emergence and relocation of function through independent duplications and recurrent subfunctionalization

    PubMed Central

    Mariotti, Marco; Santesmasses, Didac; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador; Mateo, Andrea; Arnan, Carme; Johnson, Rory; D'Aniello, Salvatore; Yim, Sun Hee; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Serras, Florenci; Corominas, Montserrat; Gabaldón, Toni; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    Selenoproteins are proteins that incorporate selenocysteine (Sec), a nonstandard amino acid encoded by UGA, normally a stop codon. Sec synthesis requires the enzyme Selenophosphate synthetase (SPS or SelD), conserved in all prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes encoding selenoproteins. Here, we study the evolutionary history of SPS genes, providing a map of selenoprotein function spanning the whole tree of life. SPS is itself a selenoprotein in many species, although functionally equivalent homologs that replace the Sec site with cysteine (Cys) are common. Many metazoans, however, possess SPS genes with substitutions other than Sec or Cys (collectively referred to as SPS1). Using complementation assays in fly mutants, we show that these genes share a common function, which appears to be distinct from the synthesis of selenophosphate carried out by the Sec- and Cys- SPS genes (termed SPS2), and unrelated to Sec synthesis. We show here that SPS1 genes originated through a number of independent gene duplications from an ancestral metazoan selenoprotein SPS2 gene that most likely already carried the SPS1 function. Thus, in SPS genes, parallel duplications and subsequent convergent subfunctionalization have resulted in the segregation to different loci of functions initially carried by a single gene. This evolutionary history constitutes a remarkable example of emergence and evolution of gene function, which we have been able to trace thanks to the singular features of SPS genes, wherein the amino acid at a single site determines unequivocally protein function and is intertwined to the evolutionary fate of the entire selenoproteome. PMID:26194102

  13. Drosophila selenophosphate synthetase 1 regulates vitamin B6 metabolism: prediction and confirmation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There are two selenophosphate synthetases (SPSs) in higher eukaryotes, SPS1 and SPS2. Of these two isotypes, only SPS2 catalyzes selenophosphate synthesis. Although SPS1 does not contain selenophosphate synthesis activity, it was found to be essential for cell growth and embryogenesis in Drosophila. The function of SPS1, however, has not been elucidated. Results Differentially expressed genes in Drosophila SL2 cells were identified using two-way analysis of variance methods and clustered according to their temporal expression pattern. Gene ontology analysis was performed against differentially expressed genes and gene ontology terms related to vitamin B6 biosynthesis were found to be significantly affected at the early stage at which megamitochondria were not formed (day 3) after SPS1 knockdown. Interestingly, genes related to defense and amino acid metabolism were affected at a later stage (day 5) following knockdown. Levels of pyridoxal phosphate, an active form of vitamin B6, were decreased by SPS1 knockdown. Treatment of SL2 cells with an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate synthesis resulted in both a similar pattern of expression as that found by SPS1 knockdown and the formation of megamitochondria, the major phenotypic change observed by SPS1 knockdown. Conclusions These results indicate that SPS1 regulates vitamin B6 synthesis, which in turn impacts various cellular systems such as amino acid metabolism, defense and other important metabolic activities. PMID:21864351

  14. Genetically programmed expression of proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-03-12

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that can incorporate the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, polynucleotides encoding the novel sythetases molecules, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine and translation systems. The invention further provides methods for producing modified proteins (e.g., lapidated proteins) through targeted modification of the phenylselenocysteine residue in a protein.

  15. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding glutamine synthetase I from the archaeum Pyrococcus woesei: anomalous phylogenies inferred from analysis of archaeal and bacterial glutamine synthetase I sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Tiboni, O; Cammarano, P; Sanangelantoni, A M

    1993-01-01

    The gene glnA encoding glutamine synthetase I (GSI) from the archaeum Pyrococcus woesei was cloned and sequenced with the Sulfolobus solfataricus glnA gene as the probe. An operon reading frame of 448 amino acids was identified within a DNA segment of 1,528 bp. The encoded protein was 49% identical with the GSI of Methanococcus voltae and exhibited conserved regions characteristic of the GSI family. The P. woesei GSI was aligned with available homologs from other archaea (S. solfataricus, M. voltae) and with representative sequences from cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, and gram-positive bacteria. Phylogenetic trees were constructed from both the amino acid and the nucleotide sequence alignments. In accordance with the sequence similarities, archaeal and bacterial sequences did not segregate on a phylogeny. On the basis of sequence signatures, the GSI trees could be subdivided into two ensembles. One encompassed the GSI of cyanobacteria and proteobacteria, but also that of the high-G + C gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor (all of which are regulated by the reversible adenylylation of the enzyme subunits); the other embraced the GSI of the three archaea as well as that of the low-G + C gram-positive bacteria (Clostridium acetobutilycum, Bacillus subtilis) and Thermotoga maritima (none of which are regulated by subunit adenylylation). The GSIs of the Thermotoga and the Bacillus-Clostridium lineages shared a direct common ancestor with that of P. woesei and the methanogens and were unrelated to their homologs from cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, and S. coelicolor. The possibility is presented that the GSI gene arose among the archaea and was then laterally transferred from some early methanogen to a Thermotoga-like organism. However, the relationship of the cyanobacterial-proteobacterial GSIs to the Thermotoga GSI and the GSI of low-G+C gram-positive bacteria remains unexplained. PMID:8098326

  16. Drosophila Ebony: a novel type of nonribosomal peptide synthetase related enzyme with unusually fast peptide bond formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Silvia; Dovengerds, Christine; Herrmann, Christian; Hovemann, Bernhard T

    2014-11-01

    Drosophila Ebony is a β-alanyl biogenic amine synthetase with proven function in cuticle and in glia of the nervous system. It is closely related to nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs), which typically consist of at least an adenylation, a peptidyl carrier protein and a peptide bond forming condensation domain. Besides its role in cuticle formation, Ebony is in most glia of the brain thought to convert biogenic amines to β-alanyl conjugates. If the metabolization of the neurotransmitter histamine to β-alanyl histamine requires a fast reaction in visual signal transduction, Ebony must be able to fulfill this requirement. Since NRPSs are in general slowly acting multi-modular protein machineries, the enigma of how Ebony quickly facilitates this inactivation remains a key question for understanding its role in vision. To quantitatively analyze the reaction kinetics, we used phosphopantetheinylated holo-Ebony prepared from Baculovirus infected Sf9 cells. Kinetic parameters for the loading reaction, e.g. the formation of β-alanyl-Ebony thioester, complied with those of slow NRPSs. In contrast, single-turnover analysis of the last reaction step, peptide bond formation between pre-activated β-alanyl Ebony thioester and histamine, revealed a very rapid conjugation reaction. This biphasic nature of activity identifies Ebony as a novel type of NRPS related molecule that combines a slow amino acid activation phase with a very fast product formation step.

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of a human mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Inna; Kessler, Naama; Moor, Nina; Klipcan, Liron; Koc, Emine; Templeton, Paul; Spremulli, Linda; Safro, Mark

    2007-09-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant human mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (mitPheRS) are reported. Diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution and the mitPheRS structure was solved using the molecular-replacement method. Human monomeric mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (mitPheRS) is an enzyme that catalyzes the charging of tRNA with the cognate amino acid phenylalanine. Human mitPheRS is a chimera of the bacterial α-subunit of PheRS and the B8 domain of its β-subunit. Together, the α-subunit and the ‘RNP-domain’ (B8 domain) at the C-terminus form the minimal structural set to construct an enzyme with phenylalanylation activity. The recombinant human mitPheRS was purified to homogeneity and crystallized in complex with phenylalanine and ATP. The crystals diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55, b = 90, c = 96 Å.

  18. Biosynthesis of amphi-enterobactin siderophores by Vibrio harveyi BAA-1116: identification of a bifunctional nonribosomal peptide synthetase condensation domain.

    PubMed

    Zane, Hannah K; Naka, Hiroaki; Rosconi, Federico; Sandy, Moriah; Haygood, Margo G; Butler, Alison

    2014-04-16

    The genome of Vibrio harveyi BAA-1116 contains a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster (aebA-F) resembling that for enterobactin, yet enterobactin is not produced. A gene predicted to encode a long-chain fatty acid CoA ligase (FACL), similar to enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of acyl peptides, resides 15 kb away from the putative enterobactin-like biosynthetic gene cluster (aebG). The proximity of this FACL gene to the enterobactin-like synthetase suggested that V. harveyi may produce amphiphilic enterobactin-like siderophores. Extraction of the bacterial cell pellet of V. harveyi led to the isolation and structure determination of a suite of eight amphi-enterobactin siderophores composed of the cyclic lactone of tris-2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl-L-serine and acyl-L-serine. The FACL knockout mutant, ΔaebG V. harveyi, and the NRPS knockout mutant, ΔaebF V. harveyi, do not produce amphi-enterobactins. The amphi-enterobactin biosynthetic machinery was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and reconstituted in vitro, demonstrating the condensation domain of AebF has unique activity, catalyzing two distinct condensation reactions.

  19. Origin and evolution of glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase WHEP domains reveal evolutionary relationships within Holozoa.

    PubMed

    Ray, Partho Sarothi; Fox, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Repeated domains in proteins that have undergone duplication or loss, and sequence divergence, are especially informative about phylogenetic relationships. We have exploited divergent repeats of the highly structured, 50-amino acid WHEP domains that join the catalytic subunits of bifunctional glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) as a sequence-informed repeat (SIR) to trace the origin and evolution of EPRS in holozoa. EPRS is the only fused tRNA synthetase, with two distinct aminoacylation activities, and a non-canonical translation regulatory function mediated by the WHEP domains in the linker. Investigating the duplications, deletions and divergence of WHEP domains, we traced the bifunctional EPRS to choanozoans and identified the fusion event leading to its origin at the divergence of ichthyosporea and emergence of filozoa nearly a billion years ago. Distribution of WHEP domains from a single species in two or more distinct clades suggested common descent, allowing the identification of linking organisms. The discrete assortment of choanoflagellate WHEP domains with choanozoan domains as well as with those in metazoans supported the phylogenetic position of choanoflagellates as the closest sister group to metazoans. Analysis of clustering and assortment of WHEP domains provided unexpected insights into phylogenetic relationships amongst holozoan taxa. Furthermore, observed gaps in the transition between WHEP domain groupings in distant taxa allowed the prediction of undiscovered or extinct evolutionary intermediates. Analysis based on SIR domains can provide a phylogenetic counterpart to palaentological approaches of discovering "missing links" in the tree of life.

