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Sample records for cms underground experimental

  1. Underground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vrchota, Janet

    1974-01-01

    At a time when the future of New York's subway system looked bleak, new underground zoning legislation (the first ever) has been enacted. This new law requires buildings constructed near a subway station to provide transit easement space to allow public access to the subway through the building property. (MA)

  2. Experimental transmission of cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Fritsvold, C; Kongtorp, R T; Taksdal, T; Ørpetveit, I; Heum, M; Poppe, T T

    2009-12-03

    Cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) is a disease of unknown aetiology, having significant economic impact as it primarily affects large, farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. in seawater, close to harvest. In the present study, we have demonstrated that CMS is a transmissible disease under experimental conditions. Histopathological lesions consistent with CMS were induced in Atlantic salmon post-smolts after injection of tissue homogenate from farmed fish diagnosed with CMS. Six weeks post-injection (p.i.), experimental fish started developing focal to multi-focal lesions in the atrial endo- and myocardium, with subsequent progression to the ventricle. This proceeded into severe endocarditis and subsequent myocarditis with mononuclear cell infiltration of the atrium and, to a lesser degree, the spongy layer of the ventricle. These lesions were consistent with histopathological findings in field outbreaks of CMS. From Week 33 p.i., lesions also appeared in the compact myocardium, with focal epicarditis adjacent to focal myocardial lesions. In conclusion, these results indicate that CMS has an infectious aetiology and should be treated as a potentially contagious disease.

  3. Making of the underground scientific experimental programme at the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory, North Eastern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delay, Jacques; Vinsot, Agnès; Krieguer, Jean-Marie; Rebours, Hervé; Armand, Gilles

    In November 1999 Andra began building an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) on the border of the Meuse and Haute-Marne departments in eastern France. The research activities of the URL are dedicated to study the feasibility of reversible, deep geological disposal of high-activity, long-lived radioactive wastes in an argillaceous host rock. The Laboratory consists of two shafts, an experimental drift at 445 m depth and a set of technical and experimental drifts at the main level at 490 m depth. The main objective of the research is to characterize the confining properties of the argillaceous rock through in situ hydrogeological tests, chemical measurements and diffusion experiments. In order to achieve this goal, a fundamental understanding of the geoscientific properties and processes that govern geological isolation in clay-rich rocks has been acquired. This understanding includes both the host rocks at the laboratory site and the regional geological context. After establishing the geological conditions, the underground research programme had to demonstrate that the construction and operation of a geological disposal will not introduce pathways for waste migration. Thus, the construction of the laboratory itself serves a research purpose through the monitoring of excavation effects and the optimization of construction technology. These studies are primarily geomechanical in nature, though chemical and hydrogeological coupling also have important roles. In order to achieve the scientific objectives of this project in the underground drifts, a specific methodology has been applied for carrying out the experimental programme conducted concurrently with the construction of the shafts and drifts. This methodology includes technological as well as organizational aspects and a systematic use of feedback from other laboratories abroad and every scientific zone of the URL already installed. This methodology was first applied to set up a multi-purpose experimental area

  4. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON DIFFICULTY OF EVACUATION FROM UNDERGROUND SPACES UNDER INUNDATED SITUATIONS USING REAL SCALE MODELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Yasuyuki; Ishigaki, Taisuke; Toda, Keiichi; Nakagawa, Hajime

    Many urbanized cities in Japan are located in alluvial plains, and the vulnerability of urbanized areas to flood disaster is highlighted by flood attacks due to heavy rain fall or typhoons. Underground spaces located in the urbanized area are flood-prone areas, and the intrusion of flood watar into underground space inflicted severe damages on urban functions and infrastructures. In a similar way, low-lying areas like "bowl-shaped" depression and underpasses under highway and railroad bridges are also prone to floods. The underpasses are common sites of accidents of submerged vehicles, and severe damage including human damage occasionally occurs under flooding conditions. To reduce the damage due to inundation in underground space, needless to say, early evacuation is one of the most important countermeasures. This paper shows some experimental results of evacuation tests from underground spaces under inundated situations. The difficulities of the evacuation from underground space has been investigated by using real scale models (door, staircase and vehicle), and the limit for safety evacuation is discussed. From the results, it is found that water depth of 0.3 - 0.4m would be a critical situation for the evacuation from underground space through staircases and door and that 0.7 - 0.8m deep on the ground would be also a critical situation for safety evacuation though the doors of the vehicle. These criteria have some possibility to vary according to different inundated situations, and they are also influenced by the individual variation like the difference of physical strength. This means that these criteria requires cautious stance to use although they show a sort of an index of the limitation for saftty evacuation from underground space.

  5. Evaluation used underground water drain pipes of experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, T.; Ohara, J.; Fujisawa, K.; Nakano, R.; Tabata, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The landslide measures in Japan, using the method of landslide reduce groundwater. The method is to drill a horizontal boring. Typically, this construction method 5mm diameter hole was opened in four directions was opened by drilling a 40mm VP pipe made of 90mm is inserted into the hole. Currently, the pipe has been used experimentally in the field. First, in this study, we have constructed a model to observe the water flowing through the pipe. Water gathering and water leakage obtained from two experiments using the model. Drainage performance has been evaluated from the results.

  6. [Experimental research on in-situ auto-monitoring for underground sewage pipeline leakage].

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Jia, Yong-Gang; Fu, Teng-Fei; Liu, Xiao-Lei; Zhao, Zhan-Kun

    2012-12-01

    The leakage of underground sewage pipes may seriously affect the soil and the environment of groundwater. In this paper, an in-situ automatic monitoring device on basis of multi-electrode resistivity method was developed for the leakage of underground sewage pipelines, and it was validated by a simulated experiment in laboratory that the feasibility of the new device is feasible for real-time monitoring the leakage of underground sewage pipelines at many different groundwater levels. The experimental results indicated that small leakage of sewage pipelines could be rapidly detected by the developed monitoring device when the pipeline was located in the vadose zone. The leakage could also be monitored in a prompt manner when the pipeline was located near the groundwater level, and the extent of pollutant leakage could be speculated with the gradient change in resistivity of the soil layer above the pipeline. When the pipeline was located below the groundwater level, the device could only monitor the leakage if it reached a certain concentration to produce notable changes in resistivity, because of the rapid mixing and diffusion of the pollutant in groundwater. The device set up in this paper was found capable of real-time automatic monitoring the leakage of underground sewage pipelines buried in different depths and groundwater levels.

  7. The spectrum of cosmic ray muons obtained with 100-ton scintillation detector underground and the analysis of recent experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalchukov, F. F.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Malgin, A. S.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Zatsepin, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    The vertical muon spectrum up to 15 TeV obtained with the underground installation is presented. Recent experimental data dealing with horizontal and vertical cosmic ray muon spectra are analyzed and discussed.

  8. Survey of existing underground openings for in-situ experimental facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenberg, H.; Graf, A.; Strisower, B.; Korbin, G.

    1981-07-01

    In an earlier project, a literature search identified 60 underground openings in crystalline rock capable of providing access for an in-situ experimental facility to develop geochemical and hydrological techniques for evaluating sites for radioactive waste isolation. As part of the current project, discussions with state geologists, owners, and operators narrowed the original group to 14. Three additional sites in volcanic rock and one site in granite were also identified. Site visits and application of technical criteria, including the geologic and hydrologic settings and depth, extent of the rock unit, condition, and accessibility of underground workings, determined four primary candidate sites: the Helms Pumped Storage Project in grandiodorite of the Sierra Nevada, California; the Tungsten Queen Mine in Precambrian granodiorite of the North Carolina Piedmont; the Mount Hope Mine in Precambrian granite and gneiss of northern New Jersey; and the Minnamax Project in the Duluth gabbro complex of northern Minnesota.

  9. Particle Shape Effect on Macroscopic Behaviour of Underground Structures: Numerical and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szarf, Krzysztof; Combe, Gael; Villard, Pascal

    2015-02-01

    The mechanical performance of underground flexible structures such as buried pipes or culverts made of plastics depend not only on the properties of the structure, but also on the material surrounding it. Flexible drains can deflect by 30% with the joints staying tight, or even invert. Large deformations of the structure are difficult to model in the framework of Finite Element Method, but straightforward in Discrete Element Methods. Moreover, Discrete Element approach is able to provide information about the grain-grain and grain-structure interactions at the microscale. This paper presents numerical and experimental investigations of flexible buried pipe behaviour with focus placed on load transfer above the buried structure. Numerical modeling was able to reproduce the experimental results. Load repartition was observed, being affected by a number of factors such as particle shape, pipe friction and pipe stiffness.

  10. Detectability of underground electrical cables junction with a ground penetrating radar: electromagnetic simulation and experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; serhir, mohammed; kameni, abelin; lambert, marc; pichon, lionel

    2016-04-01

    For a company like Electricity De France (EDF), being able to detect accurately using non-destructive methods the position of the buried junction between two underground cables is a crucial issue. The junction is the linking part where most maintenance operations are carried out. The challenge of this work is to conduct a feasibility study to confirm or deny the relevance of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to detect these buried junctions in their actual environment against clutter. Indeed, the cables are buried in inhomogeneous medium at around 80cm deep. To do this, the study is conducted in a numerical environment. We use the 3D simulation software CST MWS to model a GPR scenario. In this simulation, we place the already optimized bowtie antennas operating in the frequency band [0.5 GHz - 3 GHz] in front of wet soil (dispersive) and dry soil where the underground cable is placed at 80cm deep. We collect the amplitude and phase of the reflected waves in order to detect the contrast provoked by the geometric dimensions variation of the cable [1] (diameter of the cable is 48mm and the diameter of the junction 74mm). The use of an ultra-wideband antenna is necessary to reconcile resolution and penetration of electromagnetic waves in the medium to be characterized. We focus on the performance of the GPR method according to the characteristics of the surrounding medium in which the electric cables are buried, the polarization of the Tx and Rx antennas. The experimental measurement collected in the EDF site will be presented. The measured data are processed using the clutter reduction method based on digital filtering [2]. We aim at showing that using the developed bowtie antennas that the GPR technique is well adapted for the cable junction localization even in cluttered environment. References [1] D. J. Daniels, "Surface-Penetrating Radar", London, IEE 1996. [2] Potin, D.; Duflos, E.; Vanheeghe, P., "Landmines Ground-Penetrating Radar Signal Enhancement by Digital

  11. Response Characteristics and Experimental Study of Underground Magnetic Resonance Sounding Using a Small-Coil Sensor.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shengwu; Ma, Zhongjun; Jiang, Chuandong; Lin, Jun; Xue, Yiguo; Shang, Xinlei; Li, Zhiqiang

    2017-09-15

    Due to its unique sensitivity to hydrogen protons, magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) is the only geophysical method that directly detects water and can provide nondestructive information on subsurface aquifer properties. The relationship between the surface MRS signal and the location and characteristics of aquifers using large-coil (typically 50-150 m) sensors has been discussed based on forward modelling and experiments. However, few researchers have studied underground MRS using a small-coil sensor. In this paper, a parametric study and a large-scale physical model test were conducted to shed light on the critical response characteristics of underground MRS using a small-coil sensor. The effects of the size and number of turns of the transmitter coil and receiver coil, the geomagnetic declination, the geomagnetic inclination, and the position, thickness, and water content of a water-bearing structure on the performance of the underground MRS were studied based on numerical simulations. Furthermore, we derived the kernel function and underground MRS signal curves for a water-bearing structure model based on the simulations. Finally, a large-scale physical model test on underground MRS using a small-coil sensor was performed using a physical test system for geological prediction of tunnels at Shandong University. The results show that the inversion results of the physical model test were in good agreement with the physical prototype results. Using both numerical modeling and physical model tests, this study showed that underground MRS using a small-coil sensor can be used to predict water-bearing structures in underground engineering.

  12. Experimental study of underground exploration by auger boring on a Mars rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Masaki; Saitou, Kenji; Kaneko, Yutaka; Kawashima, Nobuki

    Results are presented of a system study conducted on the possibility of exploring Mars using a Mars rover; emphasis is focused on the underground exploration of Mars by an auger boring machine. An engineering model was constructed, and a boring test was conducted using simulated Martian soil. It is shown that it is possible to drill soil composed of dust, sand, and gravel measuring 0.007-16 mm in diameter to a depth of 1.5 m. The diffusion of the collected sample can be confined to less than a thickness of 20 cm.

  13. High energy cosmic ray physics with underground muons in MACRO. I. Analysis methods and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Castellano, M.; De Cataldo, G.; De Marzo, C.; Erriquez, O.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Giglietto, N.; Guarnaccia, P.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Montaruli, T.; Raino, A.; Spinelli, P.; Cecchini, S.; Dekhissi, H.; Fantini, R.; Giacomelli, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Margiotta-Neri, A.; Patrizii, L.; Popa, V.; Serra-Lugaresi, P.; Spurio, M.; Togo, V.; Hong, J.T.; Kearns, E.; Okada, C.; Orth, C.; Stone, J.L.; Sulak, L.R.; Barish, B.C.; Goretti, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Michael, D.G.; Nolty, R.; Peck, C.W.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C.W.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Battistoni, G.; Bilokon, H.; Bloise, C.; Carboni, M.; Chiarella, V.; Forti, C.; Iarocci, E.; Marini, A.; Patera, V.; Ronga, F.; Satta, L.; Sciubba, A.; Spinetti, M.; Valente, V.; Antolini, R.; Bosio, T.; Di Credico, A.; Grillo, A.; Gustavino, C.; Mikheyev, S.; Parlati, S.; Reynoldson, J.; Scapparone, E.; Bower, C.; Habig, A.; Hawthorne, A.; Heinz, R.; Miller, L.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; De Mitri, I.; Monacelli, P.; Bernardini, P.; Mancarella, G.; Martello, D.; Palamara, O.; Petrera, S.; Pistilli, P.; Ricciardi, M.; Surdo, A.; Baker, R.; and others

    1997-08-01

    In this paper, the first of a two-part work, we present the reconstruction and measurement of muon events detected underground by the MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso (E{sub {mu}}{ge} 1.3 TeV in atmosphere). The main aim of this work is to discuss the muon multiplicity distribution as measured in the detector. The data sample analyzed consists of 4.4{times}10{sup 6} muon events, of which {approximately} 263000 are multiple muons, corresponding to a total live time of 5850 h. In this sample, the observed multiplicities extend above N{sub {mu}}=35, with intermuon separations up to 50 m and beyond. Additional complementing measurements, such as the inclusive muon flux, the angular distribution, and the muon separation distribution (decoherence), are also included. The physical interpretation of the results presented here is reported in the following companion paper. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Chemometric Study of the Ex Situ Underground Coal Gasification Wastewater Experimental Data.

    PubMed

    Smoliński, Adam; Stańczyk, Krzysztof; Kapusta, Krzysztof; Howaniec, Natalia

    2012-11-01

    The main goal of the study was the analysis of the parameters of wastewater generated during the ex situ underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments on lignite from Belchatow, and hard coal from Ziemowit and Bobrek coal mines, simulated in the ex situ reactor. The UCG wastewater may pose a potential threat to the groundwater since it contains high concentrations of inorganic (i.e., ammonia nitrogen, nitrites, chlorides, free and bound cyanides, sulfates and trace elements: As, B, Cr, Zn, Al, Cd, Co, Mn, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Hg, Se, Ti, Fe) and organic (i.e., phenolics, benzene and their alkyl derivatives, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) contaminants. The principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis enabled to effectively explore the similarities and dissimilarities between the samples generated in lignite and hard coal oxygen gasification process in terms of the amounts and concentrations of particular components. The total amount of wastewater produced in lignite gasification process was higher than the amount generated in hard coal gasification experiments. The lignite gasification wastewater was also characterized by the highest contents of acenaphthene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene, whereas hard coal gasification wastewater was characterized by relatively higher concentrations of nitrites, As, Cr, Cu, benzene, toluene, xylene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene.

  15. Numerical and experimental study of strata behavior and land subsidence in an underground coal gasification project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirdesai, N. N.; Singh, R.; Singh, T. N.; Ranjith, P. G.

    2015-11-01

    Underground Coal Gasification, with enhanced knowledge of hydrogeological, geomechanical and environmental aspects, can be an alternative technique to exploit the existing unmineable reserves of coal. During the gasification process, petro-physical and geomechanical properties undergo a drastic change due to heating to elevated temperatures. These changes, caused due to the thermal anisotropy of various minerals, result in the generation of thermal stresses; thereby developing new fracture pattern. These fractures cause the overhead rock strata to cave and fill the gasification chamber thereby causing subsidence. The degree of subsidence, change in fluid transport and geomechanical properties of the rock strata, in and around the subsidence zone, can affect the groundwater flow. This study aims to predict the thermo-geomechanical response of the strata during UCG. Petro-physical and geomechanical properties are incorporated in the numerical modelling software COMSOL Multiphysics and an analytical strength model is developed to validate and further study the mechanical response and heat conduction of the host rock around the gasification chamber. Once the problems are investigated and solved, the enhanced efficiency and the economic exploitation of gasification process would help meet country's energy demand.

  16. An experimental scale-model study of seismic response of an underground opening in jointed rock mass

    SciTech Connect

    Kana, D.D.; Fox, D.J.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes an experimental investigation conducted by the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) to (i) obtain a better understanding of the seismic response of an underground opening in a highly-fractured and jointed rock mass and (ii) generate a data set that can be used to evaluate the capabilities (analytical methods) to calculate such response. This report describes the design and implementation of simulated seismic experiments and results for a 1/15 scale model of a jointed rock mass with a circular tunnel in the middle. The discussion on the design of the scale model includes a description of the associated similitude theory, physical design rationale, model material development, preliminary analytical evaluation, instrumentation design and calibration, and model assembly and pretest procedures. The thrust of this discussion is intended to provide the information necessary to understand the experimental setup and to provide the background necessary to understand the experimental results. The discussion on the experimental procedures and results includes the seismic input test procedures, test runs, and measured excitation and response time histories. The closure of the tunnel due to various levels of seismic activity is presented. A threshold level of seismic input amplitude was required before significant rock mass motion occurred. The experiment, though designed as a two-dimensional representation of a rock mass, behaved in a somewhat three-dimensional manner, which will have an effect on subsequent analytical model comparison.

  17. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of Fracture Patterns and Particle Motion Generated by Underground Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaly, J. M.; Rosakis, A.; Sammis, C. G.; Bhat, H.

    2013-12-01

    Fracture patterns and local particle velocities produced by point explosions in very brittle 'candy glass' plates are compared to those numerically predicted using a dynamic micro-mechanical damage mechanics model, developed by Bhat, Rosakis and Sammis, J. Appl. Mech., 2012. Empirically measured material properties for candy glass facilitate direct comparison between the numerical simulation and experimental results. The evolution of fracture damage produced in experiments is observed using high-speed digital photography, which also images resultant wave fronts (for both P and S). Local particle velocities are also recorded at up to three points using laser vibrometers. Numerical results for the spatial extent of circumferential and radial cracking, in addition to the growth-rate of individual radial cracks, are representative of experimental observations. Wave reflections from the plate edges are observed in both experiment and numerical simulation to affect the expansion of radial cracks. Numerically predicted wave-forms and arrivals compare well with experimental results observed at select points.

  18. Shielding design of an underground experimental area at point 5 of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS).

    PubMed

    Mueller, Mario J; Stevenson, Graham R

    2005-01-01

    Increasing projected values of the circulating beam intensity in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and decreasing limits to radiation exposure, taken with the increasing non-acceptance of unjustified and unoptimised radiation exposures, have led to the need to re-assess the shielding between the ECX and ECA5 underground experimental areas of the SPS. Twenty years ago, these experimental areas at SPS-Point 5 housed the UA1 experiment, where Carlo Rubbia and his team verified the existence of W and Z bosons. The study reported here describes such a re-assessment based on simulations using the multi-purpose FLUKA radiation transport code. This study concludes that while the main shield which is made of concrete blocks and is 4.8 m thick satisfactorily meets the current design limits even at the highest intensities presently planned for the SPS, dose rates calculated for liaison areas on both sides of the main shield significantly exceed the design limits. Possible ways of improving the shielding situation are discussed.

  19. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of Fracture Patterns Generated by Underground Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, H.; Mihaly, J. M.; Rosakis, A.; Sammis, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    A dynamic micro-mechanical damage mechanics model, developed by Bhat, Rosakis and Sammis, J. Appl. Mech., 2012, is used to simulate two-dimensional explosions in a brittle material. The theoretical patterns of circumferential and radial fractures are quantitatively compared with those produced by point explosions in very brittle "candy glass" plates. In these experiments the evolution of the fracture pattern is monitored using high-speed digital photography, which also images the resultant elastic waves (P and S). Theoretical estimates of the spatial extent of circumferential and radial cracking as well as the propagation speed of the comminution front and the growth-rate of individual radial cracks all compare well with the experimental observations. The wave-forms of the P and S waves, specifically the local particle velocities, are also recorded at selected points using laser vibrometers. Asymmetric fracture patterns caused by a non isotropic pre-stress, the preferred orientation of initial flaws (a rift plane), or a lithostatic gradient lead to the generation of strong S-waves from the otherwise spherically symmetric point source.

  20. Underground Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuhlrott, Rolf

    1986-01-01

    Discussion of underground buildings constructed primarily during last two decades for various reasons (energy conservation, density of environment, preservation of landscape and historic buildings) notes advantages, disadvantages, and psychological and design considerations. Examples of underground libraries, built mainly in United States, are…

  1. Background Underground at WIPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esch, Ernst-Ingo; Hime, A.; Bowles, T. J.

    2001-04-01

    Recent interest to establish a dedicated underground laboratory in the United States prompted an experimental program at to quantify the enviromental backgrounds underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. An outline of this program is provided along with recent experimental data on the cosmic ray muon flux at the 650 meter level of WIPP. The implications of the cosmic ray muon and fast neutron background at WIPP will be discussed in the context of new generation, low background experiments envisioned in the future.

  2. Measurement of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons with the CMS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2010-08-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of positive to negative muon fluxes from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, using data collected by the CMS detector both at ground level and in the underground experimental cavern at the CERN LHC. Muons were detected in the momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The surface flux ratio is measured to be 1.2766 \\pm 0.0032(stat.) \\pm 0.0032 (syst.), independent of the muon momentum, below 100 GeV/c. This is the most precise measurement to date. At higher momenta the data are consistent with an increase of the charge ratio, in agreement with cosmic ray shower models and compatible with previous measurements by deep-underground experiments.

  3. Underground Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadlock, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The movement of groundwater in underground aquifers is an ideal physical example of many important themes in mathematical modeling, ranging from general principles (like Occam's Razor) to specific techniques (such as geometry, linear equations, and the calculus). This article gives a self-contained introduction to groundwater modeling with…

  4. Underground Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadlock, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The movement of groundwater in underground aquifers is an ideal physical example of many important themes in mathematical modeling, ranging from general principles (like Occam's Razor) to specific techniques (such as geometry, linear equations, and the calculus). This article gives a self-contained introduction to groundwater modeling with…

  5. Experimental Plan of the 25Mg(p, γ)26Al Resonance Capture Reaction at Jinping Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. H.; Su, J.; Li, Y. J.; Guo, B.; Yan, S. Q.; Wang, Y. B.; Lian, G.; Zeng, S.; Zhang, Q. W.; He, G. Z.; Gan, L.; Zhou, C.; Liu, W. P.; Li, K. A.; Yu, X. Q.; Tang, X. D.; He, J. J.; Qian, Y. Z.

    The observation of 26Al is an useful tool for γ-ray astronomy and in studies of galactic chemical evolution. The most likely mechanism for 26A1 nucleosynthesis is in the hydrogen burning MgAl cycle, and the 26A1 production from the 25Mg(p, γ)26Al reaction at the important temperature range below T = 0.2 is still not well known. We present a proposal to measure the resonance strength of 58 keV resonance level of the 25Mg(p, γ)26Al reaction, and the effective counting rate is estimated for the direct measurement at Jinping underground laboratory.

  6. CMS-Wave

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-27

    2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CMS -Wave 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Program CMS -Wave CMS -Wave is a two-dimensional spectral wind-wave generation and transformation model that employs a forward-marching, finite...difference method to solve the wave action conservation equation. Capabilities of CMS -Wave include wave shoaling, refraction, diffraction, reflection

  7. CMS-Wave

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-30

    Coastal Inlets Research Program CMS-Wave CMS-Wave is a two-dimensional spectral wind -wave generation and transformation model that employs a forward...estimates. The model can be coupled to the Boussinesq wave model BOUSS-2D for port and harbor applications. CMS-Wave, a phase-averaged spectral wind -wave

  8. Underground coal gasification: Development of theory, laboratory experimentation, interpretation, and correlation with the Hanna field tests: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gunn, R.D.; Krantz, W.B.

    1987-03-01

    The following report is a description of a 7 year effort to develop a theoretical understanding of the underground coal gasification process. The approach used is one of the mathematical model development from known chemical and principles, simplification of the models to isolate important effects, and through validation of models to isolate important effects, and through validation of models with laboratory experiments and field test data. Chapter I contains only introductory material. Chapter II describes the development of two models for reverse combustion: a combustion model and a linearized model for combustion front instability. Both models are required for realistic field predictions. Chapter III contains a discussion of a successful forward gasification model. Chapter IV discusses the spalling-enhanced-drying model is applicable to prediction of cavity growth and subsidence. Chapter VI decribes the correct use of energy and material balances for the analysis of UCG field test data. Chapter VII shows how laboratory experiments were used to validate the models for reverse combustion and forward gasification. It is also shown that laboratory combustion tube experiments can be used to simulate gas compositions expected from field tests. Finally, Chapter VII presents results from a comprehensive economic analysis of UCG involving 1296 separate cases. 37 refs., 49 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Status of CMS and B-physics with CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoigne, Yves; CMS Collaboration

    2000-07-01

    The present status of CMS, one of the major experimental facilities at the future LHC is presented. After a short description of the detector and its constituents, the main physics goals and performances of the experiment (Higgs, Supersymmetry, B-Physics) is presented with emphasis on B-physics. Detailed examples are given on sin2β measurement in B-physics, using the channel Bdo, ( overlineBdo) → {J}/{ψ}K So and tagging strategies are reviewed.

  10. Forward Physics at CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Solano, Ada

    2009-03-23

    A rich program of forward physics, including very low-x QCD dynamics, photon-induced processes, underlying event and energy flow distributions, diffraction in the presence of a hard scale and even the Higgs boson search in central exclusive production, is being studied by the CMS Collaboration, taking advantage of the forward detector instrumentation around the CMS interaction point at the LHC.

  11. Water Underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, I. E. M.

    2014-12-01

    The world's largest accessible source of freshwater is hidden underground. However it remains difficult to estimate its volume, and we still cannot answer the question; will there be enough for everybody? In many places of the world groundwater abstraction is unsustainable: more water is used than refilled, leading to decreasing river discharges and declining groundwater levels. It is predicted that for many regions in the world unsustainable water use will increase in the coming decades, due to rising human water use under a changing climate. It would not take long before water shortage causes widespread droughts and the first water war begins. Improving our knowledge about our hidden water is the first step to prevent such large water conflicts. The world's largest aquifers are mapped, but these maps do not mention how much water these aquifers contain or how fast water levels decline. If we can add thickness and geohydrological information to these aquifer maps, we can estimate how much water is stored and its flow direction. Also, data on groundwater age and how fast the aquifer is refilled is needed to predict the impact of human water use and climate change on the groundwater resource. Ultimately, if we can provide this knowledge water conflicts will focus more on a fair distribution instead of absolute amounts of water.

  12. Water underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Inge

    2015-04-01

    The world's largest assessable source of freshwater is hidden underground, but we do not know what is happening to it yet. In many places of the world groundwater is abstracted at unsustainable rates: more water is used than being recharged, leading to decreasing river discharges and declining groundwater levels. It is predicted that for many regions of the world unsustainable water use will increase, due to increasing human water use under changing climate. It would not be long before shortage causes widespread droughts and the first water war begins. Improving our knowledge about our hidden water is the first step to stop this. The world largest aquifers are mapped, but these maps do not mention how much water they contain or how fast water levels decline. If we can add a third dimension to the aquifer maps, so a thickness, and add geohydrological information we can estimate how much water is stored. Also data on groundwater age and how fast it is refilled is needed to predict the impact of human water use and climate change on the groundwater resource.

  13. CMS workload management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, D.; CMS Collaboration

    2007-10-01

    From september 2007 the LHC accelerator will start its activity and CMS, one of the four experiments, will begin to take data. The CMS computing model is based on the the Grid paradigm where data is deployed and accessed on a number of geographically distributed computing centers. In addition to real data events, a large number of simulated ones will be produced in a similar, distributed manner. Both real and simulated data will be analyzed by physicist, at an expected rate of 100000 jobs per day submitted to the Grid infrastructure. In order to reach these goals, CMS is developing two tools for the workload management (plus a set of services): ProdAgent and CRAB. The ProdAgent deals with MonteCarlo production system: it creates and configures jobs, interacts with the Framework, merges outputs to a reasonable filesize and publishes the simulated data back into CMS data bookkeeping and data location services. CRAB (Cms Remote Analysis Builder) is the tool deployed ad hoc by CMS to access those remote data. CRAB allows a generic user, without specific knowledge of the Grid infrastructure, to access data and perform its analysis as simply as in a local environment. CRAB takes care to interact with all Data Management services, from data discovery and location to output file management. An overview of the current implementation of the components of the CMS workload management is presented in this work.

  14. CMS Analysis School Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, S.; Shipsey, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Bloom, K.; Chan, Kai-Feng; D'Hondt, J.; Klima, B.; Narain, M.; Palla, F.; Rolandi, G.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.

    2014-06-01

    To impart hands-on training in physics analysis, CMS experiment initiated the concept of CMS Data Analysis School (CMSDAS). It was born over three years ago at the LPC (LHC Physics Centre), Fermilab and is based on earlier workshops held at the LPC and CLEO Experiment. As CMS transitioned from construction to the data taking mode, the nature of earlier training also evolved to include more of analysis tools, software tutorials and physics analysis. This effort epitomized as CMSDAS has proven to be a key for the new and young physicists to jump start and contribute to the physics goals of CMS by looking for new physics with the collision data. With over 400 physicists trained in six CMSDAS around the globe, CMS is trying to engage the collaboration in its discovery potential and maximize physics output. As a bigger goal, CMS is striving to nurture and increase engagement of the myriad talents, in the development of physics, service, upgrade, education of those new to CMS and the career development of younger members. An extension of the concept to the dedicated software and hardware schools is also planned, keeping in mind the ensuing upgrade phase.

  15. CMS Analysis School Model

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, S.; Shipsey, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Bloom, K.; Chan, Kai-Feng; D'Hondt, J.; Klima, B.; Narain, M.; Palla, F.; Rolandi, G.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.

    2014-01-01

    To impart hands-on training in physics analysis, CMS experiment initiated the concept of CMS Data Analysis School (CMSDAS). It was born over three years ago at the LPC (LHC Physics Centre), Fermilab and is based on earlier workshops held at the LPC and CLEO Experiment. As CMS transitioned from construction to the data taking mode, the nature of earlier training also evolved to include more of analysis tools, software tutorials and physics analysis. This effort epitomized as CMSDAS has proven to be a key for the new and young physicists to jump start and contribute to the physics goals of CMS by looking for new physics with the collision data. With over 400 physicists trained in six CMSDAS around the globe, CMS is trying to engage the collaboration in its discovery potential and maximize physics output. As a bigger goal, CMS is striving to nurture and increase engagement of the myriad talents, in the development of physics, service, upgrade, education of those new to CMS and the career development of younger members. An extension of the concept to the dedicated software and hardware schools is also planned, keeping in mind the ensuing upgrade phase.

  16. CMS tracker visualization tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennea, M. S.; Osborne, I.; Regano, A.; Zito, G.

    2005-08-01

    This document will review the design considerations, implementations and performance of the CMS Tracker Visualization tools. In view of the great complexity of this sub-detector (more than 50 millions channels organized in 16540 modules each one of these being a complete detector), the standard CMS visualization tools (IGUANA and IGUANACMS) that provide basic 3D capabilities and integration within CMS framework, respectively, have been complemented with additional 2D graphics objects. Based on the experience acquired using this software to debug and understand both hardware and software during the construction phase, we propose possible future improvements to cope with online monitoring and event analysis during data taking.

  17. CMS RATFOR System Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    CMS RATFOR SYSTEM MANUAL.(U) U 79 S M CHOQUETTE, R J ORGASS AFOSR-79-O021 NCLASSIFIED VPI/SU-TM-79- AFOSR -TR-80-0277 NI MEhLlllllElIIIIIIII...GRADUATE PROGRAM IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA FAtheqsow, AC 20041 (703) 471-4600 CMS RATFOR SYSTEM MANUAL*t Stephen M. Choquette and Richard J. Orgass DTIO...the System Manual for the RATFOR preprocessor on the IBM CMS timesharing system . Included in this paper is a language description of RATPOR, an

  18. CMS Space Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnikova, N.; Huang, C.-H.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Wildish, T.; Zhang, X.

    2014-06-01

    During the first LHC run, CMS stored about one hundred petabytes of data. Storage accounting and monitoring help to meet the challenges of storage management, such as efficient space utilization, fair share between users and groups and resource planning. We present a newly developed CMS space monitoring system based on the storage metadata dumps produced at the sites. The information extracted from the storage dumps is aggregated and uploaded to a central database. A web based data service is provided to retrieve the information for a given time interval and a range of sites, so it can be further aggregated and presented in the desired format. The system has been designed based on the analysis of CMS monitoring requirements and experiences of the other LHC experiments. In this paper, we demonstrate how the existing software components of the CMS data placement system, PhEDEx, have been re-used, dramatically reducing the development effort.

  19. Diffraction with CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Antonio Vilela

    2011-07-15

    The observation of diffraction at LHC with the CMS detector at {radical}(s) = 900 and 2360 GeV is presented, along with a comparison of the data with the predictions of the PYTHIA and PHOJET generators.

  20. CMS Space Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnikova, N.; Huang, C.-H.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Wildish, T.; Zhang, X.

    2014-01-01

    During the first LHC run, CMS stored about one hundred petabytes of data. Storage accounting and monitoring help to meet the challenges of storage management, such as efficient space utilization, fair share between users and groups and resource planning. We present a newly developed CMS space monitoring system based on the storage metadata dumps produced at the sites. The information extracted from the storage dumps is aggregated and uploaded to a central database. A web based data service is provided to retrieve the information for a given time interval and a range of sites, so it can be further aggregated and presented in the desired format. The system has been designed based on the analysis of CMS monitoring requirements and experiences of the other LHC experiments. In this paper, we demonstrate how the existing software components of the CMS data placement system, PhEDEx, have been re-used, dramatically reducing the development effort.

  1. Underground Layout Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    A. Linden

    2003-09-25

    The purpose of this analysis was to develop an underground layout to support the license application (LA) design effort. In addition, the analysis will be used as the technical basis for the underground layout general arrangement drawings.

  2. Hazardous gases and oxygen depletion in a wet paddy pile: an experimental study in a simulating underground rice mill pit, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yenjai, Pornthip; Chaiear, Naesinee; Charerntanyarak, Lertchai; Boonmee, Mallika

    2012-01-01

    During the rice harvesting season in Thailand, large amounts of fresh paddy are sent to rice mills immediately after harvesting due to a lack of proper farm storage space. At certain levels of moisture content, rice grains may generate hazardous gases, which can replace oxygen (O(2)) in the confined spaces of underground rice mill pits. This phenomenon has been observed in a fatal accident in Thailand. Our study aimed to investigate the type of gases and their air concentrations emitted from the paddy piles at different levels of moisture content and duration of piling time. Four levels of moisture content in the paddy piles were investigated, including dry paddy group (< 14% wet basis (wb)), wet paddy groups (22-24, 25-27 and 28-30%wb). Our measurements were conducted in 16 experimental concrete pits 80 × 80 cm wide by 60 cm high. Gases emitted were measured with an infrared spectrophotometer and a multi-gas detector every 12 h for 5 days throughout the experiment. The results revealed high levels of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) (range 5,864-8,419 ppm) in all wet paddy groups, which gradually increased over time. The concentration of carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH(4)), nitromethane (CH(3)NO(2)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) in all wet paddy groups increased with piling time and with moisture content, with ranges of 11-289; 2-8; 36-374; and 4-26 ppm, respectively. The highest levels of moisture content in the paddy piles were in the range 28-30%wb. Nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) concentrations were low in all paddy groups. The percentage of O(2) in the wet paddy groups decreased with piling time and moisture content (from 18.7% to 4.1%). This study suggested that hazardous gases could be emitted in moist paddy piles, and their concentrations could increase with increasing moisture content and piling time period.

  3. Vitrified underground structures

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Mark T.; Buelt, James L.; Stottlemyre, James A.; Tixier, Jr., John S.

    1992-01-01

    A method of making vitrified underground structures in which 1) the vitrification process is started underground, and 2) a thickness dimension is controlled to produce substantially planar vertical and horizontal vitrified underground structures. Structures may be placed around a contaminated waste site to isolate the site or may be used as aquifer dikes.

  4. Analysis environments for CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. D.; Luca, L.; Hegner, B.

    2008-07-01

    The CMS offline software suite uses a layered approach to provide several different environments suitable for a wide range of analysis styles. At the heart of all the environments is the ROOT-based event data model file format. The simplest environment uses 'bare' ROOT to read files directly, without the use of any CMS-specific supporting libraries. This is useful for performing simple checks on a file or plotting simple distributions (such as the momentum distribution of tracks). The second environment supports use of the CMS framework's smart pointers that read data on demand, as well as automatic loading of the libraries holding the object interfaces. This environment fully supports interactive ROOT sessions in either CINT or PyROOT. The third environment combines ROOT's TSelector with the data access API of the full CMS framework, facilitating sharing of code between the ROOT environment and the full framework. The final environment is the full CMS framework that is used for all data production activities as well as full access to all data available on the Grid. By providing a layered approach to analysis environments, physicists can choose the environment that most closely matches their individual work style.

  5. Higgs Physics at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Silvio; CMS Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    The discovery of the Standard Model Higgs boson performed by the CMS and ATLAS collaborations during the LHC Run 1 has been an important success. This document is a short review of the search for the Higgs boson performed by the CMS collaboration during the LHC Run 1 and Run 2. In the first part, after a brief description of the Higgs boson production and decay channels, the Run-1 results are presented emphasizing the possible hints of New Physics. The main part of this document is devoted to the search for the Higgs boson with the 13-TeV data collected by the CMS experiment in 2015 and 2016, including the Standard Model searches as well as the Beyond Standard Model searches, such as the search for additional Higgs bosons and for resonant and non-resonant double Higgs boson production.

  6. Underground laboratory in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Heshengc

    2012-09-01

    The underground laboratories and underground experiments of particle physics in China are reviewed. The Jinping underground laboratory in the Jinping mountain of Sichuan, China is the deepest underground laboratory with horizontal access in the world. The rock overburden in the laboratory is more than 2400 m. The measured cosmic-ray flux and radioactivities of the local rock samples are very low. The high-purity germanium experiments are taking data for the direct dark-matter search. The liquid-xenon experiment is under construction. The proposal of the China National Deep Underground Laboratory with large volume at Jinping for multiple discipline research is discussed.

  7. Physics with CMS and Electronic Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlf, James W.

    2016-08-01

    The current funding is for continued work on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) as part of the Energy Frontier experimental program. The current budget year covers the first year of physics running at 13 TeV (Run 2). During this period we have concentrated on commisioning of the μTCA electronics, a new standard for distribution of CMS trigger and timing control signals and high bandwidth data aquistiion as well as participating in Run 2 physics.

  8. Automating the CMS DAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.; et al.

    2014-01-01

    We present the automation mechanisms that have been added to the Data Acquisition and Run Control systems of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment during Run 1 of the LHC, ranging from the automation of routine tasks to automatic error recovery and context-sensitive guidance to the operator. These mechanisms helped CMS to maintain a data taking efficiency above 90% and to even improve it to 95% towards the end of Run 1, despite an increase in the occurrence of single-event upsets in sub-detector electronics at high LHC luminosity.

  9. Exotica in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    Selected results on exotica searches with the CMS detector are presented. The main topics are dark matter, boosted objects, long-lived particles and classic narrow resonance searches. Most of the analyses were performed with data recorded at at centre of-mass energy of 8 TeV, but first results obtained at 13 TeV are also shown.

  10. 42 CFR 405.800 - Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. 405.800 Section... Part B Program § 405.800 Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. A CMS contractor's (that is, a carrier... supplier enrollment application. If CMS or a CMS contractor denies a provider's or supplier's...

  11. 42 CFR 405.800 - Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. 405.800 Section... Part B Program § 405.800 Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. A CMS contractor's (that is, a carrier... supplier enrollment application. If CMS or a CMS contractor denies a provider's or supplier's...

  12. 42 CFR 405.874 - Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. 405.874 Section... Part B Program § 405.874 Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. A CMS contractor's (that is, a carrier... supplier enrollment application. If CMS or a CMS contractor denies a provider's or supplier's...

  13. 42 CFR 405.874 - Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. 405.874 Section... Part B Program § 405.874 Appeals of CMS or a CMS contractor. A CMS contractor's (that is, a carrier... supplier enrollment application. If CMS or a CMS contractor denies a provider's or supplier's...

  14. Underground laboratories in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shin Ted; Yue, Qian

    2015-08-01

    Deep underground laboratories in Asia have been making huge progress recently because underground sites provide unique opportunities to explore the rare-event phenomena for the study of dark matter searches, neutrino physics and nuclear astrophysics as well as the multi-disciplinary researches based on the low radioactive environments. The status and perspectives of Kamioda underground observatories in Japan, the existing Y2L and the planned CUP in Korea, India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) in India and China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) in China will be surveyed.

  15. Underground laboratories in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shin Ted; Yue, Qian

    2015-08-17

    Deep underground laboratories in Asia have been making huge progress recently because underground sites provide unique opportunities to explore the rare-event phenomena for the study of dark matter searches, neutrino physics and nuclear astrophysics as well as the multi-disciplinary researches based on the low radioactive environments. The status and perspectives of Kamioda underground observatories in Japan, the existing Y2L and the planned CUP in Korea, India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) in India and China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) in China will be surveyed.

  16. Higgs physics at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzner, André G.

    2016-12-01

    This article reviews recent measurements of the properties of the standard model (SM) Higgs boson using data recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC: its mass, width and couplings to other SM particles. We also summarise highlights from searches for new physical phenomena in the Higgs sector as they are proposed in many extensions of the SM: flavour violating and invisible decay modes, resonances decaying into Higgs bosons and searches for additional Higgs bosons.

  17. A Facility Goes Underground.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Norman

    1980-01-01

    Ohio's Sinclair Community College met the challenge of building a campus in an urban area with limited space by connecting the system with underground tunnels. This underground complex has made a comprehensive physical education, recreation, and intercollegiate program available to students and the community. (CJ)

  18. Status of RDMS CMS computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, V.; Golutvin, I.; Kodolova, O.; Korenkov, V.; Levchuk, L.; Shmatov, S.; Tikhonenko, E.; Zhiltsov, V.

    2016-09-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a high-performance general-purpose detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. More than twenty institutes from Russia and Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) are involved in Russia and Dubna Member States (RDMS) CMS Collaboration. A proper computing grid-infrastructure has been constructed at the RDMS institutes for the participation in the running phase of the CMS experiment. Current status of RDMS CMS computing and plans of its development to the next LHC start are presented.

  19. Using fullscreen CMS at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    White, B.

    1991-05-01

    Fullscreen CMS is an optional console environment introduced in Release 5 of CMS which maintains the context of a VM session across invocations of full screen commands like XEDIT, FILELIST or MAIL. In addition it allows limited scrolling and windowing capabilities. This write-up provides CERNVM users who are interested in Fullscreen CMS with an overview of the concepts and operations which are involved. In that it is an optional environment, this write-up does not constitute an endorsement of Fullscreen CMS.

  20. Hadron Correlations in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, Charles F.

    2013-08-01

    The measurements of the anisotropic flow of single particles and particle pairs have provided some of the most compelling evidence for the creation of a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma (sQGP) in relativistic heavy ion collisions, first at RHIC, and more recently at the LHC. Using PbPb collision data taken in the 2010 and 2011 heavy ion runs at the LHC, the CMS experiment has investigated a broad scope of these flow phenomena. The v2 elliptic flow coefficient has been extracted with four different methods to cross-check contributions from initial state fluctuations and non-flow correlations. The measurements of the v2 elliptic anisotropy have been extended to a transverse momentum of 60 GeV/c, which will enable the placement of new quantitative constraints on parton energy loss models as a function of path length in the sQGP medium. Additionally, for the first time at the LHC, the CMS experiment has extracted precise elliptic anisotropy coefficients for the π0 meson in the centrality range 20-80% and over a transverse momentum range 1.6 to 8 GeV/c. These results are compared with both the π0 results reported by the PHENIX detector at RHIC, and with the inclusive charged particle anisotropy results reported from the LHC. Finally, the CMS experiment has mounted an extensive study of charged hadron pair azimuthal correlations using a Fourier harmonic decomposition to fit the data. The relationship between these pair coefficients and the single particle harmonic flow coefficients can be explored for its insight into the early dynamics of this viscous medium.

  1. Photon reconstruction in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nysten, J.

    2004-11-01

    If the mass of the Higgs boson is less than 150 GeV/ c2, the H→γγ channel will provide a clear signature at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). An overview of the general design of photon reconstruction in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is given. The handling of converted photons and rejection of neutral pions pose an additional challenge to triggering and measuring. Topics related to photon reconstruction are presented, such as an algorithm for track building of the electron and the positron coming from the photon conversion.

  2. Photon Physics at CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hollar, J J

    2009-10-20

    The Large Hadron Collider will allow studies of {gamma}{gamma} and photoproduction interactions at energies significantly higher than previous experiments, in both pp and heavy ion collisions. In this article, studies of the feasibility of measuring {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, {gamma}p {yields} {Upsilon}p {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}p, and {gamma}A {yields} {Upsilon}A {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}A processes in early LHC data with the CMS detector are presented.

  3. DEEP UNDERGROUND NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2016-03-03

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) collaboration will perform an experiment centered on accelerator-based long-baseline neutrino studies along with nucleon decay and topics in neutrino astrophysics. It will consist of a modular 40-kt (fiducial) mass liquid argon TPC detector located deep underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota and a high-resolution near detector at Fermilab in Illinois. This conguration provides a 1300-km baseline in a megawatt-scale neutrino beam provided by the Fermilab- hosted international Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility.

  4. The CMS trigger system

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2017-01-24

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, tau lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during datamore » taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.« less

  5. The CMS trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Damiao, D. De Jesus; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; El Sawy, M.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. 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S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Chowdhury, S. Roy; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Najafabadi, M. 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M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pegoraro, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. 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H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Ali, M. A. B. Md; Mohamad Idris, F.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Yusli, M. N.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Kierzkowski, K.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Oklinski, W.; Olszewski, M.; Pozniak, K.; Walczak, M.; Zabolotny, W.; Bargassa, P.; Silva, C. Beirão Da Cruz E.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. 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V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kaminskiy, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Gastler, D.; Lawson, P.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova PANEVA, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Jung, A. W.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Low, J. F.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, τ lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  6. Evidence from the Soudan 1 experiment for underground muons associated with Cygnus X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, D. S. E.

    1986-01-01

    The Soudan 1 experiment has yielded evidence for an average underground muon flux of approximately 7 x 10 to the minus 11th power/sq cm/s which points back to the X-ray binary Cygnus X-3, and which exhibits the 4.8 h periodicity observed for other radiation from this source. Underground muon events which seem to be associated with Cygnus X-3 also show evidence for longer time variability of the flux. Such underground muons cannot be explained by any conventional models of the propagation and interaction of cosmic rays.

  7. Science Center Goes Underground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A unique underground science center at Bluffton College, designed to save energy and preserve trees, rolling landscape, and other environmental features of the campus, is under construction in Bluffton, Ohio. (Author)

  8. Opportunistic Resource Usage in CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Peter; Hufnagel, Dirk; Dykstra, D.; Gutsche, O.; Tadel, M.; Sfiligoi, I.; Letts, J.; Wuerthwein, F.; McCrea, A.; Bockelman, B.; Fajardo, E.; Linares, L.; Wagner, R.; Konstantinov, P.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bradley, D.

    2014-01-01

    CMS is using a tiered setup of dedicated computing resources provided by sites distributed over the world and organized in WLCG. These sites pledge resources to CMS and are preparing them especially for CMS to run the experiment's applications. But there are more resources available opportunistically both on the GRID and in local university and research clusters which can be used for CMS applications. We will present CMS' strategy to use opportunistic resources and prepare them dynamically to run CMS applications. CMS is able to run its applications on resources that can be reached through the GRID, through EC2 compliant cloud interfaces. Even resources that can be used through ssh login nodes can be harnessed. All of these usage modes are integrated transparently into the GlideIn WMS submission infrastructure, which is the basis of CMS' opportunistic resource usage strategy. Technologies like Parrot to mount the software distribution via CVMFS and xrootd for access to data and simulation samples via the WAN are used and will be described. We will summarize the experience with opportunistic resource usage and give an outlook for the restart of LHC data taking in 2015.

  9. Opportunistic Resource Usage in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer, Peter; Hufnagel, Dirk; Dykstra, D.; Gutsche, O.; Tadel, M.; Sfiligoi, I.; Letts, J.; Wuerthwein, F.; McCrea, A.; Bockelman, B.; Fajardo, E.; Linares, L.; Wagner, R.; Konstantinov, P.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bradley, D.; Cms Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    CMS is using a tiered setup of dedicated computing resources provided by sites distributed over the world and organized in WLCG. These sites pledge resources to CMS and are preparing them especially for CMS to run the experiment's applications. But there are more resources available opportunistically both on the GRID and in local university and research clusters which can be used for CMS applications. We will present CMS' strategy to use opportunistic resources and prepare them dynamically to run CMS applications. CMS is able to run its applications on resources that can be reached through the GRID, through EC2 compliant cloud interfaces. Even resources that can be used through ssh login nodes can be harnessed. All of these usage modes are integrated transparently into the GlideIn WMS submission infrastructure, which is the basis of CMS' opportunistic resource usage strategy. Technologies like Parrot to mount the software distribution via CVMFS and xrootd for access to data and simulation samples via the WAN are used and will be described. We will summarize the experience with opportunistic resource usage and give an outlook for the restart of LHC data taking in 2015.

  10. The CMS online manual system.

    PubMed

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) explains how health care providers can use the Web-based CMS Online Manual System to learn about the Medicare program and stay up to date with the latest program changes.

  11. Low energy neutron background in deep underground laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Andreas; Görres, Joachim; Junker, Matthias; Kratz, Karl-Ludwig; Laubenstein, Matthias; Long, Alexander; Nisi, Stefano; Smith, Karl; Wiescher, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The natural neutron background influences the maximum achievable sensitivity in most deep underground nuclear, astroparticle and double-beta decay physics experiments. Reliable neutron flux numbers are an important ingredient in the design of the shielding of new large-scale experiments as well as in the analysis of experimental data. Using a portable setup of 3He counters we measured the thermal neutron flux at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility, the Soudan Underground Laboratory, on the 4100 ft and the 4850 ft levels of the Sanford Underground Research Facility, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. Absolute neutron fluxes at these laboratories are presented.

  12. Experimental study of effectiveness of four radon mitigation solutions, based on underground depressurization, tested in prototype housing built in a high radon area in Spain.

    PubMed

    Frutos Vázquez, Borja; Olaya Adán, Manuel; Quindós Poncela, Luis Santiago; Sainz Fernandez, Carlos; Fuente Merino, Ismael

    2011-04-01

    The present paper discusses the results of an empirical study of four approaches to reducing indoor radon concentrations based on depressurization techniques in underground sumps. The experiments were conducted in prototype housing built in an area of Spain where the average radon concentration at a depth of 1 m is 250 kBq m(-3). Sump effectiveness was analysed in two locations: underneath the basement, which involved cutting openings into the foundation, ground storey and roof slabs, and outside the basement walls, which entailed digging a pit alongside the building exterior. The effectiveness of both sumps was likewise tested with passive and forced ventilation methods. The systems proved to be highly efficient, lowering radon levels by 91-99%, except in the solution involving passive ventilation and the outside sump, where radon levels were reduced by 53-55%. At wind speeds of over 8 m/s, however, passive ventilation across an outside sump lowered radon levels by 95% due to a Venturi effect induced drop in pressure.

  13. CMS Software Notebook. First Edition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    For example, one of my file managing procedures will permit a user to enter the CMS subset to look for a missing file when it is not possible to...Box 17186 Washington, D.C. 20041 CMS userid: ORGASS Please specify if you want the user’s manual or the systems manual. The latter is designed for...8217 CMS SOFTWARE NOTEBOOK*t (First Edition) edited by Richard J. Orgass DT ’ Technical Memorandum No. 79-6 K. July 31, 1979 . ABSTRACT A brief description

  14. An integrated environment monitoring system for underground coal mines--Wireless Sensor Network subsystem with multi-parameter monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yang, Wei; Han, Dongsheng; Kim, Young-Il

    2014-07-21

    Environment monitoring is important for the safety of underground coal mine production, and it is also an important application of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). We put forward an integrated environment monitoring system for underground coal mine, which uses the existing Cable Monitoring System (CMS) as the main body and the WSN with multi-parameter monitoring as the supplementary technique. As CMS techniques are mature, this paper mainly focuses on the WSN and the interconnection between the WSN and the CMS. In order to implement the WSN for underground coal mines, two work modes are designed: periodic inspection and interrupt service; the relevant supporting technologies, such as routing mechanism, collision avoidance, data aggregation, interconnection with the CMS, etc., are proposed and analyzed. As WSN nodes are limited in energy supply, calculation and processing power, an integrated network management scheme is designed in four aspects, i.e., topology management, location management, energy management and fault management. Experiments were carried out both in a laboratory and in a real underground coal mine. The test results indicate that the proposed integrated environment monitoring system for underground coal mines is feasible and all designs performed well as expected.

  15. An Integrated Environment Monitoring System for Underground Coal Mines—Wireless Sensor Network Subsystem with Multi-Parameter Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Yang, Wei; Han, Dongsheng; Kim, Young-Il

    2014-01-01

    Environment monitoring is important for the safety of underground coal mine production, and it is also an important application of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). We put forward an integrated environment monitoring system for underground coal mine, which uses the existing Cable Monitoring System (CMS) as the main body and the WSN with multi-parameter monitoring as the supplementary technique. As CMS techniques are mature, this paper mainly focuses on the WSN and the interconnection between the WSN and the CMS. In order to implement the WSN for underground coal mines, two work modes are designed: periodic inspection and interrupt service; the relevant supporting technologies, such as routing mechanism, collision avoidance, data aggregation, interconnection with the CMS, etc., are proposed and analyzed. As WSN nodes are limited in energy supply, calculation and processing power, an integrated network management scheme is designed in four aspects, i.e., topology management, location management, energy management and fault management. Experiments were carried out both in a laboratory and in a real underground coal mine. The test results indicate that the proposed integrated environment monitoring system for underground coal mines is feasible and all designs performed well as expected. PMID:25051037

  16. Underground mine communications: a survey

    SciTech Connect

    Yarkan, S.; Guzelgoz, S.; Arslan, H.; Murphy, R.R.

    2009-07-01

    After a recent series of unfortunate underground mining disasters, the vital importance of communications for underground mining is underlined one more time. Establishing reliable communication is a very difficult task for underground mining due to the extreme environmental conditions. Until now, no single communication system exists which can solve all of the problems and difficulties encountered in underground mine communications. However, combining research with previous experiences might help existing systems improve, if not completely solve all of the problems. In this survey, underground mine communication is investigated. Major issues which underground mine communication systems must take into account are discussed. Communication types, methods, and their significance are presented.

  17. CASPAR - Nuclear Astrophysics Underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strieder, Frank; Robertson, Daniel; Couder, Manoel; Greife, Uwe; Wells, Doug; Wiescher, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The work of the LUNA Collaboration at the Laboratori Nationali del Gran Sasso demonstrated the research potential of an underground accelerator for the field of nuclear astrophysics. Several key reactions could be studied at LUNA, some directly at the Gamow peak for solar hydrogen burning. The CASPAR (Compact Accelerator System for Performing Astrophysical Research) Collaboration will implement a high intensity 1 MV accelerator at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) and overcome the current limitation at LUNA. The installation of the accelerator in the recently rehabilitated underground cavity at SURF started in Summer 2015 and first beam should be delivered by the end of the year. This project will primarily focus on the neutron sources for the s-process, e.g. 13C(α , n) 16O and 22Ne(α , n) 25Mg , and lead to unprecedented measurements compared to previous studies. A detailed overview of the science goals of CASPAR will be presented.

  18. Underground physics with DUNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.; DUNE Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is a project to design, construct and operate a next-generation long-baseline neutrino detector with a liquid argon (LAr) target capable also of searching for proton decay and supernova neutrinos. It is a merger of previous efforts of the LBNE and LBNO collaborations, as well as other interested parties to pursue a broad programme with a staged 40-kt LAr detector at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) 1300 km from Fermilab. This programme includes studies of neutrino oscillations with a powerful neutrino beam from Fermilab, as well as proton decay and supernova neutrino burst searches. In this paper we will focus on the underground physics with DUNE.

  19. Underground physics with DUNE

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2016-06-09

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is a project to design, construct and operate a next-generation long-baseline neutrino detector with a liquid argon (LAr) target capable also of searching for proton decay and supernova neutrinos. It is a merger of previous efforts of the LBNE and LBNO collaborations, as well as other interested parties to pursue a broad programme with a staged 40-kt LAr detector at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) 1300 km from Fermilab. This programme includes studies of neutrino oscillations with a powerful neutrino beam from Fermilab, as well as proton decay and supernova neutrino burst searches. In this study, we will focus on the underground physics with DUNE.

  20. Underground mineral extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for extracting underground minerals such as coal, which avoids the need for sending personnel underground and which enables the mining of steeply pitched seams of the mineral. The method includes the use of a narrow vehicle which moves underground along the mineral seam and which is connected by pipes or hoses to water pumps at the surface of the Earth. The vehicle hydraulically drills pilot holes during its entrances into the seam, and then directs sideward jets at the seam during its withdrawal from each pilot hole to comminute the mineral surrounding the pilot hole and combine it with water into a slurry, so that the slurried mineral can flow to a location where a pump raises the slurry to the surface.

  1. Underground physics with DUNE

    DOE PAGES

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2016-06-09

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is a project to design, construct and operate a next-generation long-baseline neutrino detector with a liquid argon (LAr) target capable also of searching for proton decay and supernova neutrinos. It is a merger of previous efforts of the LBNE and LBNO collaborations, as well as other interested parties to pursue a broad programme with a staged 40-kt LAr detector at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) 1300 km from Fermilab. This programme includes studies of neutrino oscillations with a powerful neutrino beam from Fermilab, as well as proton decay and supernova neutrino burst searches.more » In this study, we will focus on the underground physics with DUNE.« less

  2. Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R.; Newmark, R.; McConachie, W.; Udell, K.; Rice, D.; Ramirez, A.; Siegel, W.; Buettner, M.; Daily, W.; Krauter, P.; Folsom, E.; Boegel, A.J.; Bishop, D.; Udell, K.

    1992-01-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation and underground imaging techniques for use in rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called ``Dynamic Stripping`` to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first 8 months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques before moving the contaminated site in FY 92.

  3. The ANDES underground laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertou, X.

    2012-09-01

    The ANDES underground laboratory, planned for inclusion in the Agua Negra tunnel crossing the Andes between Argentina and Chile, will be the first deep underground laboratory in the southern hemisphere. It will be deep (1750 m of rock overburden), large (60 000 m3 of volume), and provide the international community with a unique site for testing dark-matter modulation signals. The site furthermore has a low nuclear reactor neutrino background and is of special interest to the geophysics sciences. The laboratory will be run as a multi-national facility, under a consortium of Latin-American countries. Its opening is expectedfor 2020.

  4. CMS multicore scheduling strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio; Hernandez, Jose; Holzman, Burt; Majewski, Krista; McCrea, Alison

    2014-01-01

    In the next years, processor architectures based on much larger numbers of cores will be most likely the model to continue 'Moore's Law' style throughput gains. This not only results in many more jobs in parallel running the LHC Run 1 era monolithic applications, but also the memory requirements of these processes push the workernode architectures to the limit. One solution is parallelizing the application itself, through forking and memory sharing or through threaded frameworks. CMS is following all of these approaches and has a comprehensive strategy to schedule multicore jobs on the GRID based on the glideinWMS submission infrastructure. The main component of the scheduling strategy, a pilot-based model with dynamic partitioning of resources that allows the transition to multicore or whole-node scheduling without disallowing the use of single-core jobs, is described. This contribution also presents the experiences made with the proposed multicore scheduling schema and gives an outlook of further developments working towards the restart of the LHC in 2015.

  5. The CMS dataset bookkeeping service

    SciTech Connect

    Afaq, Anzar,; Dolgert, Andrew; Guo, Yuyi; Jones, Chris; Kosyakov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Valentin; Lueking, Lee; Riley, Dan; Sekhri, Vijay; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    The CMS Dataset Bookkeeping Service (DBS) has been developed to catalog all CMS event data from Monte Carlo and Detector sources. It provides the ability to identify MC or trigger source, track data provenance, construct datasets for analysis, and discover interesting data. CMS requires processing and analysis activities at various service levels and the DBS system provides support for localized processing or private analysis, as well as global access for CMS users at large. Catalog entries can be moved among the various service levels with a simple set of migration tools, thus forming a loose federation of databases. DBS is available to CMS users via a Python API, Command Line, and a Discovery web page interfaces. The system is built as a multi-tier web application with Java servlets running under Tomcat, with connections via JDBC to Oracle or MySQL database backends. Clients connect to the service through HTTP or HTTPS with authentication provided by GRID certificates and authorization through VOMS. DBS is an integral part of the overall CMS Data Management and Workflow Management systems.

  6. The cathode strip chamber data acquisition electronics for CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylsma, B. G.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Gu, J.; Ling, T. Y.; Rush, C.

    2009-03-01

    Data Acquisition (DAQ) electronics for Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) [CMS Collaboration, The Muon Project Technical Design Report, CERN/LHCC 97-32, CMS TDR3, 1997] in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) [CMS Collaboration, The Compact Muon Solenoid Technical Proposal, CERN/LHCC 94-38, 1994] experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) [The LHC study group, The Large Hadron Collider: Conceptual Design, CERN/AC 1995-05, 1995] is described. The CSC DAQ system [B. Bylsma, et al., in: Proceedings of the Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics, Prague, Czech Republic, CERN-2007-007, 2007, pp. 195-198] includes on-detector and off-detector electronics, encompassing five different types of custom circuit boards designed to handle the high event rate at the LHC. The on-detector electronics includes Cathode Front End Boards (CFEB) [R. Breedon, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 471 (2001) 340], which amplify, shape, store, and digitize chamber cathode signals; Anode Front End Boards (AFEB) [T. Ferguson, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 539 (2005) 386], which amplify, shape and discriminate chamber anode signals; and Data Acquisition Motherboards (DAQMB), which controls the on-chamber electronics and the readout of the chamber. The off-detector electronics, located in the underground service cavern, includes Detector Dependent Unit (DDU) boards, which perform real time data error checking, electronics reset requests and data concentration; and Data Concentrator Card (DCC) boards, which further compact the data and send it to the CMS DAQ System [CMS Collaboration, The TriDAS Project Technical Design Report, Volume 2: Data Acquisition and High-level Trigger, CERN/LHCC 2002-26, 2002], and serve as an interface to the CMS Trigger Timing Control (TTC) [TTC system ] system. Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC) are utilized for analogous signal processing on front end boards. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) are utilized

  7. Underground neutrino astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1983-02-01

    A review is made of possible astronomical neutrino sources detectable with underground facilities. Comments are made about solar neutrinos and gravitational-collapse neutrinos, and particular emphasis is placed on ultra-high-energy astronomical neutrino sources. An appendix mentions the exotic possibility of monopolonium.

  8. Underground Coal Mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    Computer program models coal-mining production, equipment failure and equipment repair. Underground mine is represented as collection of work stations requiring service by production and repair crews alternately. Model projects equipment availability and productivity, and indicates proper balance of labor and equipment. Program is in FORTRAN IV for batch execution; it has been implemented on UNIVAC 1108.

  9. Mars Underground News.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgett, K.

    Contents: Ten years Underground. Rover roundup (International Conference on Mobile Planetary Robots and Rover Roundup, Santa Monica, CA (USA), 29 Jan - 4 Feb 1997). Reaching the Red. Schedule of missions to Mars (as of April 1, 1997). Mars on the Web.

  10. Underground Tank Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednar, Barbara A.

    1990-01-01

    The harm to human health and our environment caused by leaking underground storage tanks can be devastating. Schools can meet new federal waste management standards by instituting daily inventory monitoring, selecting a reliable volumetric testing company, locating and repairing leaks promptly, and removing and installing tanks appropriately. (MLH)

  11. Underground Coal Mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    Computer program models coal-mining production, equipment failure and equipment repair. Underground mine is represented as collection of work stations requiring service by production and repair crews alternately. Model projects equipment availability and productivity, and indicates proper balance of labor and equipment. Program is in FORTRAN IV for batch execution; it has been implemented on UNIVAC 1108.

  12. Underground Tank Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednar, Barbara A.

    1990-01-01

    The harm to human health and our environment caused by leaking underground storage tanks can be devastating. Schools can meet new federal waste management standards by instituting daily inventory monitoring, selecting a reliable volumetric testing company, locating and repairing leaks promptly, and removing and installing tanks appropriately. (MLH)

  13. Jets In Heavy Ion Collisions with CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salur, Sevil

    2016-08-01

    Jet physics in heavy ion collisions is a rich field which has been rapidly evolving since the first observations of medium interactions at RHIC through back-to-back hadron correlations and at LHC via reconstructed jets. In order to completely characterize the final state via jet-medium interactions and distinguish between competing energy loss mechanisms, complementary and robust jet observables are investigated. Latest developments of jet finding techniques and their applications to heavy ion environments are discussed with an emphasis given on experimental results from CMS experiment.

  14. Searching for extra-dimensions at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benucci, Leonardo

    2009-06-01

    A possible solution to the hierarchy problem is the presence of extra space dimensions beyond the three ones which are known from our everyday experience. The phenomenological ADD model of large extra-dimensions predicts a ETmiss +jet signature. Randall-Sundrum-type extra-dimensions predict di-lepton and di-jet resonances. This contribution addresses an overview of experimental issues and discovery potential for these new particles at the LHC, focusing on perspectives with the CMS detector during early data taking.

  15. Global Pursuits: The Underground Railroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts: The Art Education Magazine for Teachers, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This brief article describes Charles T. Webber's oil on canvas painting, "The Underground Railroad, 1893." The subject of this painting is the Underground Railroad, which today has become an American legend. The Underground Railroad was not a systematic means of transportation, but rather a secretive process that allowed fugitive slaves…

  16. Global Pursuits: The Underground Railroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts: The Art Education Magazine for Teachers, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This brief article describes Charles T. Webber's oil on canvas painting, "The Underground Railroad, 1893." The subject of this painting is the Underground Railroad, which today has become an American legend. The Underground Railroad was not a systematic means of transportation, but rather a secretive process that allowed fugitive slaves…

  17. CMS@home: Enabling Volunteer Computing Usage for CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L.; Borras, H.; Spiga, D.; Riahi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Volunteer computing remains a largely untapped opportunistic resource for the LHC experiments. The use of virtualization in this domain was pioneered by the Test4Theory project and enabled the running of high energy particle physics simulations on home computers. This paper describes the model for CMS to run workloads using a similar volunteer computing platform. It is shown how the original approach is exploited to map onto the existing CMS workflow and identifies missing functionality along with the components and changes that are required. The final implementation of the prototype is detailed along with the identification of areas that would benefit from further development.

  18. Underground waste barrier structure

    DOEpatents

    Saha, Anuj J.; Grant, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

  19. Locomotive track detection for underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhonglei; Lang, Wenhui; Li, Xiaoming; Wei, Xing

    2017-08-01

    In order to improve the PC-based track detection system, this paper proposes a method to detect linear track for underground locomotive based on DSP + FPGA. Firstly, the analog signal outputted from the camera is sampled by A / D chip. Then the collected digital signal is preprocessed by FPGA. Secondly, the output signal of FPGA is transmitted to DSP via EMIF port. Subsequently, the adaptive threshold edge detection, polar angle and radius constrain based Hough transform are implemented by DSP. Lastly, the detected track information is transmitted to host computer through Ethernet interface. The experimental results show that the system can not only meet the requirements of real-time detection, but also has good robustness.

  20. The Recent Results from CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Jeong

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN sitting astride the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva has accumulated the proton and proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of around 5 fb-1 at the center of mass energy 7 TeV in 2011 and around 20 fb-1 at 8 TeV in 2012 with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector. The CMS detector is designed to investigate the wide range of particle physics including testing perturbative QCD and searching for Brout-Englert-Higgs (BEH) boson as well as new physics phenomena beyond the Standard Model. Observation of a new boson has moved the phase from hunting for the SM BEH boson to evaluating the consistency of this new particle with the SM expectation. The latest results from the CMS collaboration will be presented.

  1. Upgrades for the CMS simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, D. J.; Hildreth, M.; Ivantchenko, V. N.; Osborne, I.

    2015-05-22

    Over the past several years, the CMS experiment has made significant changes to its detector simulation application. The geometry has been generalized to include modifications being made to the CMS detector for 2015 operations, as well as model improvements to the simulation geometry of the current CMS detector and the implementation of a number of approved and possible future detector configurations. These include both completely new tracker and calorimetry systems. We have completed the transition to Geant4 version 10, we have made significant progress in reducing the CPU resources required to run our Geant4 simulation. These have been achieved through both technical improvements and through numerical techniques. Substantial speed improvements have been achieved without changing the physics validation benchmarks that the experiment uses to validate our simulation application for use in production. As a result, we will discuss the methods that we implemented and the corresponding demonstrated performance improvements deployed for our 2015 simulation application.

  2. Underground Engineering (Selected Articles),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-04

    Layer By * An Engineering Group, by Shen Junda and Wang Jingwen .................. I Innovation in Injection Conctete Aggregates , by Hu Yexi...In the situation that the effect of underground water on the surrounding rock was small and the vibration was not significant, the surrounding rock...INNOVATIONIN INJECTION CONCRETE AGGREGATES /28 Hu Yexi The use of injection concrete in the construction of civil defense projects has already obtained

  3. CMS-2 to Ada Translator Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    these translators, and to provide information to CMS -2 project managers to assist them in the evaluation of costs and risks of translating CMS -2 to Ada....The objective of this evaluation was to determine the maturity of the CMS -2 to Ada translators and associated tools, to determine the capabilities of

  4. 42 CFR 401.108 - CMS rulings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CMS rulings. 401.108 Section 401.108 Public Health... GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Confidentiality and Disclosure § 401.108 CMS rulings. (a) After... regulations, but which has been adopted by CMS as having precedent, may be published in the Federal...

  5. 42 CFR 401.108 - CMS rulings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CMS rulings. 401.108 Section 401.108 Public Health... GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Confidentiality and Disclosure § 401.108 CMS rulings. (a) After... regulations, but which has been adopted by CMS as having precedent, may be published in the Federal...

  6. 42 CFR 401.108 - CMS rulings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CMS rulings. 401.108 Section 401.108 Public Health... GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Confidentiality and Disclosure § 401.108 CMS rulings. (a) After... regulations, but which has been adopted by CMS as having precedent, may be published in the Federal...

  7. 42 CFR 401.108 - CMS rulings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMS rulings. 401.108 Section 401.108 Public Health... GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Confidentiality and Disclosure § 401.108 CMS rulings. (a) After... regulations, but which has been adopted by CMS as having precedent, may be published in the Federal...

  8. 42 CFR 401.108 - CMS rulings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CMS rulings. 401.108 Section 401.108 Public Health... GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Confidentiality and Disclosure § 401.108 CMS rulings. (a) After... regulations, but which has been adopted by CMS as having precedent, may be published in the Federal...

  9. The CMS DBS query language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Valentin; Riley, Daniel; Afaq, Anzar; Sekhri, Vijay; Guo, Yuyi; Lueking, Lee

    2010-04-01

    The CMS experiment has implemented a flexible and powerful system enabling users to find data within the CMS physics data catalog. The Dataset Bookkeeping Service (DBS) comprises a database and the services used to store and access metadata related to CMS physics data. To this, we have added a generalized query system in addition to the existing web and programmatic interfaces to the DBS. This query system is based on a query language that hides the complexity of the underlying database structure by discovering the join conditions between database tables. This provides a way of querying the system that is simple and straightforward for CMS data managers and physicists to use without requiring knowledge of the database tables or keys. The DBS Query Language uses the ANTLR tool to build the input query parser and tokenizer, followed by a query builder that uses a graph representation of the DBS schema to construct the SQL query sent to underlying database. We will describe the design of the query system, provide details of the language components and overview of how this component fits into the overall data discovery system architecture.

  10. The CMS central hadron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, J.; E892 Collaboration

    1996-12-31

    The CMS central hadron calorimeter is a copper absorber/ scintillator sampling structure. We describe design choices that led us to this concept, details of the mechanical and optical structure, and test beam results. We discuss calibration techniques, and finally the anticipated construction schedule.

  11. 45 CFR 150.203 - Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement. 150.203... CARE ACCESS CMS ENFORCEMENT IN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL INSURANCE MARKETS CMS Enforcement Processes for... requiring CMS enforcement. CMS enforces HIPAA requirements to the extent warranted (as determined by CMS)...

  12. 45 CFR 150.203 - Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement. 150.203... CARE ACCESS CMS ENFORCEMENT IN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL INSURANCE MARKETS CMS Enforcement Processes for... requiring CMS enforcement. CMS enforces HIPAA requirements to the extent warranted (as determined by CMS)...

  13. Laboratory Investigation of Containment of Underground Explosions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    the mechanics of containing gases in cavities formed by underground nuclear explosions. One experimental technique uses constant flow rate...30 2.3 Containment Experiment Apparatus...........................31 2.4 Constant Flow -Rate Hydrofracture System ................... 32 2.5 Overall...charge size (3/8 gram PETN), overburden pressure [1000 psi (6.895 MPa). viscosity of the hydrofracture fluid (I centipoise), and rate of fluid 0 flow

  14. Underground nuclear waste containments

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.

    1995-11-01

    In the United States, about a hundred million gallons of high-level nuclear waste are stored in underground containments. Basically, these containments are of two different designs: single-shell and double-shell structures. The single-shell structures consist of reinforced concrete cylindrical walls seated on circular mats and enclosed on top with torispherical domes or circular flat roofs. The walls and the basemats are lined with carbon steel. The double-shell structures provide another layer of protection and constitute a completely enclosed steel containment within the single-shell structure leaving an annular space between the two walls. Single-shell containments are of earlier vintage and were built in the period 1945-1965. Double-shell structures were built through the 1960s and 1970s. Experience gained in building and operating the single-shell containments was used in enhancing the design and construction of the double-shell structures. Currently, there are about 250 underground single-shell and double-shell structures containing the high-level waste with an inventory of about 800 million curies. During their service lives, especially in early stages, these structures were subjected to thermal excursions of varying extents; also, they have aged in the chemical environment. Furthermore, in their remaining service lives, the structures may be subjected to loads for which they were not designed, such as larger earthquakes or chemical explosions. As a result, the demonstration of safety of these underground nuclear containments poses a challenge to structural engineers, which increases with time. Regardless of current plans for gradual retrieval of the waste and subsequent solidification for disposal, many of these structures are expected to continue to contain the waste through the next 20-40 years. In order to verify their structural capabilities in fulfilling this mission, several studies were recently performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  15. Underground petroleum tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    This book presents the results of a survey of 46 state underground storage tank program officials. The survey covers: Whether petroleum tank insurance (mandated by the EPA) is available in each state and whether category 3 and 4 owners can obtain it; state programs that help owners meet the financial responsibility and/or technical requirements of such insurance; and lending institutions' attitudes towards providing loans to storage tank owners. A survey of the number and terms of insurance policies offered to tank owners is also presented.

  16. North American deep underground laboratories: Soudan Underground Laboratory, SNOLab, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesko, Kevin T.

    2015-08-01

    Over the past several decades, fundamental physics experiments have required access to deep underground laboratories to satisfy the increasingly strict requirements for ultra-low background environments and shielding from cosmic rays. In this presentation, I summarize the existing and anticipated physics programs and laboratory facilities of North America's deep facilities: The Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota, SNOLab in Ontario, Canada, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota.

  17. Underground corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Corrosion of underground metallic structures continues to be a crucial concern within society and the engineering community. Costs associated with corrosion losses are staggering. Indirect costs associated with environmental damage as well as loss of public confidence has in many cases out-stripped direct costs for facility repair and replacement. NACE Group Committee T-10, responsible for the study and advancement of technology necessary for engineering solutions for underground corrosion problems, is divided into five key unit committees as follows: cathodic protection; interference problems; electric power and communications; protective coating systems; and internal corrosion of pipelines. The papers presented in this publication reflect the most recent developments in field practice in all five areas. Cathodic protection criteria, protection of pipelines, tanks and pilings, test methods, transit systems investigations, power and communication cables, and compliance with regulations are addressed. Interference testing, refinery problems, methods of safely mitigating the effects of induced AC on pipelines, and experience with alternate engineering materials such as prestressed concrete cylinder pipe and ductile iron pipe are included. All 37 papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  18. Multinational underground nuclear parks

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, C.W.; Giraud, K.M.

    2013-07-01

    Newcomer countries expected to develop new nuclear power programs by 2030 are being encouraged by the International Atomic Energy Agency to explore the use of shared facilities for spent fuel storage and geologic disposal. Multinational underground nuclear parks (M-UNPs) are an option for sharing such facilities. Newcomer countries with suitable bedrock conditions could volunteer to host M-UNPs. M-UNPs would include back-end fuel cycle facilities, in open or closed fuel cycle configurations, with sufficient capacity to enable M-UNP host countries to provide for-fee waste management services to partner countries, and to manage waste from the M-UNP power reactors. M-UNP potential advantages include: the option for decades of spent fuel storage; fuel-cycle policy flexibility; increased proliferation resistance; high margin of physical security against attack; and high margin of containment capability in the event of beyond-design-basis accidents, thereby reducing the risk of Fukushima-like radiological contamination of surface lands. A hypothetical M-UNP in crystalline rock with facilities for small modular reactors, spent fuel storage, reprocessing, and geologic disposal is described using a room-and-pillar reference-design cavern. Underground construction cost is judged tractable through use of modern excavation technology and careful site selection. (authors)

  19. Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, Steven Derek

    2014-03-01

    The Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF) is an operating deep underground research facility with six active projects, and greater than 50 trained researchers. KURF is 30 minutes from the Virginia Tech (VT) campus in an operating limestone mine with drive-in access (eg: roll-back truck, motor coach), over 50 miles of drifts (all 40' × 20 +' the current lab is 35' × 22' × 100'), and 1700' of overburden (1450m.w.e.). The laboratory was built in 2007 and offers fiber optic internet, LN2, 480/220/110 V power, ample water, filtered air, 55 F constant temp, low Rn levels, low rock background activity, and a muon flux of only ~0.004 muons per square meter, per second, per steradian. The current users are funded by NSF, DOE, and NNSA. Current user group: 1) mini-LENS (VT, Louisiana State University, BNL); 2) Double Beta Decay to Excited States (Duke University); 3) HPGe Low-Background Screening (University of North Carolina (UNC), VT); 4) MALBEK (UNC); 5&6) Watchman - 5) Radionuclide Detector and 6) MARS detector (LLNL, SNL, UC-Davis, UC-Berkeley, UH, Hawaii Pacific, UC-Irvine, VT).