  20. Inhibition of Protein Synthesis and Malaria Parasite Development by Drug Targeting of Methionyl-tRNA Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tahir; Yogavel, Manickam

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are housekeeping enzymes that couple cognate tRNAs with amino acids to transmit genomic information for protein translation. The Plasmodium falciparum nuclear genome encodes two P. falciparum methionyl-tRNA synthetases (PfMRS), termed PfMRScyt and PfMRSapi. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the two proteins are of primitive origin and are related to heterokonts (PfMRScyt) or proteobacteria/primitive bacteria (PfMRSapi). We show that PfMRScyt localizes in parasite cytoplasm, while PfMRSapi localizes to apicoplasts in asexual stages of malaria parasites. Two known bacterial MRS inhibitors, REP3123 and REP8839, hampered Plasmodium growth very effectively in the early and late stages of parasite development. Small-molecule drug-like libraries were screened against modeled PfMRS structures, and several “hit” compounds showed significant effects on parasite growth. We then tested the effects of the hit compounds on protein translation by labeling nascent proteins with 35S-labeled cysteine and methionine. Three of the tested compounds reduced protein synthesis and also blocked parasite growth progression from the ring stage to the trophozoite stage. Drug docking studies suggested distinct modes of binding for the three compounds, compared with the enzyme product methionyl adenylate. Therefore, this study provides new targets (PfMRSs) and hit compounds that can be explored for development as antimalarial drugs. PMID:25583729

  1. Mutation of the human mitochondrial phenylalanine-tRNA synthetase causes infantile-onset epilepsy and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency☆

    PubMed Central

    Almalki, Abdulraheem; Alston, Charlotte L.; Parker, Alasdair; Simonic, Ingrid; Mehta, Sarju G.; He, Langping; Reza, Mojgan; Oliveira, Jorge M.A.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W.; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are essential enzymes in protein synthesis since they charge tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. Mutations in the genes encoding mitochondrial aaRSs have been associated with a wide spectrum of human mitochondrial diseases. Here we report the identification of pathogenic mutations (a partial genomic deletion and a highly conserved p. Asp325Tyr missense variant) in FARS2, the gene encoding mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase, in a patient with early-onset epilepsy and isolated complex IV deficiency in muscle. The biochemical defect was expressed in myoblasts but not in fibroblasts and associated with decreased steady state levels of COXI and COXII protein and reduced steady state levels of the mt-tRNAPhe transcript. Functional analysis of the recombinant mutant p. Asp325Tyr FARS2 protein showed an inability to bind ATP and consequently undetectable aminoacylation activity using either bacterial tRNA or human mt-tRNAPhe as substrates. Lentiviral transduction of cells with wildtype FARS2 restored complex IV protein levels, confirming that the p.Asp325Tyr mutation is pathogenic, causing respiratory chain deficiency and neurological deficits on account of defective aminoacylation of mt-tRNAPhe. PMID:24161539

  2. Peripheral insertion modulates the editing activity of the isolated CP1 domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ru-Juan; Tan, Min; Du, Dao-Hai; Xu, Bei-Si; Eriani, Gilbert; Wang, En-Duo

    2011-12-01

    A large insertion domain called CP1 (connective peptide 1) present in class Ia aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is responsible for post-transfer editing. LeuRS (leucyl-tRNA synthetase) from Aquifex aeolicus and Giardia lamblia possess unique 20 and 59 amino acid insertions respectively within the CP1 that are crucial for editing activity. Crystal structures of AaLeuRS-CP1 [2.4 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm)], GlLeuRS-CP1 (2.6 Å) and the insertion deletion mutant AaLeuRS-CP1Δ20 (2.5 Å) were solved to understand the role of these insertions in editing. Both insertions are folded as peripheral motifs located on the opposite side of the proteins from the active-site entrance in the CP1 domain. Docking modelling and site-directed mutagenesis showed that the insertions do not interact with the substrates. Results of molecular dynamics simulations show that the intact CP1 is more dynamic than its mutant devoid of the insertion motif. Taken together, the data show that a peripheral insertion without a substrate-binding site or major structural role in the active site may modulate catalytic function of a protein, probably from protein dynamics regulation in two respective LeuRS CP1s. Further results from proline and glycine mutational analyses intended to reduce or increase protein flexibility are consistent with this hypothesis.

  3. Crystallogenesis in tRNA aminoacylation systems: how packing accounts for crystallization drawbacks with yeast aspartyl-tRNA synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, C.; Lorber, B.; Théobald-Dietrich, A.; Giegé, R.

    2001-11-01

    Two active forms of homodimeric aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae differing in length at their N-terminus crystallize in the same orthorhombic space group (P4 12 12) with identical cell parameters. Initial studies were hampered by the poor and anisotropic diffraction of the crystals of enzyme extracted from yeast cells. Isotropic diffraction at higher resolution was obtained when crystals were grown from an engineered protein deprived of its 70 N-terminal amino acids. The present work describes the packing contacts in crystals of the shortened protein whose structure was solved at 2.3 Å resolution. Each subunit of the enzyme develops two lattice interactions covering a surface of 670 Å 2, about 7-fold smaller than that of the interface between monomers. The smallest lattice interaction, covering 150 Å 2, brings the anticodon binding domain adjacent to the N-terminus of one monomer in contact with a loop from the active-site domain of a neighboring monomer. Modeling of the extension in the solvent channels shows that the 150 Å 2 intermolecular contact is perturbed in protein molecules possessing a floppy appendix while their second and larger 520 Å 2 contact area is unaffected. Altogether the packing organization explains the poor diffraction properties of the native enzyme crystals and the enhanced diffraction of the crystals of shortened synthetase.

  4. Substrate and Enzyme Functional Groups Contribute to Translational Quality Control by Bacterial Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Das, Mom; Hadad, Christopher M.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases activate specific amino acid substrates and attach them via an ester linkage to cognate tRNA molecules. In addition to cognate proline, prolyl-tRNA synthetase (ProRS) can activate cysteine and alanine and misacylate tRNAPro. Editing of the misacylated aminoacyl-tRNA is required for error-free protein synthesis. An editing domain (INS) appended to bacterial ProRS selectively hydrolyzes Ala-tRNAPro, whereas Cys-tRNAPro is cleared by a freestanding editing domain, YbaK, through a unique mechanism involving substrate sulfhydryl chemistry. The detailed mechanism of catalysis by INS is currently unknown. To understand the alanine specificity and mechanism of catalysis by INS, we have explored several possible mechanisms of Ala-tRNAPro deacylation via hybrid QM/MM calculations. Experimental studies were also performed to test the role of several residues in the INS active site, as well as various substrate functional groups in catalysis. Our results support a critical role for the tRNA 2′-OH group in substrate binding and catalytic water activation. A role is also proposed for the protein’s conserved GXXXP loop in transition state stabilization and for the main chain atoms of Gly261 in a proton relay that contributes substantially to catalysis. PMID:22458656

  5. Origin and Evolution of Glutamyl-prolyl tRNA Synthetase WHEP Domains Reveal Evolutionary Relationships within Holozoa

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partho Sarothi; Fox, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated domains in proteins that have undergone duplication or loss, and sequence divergence, are especially informative about phylogenetic relationships. We have exploited divergent repeats of the highly structured, 50-amino acid WHEP domains that join the catalytic subunits of bifunctional glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) as a sequence-informed repeat (SIR) to trace the origin and evolution of EPRS in holozoa. EPRS is the only fused tRNA synthetase, with two distinct aminoacylation activities, and a non-canonical translation regulatory function mediated by the WHEP domains in the linker. Investigating the duplications, deletions and divergence of WHEP domains, we traced the bifunctional EPRS to choanozoans and identified the fusion event leading to its origin at the divergence of ichthyosporea and emergence of filozoa nearly a billion years ago. Distribution of WHEP domains from a single species in two or more distinct clades suggested common descent, allowing the identification of linking organisms. The discrete assortment of choanoflagellate WHEP domains with choanozoan domains as well as with those in metazoans supported the phylogenetic position of choanoflagellates as the closest sister group to metazoans. Analysis of clustering and assortment of WHEP domains provided unexpected insights into phylogenetic relationships amongst holozoan taxa. Furthermore, observed gaps in the transition between WHEP domain groupings in distant taxa allowed the prediction of undiscovered or extinct evolutionary intermediates. Analysis based on SIR domains can provide a phylogenetic counterpart to palaentological approaches of discovering “missing links” in the tree of life. PMID:24968216

  6. Inhibition of protein synthesis and malaria parasite development by drug targeting of methionyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Tahir; Yogavel, Manickam; Sharma, Amit

    2015-04-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are housekeeping enzymes that couple cognate tRNAs with amino acids to transmit genomic information for protein translation. The Plasmodium falciparum nuclear genome encodes two P. falciparum methionyl-tRNA synthetases (PfMRS), termed PfMRS(cyt) and PfMRS(api). Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the two proteins are of primitive origin and are related to heterokonts (PfMRS(cyt)) or proteobacteria/primitive bacteria (PfMRS(api)). We show that PfMRS(cyt) localizes in parasite cytoplasm, while PfMRS(api) localizes to apicoplasts in asexual stages of malaria parasites. Two known bacterial MRS inhibitors, REP3123 and REP8839, hampered Plasmodium growth very effectively in the early and late stages of parasite development. Small-molecule drug-like libraries were screened against modeled PfMRS structures, and several "hit" compounds showed significant effects on parasite growth. We then tested the effects of the hit compounds on protein translation by labeling nascent proteins with (35)S-labeled cysteine and methionine. Three of the tested compounds reduced protein synthesis and also blocked parasite growth progression from the ring stage to the trophozoite stage. Drug docking studies suggested distinct modes of binding for the three compounds, compared with the enzyme product methionyl adenylate. Therefore, this study provides new targets (PfMRSs) and hit compounds that can be explored for development as antimalarial drugs. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Organization and nucleotide sequence of the glutamine synthetase (glnA) gene from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.

    PubMed Central

    Ishino, Y; Morgenthaler, P; Hottinger, H; Söll, D

    1992-01-01

    A 3.3-kb BamHI fragment of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DNA was cloned and sequenced. It complements an Escherichia coli glnA deletion strain and hybridizes strongly to a DNA containing the Bacillus subtilis glnA gene. DNA sequence analysis of the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DNA showed it to contain the glnA gene encoding class I glutamine synthetase, as judged by extensive homology with other prokaryotic glnA genes. The sequence suggests that the enzyme encoded in this gene is not controlled by adenylylation. Based on a comparison of glutamine synthetase sequences, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus is much closer to gram-positive eubacteria, especially Clostridium acetobutylicum, than to gram-negative eubacteria and archaebacteria. The fragment contains another open reading frame encoding a protein of unknown function consisting of 306 amino acids (ORF306), which is also present upstream of glnA of Bacillus cereus. In B. cereus, a repressor gene, glnR, is found between the open reading frame and glnA. Two proteins encoded by the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus gene were identified by the maxicell method; the sizes of these proteins are consistent with those of the open reading frames of ORF306 and glnA. The lack of a glnR gene in the L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DNA in this position may indicate a gene rearrangement or a different mechanism of glnA gene expression. Images PMID:1359838

  8. Mutation of the human mitochondrial phenylalanine-tRNA synthetase causes infantile-onset epilepsy and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Almalki, Abdulraheem; Alston, Charlotte L; Parker, Alasdair; Simonic, Ingrid; Mehta, Sarju G; He, Langping; Reza, Mojgan; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Lightowlers, Robert N; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are essential enzymes in protein synthesis since they charge tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. Mutations in the genes encoding mitochondrial aaRSs have been associated with a wide spectrum of human mitochondrial diseases. Here we report the identification of pathogenic mutations (a partial genomic deletion and a highly conserved p. Asp325Tyr missense variant) in FARS2, the gene encoding mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase, in a patient with early-onset epilepsy and isolated complex IV deficiency in muscle. The biochemical defect was expressed in myoblasts but not in fibroblasts and associated with decreased steady state levels of COXI and COXII protein and reduced steady state levels of the mt-tRNA(Phe) transcript. Functional analysis of the recombinant mutant p. Asp325Tyr FARS2 protein showed an inability to bind ATP and consequently undetectable aminoacylation activity using either bacterial tRNA or human mt-tRNA(Phe) as substrates. Lentiviral transduction of cells with wildtype FARS2 restored complex IV protein levels, confirming that the p.Asp325Tyr mutation is pathogenic, causing respiratory chain deficiency and neurological deficits on account of defective aminoacylation of mt-tRNA(Phe).