  20. A Course on Underground Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Clarence A.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses a one-semester course on recovering fossil fuels and minerals from underground formations. Includes course outline and information of its major divisions: (1) Geological Background; (2) Flow, Transport, and Interfacial Phenomena in Porous Media; and (3) Description of Underground Processes. (SK)

  1. A Case for Underground Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    The underground school offers several advantages. Preliminary studies in Oklahoma have shown that these schools perform exceptionally well as learning environments. The lack of noise and distractions helps teachers keep the attention of their students. Underground structures can protect people against a broad range of natural and man-made…

  2. A Course on Underground Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Clarence A.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses a one-semester course on recovering fossil fuels and minerals from underground formations. Includes course outline and information of its major divisions: (1) Geological Background; (2) Flow, Transport, and Interfacial Phenomena in Porous Media; and (3) Description of Underground Processes. (SK)

  3. The CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High-Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  4. Virtual data in CMS production

    SciTech Connect

    Arbree, A. et al.

    2004-08-26

    Initial applications of the GriPhyN Chimera Virtual Data System have been performed within the context of CMS Production of Monte Carlo Simulated Data. The GriPhyN Chimera system consists of four primary components: (1) a Virtual Data Language, which is used to describe virtual data products, (2) a Virtual Data Catalog, which is used to store virtual data entries, (3) an Abstract Planner, which resolves all dependencies of a particular virtual data product and forms a location and existence independent plan, (4) a Concrete Planner, which maps an abstract, logical plan onto concrete, physical grid resources accounting for staging in/out files and publishing results to a replica location service. A CMS Workflow Planner, MCRunJob, is used to generate virtual data products using the Virtual Data Language. Subsequently, a prototype workflow manager, known as WorkRunner, is used to schedule the instantiation of virtual data products across a grid.

  5. CMS Web-Based Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Badgett, William; Lopez-Perez, Juan Antonio; Maeshima, Kaori; Soha, Aron; Sulmanas, Balys; Wan, Zongru

    2010-01-01

    With the growth in size and complexity of High Energy Physics experiments, and the accompanying increase in the number of collaborators spread across the globe, the importance of widely relaying timely monitoring and status information has grown. To this end, we present online Web Based Monitoring solutions from the CMS experiment at CERN. The web tools developed present data to the user from many underlying heterogeneous sources, from real time messaging system to relational databases. We provide the power to combine and correlate data in both graphical and tabular formats of interest to the experimentalist, with data such as beam conditions, luminosity, trigger rates, detector conditions and many others, allowing for flexibility on the user side. We also present some examples of how this system has been used during CMS commissioning and early beam collision running at the Large Hadron Collider.

  6. Underground nuclear astrophysics studies with CASPAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Daniel; Couder, Manoel; Greife, Uwe; Strieder, Frank; Wiescher, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The drive of low-energy nuclear astrophysics laboratories is to study the reactions of importance to stellar burning processes and elemental production through stellar nucleosynthesis, over the energy range of astrophysical interest. As laboratory measurements approach the stellar burning window, the rapid drop off of cross-sections is a significant barrier and drives the need to lower background interference. The natural background suppression of underground accelerator facilities enables the extension of current experimental data to lower energies. An example of such reactions of interest are those thought to be sources of neutrons for the s-process, the major production mechanism for elements above the iron peak. The reactions 13C(α,n)16O and 22Ne(α,n)25Mg are the proposed initial focus of the new nuclear astrophysics accelerator laboratory (CASPAR) currently under construction at the Sanford Underground Research Facility, Lead, South Dakota

  7. Automatic three-dimensional underground mine mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.F.; Vandapel, N.

    2006-01-15

    For several years, our research group has been developing methods for automated modeling of three-dimensional environments. In September 2002, we were given the opportunity to demonstrate our mapping capability in an underground coal mine. The opportunity arose as a result of the Quecreek mine accident, in which an inaccurate map caused miners to breach an abandoned, water-filled mine, trapping them for several days. Our field test illustrates the feasibility and potential of high-resolution 3D mapping of an underground coal mine using a cart-mounted 3D laser scanner In this paper we present our experimental setup, the automatic 3D modeling method used, and the results of the field test.

  8. Upgrade of the CMS tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricomi, A.

    2014-03-01

    The LHC machine is planning an upgrade program which will smoothly bring the luminosity up to or above 5 × 1034 cm-2s-1 sometimes after 2020, to possibly reach an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1 at the end of that decade. The foreseen increases of both the instantaneous and the integrated luminosity by the LHC during the next ten years will necessitate a stepwise upgrade of the CMS tracking detector. During the extended end-of-year shutdown 2016-2017 the pixel detector will be exchanged with a new one. The so-called Phase1 Pixel foresees one additional barrel layer and one additional end-cap disk, a new readout chip, reduction of material, and the installation of more efficient cooling and powering systems. In the so-called Phase2, when LHC will reach the High Luminosity (HL-LHC) phase, CMS will need a completely new Tracker detector, in order to fully exploit the high-demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity. The new Tracker should have also trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R&D activities are ongoing to explore options and develop solutions that would allow including tracking information at Level-1. The design choices for the CMS pixel and outer tracker upgrades are discussed along with some highlights of the R&D activities.

  9. Upgrades for the CMS simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Lange, D. J.; Hildreth, M.; Ivantchenko, V. N.; ...

    2015-05-22

    Over the past several years, the CMS experiment has made significant changes to its detector simulation application. The geometry has been generalized to include modifications being made to the CMS detector for 2015 operations, as well as model improvements to the simulation geometry of the current CMS detector and the implementation of a number of approved and possible future detector configurations. These include both completely new tracker and calorimetry systems. We have completed the transition to Geant4 version 10, we have made significant progress in reducing the CPU resources required to run our Geant4 simulation. These have been achieved throughmore » both technical improvements and through numerical techniques. Substantial speed improvements have been achieved without changing the physics validation benchmarks that the experiment uses to validate our simulation application for use in production. As a result, we will discuss the methods that we implemented and the corresponding demonstrated performance improvements deployed for our 2015 simulation application.« less

  10. The CMS integration grid testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Gregory E.

    2004-08-26

    The CMS Integration Grid Testbed (IGT) comprises USCMS Tier-1 and Tier-2 hardware at the following sites: the California Institute of Technology, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of California at San Diego, and the University of Florida at Gainesville. The IGT runs jobs using the Globus Toolkit with a DAGMan and Condor-G front end. The virtual organization (VO) is managed using VO management scripts from the European Data Grid (EDG). Gridwide monitoring is accomplished using local tools such as Ganglia interfaced into the Globus Metadata Directory Service (MDS) and the agent based Mona Lisa. Domain specific software is packaged and installed using the Distribution After Release (DAR) tool of CMS, while middleware under the auspices of the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT) is distributed using Pacman. During a continuous two month span in Fall of 2002, over 1 million official CMS GEANT based Monte Carlo events were generated and returned to CERN for analysis while being demonstrated at SC2002. In this paper, we describe the process that led to one of the world's first continuously available, functioning grids.

  11. Underground pumped hydroelectric storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. D.; Doherty, T. J.; Kannberg, L. D.

    1984-07-01

    Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-velocity requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more.

  12. Enabling opportunistic resources for CMS Computing Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Hufnagel, Dick

    2015-11-19

    With the increased pressure on computing brought by the higher energy and luminosity from the LHC in Run 2, CMS Computing Operations expects to require the ability to utilize “opportunistic” resources — resources not owned by, or a priori configured for CMS — to meet peak demands. In addition to our dedicated resources we look to add computing resources from non CMS grids, cloud resources, and national supercomputing centers. CMS uses the HTCondor/glideinWMS job submission infrastructure for all its batch processing, so such resources will need to be transparently integrated into its glideinWMS pool. Bosco and parrot wrappers are used to enable access and bring the CMS environment into these non CMS resources. Here we describe our strategy to supplement our native capabilities with opportunistic resources and our experience so far using them.

  13. Enabling opportunistic resources for CMS Computing Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufnagel, D.; CMS Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    With the increased pressure on computing brought by the higher energy and luminosity from the LHC in Run 2, CMS Computing Operations expects to require the ability to utilize opportunistic resources resources not owned by, or a priori configured for CMS to meet peak demands. In addition to our dedicated resources we look to add computing resources from non CMS grids, cloud resources, and national supercomputing centers. CMS uses the HTCondor/glideinWMS job submission infrastructure for all its batch processing, so such resources will need to be transparently integrated into its glideinWMS pool. Bosco and parrot wrappers are used to enable access and bring the CMS environment into these non CMS resources. Here we describe our strategy to supplement our native capabilities with opportunistic resources and our experience so far using them.

  14. Enabling opportunistic resources for CMS Computing Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Hufnagel, Dirk

    2015-12-23

    With the increased pressure on computing brought by the higher energy and luminosity from the LHC in Run 2, CMS Computing Operations expects to require the ability to utilize opportunistic resources resources not owned by, or a priori configured for CMS to meet peak demands. In addition to our dedicated resources we look to add computing resources from non CMS grids, cloud resources, and national supercomputing centers. CMS uses the HTCondor/glideinWMS job submission infrastructure for all its batch processing, so such resources will need to be transparently integrated into its glideinWMS pool. Bosco and parrot wrappers are used to enable access and bring the CMS environment into these non CMS resources. Finally, we describe our strategy to supplement our native capabilities with opportunistic resources and our experience so far using them.

  15. Enabling opportunistic resources for CMS Computing Operations

    DOE PAGES

    Hufnagel, Dirk

    2015-12-23

    With the increased pressure on computing brought by the higher energy and luminosity from the LHC in Run 2, CMS Computing Operations expects to require the ability to utilize opportunistic resources resources not owned by, or a priori configured for CMS to meet peak demands. In addition to our dedicated resources we look to add computing resources from non CMS grids, cloud resources, and national supercomputing centers. CMS uses the HTCondor/glideinWMS job submission infrastructure for all its batch processing, so such resources will need to be transparently integrated into its glideinWMS pool. Bosco and parrot wrappers are used to enablemore » access and bring the CMS environment into these non CMS resources. Finally, we describe our strategy to supplement our native capabilities with opportunistic resources and our experience so far using them.« less

  16. Coastal Modeling System (CMS) Users Manuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    AD-A268 830 , INSTRUCTION REPORT CERC-91-1 COASTAL MODELING SYSTEM ( CMS ) USER’S MANUAL by Mary A. Cialone, David J. Mark, Lucia W. Chou, David A...THE COASTAL MODELING SYSTEM USER’S MANUAL Supplement 1 Issued August 1992 Enclosed are additions and corrections to the Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ...COVERED1 August 1992 Supplement I to September 1991 Manual 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) User’s Manual WU

  17. The CMS Journey to LHC Physics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    An overview of the design, the construction and physics of CMS will be given. A history of construction, encompassing the R&D; and challenges faced over the last decade and a half, will be recalled using selected examples. CMS is currently in the final stages of installation and commissioning is gathering pace. After a short status report of where CMS stands today some of the expected (great) physics to come will be outlined. * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  18. The CMS Journey to LHC Physics

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-09

    An overview of the design, the construction and physics of CMS will be given. A history of construction, encompassing the R&D; and challenges faced over the last decade and a half, will be recalled using selected examples. CMS is currently in the final stages of installation and commissioning is gathering pace. After a short status report of where CMS stands today some of the expected (great) physics to come will be outlined. * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  19. 42 CFR 422.510 - Termination of contract by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Termination of contract by CMS. 422.510 Section 422... Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.510 Termination of contract by CMS. (a) Termination by CMS. CMS may at any time terminate a contract if CMS determines that the MA organization meets any of...

  20. 42 CFR 422.510 - Termination of contract by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Termination of contract by CMS. 422.510 Section 422... Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.510 Termination of contract by CMS. (a) Termination by CMS. CMS may at any time terminate a contract if CMS determines that the MA organization meets any of...

  1. 45 CFR 150.203 - Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement. 150.203... CARE ACCESS CMS ENFORCEMENT IN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL INSURANCE MARKETS CMS Enforcement Processes for... requiring CMS enforcement. CMS enforces PHS Act requirement to the extent warranted (as determined by...

  2. 45 CFR 150.203 - Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement. 150.203... CARE ACCESS CMS ENFORCEMENT IN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL INSURANCE MARKETS CMS Enforcement Processes for... requiring CMS enforcement. CMS enforces PHS Act requirement to the extent warranted (as determined by...

  3. MACSYMA at CMS. Version 309.3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    these examples are quite complicated. 1.1 Invoking Macsyma To use Macsvma on the CMS VAX you must first log in to the computer (see the System Manager ...1.8 C MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANOARDS-1963-A % JoI *ur~FILE LJ2 rCMS Technical Summary Report #88-3 f% MACSYMA AT CMS ...MACSYMA AT CMS . VERSION 309.3 Distribution/ W. Hereman, Y. Nagel and J. Strikwerda AvaIlcblflty Cces Technical Summary Report #88-3 ’Dist Sr~ci

  4. Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelaar, R. Bruce

    2011-10-01

    A new deep underground research facility is open and operating only 30 minutes from the Virginia Tech campus. It is located in an operating limestone mine, and has drive-in access (eg: roll-back truck, motor coach), over 50 miles of drifts (all 40' x 20' x 100'; the current lab is 35'x100'x22'), and is located where there is a 1700' overburden. The laboratory was built in 2007 and offers fiber optic internet, LN2, 480/220/110 V power, ample water, filtered air, 55 F constant temp, low Rn levels, low rock background activity, and a muon flux of only ˜ 0.004 muons per square meter, per second, per steradian. There are currently six projects using the facility: mini-LENS - Low Energy Neutrino Spectroscopy (Virginia Tech, Louisiana State University, BNL); Neutron Spectrometer (University of Maryland, NIST); Double Beta Decay to Excited States (Duke University); HPGe Low-Background Screening (North Carolina State University, University of North Carolina, Virginia Tech); MALBEK - Majorana neutrinoless double beta decay (University of North Carolina); Ar-39 Depleted Argon (Princeton University). I will summarize the current program, and exciting plans for the future.

  5. Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, S. Derek; Vogelaar, R. Bruce

    2012-03-01

    A new deep underground research facility is open and operating only 30 minutes from the Virginia Tech campus. It is located in an operating limestone mine, and has drive-in access (eg: roll-back truck, motor coach), over 50 miles of drifts (all 40' x 20+'; the current lab is 35' x 22' x 100'), and is located where there is a 1700' overburden. The laboratory was built in 2007 and offers fiber optic internet, LN2, 480/220/110 V power, ample water, filtered air, 55 F constant temp, low Rn levels, low rock background activity, and a muon flux of only ˜0.004 muons per square meter, per second, per steradian. There are currently six projects using the facility: mini-LENS - Low Energy Neutrino Spectroscopy (Virginia Tech, Louisiana State University, BNL); Neutron Spectrometer (University of Maryland, NIST); Double Beta Decay to Excited States (Duke University); HPGe Low-Background Screening (North Carolina State University, University of North Carolina, Virginia Tech); MALBEK - Majorana neutrinoless double beta decay (University of North Carolina); Ar-39 Depleted Argon (Princeton University). I will summarize the current program and exciting potential for the future.

  6. Underground pumped hydroelectric storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

    1984-07-01

    Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

  7. 30 CFR 75.343 - Underground shops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground shops. 75.343 Section 75.343... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.343 Underground shops. (a) Underground shops shall be equipped with an automatic fire suppression system meeting the requirements of §...

  8. Environmental benefits of underground coal gasification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-qin; Liu, Jun-hua; Yu, Li

    2002-04-01

    Environmental benefits of underground coal gasification are evaluated. The results showed that through underground coal gasification, gangue discharge is eliminated, sulfur emission is reduced, and the amount of ash, mercury, and tar discharge are decreased. Moreover, effect of underground gasification on underground water is analyzed and CO2 disposal method is put forward.

  9. The CMS tracker control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierlamm, A.; Dirkes, G. H.; Fahrer, M.; Frey, M.; Hartmann, F.; Masetti, L.; Militaru, O.; Shah, S. Y.; Stringer, R.; Tsirou, A.

    2008-07-01

    The Tracker Control System (TCS) is a distributed control software to operate about 2000 power supplies for the silicon modules of the CMS Tracker and monitor its environmental sensors. TCS must thus be able to handle about 104 power supply parameters, about 103 environmental probes from the Programmable Logic Controllers of the Tracker Safety System (TSS), about 105 parameters read via DAQ from the DCUs in all front end hybrids and from CCUs in all control groups. TCS is built on top of an industrial SCADA program (PVSS) extended with a framework developed at CERN (JCOP) and used by all LHC experiments. The logical partitioning of the detector is reflected in the hierarchical structure of the TCS, where commands move down to the individual hardware devices, while states are reported up to the root which is interfaced to the broader CMS control system. The system computes and continuously monitors the mean and maximum values of critical parameters and updates the percentage of currently operating hardware. Automatic procedures switch off selected parts of the detector using detailed granularity and avoiding widespread TSS intervention.

  10. Assessment of Cosmic Background Attenuation at Building 3425 (Underground Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Borgardt, James D.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Panisko, Mark E.

    2009-10-01

    Specifications for the Underground Facility (building 3425) in the Radiation Detection and Nuclear Sciences complex presently under construction at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory mandate a 30 meters water equivalent shielding for cosmic background attenuation at the 30-foot underground depth of the laboratory. A set thickness of a specified fill material was determined; however a smaller thickness of a higher density material was used for the earthen bunker. Questions arose as to whether this altered configuration met the required shielding specifications. A series of measurements were made to address this concern using a 4”x4”x16” NaI(Tl) detector (Scionix Holland, 3.5N-E2-X). Cosmic ray data were taken at the surface, and at several locations within the underground facility in order to obtain an experimental value for the attenuation of the cosmic radiation. This experimental result was compared with the contracted attenuation.

  11. Underground Coal Gasification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsness, C. B.; Britten, J. A.

    1994-12-01

    CAVSIM is a three-dimensional, axisymmetric model for resource recovery and cavity growth during underground coal gasification (UCG). CAVSIM is capable of following the evolution of the cavity from near startup to exhaustion, and couples explicitly wall and roof surface growth to material and energy balances in the underlying rubble zones. Growth mechanisms are allowed to change smoothly as the system evolves from a small, relatively empty cavity low in the coal seam to a large, almost completely rubble-filled cavity extending high into the overburden rock. The model is applicable to nonswelling coals of arbitrary seam thickness and can handle a variety of gas injection flow schedules or compositions. Water influx from the coal aquifer is calculated by a gravity drainage-permeation submodel which is integrated into the general solution. The cavity is considered to consist of up to three distinct rubble zones and a void space at the top. Resistance to gas flow injected from a stationary source at the cavity floor is assumed to be concentrated in the ash pile, which builds up around the source, and also the overburden rubble which accumulates on top of this ash once overburden rock is exposed at the cavity top. Char rubble zones at the cavity side and edges are assumed to be highly permeable. Flow of injected gas through the ash to char rubble piles and the void space is coupled by material and energy balances to cavity growth at the rubble/coal, void/coal and void/rock interfaces. One preprocessor and two postprocessor programs are included - SPALL calculates one-dimensional mean spalling rates of coal or rock surfaces exposed to high temperatures and generates CAVSIM input: TAB reads CAVSIM binary output files and generates ASCII tables of selected data for display; and PLOT produces dot matrix printer or HP printer plots from TAB output.

  12. CMS: Present status, limitations, and upgrade plans

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, H.W.K.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    An overview of the CMS upgrade plans will be presented. A brief status of the CMS detector will be given, covering some of the issues we have so far experienced. This will be followed by an overview of the various CMS upgrades planned, covering the main motivations for them, and the various R&D efforts for the possibilities under study. The CMS detector has been working extremely well since the start of data-taking at the LHC as is evidenced by the numerous excellent results published by CMS and presented at this workshop and recent conferences. Less well documented are the various issues that have been encountered with the detector. In the spirit of this workshop I will cover some of these issues with particular emphasis on problems that motivate some of the upgrades to the CMS detector for this decade of data-taking. Though the CMS detector has been working extremely well and expectations are great for making the most of the LHC luminosity, there have been a number of issues encountered so far. Some of these have been described and while none currently presents a problem for physics performance, some of them are expected to become more problematic, especially at the highest Phase 1 luminosities for which the majority of the integrated luminosity will be collected. These motivate upgrades for various parts of the CMS detector so that the current excellent physics performance can be maintained or even surpassed in the realm of the highest Phase 1 luminosities.

  13. The Status of the Cms Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Dan

    The CMS experiment was completely assembled in the fall of 2008 after a decade of design, construction and installation. During the last two years, cosmic ray data were taken on a regular basis. These data have enabled CMS to align the detector components, both spatially and temporally. Initial use of muons has also established the relative alignment of the CMS tracking and muon systems. In addition, the CMS calorimetry has been crosschecked with test beam data, thus providing an initial energy calibration of CMS calorimetry to about 5%. The CMS magnet has been powered and field mapped. The trigger and data acquisition systems have been installed and run at full speed. The tiered data analysis system has been exercised at full design bandwidth for Tier0, Tier1 and Tier2 sites. Monte Carlo simulation of the CMS detector has been constructed at a detailed geometric level and has been tuned to test beam and other production data to provide a realistic model of the CMS detector prior to first collisions.

  14. The diverse use of clouds by CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Andronis, Anastasios; Bauer, Daniela; Chaze, Olivier; Colling, David; Dobson, Marc; Fayer, Simon; Girone, Maria; Grandi, Claudio; Huffman, Adam; Hufnagel, Dirk; Khan, Farrukh Aftab; Lahiff, Andrew; McCrae, Alison; Rand, Duncan; Sgaravatto, Massimo; Tiradani, Anthony; Zhang, Xiaomei

    2015-12-23

    The resources CMS is using are increasingly being offered as clouds. In Run 2 of the LHC the majority of CMS CERN resources, both in Meyrin and at the Wigner Computing Centre, will be presented as cloud resources on which CMS will have to build its own infrastructure. This infrastructure will need to run all of the CMS workflows including: Tier 0, production and user analysis. In addition, the CMS High Level Trigger will provide a compute resource comparable in scale to the total offered by the CMS Tier 1 sites, when it is not running as part of the trigger system. During these periods a cloud infrastructure will be overlaid on this resource, making it accessible for general CMS use. Finally, CMS is starting to utilise cloud resources being offered by individual institutes and is gaining experience to facilitate the use of opportunistically available cloud resources. Lastly, we present a snap shot of this infrastructure and its operation at the time of the CHEP2015 conference.

  15. The diverse use of clouds by CMS

    DOE PAGES

    Andronis, Anastasios; Bauer, Daniela; Chaze, Olivier; ...

    2015-12-23

    The resources CMS is using are increasingly being offered as clouds. In Run 2 of the LHC the majority of CMS CERN resources, both in Meyrin and at the Wigner Computing Centre, will be presented as cloud resources on which CMS will have to build its own infrastructure. This infrastructure will need to run all of the CMS workflows including: Tier 0, production and user analysis. In addition, the CMS High Level Trigger will provide a compute resource comparable in scale to the total offered by the CMS Tier 1 sites, when it is not running as part of themore » trigger system. During these periods a cloud infrastructure will be overlaid on this resource, making it accessible for general CMS use. Finally, CMS is starting to utilise cloud resources being offered by individual institutes and is gaining experience to facilitate the use of opportunistically available cloud resources. Lastly, we present a snap shot of this infrastructure and its operation at the time of the CHEP2015 conference.« less

  16. Final Technical Report CMS fast optical calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, David R.

    2012-07-12

    This is the final report of CMS FAST OPTICAL CALORIMETRY, a grant to Fairfield University for development, construction, installation and operation of the forward calorimeter on CMS, and for upgrades of the forward and endcap calorimeters for higher luminosity and radiation damage amelioration.

  17. The status of the CMS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Dan; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The CMS experiment was completely assembled in the fall of 2008 after a decade of design, construction and installation. During the last two years, cosmic ray data were taken on a regular basis. These data have enabled CMS to align the detector components, both spatially and temporally. Initial use of muons has also established the relative alignment of the CMS tracking and muon systems. In addition, the CMS calorimetry has been crosschecked with test beam data, thus providing an initial energy calibration of CMS calorimetry to about 5%. The CMS magnet has been powered and field mapped. The trigger and data acquisition systems have been installed and run at full speed. The tiered data analysis system has been exercised at full design bandwidth for Tier0, Tier1 and Tier2 sites. Monte Carlo simulation of the CMS detector has been constructed at a detailed geometric level and has been tuned to test beam and other production data to provide a realistic model of the CMS detector prior to first collisions.

  18. CMS: The Midwife of Instruction and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Valerie

    1989-01-01

    Gifted students may exhibit a deficit in ability to follow a sequence of verbal instructions, termed Cognition of SeMantic Systems (CMS). Three types of low-CMS students are described, and counseling strategies are outlined. Achievement of academic success and emotional health calls for teachers to build students' self-esteem and be patient. (JDD)

  19. Getting Started with Drupal WebCMS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Drupal WebCMS is accessible to EPA employees, and to onsite and offsite contractors. There are several roles in Drupal WebCMS and each allows a certain set of actions in the system. Users can have different roles in different web areas.

  20. SKIROC2_CMS an ASIC for testing CMS HGCAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, J.; Callier, S.; Coko, D.; Dulucq, F.; de La Taille, C.; Raux, L.; Sculac, T.; Thienpont, D.

    2017-02-01

    SKIROC2_CMS is a chip derived from CALICE SKIROC2 that provides 64 channels of low noise charge preamplifiers optimized for 50 pF pin diodes and 10 pC dynamic range. They are followed by high gain and low gain 25 ns shapers, a 13-deep 40 MHz analog memory used as a waveform sampler at 40 MHz. and 12-bit ADCs. A fast shaper followed by discriminator and TDC provide timing information to an accuracy of 50 ps, in order to test TOT and TOA techniques at system level and in test-beam. The chip was sent to fabrication in January 2016 in AMS SiGe 0,35 μm and was received in May. It was tested in the lab during the summer and will be mounted on sensors for beam-tests in the fall.

  1. Research on joint parameter inversion for an integrated underground displacement 3D measuring sensor.

    PubMed

    Shentu, Nanying; Qiu, Guohua; Li, Qing; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Wang, Yanjie

    2015-04-13

    Underground displacement monitoring is a key means to monitor and evaluate geological disasters and geotechnical projects. There exist few practical instruments able to monitor subsurface horizontal and vertical displacements simultaneously due to monitoring invisibility and complexity. A novel underground displacement 3D measuring sensor had been proposed in our previous studies, and great efforts have been taken in the basic theoretical research of underground displacement sensing and measuring characteristics by virtue of modeling, simulation and experiments. This paper presents an innovative underground displacement joint inversion method by mixing a specific forward modeling approach with an approximate optimization inversion procedure. It can realize a joint inversion of underground horizontal displacement and vertical displacement for the proposed 3D sensor. Comparative studies have been conducted between the measured and inversed parameters of underground horizontal and vertical displacements under a variety of experimental and inverse conditions. The results showed that when experimentally measured horizontal displacements and vertical displacements are both varied within 0~30 mm, horizontal displacement and vertical displacement inversion discrepancies are generally less than 3 mm and 1 mm, respectively, under three kinds of simulated underground displacement monitoring circumstances. This implies that our proposed underground displacement joint inversion method is robust and efficient to predict the measuring values of underground horizontal and vertical displacements for the proposed sensor.

  2. Research on Joint Parameter Inversion for an Integrated Underground Displacement 3D Measuring Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Nanying; Qiu, Guohua; Li, Qing; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Wang, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    Underground displacement monitoring is a key means to monitor and evaluate geological disasters and geotechnical projects. There exist few practical instruments able to monitor subsurface horizontal and vertical displacements simultaneously due to monitoring invisibility and complexity. A novel underground displacement 3D measuring sensor had been proposed in our previous studies, and great efforts have been taken in the basic theoretical research of underground displacement sensing and measuring characteristics by virtue of modeling, simulation and experiments. This paper presents an innovative underground displacement joint inversion method by mixing a specific forward modeling approach with an approximate optimization inversion procedure. It can realize a joint inversion of underground horizontal displacement and vertical displacement for the proposed 3D sensor. Comparative studies have been conducted between the measured and inversed parameters of underground horizontal and vertical displacements under a variety of experimental and inverse conditions. The results showed that when experimentally measured horizontal displacements and vertical displacements are both varied within 0 ~ 30 mm, horizontal displacement and vertical displacement inversion discrepancies are generally less than 3 mm and 1 mm, respectively, under three kinds of simulated underground displacement monitoring circumstances. This implies that our proposed underground displacement joint inversion method is robust and efficient to predict the measuring values of underground horizontal and vertical displacements for the proposed sensor. PMID:25871714

  3. Automatic identification of bullet signatures based on consecutive matching striae (CMS) criteria.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wei; Thompson, Robert M; Song, John; Vorburger, Theodore V

    2013-09-10

    The consecutive matching striae (CMS) numeric criteria for firearm and toolmark identifications have been widely accepted by forensic examiners, although there have been questions concerning its observer subjectivity and limited statistical support. In this paper, based on signal processing and extraction, a model for the automatic and objective counting of CMS is proposed. The position and shape information of the striae on the bullet land is represented by a feature profile, which is used for determining the CMS number automatically. Rapid counting of CMS number provides a basis for ballistics correlations with large databases and further statistical and probability analysis. Experimental results in this report using bullets fired from ten consecutively manufactured barrels support this developed model.

  4. CMS results on multijet correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Safronov, Grigory

    2015-04-10

    We present recent CMS measurements on multijet correlations using forward and low-p{sub T} jets, focusing on searches for BFKL and saturation phenomena. In pp collisions at √(s)=7 TeV, azimuthal correlations in dijets separated in rapidity by up to 9.4 units were measured. The results are compared to BFKL- and DGLAP-based predictions. In pp collisions at √(s)=8 TeV, cross sections for jets with p{sub T} > 21 GeV and |y| < 4.7, and for track-jets with p{sub T} > 1 GeV (minijets) are presented. The minijet results are sensitive to the bound imposed by the total inelastic cross section, and are compared to various models for taming the growth of the 2 → 2 cross section at low p{sub T}.

  5. Advancing Underground Nuclear Astrophysics with CASPAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Daniel; Couder, Manoel; Greife, Uwe; Strieder, Frank; Wells, Doug; Wiescher, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The advancement of experimental nuclear astrophysics techniques and the requirement of astrophysical network models for further nuclear data over greater energy ranges, has led to the requirement for the better understanding of nuclear reactions in stellar burning regimes. For those reactions of importance to stellar burning processes and elemental production through stellar nucleosynthesis, the energy range of astrophysical interest is always problematic to probe. As reaction measurements approach the burning window of interest, the rapid drop off in cross-section hampers laboratory investigation. The natural background suppression of underground accelerator facilities enables the extension of current experimental data to lower energies. An example of such reactions of interest are those thought to be sources of neutrons for the s-process, the major production mechanism for elements above the iron peak. The reactions 13 C(α,n)16 O and 22 Ne(α,n)25 Mg are the proposed initial focus of the new nuclear astrophysics accelerator laboratory (CASPAR) currently under construction at the Sanford Underground Research Facility, Lead, SD. With thanks to funding provided by South Dakota Science and Technology Authority and the NSF under Grant Number PHY-1419765.

  6. CMS centres worldwide: A new collaborative infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Lucas; Gottschalk, Erik; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC is establishing a global network of inter-connected 'CMS Centres' for controls, operations and monitoring. These support: (1) CMS data quality monitoring, detector calibrations, and analysis; and (2) computing operations for the processing, storage and distribution of CMS data. We describe the infrastructure, computing, software, and communications systems required to create an effective and affordable CMS Centre. We present our highly successful operations experiences with the major CMS Centres at CERN, Fermilab, and DESY during the LHC first beam data-taking and cosmic ray commissioning work. The status of the various centres already operating or under construction in Asia, Europe, Russia, South America, and the USA is also described. We emphasise the collaborative communications aspects. For example, virtual co-location of experts in CMS Centres Worldwide is achieved using high-quality permanently-running 'telepresence' video links. Generic Web-based tools have been developed and deployed for monitoring, control, display management and outreach.

  7. Underground at Black Diamond Mines

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.T.

    1989-10-01

    Although California is noted for its mining history and annually leads the nation in total monetary value of minerals produced, there a few opportunities for the public to tour underground mines. One reason is that nearly all mining in the state today is done above ground in open pits. Another reason is that active underground mines are not commonly favorable to public tours. There is one place, Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve, where the public can safely tour a formerly active underground mine. Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve is a 3,600-acre parkland about 5 miles southwest of Antioch in Contra Costa County. The Preserve was established in the early 1970s and is administered by the East Bay Regional Park District. Black Diamond Mines Preserve is noteworthy for its mining history as well as its natural history, both of which are briefly described here.

  8. a Dedicated Beam Tests of the Full-Scale Prototype of GEMS for Cms in a Strong Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaneo, D.; Bally, S.; Postema, H.; Garcia, A. Conde; Chatalain, J. P.; Faber, G.; Ropelewski, L.; Pinto, S. Duarte; Croci, G.; Alfonsi, M.; van Stenis, M.; Sharma, A.; Villa, M.; Zientek, M.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Passamonti, L.; Piccolo, D.; Pierluigi, D.; Raffone, G.; Russo, A.; Saviano, G.; Marinov, A.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Hohlmann, M.; Gnanvo, K.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Cecchi, R.; Turini, N.; Oliveri, E.; Magazzu, G.

    2012-08-01

    In the high-eta (1.6 - 2.4) region of the CMS endcap, Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM) present an interesting option for a future upgrade of the forward region of the CMS muon system. Large GEM detectors are challenging due to technological issues; in the view of the CMS upgrade we have designed and built the largest full-size triple GEM-based muon detector to-date. This prototype meets the stringent requirements of the hostile forward environment of CMS at high-luminosity LHC. Dedicated test beam measurements have been performed at the SPS in June 2011 to study efficiency, space resolution, and timing performance with different inter-electrode gap configurations and gas mixtures and in a strong magnetic field of 3T (as at CMS). Preliminary results of these experimental tests will be presented.

  9. Progress of Jinping Underground laboratory for Nuclear Astrophysics experiment JUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiping

    2015-08-01

    Direct measurement of the cross sections for the key nuclear reactions in hydrostatic stellar evolution within Gamow window, which makes use of low background at deep underground laboratory, is crucial to solve key scientific questions in nuclear astrophysics. JUNA project aims at direct measurement of (α,γ), (α,n) reactions in hydrostatic helium burning and (p, γ), (p, α) reactions in hydrostatic hydrogen burning based on Jinping deep underground laboratory in China. The progress of experimental techniques, which include the accelerator system with high stability and high intensity, the detector system, and the shielding material with low background, will be presented.

  10. Locating nuclear power plants underground.

    PubMed

    Scott, F M

    1975-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the questions that have been asked by experts and others as to why nuclear power plants are not located or placed underground. While the safeguards and present designs make such installations unnecessary, there are some definite advantages that warrant the additional cost involved. First of all, such an arrangement does satisfy the psychological concern of a number of people and, in so doing, might gain the acceptance of the public so that such plants could be constructed in urban areas of load centers. The results of these studies are presented and some of the requirements necessary for underground installations described, including rock conditions, depth of facilities, and economics.

  11. Logistics background study: underground mining

    SciTech Connect

    Hanslovan, J. J.; Visovsky, R. G.

    1982-02-01

    Logistical functions that are normally associated with US underground coal mining are investigated and analyzed. These functions imply all activities and services that support the producing sections of the mine. The report provides a better understanding of how these functions impact coal production in terms of time, cost, and safety. Major underground logistics activities are analyzed and include: transportation and personnel, supplies and equipment; transportation of coal and rock; electrical distribution and communications systems; water handling; hydraulics; and ventilation systems. Recommended areas for future research are identified and prioritized.

  12. Underground Nuclear Astrophysics in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiping

    2016-10-01

    Underground Nuclear Astrophysics in China (JUNA) will take the advantage of the ultra-low background in Jinping underground lab. High current accelerator with an ECR source and detectors will be set up. We plan to study directly a number of nuclear reactions important to hydrostatic stellar evolution at their relevant stellar energies, such as 25Mg(p,γ)26Al, 19F(p,α)16O, 13C(α,n)16O and 12C(α,γ)16O.

  13. The CMS Masterclass and Particle Physics Outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Cecire, Kenneth; Bardeen, Marjorie; McCauley, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The CMS Masterclass enables high school students to analyse authentic CMS data. Students can draw conclusions on key ratios and particle masses by combining their analyses. In particular, they can use the ratio of W^+ to W^- candidates to probe the structure of the proton, they can find the mass of the Z boson, and they can identify additional particles including, tentatively, the Higgs boson. In the United States, masterclasses are part of QuarkNet, a long-term program that enables students and teachers to use cosmic ray and particle physics data for learning with an emphasis on data from CMS.

  14. CMS for digital photography: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Robert Y.; Sa-areddee, Darunee

    2002-06-01

    The objectives of the study was to compare image quality from digital photography to RGB-printer under two digital imaging workflows: legacy-based and CMS-based. Due to the difference in judging criteria, the study shows that legacy- based digital imaging workflow can produce pleasing images as good as CMS-based workflow. But ICC-based CMS out performs legacy-based workflow in matching the color appearance of the source images. This is a welcome feature in direct mail catalogs whereby printed images need to match the appearance of the merchandise closely.

  15. Geotechnical basis for underground energy storage in hard rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquhar, O. C.

    1982-03-01

    Underground pumped hydroelectric storage requires the excavation of caverns in hard rock. Hard rock caverns, also, are one option for compressed air stoage. Preliminary design studies for both technologies at a specific site were completed. The geotechnical aspects of these storage systems are discussed from a generic viewpoint. Information about effective use of hard rock openings, including tunnels and shafts, comes mainly from other types of underground projects. These are power houses for hydroelectric and conventional pumped storage schemes, as well as transportation facilities and mines. Rock strength, support, instrumentation, costs, management, and experimental work are among the items considered. Mapping of geologic structures, rock fragmentation, and rock mass properties is also discussed. The general conclusions are that rock types favorable for underground energy storage are present at suitable depths in many areas and that they can be identified by adequate geotechnical exploration prior to detailed design.

  16. Evacuation of aged persons from inundated underground space.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, T; Asai, Y; Nakahata, Y; Shimada, H; Baba, Y; Toda, K

    2010-01-01

    Underground is an important space that supports function of cities, such as subways, shopping malls and basement parking. However in consequence a new type of disaster, the "urban flood" menaces these spaces. In the last decade, urban floods struck Tokyo, Nagoya and Fukuoka. When underground inundation occurs, people must evacuate to the ground as soon as possible. But, when such an inundation situation happens, aged persons may not be able to evacuate quickly to ground level. In this paper, the method of safety assessment for aged persons is discussed on the experimental results and flood simulation data in an underground space. As a criterion of the safety evacuation, the specific force per unit width is used in this study. From the result of experiments, it is difficult to implement safety evacuation when the specific force per unit width is over 0.100 m(2) for the aged male.

  17. Underground metabolism: network-level perspective and biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    Notebaart, Richard A; Kintses, Bálint; Feist, Adam M; Papp, Balázs

    2017-08-21

    A key challenge in molecular systems biology is understanding how new pathways arise during evolution and how to exploit them for biotechnological applications. New pathways in metabolic networks often evolve by recruiting weak promiscuous activities of pre-existing enzymes. Here we describe recent systems biology advances to map such 'underground' activities and to predict and analyze their contribution to new metabolic functions. Underground activities are prevalent in cellular metabolism and can form novel pathways that either enable evolutionary adaptation to new environments or provide bypass to genetic lesions. We also illustrate the potential of integrating computational models of underground metabolism and experimental approaches to study the evolution of novel metabolic phenotypes and advance the field of biotechnology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Displacement parameter inversion for a novel electromagnetic underground displacement sensor.

    PubMed

    Shentu, Nanying; Li, Qing; Li, Xiong; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Jiang, Guoqing; Qiu, Guohua

    2014-05-22

    Underground displacement monitoring is an effective method to explore deep into rock and soil masses for execution of subsurface displacement measurements. It is not only an important means of geological hazards prediction and forecasting, but also a forefront, hot and sophisticated subject in current geological disaster monitoring. In previous research, the authors had designed a novel electromagnetic underground horizontal displacement sensor (called the H-type sensor) by combining basic electromagnetic induction principles with modern sensing techniques and established a mutual voltage measurement theoretical model called the Equation-based Equivalent Loop Approach (EELA). Based on that work, this paper presents an underground displacement inversion approach named "EELA forward modeling-approximate inversion method". Combining the EELA forward simulation approach with the approximate optimization inversion theory, it can deduce the underground horizontal displacement through parameter inversion of the H-type sensor. Comprehensive and comparative studies have been conducted between the experimentally measured and theoretically inversed values of horizontal displacement under counterpart conditions. The results show when the measured horizontal displacements are in the 0-100 mm range, the horizontal displacement inversion discrepancy is generally tested to be less than 3 mm under varied tilt angles and initial axial distances conditions, which indicates that our proposed parameter inversion method can predict underground horizontal displacement measurements effectively and robustly for the H-type sensor and the technique is applicable for practical geo-engineering applications.

  19. Displacement Parameter Inversion for a Novel Electromagnetic Underground Displacement Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Nanying; Li, Qing; Li, Xiong; Tong, Renyuan; Shentu, Nankai; Jiang, Guoqing; Qiu, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    Underground displacement monitoring is an effective method to explore deep into rock and soil masses for execution of subsurface displacement measurements. It is not only an important means of geological hazards prediction and forecasting, but also a forefront, hot and sophisticated subject in current geological disaster monitoring. In previous research, the authors had designed a novel electromagnetic underground horizontal displacement sensor (called the H-type sensor) by combining basic electromagnetic induction principles with modern sensing techniques and established a mutual voltage measurement theoretical model called the Equation-based Equivalent Loop Approach (EELA). Based on that work, this paper presents an underground displacement inversion approach named “EELA forward modeling-approximate inversion method”. Combining the EELA forward simulation approach with the approximate optimization inversion theory, it can deduce the underground horizontal displacement through parameter inversion of the H-type sensor. Comprehensive and comparative studies have been conducted between the experimentally measured and theoretically inversed values of horizontal displacement under counterpart conditions. The results show when the measured horizontal displacements are in the 0–100 mm range, the horizontal displacement inversion discrepancy is generally tested to be less than 3 mm under varied tilt angles and initial axial distances conditions, which indicates that our proposed parameter inversion method can predict underground horizontal displacement measurements effectively and robustly for the H-type sensor and the technique is applicable for practical geo-engineering applications. PMID:24858960

  20. 42 CFR 426.517 - CMS' statement regarding new evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CMS' statement regarding new evidence. 426.517... COVERAGE DETERMINATIONS Review of an NCD § 426.517 CMS' statement regarding new evidence. (a) CMS may... clinical experts; and (5) Presented during any hearing. (b) CMS may submit a statement regarding...

  1. 42 CFR 489.53 - Termination by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Termination by CMS. 489.53 Section 489.53 Public... Reinstatement After Termination § 489.53 Termination by CMS. (a) Basis for termination of agreement with any provider. CMS may terminate the agreement with any provider if CMS finds that any of the following...

  2. 42 CFR 489.53 - Termination by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Termination by CMS. 489.53 Section 489.53 Public... Reinstatement After Termination § 489.53 Termination by CMS. (a) Basis for termination of agreement with any provider. CMS may terminate the agreement with any provider if CMS finds that any of the following...

  3. 42 CFR 460.20 - Notice of CMS determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notice of CMS determination. 460.20 Section 460.20... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.20 Notice of CMS determination. (a... application to CMS, CMS takes one of the following actions: (1) Approves the application. (2) Denies...

  4. 42 CFR 426.517 - CMS' statement regarding new evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CMS' statement regarding new evidence. 426.517... DETERMINATIONS Review of an NCD § 426.517 CMS' statement regarding new evidence. (a) CMS may review any new... experts; and (5) Presented during any hearing. (b) CMS may submit a statement regarding whether the...

  5. 42 CFR 489.53 - Termination by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination by CMS. 489.53 Section 489.53 Public... Reinstatement After Termination § 489.53 Termination by CMS. (a) Basis for termination of agreement with any provider. CMS may terminate the agreement with any provider if CMS finds that any of the following...

  6. 42 CFR 460.20 - Notice of CMS determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notice of CMS determination. 460.20 Section 460.20... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.20 Notice of CMS determination. (a... application to CMS, CMS takes one of the following actions: (1) Approves the application. (2) Denies...

  7. 42 CFR 426.517 - CMS' statement regarding new evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMS' statement regarding new evidence. 426.517... COVERAGE DETERMINATIONS Review of an NCD § 426.517 CMS' statement regarding new evidence. (a) CMS may... clinical experts; and (5) Presented during any hearing. (b) CMS may submit a statement regarding...

  8. 42 CFR 460.20 - Notice of CMS determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notice of CMS determination. 460.20 Section 460.20... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.20 Notice of CMS determination. (a... application to CMS, CMS takes one of the following actions: (1) Approves the application. (2) Denies...

  9. 42 CFR 426.517 - CMS' statement regarding new evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CMS' statement regarding new evidence. 426.517... DETERMINATIONS Review of an NCD § 426.517 CMS' statement regarding new evidence. (a) CMS may review any new... experts; and (5) Presented during any hearing. (b) CMS may submit a statement regarding whether the...

  10. 42 CFR 426.517 - CMS' statement regarding new evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CMS' statement regarding new evidence. 426.517... COVERAGE DETERMINATIONS Review of an NCD § 426.517 CMS' statement regarding new evidence. (a) CMS may... clinical experts; and (5) Presented during any hearing. (b) CMS may submit a statement regarding...

  11. 42 CFR 489.53 - Termination by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Termination by CMS. 489.53 Section 489.53 Public... Reinstatement After Termination § 489.53 Termination by CMS. (a) Basis for termination of agreement with any provider. CMS may terminate the agreement with any provider if CMS finds that any of the following...

  12. 42 CFR 460.20 - Notice of CMS determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notice of CMS determination. 460.20 Section 460.20... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.20 Notice of CMS determination. (a... application to CMS, CMS takes one of the following actions: (1) Approves the application. (2) Denies...

  13. Underground Coal Thermal Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.; Deo, M.; Eddings, E.; Sarofim, A.; Gueishen, K.; Hradisky, M.; Kelly, K.; Mandalaparty, P.; Zhang, H.

    2012-01-11

    The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coal's carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO2 sequestration.

  14. Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In 1986, Congress created the Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund to address releases from federally regulated underground storage tanks (USTs) by amending Subtitle I of the Solid Waste Disposal Act.

  15. Results from CMS on Higgs boson physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzurri, Paolo; CMS Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    A selection of measurements and results of Higgs physics obtained by the CMS experiment are presented, obtained with proton collision data collected in 2015 and 2016 at the center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  16. Predicting dataset popularity for the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V.; Li, T.; Giommi, L.; Bonacorsi, D.; Wildish, T.

    2016-10-01

    The CMS experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN relies on its computing infrastructure to stay at the frontier of High Energy Physics, searching for new phenomena and making discoveries. Even though computing plays a significant role in physics analysis we rarely use its data to predict the system behavior itself. A basic information about computing resources, user activities and site utilization can be really useful for improving the throughput of the system and its management. In this paper, we discuss a first CMS analysis of dataset popularity based on CMS meta-data which can be used as a model for dynamic data placement and provide the foundation of data-driven approach for the CMS computing infrastructure.

  17. The CMS central hadron calorimeter: Update

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, J.

    1998-06-01

    The CMS central hadron calorimeter is a brass absorber/ scintillator sampling structure. We describe details of the mechanical and optical structure. We also discuss calibration techniques, and finally the anticipated construction schedule.

  18. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  19. Earthquake damage to underground facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, H.R.; Stephenson, D.E.; Zandt, G.; Bouchon, M.; Hustrulid, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    In order to assess the seismic risk for an underground facility, a data base was established and analyzed to evaluate the potential for seismic disturbance. Substantial damage to underground facilities is usually the result of displacements primarily along pre-existing faults and fractures, or at the surface entrance to these facilities. Evidence of this comes from both earthquakes and large explosions. Therefore, the displacement due to earthquakes as a function of depth is important in the evaluation of the hazard to underground facilities. To evaluate potential displacements due to seismic effects of block motions along pre-existing or induced fractures, the displacement fields surrounding two types of faults were investigated. Analytical models were used to determine relative displacements of shafts and near-surface displacement of large rock masses. Numerical methods were used to determine the displacement fields associated with pure strike-slip and vertical normal faults. Results are presented as displacements for various fault lengths as a function of depth and distance. This provides input to determine potential displacements in terms of depth and distance for underground facilities, important for assessing potential sites and design parameters.

  20. Slavery and the Underground Railroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Nancy Comfort

    2000-01-01

    Presents a bibliography of sources to help children understand slavery and the Underground Railroad and recommends a combination of fiction and nonfiction for a better understanding. Includes picture books, biographies of people who played prominent roles during the time of slavery, nonfiction books for older readers, and videotape. (LRW)

  1. Slavery and the Underground Railroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Nancy Comfort

    2000-01-01

    Presents a bibliography of sources to help children understand slavery and the Underground Railroad and recommends a combination of fiction and nonfiction for a better understanding. Includes picture books, biographies of people who played prominent roles during the time of slavery, nonfiction books for older readers, and videotape. (LRW)

  2. Underground technology benefits surface operations

    SciTech Connect

    Swaim, M.

    2008-09-15

    Sensitive ground fault relays (GFRs) on high voltage underground electrical equipment have been in used for a number of years to improve mine safety. Advanced GFRs do more than just interrupt fault current flow. They can also reveal linkages as they develop so ground faults are detected before they become critical. 3 figs.

  3. File level provenance tracking in CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.D.; Kowalkowski, J.; Paterno, M.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Tanenbaum, W.; Riley, D.S.; /Cornell U., LEPP

    2009-05-01

    The CMS off-line framework stores provenance information within CMS's standard ROOT event data files. The provenance information is used to track how each data product was constructed, including what other data products were read to do the construction. We will present how the framework gathers the provenance information, the efforts necessary to minimize the space used to store the provenance in the file and the tools that will be available to use the provenance.

  4. Virtual data in CMS analysis

    SciTech Connect

    A. Arbree et al.

    2003-10-01

    The use of virtual data for enhancing the collaboration between large groups of scientists is explored in several ways: by defining ''virtual'' parameter spaces which can be searched and shared in an organized way by a collaboration of scientists in the course of their analysis; by providing a mechanism to log the provenance of results and the ability to trace them back to the various stages in the analysis of real or simulated data; by creating ''check points'' in the course of an analysis to permit collaborators to explore their own analysis branches by refining selections, improving the signal to background ratio, varying the estimation of parameters, etc.; by facilitating the audit of an analysis and the reproduction of its results by a different group, or in a peer review context. We describe a prototype for the analysis of data from the CMS experiment based on the virtual data system Chimera and the object-oriented data analysis framework ROOT. The Chimera system is used to chain together several steps in the analysis process including the Monte Carlo generation of data, the simulation of detector response, the reconstruction of physics objects and their subsequent analysis, histogramming and visualization using the ROOT framework.

  5. CRAB: Distributed analysis tool for CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Leonardo; CMS Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    CMS has a distributed computing model, based on a hierarchy of tiered regional computing centers and adopts a data driven model for the end user analysis. This model foresees that jobs are submitted to the analysis resources where data are hosted. The increasing complexity of the whole computing infrastructure makes the simple analysis work flow more and more complicated for the end user. CMS has developed and deployed a dedicated tool named CRAB (CMS Remote Analysis Builder) in order to guarantee the physicists an efficient access to the distributed data whilst hiding the underlying complexity. This tool is used by CMS to enable the running of physics analysis jobs in a transparent manner over data distributed across sites. It factorizes out the interaction with the underlying batch farms, grid infrastructure and CMS data management tools, allowing the user to deal only with a simple and intuitive interface. We present the CRAB architecture, as well as the current status and lessons learnt in deploying this tool for use by the CMS collaboration. We also present the future development of the CRAB system.

  6. CMS-Wave Model: Part 4. An Automated Procedure for CMS-Wave in Resource-Demanding Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    user’s manual for CMS -Wave are available (Lin et al. 2008, 2006; Demirbilek et al. 2007). CMS -Wave is part of the Coastal Modeling System developed...at the same level as the subfolders. Figure 2 shows the contents of the Visser_1991 example subfolder, including two CMS -Wave simulations, named as...and the surrounding area (red line denotes the CMS domain). The Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) was applied to evaluate current and sedimentation

  7. Applying the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to Explore the Effects of a Course Management System (CMS)-Assisted EFL Writing Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Yea-Ru

    2015-01-01

    This study illustrates a teaching model that utilizes a Blackboard (Bb) course management system (CMS) to support English writing instruction. It was implemented in a blended English research paper (RP) writing course, with specific learning resources and activities offered inside and outside the Bb CMS. A quasi-experimental study in which the…

  8. Underground hibernation in a primate.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Marina B; Dausmann, Kathrin H; Ranaivoarisoa, Jean F; Yoder, Anne D

    2013-01-01

    Hibernation in mammals is a remarkable state of heterothermy wherein metabolic rates are reduced, core body temperatures reach ambient levels, and key physiological functions are suspended. Typically, hibernation is observed in cold-adapted mammals, though it has also been documented in tropical species and even primates, such as the dwarf lemurs of Madagascar. Western fat-tailed dwarf lemurs are known to hibernate for seven months per year inside tree holes. Here, we report for the first time the observation that eastern dwarf lemurs also hibernate, though in self-made underground hibernacula. Hence, we show evidence that a clawless primate is able to bury itself below ground. Our findings that dwarf lemurs can hibernate underground in tropical forests draw unforeseen parallels to mammalian temperate hibernation. We expect that this work will illuminate fundamental information about the influence of temperature, resource limitation and use of insulated hibernacula on the evolution of hibernation.

  9. Underground hibernation in a primate

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Marina B.; Dausmann, Kathrin H.; Ranaivoarisoa, Jean F.; Yoder, Anne D.

    2013-01-01

    Hibernation in mammals is a remarkable state of heterothermy wherein metabolic rates are reduced, core body temperatures reach ambient levels, and key physiological functions are suspended. Typically, hibernation is observed in cold-adapted mammals, though it has also been documented in tropical species and even primates, such as the dwarf lemurs of Madagascar. Western fat-tailed dwarf lemurs are known to hibernate for seven months per year inside tree holes. Here, we report for the first time the observation that eastern dwarf lemurs also hibernate, though in self-made underground hibernacula. Hence, we show evidence that a clawless primate is able to bury itself below ground. Our findings that dwarf lemurs can hibernate underground in tropical forests draw unforeseen parallels to mammalian temperate hibernation. We expect that this work will illuminate fundamental information about the influence of temperature, resource limitation and use of insulated hibernacula on the evolution of hibernation. PMID:23636180

  10. Quantum cryptography over underground optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; Luther, G.G.; Morgan, G.L.; Peterson, C.G.; Simmons, C.

    1996-05-01

    Quantum cryptography is an emerging technology in which two parties may simultaneously generated shared, secret cryptographic key material using the transmission of quantum states of light whose security is based on the inviolability of the laws of quantum mechanics. An adversary can neither successfully tap the key transmissions, nor evade detection, owing to Heisenberg`s uncertainty principle. In this paper the authors describe the theory of quantum cryptography, and the most recent results from their experimental system with which they are generating key material over 14-km of underground optical fiber. These results show that optical-fiber based quantum cryptography could allow secure, real-time key generation over ``open`` multi-km node-to-node optical fiber communications links between secure ``islands.``

  11. Radionuclides in an underground environment

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.L.

    1996-08-01

    In the 100 years since Becquerel recognized radioactivity, mankind has been very successful in producing large amounts of radioactive materials. We have been less successful in reaching a consensus on how to dispose of the billions of curies of fission products and transuranics resulting from nuclear weapons testing, electrical power generation, medical research, and a variety of other human endeavors. Many countries, including the United States, favor underground burial as a means of disposing of radioactive wastes. There are, however, serious questions about how such buried wastes may behave in the underground environment and particularly how they might eventually contaminate water, air and soil resources on which we are dependent. This paper describes research done in the United States in the state of Nevada on the behavior of radioactive materials placed underground. During the last thirty years, a series of ``experiments`` conducted for other purposes (testing of nuclear weapons) have resulted in a wide variety of fission products and actinides being injected in rock strata both above and below the water table. Variables which seem to control the movement of these radionuclides include the physical form (occlusion versus surface deposition), the chemical oxidation state, sorption by mineral phases of the host rock, and the hydrologic properties of the medium. The information gained from these studies should be relevant to planning for remediation of nuclear facilities elsewhere in the world and for long-term storage of nuclear wastes.

  12. The stress and underground environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chama, A.

    2009-04-01

    Currently,the program of prevention in occupational health needs mainly to identify occupational hazards and strategy of their prevention.Among these risks,the stress represents an important psycho-social hazard in mental health,which unfortunately does not spare no occupation.My Paper attempts to highlight and to develop this hazard in its different aspects even its regulatory side in underground environment as occupational environment.In the interest of better prevention ,we consider "the information" about the impact of stress as the second prevention efficient and no expensive to speleologists,hygienists and workers in the underground areas. In this occasion of this event in Vienna,we also highlight the scientific works on the stress of the famous viennese physician and endocrinologist Doctor Hans Selye (1907-1982),nicknamed "the father of stress" and note on relation between biological rhythms in this underground area and psychological troubles (temporal isolation) (Jurgen Aschoff’s works and experiences out-of time).

  13. Above- and underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Canning, K.; Kilbourne, A.

    1997-09-01

    Storage tanks are the primary means of storing liquid, fluid and gas products. Federal and state environmental regulations, as well as local building and fire codes, take into account leaks and spills, tank emissions, underground tank seepage and safety issues, and they define standards for tank manufacturers and owners. For specific regulatory information pertaining to your application, contact the local authorities having jurisdiction. Storage tanks listed within this product guide have been classified as underground or aboveground, with subcategories including modular, process and temporary tanks. Tank construction materials include aluminum, carbon steel, concrete, fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP) and stainless steel. A variety of accessories, including automatic tank gauging systems, level monitors, leak detectors, overfill protection and tank inspection systems, also are listed. Aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) have less than 10 percent of their tank volume and piping below ground. Available in both vertical and horizontal configurations, they can be either erected in the field or fabricated in a factory. Underground storage tanks (USTs) are primarily used to contain regulated substances; USTs have at least 10% of their tank volume and piping buried belowground. Common UST construction materials include carbon steel, coated steel, cathodically protected steel and FRP. USTs are required to have corrosion protection, spill and overfill prevention and control and release detection in place by December 1998.

  14. Underground storage of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Shoichi

    1993-12-31

    Desk studies on underground storage of CO{sub 2} were carried out from 1990 to 1991 fiscal years by two organizations under contract with New Energy and Indestrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). One group put emphasis on application of CO{sub 2} EOR (enhanced oil recovery), and the other covered various aspects of underground storage system. CO{sub 2} EOR is a popular EOR method in U.S. and some oil countries. At present, CO{sub 2} is supplied from natural CO{sub 2} reservoirs. Possible use of CO{sub 2} derived from fixed sources of industries is a main target of the study in order to increase oil recovery and storage CO{sub 2} under ground. The feasibility study of the total system estimates capacity of storage of CO{sub 2} as around 60 Gton CO{sub 2}, if worldwide application are realized. There exist huge volumes of underground aquifers which are not utilized usually because of high salinity. The deep aquifers can contain large amount of CO{sub 2} in form of compressed state, liquefied state or solution to aquifer. A preliminary technical and economical survey on the system suggests favorable results of 320 Gton CO{sub 2} potential. Technical problems are discussed through these studies, and economical aspects are also evaluated.

  15. The world deep underground laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettini, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper is an introduction to a series of coordinated articles of an EPJ Plus Focus Point on underground physics laboratories, written by the directors of the larger ones and by the coordinators of the principal new projects. The paper is largely based on the text of my lecture Perspectives of underground physics, given at the Enrico Fermi Varenna International School, Course CLXXXII (2011), Neutrino physics and astrophysics, reproduced here by permission of the Italian Physical Society. Underground laboratories provide the low radioactive background environment necessary to explore the highest energy scales that cannot be reached with accelerators, by searching for extremely rare phenomena. Experiments range from the direct search of the dark-matter particles that constitute the largest fraction of matter in the Universe, to the exploration of the properties of the neutrinos, the most elusive of the known particles and which might be particle and antiparticle at the same time, to the investigation on why our universe contains only matter and almost no antimatter, and much more.

  16. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, N.; Dabrowski, A. E.; Fabbri, F.; Grassi, T.; Hughes, E.; Mans, J.; Montanari, A.; Orfanelli, S.; Rusack, R.; Torromeo, G.; Stickland, D. P.; Stifter, K.

    2016-02-01

    The CMS Beam Halo Monitor has been successfully installed in the CMS cavern in LHC Long Shutdown 1 for measuring the machine induced background for LHC Run II. The system is based on 40 detector units composed of synthetic quartz Cherenkov radiators coupled to fast photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The readout electronics chain uses many components developed for the Phase 1 upgrade to the CMS Hadronic Calorimeter electronics, with dedicated firmware and readout adapted to the beam monitoring requirements. The PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC (QIE10), providing both the signal rise time, with few nanosecond resolution, and the charge integrated over one bunch crossing. The backend electronics uses microTCA technology and receives data via a high-speed 5 Gbps asynchronous link. It records histograms with sub-bunch crossing timing resolution and is read out via IPbus using the newly designed CMS data acquisition for non-event based data. The data is processed in real time and published to CMS and the LHC, providing online feedback on the beam quality. A dedicated calibration monitoring system has been designed to generate short triggered pulses of light to monitor the efficiency of the system. The electronics has been in operation since the first LHC beams of Run II and has served as the first demonstration of the new QIE10, Microsemi Igloo2 FPGA and high-speed 5 Gbps link with LHC data.

  17. Exotic quarkonium states in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristella, Leonardo

    2017-03-01

    The studies of the production of the X(3872), either prompt or from B hadron decays, and of the J/ψϕ mass spectrum in B hadron decays have been carried out by using pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross-section ratio of the X(3872) with respect to the ψ(2S ) in the J/ψπ+π- decay channel and the fraction of X(3872) coming from B-hadron decays are measured as a function of transverse momentum (pT), covering unprecedentedly high values of pT. For the first time, the prompt production cross section for the X(3872) times the unknown branching fraction for the decay of X(3872) →J/ψπ+π- is extracted differentially in pT and compared to theoretical predictions based on the Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization approach. The dipion invariant-mass spectrum of the J/ψπ+π- system in the X(3872) decay is also investigated. A peaking structure in the J/ψϕ mass spectrum near threshold is observed in B± → J/ψϕK± decays. The data sample, selected on the basis of the dimuon decay mode of the J/ψ, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.2 fb-1. Fitting the structure to an S-wave relativistic Breit-Wigner lineshape above a three-body phase-space nonresonant component gives a signal statistical significance exceeding five standard deviations. The fitted mass and width values are m = 4148.0 ± 2.4(stat.) ± 6.3(syst.) MeV and Γ = 28-11+15 (stat.) ± 19(syst.) MeV, respectively. Evidence for an additional peaking structure at higher J/ψϕ mass is also reported. The search for resonance-like structures in the Bs0π± invariant mass spectrum do not show any unexpected result. An upper limit on the relative production of the claimed X(5568) and Bs multiplied by the unknown branching fraction of the decay X(5568) → Bsπ± is estimated to be 3.9% at 95% CL in the most conservative case.

  18. Inter-disciplinary Interactions in Underground Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. S.; Bettini, A.

    2010-12-01

    Many of underground facilities, ranging from simple cavities to fully equipped laboratories, have been established worldwide (1) to evaluate the impacts of emplacing nuclear wastes in underground research laboratories (URLs) and (2) to measure rare physics events in deep underground laboratories (DULs). In this presentation, we compare similarities and differences between URLs and DULs in focus of site characterization, in quantification of quietness, and in improvement of signal to noise ratios. The nuclear waste URLs are located primarily in geological medium with potentials for slow flow/transport and long isolation. The URL medium include plastic salt, hard rock, soft clay, volcanic tuff, basalt and shale, at over ~500 m where waste repositories are envisioned to be excavated. The majority of URLs are dedicated facilities excavated after extensive site characterization. The focuses are on fracture distributions, heterogeneity, scaling, coupled processes, and other fundamental issues of earth sciences. For the physics DULs, the depth/overburden thickness is the main parameter that determines the damping of cosmic rays, and that, consequently, should be larger than, typically, 800m. Radioactivity from rocks, neutron flux, and radon gas, depending on local rock and ventilation conditions (largely independent of depth), are also characterized at different sites to quantify the background level for physics experiments. DULs have been constructed by excavating dedicated experimental halls and service cavities near to a road tunnel (horizontal access) or in a mine (vertical access). Cavities at shallower depths are suitable for experiments on neutrinos from artificial source, power reactors or accelerators. Rocks stability (depth dependent), safe access, and utility supply are among factors of main concerns for DULs. While the focuses and missions of URLs and DULs are very different, common experience and lessons learned may be useful for ongoing development of new

  19. Calorimeter Simulation with Hadrons in CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Piperov, Stefan; /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    CMS is using Geant4 to simulate the detector setup for the forthcoming data from the LHC. Validation of physics processes inside Geant4 is a major concern in view of getting a proper description of jets and missing energy for signal and background events. This is done by carrying out an extensive studies with test beam using the prototypes or real detector modules of the CMS calorimeter. These data are matched with Geant4 predictions using the same framework that is used for the entire CMS detector. Tuning of the Geant4 models is carried out and steps to be used in reproducing detector signals are defined in view of measurements of energy response, energy resolution, transverse and longitudinal shower profiles for a variety of hadron beams over a broad energy spectrum between 2 to 300 GeV/c. The tuned Monte Carlo predictions match many of these measurements within systematic uncertainties.

  20. The Physics of the CMS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sanabria, J. C.

    2007-10-26

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will start running 2008 producing proton-proton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. Four large experiments will operate together with this accelerator: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. The main scientific goal of this project is to understand in detail the mechanism for electro-weak symmetry breaking and to search for physics beyond the standard model of particles. ATLAS and CMS are general purpose detectors designed for search and discovery of new physics, and optimized to search for Higgs and signals of supersymmetric matter (SUSY). In this paper the main features of the CMS detector will be presented and its potential for Higgs and SUSY discoveries will be discussed.

  1. Plans for Jet Energy Corrections at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Kalanand

    2009-05-01

    We present a plan for Jet Energy Corrections at CMS. Jet corrections at CMS will come initially from simulation tuned on test beam data, directly from collision data when available, and ultimately from a simulation tuned on collision data. The corrections will be factorized into a fixed sequence of sub-corrections associated with different detector and physics effects. The following three factors are minimum requirements for most analysis: offset corrections for pile-up and noise; correction for the response of the calorimeter as a function of jet pseudorapidity relative to the barrel; correction for the absolute response as a function of transverse momentum in the barrel. The required correction gives a jet Lorentz vector equivalent to the sum of particles in the jet cone emanating from a QCD hard collision. We discuss the status of these corrections, the planned data-driven techniques for their derivation, and their anticipated evolution with the stages of the CMS experiment.

  2. Fireworks: A physics event display for CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalskyi, D.; Tadel, M.; Mrak-Tadel, A.; Bellenot, B.; Kuznetsov, V.; Jones, C.D.; Bauerdick, L. Case, M.; Mulmenstadt, J.; Yagil, A.; /UC, San Diego

    2010-01-01

    Fireworks is a CMS event display which is specialized for the physics studies case. This specialization allows us to use a stylized rather than 3D-accurate representation when appropriate. Data handling is greatly simplified by using only reconstructed information and ideal geometry. Fireworks provides an easy-to-use interface which allows a physicist to concentrate only on the data in which he is interested. Data is presented via graphical and textual views. Fireworks is built using the Eve subsystem of the CERN ROOT project and CMS's FWLite project. The FWLite project was part of CMS's recent code redesign which separates data classes into libraries separate from algorithms producing the data and uses ROOT directly for C++ object storage, thereby allowing the data classes to be used directly in ROOT.

  3. Power Studies for the CMS Pixel Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Todri, A.; Turqueti, M.; Rivera, R.; Kwan, S.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The Electronic Systems Engineering Department of the Computing Division at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is carrying out R&D investigations for the upgrade of the power distribution system of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Pixel Tracker at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Among the goals of this effort is that of analyzing the feasibility of alternative powering schemes for the forward tracker, including DC to DC voltage conversion techniques using commercially available and custom switching regulator circuits. Tests of these approaches are performed using the PSI46 pixel readout chip currently in use at the CMS Tracker. Performance measures of the detector electronics will include pixel noise and threshold dispersion results. Issues related to susceptibility to switching noise will be studied and presented. In this paper, we describe the current power distribution network of the CMS Tracker, study the implications of the proposed upgrade with DC-DC converters powering scheme and perform noise susceptibility analysis.

  4. Power distribution studies for CMS forward tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Todri, A.; Turqueti, M.; Rivera, R.; Kwan, S.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The Electronic Systems Engineering Department of the Computing Division at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is carrying out R&D investigations for the upgrade of the power distribution system of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Pixel Tracker at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Among the goals of this effort is that of analyzing the feasibility of alternative powering schemes for the forward tracker, including DC to DC voltage conversion techniques using commercially available and custom switching regulator circuits. Tests of these approaches are performed using the PSI46 pixel readout chip currently in use at the CMS Tracker. Performance measures of the detector electronics will include pixel noise and threshold dispersion results. Issues related to susceptibility to switching noise will be studied and presented. In this paper, we describe the current power distribution network of the CMS Tracker, study the implications of the proposed upgrade with DC-DC converters powering scheme and perform noise susceptibility analysis.

  5. Remote Operations for LHC and CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, E.E.; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    Commissioning the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments will be a vital part of the worldwide high energy physics program beginning in 2007. A remote operations center has been built at Fermilab to contribute to commissioning and operations of the LHC and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, and to develop new capabilities for real-time data analysis and monitoring for LHC, CMS, and grid computing. Remote operations will also be essential to a future International Linear Collider with its multiple, internationally distributed control rooms. In this paper we present an overview of Fermilab's LHC@FNAL remote operations center for LHC and CMS, describe what led up to the development of the center, and describe noteworthy features of the center.

  6. Laboratory study of the underground sound generated by debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ching-Jer; Shieh, Chieng-Lun; Yin, Hsiao-Yuan

    2004-03-01

    This experimental study investigates the underground sound generated by different kinds of rock motions that occur in debris flows. The experiments were divided into two parts. The first part consisted of measuring the main characteristics of the underground sound caused by friction of a rock rubbed against a bed of gravel and of that caused by a free-falling rock hitting a similar bed of gravel. In the second part a hydrophone was installed at the bottom of a laboratory channel to measure the underground sound of debris flows in that channel. The sound signals were analyzed using both the fast Fourier transform and the Gabor transform to represent the signals in both the frequency and time-frequency domains. The measurement results reveal that the frequency of the sound generated by the rock-gravel bed friction is relatively low, being mostly between 20 and 80 Hz. In contrast, the frequency range of the collision sound is relatively higher, between 10 and 500 Hz. Finally, the frequency of the underground sound caused by the debris flows in the flume is in the range of 20-300 Hz.

  7. Beyond the discovery: Higgs results from CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankel, Rainer

    2016-11-01

    The observation of a Higgs boson at a mass near 125 GeV in the year 2012 has been a milestone for elementary particle physics. Since this fundamental discovery, the CMS collaboration has scrutinized the complete LHC Run I dataset in depth, and studied the properties of the observed state in full detail. This includes investigations of more elusive production and decay modes, as well as searches for first indications of an extended Higgs sector, which would represent very likely a promising gateway to new physics. This article summarizes recent Higgs results from the CMS experiment.

  8. Experience with the CMS Event Data Model

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, P.; Hegner, B.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; /Fermilab

    2009-06-01

    The re-engineered CMS EDM was presented at CHEP in 2006. Since that time we have gained a lot of operational experience with the chosen model. We will present some of our findings, and attempt to evaluate how well it is meeting its goals. We will discuss some of the new features that have been added since 2006 as well as some of the problems that have been addressed. Also discussed is the level of adoption throughout CMS, which spans the trigger farm up to the final physics analysis. Future plans, in particular dealing with schema evolution and scaling, will be discussed briefly.

  9. A Psychosocial Approach to Understanding Underground Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun H.; Christopoulos, George I.; Kwok, Kian W.; Roberts, Adam C.; Soh, Chee-Kiong

    2017-01-01

    With a growing need for usable land in urban areas, subterranean development has been gaining attention. While construction of large underground complexes is not a new concept, our understanding of various socio-cultural aspects of staying underground is still at a premature stage. With projected emergence of underground built environments, future populations may spend much more of their working, transit, and recreational time in underground spaces. Therefore, it is essential to understand the challenges and advantages that such environments have to improve the future welfare of users of underground spaces. The current paper discusses various psycho-social aspects of underground spaces, the impact they can have on the culture shared among the occupants, and possible solutions to overcome some of these challenges. PMID:28400744

  10. A Psychosocial Approach to Understanding Underground Spaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun H; Christopoulos, George I; Kwok, Kian W; Roberts, Adam C; Soh, Chee-Kiong

    2017-01-01

    With a growing need for usable land in urban areas, subterranean development has been gaining attention. While construction of large underground complexes is not a new concept, our understanding of various socio-cultural aspects of staying underground is still at a premature stage. With projected emergence of underground built environments, future populations may spend much more of their working, transit, and recreational time in underground spaces. Therefore, it is essential to understand the challenges and advantages that such environments have to improve the future welfare of users of underground spaces. The current paper discusses various psycho-social aspects of underground spaces, the impact they can have on the culture shared among the occupants, and possible solutions to overcome some of these challenges.

  11. Shotcrete for underground support VI

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This proceedings consists of papers presented at the Shotcrete for Underground Support VI Conference held in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada, May 2-6, 1993. It covers three broad themes concerning shotcrete - engineering, research, and applications. Specifically, the proceedings presents papers on: (1) materials engineering; (2) shotcrete research; (3) engineering design; and (4) tunneling, soil nailing, and mining applications. The book concludes by presenting an international compilation of guidelines and recommendations on shotcrete. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  12. Is the signal from Cyg X-3, as recorded in some underground experiments, real?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudakov, A. E.

    1986-01-01

    Most of the excitement concerning the underground detection of signals from Cyg X-3 comes not from astrophysical grounds, but from the contradiction with surface experimental data. Believing in the Cyg X-3 signal underground and also that the main processes of muon production are well knownm the conclusion was drawn that the signal in EAS Cherenkov or counter experiments could be remarkably high, which is not the case. Possible solutions to this discrepancy are discussed.

  13. 30 CFR 57.8519 - Underground main fan controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground main fan controls. 57.8519 Section... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Ventilation Surface and Underground § 57.8519 Underground main fan controls. All underground main fans shall...

  14. 42 CFR 438.724 - Notice to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notice to CMS. 438.724 Section 438.724 Public...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Sanctions § 438.724 Notice to CMS. (a) The State must give the CMS Regional Office written notice whenever it imposes or lifts a sanction for one of the...

  15. 42 CFR 425.200 - Agreement with CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Agreement with CMS. 425.200 Section 425.200 Public... Agreement § 425.200 Agreement with CMS. (a) General. In order to participate in the Shared Savings Program, an ACO must enter into a participation agreement with CMS for a period of not less than three...

  16. 42 CFR 422.210 - Assurances to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Assurances to CMS. 422.210 Section 422.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... to CMS. (a) Assurances to CMS. Each organization will provide assurance satisfactory to the...

  17. 42 CFR 457.1003 - CMS review of waiver requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMS review of waiver requests. 457.1003 Section 457.1003 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Waivers: General Provisions § 457.1003 CMS review of waiver requests. CMS will review the waiver...

  18. 42 CFR 460.18 - CMS evaluation of applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMS evaluation of applications. 460.18 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.18 CMS evaluation of applications. CMS evaluates an application for approval as a PACE organization on the basis of the...

  19. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive. 411.386... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... described in § 411.370. CMS has not and does not issue a binding advisory opinion on the subject matter...

  20. 42 CFR 411.379 - When CMS accepts a request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false When CMS accepts a request. 411.379 Section 411.379... Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.379 When CMS accepts a request. (a) Upon receiving a request for an advisory opinion, CMS promptly makes an initial determination of whether...

  1. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive. 411.386... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... described in § 411.370. CMS has not and does not issue a binding advisory opinion on the subject matter...

  2. 42 CFR 405.1834 - CMS reviewing official procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CMS reviewing official procedure. 405.1834 Section... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1834 CMS reviewing official procedure. (a) Scope. A provider that is a party to... Administrator by a designated CMS reviewing official who considers whether the decision of the...

  3. 42 CFR 438.724 - Notice to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notice to CMS. 438.724 Section 438.724 Public...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Sanctions § 438.724 Notice to CMS. (a) The State must give the CMS Regional Office written notice whenever it imposes or lifts a sanction for one of the...

  4. 42 CFR 411.379 - When CMS accepts a request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false When CMS accepts a request. 411.379 Section 411.379... Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.379 When CMS accepts a request. (a) Upon receiving a request for an advisory opinion, CMS promptly makes an initial determination of whether...

  5. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive. 411.386... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... described in § 411.370. CMS has not and does not issue a binding advisory opinion on the subject matter...

  6. 42 CFR 460.18 - CMS evaluation of applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CMS evaluation of applications. 460.18 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.18 CMS evaluation of applications. CMS evaluates an application for approval as a PACE organization on the basis of the...

  7. 42 CFR 457.1003 - CMS review of waiver requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CMS review of waiver requests. 457.1003 Section 457.1003 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Waivers: General Provisions § 457.1003 CMS review of waiver requests. CMS will review the waiver...

  8. 42 CFR 425.200 - Agreement with CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Agreement with CMS. 425.200 Section 425.200 Public... Agreement § 425.200 Agreement with CMS. (a) General. In order to participate in the Shared Savings Program, an ACO must enter into a participation agreement with CMS for a period of not less than three...

  9. 42 CFR 405.1834 - CMS reviewing official procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMS reviewing official procedure. 405.1834 Section... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1834 CMS reviewing official procedure. (a) Scope. A provider that is a party to... Administrator by a designated CMS reviewing official who considers whether the decision of the...

  10. 42 CFR 403.248 - Administrative review of CMS determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Administrative review of CMS determinations. 403... Certification Program: General Provisions § 403.248 Administrative review of CMS determinations. (a) This section provides for administrative review if CMS determines— (1) Not to certify a policy; or (2) That...