  9. Effect of Liver Damage and Hyperbaric Oxygenation on Glutamine Synthetase of Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Savilov, P N; Yakovlev, V N

    2016-01-01

    Activity of glutamine synthetase in the hepatocytes of healthy animals and animals with chronic CCl4-induced hepatitis was studied on white mature female rats after liver resection (15-20% of organ weight) and hyperbaric oxygenation (3 atm, 50 min, 3 times). Surgically operated left and non-operated middle lobes of the liver were analyzed on day 3 after liver resection and exposure to hyperbaric oxygenation. On day 65 of CCl4 poisoning, activity of glutamine synthetase decreased in both lobes and did not recover on day 3 after toxin cessation. Liver resection under conditions of CCl4-induced hepatitis restored reduced activity of glutamine synthetase in both liver lobes to the normal level. In healthy rats, the increase in glutamine synthetase activity after liver resection was found only in the middle lobe of the liver. Hyperbaric oxygenation enhanced the stimulatory effect of liver resection on glutamine synthetase activity in hepatocytes during chronic CCl4-induced hepatitis. In healthy animals with liver resection, activity of glutamine synthetase did not change after hyperbaric oxygenation, while normally oxygenation inhibited glutamine synthetase activity.

  10. Encapsulation of glutamine synthetase in mouse erythrocytes: a new procedure for ammonia detoxification.

    PubMed

    Kosenko, Elena A; Venediktova, Natalia I; Kudryavtsev, Andrey A; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Kaminsky, Yury G; Felipo, Vicente; Montoliu, Carmina

    2008-12-01

    There are a number of pathological situations in which ammonia levels increase leading to hyperammonemia, which may cause neurological alterations and can lead to coma and death. Currently, there are no efficient treatments allowing rapid and sustained decrease of ammonia levels in these situations. A way to increase ammonia detoxification would be to increase its incorporation in glutamine by glutamine synthetase. The aim of this work was to develop a procedure to encapsulate glutamine synthetase in mouse erythrocytes and to assess whether administration of these erythrocytes containing glutamine synthetase (GS) reduce ammonia levels in hyperammonemic mice. The procedure developed allowed the encapsulation of 3 +/- 0.25 IU of GS / mL of erythrocytes with a 70% cell recovery. Most metabolites, including ATP, remained unaltered in glutamine synthetase-loaded erythrocytes (named ammocytes by us) compared with native erythrocytes. The glutamine synthetase-loaded ammocytes injected in mice survived and retained essentially all of their glutamine synthetase activity for at least 48 h in vivo. Injection of these ammocytes into hyperammonemic mice reduced ammonia levels in the blood by about 50%. The results reported indicate that ammocytes are able to keep their integrity, normal energy metabolism, the inserted glutamine synthetase activity, and can be useful to reduce ammonia levels in hyperammonemic situations.

  11. Molecular structure of the human argininosuccinate synthetase gene: Occurrence of alternative mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, S.O.; Beaudet, A.L.; Bock, H.G.O.; O'Brien, W.E.

    1984-10-01

    The human genome contains one expressed argininosuccinate synthetase gene and ca. 14 pseudogenes that are dispersed to at least 11 human chromosomes. Eleven clones isolated from a human genomic DNA library were characterized extensively by restriction mapping, Southern blotting, and nucleotide sequencing. These 11 clones represent the entire expressed argininosuccinate synthetase gene that spans 63 kilobases and contains at least 13 exons. The expressed gene codes for two mRNAs that differ in their 5' untranslated sequences and arise by alternative splicing involving the inclusion or deletion of an entire exon. In normal human liver and cultured fibroblasts, the predominant mature argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA lacks sequences encoded by exon 2 in the expressed gene. In contrast, the predominant argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA in baboon liver contains exon 2 sequences. A transformed canavanine-resistant human cell line in which argininosuccinate synthetase activity is 180-fold higher than that in wild-type cells contains abundant amounts of both forms of the argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA. The mRNA lacking exon 2 sequences is the more abundant mRNA species in the canavanine-resistant cells. These observations show that splicing of the argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA is species specific in primates and varies among different human cell types.

  12. Lincosamide Synthetase—A Unique Condensation System Combining Elements of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Mycothiol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Janata, Jiri; Kadlcik, Stanislav; Koberska, Marketa; Ulanova, Dana; Kamenik, Zdenek; Novak, Petr; Kopecky, Jan; Novotna, Jitka; Radojevic, Bojana; Plhackova, Kamila; Gazak, Radek; Najmanova, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    In the biosynthesis of lincosamide antibiotics lincomycin and celesticetin, the amino acid and amino sugar units are linked by an amide bond. The respective condensing enzyme lincosamide synthetase (LS) is expected to be an unusual system combining nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) components with so far unknown amino sugar related activities. The biosynthetic gene cluster of celesticetin was sequenced and compared to the lincomycin one revealing putative LS coding ORFs shared in both clusters. Based on a bioassay and production profiles of S. lincolnensis strains with individually deleted putative LS coding genes, the proteins LmbC, D, E, F and V were assigned to LS function. Moreover, the newly recognized N-terminal domain of LmbN (LmbN-CP) was also assigned to LS as a NRPS carrier protein (CP). Surprisingly, the homologous CP coding sequence in celesticetin cluster is part of ccbZ gene adjacent to ccbN, the counterpart of lmbN, suggesting the gene rearrangement, evident also from still active internal translation start in lmbN, and indicating the direction of lincosamide biosynthesis evolution. The in vitro test with LmbN-CP, LmbC and the newly identified S. lincolnensis phosphopantetheinyl transferase Slp, confirmed the cooperation of the previously characterized NRPS A-domain LmbC with a holo-LmbN-CP in activation of a 4-propyl-L-proline precursor of lincomycin. This result completed the functional characterization of LS subunits resembling NRPS initiation module. Two of the four remaining putative LS subunits, LmbE/CcbE and LmbV/CcbV, exhibit low but significant homology to enzymes from the metabolism of mycothiol, the NRPS-independent system processing the amino sugar and amino acid units. The functions of particular LS subunits as well as cooperation of both NRPS-based and NRPS-independent LS blocks are discussed. The described condensing enzyme represents a unique hybrid system with overall composition quite dissimilar to any other known enzyme system

  13. The Inhibition of Folylpolyglutamate Synthetase (folC) in the Prevention of Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tzu-Chieh; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Lee, Wen-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by many strains of mycobacteria, but commonly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As a possible method of reducing the drug resistance of M. tuberculosis, this research investigates the inhibition of Folylpolyglutamate synthetase, a protein transcript from the resistance association gene folC. After molecular docking to screen the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) database, the candidate TCM compounds, with Folylpolyglutamate synthetase, were selected by molecular dynamics. The 10,000 ps simulation in association with RMSD analysis and total energy and structural variation defined the protein-ligand interaction. The selected TCM compounds Saussureamine C, methyl 3-O-feruloylquinate, and Labiatic acid have been found to inhibit the activity of bacteria and viruses and to regulate immunity. We also suggest the possible pathway in protein for each ligand. Compared with the control, similar interactions and structural variations indicate that these compounds might have an effect on Folylpolyglutamate synthetase. Finally, we suggest Saussureamine C is the best candidate compound as the complex has a high score, maintains its structural composition, and has a larger variation value than the control, thus inhibiting the drug resistance ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:25050369

  14. Cloning and characterization of a putative human holocytochrome c-type synthetase gene (HCCS) isolated from the critical region for microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, L.; Ballabio, A.; Zoghbi, H.Y.

    1996-06-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome (MLS) is an X-linked male-lethal disorder associated with X chromosomal rearrangements resulting in monosomy from Xpter to Xp22. Features include microphthalmia, sclerocornea, linear skin defects, and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Using a cross-species conservation strategy, an expressed sequence from the 450- to the 550-kb MLS critical region on Xp22 was identified by screening a human embryo cDNA library. Northern analysis revealed a transcript of {approx}2.6 kb in all tissues examined, with weaker expression of {approx}1.2- and {approx}5.2-kb transcripts. The strongest expression was observed in heart and skeletal muscle. Sequence analysis of a 3-kb cDNA contig revealed an 807-bp open reading frame encoding a putative 268-amino-acid-protein. Comparison of the sequence with sequences in the databases revealed homology with holocytochrome c-type synthetases, which catalyze the covalent addition of a heme group onto c-type cytochromes in the mitochondria. The c-type cytochromes are required for proper functioning of the electron transport pathway. The human gene (HGMW-approved symbol HCCS) and the corresponding murine gene characterized in this paper are the first mammalian holocytochrome c-type synthetases to be described in the literature. Because of the lack of a neuromuscular phenotype in MLS, it is uncertain whether the deletion of a mitochondrial holocytochrome synthetase would contribute to the phenotype seen in MLS. The expression pattern of this gene and knowledge about the function of holocytochrome synthetases, however, suggest that it is a good candidate for X-linked encephalomyopathies typically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Critical Evaluation of the Changes in Glutamine Synthetase Activity in Models of Cerebral Stroke.

    PubMed

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Battaile, Kevin; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2015-12-01

    The following article addresses some seemingly paradoxical observations concerning cerebral glutamine synthetase in ischemia-reperfusion injury. In the brain, this enzyme is predominantly found in astrocytes and catalyzes part of the glutamine-glutamate cycle. Glutamine synthetase is also thought to be especially sensitive to inactivation by the oxygen- and nitrogen-centered radicals generated during strokes. Despite this apparent sensitivity, glutamine synthetase specific activity is elevated in the affected tissues during reperfusion. Given the central role of the glutamine-glutamate cycle in the brain, we sought to resolve these conflicting observations with the view of providing an alternative perspective for therapeutic intervention in stroke.

  16. Isolation of a cDNA clone for human threonyl-tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Kontis, K.J.; Arfin, S.M.

    1989-05-01

    A cDNA for threonyl-tRNA synthetase was isolated from a human placental cDNA /lambda/gt11 expression library by immunological screening, and its identity was confirmed by hybrid-selected mRNA translation. With this cDNA used as a hybridization probe, borrelidin-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cells that overproduced threonyl-tRNA synthetase were shown to have increased levels of threonyl-tRNA synthetase mRNA and gene sequences. Amplification of the gene did not appear to have been accompanied by any major structural reorganizations.

  17. Organizing pneumonia as the first manifestation of anti-synthetase syndrome.

    PubMed

    Priyangika, S M Thanuja Nilushi; Karunarathna, W G S G; Liyanage, Isurujith; Gunawardana, Methsala; Udumalgala, Sumeda; Rosa, Chamith; Kulatunga, Aruna

    2016-06-02

    Anti-synthetase syndrome associated interstitial lung disease can occur either simultaneously, before, or after the development of polymyositis/dermatomyositis. Histology of interstitial lung disease can be nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, usual interstitial pneumonia, diffuse alveolar damage, organizing pneumonia. Organizing pneumonia associated anti-synthetase syndrome is a rare finding especially as the first manifestation. We report a 41 year old male patient who presented with organizing pneumonia and 2 years following the onset, developed polymyositis with anti-JO-1 antibody positivity. It is important to screen patients with organizing pneumonia for anti-synthetase syndrome which can be manifested later.