  11. 42 CFR 422.210 - Assurances to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Assurances to CMS. 422.210 Section 422.210 Public...) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Relationships With Providers § 422.210 Assurances to CMS. (a) Assurances to CMS. Each organization will provide assurance satisfactory to the Secretary that...

  12. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive. 411.386... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... described in § 411.370. CMS has not and does not issue a binding advisory opinion on the subject matter...

  13. 42 CFR 438.724 - Notice to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notice to CMS. 438.724 Section 438.724 Public...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Sanctions § 438.724 Notice to CMS. (a) The State must give the CMS Regional Office written notice whenever it imposes or lifts a sanction for one of the...

  14. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive. 411.386... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... described in § 411.370. CMS has not and does not issue a binding advisory opinion on the subject matter...

  15. 42 CFR 433.320 - Procedures for refunds to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for refunds to CMS. 433.320 Section 433... Overpayments to Providers § 433.320 Procedures for refunds to CMS. (a) Basic requirements. (1) The agency must refund the Federal share of overpayments that are subject to recovery to CMS through a credit on...

  16. 42 CFR 425.200 - Agreement with CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Agreement with CMS. 425.200 Section 425.200 Public... Agreement § 425.200 Agreement with CMS. (a) General. In order to participate in the Shared Savings Program, an ACO must enter into a participation agreement with CMS for a period of not less than three...

  17. 42 CFR 405.1834 - CMS reviewing official procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CMS reviewing official procedure. 405.1834 Section... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1834 CMS reviewing official procedure. (a) Scope. A provider that is a party to... Administrator by a designated CMS reviewing official who considers whether the decision of the...

  18. 42 CFR 403.248 - Administrative review of CMS determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Administrative review of CMS determinations. 403... Certification Program: General Provisions § 403.248 Administrative review of CMS determinations. (a) This section provides for administrative review if CMS determines— (1) Not to certify a policy; or (2) That...

  19. 42 CFR 422.210 - Assurances to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Assurances to CMS. 422.210 Section 422.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... to CMS. (a) Assurances to CMS. Each organization will provide assurance satisfactory to the...

  20. 42 CFR 433.320 - Procedures for refunds to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for refunds to CMS. 433.320 Section 433... Overpayments to Providers § 433.320 Procedures for refunds to CMS. (a) Basic requirements. (1) The agency must refund the Federal share of overpayments that are subject to recovery to CMS through a credit on...

  1. 42 CFR 411.379 - When CMS accepts a request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false When CMS accepts a request. 411.379 Section 411.379... Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.379 When CMS accepts a request. (a) Upon receiving a request for an advisory opinion, CMS promptly makes an initial determination of whether...

  2. 42 CFR 460.18 - CMS evaluation of applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CMS evaluation of applications. 460.18 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.18 CMS evaluation of applications. CMS evaluates an application for approval as a PACE organization on the basis of the...

  3. 42 CFR 422.210 - Assurances to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Assurances to CMS. 422.210 Section 422.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... to CMS. (a) Assurances to CMS. Each organization will provide assurance satisfactory to the...

  4. 42 CFR 433.320 - Procedures for refunds to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for refunds to CMS. 433.320 Section 433... Overpayments to Providers § 433.320 Procedures for refunds to CMS. (a) Basic requirements. (1) The agency must refund the Federal share of overpayments that are subject to recovery to CMS through a credit on...

  5. 42 CFR 405.1834 - CMS reviewing official procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CMS reviewing official procedure. 405.1834 Section... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1834 CMS reviewing official procedure. (a) Scope. A provider that is a party to... Administrator by a designated CMS reviewing official who considers whether the decision of the...

  6. 42 CFR 411.379 - When CMS accepts a request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false When CMS accepts a request. 411.379 Section 411.379... Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.379 When CMS accepts a request. (a) Upon receiving a request for an advisory opinion, CMS promptly makes an initial determination of whether...

  7. 42 CFR 460.18 - CMS evaluation of applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CMS evaluation of applications. 460.18 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.18 CMS evaluation of applications. CMS evaluates an application for approval as a PACE organization on the basis of the...

  8. 42 CFR 433.320 - Procedures for refunds to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures for refunds to CMS. 433.320 Section 433... Overpayments to Providers § 433.320 Procedures for refunds to CMS. (a) Basic requirements. (1) The agency must refund the Federal share of overpayments that are subject to recovery to CMS through a credit on...

  9. 42 CFR 422.210 - Assurances to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assurances to CMS. 422.210 Section 422.210 Public...) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Relationships With Providers § 422.210 Assurances to CMS. (a) Assurances to CMS. Each organization will provide assurance satisfactory to the Secretary that...

  10. 42 CFR 438.724 - Notice to CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notice to CMS. 438.724 Section 438.724 Public...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Sanctions § 438.724 Notice to CMS. (a) The State must give the CMS Regional Office written notice whenever it imposes or lifts a sanction for one of the...

  11. 42 CFR 411.379 - When CMS accepts a request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false When CMS accepts a request. 411.379 Section 411.379... Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.379 When CMS accepts a request. (a) Upon receiving a request for an advisory opinion, CMS promptly makes an initial determination of whether...

  12. 42 CFR 457.1003 - CMS review of waiver requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CMS review of waiver requests. 457.1003 Section 457.1003 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Waivers: General Provisions § 457.1003 CMS review of waiver requests. CMS will review the waiver...

  13. 42 CFR 403.248 - Administrative review of CMS determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Administrative review of CMS determinations. 403... Certification Program: General Provisions § 403.248 Administrative review of CMS determinations. (a) This section provides for administrative review if CMS determines— (1) Not to certify a policy; or (2) That...

  14. 42 CFR 405.1834 - CMS reviewing official procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CMS reviewing official procedure. 405.1834 Section... Determinations and Appeals § 405.1834 CMS reviewing official procedure. (a) Scope. A provider that is a party to... Administrator by a designated CMS reviewing official who considers whether the decision of the...

  15. Commissioning of the CMS High Level Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Agostino, Lorenzo; et al.

    2009-08-01

    The CMS experiment will collect data from the proton-proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a centre-of-mass energy up to 14 TeV. The CMS trigger system is designed to cope with unprecedented luminosities and LHC bunch-crossing rates up to 40 MHz. The unique CMS trigger architecture only employs two trigger levels. The Level-1 trigger is implemented using custom electronics, while the High Level Trigger (HLT) is based on software algorithms running on a large cluster of commercial processors, the Event Filter Farm. We present the major functionalities of the CMS High Level Trigger system as of the starting of LHC beams operations in September 2008. The validation of the HLT system in the online environment with Monte Carlo simulated data and its commissioning during cosmic rays data taking campaigns are discussed in detail. We conclude with the description of the HLT operations with the first circulating LHC beams before the incident occurred the 19th September 2008.

  16. The CMS Remote Analysis Builder (CRAB)

    SciTech Connect

    Spiga, D.; Cinquilli, M.; Servoli, L.; Lacaprara, S.; Fanzago, F.; Dorigo, A.; Merlo, M.; Farina, F.; Fanfani, A.; Codispoti, G.; Bacchi, W.; /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U /CERN /INFN, CNAF /INFN, Trieste /Fermilab

    2008-01-22

    The CMS experiment will produce several Pbytes of data every year, to be distributed over many computing centers geographically distributed in different countries. Analysis of this data will be also performed in a distributed way, using grid infrastructure. CRAB (CMS Remote Analysis Builder) is a specific tool, designed and developed by the CMS collaboration, that allows a transparent access to distributed data to end physicist. Very limited knowledge of underlying technicalities are required to the user. CRAB interacts with the local user environment, the CMS Data Management services and with the Grid middleware. It is able to use WLCG, gLite and OSG middleware. CRAB has been in production and in routine use by end-users since Spring 2004. It has been extensively used in studies to prepare the Physics Technical Design Report (PTDR) and in the analysis of reconstructed event samples generated during the Computing Software and Analysis Challenge (CSA06). This involved generating thousands of jobs per day at peak rates. In this paper we discuss the current implementation of CRAB, the experience with using it in production and the plans to improve it in the immediate future.

  17. 23 CFR 500.109 - CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... provides accurate, up-to-date information on transportation system operations and performance and assesses... SYSTEMS Management Systems § 500.109 CMS. (a) For purposes of this part, congestion means the level at which transportation system performance is unacceptable due to excessive travel times and delays...

  18. Top quark properties measurements in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazgan, E.; CMS Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Recent top quark properties measurements made with the CMS detector at the LHC are presented. The measurements summarized include spin correlation of top quark pairs, asymmetries, top quark mass, and the underlying event in top quark pair events. The results are compared to the standard model predictions and new physics models.

  19. CMS results on exclusive and diffractive production

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Gilvan A.

    2015-04-10

    We present recent CMS measurements of diffractive and exclusive processes, using data collected at 7 TeV at the LHC. Measurements of soft single- and double-diffractive cross sections are presented, as well as measurements of photon-induced processes including studies of exclusive WW production via photon-photon exchange.

  20. Monte Carlo Production Management at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudoul, G.; Franzoni, G.; Norkus, A.; Pol, A.; Srimanobhas, P.; Vlimant, J.-R.

    2015-12-01

    The analysis of the LHC data at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment requires the production of a large number of simulated events. During the RunI of LHC (20102012), CMS has produced over 12 Billion simulated events, organized in approximately sixty different campaigns each emulating specific detector conditions and LHC running conditions (pile up). In order to aggregate the information needed for the configuration and prioritization of the events production, assure the book-keeping of all the processing requests placed by the physics analysis groups, and to interface with the CMS production infrastructure, the web- based service Monte Carlo Management (McM) has been developed and put in production in 2013. McM is based on recent server infrastructure technology (CherryPy + AngularJS) and relies on a CouchDB database back-end. This contribution covers the one and half year of operational experience managing samples of simulated events for CMS, the evolution of its functionalities and the extension of its capability to monitor the status and advancement of the events production.

  1. Commissioning of the CMS Forward Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashish; /SUNY, Buffalo

    2008-12-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is scheduled for physics data taking in summer 2009 after the commissioning of high energy proton-proton collisions at Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the core of the CMS all-silicon tracker is the silicon pixel detector, comprising three barrel layers and two pixel disks in the forward and backward regions, accounting for a total of 66 million channels. The pixel detector will provide high-resolution, 3D tracking points, essential for pattern recognition and precise vertexing, while being embedded in a hostile radiation environment. The end disks of the pixel detector, known as the Forward Pixel detector, has been assembled and tested at Fermilab, USA. It has 18 million pixel cells with dimension 100 x 150 {micro}m{sup 2}. The complete forward pixel detector was shipped to CERN in December 2007, where it underwent extensive system tests for commissioning prior to the installation. The pixel system was put in its final place inside the CMS following the installation and bake out of the LHC beam pipe in July 2008. It has been integrated with other sub-detectors in the readout since September 2008 and participated in the cosmic data taking. This report covers the strategy and results from commissioning of CMS forward pixel detector at CERN.

  2. 30 CFR 72.630 - Drill dust control at underground areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drill dust control at underground areas of... OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH HEALTH STANDARDS FOR COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 72.630 Drill dust control at underground areas of underground mines. (a) Dust resulting from drilling in rock shall...

  3. 30 CFR 72.630 - Drill dust control at underground areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drill dust control at underground areas of... OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH HEALTH STANDARDS FOR COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 72.630 Drill dust control at underground areas of underground mines. (a) Dust resulting from drilling in rock...

  4. Experimental investigations and geochemical modelling of site-specific fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions in underground storage of CO2/H2/CH4 mixtures: the H2STORE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Marco; Pilz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Underground gas storage is increasingly regarded as a technically viable option for meeting the energy demand and environmental targets of many industrialized countries. Besides the long-term CO2 sequestration, energy can be chemically stored in form of CO2/CH4/H2 mixtures, for example resulting from excess wind energy. A precise estimation of the impact of such gas mixtures on the mineralogical, geochemical and petrophysical properties of specific reservoirs and caprocks is crucial for site selection and optimization of storage depth. Underground gas storage is increasingly regarded as a technically viable option for meeting environmental targets and the energy demand through storage in form of H2 or CH4, i.e. resulting from excess wind energy. Gas storage in salt caverns is nowadays a mature technology; in regions where favorable geologic structures such as salt diapires are not available, however, gas storage can only be implemented in porous media such as depleted gas and oil reservoirs or suitable saline aquifers. In such settings, a significant amount of in-situ gas components such as CO2, CH4 (and N2) will always be present, making the CO2/CH4/H2 system of particular interest. A precise estimation of the impact of their gas mixtures on the mineralogical, geochemical and petrophysical properties of specific reservoirs and caprocks is therefore crucial for site selection and optimization of storage depth. In the framework of the collaborative research project H2STORE, the feasibility of industrial-scale gas storage in porous media in several potential siliciclastic depleted gas and oil reservoirs or suitable saline aquifers is being investigated by means of experiments and modelling on actual core materials from the evaluated sites. Among them are the Altmark depleted gas reservoir in Saxony-Anhalt and the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage in Brandenburg (Germany). Further sites are located in the Molasse basin in South Germany and Austria. In particular, two

  5. Underground storage tank management plan

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Management Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems in operation at the facility, to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks, and to establish a program for the removal of unnecessary UST systems and upgrade of UST systems that continue to be needed. The program implements an integrated approach to the management of UST systems, with each system evaluated against the same requirements and regulations. A common approach is employed, in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance, when corrective action is mandated. This Management Plan outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed by the UST Management Program, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Management Plan provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. (There are no underground radioactive waste UST systems located at Y-12.) The plan is divided into four major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) implementation requirements, (3) Y-12 Plant UST Program inventory sites, and (4) UST waste management practices. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Management Program, and the procedures and guidance used for compliance with applicable regulations.

  6. Quantitative proteomic analysis of CMS-related changes in Honglian CMS rice anther.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingping; Hu, Chaofeng; Hu, Jun; Li, Shaoqing; Zhu, Yingguo

    2009-10-01

    Honglian (HL) cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is one of the rice CMS types and has been widely used in hybrid rice production in China. The CMS line (Yuetai A, YTA) has a Yuetai B (maintainer line, YTB) nuclear genome, but has a rearranged mitochondrial (mt) genome consisting of Yuetai B. The fertility of hybrid (HL-6) was restored by restorer gene in nuclear genome of restorer line (9311). We used isotope-code affinity tag (ICAT) technology to perform the protein profiling of uninucleate stage rice anther and identify the CMS-HL related proteins. Two separate ICAT analyses were performed in this study: (1) anthers from YTA versus anthers from YTB, and (2) anthers from YTA versus anthers from HL-6. Based on the two analyses, a total of 97 unique proteins were identified and quantified in uninucleate stage rice anther under the error rate of less than 10%, of which eight proteins showed abundance changes of at least twofold between YTA and YTB. Triosephosphate isomerase, fructokinase II, DNA-binding protein GBP16 and ribosomal protein L3B were over-expressed in YTB, while oligopeptide transporter, floral organ regulator 1, kinase and S-adenosyl-L: -methionine synthetase were over-expressed in YTA. Reduction of the proteins associated with energy production and lesser ATP equivalents detected in CMS anther indicated that the low level of energy production played an important role in inducing CMS-HL.

  7. State Certification of Underground Storage Tanks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-15

    This audit was part of the overall audit of "DoD Management of Underground Storage Tanks ," (Project No. 6CK-5051). The overall audit was jointly...Committee inquiry about whether state environmental regulatory agencies would be able to certify that DoD underground storage tanks were compliant

  8. 30 CFR 57.4761 - Underground shops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and... toxic gases from a fire originating in an underground shop where maintenance work is routinely done...

  9. 47 CFR 32.2422 - Underground cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., Buried Cable. (d) The cost of cables leading from the main distributing frame or equivalent to central... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Underground cable. 32.2422 Section 32.2422... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2422 Underground cable...

  10. 47 CFR 32.2422 - Underground cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., Buried Cable. (d) The cost of cables leading from the main distributing frame or equivalent to central... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Underground cable. 32.2422 Section 32.2422... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2422 Underground cable...

  11. 47 CFR 32.2422 - Underground cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Buried Cable. (d) The cost of cables leading from the main distributing frame or equivalent to central... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Underground cable. 32.2422 Section 32.2422... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2422 Underground cable...

  12. 47 CFR 32.2422 - Underground cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., Buried Cable. (d) The cost of cables leading from the main distributing frame or equivalent to central... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Underground cable. 32.2422 Section 32.2422... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2422 Underground cable...

  13. Resource Recovery of Flooded Underground Mine Workings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Butte, Montana has been the site of hard rock mining activities for over a century. Over 400 hundred underground mines were developed and over 10,000 miles of underground mine workings were created. During active mining, groundwater was removed from the workings by large-scale pu...

  14. Resource Recovery from Flooded Underground Mines

    EPA Science Inventory

    Butte, Montana has been the site of hard rock mining activities for over a century. Over 400 hundred underground mines were developed and over 10,000 miles of underground mine workings were created. During active mining, groundwater was removed from the workings by large-scale pu...

  15. Resource Recovery of Flooded Underground Mine Workings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Butte, Montana has been the site of hard rock mining activities for over a century. Over 400 hundred underground mines were developed and over 10,000 miles of underground mine workings were created. During active mining, groundwater was removed from the workings by large-scale pu...

  16. Resource Recovery from Flooded Underground Mines

    EPA Science Inventory

    Butte, Montana has been the site of hard rock mining activities for over a century. Over 400 hundred underground mines were developed and over 10,000 miles of underground mine workings were created. During active mining, groundwater was removed from the workings by large-scale pu...

  17. Seismic evaluation of an underground reinforced concrete tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.N.

    1993-02-01

    An underground reinforced concrete tunnel under the influence of seismic wave propagation was analyzed. Methods previously developed for underground steel pipes were extended to assess the structural integrity of the underground reinforced concrete tunnel.

  18. Transport model of underground sediment in soils.

    PubMed

    Jichao, Sun; Guangqian, Wang

    2013-01-01

    Studies about sediment erosion were mainly concentrated on the river channel sediment, the terrestrial sediment, and the underground sediment. The transport process of underground sediment is studied in the paper. The concept of the flush potential sediment is founded. The transport equation with stable saturated seepage is set up, and the relations between the flush potential sediment and water sediment are discussed. Flushing of underground sediment begins with small particles, and large particles will be taken away later. The pore ratio of the soil increases gradually. The flow ultimately becomes direct water seepage, and the sediment concentration at the same position in the water decreases over time. The concentration of maximal flushing potential sediment decreases along the path. The underground sediment flushing model reflects the flushing mechanism of underground sediment.

  19. Transport Model of Underground Sediment in Soils

    PubMed Central

    Guangqian, Wang

    2013-01-01

    Studies about sediment erosion were mainly concentrated on the river channel sediment, the terrestrial sediment, and the underground sediment. The transport process of underground sediment is studied in the paper. The concept of the flush potential sediment is founded. The transport equation with stable saturated seepage is set up, and the relations between the flush potential sediment and water sediment are discussed. Flushing of underground sediment begins with small particles, and large particles will be taken away later. The pore ratio of the soil increases gradually. The flow ultimately becomes direct water seepage, and the sediment concentration at the same position in the water decreases over time. The concentration of maximal flushing potential sediment decreases along the path. The underground sediment flushing model reflects the flushing mechanism of underground sediment. PMID:24288479

  20. Model based, sensor-directed remediation of underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.; Thunborg, S. )

    1990-06-01

    Sensor-rich, intelligent robots that function with respect to models of their environment have significant potential to reduce the time and cost for the cleanup of hazardous waste while increasing operator safety. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is performing technology development and experimental investigations into the application of intelligent robot control technology to the problem of cleaning up waste stored in underground tanks. The tasks addressed in the SNL experiments are in situ physical characterizations of underground storage tanks (USTs) as well as the contained waste and the removal of the waste from the tank both for laboratory analysis and as part of the tank cleanup process. Both fully automatic and manual robot control technologies are being developed and demonstrated. The SNL-developed concept of human-assisted computer control will be employed whenever manual control of the robot is required. The UST Robot Technology Development Laboratory (URTDL) consists of a commercial gantry robot modified to allow hybrid force/position control.

  1. Evaluation of communication in wireless underground sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X. Q.; Zhang, Z. L.; Han, W. T.

    2017-06-01

    Wireless underground sensor networks (WUSN) are an emerging area of research that promises to provide communication capabilities to buried sensors. In this paper, experimental measurements have been conducted with commodity sensor motes at the frequency of 2.4GHz and 433 MHz, respectively. Experiments are run to examine the received signal strength of correctly received packets and the packet error rate for a communication link. The tests show the potential feasibility of the WUSN with the use of powerful RF transceivers at 433MHz frequency. Moreover, we also illustrate a classification for wireless underground sensor network communication. Finally, we conclude that the effects of burial depth, inter-node distance and volumetric water content of the soil on the signal strength and packet error rate in communication of WUSN.

  2. Numerical Investigation of Rockfall Impacts on Muckpiles for Underground Portals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effeindzourou, Anna; Giacomini, Anna; Thoeni, Klaus; Sloan, Scott W.

    2017-06-01

    Small-scale waste rock piles or muckpiles are commonly used as energy absorption barriers in various surface mining applications. This paper numerically investigates the impact behaviour of blocks on muckpiles used as cushion layer on top of underground portal entries. A three-dimensional discrete element model is implemented into the open-source framework YADE and validated using full-scale experimental data. The model allows estimating the energy absorption capacity of the muckpile and the impact forces acting on the portal structure. It also provides valuable information on the rebound characteristics which are useful for the definition of the potential safety areas in the vicinity of an underground entry. In order to show its capabilities, the model is applied to a large number of cases representing potential design conditions. The influence of block mass, impact velocity and absorbing cushion thickness on the forces at the base of the muckpile and the rebound trajectories after impact are investigated.

  3. Progress of Jinping Underground laboratory for Nuclear Astrophysics (JUNA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, WeiPing; Li, ZhiHong; He, JiangJun; Tang, XiaoDong; Lian, Gang; An, Zhu; Chang, JianJun; Chen, Han; Chen, QingHao; Chen, XiongJun; Chen, ZhiJun; Cui, BaoQun; Du, XianChao; Fu, ChangBo; Gan, Lin; Guo, Bing; He, GuoZhu; Heger, Alexander; Hou, SuQing; Huang, HanXiong; Huang, Ning; Jia, BaoLu; Jiang, LiYang; Kubono, Shigeru; Li, JianMin; Li, KuoAng; Li, Tao; Li, YunJu; Lugaro, Maria; Luo, XiaoBing; Ma, HongYi; Ma, ShaoBo; Mei, DongMing; Qian, YongZhong; Qin, JiuChang; Ren, Jie; Shen, YangPing; Su, Jun; Sun, LiangTing; Tan, WanPeng; Tanihata, Isao; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Peng; Wang, YouBao; Wu, Qi; Xu, ShiWei; Yan, ShengQuan; Yang, LiTao; Yang, Yao; Yu, XiangQing; Yue, Qian; Zeng, Sheng; Zhang, HuanYu; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, LiYong; Zhang, NingTao; Zhang, QiWei; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, XiaoPeng; Zhang, XueZhen; Zhang, ZiMing; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Zuo; Zhou, Chao

    2016-02-01

    Jinping Underground lab for Nuclear Astrophysics (JUNA) will take the advantage of the ultralow background in Jinping underground lab, high current accelerator based on an ECR source and highly sensitive detector to study directly a number of crucial reactions to the hydrostatic stellar evolution for the first time at their relevant stellar energies. In its first phase, JUNA aims at the direct measurements of 25Mg(p,γ)26Al, 19F(p,α)16O, 13C(α,n)16O and 12C(α,γ)16O. The experimental setup, which include the accelerator system with high stability and high intensity, the detector system, and the shielding material with low background, will be established during the above research. The current progress of JUNA will be given.

  4. Detection and location of underground cables using magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, K. F.; Wang, P.; Lewin, P. L.; Swingler, S. G.

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes an experimental study into the detection and location of underground cables using magnetic field measurements. The basic theory behind the technique is discussed. A method of locating and classifying buried cables using measurements of their magnetic field is then introduced and explained. Experimental results are presented, which show that this system can give useful results in uncluttered locations. Some options for extending the system so that it can be used in cluttered locations, and for integrating the system into multi-sensor device, are discussed briefly.

  5. Underground coal mining section data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabrill, C. P.; Urie, J. T.

    1981-01-01

    A set of tables which display the allocation of time for ten personnel and eight pieces of underground coal mining equipment to ten function categories is provided. Data from 125 full shift time studies contained in the KETRON database was utilized as the primary source data. The KETRON activity and delay codes were mapped onto JPL equipment, personnel and function categories. Computer processing was then performed to aggregate the shift level data and generate the matrices. Additional, documented time study data were analyzed and used to supplement the KETRON databased. The source data including the number of shifts are described. Specific parameters of the mines from which there data were extracted are presented. The result of the data processing including the required JPL matrices is presented. A brief comparison with a time study analysis of continuous mining systems is presented. The procedures used for processing the source data are described.

  6. Depleted Argon from Underground Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H. O.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A.; Rogers, H.; Kendziora, C.; Pordes, S.

    2011-04-27

    Argon is a strong scintillator and an ideal target for Dark Matter detection; however {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon from cosmic ray interactions limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar due to the cosmic ray shielding of the earth. In Cortez, Colorado, a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 600 ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. We first concentrate the argon locally to 3% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation, and then the N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous distillation to purify the argon. We have collected 26 kg of argon from the CO{sub 2} facility and a cryogenic distillation column is under construction at Fermilab to further purify the argon.

  7. Toxic hazards of underground excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

    1982-09-01

    Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

  8. Measurement of cosmic ray flux in the China JinPing underground laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Cheng; Hao, Xi-Qing; Yue, Qian; Li, Yuan-Jing; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Kang, Ke-Jun; Chen, Yun-Hua; Li, Jin; Li, Jian-Min; Li, Yu-Lan; Liu, Shu-Kui; Ma, Hao; Ren, Jin-Bao; Shen, Man-Bin; Wang, Ji-Min; Wu, Shi-Yong; Xue, Tao; Yi, Nan; Zeng, Xiong-Hui; Zeng, Zhi; Zhu, Zhong-Hua

    2013-08-01

    The China JinPing underground Laboratory (CJPL) is the deepest underground laboratory running in the world at present. In such a deep underground laboratory, the cosmic ray flux is a very important and necessary parameter for rare-event experiments. A plastic scintillator telescope system has been set up to measure the cosmic ray flux. The performance of the telescope system has been studied using the cosmic rays on the ground laboratory near the CJPL. Based on the underground experimental data taken from November 2010 to December 2011 in the CJPL, which has an effective live time of 171 days, the cosmic ray muon flux in the CJPL is measured to be (2.0±0.4)×10-10/(cm2·s). The ultra-low cosmic ray background guarantees an ideal environment for dark matter experiments at the CJPL.

  9. Simulation of Underground Muon Flux with Application to Muon Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, J. A. K.; Bonneville, A.; Flygare, J.; Lintereur, A.; Kouzes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Muon tomography uses highly energetic muons, produced by cosmic rays interacting within the upper atmosphere, to image dense materials. Like x-rays, an image can be constructed from the negative of the absorbed (or scattered) muons. Unlike x-rays, these muons can penetrate thousands of meters of earth. Muon tomography has been shown to be useful across a wide range of applications (such as imaging of the interior of volcanoes and cargo containers). This work estimates the sensitivity of muon tomography for various underground applications. We use simulations to estimate the change in flux as well as the spatial resolution when imaging static objects, such as mine shafts, and dynamic objects, such as a CO2 reservoir filling over time. We present a framework where we import ground density data from other sources, such as wells, gravity and seismic data, to generate an expected muon flux distribution at specified underground locations. This information can further be fed into a detector simulation to estimate a final experimental sensitivity. There are many applications of this method. We explore its use to image underground nuclear test sites, both the deformation from the explosion as well as the supporting infrastructure (access tunnels and shafts). We also made estimates for imaging a CO2 sequestration site similar to Futuregen 2.0 in Illinois and for imaging magma chambers beneath the Cascade Range volcanoes. This work may also be useful to basic science, such as underground dark matter experiments, where increasing experimental sensitivity requires, amongst other factors, a precise knowledge of the muon background.

  10. Phase-2 Upgrade of the CMS Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mersi, Stefano; CMS Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    An upgrade program is planned for the LHC which will smoothly bring the luminosity up to or above 5 ×1034 cm-2 s-1 sometimes after 2020, to possibly reach an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1 at the end of that decade. In this ultimate scenario, called Phase-2, when LHC will reach the High Luminosity phase (HL-LHC), CMS will need a completely new Tracker detector, in order to fully exploit the highly-demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity. The new Tracker should have also trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R&D activities are ongoing to explore options and develop solutions that would allow including tracking information at Level-1. The design choices for the CMS pixel and outer tracker upgrades are discussed along with some highlights of the R&D activities and expected detector performance.

  11. Lustre filesystem for CMS storage element (SE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Kim, B.; Avery, P.; Fu, Y.; Bourilkov, D.; Taylor, C.; Prescott, C.; Rodriguez, J.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents our effort to integrate the Lustre filesystem with BeStMan, GridFTP and Ganglia to make it a fully functional WLCG SE (Storage Element). We first describe the configuration of our Lustre filesystem at the University of Florida and our integration process. We then present benchmark performance figures and IO rates from the CMS analysis jobs and the WAN data transfer performance that are conducted on the Lustre SE.

  12. Regional CMS Modeling: Southwest Florida Gulf Coast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    Island , the City of Sarasota SPP at Lido Key, Sarasota County SPP at Venice Beach, and a number of federally authorized channels. Local projects exist...approximately 24.9 miles from the throat of Big Sarasota Pass and extends approximately 53.4 miles in the alongshore from Treasure Island to South Venice Inlet...regional CMS modeling framework that has been used to determine the morphologic change in multiple barrier -inlet systems along the Gulf Coast of

  13. CMS RATFOR User’s Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    timesharing system . Included in this paper is a language description of RATFOR, a discussion of how to use RATFOR on CMS , sample terminal sessions and a...character constants. There is an include facility so that large programs can be constructed out of a mul- titude of small files without using the system ...second author at the above address. \\ * Research sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research . Air Force Systems Command, under Grant No

  14. CMS memo OKs use of standing orders.

    PubMed

    2008-12-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has reversed course and clarified the use of standing orders in a manner that is much more favorable to EDs. Initiation of standing orders or protocols no longer requires prior authorization by a physician. Documentation still is required, and it must be entered into the medical record, but it can be entered following implementation of the standing order. Nurses can administer drugs if approved by protocol and if it is within their nursing scope of practice.

  15. Operation of the CMS silicon strip tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuri, Gotra; CMS Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The CMS Silicon Strip Tracker (SST), comprising 9.6 million readout channels from 15148 modules covering an area of about 200 m², needs to be precisely calibrated in order to correctly interpret and reconstruct the events recorded from the detector, ensuring that the SST performance fully meets the physics research program of the CMS experiment. Calibration constants may be derived from promptly reconstructed events as well as from pedestal runs gathered just before the acquisition of physics runs. These calibration procedures were exercised in summer and winter 2009, when the CMS detector was commissioned using cosmic muons and proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energies of 900 GeV and 2.36 TeV. During these data taking periods the performance of the SST was carefully studied: the noise of the detector, the data integrity, the signal-to-noise ratio, the hit reconstruction efficiency, the calibration workflows have been all checked for stability and for different conditions, at the module level. The calibration procedures and the detector performance results from recent physics runs are described.

  16. Monitoring the CMS data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G.; Behrens, U.; Biery, K.; Branson, J.; Cano, E.; Cheung, H.; Ciganek, M.; Cittolin, S.; Coarasa, J. A.; Deldicque, C.; Dusinberre, E.; Erhan, S.; Fortes Rodrigues, F.; Gigi, D.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino, R.; Gutleber, J.; Hatton, D.; Laurens, J. F.; Lopez Perez, J. A.; Meijers, F.; Meschi, E.; Meyer, A.; Mommsen, R.; Moser, R.; O'Dell, V.; Oh, A.; Orsini, L. B.; Patras, V.; Paus, C.; Petrucci, A.; Pieri, M.; Racz, A.; Sakulin, H.; Sani, M.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schwick, C.; Shpakov, D.; Simon, S.; Sumorok, K.; Zanetti, M.

    2010-04-01

    The CMS data acquisition system comprises O(20000) interdependent services that need to be monitored in near real-time. The ability to monitor a large number of distributed applications accurately and effectively is of paramount importance for robust operations. Application monitoring entails the collection of a large number of simple and composed values made available by the software components and hardware devices. A key aspect is that detection of deviations from a specified behaviour is supported in a timely manner, which is a prerequisite in order to take corrective actions efficiently. Given the size and time constraints of the CMS data acquisition system, efficient application monitoring is an interesting research problem. We propose an approach that uses the emerging paradigm of Web-service based eventing systems in combination with hierarchical data collection and load balancing. Scalability and efficiency are achieved by a decentralized architecture, splitting up data collections into regions of collections. An implementation following this scheme is deployed as the monitoring infrastructure of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. All services in this distributed data acquisition system are providing standard web service interfaces via XML, SOAP and HTTP [15,22]. Continuing on this path we adopted WS-* standards implementing a monitoring system layered on top of the W3C standards stack. We designed a load-balanced publisher/subscriber system with the ability to include high-speed protocols [10,12] for efficient data transmission [11,13,14] and serving data in multiple data formats.