  18. The MTCY428.08 Gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Codes for NAD+ Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Cantoni, Rita; Branzoni, Manuela; Labò, Monica; Rizzi, Menico; Riccardi, Giovanna

    1998-01-01

    The product of the MTCY428.08 gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows sequence homology with several NAD+ synthetases. The MTCY428.08 gene was cloned into the expression vectors pGEX-4T-1 and pET-15b. Expression in Escherichia coli led to overproduction of glutathione S-transferase fused and His6-tagged gene products, which were enzymatically assayed for NAD synthetase activity. Our results demonstrate that the MTCY428.08 gene of M. tuberculosis is the structural gene for NAD+ synthetase. PMID:9620974

  19. Heterogeneity of holocarboxylase synthetase in patients with biotin-responsive multiple carboxylase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Burri, B J; Sweetman, L; Nyhan, W L

    1985-01-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase activity has been determined in fibroblasts of seven patients with the neonatal form of biotin-responsive multiple carboxylase deficiency. The normal Km for biotin was 15 +/- 3 nmol/l, while in the patients the values ranged from 48 to 1,062 nmol/l. The mean maximum velocity was 27% of normal. Differences among the values obtained for the Km for biotin and the heat stability of holocarboxylase synthetase suggested that the patients studied represented at least four distinct variants at the holocarboxylase synthetase locus. PMID:3920902

  20. Revised nomenclature for the mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase gene family.

    PubMed

    Mashek, Douglas G; Bornfeldt, Karin E; Coleman, Rosalind A; Berger, Johannes; Bernlohr, David A; Black, Paul; DiRusso, Concetta C; Farber, Steven A; Guo, Wen; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Khodiyar, Varsha; Kuypers, Frans A; Maltais, Lois J; Nebert, Daniel W; Renieri, Alessandra; Schaffer, Jean E; Stahl, Andreas; Watkins, Paul A; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Yamamoto, Tokuo T

    2004-10-01

    By consensus, the acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) community, with the advice of the human and mouse genome nomenclature committees, has revised the nomenclature for the mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases. ACS is the family root name, and the human and mouse genes for the long-chain ACSs are termed ACSL1,3-6 and Acsl1,3-6, respectively. Splice variants of ACSL3, -4, -5, and -6 are cataloged. Suggestions for naming other family members and for the nonmammalian acyl-CoA synthetases are made.

  1. Regulation of Angiogenesis by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Mirando, Adam C.; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Lounsbury, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their canonical roles in translation the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) have developed secondary functions over the course of evolution. Many of these activities are associated with cellular survival and nutritional stress responses essential for homeostatic processes in higher eukaryotes. In particular, six ARSs and one associated factor have documented functions in angiogenesis. However, despite their connection to this process, the ARSs are mechanistically distinct and exhibit a range of positive or negative effects on aspects of endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and survival. This variability is achieved through the appearance of appended domains and interplay with inflammatory pathways not found in prokaryotic systems. Complete knowledge of the non-canonical functions of ARSs is necessary to understand the mechanisms underlying the physiological regulation of angiogenesis. PMID:25535072

  2. Biochemical and structural investigations on phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Donini, Stefano; Garavaglia, Silvia; Ferraris, Davide M.; Miggiano, Riccardo; Mori, Shigetarou; Shibayama, Keigo

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis represents one model for studying the biology of its pathogenic relative Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structural characterization of a M. tuberculosis ortholog protein can serve as a valid tool for the development of molecules active against the M. tuberculosis target. In this context, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of M. smegmatis phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (PrsA), the ortholog of M. tuberculosis PrsA, the unique enzyme responsible for the synthesis of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). PRPP is a key metabolite involved in several biosynthetic pathways including those for histidine, tryptophan, nucleotides and decaprenylphosphoryl-arabinose, an essential precursor for the mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Since M. tuberculosis PrsA has been validated as a drug target for the development of antitubercular agents, the data presented here will add to the knowledge of the mycobacterial enzyme and could contribute to the development of M. tuberculosis PrsA inhibitors of potential pharmacological interest. PMID:28419153

  3. Transformation of Bacillus Subtilis with cloned thymidylate synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Edward M.

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis carries two genes, thyA and thyB, each encoding different protein products, with thymidylate synthetase (TSase) activity. Either of these genes alone is sufficient for thymidine independence in B. subtilis. In addition there exist two B. subtilis temperate bacteriophages which upon infection of thymine requiring auxotrophs results in conversion of the organism to thymine independence. Chimeric plasmids selected for Thy/sup +/ transforming activity in E. coli were constructed and then used as a source of defined highly enriched DNA with which to transform competent B. subtilis. These plasmids were studied for their: (1) abiility to transform B. subtilis to thymine independence; (2) site of integration within the B. subtilis chromosome upon transformation; (3) phenotype of Thy/sup +/ plasmid generated transformants; and (4) nucleotide sequence homology among the cloned DNA fragments conferring thymine independence. Plasmids containing the two bacteriophage thy genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyA, whereas the plasmids containing the cloned B. subtilis chromosomal genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyB. Utilizing similar technology, the ability of an entirely foreign hybred bacterial plasmiid to transform B. subtilis was examined. In this case the gene from E. coli encoding thymidylate synthetase was cloned in the plasmid pBR322. The resulting chimeric plasmid was effective in transforming both E. coli and B. subtilis to thymine prototrophy. Uncloned linear E. coli chromosomal DNA was unable to transform thymine requiring strains of B. subtilis to thymine independence. Although the Thy/sup +/ transformants of E. coli contained plasmid DNA, the Thy/sup +/ transformants derived from the transformation of B. subtilis did not contain detectable extrachromosomal DNA. Instead the DNA from the chimeric plasmid was integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis. (ERB)

  4. Activity of formylphosphate in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Jahansouz, H.; Kofron, J.L.; Smithers, G.W.; Himes, R.H.; Reed, G.H.

    1986-05-01

    Formylphosphate (FP), a putative enzyme-bound intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate synthetase, was synthesized from formylfluoride and Pi. Measurement of hydrolysis rates by /sup 31/P NMR showed that FP is very unstable with a half-life of 48 min at 20/sup 0/C and pH 7. At pH 7 hydrolysis occurs with O-P bond cleavage as shown by /sup 18/O incorporation from /sup 18/O-H/sub 2/O into Pi. The substrate activity of FP was tested in the reaction catalyzed by N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate synthetase isolated from Clostridium cylindrosporum. MgATP + H/sub 4/folate + HCOO/sup -/ in equilibrium MgADP + Pi +N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate FP supports the reaction in both the forward and reverse directions. Thus, N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate is produced from H/sub 4/-folate and FP but only if ADP is present, and ATP is produced from FP and ADP but only if H/sub 4/folate is present. The requirements for H/sub 4/folate in the synthesis of ATP from ADP and FP and for ADP in the synthesis of N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate from FP and H/sub 4/folate, are consistent with past kinetic and isotope exchange studies which showed that the reaction proceeds by a sequential mechanism and that all three substrates must be present for any reaction to occur.

  5. Identification of pantoate kinase and phosphopantothenate synthetase from Methanospirillum hungatei.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Hiroki; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Tokutake, Yuka; Hanada, Satoshi; Chohnan, Shigeru

    2013-04-01

    Pantothenate synthetase (PanC) and pantothenate kinase which function in the canonical coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway cannot be found in most archaea. COG1829 and COG1701 intrinsic to archaea were proposed as the candidate proteins for producing 4'-phosphopantothenate instead, and the COG1701 protein from Methanosarcina mazei was assigned as PanC. Meanwhile, the Thermococcus kodakarensis COG1829 and COG1701 proteins were biochemically identified as novel enzymes, i.e., pantoate kinase (PoK) and phosphopantothenate synthetase (PPS). In this study, the functions of Mhun_0831 (COG1829) and Mhun_0832 (COG1701) from Methanospirillum hungatei were identified, and the recombinant enzymes were partially characterized. Plasmids simultaneously possessing the two genes encoding Mhun_0831 and Mhun_0832 complemented the poor growth of the temperature-sensitive Escherichia coli pantothenate kinase mutant ts9. The recombinant Mhun_0831 and Mhun_0832 expressed in E. coli cells exhibited PoK and PPS activities, respectively, being in accord with the functions of T. kodakarensis proteins. The PoK activity was most active at pH 8.5 and 40°C, and accepted ATP and UTP as a phosphate donor. Although CoA did not affect the PoK activity, the end product considerably accelerated the PPS activity. The homologs of both proteins are widely conserved in most archaeal genomes. Taken together, our findings indicate that archaea can synthesize CoA through the unique pathway involving PoK and PPS, in addition to the canonical one that the order Thermoplasmatales employs.

  6. Identification and functional characterization of a novel bacterial type asparagine synthetase A: a tRNA synthetase paralog from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Manhas, Reetika; Tripathi, Pankaj; Khan, Sameena; Sethu Lakshmi, Bhavana; Lal, Shambhu Krishan; Gowri, Venkatraman Subramanian; Sharma, Amit; Madhubala, Rentala

    2014-04-25

    Asparagine is formed by two structurally distinct asparagine synthetases in prokaryotes. One is the ammonia-utilizing asparagine synthetase A (AsnA), and the other is asparagine synthetase B (AsnB) that uses glutamine or ammonia as a nitrogen source. In a previous investigation using sequence-based analysis, we had shown that Leishmania spp. possess asparagine-tRNA synthetase paralog asparagine synthetase A (LdASNA) that is ammonia-dependent. Here, we report the cloning, expression, and kinetic analysis of ASNA from Leishmania donovani. Interestingly, LdASNA was both ammonia- and glutamine-dependent. To study the physiological role of ASNA in Leishmania, gene deletion mutations were attempted via targeted gene replacement. Gene deletion of LdASNA showed a growth delay in mutants. However, chromosomal null mutants of LdASNA could not be obtained as the double transfectant mutants showed aneuploidy. These data suggest that LdASNA is essential for survival of the Leishmania parasite. LdASNA enzyme was recalcitrant toward crystallization so we instead crystallized and solved the atomic structure of its close homolog from Trypanosoma brucei (TbASNA) at 2.2 Å. A very significant conservation in active site residues is observed between TbASNA and Escherichia coli AsnA. It is evident that the absence of an LdASNA homolog from humans and its essentiality for the parasites make LdASNA a novel drug target.

  7. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  8. Purification and determination of glutamine synthetase by high-performance immunoaffinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Alhama, J; López-Barea, J; Toribio, F; Roldán, J M

    1992-01-10

    High-performance immunoaffinity chromatography (HPIAC) with anti-glutamine synthetase polyclonal antibodies bound to epoxy-activated silica was used to purify and determine this enzyme from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis. A single-step HPIAC procedure with cell-free extracts yielded electroporetically homogeneous glutamine synthetase. In the determination of glutamine synthetase by HPIAC a linear response in the range 10-60 micrograms of enzyme was observed. Recoveries of 70% of the loaded enzymatic activity and 100% of protein were obtained. The determination of glutamine synthetase protein by HPIAC was compared with that obtained by rocket immunoelectrophoresis. The chromatographic method is proposed as a possible alternative to other immunochemical quantitative techniques, particularly when non-limiting amounts of samples are available.

  9. Evidence for two immunologically distinct acetyl-coenzyme A synthetases in yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, T.; Mandel, A. D.; Klein, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    Evidence is presented that clearly establishes the presence of two acetyl-CoA synthetases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one elaborated under 'aerobic' conditions, the other under 'nonaerobic' conditions. The antibody produced by each enzyme is immunologically specific.

  10. Regulation of active site coupling in glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Resto, Melissa; Gerratana, Barbara

    2009-05-21

    NAD{sup +} is an essential metabolite both as a cofactor in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis and as a regulator of cellular processes. In contrast to humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD{sup +} biosynthesis is absolutely dependent on the activity of a multifunctional glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} at the synthetase domain using ammonia derived from L-glutamine in the glutaminase domain. Here we report the kinetics and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis NAD{sup +} synthetase. The kinetics data strongly suggest tightly coupled regulation of the catalytic activities. The structure, the first of a glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, reveals a homooctameric subunit organization suggesting a tight dependence of catalysis on the quaternary structure, a 40-{angstrom} intersubunit ammonia tunnel and structural elements that may be involved in the transfer of information between catalytic sites.

  11. Severe holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency with incomplete biotin responsiveness resulting in antenatal insult in samoan neonates.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Callum J; Myer, Michael; Darlow, Brian A; Stanley, Thorsten; Thomson, Glen; Baumgartner, E Regula; Kirby, Denise M; Thorburn, David R

    2005-07-01

    We describe 7 Polynesian babies with a unique severe form of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency characterized by antenatal growth retardation, subependymal cysts, only partial response to biotin, and a poor outcome.

  12. Evidence for two immunologically distinct acetyl-coenzyme A synthetases in yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, T.; Mandel, A. D.; Klein, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    Evidence is presented that clearly establishes the presence of two acetyl-CoA synthetases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one elaborated under 'aerobic' conditions, the other under 'nonaerobic' conditions. The antibody produced by each enzyme is immunologically specific.

  13. Failure of the Normal Ureagenic Response to Amino Acids in Organic Acid-loaded Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Peter M.; Walser, Mackenzie

    1980-01-01

    Propionic and methylmalonic acidemia are both known to be associated with hyperammonemia. Rats injected with 10 or 20 mmol/kg of propionate or 20 mmol/kg of methylmalonate, along with 1.5 g/kg of a mixture of amino acids, developed severe hyperammonemia, whereas rats administered the same dosages of acetate did not. In vitro, neither propionyl nor methylmalonyl CoA affected the activity of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I, ornithine transcarbamylase, nor the activation constant (KA) of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I for N-acetyl glutamate. Furthermore, rats injected with propionate showed no alteration of liver amino acid concentrations, which could explain impaired ureagenesis. Animals injected with methylmalonate showed an increase in both citrulline and aspartate, suggesting that argininosuccinic acid synthetase may also have been inhibited. Liver ATP levels were unchanged. Citrullinogenesis, measured in intact mitochondria from livers of injected animals, was reduced 20-25% by 20 mmol/kg of propionate or methylmalonate (compared with acetate). This effect was attributable to an impairment in the normal rise of liver N-acetyl glutamate content after amino acid injection. Thus, carbamyl phosphate synthetase I activation was reduced. Liver levels of acetyl CoA and free CoA were reduced. Levels of unidentified acyl CoA derivatives rose, presumably reflecting the accumulation of propionyl and methylmalonyl CoA. Thus, the principal mechanism for hyperammonemia induced by these acids is depletion of liver N-acetyl glutamate, which is in turn attributable to depletion of acetyl CoA and/or competitive inhibition by propionyl and methylmalonyl CoA of N-acetyl glutamate synthetase. Injection of methylmalonate may also have an additional inhibitory effect on argininosuccinic acid synthetase. PMID:7400325

  14. Assignment of two human autoantigen genes-isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 9q21 and lysyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 16q23-q24

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, R.C.; Blinder, J.; Pai, S.I.

    1996-08-15

    Protein synthesis is initiated by the attachment of amino acids to cognate tRNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS). Five of twenty human aaRS (histidyl-RS, threonyl-RS, alanyl-RS, glycyl-RS, and isoleucyl-RS) have been identified as targets of autoantibodies in the autoimmune disease polymyositis/dermatomyositis. Autoantibodies to human lysyl-RS, a sixth autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS, were recently identified. The genes for histidyl-RS and threonyl-RS have been localized to chromosome 5, and we recently reported that the genes for alanyl-RS and glycyl-RS localize to chromosomes 16 and 7, respectively. To understand the genesis of autoimmune responses to aaRS better, we have used PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrid panels and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to assign the genes for isoleucyl-RS and lysyl-RS. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Diffuse glutamine synthetase overexpression restricted to areas of peliosis in a β-catenin-activated hepatocellular adenoma: a potential pitfall in glutamine synthetase interpretation.

    PubMed

    Berry, Ryan S; Gullapalli, Rama R; Wu, Jin; Morris, Katherine; Hanson, Joshua A

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular adenomas have recently been classified into four subtypes based on molecular findings: hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) inactivated, inflammatory/telangiectatic, β-catenin activated, and unclassifiable. β-catenin-activated adenomas have the potential for malignant transformation and are thus important to recognize. Diffuse glutamine synthetase immunohistochemical positivity has been shown to be a reliable surrogate marker for β-catenin activation, though variations in staining patterns may be difficult to interpret. We report a case of a peliotic adenoma that was morphologically consistent with a β-catenin wild-type hepatocellular adenoma but harbored a β-catenin mutation by molecular analysis. The tumor lacked nuclear β-catenin positivity and demonstrated a hitherto undescribed pattern of glutamine synthetase overexpression restricted to areas of peliosis with mostly negative staining in non-peliotic areas. This pattern was initially interpreted as physiologic and may represent a potential pitfall in glutamine synthetase interpretation.

  16. An unusual S-adenosylmethionine synthetase gene from dinoflagellate is methylated

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Percy; Kong, KF; Chan, YH; Tsang, Jimmy SH; Wong, Joseph TY

    2007-01-01

    Background S-Adenosylmethionine synthetase (AdoMetS) catalyzes the formation of S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), the major methyl group donor in cells. AdoMet-mediated methylation of DNA is known to have regulatory effects on DNA transcription and chromosome structure. Transcription of environmental-responsive genes was demonstrated to be mediated via DNA methylation in dinoflagellates. Results A full-length cDNA encoding AdoMetS was cloned from the dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the CcAdoMetS gene, is associated with the clade of higher plant orthrologues, and not to the clade of the animal orthrologues. Surprisingly, three extra stretches of residues (8 to 19 amino acids) were found on CcAdoMetS, when compared to other members of this usually conserved protein family. Modeled on the bacterial AdeMetS, two of the extra loops are located close to the methionine binding site. Despite this, the CcAdoMetS was able to rescue the corresponding mutant of budding yeast. Southern analysis, coupled with methylation-sensitive and insensitive enzyme digestion of C. cohnii genomic DNA, demonstrated that the AdoMetS gene is itself methylated. The increase in digestibility of methylation-sensitive enzymes on AdoMet synthetase gene observed following the addition of DNA methylation inhibitors L-ethionine and 5-azacytidine suggests the presence of cytosine methylation sites within CcAdoMetS gene. During the cell cycle, both the transcript and protein levels of CcAdoMetS peaked at the G1 phase. L-ethionine was able to delay the cell cycle at the entry of S phase. A cell cycle delay at the exit of G2/M phase was induced by 5-azacytidine. Conclusion The present study demonstrates a major role of AdoMet-mediated DNA methylation in the regulation of cell proliferation and that the CcAdoMetS gene is itself methylated. PMID:17915037

  17. Portability of the thiolation domain in recombinant pyoverdine non-ribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Calcott, Mark J; Ackerley, David F

    2015-08-13

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) enzymes govern the assembly of amino acids and related monomers into peptide-like natural products. A key goal of the field is to develop methods to effective recombine NRPS domains or modules, and thereby generate modified or entirely novel products. We previously showed that substitution of the condensation (C) and adenylation (A) domains in module 2 of the pyoverdine synthetase PvdD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa led to synthesis of modified pyoverdines in a minority of cases, but that more often the recombinant enzymes were non-functional. One possible explanation was that the majority of introduced C domains were unable to effectively communicate with the thiolation (T) domain immediately upstream, in the first module of PvdD. To test this we first compared the effectiveness of C-A domain substitution relative to T-C-A domain substitution using three different paired sets of domains. Having previously demonstrated that the PvdD A/T domain interfaces are tolerant of domain substitution, we hypothesised that T-C-A domain substitution would lead to more functional recombinant enzymes, by maintaining native T/C domain interactions. Although we successfully generated two recombinant pyoverdines, having a serine or a N5-formyl-N5-hydroxyornithine residue in place of the terminal threonine of wild type pyoverdine, in neither case did the T-C-A domain substitution strategy lead to substantially higher product yield. To more comprehensively examine the abilities of non-native T domains to communicate effectively with the C domain of PvdD module 2 we then substituted the module 1 T domain with 18 different T domains sourced from other pyoverdine NRPS enzymes. In 15/18 cases the recombinant NRPS was functional, including 6/6 cases where the introduced T domain was located upstream of a C domain in its native context. Our data indicate that T domains are generally able to interact effectively with non-native C domains, contrasting with

  18. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Lamers, Wouter H; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2016-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4 (+) with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of PT GS in ammonia metabolism under basal conditions and during metabolic acidosis. We generated mice with PT-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Under basal conditions, PT-GS-KO increased urinary ammonia excretion significantly. Increased ammonia excretion occurred despite decreased expression of key proteins involved in renal ammonia generation. After the induction of metabolic acidosis, the ability to increase ammonia excretion was impaired significantly by PT-GS-KO. The blunted increase in ammonia excretion occurred despite greater expression of multiple components of ammonia generation, including SN1 (Slc38a3), phosphate-dependent glutaminase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and Na(+)-coupled electrogenic bicarbonate cotransporter. We conclude that 1) GS-mediated ammonia recycling in the PT contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism and 2) adaptive changes in other proteins involved in ammonia metabolism occur in response to PT-GS-KO and cause an underestimation of the role of PT GS expression.

  19. Glutamine synthetase in the phloem plays a major role in controlling proline production

    PubMed Central

    Brugiere, N; Dubois, F; Limami, AM; Lelandais, M; Roux, Y; Sangwan, RS; Hirel, B

    1999-01-01

    To inhibit expression specifically in the phloem, a 274-bp fragment of a cDNA (Gln1-5) encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1) from tobacco was placed in the antisense orientation downstream of the cytosolic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase promoter of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. After Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, two transgenic N. tabacum lines exhibiting reduced levels of GS1 mRNA and GS activity in midribs, stems, and roots were obtained. Immunogold labeling experiments allowed us to verify that the GS protein content was markedly decreased in the phloem companion cells of transformed plants. Moreover, a general decrease in proline content in the transgenic plants in comparison with wild-type tobacco was observed when plants were forced to assimilate large amounts of ammonium. In contrast, no major changes in the concentration of amino acids used for nitrogen transport were apparent. A (15)NH(4)(+)-labeling kinetic over a 48-hr period confirmed that in leaves of transgenic plants, the decrease in proline production was directly related to glutamine availability. After 2 weeks of salt treatment, the transgenic plants had a pronounced stress phenotype, consisting of wilting and bleaching in the older leaves. We conclude that GS in the phloem plays a major role in regulating proline production consistent with the function of proline as a nitrogen source and as a key metabolite synthesized in response to water stress. PMID:10521528

  20. Mouse very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Heinzer, Ann K; Kemp, Stephan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Watkins, Paul A; Smith, Kirby D

    2002-08-09

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). This accumulation has been attributed to decreased VLCFA beta-oxidation and peroxisomal very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (VLCS) activity. The X-ALD gene, ABCD1, encodes a peroxisomal membrane ATP binding cassette transporter, ALDP, that is hypothesized to affect VLCS activity in peroxisomes by direct interaction with the VLCS enzyme. Recently, a VLCS gene that encodes a protein with significant sequence identity to known rat and human peroxisomal VLCS protein has been identified in mice. We find that the mouse VLCS gene (Vlcs) encodes an enzyme (Vlcs) with VLCS activity that localizes to peroxisomes and is expressed in X-ALD target tissues. We show that the expression of Vlcs in the peroxisomes of X-ALD mouse fibroblasts improves VLCFA beta-oxidation in these cells, implying a role for this enzyme in the biochemical abnormality of X-ALD. X-ALD mice, which accumulate VLCFA in tissues, show no change in the expression of Vlcs, the subcellular localization of Vlcs, or general peroxisomal VLCS activity. These observations imply that ALDP is not necessary for the proper expression or localization of Vlcs protein, and the control of VLCFA levels does not depend on the direct interaction of Vlcs and ALDP.