  17. The CMS experiment at the CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CMS Collaboration; Chatrchyan, S.; Hmayakyan, G.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Adam, W.; Bauer, T.; Bergauer, T.; Bergauer, H.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Glaser, P.; Hartl, C.; Hoermann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Hänsel, S.; Jeitler, M.; Kastner, K.; Krammer, M.; Magrans de Abril, I.; Markytan, M.; Mikulec, I.; Neuherz, B.; Nöbauer, T.; Oberegger, M.; Padrta, M.; Pernicka, M.; Porth, P.; Rohringer, H.; Schmid, S.; Schreiner, T.; Stark, R.; Steininger, H.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Uhl, D.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Petrov, V.; Prosolovich, V.; Chekhovsky, V.; Dvornikov, O.; Emeliantchik, I.; Litomin, A.; Makarenko, V.; Marfin, I.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Solin, A.; Stefanovitch, R.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Tikhonov, A.; Fedorov, A.; Korzhik, M.; Missevitch, O.; Zuyeuski, R.; Beaumont, W.; Cardaci, M.; DeLanghe, E.; DeWolf, E. A.; Delmeire, E.; Ochesanu, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Van Mechelen, P.; D'Hondt, J.; DeWeirdt, S.; Devroede, O.; Goorens, R.; Hannaert, S.; Heyninck, J.; Maes, J.; Mozer, M. U.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Lancker, L.; Van Mulders, P.; Villella, I.; Wastiels, C.; Yu, C.; Bouhali, O.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; DeHarenne, P.; DeLentdecker, G.; Dewulf, J. P.; Elgammal, S.; Gindroz, R.; Hammad, G. H.; Mahmoud, T.; Neukermans, L.; Pins, M.; Pins, R.; Rugovac, S.; Stefanescu, J.; Sundararajan, V.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wickens, J.; Tytgat, M.; Assouak, S.; Bonnet, J. L.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; DeCallatay, B.; DeFavereau DeJeneret, J.; DeVisscher, S.; Demin, P.; Favart, D.; Felix, C.; Florins, B.; Forton, E.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Jonckman, M.; Kcira, D.; Keutgen, T.; Lemaitre, V.; Michotte, D.; Militaru, O.; Ovyn, S.; Pierzchala, T.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Roberfroid, V.; Rouby, X.; Schul, N.; Van der Aa, O.; Beliy, N.; Daubie, E.; Herquet, P.; Alves, G.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Vaz, M.; DeJesus Damiao, D.; Oguri, V.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; DeMoraes Gregores, E.; Iope, R. L.; Novaes, S. F.; Tomei, T.; Anguelov, T.; Antchev, G.; Atanasov, I.; Damgov, J.; Darmenov, N.; Dimitrov, L.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Trayanov, R.; Vankov, I.; Cheshkov, C.; Dimitrov, A.; Dyulendarova, M.; Glushkov, I.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Makariev, M.; Marinova, E.; Markov, S.; Mateev, M.; Nasteva, I.; Pavlov, B.; Petev, P.; Petkov, P.; Spassov, V.; Toteva, Z.; Velev, V.; Verguilov, V.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Jiang, C. H.; Liu, B.; Shen, X. Y.; Sun, H. S.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Yang, M.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, W. R.; Zhuang, H. L.; Ban, Y.; Cai, J.; Ge, Y. C.; Liu, S.; Liu, H. T.; Liu, L.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, Q.; Xue, Z. H.; Yang, Z. C.; Ye, Y. L.; Ying, J.; Li, P. J.; Liao, J.; Xue, Z. L.; Yan, D. S.; Yuan, H.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Puljak, I.; Soric, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Marasovic, K.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Morovic, S.; Fereos, R.; Nicolaou, C.; Papadakis, A.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Tsiakkouri, D.; Zinonos, Z.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Kannike, K.; Lippmaa, E.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Aarnio, P. A.; Anttila, E.; Banzuzi, K.; Bulteau, P.; Czellar, S.; Eiden, N.; Eklund, C.; Engstrom, P.; Heikkinen, A.; Honkanen, A.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Katajisto, H. M.; Kinnunen, R.; Klem, J.; Kortesmaa, J.; Kotamäki, M.; Kuronen, A.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lefébure, V.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P. R.; Michal, S.; Moura Brigido, F.; Mäenpää, T.; Nyman, T.; Nystén, J.; Pietarinen, E.; Skog, K.; Tammi, K.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Ungaro, D.; Vanhala, T. P.; Wendland, L.; Williams, C.; Iskanius, M.; Korpela, A.; Polese, G.; Tuuva, T.; Bassompierre, G.; Bazan, A.; David, P. Y.; Ditta, J.; Drobychev, G.; Fouque, N.; Guillaud, J. P.; Hermel, V.; Karneyeu, A.; LeFlour, T.; Lieunard, S.; Maire, M.; Mendiburu, P.; Nedelec, P.; Peigneux, J. P.; Schneegans, M.; Sillou, D.; Vialle, J. P.; Anfreville, M.; Bard, J. P.; Besson, P.; Bougamont, E.; Boyer, M.; Bredy, P.; Chipaux, R.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Descamps, J.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ganjour, S.; Gentit, F. X.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeanney, C.; Kircher, F.; Lemaire, M. C.; Lemoigne, Y.; Levesy, B.; Locci, E.; Lottin, J. P.; Mandjavidze, I.; Mur, M.; Pansart, J. P.; Payn, A.; Rander, J.; Reymond, J. M.; Rolquin, J.; Rondeaux, F.; Rosowsky, A.; Rousse, J. Y. A.; Sun, Z. H.; Tartas, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Venault, P.; Verrecchia, P.; Anduze, M.; Badier, J.; Baffioni, S.; Bercher, M.; Bernet, C.; Berthon, U.; Bourotte, J.; Busata, A.; Busson, P.; Cerutti, M.; Chamont, D.; Charlot, C.; Collard, C.; Debraine, A.; Decotigny, D.; Dobrzynski, L.; Ferreira, O.; Geerebaert, Y.; Gilly, J.; Gregory, C.; Guevara Riveros, L.; Haguenauer, M.; Karar, A.; Koblitz, B.; Lecouturier, D.; Mathieu, A.; Milleret, G.; Miné, P.; Paganini, P.; Poilleux, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Regnault, N.; Romanteau, T.; Semeniouk, I.; Sirois, Y.; Thiebaux, C.; Vanel, J. C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. L.; Albert, A.; Anckenmann, L.; Andrea, J.; Anstotz, F.; Bergdolt, A. M.; Berst, J. D.; Blaes, R.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. M.; Cailleret, J.; Charles, F.; Christophel, E.; Claus, G.; Coffin, J.; Colledani, C.; Croix, J.; Dangelser, E.; Dick, N.; Didierjean, F.; Drouhin, F.; Dulinski, W.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Fang, R.; Fontaine, J. C.; Gaudiot, G.; Geist, W.; Gelé, D.; Goeltzenlichter, T.; Goerlach, U.; Graehling, P.; Gross, L.; Hu, C. Guo; Helleboid, J. M.; Henkes, T.; Hoffer, M.; Hoffmann, C.; Hosselet, J.; Houchu, L.; Hu, Y.; Huss, D.; Illinger, C.; Jeanneau, F.; Juillot, P.; Kachelhoffer, T.; Kapp, M. R.; Kettunen, H.; Lakehal Ayat, L.; LeBihan, A. C.; Lounis, A.; Maazouzi, C.; Mack, V.; Majewski, P.; Mangeol, D.; Michel, J.; Moreau, S.; Olivetto, C.; Pallarès, A.; Patois, Y.; Pralavorio, P.; Racca, C.; Riahi, Y.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Schmitt, P.; Schunck, J. P.; Schuster, G.; Schwaller, B.; Sigward, M. H.; Sohler, J. L.; Speck, J.; Strub, R.; Todorov, T.; Turchetta, R.; Van Hove, P.; Vintache, D.; Zghiche, A.; Ageron, M.; Augustin, J. E.; Baty, C.; Baulieu, G.; Bedjidian, M.; Blaha, J.; Bonnevaux, A.; Boudoul, G.; Brunet, P.; Chabanat, E.; Chabert, E. C.; Chierici, R.; Chorowicz, V.; Combaret, C.; Contardo, D.; Della Negra, R.; Depasse, P.; Drapier, O.; Dupanloup, M.; Dupasquier, T.; El Mamouni, H.; Estre, N.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Giraud, N.; Girerd, C.; Guillot, G.; Haroutunian, R.; Ille, B.; Lethuillier, M.; Lumb, N.; Martin, C.; Mathez, H.; Maurelli, G.; Muanza, S.; Pangaud, P.; Perries, S.; Ravat, O.; Schibler, E.; Schirra, F.; Smadja, G.; Tissot, S.; Trocme, B.; Vanzetto, S.; Walder, J. P.; Bagaturia, Y.; Mjavia, D.; Mzhavia, A.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Roinishvili, V.; Adolphi, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Brauer, R.; Braunschweig, W.; Esser, H.; Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Khomich, A.; Klein, K.; Kukulies, C.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Olzem, J.; Ostaptchouk, A.; Pandoulas, D.; Pierschel, G.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schultz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Siedling, R.; Thomas, M.; Weber, M.; Wittmer, B.; Wlochal, M.; Adamczyk, F.; Adolf, A.; Altenhöfer, G.; Bechstein, S.; Bethke, S.; Biallass, P.; Biebel, O.; Bontenackels, M.; Bosseler, K.; Böhm, A.; Erdmann, M.; Faissner, H.; Fehr, B.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fetchenhauer, G.; Frangenheim, J.; Frohn, J. H.; Grooten, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hermann, S.; Hermens, E.; Hilgers, G.; Hoepfner, K.; Hof, C.; Jacobi, E.; Kappler, S.; Kirsch, M.; Kreuzer, P.; Kupper, R.; Lampe, H. R.; Lanske, D.; Mameghani, R.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, S.; Moers, T.; Müller, E.; Pahlke, R.; Philipps, B.; Rein, D.; Reithler, H.; Reuter, W.; Rütten, P.; Schulz, S.; Schwarthoff, H.; Sobek, W.; Sowa, M.; Stapelberg, T.; Szczesny, H.; Teykal, H.; Teyssier, D.; Tomme, H.; Tomme, W.; Tonutti, M.; Tsigenov, O.; Tutas, J.; Vandenhirtz, J.; Wagner, H.; Wegner, M.; Zeidler, C.; Beissel, F.; Davids, M.; Duda, M.; Flügge, G.; Giffels, M.; Hermanns, T.; Heydhausen, D.; Kalinin, S.; Kasselmann, S.; Kaussen, G.; Kress, T.; Linn, A.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Poettgens, M.; Pooth, O.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Tornier, D.; Zoeller, M. H.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Flossdorf, A.; Hatton, D.; Hegner, B.; Kasemann, M.; Mankel, R.; Meyer, A.; Mnich, J.; Rosemann, C.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bechtel, F.; Buhmann, P.; Butz, E.; Flucke, G.; Hamdorf, R. H.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Pein, U.; Schirm, N.; Schleper, P.; Steinbrück, G.; Van Staa, R.; Wolf, R.; Atz, B.; Barvich, T.; Blüm, P.; Boegelspacher, F.; Bol, H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Chowdhury, S.; DeBoer, W.; Dehm, P.; Dirkes, G.; Fahrer, M.; Felzmann, U.; Frey, M.; Furgeri, A.; Gregoriev, E.; Hartmann, F.; Hauler, F.; Heier, S.; Kärcher, K.; Ledermann, B.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th; Neuberger, D.; Piasecki, C.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Sabellek, A.; Scheurer, A.; Schilling, F. P.; Simonis, H. J.; Skiba, A.; Steck, P.; Theel, A.; Thümmel, W. H.; Trunov, A.; Vest, A.; Weiler, T.; Weiser, C.; Weseler, S.; Zhukov, V.; Barone, M.; Daskalakis, G.; Dimitriou, N.; Fanourakis, G.; Filippidis, C.; Geralis, T.; Kalfas, C.; Karafasoulis, K.; Koimas, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Mavrommatis, C.; Mousa, J.; Papadakis, I.; Petrakou, E.; Siotis, I.; Theofilatos, K.; Tzamarias, S.; Vayaki, A.; Vermisoglou, G.; Zachariadou, A.; Gouskos, L.; Karapostoli, G.; Katsas, P.; Panagiotou, A.; Papadimitropoulos, C.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Triantis, F. A.; Bencze, G.; Boldizsar, L.; Debreczeni, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Kovesarki, P.; Laszlo, A.; Odor, G.; Patay, G.; Sikler, F.; Veres, G.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zalan, P.; Fenyvesi, A.; Imrek, J.; Molnar, J.; Novak, D.; Palinkas, J.; Szekely, G.; Beni, N.; Kapusi, A.; Marian, G.; Radics, B.; Raics, P.; Szabo, Z.; Szillasi, Z.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Zilizi, G.; Bawa, H. S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhandari, V.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Kumar, A.; Singh, B.; Singh, J. B.; Arora, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterji, S.; Chauhan, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Gupta, P.; Jha, M.; Ranjan, K.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Srivastava, A. K.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Ghodgaonkar, M.; Kailas, S.; Kataria, S. K.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bose, S.; Chendvankar, S.; Deshpande, P. V.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Nayak, A.; Patil, M. R.; Sharma, S.; Sudhakar, K.; Acharya, B. S.; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bheesette, S.; Dugad, S.; Kalmani, S. D.; Lakkireddi, V. R.; Mondal, N. K.; Panyam, N.; Verma, P.; Arfaei, H.; Hashemi, M.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Moshaii, A.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abadjiev, K.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Cariola, P.; Chiumarulo, F.; Clemente, A.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; DeFilippis, N.; DePalma, M.; DeRobertis, G.; Donvito, G.; Ferorelli, R.; Fiore, L.; Franco, M.; Giordano, D.; Guida, R.; Iaselli, G.; Lacalamita, N.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Manna, N.; Marangelli, B.; Mennea, M. S.; My, S.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Papagni, G.; Pinto, C.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Roselli, G.; Sala, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Trentadue, R.; Tupputi, S.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Bacchi, W.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Boldini, M.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Cafaro, V. D.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Ciocca, C.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; D'Antone, I.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Finelli, S.; Giacomelli, P.; Giordano, V.; Giunta, M.; Grandi, C.; Guerzoni, M.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Paolucci, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Torromeo, G.; Travaglini, R.; Veronese, G. P.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Galanti, M.; Gatto Rotondo, G.; Giudice, N.; Guardone, N.; Noto, F.; Potenza, R.; Saizu, M. A.; Salemi, G.; Sutera, C.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Bellucci, L.; Brianzi, M.; Broccolo, G.; Catacchini, E.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Genta, C.; Landi, G.; Lenzi, P.; Macchiolo, A.; Maletta, F.; Manolescu, F.; Marchettini, C.; Masetti, L.; Mersi, S.; Meschini, M.; Minelli, C.; Paoletti, S.; Parrini, G.; Scarlini, E.; Sguazzoni, G.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Bianco, S.; Caponero, M.; Colonna, D.; Daniello, L.; Fabbri, F.; Felli, F.; Giardoni, M.; La Monaca, A.; Ortenzi, B.; Pallotta, M.; Paolozzi, A.; Paris, C.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Ponzio, B.; Pucci, C.; Russo, A.; Saviano, G.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Greco, M.; Musenich, R.; Badoer, S.; Berti, L.; Biasotto, M.; Fantinel, S.; Frizziero, E.; Gastaldi, U.; Gulmini, M.; Lelli, F.; Maron, G.; Squizzato, S.; Toniolo, N.; Traldi, S.; Banfi, S.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Carbone, L.; Cerati, G. B.; Chignoli, F.; D'Angelo, P.; DeMin, A.; Dini, P.; Farina, F. M.; Ferri, F.; Govoni, P.; Magni, S.; Malberti, M.; Malvezzi, S.; Mazza, R.; Menasce, D.; Miccio, V.; Moroni, L.; Negri, P.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pullia, A.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Rovere, M.; Sala, L.; Sala, S.; Salerno, R.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Tancini, V.; Taroni, S.; Boiano, A.; Cassese, F.; Cassese, C.; Cimmino, A.; D'Aquino, B.; Lista, L.; Lomidze, D.; Noli, P.; Paolucci, P.; Passeggio, G.; Piccolo, D.; Roscilli, L.; Sciacca, C.; Vanzanella, A.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Barcellan, L.; Bellato, M.; Benettoni, M.; Bisello, D.; Borsato, E.; Candelori, A.; Carlin, R.; Castellani, L.; Checchia, P.; Ciano, L.; Colombo, A.; Conti, E.; Da Rold, M.; Dal Corso, F.; DeGiorgi, M.; DeMattia, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanin, C.; Galet, G.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giraldo, A.; Giubilato, P.; Gonella, F.; Gresele, A.; Griggio, A.; Guaita, P.; Kaminskiy, A.; Karaevskii, S.; Khomenkov, V.; Kostylev, D.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lippi, I.; Loreti, M.; Margoni, M.; Martinelli, R.; Mattiazzo, S.; Mazzucato, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Modenese, L.; Montecassiano, F.; Neviani, A.; Nigro, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Pantano, D.; Parenti, A.; Passaseo, M.; Pedrotta, R.; Pegoraro, M.; Rampazzo, G.; Reznikov, S.; Ronchese, P.; Sancho Daponte, A.; Sartori, P.; Stavitskiy, I.; Tessaro, M.; Torassa, E.; Triossi, A.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Ventura, L.; Verlato, M.; Zago, M.; Zatti, F.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Baesso, P.; Belli, G.; Berzano, U.; Bricola, S.; Grelli, A.; Musitelli, G.; Nardò, R.; Necchi, M. M.; Pagano, D.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vicini, A.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.; Aisa, D.; Aisa, S.; Ambroglini, F.; Angarano, M. M.; Babucci, E.; Benedetti, D.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Bizzaglia, S.; Brunetti, M. T.; Caponeri, B.; Checcucci, B.; Covarelli, R.; Dinu, N.; Fanò, L.; Farnesini, L.; Giorgi, M.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Moscatelli, F.; Passeri, D.; Piluso, A.; Placidi, P.; Postolache, V.; Santinelli, R.; Santocchia, A.; Servoli, L.; Spiga, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Balestri, G.; Basti, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Benucci, L.; Bernardini, J.; Berretta, L.; Bianucci, S.; Boccali, T.; Bocci, A.; Borrello, L.; Bosi, F.; Bracci, F.; Brez, A.; Calzolari, F.; Castaldi, R.; Cazzola, U.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, R.; Cerri, C.; Cucoanes, A. S.; Dell'Orso, R.; Dobur, D.; Dutta, S.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Gaggelli, A.; Gennai, S.; Giassi, A.; Giusti, S.; Kartashov, D.; Kraan, A.; Latronico, L.; Ligabue, F.; Linari, S.; Lomtadze, T.; Lungu, G. A.; Magazzu, G.; Mammini, P.; Mariani, F.; Martinelli, G.; Massa, M.; Messineo, A.; Moggi, A.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Petragnani, G.; Petrucciani, G.; Profeti, A.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzi, D.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sarkar, S.; Segneri, G.; Sentenac, D.; Serban, A. T.; Slav, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Spandre, G.; Tenchini, R.; Tolaini, S.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vos, M.; Zaccarelli, L.; Baccaro, S.; Barone, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Borgia, B.; Capradossi, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cecilia, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Dafinei, I.; DelRe, D.; Di Marco, E.; Diemoz, M.; Ferrara, G.; Gargiulo, C.; Guerra, S.; Iannone, M.; Longo, E.; Montecchi, M.; Nuccetelli, M.; Organtini, G.; Palma, A.; Paramatti, R.; Pellegrino, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Zullo, A.; Alampi, G.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Benotto, F.; Biino, C.; Bolognesi, S.; Borgia, M. A.; Botta, C.; Brasolin, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Castello, R.; Cerminara, G.; Cirio, R.; Cordero, M.; Costa, M.; Dattola, D.; Daudo, F.; Dellacasa, G.; Demaria, N.; Dughera, G.; Dumitrache, F.; Farano, R.; Ferrero, G.; Filoni, E.; Kostyleva, G.; Larsen, H. E.; Mariotti, C.; Marone, M.; Maselli, S.; Menichetti, E.; Mereu, P.; Migliore, E.; Mila, G.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Nervo, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Panero, R.; Parussa, A.; Pastrone, N.; Peroni, C.; Petrillo, G.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Scalise, M.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Trapani, P. P.; Trocino, D.; Vaniev, V.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Zampieri, A.; Belforte, S.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Kavka, C.; Penzo, A.; Kim, Y. E.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. C.; Kong, D. J.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Park, S. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Lee, S. J.; Jung, S. Y.; Rhee, J. T.; Ahn, S. H.; Hong, B. S.; Jeng, Y. K.; Kang, M. H.; Kim, H. C.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Lim, J. K.; Moon, D. H.; Park, I. C.; Park, S. K.; Ryu, M. S.; Sim, K.-S.; Son, K. J.; Hong, S. J.; Choi, Y. I.; Castilla Valdez, H.; Sanchez Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Aerts, A.; Van der Stok, P.; Weffers, H.; Allfrey, P.; Gray, R. N. C.; Hashimoto, M.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Bernardino Rodrigues, N.; Butler, P. H.; Churchwell, S.; Knegjens, R.; Whitehead, S.; Williams, J. C.; Aftab, Z.; Ahmad, U.; Ahmed, I.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, M. I.; Asghar, S.; Dad, G.; Hafeez, M.; Hoorani, H. R.; Hussain, I.; Hussain, N.; Iftikhar, M.; Khan, M. S.; Mehmood, K.; Osman, A.; Shahzad, H.; Zafar, A. R.; Ali, A.; Bashir, A.; Jan, A. M.; Kamal, A.; Khan, F.; Saeed, M.; Tanwir, S.; Zafar, M. A.; Blocki, J.; Cyz, A.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Mikocki, S.; Rybczynski, M.; Turnau, J.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Zychowski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Czyrkowski, H.; Dabrowski, R.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Kierzkowski, K.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Kudla, I. M.; Pietrusinski, M.; Pozniak, K.; Zabolotny, W.; Zych, P.; Gokieli, R.; Goscilo, L.; Górski, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Traczyk, P.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Pozniak, K. T.; Romaniuk, R.; Zabolotny, W. M.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Almeida, C.; Almeida, N.; Araujo Vila Verde, A. S.; Barata Monteiro, T.; Bluj, M.; Da Mota Silva, S.; Tinoco Mendes, A. David; Freitas Ferreira, M.; Gallinaro, M.; Husejko, M.; Jain, A.; Kazana, M.; Musella, P.; Nobrega, R.; Rasteiro Da Silva, J.; Ribeiro, P. Q.; Santos, M.; Silva, P.; Silva, S.; Teixeira, I.; Teixeira, J. P.; Varela, J.; Varner, G.; Vaz Cardoso, N.; Altsybeev, I.; Babich, K.; Belkov, A.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Elsha, V.; Ershov, Y.; Filozova, I.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Golunov, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, N.; Gramenitski, I.; Kalagin, V.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Khabarov, S.; Khabarov, V.; Kiryushin, Y.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Korenkov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Kurenkov, A.; Lanev, A.; Lysiakov, V.; Malakhov, A.; Melnitchenko, I.; Mitsyn, V. V.; Moisenz, K.; Moisenz, P.; Movchan, S.; Nikonov, E.; Oleynik, D.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Petrosyan, A.; Rogalev, E.; Samsonov, V.; Savina, M.; Semenov, R.; Sergeev, S.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Smirnov, V.; Smolin, D.; Tcheremoukhine, A.; Teryaev, O.; Tikhonenko, E.; Urkinbaev, A.; Vasil'ev, S.; Vishnevskiy, A.; Volodko, A.; Zamiatin, N.; Zarubin, A.; Zarubin, P.; Zubarev, E.; Bondar, N.; Gavrikov, Y.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kozlov, V.; Lebedev, V.; Makarenkov, G.; Moroz, F.; Neustroev, P.; Obrant, G.; Orishchin, E.; Petrunin, A.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shchetkovskiy, A.; Sknar, V.; Skorobogatov, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Velichko, G.; Volkov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Chmelev, D.; Druzhkin, D.; Ivanov, A.; Kudinov, V.; Logatchev, O.; Onishchenko, S.; Orlov, A.; Sakharov, V.; Smetannikov, V.; Tikhomirov, A.; Zavodthikov, S.; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A.; Duk, V.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Gorbunov, D.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Pastsyak, A.; Postoev, V. E.; Sadovski, A.; Skassyrskaia, A.; Solovey, Alexander; Solovey, Anatoly; Soloviev, D.; Toropin, A.; Troitsky, S.; Alekhin, A.; Baldov, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Ilina, N.; Kaftanov, V.; Karpishin, V.; Kiselevich, I.; Kolosov, V.; Kossov, M.; Krokhotin, A.; Kuleshov, S.; Oulianov, A.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Stepanov, N.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zaytsev, V.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Eyyubova, G.; Gribushin, A.; Ilyin, V.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Kruglov, N. A.; Kryukov, A.; Lokhtin, I.; Malinina, L.; Mikhaylin, V.; Petrushanko, S.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Shamardin, L.; Sherstnev, A.; Snigirev, A.; Teplov, K.; Vardanyan, I.; Fomenko, A. M.; Konovalova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Lebedev, A. I.; Lvova, N.; Rusakov, S. V.; Terkulov, A.; Abramov, V.; Akimenko, S.; Artamonov, A.; Ashimova, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Chikilev, O.; Datsko, K.; Filine, A.; Godizov, A.; Goncharov, P.; Grishin, V.; Inyakin, A.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Khmelnikov, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Krinitsyn, A.; Levine, A.; Lobov, I.; Lukanin, V.; Mel'nik, Y.; Molchanov, V.; Petrov, V.; Petukhov, V.; Pikalov, V.; Ryazanov, A.; Ryutin, R.; Shelikhov, V.; Skvortsov, V.; Slabospitsky, S.; Sobol, A.; Sytine, A.; Talov, V.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Zelepoukine, S.; Lukyanov, V.; Mamaeva, G.; Prilutskaya, Z.; Rumyantsev, I.; Sokha, S.; Tataurschikov, S.; Vasilyev, I.; Adzic, P.; Anicin, I.; Djordjevic, M.; Jovanovic, D.; Maletic, D.; Puzovic, J.; Smiljkovic, N.; Aguayo Navarrete, E.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahijado Munoz, J.; Alarcon Vega, J. M.; Alberdi, J.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Berdugo, J.; Blanco Ramos, C. 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M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Atramentov, O.; Bertoldi, M.; Dharmaratna, W. G. D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, C. J.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Simek, D.; Thomaston, J.; Baarmand, M.; Baksay, L.; Guragain, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Mermerkaya, H.; Ralich, R.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Barannikova, O.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Dragoiu, C.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R.; Iordanova, A.; Khalatian, S.; Mironov, C.; Shabalina, E.; Smoron, A.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Ayan, A. S.; Briggs, R.; Cankocak, K.; Clarida, W.; Cooper, A.; Debbins, P.; Duru, F.; Fountain, M.; McCliment, E.; Merlo, J. P.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Miller, M. J.; Moeller, A.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Perera, L.; Schmidt, I.; Wang, S.; Yetkin, T.; Anderson, E. W.; Chakir, H.; Hauptman, J. M.; Lamsa, J.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Chien, C. Y.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A.; Kim, D. W.; Lae, C. K.; Maksimovic, P.; Swartz, M.; Tran, N.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Chen, J.; Coppage, D.; Grachov, O.; Murray, M.; Radicci, V.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Bandurin, D.; Bolton, T.; Kaadze, K.; Kahl, W. E.; Maravin, Y.; Onoprienko, D.; Sidwell, R.; Wan, Z.; Dahmes, B.; Gronberg, J.; Hollar, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Wuest, C. R.; Baden, D.; Bard, R.; Eno, S. C.; Ferencek, D.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kunori, S.; Lockner, E.; Ratnikov, F.; Santanastasio, F.; Skuja, A.; Toole, T.; Wang, L.; Wetstein, M.; Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Hahn, K. A.; Harris, P.; Klute, M.; Kravchenko, I.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Pavlon, S.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G.; Sumorok, K.; Vaurynovich, S.; Wenger, E. A.; Wyslouch, B.; Bailleux, D.; Cooper, S.; Cushman, P.; DeBenedetti, A.; Dolgopolov, A.; Dudero, P. R.; Egeland, R.; Franzoni, G.; Gilbert, W. J.; Gong, D.; Grahl, J.; Haupt, J.; Klapoetke, K.; Kronkvist, I.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Rusack, R.; Sengupta, S.; Sherwood, B.; Singovsky, A.; Vikas, P.; Zhang, J.; Booke, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reep, M.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D.; Watkins, S.; Bloom, K.; Bockelman, B.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Furukawa, M.; Keller, J.; Kelly, T.; Lundstedt, C.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Swanson, D.; Ecklund, K. M.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Strang, M.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Boeriu, O.; Eulisse, G.; McCauley, T.; Musienko, Y.; Muzaffar, S.; Osborne, I.; Reucroft, S.; Swain, J.; Taylor, L.; Tuura, L.; Gobbi, B.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubik, A.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Schmitt, M.; Spencer, E.; Stoynev, S.; Szleper, M.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Andert, K.; Baumbaugh, B.; Beiersdorf, B. A.; Castle, L.; Chorny, J.; Goussiou, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolberg, T.; Marchant, J.; Marinelli, N.; McKenna, M.; Ruchti, R.; Vigneault, M.; Wayne, M.; Wiand, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Gu, J.; Killewald, P.; Ling, T. Y.; Rush, C. J.; Sehgal, V.; Williams, G.; Adam, N.; Chidzik, S.; Denes, P.; Elmer, P.; Garmash, A.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Jones, J.; Marlow, D.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Wildish, T.; Wynhoff, S.; Xie, Z.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Apresyan, A.; Arndt, K.; Barnes, V. E.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Bujak, A.; Everett, A.; Fahling, M.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gutay, L.; Ippolito, N.; Kozhevnikov, Y.; Laasanen, A. T.; Liu, C.; Maroussov, V.; Medved, S.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Miyamoto, J.; Neumeister, N.; Pompos, A.; Roy, A.; Sedov, A.; Shipsey, I.; Cuplov, V.; Parashar, N.; Bargassa, P.; Lee, S. J.; Liu, J. H.; Maronde, D.; Matveev, M.; Nussbaum, T.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Tumanov, A.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Cammin, J.; Chung, Y. S.; DeBarbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Ginther, G.; Gotra, Y.; Korjenevski, S.; Miner, D. C.; Sakumoto, W.; Slattery, P.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Hatakeyama, K.; Mesropian, C.; Bartz, E.; Chuang, S. H.; Doroshenko, J.; Halkiadakis, E.; Jacques, P. F.; Khits, D.; Lath, A.; Macpherson, A.; Plano, R.; Rose, K.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Watts, T. L.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Lazoflores, J.; Ragghianti, G.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Aurisano, A.; Golyash, A.; Kamon, T.; Nguyen, C. N.; Pivarski, J.; Safonov, A.; Toback, D.; Weinberger, M.; Akchurin, N.; Berntzon, L.; Carrell, K. W.; Gumus, K.; Jeong, C.; Kim, H.; Lee, S. W.; McGonagill, B. G.; Roh, Y.; Sill, A.; Spezziga, M.; Thomas, R.; Volobouev, I.; Washington, E.; Wigmans, R.; Yazgan, E.; Bapty, T.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Johns, W.; Keskinpala, T.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Neema, S.; Nordstrom, S.; Pathak, S.; Sheldon, P.; Andelin, D.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Buehler, M.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Humphrey, M.; Imlay, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Phillips, D., II; Powell, H.; Ronquest, M.; Yohay, R.; Anderson, M.; Baek, Y. W.; Bellinger, J. N.; Bradley, D.; Cannarsa, P.; Carlsmith, D.; Crotty, I.; Dasu, S.; Feyzi, F.; Gorski, T.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Jaworski, M.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Magrans de Abril, M.; Mohapatra, A.; Ott, G.; Smith, W. H.; Weinberg, M.; Wenman, D.; Atoian, G. S.; Dhawan, S.; Issakov, V.; Neal, H.; Poblaguev, A.; Zeller, M. E.; Abdullaeva, G.; Avezov, A.; Fazylov, M. I.; Gasanov, E. M.; Khugaev, A.; Koblik, Y. N.; Nishonov, M.; Olimov, K.; Umaraliev, A.; Yuldashev, B. S.

    2008-08-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector is described. The detector operates at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It was conceived to study proton-proton (and lead-lead) collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV (5.5 TeV nucleon-nucleon) and at luminosities up to 1034 cm-2 s-1 (1027 cm-2 s-1). At the core of the CMS detector sits a high-magnetic-field and large-bore superconducting solenoid surrounding an all-silicon pixel and strip tracker, a lead-tungstate scintillating-crystals electromagnetic calorimeter, and a brass-scintillator sampling hadron calorimeter. The iron yoke of the flux-return is instrumented with four stations of muon detectors covering most of the 4π solid angle. Forward sampling calorimeters extend the pseudorapidity coverage to high values (|η| <= 5) assuring very good hermeticity. The overall dimensions of the CMS detector are a length of 21.6 m, a diameter of 14.6 m and a total weight of 12500 t.

  18. Web Based Monitoring in the CMS Experiment at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Badgett, William; Borrello, Laura; Chakaberia, Irakli; Gigi, Dominique; Jo, Young-Kwon; Lopez-Perez, Juan Antonio; Maeshima, Kaori; Maruyama, Sho; Patrick, James; Rapsevicius, Valdas; Soha, Aron; Sulmanas, Balys; Wan, Zongru

    2014-09-03

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a large and complex general purpose experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), built and maintained by many collaborators from around the world. Efficient operation of the detector requires widespread and timely access to a broad range of monitoring and status information. To this end the Web Based Monitoring (WBM) system was developed to present data to users located anywhere from many underlying heterogeneous sources, from real time messaging systems to relational databases. This system provides the power to combine and correlate data in both graphical and tabular formats of interest to the experimenters, including data such as beam conditions, luminosity, trigger rates, detector conditions, and many others, allowing for flexibility on the user side. This paper describes the WBM system architecture and describes how the system was used during the first major data taking run of the LHC.

  19. Reconstruction and identification of tau leptons in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Tau leptons constitute an important experimental signature for analyses at the CERN LHC related to Higgs boson, Standard Model, and beyond the Standard Model measurements. We describe the algorithm used by the CMS experiment to reconstruct and identify decays of tau leptons into hadrons and a neutrino during Run 1 of the CERN LHC. The performance of the algorithm is studied in proton-proton collisions recorded at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The algorithm achieves an identification efficiency of typically 50-60%, with misidentification rates for quark and gluon jets, electrons and muons that vary between per mille and percent levels.

  20. Open beauty measurements in pPb collisions with CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunchul

    2014-11-01

    The B+, B0 and Bs0 mesons are exclusively reconstructed in proton-lead (pPb) collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV by the CMS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The cross sections are measured in the range of transverse momentum of 10 to 60 GeV / c and the center-of-mass rapidity smaller than 1.93. The nuclear modification factor, which is the ratio of the cross section in between pPb and proton-proton (pp) collisions, is estimated using the experimental data from pPb collisions and theoretical calculations as the pp reference. The calculated nuclear modification factors for each particle species are consistent with unity within the current uncertainties. The forward-to-backward asymmetry of B+ is also analyzed and does not show any nuclear effect in the measured rapidity range.

  1. Blast damage control during underground mining

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.P.

    1994-12-31

    Tracer blasting is commonly used in Canadian underground mines for overbreak control. It involves tracing a column of ANFO with a low strength detonating cord. In order to investigate the effectiveness of tracer blasting in perimeter control and to understand its mechanism, a field experimentation was conducted which involved drifting, benching and pipe tests. Initially, a comparison between tracer blasting and other explosive products was made on the basis of half cast factor and percentage overbreak. It was found that tracer blasting produced relatively much lower damage. The following observations were made during tracer blasting experiments: (a) reduction in ground vibrations; (b) partial deflagration and desensitization of ANFO; (c) reduction in the total available explosive energy; (d) continuous side initiation of ANFO column; (e) lateral VOD of ANFO was much less than the steady state VOD; (f) energy partitioning was more in favor of gas energy. It was observed that tracer blasting has the potential of being very cost effective and safer technique for overbreak control. A mechanism of tracer blasting has also been proposed in this paper.

  2. Soviet underground coal gasification on the rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-13

    According to the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, the U.S.S.R. has abandoned large-scale development plans for coal-gasification projects, due to the low heating value of the gas produced at test burns at Angren, and to the cost, estimated at 132% of the standard Lurgi value, in contrast to the cost of approx. 65% of the standard Lurgi value in U.S. experimental burns. The U.S.S.R. coal-gasification effort has been in development since 1950, with a peak production of approx. 2 billion cu m/yr in 1966. The poor test burn results might have been caused by: drilling the boreholes too close to each other, which would increase drilling costs; the loss of a large amount of heat through a porous overburden; the lack of good underground diagnostics before and during a burn; and a lack of a good laboratory support program. The gas heating value was too low to warrant transportation far from the burn site, but most suitable burn sites are in remote areas. In the U.S.S.R., natural gas and open-pit lignite mining appear to be cheaper sources of energy.

  3. Assessing the acoustical climate of underground stations.

    PubMed

    Nowicka, Elzbieta

    2007-01-01

    Designing a proper acoustical environment--indispensable to speech recognition--in long enclosures is difficult. Although there is some literature on the acoustical conditions in underground stations, there is still little information about methods that make estimation of correct reverberation conditions possible. This paper discusses the assessment of the reverberation conditions of underground stations. A comparison of the measurements of reverberation time in Warsaw's underground stations with calculated data proves there are divergences between measured and calculated early decay time values, especially for long source-receiver distances. Rapid speech transmission index values for measured stations are also presented.

  4. German contributions to the CMS computing infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheurer, A.; German CMS Community

    2010-04-01

    The CMS computing model anticipates various hierarchically linked tier centres to counter the challenges provided by the enormous amounts of data which will be collected by the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider, LHC, at CERN. During the past years, various computing exercises were performed to test the readiness of the computing infrastructure, the Grid middleware and the experiment's software for the startup of the LHC which took place in September 2008. In Germany, several tier sites are set up to allow for an efficient and reliable way to simulate possible physics processes as well as to reprocess, analyse and interpret the numerous stored collision events of the experiment. It will be shown that the German computing sites played an important role during the experiment's preparation phase and during data-taking of CMS and, therefore, scientific groups in Germany will be ready to compete for discoveries in this new era of particle physics. This presentation focuses on the German Tier-1 centre GridKa, located at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, the German CMS Tier-2 federation DESY/RWTH with installations at the University of Aachen and the research centre DESY. In addition, various local computing resources in Aachen, Hamburg and Karlsruhe are briefly introduced as well. It will be shown that an excellent cooperation between the different German institutions and physicists led to well established computing sites which cover all parts of the CMS computing model. Therefore, the following topics are discussed and the achieved goals and the gained knowledge are depicted: data management and distribution among the different tier sites, Grid-based Monte Carlo production at the Tier-2 as well as Grid-based and locally submitted inhomogeneous user analyses at the Tier-3s. Another important task is to ensure a proper and reliable operation 24 hours a day, especially during the time of data-taking. For this purpose, the meta-monitoring tool "HappyFace", which was

  5. Radiometric surveys in underground environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochiolo, Massimo; Chiozzi, Paolo; Verdoya, Massimo; Pasquale, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    Due to their ability to travel through the air for several metres, gamma-rays emitted from natural radioactive elements can be successfully used in surveys carried out both with airborne and ground equipments. Besides the concentration of the radio-elements contained in rocks and soils and the intrinsic characteristics of the gamma-ray detector, the detected count rate depends on the solid angle around the spectrometer. On a flat outcrop, ground spectrometry detects the radiation ideally produced by a cylindrical mass of rock of about two metres in diameter and thickness of about half a meter. Under these geometrical conditions, the natural radioactivity can be easily evaluated. With operating conditions different from the standard ones, such as at the edge of an escarpment, the count rate halves because of the missing material, whereas in the vicinity of a rock wall the count rate will increase. In underground environment, the recorded count rate may even double and the in situ assessment of the concentration of radio-elements may be rather difficult, even if the ratios between the different radio-elements may not be affected. We tested the applicability of gamma-ray spectrometry for rapid assessment of the potential hazard levels related to radon and radiation dose rate in underground environment. A mine shaft, located in a zone of uranium enrichment in Liguria (Italy), has been investigated. A preliminary ground radiometric survey was carried out to define the extent of the ore deposit. Then, the radiometric investigation was focussed on the mine shaft. Due to rock mass above the shaft vault, the background gamma radiation can be considered of negligible influence on measurements. In underground surveys, besides deviations from a flat geometry, factors controlling radon exhalation, emanation and stagnation, such as fractures, water leakage and the presence of ventilation, should be carefully examined. We attempted to evaluate these control factors and collected

  6. Wireless device for activation of an underground shock wave absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikhradze, M.; Akhvlediani, I.; Bochorishvili, N.; Mataradze, E.

    2011-10-01

    The paper describes the mechanism and design of the wireless device for activation of energy absorber for localization of blast energy in underground openings. The statistics shows that the greatest share of accidents with fatal results associate with explosions in coal mines due to aero-methane and/or air-coal media explosion. The other significant problem is terrorist or accidental explosions in underground structures. At present there are different protective systems to reduce the blast energy. One of the main parts of protective Systems is blast Identification and Registration Module. The works conducted at G. Tsulukidze Mining Institute of Georgia enabled to construct the wireless system of explosion detection and mitigation of shock waves. The system is based on the constant control on overpressure. The experimental research continues to fulfill the system based on both threats, on the constant control on overpressure and flame parameters, especially in underground structures and coal mines. Reaching the threshold value of any of those parameters, the system immediately starts the activation. The absorber contains a pyrotechnic device ensuring the discharge of dispersed water. The operational parameters of wireless device and activation mechanisms of pyrotechnic element of shock wave absorber are discussed in the paper.

  7. ANNs pinpoint underground distribution faults

    SciTech Connect

    Glinkowski, M.T.; Wang, N.C.

    1995-10-01

    Many offline fault location techniques in power distribution circuits involve patrolling along the lines or cables. In overhead distribution lines, most of the failures can be located quickly by visual inspection without the aid of special equipment. However, locating a fault in underground cable systems is more difficult. It involves additional equipment (e.g., thumpers, radars, etc.) to transform the invisibility of the cable into other forms of signals, such as acoustic sound and electromagnetic pulses. Trained operators must carry the equipment above the ground, follow the path of the signal, and draw lines on their maps in order to locate the fault. Sometimes, even smelling the burnt cable faults is a way of detecting the problem. These techniques are time consuming, not always reliable, and, as in the case of high-voltage dc thumpers, can cause additional damage to the healthy parts of the cable circuit. Online fault location in power networks that involve interconnected lines (cables) and multiterminal sources continues receiving great attention, with limited success in techniques that would provide simple and practical solutions. This article features a new online fault location technique that: uses the pattern recognition feature of artificial neural networks (ANNs); utilizes new capabilities of modern protective relaying hardware. The output of the neural network can be graphically displayed as a simple three-dimensional (3-D) chart that can provide an operator with an instantaneous indication of the location of the fault.

  8. Depleted argon from underground sources

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.O.; Alton, A.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Kendziora, C.; Loer, B.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  9. The First Great Migration: The Underground Railroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodstein, Carol

    1990-01-01

    Describes the Underground Railroad, a loosely organized system used by runaway Southern slaves to reach freedom in the North. Discusses the role of "conductors," who acted as guides and offered shelter along the route. (FMW)

  10. The Black Underground: Fugitives from Slavery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarles, Benjamin

    1969-01-01

    A brief account of the activities prior to the American Civil War of those who assisted black slaves in their flight from the South to the Northern States and Canada by an underground railroad movement. (RJ)

  11. The Black Underground: Fugitives from Slavery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quarles, Benjamin

    1969-01-01

    A brief account of the activities prior to the American Civil War of those who assisted black slaves in their flight from the South to the Northern States and Canada by an underground railroad movement. (RJ)

  12. The First Great Migration: The Underground Railroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodstein, Carol

    1990-01-01

    Describes the Underground Railroad, a loosely organized system used by runaway Southern slaves to reach freedom in the North. Discusses the role of "conductors," who acted as guides and offered shelter along the route. (FMW)

  13. Establishing sustainable strategies in urban underground engineering.

    PubMed

    Curiel-Esparza, Jorge; Canto-Perello, Julian; Calvo, Maria A

    2004-07-01

    Growth of urban areas, the corresponding increased demand for utility services and the possibility of new types of utility systems are overcrowding near surface underground space with urban utilities. Available subsurface space will continue to diminish to the point where utilidors (utility tunnels) may become inevitable. Establishing future sustainable strategies in urban underground engineering consists of the ability to lessen the use of traditional trenching. There is an increasing interest in utility tunnels for urban areas as a sustainable technique to avoid congestion of the subsurface. One of the principal advantages of utility tunnels is the substantially lower environmental impact compared with common trenches. Implementing these underground facilities is retarded most by the initial cost and management procedures. The habitual procedure is to meet problems as they arise in current practice. The moral imperative of sustainable strategies fails to confront the economic and political conflicts of interest. Municipal engineers should act as a key enabler in urban underground sustainable development.

  14. 30 CFR 57.8519 - Underground main fan controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Underground main fan controls. 57.8519 Section... Ventilation Surface and Underground § 57.8519 Underground main fan controls. All underground main fans shall have controls placed at a suitable protected location remote from the fan and preferably on the...

  15. 30 CFR 57.20031 - Blasting underground in hazardous areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blasting underground in hazardous areas. 57... METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Miscellaneous § 57.20031 Blasting underground in hazardous areas. In underground areas where...

  16. Network-level architecture and the evolutionary potential of underground metabolism.

    PubMed

    Notebaart, Richard A; Szappanos, Balázs; Kintses, Bálint; Pál, Ferenc; Györkei, Ádám; Bogos, Balázs; Lázár, Viktória; Spohn, Réka; Csörgő, Bálint; Wagner, Allon; Ruppin, Eytan; Pál, Csaba; Papp, Balázs

    2014-08-12

    A central unresolved issue in evolutionary biology is how metabolic innovations emerge. Low-level enzymatic side activities are frequent and can potentially be recruited for new biochemical functions. However, the role of such underground reactions in adaptation toward novel environments has remained largely unknown and out of reach of computational predictions, not least because these issues demand analyses at the level of the entire metabolic network. Here, we provide a comprehensive computational model of the underground metabolism in Escherichia coli. Most underground reactions are not isolated and 45% of them can be fully wired into the existing network and form novel pathways that produce key precursors for cell growth. This observation allowed us to conduct an integrated genome-wide in silico and experimental survey to characterize the evolutionary potential of E. coli to adapt to hundreds of nutrient conditions. We revealed that underground reactions allow growth in new environments when their activity is increased. We estimate that at least ∼20% of the underground reactions that can be connected to the existing network confer a fitness advantage under specific environments. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the genetic basis of evolutionary adaptations via underground metabolism is computationally predictable. The approach used here has potential for various application areas from bioengineering to medical genetics.

  17. Network-level architecture and the evolutionary potential of underground metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Notebaart, Richard A.; Szappanos, Balázs; Kintses, Bálint; Pál, Ferenc; Györkei, Ádám; Bogos, Balázs; Lázár, Viktória; Spohn, Réka; Csörgő, Bálint; Wagner, Allon; Ruppin, Eytan; Pál, Csaba; Papp, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    A central unresolved issue in evolutionary biology is how metabolic innovations emerge. Low-level enzymatic side activities are frequent and can potentially be recruited for new biochemical functions. However, the role of such underground reactions in adaptation toward novel environments has remained largely unknown and out of reach of computational predictions, not least because these issues demand analyses at the level of the entire metabolic network. Here, we provide a comprehensive computational model of the underground metabolism in Escherichia coli. Most underground reactions are not isolated and 45% of them can be fully wired into the existing network and form novel pathways that produce key precursors for cell growth. This observation allowed us to conduct an integrated genome-wide in silico and experimental survey to characterize the evolutionary potential of E. coli to adapt to hundreds of nutrient conditions. We revealed that underground reactions allow growth in new environments when their activity is increased. We estimate that at least ∼20% of the underground reactions that can be connected to the existing network confer a fitness advantage under specific environments. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the genetic basis of evolutionary adaptations via underground metabolism is computationally predictable. The approach used here has potential for various application areas from bioengineering to medical genetics. PMID:25071190

  18. Geomechanical Evaluation of Derinkuyu Antique Underground City and its Implications in Geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydan, Ömer; Ulusay, Reşat

    2013-07-01

    Derinkuyu Underground City, located in the Cappadocia Region of Turkey, is an important structure not only for its antique and archaeological characteristics, but also as a structure in terms of the long-term stability of underground rock structures excavated by mankind. The authors carried out some observational, experimental and theoretical rock mechanics studies in the region from 1996 in the context of a research project supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan for the assessment of the long-term behaviour of Derinkuyu Underground City, and these studies are still continuing. In addition to the monitoring of the environmental conditions such as temperature, moisture and air pressure, they also installed acoustic emission (AE) and electrical potential (EP) measurement systems to monitor the behaviour and response of the surrounding rock at the fifth and seventh floors of the underground city. In this article, the geology, seismicity and state of stress of the Cappadocia Region, climatic conditions in the underground city and its vicinity, short- and long-term behaviours of the surrounding rock, its index and mechanical properties, and effects of water content and freezing-thawing processes were investigated. The stability of Derinkuyu Underground City was also evaluated using theoretical and numerical methods, and the results were presented. Furthermore, its implications in modern geoengineering are also discussed.

  19. CMS Reverse Engineering and Encore/Model Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-31

    Systems , Dam Neck, as follows: Module - 1 consisting of two files containing 5,600 lines of CMS -2Y source code. This module is a portion of the common...initial demonstration system is currently operational which produces a CADRE Teamwork/ SD structure chart from CMS source code. This demonstrates the...case kind(N) is when auto_datadesign => process-autodatadesign(N, flags); when cms - system => process_cmssystem(N, flags); (similarly for all italicized

  20. Use of the PTM with CMS Quadtree Grids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    simulation through coupling the Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) with a quadtree grid and Version 2.1 of the Particle Tracking Model (PTM) in the Surface...water Modeling System (SMS). A CMS /PTM application is presented to demonstrate the recent changes in the SMS interface of the PTM. INTRODUCTION: The...from the contents of the cards file.  Boundary conditions - This file has information about what to do for the PTM along the boundaries of the CMS

  1. CMS experiment at the LHC: Results and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golutvin, I. A.; Shmatov, S. V.

    2017-09-01

    The results of the CMS experiment based on the LHC first-run data taken at c.m.s. energies of 7 and 8 TeV and on the first data taken in the second-run at the c.m.s. energy of 13 TeV are presented. The research prospects with the LHC running at high luminosity are discussed.

  2. 29 CFR 1926.800 - Underground construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., floor or walls in any underground work area for more than a 24-hour period; or (ii) The history of the... inches (304.8 mm) ±0.25 inch (6.35 mm) from the roof, face, floor or walls in any underground work area... equipped with explosion-doors or a weak-wall having an area at least equivalent to the cross-sectional...

  3. Underground infrastructure damage for a Chicago scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Thomas N; Bos, Rabdall J

    2011-01-25

    Estimating effects due to an urban IND (improvised nuclear device) on underground structures and underground utilities is a challenging task. Nuclear effects tests performed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the era of nuclear weapons testing provides much information on how underground military structures respond. Transferring this knowledge to answer questions about the urban civilian environment is needed to help plan responses to IND scenarios. Explosions just above the ground surface can only couple a small fraction of the blast energy into an underground shock. The various forms of nuclear radiation have limited penetration into the ground. While the shock transmitted into the ground carries only a small fraction of the blast energy, peak stresses are generally higher and peak ground displacement is lower than in the air blast. While underground military structures are often designed to resist stresses substantially higher than due to the overlying rocks and soils (overburden), civilian structures such as subways and tunnels would generally only need to resist overburden conditions with a suitable safety factor. Just as we expect the buildings themselves to channel and shield air blast above ground, basements and other underground openings as well as changes of geology will channel and shield the underground shock wave. While a weaker shock is expected in an urban environment, small displacements on very close-by faults, and more likely, soils being displaced past building foundations where utility lines enter could readily damaged or disable these services. Immediately near an explosion, the blast can 'liquefy' a saturated soil creating a quicksand-like condition for a period of time. We extrapolate the nuclear effects experience to a Chicago-based scenario. We consider the TARP (Tunnel and Reservoir Project) and subway system and the underground lifeline (electric, gas, water, etc) system and provide guidance for planning this scenario.

  4. System for remote control of underground device

    DOEpatents

    Brumleve, T.D.; Hicks, M.G.; Jones, M.O.

    1975-10-21

    A system is described for remote control of an underground device, particularly a nuclear explosive. The system includes means at the surface of the ground for transmitting a seismic signal sequence through the earth having controlled and predetermined signal characteristics for initiating a selected action in the device. Additional apparatus, located with or adjacent to the underground device, produces electrical signals in response to the seismic signals received and compares these electrical signals with the predetermined signal characteristics.

  5. Detection of underground structures and tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.M.; Moses, R.W.; Kelly, R.E.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H.; Cogbill, A.H.; Stolarczyk, L.G.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. There is a continuing need in the United States defense and drug interdiction for effective over, convert, and standoff means of detecting underground tunnels, structures, and objects. This project sought to begin an assessment of electromagnetic and gravitational gradient detection approaches to the detection of underground structures and tunnels.

  6. 42 CFR 425.218 - Termination of the agreement by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Termination of the agreement by CMS. 425.218... and Participation Agreement § 425.218 Termination of the agreement by CMS. (a) General. CMS may... termination by CMS. CMS may terminate the participation agreement for reasons including, but not limited...

  7. 42 CFR 425.218 - Termination of the agreement by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Termination of the agreement by CMS. 425.218... and Participation Agreement § 425.218 Termination of the agreement by CMS. (a) General. CMS may... termination by CMS. CMS may terminate the participation agreement for reasons including, but not limited...

  8. 42 CFR 425.218 - Termination of the agreement by CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Termination of the agreement by CMS. 425.218... and Participation Agreement § 425.218 Termination of the agreement by CMS. (a) General. CMS may... termination by CMS. CMS may terminate the participation agreement for reasons including, but not limited...

  9. Using the CMS threaded framework in a production environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C. D.; Contreras, L.; Gartung, P.; Hufnagel, D.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.

    2015-12-23

    During 2014, the CMS Offline and Computing Organization completed the necessary changes to use the CMS threaded framework in the full production environment. We will briefly discuss the design of the CMS Threaded Framework, in particular how the design affects scaling performance. We will then cover the effort involved in getting both the CMSSW application software and the workflow management system ready for using multiple threads for production. Finally, we will present metrics on the performance of the application and workflow system as well as the difficulties which were uncovered. As a result, we will end with CMS' plans for using the threaded framework to do production for LHC Run 2.

  10. CMS-2 Reverse Engineering and ENCORE/MODEL Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    14399 S92 6 01 0,68 I. Table of Contents CMS2 Reverse Engineering and NENCORE/MODEL Integration Study Final Report Part I CMS -2 Reverse Engineering...Automated extraction of design information from an existing software system written in CMS -2 can be used to document that system as-built, and that I The...Cadre Technologies Inc.a N00114-91 -C-0240 Final Report May 1992 The key features of the CMS RET system are: *The interactive visual interface to the

  11. 40 CFR 280.220 - Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property on which an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system is located. 280.220 Section 280.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  12. CMS Changes in Reimbursement for HAIs

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Patricia W.; Glied, Sherry A.; McNair, Peter D.; Matthes, Nikolas; Cohen, Bevin; Landers, Timothy F.; Larson, Elaine L.

    2010-01-01

    Background The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) promulgated regulations commencing October 1, 2008, which deny payment for selected conditions occurring during the hospital stay and are not present on admission. Three of the 10 hospital-acquired conditions covered by the new CMS policy involve healthcare-associated infections, which are a common, expensive, and often preventable cause of inpatient morbidity and mortality. Objective To outline a research agenda on the impact of CMS’s payment policy on the healthcare system and the prevention of healthcare-associated infections. Methods An invitational daylong conference was convened in April 2009. Including the planning committee and speakers there were 41 conference participants who were national experts and senior researchers. Results Building upon a behavioral model and organizational theory and management research a conceptual framework was applied to organize the wide range of issues that arose. A broad array of research topics was identified. Thirty-two research agenda items were organized in the areas of incentives, environmental factors, organizational factors, clinical outcomes, staff outcomes, and financial outcomes. Methodological challenges are also discussed. Conclusions This policy is a first significant step to move output-based inpatient funding to outcome-based funding, and this agenda is applicable to all hospital-acquired conditions. Studies beginning soon will have the best hope of capturing data for the years preceding the policy change, a key element in nonexperimental research. The CMS payment policy offers an excellent opportunity to understand and influence the use of financial incentives for improving patient safety. PMID:20351584

  13. Model of heat losses from underground heat distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čarnogurská, Mária; Příhoda, Miroslav; Dobáková, Romana; Brestovič, Tomáš

    2017-09-01

    The paper describes the linear density of the heat flow using dimensional analysis in the case of underground, pre-insulated piping. The methodology makes it possible to determine the heat loss based on a simple criterial relationship. Heat losses in the piping system were also calculated using numerical simulation. The difference between the experimentally detected losses and the values obtained from the model is -3.6% to 6.4%. The results of the numerical simulation at an ambient temperature of 25°C differ from the experiment by -1.7%. At an ambient temperature of -10°C the difference is -4.0%.

  14. Underground tests of quantum mechanics. Whispers in the cosmic silence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curceanu, C.; Bartalucci, S.; Bassi, A.; Bazzi, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Cargnelli, M.; Clozza, A.; De Paolis, L.; Di Matteo, S.; Donadi, S.; Egger, J.-P.; Guaraldo, C.; Iliescu, M.; Laubenstein, M.; Marton, J.; Milotti, E.; Pichler, A.; Pietreanu, D.; Piscicchia, K.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Sperandio, L.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Zmeskal, J.

    2017-08-01

    By performing X-rays measurements in the “cosmic silence” of the underground laboratory of Gran Sasso, LNGS-INFN, we test a basic principle of quantum mechanics: the Pauli Exclusion Principle (PEP), for electrons. We present the achieved results of the VIP experiment and the ongoing VIP2 measurement aiming to gain two orders of magnitude improvement in testing PEP. We also use a similar experimental technique to search for radiation (X and gamma) predicted by continuous spontaneous localization models, which aim to solve the “measurement problem”.

  15. G-2 and CMS fast optical calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, David R.

    2001-06-01

    The following projects are discussed: (A) Operation of the muon g-2 experiment at Brookhaven National Lab (Experiment E821), especially the pulsed laser calibration system, to test the standard model of forces, and to see if new forces may exist in the vacuum. (B) The second part of this project developed fast optical forward Cerenkov jet calorimetry used in the CMS experiment collaboration (US lead organization FermiLab) at CERN on the Large Hadron Collider, designed to detect new physics at the TeV scale, such as supersymmetry and the Higgs boson.

  16. SUSY Search Strategies at Atlas and CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Autermann, Christian

    2008-11-23

    Supersymmetry is regarded as the most promising candidate for physics beyond the Standard Model. Various search strategies for SUSY are conducted at the Atlas and CMS experiments. In the early data inclusive searches, with different lepton multiplicities, are most sensitive and will be discussed here. The reach of both experiments is interpreted within the mSUGRA model.The LHC has started operation and the experiments are expected to collect of the order of 100 pb{sup -1} integrated luminosity within the first year.

  17. CMS Calorimeter Trigger Phase I upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klabbers, P.; Gorski, T.; Bachtis, M.; Compton, K.; Dasu, S.; Farmahini-Farahani, A.; Fobes, R.; Gregerson, A.; Grothe, M.; Ross, I.; Seemuth, D.; Schulte, M.; Smith, W. H.

    2012-01-01

    We present a design for the Phase-1 upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) calorimeter trigger system composed of FPGAs and Multi-GBit/sec links that adhere to the μTCA crate Telecom standard. The upgrade calorimeter trigger will implement algorithms that create collections of isolated and non-isolated electromagnetic objects, isolated and non-isolated tau objects and jet objects. The algorithms are organized in several steps with progressive data reduction. These include a particle cluster finder that reconstructs overlapping clusters of 2x2 calorimeter towers and applies electron identification, a cluster overlap filter, particle isolation determination, jet reconstruction, particle separation and sorting.

  18. Photodetectors for the CMS hadron calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, J. E.; CMS Hadron Calorimeter Readout Group

    1997-02-01

    Hadronic energy measurements in the central and end cap regions of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector will be made using sampling calorimeter techniques with plastic scintillator tiles as the sensitive layers. Plastic fibers doped with wavelength shifting fluors embedded in each tile are used to extract the scintillation light. Clear plastic wave guide fibers carry the shifted light to photodetectors located on the outer surface of the calorimeter structure. Environmental constraints and physics performance requirements for these photodetectors are presented. Candidate photodetector technologies are discussed, and the hybrid photomultiplier tube technology is identified as most promising.

  19. Study of Zγ Helicity Distributions at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakaberia, Irakli; CMS Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    Measurement of the production of electroweak gauge bosons (γ, W, Z) provides important tests of the standard model. The production of a diboson final state at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can occur by quark-antiquark annihilation (t-channel) or by boson self-interaction (s-channel). The s-channel production provides a unique probe of triple gauge boson couplings (TGC) and the effects of new physics on these couplings. I present a study of the helicity angle distributions in the Zγ production process at the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC and an examination of the sensitivity of these distributions to new physics.

  20. The upgrade of the CMS Global Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, J.; Arnold, B.; Bergauer, H.; Jeitler, M.; Matsushita, T.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Wulz, C.-E.

    2016-02-01

    The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS Level-1 Trigger. Previously implemented in VME, it has been redesigned and completely rebuilt in MicroTCA technology, using the Virtex-7 FPGA chip family. It will allow to implement trigger algorithms close to the final physics selection. The new system is presented, together with performance tests undertaken in parallel operation with the legacy system during the initial months of Run II of the LHC at a beam energy of 13 TeV.

  1. The simulation of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossutti, F.

    2008-07-01

    The CMS Collaboration has developed a detailed simulation of the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL), which has been fully integrated in the collaboration software framework CMSSW. The simulation is based on the Geant4 detector simulation toolkit for the modelling of the passage of particles through matter and magnetic field. The geometrical description of the detector is being re-implemented using the DetectorDescription language, combining an XML based description with the algorithmic definition of the position of the elements. The ECAL simulation software is fully operational and has been validated using real data from the ECAL test beam experiment that took place in summer 2006.

  2. Review of bottomonium measurements from CMS

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Z.; Liu, T.; Leonardo, N. T.; ...

    2017-07-20

    We review the results on the bottomonium system from the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. Measurements have been carried out at different center-of-mass energies in proton collisions and in collisions involving heavy ions. These include precision measurements of cross sections and polarizations, shedding light on hadroproduction mechanisms, and the observation of quarkonium sequential suppression, a notable indication of quark–gluon plasma formation. The observation of the production of bottomonium pairs is also reported along with searches for new states. We close with a brief outlook of the future physics program.

  3. Study on Snow-Melting System around Steel Top of Underground Fire Cistern using Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Niro; Nakano, Norimasa; Takeuchi, Masanori; Maekawa, Yoshitaka; Maegawa, Yoshikazu

    This research aims to develop snow melting system around steel top of underground fire cistern by using heat pipe, for realizing quick finding of the steel top under heavy snow fall. Water in a fire cistern installed underground is heated by underground heat source, 10 ~15 °C. The iron top is put on snow melting panel made of reinforced concrete. Heat is transported from water to the snow melting panel by heat pipes, which melts snow on it. The experimental results obtained for two years show that this system can melt the snow around the steel top in winter season preferably. The numerical simulation using only weather data was found to predict temperature variations of the whole system with good agreements to the experimental data. Therefore, this simulation software can be used for designing this snow-melting system.

  4. Underground Cross Section Measurements of Stellar Reactions at Astrophysically Relevant Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formicola, A.; Gugliemetti, A.

    Accurate knowledge of thermonuclear reaction rates is important to understand the generation of energy, the luminosity of neutrinos, and the synthesis of elements in stars and in the primordial nucleosynthesis. An innovative experimental approach for the study of nuclear fusion reactions based on an accelerator installed in a low background underground laboratory (the LUNA experiment at the Gran Sasso Laboratory) was able to give breaktrough results in this field over the last 25 years. By going underground and by using the typical techniques of low background physics, it is possible to measure nuclear cross sections down to the energy of stellar interest. In this proceeding, the experimental techniques adopted in underground nuclear astrophysics and an overwiev of present and proposed future facilities and of their major scientific drivers are reported.

  5. CAVSIM. Underground Coal Gasification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J.A., Thorsness, C.B. )

    1989-03-03

    CAVSIM is a three-dimensional, axisymmetric model for resource recovery and cavity growth during underground coal gasification (UCG). CAVSIM is capable of following the evolution of the cavity from near startup to exhaustion, and couples explicitly wall and roof surface growth to material and energy balances in the underlying rubble zones. Growth mechanisms are allowed to change smoothly as the system evolves from a small, relatively empty cavity low in the coal seam to a large, almost completely rubble-filled cavity extending high into the overburden rock. The model is applicable to nonswelling coals of arbitrary seam thickness and can handle a variety of gas injection flow schedules or compositions. Water influx from the coal aquifer is calculated by a gravity drainage-permeation submodel which is integrated into the general solution. The cavity is considered to consist of up to three distinct rubble zones and a void space at the top. Resistance to gas flow injected from a stationary source at the cavity floor is assumed to be concentrated in the ash pile, which builds up around the source, and also the overburden rubble which accumulates on top of this ash once overburden rock is exposed at the cavity top. Char rubble zones at the cavity side and edges are assumed to be highly permeable. Flow of injected gas through the ash to char rubble piles and the void space is coupled by material and energy balances to cavity growth at the rubble/coal, void/coal and void/rock interfaces. One preprocessor and two postprocessor programs are included - SPALL calculates one-dimensional mean spalling rates of coal or rock surfaces exposed to high temperatures and generates CAVSIM input: TAB reads CAVSIM binary output files and generates ASCII tables of selected data for display; and PLOT produces dot matrix printer or HP printer plots from TAB output.

  6. Migration of BTEX and Biodegradation in Shallow Underground Water through Fuel Leak Simulation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yaping; Chen, Yudao; Jiang, Yaping; Jiang, Lingzhi; Sun, Liqun; Li, Liuyue; Huang, Junyu

    2016-01-01

    To provide more reasonable references for remedying underground water, fuel leak was simulated by establishing an experimental model of a porous-aquifer sand tank with the same size as that of the actual tank and by monitoring the underground water. In the tank, traditional gasoline and ethyl alcohol gasoline were poured. This study was conducted to achieve better understanding of the migration and distribution of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene (BTEX), which are major pollutants in the underground water. Experimental results showed that, compared with conventional gasoline, the content peak of BTEX in the mixture of ethyl alcohol gasoline appeared later; BTEX migrated along the water flow direction horizontally and presented different pollution halos; BTEX also exhibited the highest content level at 45 cm depth; however, its content declined at the 30 and 15 cm depths vertically because of the vertical dispersion effect; the rise of underground water level increased the BTEX content, and the attenuation of BTEX content in underground water was related to the biodegradation in the sand tank, which mainly included biodegradation with oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate.

  7. Migration of BTEX and Biodegradation in Shallow Underground Water through Fuel Leak Simulation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To provide more reasonable references for remedying underground water, fuel leak was simulated by establishing an experimental model of a porous-aquifer sand tank with the same size as that of the actual tank and by monitoring the underground water. In the tank, traditional gasoline and ethyl alcohol gasoline were poured. This study was conducted to achieve better understanding of the migration and distribution of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene (BTEX), which are major pollutants in the underground water. Experimental results showed that, compared with conventional gasoline, the content peak of BTEX in the mixture of ethyl alcohol gasoline appeared later; BTEX migrated along the water flow direction horizontally and presented different pollution halos; BTEX also exhibited the highest content level at 45 cm depth; however, its content declined at the 30 and 15 cm depths vertically because of the vertical dispersion effect; the rise of underground water level increased the BTEX content, and the attenuation of BTEX content in underground water was related to the biodegradation in the sand tank, which mainly included biodegradation with oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate. PMID:27882327

  8. 40 CFR 280.230 - Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... underground storage tank or underground storage tank system. (a) Operating an UST or UST system prior to...) Operating an UST or UST system after foreclosure. The following provisions apply to a holder who, through..., the purchaser must decide whether to operate or close the UST or UST system in accordance with...

  9. 40 CFR 280.230 - Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... underground storage tank or underground storage tank system. (a) Operating an UST or UST system prior to...) Operating an UST or UST system after foreclosure. The following provisions apply to a holder who, through..., the purchaser must decide whether to operate or close the UST or UST system in accordance with...

  10. 30 CFR 72.630 - Drill dust control at underground areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dust control at underground areas of underground mines. (a) Dust resulting from drilling in rock shall... condition. Dust collectors approved under Part 33—Dust Collectors for Use in Connection with Rock Drilling... the purpose of this section. (c) Water control. Water used to control dust from drilling rock shall...

  11. 30 CFR 72.630 - Drill dust control at underground areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dust control at underground areas of underground mines. (a) Dust resulting from drilling in rock shall... condition. Dust collectors approved under Part 33—Dust Collectors for Use in Connection with Rock Drilling... the purpose of this section. (c) Water control. Water used to control dust from drilling rock shall be...

  12. 30 CFR 72.630 - Drill dust control at underground areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dust control at underground areas of underground mines. (a) Dust resulting from drilling in rock shall... condition. Dust collectors approved under Part 33—Dust Collectors for Use in Connection with Rock Drilling... the purpose of this section. (c) Water control. Water used to control dust from drilling rock shall be...

  13. 42 CFR 423.2063 - Applicability of laws, regulations and CMS Rulings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., ALJ Hearings, MAC review, and Judicial Review § 423.2063 Applicability of laws, regulations and CMS... on ALJs and the MAC. (b) CMS Rulings are published under the authority of the CMS Administrator...

  14. Low-cost, high-precision propagation delay measurement of 12-fibre MPO cables for the CMS DT electronics upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Tobar, Á.; Fernández-Bedoya, C.; Redondo, I.

    2013-02-01

    CMS DT electronics upgrade involves laying down 3500 optical links from the CMS experimental cavern to the service cavern, whose lengths must be matched to minimize skew, so that the present upstream electronics can be reused at an initial stage. In order to assess the cables' compliance, a high resolution and cost-effective system has been developed to measure the length uniformity of these fibres. Transit-time oscillation method has been implemented with matched MTP 12-channel fibre optic transmitter and receiver and a Spartan-6 FPGA. After proper corrections and averaging, millimetre-range accuracy has been achieved.

  15. CMS distributed data analysis with CRAB3

    DOE PAGES

    Mascheroni, M.; Balcas, J.; Belforte, S.; ...

    2015-12-23

    The CMS Remote Analysis Builder (CRAB) is a distributed workflow management tool which facilitates analysis tasks by isolating users from the technical details of the Grid infrastructure. Throughout LHC Run 1, CRAB has been successfully employed by an average of 350 distinct users each week executing about 200,000 jobs per day.CRAB has been significantly upgraded in order to face the new challenges posed by LHC Run 2. Components of the new system include 1) a lightweight client, 2) a central primary server which communicates with the clients through a REST interface, 3) secondary servers which manage user analysis tasks andmore » submit jobs to the CMS resource provisioning system, and 4) a central service to asynchronously move user data from temporary storage in the execution site to the desired storage location. Furthermore, the new system improves the robustness, scalability and sustainability of the service.Here we provide an overview of the new system, operation, and user support, report on its current status, and identify lessons learned from the commissioning phase and production roll-out.« less

  16. CMS distributed data analysis with CRAB3

    SciTech Connect

    Mascheroni, M.; Balcas, J.; Belforte, S.; Bockelman, B. P.; Hernandez, J. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Konstantinov, P. B.; Silva, J. M. D.; Ali, M. A. B. M.; Melo, A. M.; Riahi, H.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Yusli, M. N. B.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A. E.; Vaandering, E.

    2015-12-23

    The CMS Remote Analysis Builder (CRAB) is a distributed workflow management tool which facilitates analysis tasks by isolating users from the technical details of the Grid infrastructure. Throughout LHC Run 1, CRAB has been successfully employed by an average of 350 distinct users each week executing about 200,000 jobs per day.CRAB has been significantly upgraded in order to face the new challenges posed by LHC Run 2. Components of the new system include 1) a lightweight client, 2) a central primary server which communicates with the clients through a REST interface, 3) secondary servers which manage user analysis tasks and submit jobs to the CMS resource provisioning system, and 4) a central service to asynchronously move user data from temporary storage in the execution site to the desired storage location. Furthermore, the new system improves the robustness, scalability and sustainability of the service.Here we provide an overview of the new system, operation, and user support, report on its current status, and identify lessons learned from the commissioning phase and production roll-out.

  17. Status of the CMS pixel project

    SciTech Connect

    Uplegger, Lorenzo; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment (CMS) will start taking data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2008. The closest detector to the interaction point is the silicon pixel detector which is the heart of the tracking system. It consists of three barrel layers and two pixel disks on each side of the interaction point for a total of 66 million channels. Its proximity to the interaction point means there will be very large particle fluences and therefore a radiation-tolerant design is necessary. The pixel detector will be crucial to achieve a good vertex resolution and will play a key role in pattern recognition and track reconstruction. The results from test beam runs prove that the expected performances can be achieved. The detector is currently being assembled and will be ready for insertion into CMS in early 2008. During the assembly phase, a thorough electronic test is being done to check the functionality of each channel to guarantee the performance required to achieve the physics goals. This report will present the final detector design, the status of the production as well as results from test beam runs to validate the expected performance.

  18. The Phase1 CMS Pixel detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavolaro, V. R.

    2016-12-01

    The pixel detector of the CMS experiment will be replaced in an extended end-of-year shutdown during winter 2016/2017 with an upgraded one able to cope with peak instantaneous luminosities beyond the nominal LHC instantaneous luminosity of 1 × 1034 cm-2 s-1. Under the conditions expected in the coming years, which will see an increase of a factor two in instantaneous luminosity, the present system would experience a dynamic inefficiency caused mainly by data losses due to buffer overflows. The Phase I upgrade of the CMS pixel detector, described in this paper, will operate at full efficiency at an instantaneous luminosity of 2 × 1034 cm-2 s-1 and beyond, thanks to a new readout chip. The new detector will feature one additional tracking point both in the barrel and in the forward regions, while reducing the material budget as a result of a new CO2 cooling system and optimised layout of the services. In this paper, the design and the technological choices of the Phase I detector will be reviewed and the status of the construction of the detector and the performance of its components will be discussed.

  19. Status of the CMS Detector Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Gerry; Behrens, Ulf; Bowen, Matthew; Branson, James; Bukowiec, Sebastian; Cittolin, Sergio; Coarasa, Jose Antonio; Deldicque, Christian; Dobson, Marc; Dupont, Aymeric; Erhan, Samim; Flossdorf, Alexander; Gigi, Dominique; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino, Robert; Hartl, Christian; Hegeman, Jeroen; Holzner, Andre; Hwong, Yi Ling; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Meschi, Emilio; Mommsen, Remigius K.; O'Dell, Vivian; Orsini, Luciano; Paus, Christoph; Petrucci, Andrea; Pieri, Marco; Polese, Giovanni; Racz, Attila; Raginel, Olivier; Sakulin, Hannes; Sani, Matteo; Schwick, Christoph; Shpakov, Dennis; Simon, Michal; Cristian Spataru, Andrei; Sumorok, Konstanty

    2012-12-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a CERN multi-purpose experiment that exploits the physics of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The Detector Control System (DCS) is responsible for ensuring the safe, correct and efficient operation of the experiment, and has contributed to the recording of high quality physics data. The DCS is programmed to automatically react to the LHC operational mode. CMS sub-detectors’ bias voltages are set depending on the machine mode and particle beam conditions. An operator provided with a small set of screens supervises the system status summarized from the approximately 6M monitored parameters. Using the experience of nearly two years of operation with beam the DCS automation software has been enhanced to increase the system efficiency by minimizing the time required by sub-detectors to prepare for physics data taking. From the infrastructure point of view the DCS will be subject to extensive modifications in 2012. The current rack mounted control PCs will be replaced by a redundant pair of DELL Blade systems. These blade servers are a high-density modular solution that incorporates servers and networking into a single chassis that provides shared power, cooling and management. This infrastructure modification associated with the migration to blade servers will challenge the DCS software and hardware factorization capabilities. The on-going studies for this migration together with the latest modifications are discussed in the paper.

  20. CMS distributed data analysis with CRAB3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascheroni, M.; Balcas, J.; Belforte, S.; Bockelman, B. P.; Hernandez, J. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Konstantinov, P. B.; Silva, J. M. D.; Ali, M. A. B. M.; Melo, A. M.; Riahi, H.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Yusli, M. N. B.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A. E.; Vaandering, E.

    2015-12-01

    The CMS Remote Analysis Builder (CRAB) is a distributed workflow management tool which facilitates analysis tasks by isolating users from the technical details of the Grid infrastructure. Throughout LHC Run 1, CRAB has been successfully employed by an average of 350 distinct users each week executing about 200,000 jobs per day. CRAB has been significantly upgraded in order to face the new challenges posed by LHC Run 2. Components of the new system include 1) a lightweight client, 2) a central primary server which communicates with the clients through a REST interface, 3) secondary servers which manage user analysis tasks and submit jobs to the CMS resource provisioning system, and 4) a central service to asynchronously move user data from temporary storage in the execution site to the desired storage location. The new system improves the robustness, scalability and sustainability of the service. Here we provide an overview of the new system, operation, and user support, report on its current status, and identify lessons learned from the commissioning phase and production roll-out.

  1. Performance of the CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotta, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increases in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. The increase in the number of interactions per bunch crossing, on average 25 in 2012, and expected to be around 40 in Run II, will be an additional complication. We present here the expected performance of the main triggers that will be used during the 2015 data taking campaign, paying particular attention to the new approaches that have been developed to cope with the challenges of the new run. This includes improvements in HLT electron and photon reconstruction as well as better performing muon triggers. We will also present the performance of the improved tracking and vertexing algorithms, discussing their impact on the b-tagging performance as well as on the jet and missing energy reconstruction.

  2. Prospects for SUSY searches in CMS and ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, Paul de

    2008-11-23

    We discuss how the CMS and ATLAS experiments are preparing for the analysis of first LHC data with emphasis on the search for supersymmetry. We will show the importance of the understanding of detector, trigger, reconstruction and backgrounds, and we will present realistic estimates of the reach of CMS and ATLAS.

  3. Higgs Boson Search at LHC (and LHC/CMS status)

    SciTech Connect

    Korytov, Andrey

    2008-11-23

    Presented are the results of the most recent studies by the CMS and ATLAS collaborations on the expected sensitivity of their detectors to observing a Higgs boson at LHC. The overview is preceded with a brief summary of the LHC and the CMS Experiment status.

  4. 42 CFR 460.18 - CMS evaluation of applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.18 CMS evaluation of applications... information: (a) Information contained in the application. (b) Information obtained through onsite visits conducted by CMS or the State administering agency. (c) Information obtained by the State administering...

  5. 45 CFR 150.203 - Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... individual market. If a State has notified CMS that it is implementing an acceptable alternative mechanism in... requirements of § 148.120, CMS's determination focuses on the following: (1) Whether the State's mechanism meets the requirements for an acceptable alternative mechanism. (2) Whether the State is...

  6. 42 CFR 416.30 - Terms of agreement with CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... from someone on their behalf. (2) As used in this section, money incorrectly collected means sums... entitlement period falls within the time the ASC's agreement with CMS is in effect. (d) Furnishing information. The ASC agrees to furnish to CMS, if requested, information necessary to establish payment rates...

  7. 42 CFR 416.30 - Terms of agreement with CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... from someone on their behalf. (2) As used in this section, money incorrectly collected means sums... entitlement period falls within the time the ASC's agreement with CMS is in effect. (d) Furnishing information. The ASC agrees to furnish to CMS, if requested, information necessary to establish payment rates...

  8. 42 CFR 416.30 - Terms of agreement with CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... from someone on their behalf. (2) As used in this section, money incorrectly collected means sums... entitlement period falls within the time the ASC's agreement with CMS is in effect. (d) Furnishing information. The ASC agrees to furnish to CMS, if requested, information necessary to establish payment rates...

  9. 42 CFR 416.30 - Terms of agreement with CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... from someone on their behalf. (2) As used in this section, money incorrectly collected means sums... entitlement period falls within the time the ASC's agreement with CMS is in effect. (d) Furnishing information. The ASC agrees to furnish to CMS, if requested, information necessary to establish payment rates...

  10. 42 CFR 416.30 - Terms of agreement with CMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... from someone on their behalf. (2) As used in this section, money incorrectly collected means sums... entitlement period falls within the time the ASC's agreement with CMS is in effect. (d) Furnishing information. The ASC agrees to furnish to CMS, if requested, information necessary to establish payment rates...

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Male-Fertility Restoration in CMS Onion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The production of hybrid-onion seed is dependent on cytoplasmic-genic male sterility (CMS) systems. For the most commonly used CMS, male-sterile (S) cytoplasm interacts with a dominant allele at one nuclear male-fertility restoration locus (Ms) to condition male fertility. We are using proteomics ...

  12. Proteomic analyses of male-fertility restoration in CMS onion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The production of hybrid-onion seed is dependent on cytoplasmic-genic male sterility (CMS) systems. For the most commonly used CMS, male-sterile (S) cytoplasm interacts with a dominant allele at one nuclear male-fertility restoration locus (Ms) to condition male fertility. We are using a proteomics ...

  13. Risk factors for cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) in Norwegian salmon farming.

    PubMed

    Bang Jensen, Britt; Brun, Edgar; Fineid, Birgitte; Larssen, Rolf Bjerke; Kristoffersen, Anja B

    2013-12-12

    Cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) has been an economically important disease in Norwegian aquaculture since the 1990s. In this study, data on monthly production characteristics and case registrations were combined in a cohort study and supplemented with a questionnaire-based case-control survey on management factors in order to identify risk factors for CMS. The cohort study included cases and controls from 2005 to 2012. From this dataset differences between all cases and controls were analyzed by a mixed effect multivariate logistic regression. From this we found that the probability of CMS increased with increasing time in the sea, infection pressure, and cohort size, and that cohorts which had previously been diagnosed with heart and skeletal muscle inflammation or which were in farms with a history of CMS in previous cohorts had double the odds of developing CMS. The model was then used to calculate the predicted value for each cohort from which additional data were obtained via the questionnaire-based survey and used as offset for calculating the probability of CMS in a semi-univariate analysis of additional risk factors. Finally, the model was used to calculate the probability of developing CMS in 100 different scenarios in which the cohorts were subject to increasingly worse conditions with regards to the risk factors from the dataset. We believe that this exercise is a good way of communicating the findings to farmers, so they can make informed decisions when trying to avoid CMS in their fish cohorts.

  14. Particulate matter in the underground of Stockholm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Christer; Johansson, Per-Åke

    The concentrations of PM 10 and PM 2.5 were measured during 2 weeks at an underground station in central Stockholm. The instrument, an automatic TEOM monitor (Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance), was placed on the platform in the centre of the station. During weekdays between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. the average PM 10 and PM 2.5 concentrations were 470 and 260 μg/ m3, respectively. These levels are a factor 5 and 10 times higher than the corresponding values measured in one of the busiest streets in central Stockholm. The concentrations in the underground followed closely the train traffic intensity. The levels were very similar from one day to the next. During Saturdays and Sundays the levels decreased slightly due to less frequent train passages. Additional measurements were performed right after the tunnel had been washed. Tunnel walls and railway tracks between the platforms of the underground system were washed using water. Only a slight reduction of the PM 10 levels (approximately 13%) could be observed during a few days after the water treatment. For PM 2.5 the reduction was even less, about 10% lower levels could be seen. This might indicate that particles from tunnel walls and tracks make only a minor contribution to the observed levels. These results confirm earlier unpublished measurements showing high levels of PM in the underground of Stockholm. Substantially, elevated particle exposure levels have also been reported in several earlier studies in the underground of London, UK.

  15. Geological-Technical and Geo-engineering Aspects of Dimensional Stone Underground Quarrying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaro, Mauro; Lovera, Enrico

    improved. The paper refers to some of the most important and significant examples in Italy, and underlines the possibility of extending, by underground quarrying, the exploitation of important and well-appreciated natural stones, as the quartzite-sandstone of the Tosco-Emiliano Appennini (Firenzuola Stone) and the Alpine gneisses. In order to pass from the simple experimental stage (explorative drift) to the more complex 3D design of the underground voids, detailed geo-structural reconstruction of the rock body and specific lithological in situ surveys are needed: such important aspects represent a very interesting common field between mining engineers and geologists.