  1. Oxidative modification of glutamine synthetase by 2,2'-azobis(2- amidinopropane) dihydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y S; Chao, C C; Stadtman, E R

    1999-03-01

    In the present study, we examined the pattern of protein modification elicited by alkylperoxyl radicals and alkylperoxides. To this end, we exposed glutamine synthetase (GS) and the peptide melittin to solutions containing 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH), which is known to decompose in aqueous, aerobic solutions to yield alkyl radicals and alkylperoxides. Under our conditions, pH 7.4, 37 degrees C, the AAPH-dependent formation of alkylhydroperoxide increased linearly with time and led to 40% inactivation of GS in 1 h and to complete inactivation in 4 h. Complete inactivation was associated with the loss of 2 of 16 histidine residues, 6 of 17 tyrosine residues, 5 of 16 methionine residues, and all of the tryptophan residues (2 residues) per subunit. Inactivation of GS was associated also with some protein fragmentation and the formation of some higher molecular weight aggregates. Exposure of GS to AAPH led also to the generation of protein carbonyl derivatives (0.34 mol/mol subunit) and to formation of a significant amount (0.038 mol/mol subunits) of quinoprotein derivatives. To investigate the mechanism of tryptophan modification, the 26-amino-acid peptide, melittin, which contains one tryptophan but no histidine, tyrosine, or methionine residues, was treated with AAPH. N-Formylkynurenine was identified as the major product of tryptophan oxidation in melittin. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  2. Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases: Identifying the cryptic gene clusters and decoding the natural product.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mangal; Chaudhary, Sandeep; Sareen, Dipti

    2017-03-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) present in bacteria and fungi are the major multi-modular enzyme complexes which synthesize secondary metabolites like the pharmacologically important antibiotics and siderophores. Each of the multiple modules of an NRPS activates a different amino or aryl acid, followed by their condensation to synthesize a linear or cyclic natural product. The studies on NRPS domains, the knowledge of their gene cluster architecture and tailoring enzymes have helped in the in silico genetic screening of the ever-expanding sequenced microbial genomic data for the identification of novel NRPS/PKS clusters and thus deciphering novel non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs). Adenylation domain is an integral part of the NRPSs and is the substrate selecting unit for the final assembled NRP. In some cases, it also requires a small protein, the MbtH homolog, for its optimum activity. The presence of putative adenylation domain and MbtH homologs in a sequenced genome can help identify the novel secondary metabolite producers. The role of the adenylation domain in the NRPS gene clusters and its characterization as a tool for the discovery of novel cryptic NRPS gene clusters are discussed.

  3. Acyl-CoA synthetase 3 promotes lipid droplet biogenesis in ER microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Kassan, Adam; Herms, Albert; Fernández-Vidal, Andrea; Bosch, Marta; Schieber, Nicole L.; Reddy, Babu J.N.; Fajardo, Alba; Gelabert-Baldrich, Mariona; Tebar, Francesc; Enrich, Carlos; Gross, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    Control of lipid droplet (LD) nucleation and copy number are critical, yet poorly understood, processes. We use model peptides that shift from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to LDs in response to fatty acids to characterize the initial steps of LD formation occurring in lipid-starved cells. Initially, arriving lipids are rapidly packed in LDs that are resistant to starvation (pre-LDs). Pre-LDs are restricted ER microdomains with a stable core of neutral lipids. Subsequently, a first round of “emerging” LDs is nucleated, providing additional lipid storage capacity. Finally, in proportion to lipid concentration, new rounds of LDs progressively assemble. Confocal microscopy and electron tomography suggest that emerging LDs are nucleated in a limited number of ER microdomains after a synchronized stepwise process of protein gathering, lipid packaging, and recognition by Plin3 and Plin2. A comparative analysis demonstrates that the acyl-CoA synthetase 3 is recruited early to the assembly sites, where it is required for efficient LD nucleation and lipid storage. PMID:24368806

  4. An exposed cysteine residue of human angiostatic mini tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Wakasugi, Keisuke

    2010-04-13

    Human tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) catalyzes the aminoacylation of tRNA(Trp). Human TrpRS exists in two forms: a major form that is the full-length protein and a truncated form (mini TrpRS) in which most of the N-terminal extension is absent. Human mini, but not full-length, TrpRS has angiostatic activity. Because the full-length protein, which lacks angiostatic activity, has all of the amino acid determinants of the mini form, which has activity, I searched for conformational differences between the two proteins. Using a disulfide cross-linking assay, I showed that the molecular environment around Cys62 is significantly different between the two proteins. This difference can be explained by inspection of the three-dimensional structure of the full-length protein. These results give a clear demonstration of a significant difference, around a specific residue (Cys62), between a potent angiostatic and nonangiostatic version of human TrpRS.

  5. The inactivating factor of glutamine synthetase, IF7, is a "natively unfolded" protein

    PubMed Central

    Muro-Pastor, M. Isabel; Barrera, Francisco N.; Reyes, José C.; Florencio, Francisco J.; Neira, José L.

    2003-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the key enzyme responsible for the primary assimilation of ammonium in all living organisms, and it catalyses the synthesis of glutamine from glutamic acid, ATP, and ammonium. One of the recently discovered mechanisms of GS regulation involves protein-protein interactions with a small 65-residue-long protein named IF7. Here, we study the structure and stability of IF7 and its binding properties to GS, by using several biophysical techniques (fluorescence, circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, and gel filtration chromatography) which provide complementary structural information. The findings show that IF7 has a small amount of residual secondary structure, but lacks a well defined tertiary structure, and is not compact. Thus, all of the studies indicate that IF7 is a "natively unfolded" protein. The binding of IF7 to GS, its natural binding partner, occurs with an apparent dissociation constant of KD = 0.3 ± 0.1 μM, as measured by fluorescence. We discuss the implications for the GS regulation mechanisms of IF7 being unfolded. PMID:12824490

  6. Biochemical and mutational analysis of glutamine synthetase type III from the rumen anaerobe Ruminococcus albus 8.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Kensey R; Kocherginskaya, Svetlana A; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O

    2005-11-01

    Two different genes encoding glutamine synthetase type I (GSI) and GSIII were identified in the genome sequence of R. albus 8. The identity of the GSIII protein was confirmed by the presence of its associated conserved motifs. The glnN gene, encoding the GSIII, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells. The recombinant protein was purified and subjected to biochemical and physical analyses. Subunit organization suggested a protein present in solution as both monomers and oligomers. Kinetic studies using the forward and the gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT) assays were carried out. Mutations that changed conserved glutamic acid residues to alanine in the four GSIII motifs resulted in drastic decreases in GS activity using both assays, except for an E380A mutation, which rather resulted in an increase in activity in the forward assay compared to the wild-type protein. Reduced GSIII activity was also exhibited by mutating, individually, two lysines (K308 and K318) located in the putative nucleotide-binding site to alanine. Most importantly, the presence of mRNA transcripts of the glnN gene in R. albus 8 cells grown under ammonia limiting conditions, whereas little or no transcript was detected in cells grown under ammonia sufficient conditions, suggested an important role for the GSIII in the nitrogen metabolism of R. albus 8. Furthermore, the mutational studies on the conserved GSIII motifs demonstrated, for the first time, their importance in the structure and/or function of a GSIII protein.

  7. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats.

    PubMed

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Simonsen, Mette; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Sørensen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine, and aspartate and incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into glutamine in all tissues. It did not affect alanine concentrations in any of the tissues but plasma alanine concentration increased; incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into alanine was increased in brain in sham and BDL rats and in kidney in sham rats. It inhibited GS in all tissues examined but only in brain was an increased incorporation of (15)N-ammonia into alanine observed. Liver and kidney were important for metabolizing blood-borne ammonia.

  8. Over-expression in Escherichia coli and characterization of two recombinant isoforms of human FAD synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Brizio, Carmen; Galluccio, Michele; Wait, Robin; Torchetti, Enza Maria; Bafunno, Valeria; Accardi, Rosita; Gianazza, Elisabetta; Indiveri, Cesare; Barile, Maria . E-mail: m.barile@biologia.uniba.it

    2006-06-09

    FAD synthetase (FADS) (EC 2.7.7.2) is a key enzyme in the metabolic pathway that converts riboflavin into the redox cofactor FAD. Two hypothetical human FADSs, which are the products of FLAD1 gene, were over-expressed in Escherichia coli and identified by ESI-MS/MS. Isoform 1 was over-expressed as a T7-tagged protein which had a molecular mass of 63 kDa on SDS-PAGE. Isoform 2 was over-expressed as a 6-His-tagged fusion protein, carrying an extra 84 amino acids at the N-terminal with an apparent molecular mass of 60 kDa on SDS-PAGE. It was purified near to homogeneity from the soluble cell fraction by one-step affinity chromatography. Both isoforms possessed FADS activity and had a strict requirement for MgCl{sub 2}, as demonstrated using both spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods. The purified recombinant isoform 2 showed a specific activity of 6.8 {+-} 1.3 nmol of FAD synthesized/min/mg protein and exhibited a K {sub M} value for FMN of 1.5 {+-} 0.3 {mu}M. This is First report on characterization of human FADS, and First cloning and over-expression of FADS from an organism higher than yeast.

  9. Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma Parasites Are Inhibited by a Benzoxaborole Targeting Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ru-Juan; Lukarska, Maria; Gut, Jiri; Bougdour, Alexandre; Touquet, Bastien; Wang, En-Duo; Li, Xianfeng; Alley, M. R. K.; Freund, Yvonne R.; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2016-01-01

    The apicomplexan parasites Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma are serious threats to human health. Cryptosporidiosis is a severe diarrheal disease in malnourished children and immunocompromised individuals, with the only FDA-approved drug treatment currently being nitazoxanide. The existing therapies for toxoplasmosis, an important pathology in immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women, also have serious limitations. With the aim of developing alternative therapeutic options to address these health problems, we tested a number of benzoxaboroles, boron-containing compounds shown to be active against various infectious agents, for inhibition of the growth of Cryptosporidium parasites in mammalian cells. A 3-aminomethyl benzoxaborole, AN6426, with activity in the micromolar range and with activity comparable to that of nitazoxanide, was identified and further characterized using biophysical measurements of affinity and crystal structures of complexes with the editing domain of Cryptosporidium leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS). The same compound was shown to be active against Toxoplasma parasites, with the activity being enhanced in the presence of norvaline, an amino acid that can be mischarged by LeuRS. Our observations are consistent with AN6426 inhibiting protein synthesis in both Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma by forming a covalent adduct with tRNALeu in the LeuRS editing active site and suggest that further exploitation of the benzoxaborole scaffold is a valid strategy to develop novel, much needed antiparasitic agents. PMID:27431220

  10. Dark-induced and organ-specific expression of two asparagine synthetase genes in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, F Y; Coruzzi, G M

    1990-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence analysis of cDNAs for asparagine synthetase (AS) of Pisum sativum has uncovered two distinct AS mRNAs (AS1 and AS2) encoding polypeptides that are highly homologous to the human AS enzyme. The amino-terminal residues of both AS1 and AS2 polypeptides are identical to the glutamine-binding domain of the human AS enzyme, indicating that the full-length AS1 and AS2 cDNAs encode glutamine-dependent AS enzymes. Analysis of nuclear DNA shows that AS1 and AS2 are each encoded by single genes in P.sativum. Gene-specific Northern blot analysis reveals that dark treatment induces high-level accumulation of AS1 mRNA in leaves, while light treatment represses this effect as much as 30-fold. Moreover, the dark-induced accumulation of AS1 mRNA was shown to be a phytochrome-mediated response. Both AS1 and AS2 mRNAs also accumulate to high levels in cotyledons of germinating seedlings and in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. These patterns of AS gene expression correlate well with the physiological role of asparagine as a nitrogen transport amino acid during plant development. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1968003

  11. Visualization of Leucyl-tRNA synthetase in lysosome depending on leucine sensor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyosun; Son, Jung Bae; Kang, Jooyoun; Kwon, Jiwoong; Kim, Jong Hyun; Jung, Minkyo; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Sunghoon; Mun, Ji Young

    2017-09-04

    Leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LRS) plays major roles in providing leucine-tRNA and activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) through intracellular leucine sensing. mTORC1 activated by amino acids affects the influence on physiology functions including cell proliferation, protein synthesis and autophagy in various organisms. Biochemical results demonstrating leucine sensing have been published, but visual results are lacking. Therefore, we observed the location of LRS with and without leucine using stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy one of the super-resolution microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This revealed that LRS was translocated to the lysosome on addition of leucine. The translocation was inhibited by treatment with compound BC-LI-0186, disrupting the interaction between RagD and LRS. Immuno-TEM revealed a clear decrease in LRS translocation to the lysosome on addition of the inhibitor. This direct visualization of leucine sensing and LRS translocation to the lysosome was related to mTORC1 activation. To study the relationship between mTORC1 activation and LRS translocation, we monitored the change in autophagy for each condition using TEM and CLSM. The results showed a decrease in autophagy on addition of leucine, demonstrating crosstalk between leucine sensing, LRS translocation, RagD interaction, and mTORC1 activation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Structure of human carbamoyl phosphate synthetase: deciphering the on/off switch of human ureagenesis

    PubMed Central

    de Cima, Sergio; Polo, Luis M.; Díez-Fernández, Carmen; Martínez, Ana I.; Cervera, Javier; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Human carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS1), a 1500-residue multidomain enzyme, catalyzes the first step of ammonia detoxification to urea requiring N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG) as essential activator to prevent ammonia/amino acids depletion. Here we present the crystal structures of CPS1 in the absence and in the presence of NAG, clarifying the on/off-switching of the urea cycle by NAG. By binding at the C-terminal domain of CPS1, NAG triggers long-range conformational changes affecting the two distant phosphorylation domains. These changes, concerted with the binding of nucleotides, result in a dramatic remodeling that stabilizes the catalytically competent conformation and the building of the ~35 Å-long tunnel that allows migration of the carbamate intermediate from its site of formation to the second phosphorylation site, where carbamoyl phosphate is produced. These structures allow rationalizing the effects of mutations found in patients with CPS1 deficiency (presenting hyperammonemia, mental retardation and even death), as exemplified here for some mutations. PMID:26592762

  13. Over-expression of cytosolic glutamine synthetase increases photosynthesis and growth at low nitrogen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, S I; Allen, D J; Ortiz-Lopez, A; Hernández, G

    2001-05-01

    Nitrogen, which is a major limiting nutrient for plant growth, is assimilated as ammonium by the concerted action of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT). GS catalyses the critical incorporation of inorganic ammonium into the amino acid glutamine. Two types of GS isozymes, located in the cytosol (GS1) and in the chloroplast (GS2) have been identified in plants. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) transformants, over-expressing GS1 driven by the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter were analysed. GS in leaves of GS-5 and GS-8 plants was up-regulated, at the level of RNA and proteins. These transgenic plants had six times higher leaf GS activity than controls. Under optimum nitrogen fertilization conditions there was no effect of GS over-expression on photosynthesis or growth. However, under nitrogen starvation the GS transgenics had c. 70% higher shoot and c. 100% greater root dry weight as well as 50% more leaf area than low nitrogen controls. This was achieved by the maintenance of photosynthesis at rates indistinguishable from plants under high nitrogen, while photosynthesis in control plants was inhibited by 40-50% by nitrogen deprivation. It was demonstrated that manipulation of GS activity has the potential to maintain crop photosynthetic productivity while reducing nitrogen fertilization and the concomitant pollution.

  14. Cloning, expression, and nutritional regulation of the glutamine synthetase gene in Ctenopharyngodon idellus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rong; Qu, Fufa; Tang, Jianzhou; Zhao, Qiong; Yan, Jinpeng; Zhou, Zhigang; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Zhen

    2017-10-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is considered a master enzyme that catalyzes ATP-dependent biosynthesis of glutamine from glutamate. In the present study, the GS gene was cloned from the intestine of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus). The full-length cDNA sequence of GS encodes a 371-amino-acid polypetide. Phylogenetic analysis of the C. idellus GS sequence reveals common carp (Cyprinus carpio) as its closest neighbor. GS mRNA was differentially expressed in different tissues, with high to low gradient expression the intestine, brain, muscle, heart, gill, liver, pituitary gland, and spleen. Additionally, GS exhibited a dynamic pattern of expression during embryonic development, reaching maximal and minimal levels in the organ and hatching stages, respectively, and constant low levels from 7 to 28days post-hatching. We also assessed dietary protein levels and feed sources in diet-regulated fish, and the results suggested that low crude protein (CP) and fish meal stimulate GS gene expression. Furthermore, intestinal GS mRNA expression was significantly increased by 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8mM concentrations of glutamine dipeptide in vitro. This study provides valuable knowledge about the regulation of GS expression in teleosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Isolation and characterization of glutamine synthetase from the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, D L; Alberte, R S

    1996-01-01

    Two peaks of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity were resolved by anion-exchange chromatography from the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum Grev. The second peak of activity accounted for greater than 93% of total enzyme activity, and this isoform was purified over 200-fold. Results from denaturing gel electrophoresis and gel-filtration chromatography suggest that six 70-kD subunits constitute the 400-kD native enzyme. The structure of the diatom GS, therefore, appears more similar to that of a type found in bacteria than to the type common among other eukaryotes. Apparent Michaelis constant values were 0.7 mM for NH4(+), 5.7 mM for glutamic acid, and 0.5 mM for ATP. Enzyme activity was inhibited by serine, alanine, glycine, phosphinothricin, and methionine sulfoximine. Polyclonal antiserum raised against the purified enzyme localized a single polypeptide on western blots of S. costatum cell lysates and recognized the denatured, native enzyme. Western analysis of the two peak fractions derived from anion-exchange chromatography demonstrated that the 70-kD protein was present only in the later eluting peak of enzyme activity. This form of GS does not appear to be unique to S. costatum, since the antiserum recognized a similar-sized protein in cell lysates of other chromophytic algae. PMID:8756499

  16. Isolation and characterization of glutamine synthetase from the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum.

    PubMed

    Robertson, D L; Alberte, R S

    1996-08-01

    Two peaks of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity were resolved by anion-exchange chromatography from the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum Grev. The second peak of activity accounted for greater than 93% of total enzyme activity, and this isoform was purified over 200-fold. Results from denaturing gel electrophoresis and gel-filtration chromatography suggest that six 70-kD subunits constitute the 400-kD native enzyme. The structure of the diatom GS, therefore, appears more similar to that of a type found in bacteria than to the type common among other eukaryotes. Apparent Michaelis constant values were 0.7 mM for NH4(+), 5.7 mM for glutamic acid, and 0.5 mM for ATP. Enzyme activity was inhibited by serine, alanine, glycine, phosphinothricin, and methionine sulfoximine. Polyclonal antiserum raised against the purified enzyme localized a single polypeptide on western blots of S. costatum cell lysates and recognized the denatured, native enzyme. Western analysis of the two peak fractions derived from anion-exchange chromatography demonstrated that the 70-kD protein was present only in the later eluting peak of enzyme activity. This form of GS does not appear to be unique to S. costatum, since the antiserum recognized a similar-sized protein in cell lysates of other chromophytic algae.

  17. The mitochondrial folylpolyglutamate synthetase gene is required for nitrogen utilization during early seedling development in arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling; Liu, Yanyan; Sun, Hong; Han, Yueting; Li, Jinglai; Li, Changkun; Guo, Wenzhu; Meng, Hongyan; Li, Sha; Fan, Yunliu; Zhang, Chunyi

    2013-02-01

    Investigations into the biochemical processes and regulatory mechanisms of nitrogen (N) utilization can aid in understanding how N is used efficiently in plants. This report describes a deficiency in N utilization in an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion mutant of the mitochondrial folylpolyglutamate synthetase gene DFC, which catalyzes the conjugation of glutamate residues to the tetrahydrofolate during folate synthesis. The mutant seedlings displayed several metabolic changes that are typical of plant responses to low-N stress, including increased levels of starch and anthocyanin synthesis as well as decreased levels of soluble protein and free amino acid, as compared with those in wild-type seedlings when external N was sufficient. More striking changes were observed when dfc seedlings were grown under N-limited conditions, including shorter primary roots, fewer lateral roots, higher levels of glycine and carbon-N ratios, and lower N content than those in wild-type seedlings. Gene expression studies in mutant seedlings revealed altered transcript levels of several genes involved in folate biosynthesis and N metabolism. The biochemical and metabolic changes also suggested that N assimilation is drastically perturbed due to a loss of DFC function. The observation that elevated CO(2) partly rescued the dfc phenotypes suggests that the alterations in N metabolism in dfc may be mainly due to a defect in photorespiration. These results indicate that DFC is required for N utilization in Arabidopsis and provide new insight into a potential interaction between folate and N metabolism.

  18. No rosetta stone for a sense-antisense origin of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase classes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tom A; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Fares, Mario A

    2009-02-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are crucial enzymes that join amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, thereby implementing the genetic code. These enzymes fall into two unrelated structural classes whose evolution has not been explained. The leading hypothesis, proposed by Rodin and Ohno, is that the two classes originated as a pair of sense-antisense genes encoded on opposite strands of a single DNA molecule. This unusual idea obtained its main support from reports of a "Rosetta stone": a locus where genes for heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and an Nicotinamide adenine dinulecotide-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH), which are structurally homologous to the two classes of aaRS, overlap extensively on complementary DNA strands. This remarkable locus was first characterized in the oomycete Achlya klebsiana and has since been reported in many other species. Here we present evidence that the open reading frames on the antisense strand of HSP70 genes are spurious, and we identify a more probable candidate for the gene encoding the oomycete NAD-GDH enzyme. These results cast extensive doubt on the Rosetta Stone argument.

  19. Acyl-CoA synthetase 1 deficiency alters cardiolipin species and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Martin, Sarah A.; Katunga, Lalage; Cooper, Daniel E.; Anderson, Ethan J.; Murphy, Robert C.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) contributes more than 90% of total cardiac ACSL activity, but its role in phospholipid synthesis has not been determined. Mice with an inducible knockout of ACSL1 (Acsl1T−/−) have impaired cardiac fatty acid oxidation and rely on glucose for ATP production. Because ACSL1 exhibited a strong substrate preference for linoleate, we investigated the composition of heart phospholipids. Acsl1T−/− hearts contained 83% less tetralinoleoyl-cardiolipin (CL), the major form present in control hearts. A stable knockdown of ACSL1 in H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes resulted in low incorporation of linoleate into CL and in diminished incorporation of palmitate and oleate into other phospholipids. Overexpression of ACSL1 in H9c2 and HEK-293 cells increased incorporation of linoleate into CL and other phospholipids. To determine whether increasing the content of linoleate in CL would improve mitochondrial respiratory function in Acsl1T−/− hearts, control and Acsl1T−/− mice were fed a high-linoleate diet; this diet normalized the amount of tetralinoleoyl-CL but did not improve respiratory function. Thus, ACSL1 is required for the normal composition of several phospholipid species in heart. Although ACSL1 determines the acyl-chain composition of heart CL, a high tetralinoleoyl-CL content may not be required for normal function. PMID:26136511

  20. Evolutionary history of Arabidopsis thaliana aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dual-targeted proteins.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Marcelo M; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl-transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetases (aaRS) are key players in translation and act early in protein synthesis by mediating the attachment of amino acids to their cognate tRNA molecules. In plants, protein synthesis may occur in three subcellular compartments (cytosol, mitochondria, and chloroplasts), which requires multiple versions of the protein to be correctly delivered to its proper destination. The organellar aaRS are nuclear encoded and equipped with targeting information at the N-terminal sequence, which enables them to be specifically translocated to their final location. Most of the aaRS families present organellar proteins that are dual targeted to mitochondria and chloroplasts. Here, we examine the dual targeting behavior of aaRS from an evolutionary perspective. Our results show that Arabidopsis thaliana aaRS sequences are a result of a horizontal gene transfer event from bacteria. However, there is no evident bias indicating one single ancestor (Cyanobacteria or Proteobacteria). The dual-targeted aaRS phylogenetic relationship was characterized into two different categories (paralogs and homologs) depending on the state recovered for both dual-targeted and cytosolic proteins. Taken together, our results suggest that the dual-targeted condition is a gain-of-function derived from gene duplication. Selection may have maintained the original function in at least one of the copies as the additional copies diverged.