  16. The Underground Laboratory in South Korea : facilities and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeongduk

    2017-01-01

    We have developed underground physics programs for last 15 years in South Korea. The scientific and technical motivation for this initiative was the lack of local facility of a large accelerator in Korea. Thanks to the large underground electric power generator in Yangyang area, we could construct a deep underground laboratory (Yangyang Laboratory, Y2L) and has performed some pioneering experiments for dark matter search and double beta decay experiments. Since year of 2013, a new research center in the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Center for Underground Physics (CUP), is approved by the government and Y2L laboratory is managed by CUP. Due to the limited space in Y2L, we are proposing to construct a new deep underground laboratory where we can host larger scale experiments of next generation. The site is in an active iron mine, and will be made in 1100 meter underground with a space of about 2000 m2 by the end of 2019. I will describe the status and future plan for this underground laboratory. CUP has two main experimental programs. (1) Identification of dark matter : The annual modulation signal of DAMA/LIBRA experiment has been contradictory to many other experiments such as XENON100, LUX, and Super CDMS. Yale University and CUP (COSINE-100) experimentalists agreed to do an experiment together at the Y2L and recently commissioned a 100kg scale low background NaI(Tl) crystal experiment. In future, we will develop NaI(Tl) crystals with lower internal backgrounds and try to run identical detectors at both north and south hemisphere. Low mass WIMP search is also planned with a development of low temperature sensors coupled with highly scintillating crystals. (2) Neutrinoless double beta decay search : The mass of the lightest neutrino and the Majorana nature of the neutrinos are not determined yet. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiment can answer both of the questions directly, and ultra-low backgrounds and excellent energy resolution are critical to

  17. Method for making generally cylindrical underground openings

    DOEpatents

    Routh, J.W.

    1983-05-26

    A rapid, economical and safe method for making a generally cylindrical underground opening such as a shaft or a tunnel is described. A borehole is formed along the approximate center line of where it is desired to make the underground opening. The borehole is loaded with an explodable material and the explodable material is detonated. An enlarged cavity is formed by the explosive action of the detonated explodable material forcing outward and compacting the original walls of the borehole. The enlarged cavity may be increased in size by loading it with a second explodable material, and detonating the second explodable material. The process may be repeated as required until the desired underground opening is made. The explodable material used in the method may be free-flowing, and it may be contained in a pipe.

  18. Design criteria for an underground lunar mine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siekmeier, John A.

    1992-01-01

    Underground excavation and construction techniques have been well developed terrestrially and provide an attractive option for lunar mining and habitat construction. The lunar mine, processing facilities and habitats could be located beneath the lunar surface in basaltic rock that would protect the crew and equipment from the hazardous surface environment. A terrestrial-like atmosphere would be created within the underground structures allowing more conventional technologies to be utilized. In addition, the basalt would likely contain higher quality mineral deposits than the regolith (lunar soil) since the minerals in the regolith have been degraded by meteorite bombardment. The conditions that would affect the design of an underground lunar mine are described and a lunar rock mass rated to assess its quality using terrestrial rock mass classification systems. Design criteria are established and a construction scenario proposed. Parameters having the greatest effect on stability are identified based on distinct element computer modeling and terrestrial experience.

  19. Underground pipe inspection device and method

    SciTech Connect

    Germata, Daniel Thomas

    2009-02-24

    A method and apparatus for inspecting the walls of an underground pipe from inside the pipe in which an inspection apparatus having a circular planar platform having a plurality of lever arms having one end pivotably attached to one side of the platform, having a pipe inspection device connected to an opposite end, and having a system for pivoting the lever arms is inserted into the underground pipe, with the inspection apparatus oriented with the planar platform disposed perpendicular to the pipe axis. The plurality of lever arms are pivoted toward the inside wall of the pipe, contacting the inside wall with each inspection device as the apparatus is conveyed along a length of the underground pipe.

  20. Overview of Opportunities in Underground Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nigel

    2016-09-01

    The field of deep underground nuclear physics is within an exciting and burgeoning phase, demonstrated by the recent award of the 2105 Nobel Prize in physics for the observation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino flavor change, with new detector systems in construction and deployment to further develop this scientific field. This talk will overview the current status of the fields within deep underground nuclear physics, focusing on the study of astrophysical neutrino sources, the intrinsic nature of the neutrino, and nuclear astrophysics. The opportunities available in these fields in the near-future will also be discussed.

  1. Suicide on the London Underground System.

    PubMed

    Farmer, R; O'Donnell, I; Tranah, T

    1991-09-01

    Over the past 50 years there has been an increase in the numbers of people jumping/falling in front of trains on the London Underground system. Case-fatality rates have fallen from 70% in the 1950s to 55% today. The proportion certified as suicide has fallen while the proportions certified as accidents or open verdicts have risen. There is unusual clustering of events at some stations which are adjacent to psychiatric units. The hypothesis that ease of access to London Underground stations may sometimes be a determinant of suicide is investigated.

  2. Background Models for Muons and Neutrons Underground

    SciTech Connect

    Formaggio, Joseph A.

    2005-09-08

    Cosmogenic-induced activity is an issue of great concern for many sensitive experiments sited underground. A variety of different arch-type experiments - such as those geared toward the detection of dark matter, neutrinoless double beta decay and solar neutrinos - have reached levels of cleanliness and sensitivity that warrant careful consideration of secondary activity induced by cosmic rays. This paper reviews some of the main issues associated with the modeling of cosmogenic activity underground. Comparison with data, when such data is available, is also presented.

  3. Underground physics in Japan - Present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, T.

    1986-04-01

    Japanese underground-physics projects and Japanese participation in international programs are reviewed. Consideration is given to the large-solid-angle 30-100-m-deep underground-detector/surface-EAS-array installation at Ohya-cho; the Kamioka-mine Cerenkov detector; the DUMAND project near Hawaii; development of Super-Mutrons A and B at Ohya-cho; the results obtained in the JACEE project regarding quark-gluon-plasma muon pairs, muon bundles, and muon point sources; and a pair calorimeter and a proton-decay experiment for Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy. Diagrams, graphs, and drawings are provided.

  4. Underground Nuclear Astrophysics Experiment JUNA in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. P.

    Underground Nuclear Astrophysics Experiment in China (JUNA) will take the advantage of the ultra-low background in Jinping underground lab. A 400 kV high current accelerator with an ECR source and γ , neutron and charged particle detectors will be set up. We plan to study directly a number of nuclear reactions important to hydrostatic stellar evolution near their Gamow window energies such as 25Mg(p, γ )26Al, 19F(p, α )16O, 13C(α , n)16O, and 12C(α , γ )16O, by the end of 2019.

  5. Black Hills State University Underground Campus.

    PubMed

    Mount, Brianna J; Thomas, Keenan J; Oliver-Mallory, Kelsey C; Lesko, Kevin T; Schnee, Richard W; Henning, Reyco; MacLellan, Ryan F; Guerra, Marcelo B B; Busch, Matthew; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann D; Wilkerson, J F; Xu, Wenqin; Mei, Dongming

    2017-08-01

    The Black Hills State University Underground Campus (BHUC) houses a low background counting facility on the 4850' level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility. There are currently four ultra-low background, high-purity germanium detectors installed in the BHUC and it is anticipated four more detectors will be installed within a year. In total, the BHUC will be able to accommodate up to twelve detectors with space inside a class 1000 cleanroom, an automated liquid nitrogen fill system, on-site personnel assistance and other required utilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Public outreach at the Soudan Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, Richard

    2016-04-01

    There are many facets to the outreach program at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, currently host to the MINOS neutrino oscillation experiment and the Cryogenic Dark Matter experiment, plus a number of smaller experiments in the Low Background Counting Facility. The main focus is on twice daily public tours, operated in coordination with the Soudan Underground State Park and Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, who also operate undergound tours of the historical iron mining area. Another important component is the undergraduate interns and high school teachers who lead the tours. They also participate in the operation and/or analysis of the experiments hosted at the mine.

  7. Optimizing CMS build infrastructure via Apache Mesos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurachmanov, David; Degano, Alessandro; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Mendez, David; Muzaffar, Shahzad

    2015-12-01

    The Offline Software of the CMS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN consists of 6M lines of in-house code, developed over a decade by nearly 1000 physicists, as well as a comparable amount of general use open-source code. A critical ingredient to the success of the construction and early operation of the WLCG was the convergence, around the year 2000, on the use of a homogeneous environment of commodity x86-64 processors and Linux. Apache Mesos is a cluster manager that provides efficient resource isolation and sharing across distributed applications, or frameworks. It can run Hadoop, Jenkins, Spark, Aurora, and other applications on a dynamically shared pool of nodes. We present how we migrated our continuous integration system to schedule jobs on a relatively small Apache Mesos enabled cluster and how this resulted in better resource usage, higher peak performance and lower latency thanks to the dynamic scheduling capabilities of Mesos.

  8. Optimizing CMS build infrastructure via Apache Mesos

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurachmanov, David; Degano, Alessandro; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Mendez, David; Muzaffar, Shahzad

    2015-12-23

    The Offline Software of the CMS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN consists of 6M lines of in-house code, developed over a decade by nearly 1000 physicists, as well as a comparable amount of general use open-source code. A critical ingredient to the success of the construction and early operation of the WLCG was the convergence, around the year 2000, on the use of a homogeneous environment of commodity x86-64 processors and Linux.Apache Mesos is a cluster manager that provides efficient resource isolation and sharing across distributed applications, or frameworks. It can run Hadoop, Jenkins, Spark, Aurora, and other applications on a dynamically shared pool of nodes. Lastly, we present how we migrated our continuous integration system to schedule jobs on a relatively small Apache Mesos enabled cluster and how this resulted in better resource usage, higher peak performance and lower latency thanks to the dynamic scheduling capabilities of Mesos.

  9. MPPC photon sensor operational experience in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Künsken, Andreas; CMS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    During the first long shutdown of the LHC the Outer Hadron Calorimeter of CMS has been equipped with silicon photomultipliers that replace the existing hybrid photodiodes while maintaining most of the readout chain. The new photon sensors are Hamamatsu MultiPixel Photon Counters with an active area of 3 mm × 3 mm and a cell pitch of 50 μm. Different means of determining the device's breakdown voltage and gain are presented. The stability of the overall system temperature as well as the stability of the gain and the breakdown voltage of the silicon photomultipliers are studied. The correlation between the different methods of determining the gain and breakdown voltage is tested to find whether they yield comparable results.

  10. Radiation simulations of the CMS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, Graham J.

    This thesis presents results of recent radiation simulations for the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN performed using the Monte Carlo simulation package FLUKA. High statistics simulations with a fine granularity in the detector were carried out using the Condor batch system at the Fermilab LHC Physics Center. In addition, an existing web tool for accessing and displaying simulation data was upgraded. The FLUKA data and previously generated MARS Monte Carlo data can be plotted using 1-D or 2-D plotting functionalities along R and Z, the transverse distance from the beamline and the distance along the beamline, respectively. Comparisons between the data sets have been carried out; the effect of particle transport thresholds in both packages was explored, comparisons with zero magnetic field in the CMS solenoid and full field are made, a model of non-ionizing energy losses is examined, and sensitive areas of interest within the simulation are identified.

  11. Computing challenges of the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krammer, N.; Liko, D.

    2017-06-01

    The success of the LHC experiments is due to the magnificent performance of the detector systems and the excellent operating computing systems. The CMS offline software and computing system is successfully fulfilling the LHC Run 2 requirements. For the increased data rate of future LHC operation, together with high pileup interactions, improvements of the usage of the current computing facilities and new technologies became necessary. Especially for the challenge of the future HL-LHC a more flexible and sophisticated computing model is needed. In this presentation, I will discuss the current computing system used in the LHC Run 2 and future computing facilities for the HL-LHC runs using flexible computing technologies like commercial and academic computing clouds. The cloud resources are highly virtualized and can be deployed for a variety of computing tasks providing the capacities for the increasing needs of large scale scientific computing.

  12. Estimating job runtime for CMS analysis jobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfiligoi, I.

    2014-06-01

    The basic premise of pilot systems is to create an overlay scheduling system on top of leased resources. And by definition, leases have a limited lifetime, so any job that is scheduled on such resources must finish before the lease is over, or it will be killed and all the computation is wasted. In order to effectively schedule jobs to resources, the pilot system thus requires the expected runtime of the users' jobs. Past studies have shown that relying on user provided estimates is not a valid strategy, so the system should try to make an estimate by itself. This paper provides a study of the historical data obtained from the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment's Analysis Operations submission system. Clear patterns are observed, suggesting that making prediction of an expected job lifetime range is achievable with high confidence level in this environment.

  13. On muon energy spectrum in muon groups underground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakatanov, V. N.; Chudakov, A. E.; Novoseltsev, Y. F.; Novoseltseva, M. V.; Stenkin, Y. V.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described which was used to measure muon energy spectrum characteristics in muon groups underground using mu-e decays recording. The Baksan Telescope's experimental data on mu-e decays intensity in muon groups of various multiplicities are analyzed. The experimental data indicating very flat spectrum does not however represent the total spectrum in muon groups. Obviously the muon energy spectrum depends strongly on a distance from the group axis. The core attraction effect makes a significant distortion, making the spectrum flatter. After taking this into account and making corrections for this effect the integral total spectrum index in groups has a very small depencence on muon multiplicity and agrees well with expected one: beta=beta (sub expected) = 1.75.

  14. Status and Growth of Underground Science at WIPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempe, Norbert T.

    2008-10-01

    The science community is increasingly taking advantage of research opportunities in the government-owned Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), 655m underground near Carlsbad, NM. Discoveries so far include viable bacteria, cellulose, and DNA in 250 million-year old salt, preserved in an ultra-low background-radiation setting. Supplementing the overburden's shielding against cosmic radiation, terrestrial background from the host formation is less than five percent that of average crustal rock. In the past, WIPP accommodated development and testing of neutral current detectors for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and dark matter research, and it currently hosts two experiments pursuing neutrino-less double-beta decay. That scientists can listen to whispers from the universe in proximity to megacuries of radioactive waste lends, of course, credibility to the argument that WIPP itself is very safe. Almost a century of regional petroleum and potash extraction history and more than three decades of WIPP studies have generated a comprehensive body of knowledge on geology, mining technology, rock mechanics, geochemistry, and other disciplines relevant to underground science. Existing infrastructure is being used and can be expanded to fit experimental needs. WIPP's exemplary safety and regulatory compliance culture, low excavating and operating cost, and the high probability of the repository operating at least another 40 years make its available underground space attractive for future research and development. Recent proposals include low-photon energy counting to study internal dose received decades ago, investigations into ultra-low radiation dose response in cell cultures and laboratory animals (e.g., hormesis vs. linear no-threshold) and detectors for dark matter, solar and supernova neutrinos, and proton decay. Additional proposals compatible with WIPP's primary mission are welcome.

  15. Wireless system for explosion detection in underground structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikhradze, M.; Bochorishvili, N.; Akhvlediani, I.; Kukhalashvili, D.; Kalichava, I.; Mataradze, E.

    2009-06-01

    Considering the growing threat of terrorist or accidental explosions in underground stations, underground highway and railway sections improvement of system for protecting people from explosions appears urgent. Current automatic protective devices with blast identification module and blast damping absorbers of various designs as their basic elements cannot be considered effective. Analysis revealed that low reliability of blast detection and delayed generation of start signal for the activation of an absorber are the major disadvantages of protective devices. Besides the transmission of trigger signal to an energy absorber through cable communication reduces the reliability of the operation of protective device due to a possible damage of electric wiring under blast or mechanical attack. This paper presents the outcomes of the studies conducted to select accurate criteria for blast identification and to design wireless system of activation of defensive device. The results of testing of blast detection methods (seismic, EMP, optical, on overpressure) showed that the proposed method, which implies constant monitoring of overpressure in terms of its reliability and response speed, best meets the requirements. Proposed wireless system for explosions identification and activation of protective device consists of transmitter and receiver modules. Transmitter module contains sensor and microprocessor equipped with blast identification software. Receiver module produces activation signal for operation of absorber. Tests were performed in the underground experimental base of Mining Institute. The time between the moment of receiving signal by the sensor and activation of absorber - 640 microsecond; distance between transmitter and receiver in direct tunnel - at least 150m; in tunnel with 900 bending - 50m. This research is sponsored by NATO's Public Diplomacy Division in the framework of "Science for Peace".

  16. Performance studies and improvements of CMS distributed data transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacorsi, D.; Flix, J.; Kaselis, R.; Letts, J.; Magini, N.; Sartirana, A.

    2012-12-01

    CMS computing needs reliable, stable and fast connections among multi-tiered distributed infrastructures. CMS experiment relies on File Transfer Services (FTS) for data distribution, a low level data movement service responsible for moving sets of files from one site to another, while allowing participating sites to control the network resource usage. FTS servers are provided by Tier-0 and Tier-1 centers and used by all the computing sites in CMS, subject to established CMS and sites setup policies, including all the virtual organizations making use of the Grid resources at the site, and properly dimensioned to satisfy all the requirements for them. Managing the service efficiently needs good knowledge of the CMS needs for all kind of transfer routes, and the sharing and interference with other VOs using the same FTS transfer managers. This contribution deals with a complete revision of all FTS servers used by CMS, customizing the topologies and improving their setup in order to keep CMS transferring data to the desired levels, as well as performance studies for all kind of transfer routes, including overheads measurements introduced by SRM servers and storage systems, FTS server misconfigurations and identification of congested channels, historical transfer throughputs per stream, file-latency studies,… This information is retrieved directly from the FTS servers through the FTS Monitor webpages and conveniently archived for further analysis. The project provides an interface for all these values, to ease the analysis of the data.

  17. Multiple CMS-restorer gene polymorphism in gynodioecious Plantago coronopus.

    PubMed

    van Damme, J M M; Hundscheid, M P J; Ivanovic, S; Koelewijn, H P

    2004-08-01

    The mode of inheritance of the male sterility trait is crucial for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of the sexual system gynodioecy, which is the co-occurrence of female and hermaphrodite plants in natural populations. Both cytoplasmic (CMS) and nuclear (restorer) genes are known to be involved. Theoretical models usually assume a limited number of CMS genes with each a single restorer gene, while reality is more complex. In this study, it is shown that in the gynodioecious species Plantago coronopus two new CMS-restorer polymorphisms exist in addition to the two that were already known, which means four CMS-restorer systems at the species level. Furthermore, three CMS types were shown to co-occur within a single population. All new CMS types showed a multilocus system for male fertility restoration, in which both recessive and dominant restorer alleles occur. Our finding of more than two co-occurring CMS-restorer systems each with multiple restorer genes raises the question how this complex of male sterility systems is maintained in natural populations.

  18. MEASUREMENT OF METHANE EMISSIONS FROM UNDERGROUND DISTRIBUTION MAINS AND SERVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports results of measurements of methane emissions from underground distribution mains and services. In the program, leakage from underground distribution systems is estimated by combining leak measurements with historical leak record data and the length of undergroun...

  19. 30 CFR 57.14160 - Mantrip trolley wire hazards underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mantrip trolley wire hazards underground. 57... wire hazards underground. Mantrips shall be covered if there is danger of persons contacting the trolley wire. ...

  20. Visit to the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    U.S. Department of Energy scientists and administrators join members of the National Science Foundation and South Dakotas Sanford Underground Laboratory for the deepest journey yet to the proposed site of the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL).

  1. MEASUREMENT OF METHANE EMISSIONS FROM UNDERGROUND DISTRIBUTION MAINS AND SERVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports results of measurements of methane emissions from underground distribution mains and services. In the program, leakage from underground distribution systems is estimated by combining leak measurements with historical leak record data and the length of undergroun...

  2. 30 CFR 57.4362 - Underground rescue and firefighting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4362 Underground rescue...

  3. Visit to the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy scientists and administrators join members of the National Science Foundation and South Dakotas Sanford Underground Laboratory for the deepest journey yet to the proposed site of the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL).

  4. Visit to the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-31

    U.S. Department of Energy scientists and administrators join members of the National Science Foundation and South Dakotas Sanford Underground Laboratory for the deepest journey yet to the proposed site of the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL).

  5. 30 CFR 57.14160 - Mantrip trolley wire hazards underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mantrip trolley wire hazards underground. 57... wire hazards underground. Mantrips shall be covered if there is danger of persons contacting the trolley wire....

  6. 30 CFR 57.14160 - Mantrip trolley wire hazards underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mantrip trolley wire hazards underground. 57... wire hazards underground. Mantrips shall be covered if there is danger of persons contacting the trolley wire....

  7. 30 CFR 57.14160 - Mantrip trolley wire hazards underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mantrip trolley wire hazards underground. 57... wire hazards underground. Mantrips shall be covered if there is danger of persons contacting the trolley wire....

  8. 30 CFR 57.14160 - Mantrip trolley wire hazards underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mantrip trolley wire hazards underground. 57... wire hazards underground. Mantrips shall be covered if there is danger of persons contacting the trolley wire....

  9. Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Underground Storage Tanks (USTs)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 significantly affected federal and state underground storage tank programs, required major changes to the programs, and is aimed at reducing underground storage tank releases to our environment.

  10. 9. PHOTOCOPY, ARCHITECTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAIL DRAWING OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. PHOTOCOPY, ARCHITECTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAIL DRAWING OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE MAGAZINES AND LAUNCHER-LOADER ASSEMBLIES. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Underground Storage Magazines & Launcher-Loader Assemblies, Southwesternmost end of launch area, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  11. 8. PHOTOCOPY, ARCHITECTURAL FLOOR PLAN AND DETAIL DRAWING OF UNDERGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. PHOTOCOPY, ARCHITECTURAL FLOOR PLAN AND DETAIL DRAWING OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE MAGAZINES AND LAUNCHER-LOADER ASSEMBLIES. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Underground Storage Magazines & Launcher-Loader Assemblies, Southwesternmost end of launch area, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  12. 7. PHOTOCOPY, PLUMBING AND MECHANICAL PLAN AND DETAILS FOR UNDERGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. PHOTOCOPY, PLUMBING AND MECHANICAL PLAN AND DETAILS FOR UNDERGROUND STORAGE MAGAZINES AND LAUNCHER-LOADER ASSEMBLIES. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Underground Storage Magazines & Launcher-Loader Assemblies, Southwesternmost end of launch area, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  13. Ground Water Discharges (EPA's Underground Injection ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-07-06

    Most ground water used for drinking occurs near the earth's surface and is easily contaminated. Of major concern is the potential contamination of underground sources of drinking water by any of the hundreds of thousands of subsurface wastewater disposal injection wells nationwide.

  14. Reference electrodes for underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Ansuini, F.J.; Dimond, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses several factors affecting the reference potential established by copper/copper sulfate and silver/silver chloride reference electrodes. Guidelines for using permanent references in underground storage tank applications are presented and some causes of misleading readings with portable references are discussed.

  15. Underground Energy Storage Program. 1983 annual summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1984-06-01

    The Underground Energy Storage Program approach, structure, history, and milestones are described. Technical activities and progress in the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage and Compressed Air Energy Storage components of the program are then summarized, documenting the work performed and progress made toward resolving and eliminating technical and economic barriers associated with those technologies. (LEW)

  16. Animals Underground. Young Discovery Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffault, Charlotte

    This book is written for children ages 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume explores the natural history of animals that live underground. Animals included are porcupine, insects, earthworm, mole, badger, rabbit, prairie dog, and beach animals. (YP)

  17. Animals Underground. Young Discovery Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffault, Charlotte

    This book is written for children ages 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume explores the natural history of animals that live underground. Animals included are porcupine, insects, earthworm, mole, badger, rabbit, prairie dog, and beach animals. (YP)

  18. A Walk on the Underground Railroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Describes one historian's search for information on the Underground Railroad, retracing on foot one of the routes formerly traveled by fugitives, seeking historical societies and libraries in each town, and interviewing descendants of slaves. He also had himself boxed up and smuggled onto a train to simulate the situation of one fugitive. A…

  19. Preventing suicide on the London Underground.

    PubMed

    Clarke, R V; Poyner, B

    1994-02-01

    A field study was carried out to investigate the possibility of preventing suicide on the London Underground. Four groups of potentially valuable measures were identified with the objectives of: (i) reducing public access to the tracks; (ii) improving surveillance by station staff; (iii) facilitating emergency stops; and (iv) reducing injury. These strategies are discussed.

  20. Freedom Train: Building an Underground Railroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickman, Wayne

    1999-01-01

    Describes an activity called the "Freedom Train": a simulation for eighth grade students that enables them to gain an understanding of the importance and dangers of the Underground Railroad. Explains that the project encourages students to work cooperatively while also reinforcing their research and map skills. Provides follow-up…

  1. Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Mary; Ruthsdotter, Mary

    Suitable for elementary level students, this study unit helps increase students' comprehension of the risks involved in a black person's flight from slavery and of Harriet Tubman's success in leading more than 300 slaves to freedom via the Underground Railroad. Five activity suggestions are followed by a reading on the life of Harriet Tubman.…

  2. Freedom Train: Building an Underground Railroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickman, Wayne

    1999-01-01

    Describes an activity called the "Freedom Train": a simulation for eighth grade students that enables them to gain an understanding of the importance and dangers of the Underground Railroad. Explains that the project encourages students to work cooperatively while also reinforcing their research and map skills. Provides follow-up…

  3. Underground natural gas storage reservoir management

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

  4. Leakage Potential of Underground Storage Tanks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments , Title 17. Underground Storage Tanks, Sabitle I...Regulations The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) 10 of 1984 require all UST owners to comply with all applicable Federal, State, interstate and...Recovery Act, 1976. Public Law 98-616, Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments , 1984. Public Law 98-616, Hazardous and Solid Waste

  5. A Walk on the Underground Railroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Describes one historian's search for information on the Underground Railroad, retracing on foot one of the routes formerly traveled by fugitives, seeking historical societies and libraries in each town, and interviewing descendants of slaves. He also had himself boxed up and smuggled onto a train to simulate the situation of one fugitive. A…

  6. 30 CFR 57.4761 - Underground shops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and..., routing of the mine shop air directly to an exhaust system, reversal of mechanical ventilation, or use of...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.800 - Underground construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... exposure to electric current. (2) Following blasting, an employee shall not enter a work area until the air...; nor (ii) Underground electrical transmission and distribution lines, as addressed in subpart V of this... to function in the event of an electrical power failure at the jobsite. Such hoisting means shall...

  8. 47 CFR 32.2422 - Underground cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Underground cable. 32.2422 Section 32.2422 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS..., Buried Cable. (d) The cost of cables leading from the main distributing frame or equivalent to...

  9. JINR Tier-1 centre for the CMS experiment at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astakhov, N. S.; Baginyan, A. S.; Belov, S. D.; Dolbilov, A. G.; Golunov, A. O.; Gorbunov, I. N.; Gromova, N. I.; Kadochnikov, I. S.; Kashunin, I. A.; Korenkov, V. V.; Mitsyn, V. V.; Pelevanyuk, I. S.; Shmatov, S. V.; Strizh, T. A.; Tikhonenko, E. A.; Trofimov, V. V.; Voitishin, N. N.; Zhiltsov, V. E.

    2016-09-01

    An overview of the JINR Tier-1 centre for the CMS experiment at the LHC is given. Special emphasis is placed on the main tasks and services of the CMS Tier-1 at JINR. In February 2015 the JINR CMS Tier-1 resources were increased to the level that was outlined in JINR's rollout plan: CPU 2400 cores (28800 HEP-Spec06), 2.4 PB disks, and 5.0 PB tapes. The first results of the Tier-1 operations received during the LHC Run-2 start are presented.

  10. Underground physics and the barometric pumping effect observed for thermal neutron flux underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenkin, Yu. V.; Alekseenko, V. V.; Gromushkin, D. M.; Sulakov, V. P.; Shchegolev, O. B.

    2017-05-01

    It is known that neutron background is a major problem for low-background experiments carrying out underground, such as dark matter search, double-beta decay searches and other experiments known as Underground Physics. We present here some results obtained with the en-detector of 0.75 m2, which is running for more than 4 years underground at a depth of 25 m water equivalent in Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University. Some spontaneous increases in thermal neutron flux up to a factor of 3 were observed in delayed anti-correlation with barometric pressure. The phenomenon can be explained by the radon barometric pumping effect resulting in similar effect in neutron flux being produced in (α, n)-reactions by alpha-decays of radon and its daughters in surrounding rock. This is the first demonstration of the barometric pumping effect observed in thermal neutron flux underground.

  11. Polysubstance Use Patterns in Underground Rave Attenders: A Cluster Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Calderon, Fermin; Lozano, Oscar M.; Vidal, Claudio; Ortega, Josefa Gutierrez; Vergara, Esperanza; Gonzalez-Saiz, Francisco; Bilbao, Izaskun; Caluente, Marta; Cano, Tomas; Cid, Francisco; Dominguez, Celia; Izquierdo, Emcarni; Perez, Maria I.

    2011-01-01

    Drug use in mainstream rave parties has been widely documented in a large number of studies. However, not much is known about drug use in underground raves. The purpose of this study is to find out the polysubstance use patterns at underground raves. Two hundred and fifty-two young people between the ages of 18 and 30 who went to underground raves…

  12. 43 CFR 3461.1 - Underground mining exemption from criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Underground mining exemption from criteria...: Unsuitability for Mining § 3461.1 Underground mining exemption from criteria. (a) Federal lands with coal deposits that would be mined by underground mining methods shall not be assessed as unsuitable where...

  13. 43 CFR 3461.1 - Underground mining exemption from criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Underground mining exemption from criteria...: Unsuitability for Mining § 3461.1 Underground mining exemption from criteria. (a) Federal lands with coal deposits that would be mined by underground mining methods shall not be assessed as unsuitable where...

  14. 43 CFR 3461.1 - Underground mining exemption from criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Underground mining exemption from criteria...: Unsuitability for Mining § 3461.1 Underground mining exemption from criteria. (a) Federal lands with coal deposits that would be mined by underground mining methods shall not be assessed as unsuitable where...

  15. 43 CFR 3461.1 - Underground mining exemption from criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Underground mining exemption from criteria...: Unsuitability for Mining § 3461.1 Underground mining exemption from criteria. (a) Federal lands with coal deposits that would be mined by underground mining methods shall not be assessed as unsuitable where...

  16. 47 CFR 32.6422 - Underground cable expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Underground cable expense. 32.6422 Section 32.6422 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM... Underground cable expense. (a) This account shall include expenses associated with underground cable. (b...

  17. 30 CFR 57.4057 - Underground trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Underground trailing cables. 57.4057 Section 57.4057 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Control § 57.4057 Underground trailing cables. Underground trailing cables shall be accepted or...

  18. 30 CFR 57.4057 - Underground trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Underground trailing cables. 57.4057 Section 57.4057 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Control § 57.4057 Underground trailing cables. Underground trailing cables shall be accepted or...

  19. 30 CFR 57.4057 - Underground trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground trailing cables. 57.4057 Section 57.4057 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Control § 57.4057 Underground trailing cables. Underground trailing cables shall be accepted or...

  20. 47 CFR 32.6422 - Underground cable expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Underground cable expense. 32.6422 Section 32.6422 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM... Underground cable expense. (a) This account shall include expenses associated with underground cable. (b...

  1. 30 CFR 75.804 - Underground high-voltage cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Underground high-voltage cables. 75.804 Section... § 75.804 Underground high-voltage cables. (a) Underground high-voltage cables used in resistance... cables shall be adequate for the intended current and voltage. Splices made in such cables shall provide...

  2. 30 CFR 75.804 - Underground high-voltage cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underground high-voltage cables. 75.804 Section... § 75.804 Underground high-voltage cables. (a) Underground high-voltage cables used in resistance... cables shall be adequate for the intended current and voltage. Splices made in such cables shall provide...

  3. 30 CFR 57.4057 - Underground trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Underground trailing cables. 57.4057 Section 57.4057 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Control § 57.4057 Underground trailing cables. Underground trailing cables shall be accepted or...

  4. 30 CFR 75.804 - Underground high-voltage cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Underground high-voltage cables. 75.804 Section... § 75.804 Underground high-voltage cables. (a) Underground high-voltage cables used in resistance... cables shall be adequate for the intended current and voltage. Splices made in such cables shall provide...

  5. 47 CFR 32.6422 - Underground cable expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Underground cable expense. 32.6422 Section 32.6422 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM... Underground cable expense. (a) This account shall include expenses associated with underground cable. (b...

  6. 30 CFR 75.804 - Underground high-voltage cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Underground high-voltage cables. 75.804 Section... § 75.804 Underground high-voltage cables. (a) Underground high-voltage cables used in resistance... cables shall be adequate for the intended current and voltage. Splices made in such cables shall provide...

  7. 30 CFR 75.804 - Underground high-voltage cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Underground high-voltage cables. 75.804 Section... § 75.804 Underground high-voltage cables. (a) Underground high-voltage cables used in resistance... cables shall be adequate for the intended current and voltage. Splices made in such cables shall provide...

  8. 30 CFR 57.4057 - Underground trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Underground trailing cables. 57.4057 Section 57.4057 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL... and Control § 57.4057 Underground trailing cables. Underground trailing cables shall be accepted or...

  9. 47 CFR 32.6422 - Underground cable expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Underground cable expense. 32.6422 Section 32.6422 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM... Underground cable expense. (a) This account shall include expenses associated with underground cable. (b...

  10. 47 CFR 32.6422 - Underground cable expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Underground cable expense. 32.6422 Section 32.6422 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM... Underground cable expense. (a) This account shall include expenses associated with underground cable. (b...

  11. 30 CFR 57.4161 - Use of fire underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of fire underground. 57.4161 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4161 Use of fire underground. Fires shall not...

  12. 30 CFR 57.4260 - Underground self-propelled equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Prevention and Control Firefighting Equipment § 57.4260 Underground self-propelled equipment. (a) Whenever self-propelled equipment is used underground, a fire extinguisher shall be on the equipment. This... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Underground self-propelled equipment....

  13. 30 CFR 57.4461 - Gasoline use restrictions underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gasoline use restrictions underground. 57.4461... Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4461 Gasoline use restrictions underground. If gasoline is used underground to power internal combustion engines— (a) The mine shall...

  14. 30 CFR 57.4461 - Gasoline use restrictions underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gasoline use restrictions underground. 57.4461... Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4461 Gasoline use restrictions underground. If gasoline is used underground to power internal combustion engines— (a) The mine shall...

  15. 30 CFR 57.4461 - Gasoline use restrictions underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gasoline use restrictions underground. 57.4461... Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4461 Gasoline use restrictions underground. If gasoline is used underground to power internal combustion engines— (a) The mine shall...

  16. 30 CFR 57.4461 - Gasoline use restrictions underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline use restrictions underground. 57.4461... Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4461 Gasoline use restrictions underground. If gasoline is used underground to power internal combustion engines— (a) The mine shall...

  17. 30 CFR 57.4461 - Gasoline use restrictions underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gasoline use restrictions underground. 57.4461... Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4461 Gasoline use restrictions underground. If gasoline is used underground to power internal combustion engines— (a) The mine shall...

  18. An Economic Comparison of Passively Conditioned Underground Houses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    15 Heat Transfer ........ ..................... ... 34 Energy Balance and Human Thermal Comfort . ...... ... 41 Conclusion...114 29. Thermal Comfort --Passive Underground House ... ........... .. 117 30. Stable Soil Temperature Depths...121 31. Thermal Comfort --Deep Earth Underground House .. ......... .. 124 32. Life Cycle Cash Flow Diagram--Base Underground House

  19. How to Start a High School Underground Newspaper. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Cory

    Stressing the diversity which characterizes the high school underground press movement, the pamphlet presents case histories of several papers, an overview of the first ten years of the high school underground press, and technical information necessary for starting a paper. The first wave of high school underground newspapers appeared in major…

  20. 30 CFR 57.4462 - Storage of combustible liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Storage of combustible liquids underground. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4462 Storage of combustible liquids underground. The requirements of this standard apply to underground areas only....

  1. 30 CFR 57.4460 - Storage of flammable liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Storage of flammable liquids underground. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4460 Storage of flammable liquids underground. (a) Flammable liquids shall not be stored underground, except— (1) Small...

  2. 30 CFR 57.4462 - Storage of combustible liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Storage of combustible liquids underground. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4462 Storage of combustible liquids underground. The requirements of this standard apply to underground areas only....

  3. 30 CFR 57.4460 - Storage of flammable liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Storage of flammable liquids underground. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4460 Storage of flammable liquids underground. (a) Flammable liquids shall not be stored underground, except— (1) Small...

  4. 30 CFR 57.4462 - Storage of combustible liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Storage of combustible liquids underground. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4462 Storage of combustible liquids underground. The requirements of this standard apply to underground areas only....

  5. 30 CFR 57.4462 - Storage of combustible liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Storage of combustible liquids underground. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4462 Storage of combustible liquids underground. The requirements of this standard apply to underground areas only....

  6. 30 CFR 57.4460 - Storage of flammable liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Storage of flammable liquids underground. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4460 Storage of flammable liquids underground. (a) Flammable liquids shall not be stored underground, except— (1) Small...

  7. 30 CFR 57.4460 - Storage of flammable liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Storage of flammable liquids underground. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4460 Storage of flammable liquids underground. (a) Flammable liquids shall not be stored underground, except— (1) Small...

  8. 30 CFR 57.4460 - Storage of flammable liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Storage of flammable liquids underground. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4460 Storage of flammable liquids underground. (a) Flammable liquids shall not be stored underground, except— (1) Small...

  9. 30 CFR 57.4462 - Storage of combustible liquids underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Storage of combustible liquids underground. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4462 Storage of combustible liquids underground. The requirements of this standard apply to underground areas only....

  10. Polysubstance Use Patterns in Underground Rave Attenders: A Cluster Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Calderon, Fermin; Lozano, Oscar M.; Vidal, Claudio; Ortega, Josefa Gutierrez; Vergara, Esperanza; Gonzalez-Saiz, Francisco; Bilbao, Izaskun; Caluente, Marta; Cano, Tomas; Cid, Francisco; Dominguez, Celia; Izquierdo, Emcarni; Perez, Maria I.

    2011-01-01

    Drug use in mainstream rave parties has been widely documented in a large number of studies. However, not much is known about drug use in underground raves. The purpose of this study is to find out the polysubstance use patterns at underground raves. Two hundred and fifty-two young people between the ages of 18 and 30 who went to underground raves…

  11. 30 CFR 57.4263 - Underground belt conveyors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Control Firefighting Equipment § 57.4263 Underground belt conveyors. Fire protection shall be provided at the head, tail, drive, and take-up pulleys of underground belt conveyors. Provisions shall be... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Underground belt conveyors. 57.4263 Section...

  12. 30 CFR 57.4161 - Use of fire underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of fire underground. 57.4161 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4161 Use of fire underground. Fires shall...

  13. 30 CFR 57.4360 - Underground alarm systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4360 Underground alarm systems. (a) Fire alarm... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Underground alarm systems. 57.4360 Section 57...

  14. 30 CFR 57.4360 - Underground alarm systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4360 Underground alarm systems. (a) Fire alarm... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Underground alarm systems. 57.4360 Section 57...

  15. 30 CFR 57.4360 - Underground alarm systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4360 Underground alarm systems. (a) Fire alarm... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Underground alarm systems. 57.4360 Section 57...

  16. 30 CFR 57.4360 - Underground alarm systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4360 Underground alarm systems. (a) Fire alarm... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Underground alarm systems. 57.4360 Section 57...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.903 - Underground transportation of explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Underground transportation of explosives. 1926.903 Section... Explosives § 1926.903 Underground transportation of explosives. (a) All explosives or blasting agents in... explosives or blasting agents taken to an underground loading area shall not exceed the amount estimated to...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.903 - Underground transportation of explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Underground transportation of explosives. 1926.903 Section... Explosives § 1926.903 Underground transportation of explosives. (a) All explosives or blasting agents in... explosives or blasting agents taken to an underground loading area shall not exceed the amount estimated to...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.903 - Underground transportation of explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Underground transportation of explosives. 1926.903 Section... Explosives § 1926.903 Underground transportation of explosives. (a) All explosives or blasting agents in... explosives or blasting agents taken to an underground loading area shall not exceed the amount estimated to...

  20. 30 CFR 57.4505 - Fuel lines to underground areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel lines to underground areas. 57.4505... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4505 Fuel lines to underground areas. Fuel...