  1. Carbamoyl Phosphate Synthetase, Ornithine Transcarbamylase, and Aspartate Transcarbamylase Activities in the Pea Ovary 1

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-España, Antonio; Carbonell, Juan; Rubio, Vicente

    1989-01-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS), ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC), and aspartate transcarbamylase (ATC) were assayed in extracts from unpollinated ovaries of Pisum sativum L. CPS and OTC activities were, per milligram protein, the highest reported in a plant tissue, representing an estimated 0.1% of the protein in the ovary. The OTC/CPS and ATC/CPS ratios were about 100 and 0.5, respectively, indicating that most of the carbamoyl phosphate is used for arginine synthesis. The weight, protein content, and CPS, OTC, and ATC activities per ovary were determined during the senescence of the ovary and also during fruit set induced by treatment with gibberellic acid (GA3). In the nontreated ovary the weight and the protein first increased and then decreased dramatically, but the decrease in protein took place much earlier. In the GA3-treated ovaries the increase in weight was considerably greater than the increase in the protein. Whether or not the ovaries were treated with GA3, CPS, OTC, and ATC activities closely followed the changes in protein, and thus their ratios and specific activities remained essentially constant. It appears that treatment with GA3 increases the amount of protein and enzymic activities by preventing a large increase in the rate of protein degradation. In addition, the effects of acetylglutamate, ornithine, and UMP on CPS activity were studied. The pea enzyme exhibits regulatory properties intermediate between those of Escherichia coli and the ureotelic liver enzymes. PMID:16666966

  2. Peripheral neuropathy via mutant tRNA synthetases: Inhibition of protein translation provides a possible explanation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that inhibition of protein translation may be a common pathogenic mechanism for peripheral neuropathy associated with mutant tRNA synthetases (aaRSs). aaRSs are enzymes that ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNA, thus catalyzing the first step of translation. Dominant mutations in five distinct aaRSs cause Charcot‐Marie‐Tooth (CMT) peripheral neuropathy, characterized by length‐dependent degeneration of peripheral motor and sensory axons. Surprisingly, loss of aminoacylation activity is not required for mutant aaRSs to cause CMT. Rather, at least for some mutations, a toxic‐gain‐of‐function mechanism underlies CMT‐aaRS. Interestingly, several mutations in two distinct aaRSs were recently shown to inhibit global protein translation in Drosophila models of CMT‐aaRS, by a mechanism independent of aminoacylation, suggesting inhibition of translation as a common pathogenic mechanism. Future research aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the translation defect induced by CMT‐mutant aaRSs should provide novel insight into the molecular pathogenesis of these incurable diseases. PMID:27352040

  3. Glutamine Synthetase activity fuels nucleotide biosynthesis and supports growth of glutamine-restricted glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Tardito, Saverio; Oudin, Anaïs; Ahmed, Shafiq U.; Fack, Fred; Keunen, Olivier; Zheng, Liang; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Øystein; Weinstock, Adam; Wagner, Allon; Lindsay, Susan L.; Hock, Andreas K.; Barnett, Susan C.; Ruppin, Eytan; Mørkve, Svein Harald; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Chalmers, Anthony J.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P.; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    L-Glutamine (Gln) functions physiologically to balance tissue requirements of carbon and nitrogen. It has been proposed that in cancer cells undergoing aerobic glycolysis, accelerated anabolism is sustained by Gln-derived carbons, which replenish the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). However, it is shown here that in glioblastoma (GBM) cells, almost half of the Gln-derived glutamate (Glu) is secreted and does not enter the TCA cycle and, that inhibiting glutaminolysis does not affect proliferation. Moreover, Gln-starved cells are not rescued by TCA cycle replenishment. Instead, the conversion of Glu to Gln by Glutamine Synthetase (GS) (cataplerosis) confers Gln prototrophy, and fuels de novo purine biosynthesis. In both orthotopic GBM models and in patients, 13C-glucose tracing showed that GS produces Gln from TCA cycle-derived carbons. Finally, while it is contributed only marginally by the circulation, the Gln required for the growth of GBM tumours is either autonomously synthesized by GS-positive glioma cells, or supplied by astrocytes. PMID:26595383

  4. Regulation of a glutamyl-tRNA synthetase by the heme status

    PubMed Central

    Levicán, Gloria; Katz, Assaf; de Armas, Merly; Núñez, Harold; Orellana, Omar

    2007-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA (Glu-tRNA), formed by Glu-tRNA synthetase (GluRS), is a substrate for protein biosynthesis and tetrapyrrole formation by the C5 pathway. In this route Glu-tRNA is transformed to δ-aminolevulinic acid, the universal precursor of tetrapyrroles (e.g., heme and chlorophyll) by the action of Glu-tRNA reductase (GluTR) and glutamate semialdehyde aminotransferase. GluTR is a target of feedback regulation by heme. In Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, an acidophilic bacterium that expresses two GluRSs (GluRS1 and GluRS2) with different tRNA specificity, the intracellular heme level varies depending on growth conditions. Under high heme requirement for respiration increased levels of GluRS and GluTR are observed. Strikingly, when intracellular heme is in excess, the cells respond by a dramatic decrease of GluRS activity and the level of GluTR. The recombinant GluRS1 enzyme is inhibited in vitro by hemin, but NADPH restores its activity. These results suggest that GluRS plays a major role in regulating the cellular level of heme. PMID:17360620

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6322 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  6. In vitro characterization of the NAD+ synthetase NadE1 from Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    PubMed

    Laskoski, Kerly; Santos, Adrian R S; Bonatto, Ana C; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Huergo, Luciano F

    2016-05-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthetase enzyme (NadE) catalyzes the amination of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD) to form NAD(+). This reaction represents the last step in the majority of the NAD(+) biosynthetic routes described to date. NadE enzymes typically use either glutamine or ammonium as amine nitrogen donor, and the reaction is energetically driven by ATP hydrolysis. Given the key role of NAD(+) in bacterial metabolism, NadE has attracted considerable interest as a potential target for the development of novel antibiotics. The plant-associative nitrogen-fixing bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae encodes two putative NadE, namely nadE1 and nadE2. The nadE1 gene is linked to glnB encoding the signal transduction protein GlnB. Here we report the purification and in vitro characterization of H. seropedicae NadE1. Gel filtration chromatography analysis suggests that NadE1 is an octamer. The NadE1 activity was assayed in vitro, and the Michaelis-Menten constants for substrates NaAD, ATP, glutamine and ammonium were determined. Enzyme kinetic and in vitro substrate competition assays indicate that H. seropedicae NadE1 uses glutamine as a preferential nitrogen donor.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, V. I. Abramchik, Yu. A. Zhukhlistova, N. E. Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6{sub 3}22 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  8. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats

    PubMed Central

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Simonsen, Mette; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Sørensen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine, and aspartate and incorporation of 15NH4+ into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation of 15NH4+ into glutamine in all tissues. It did not affect alanine concentrations in any of the tissues but plasma alanine concentration increased; incorporation of 15NH4+ into alanine was increased in brain in sham and BDL rats and in kidney in sham rats. It inhibited GS in all tissues examined but only in brain was an increased incorporation of 15N-ammonia into alanine observed. Liver and kidney were important for metabolizing blood-borne ammonia. PMID:24346692

  9. Deletion of Type I glutamine synthetase deregulates nitrogen metabolism and increases ethanol production in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Rydzak, Thomas; Garcia, David; Stevenson, David M.; ...

    2017-05-01

    Clostridium thermocellum rapidly deconstructs cellulose and ferments resulting hydrolysis products into ethanol and other products, and is thus a promising platform organism for the development of cellulosic biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. And while recent metabolic engineering strategies have targeted eliminating canonical fermentation products (acetate, lactate, formate, and H2), C. thermocellum also secretes amino acids, which has limited ethanol yields in engineered strains to approximately 70% of the theoretical maximum. To decrease amino acid secretion, we attempted to reduce ammonium assimilation by deleting the Type I glutamine synthetase (glnA) in C. thermocellum. Deletion of glnA reduced levels of secreted valinemore » and total amino acids by 53% and 44% respectively, and increased ethanol yields by 53%. RNA-seq analysis revealed that genes encoding the RNF-complex were more highly expressed in ΔglnA and may have a role in improving NADH-availability for ethanol production. While a significant up-regulation of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation and urea uptake suggested that deletion of glnA induces a nitrogen starvation response, metabolomic analysis showed an increase in intracellular glutamine and α-ketoglutarate levels indicative of nitrogen-rich conditions. Here, we propose that deletion of glnA causes deregulation of nitrogen metabolism, leading to overexpression of nitrogen metabolism genes and, in turn, elevated glutamine/α-ketoglutarate levels. Here we demonstrate that perturbation of nitrogen assimilation is a promising strategy to redirect flux from the production of nitrogenous compounds toward biofuels in C. thermocellum.« less

  10. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of human holocarboxylase synthetase, a gene responsible for biotin dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Aoki, Y.; Ishida, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) catalyzes biotin incorporation into various carboxylases that require biotin as a prosthetic group. They are acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid synthesis; pyruvate carboxylase, a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis; propionyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase, enzymes involved in amino acid catabolism. HCS is therefore involved in various metabolic processes and is a key enzyme for biotin utilization by mammalian cells. Deficiency of HCS in man is known to cause biotin-responsive multiple carboxylase deficiency. Isolation of cDNA clones for the enzyme is essential to understand HCS and its deficiency at the molecular level. We purified bovine liver HCS and sequenced its proteolytic peptides. Degenerative oligonucleotide primers were synthesized from the two peptide sequences and used to amplify a putative HCS cDNA fragment from human liver by PCR. Using the amplified DNA fragment as a probe, we screened {lambda}gt10 human liver cDNA library and isolated 12 positive clones. The isolated cDNAs encoded a protein of 726 amino acids with molecular mass of 80,759. The protein contained several sequences identical or similar to those of peptides derived from the bovine liver HCS. The predicted protein had a homologous region with BirA which acts as both a biotin-[acetyl-CoA-carboxylase] ligase and a biotin repressor in E. coli, suggesting a functional relationship between the two proteins. We expressed the protein using pET3 a vector in E. coli (BL21 strain) and raised antiserum against the expressed protein. The antiserum immunoprecipitated HCS activities of human lymphoblasts and bovine liver. A one-base deletion and a missense mutation were found in cells from siblings with HCS deficiency. The human HCS gene was assigned to chromosome 21, region 21q22.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis.